These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting  

SciTech Connect

A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

McKoon, R.

1993-11-01

2

Scrap tire recycling  

SciTech Connect

As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

1997-03-01

3

Scrap tire recycling in Minnesota  

SciTech Connect

The author discusses the problems associated with scrap tires. For example, surface storing of scrap tires poses a fire hazard and the rainwater trapped in the tire casings is an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes. Use as a fuel for energy production is unattractive as long as oil retails at its present low price. Past reclamation processes have not met expectations. Legislation alone is not the answer, because scrap tires cannot be regulated out of existence. However, the Minnesota state legislature has come up with an approach that seems to be successful. It has passed the Waste Tire Act, which not only formulates regulations but also provides funding for research and development. Thus, it has established a tire disposal fund for financing construction costs of tire recycling facilities. One of the outcomes was the construction of the St. Louis county Waste Tire Recycling Facility. Through a leasing arrangement with Minneapolis-based Rubber Elastomerics, Inc. (RRE), construction costs financed by the tire disposal fund eventually will be repaid by RRE to the fund. The arrangement is described in detail. By a process also described, RRE produces a product that can be used in thermoset and in thermoplastic compounds. The user can incorporate between 50 percent and 85 percent of the recycled product into a rubber or plastic compound without significantly affecting the physical properties of the compound.

Not Available

1989-10-01

4

High Value Scrap Tire Recycle  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to further develop and scale-up a novel technology for reuse of scrap tire rubber, to identify and develop end uses for the technology (products), and to characterize the technology's energy savings and environmental impact.

Bauman, B. D.

2003-02-01

5

Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

1995-12-01

6

Chemical recycling of scrap composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are no well-developed technologies for recycling composite materials other than grinding to produce fillers. New approaches are needed to reclaim these valuable resources. Chemical or tertiary recycling, conversion of polymers into low molecular weight hydrocarbons for reuse as chemicals or fuels, is emerging as the most practical means for obtaining value from waste plastics and composites. Adherent Technologies is exploring a low-temperature catalytic process for recycling plastics and composites. Laboratory results show that all types of plastics, thermosets as well as thermoplastics, can be converted in high yields to valuable hydrocarbon products. This novel catalytic process runs at 200 C, conversion times are rapid, the process is closed and, thus, nonpolluting, and no highly toxic gas or liquid products have been observed so no negative environmental impact will result from its implementation. Tests on reclamation of composite materials show that epoxy, imide, and engineering thermoplastic matrices can be converted to low molecular weight hydrocarbons leaving behind the reinforcing fibers for reuse as composite reinforcements in secondary, lower-performance applications. Chemical recycling is also a means to dispose of sensitive or classified organic materials without incineration and provides a means to eliminate or reduce mixed hazardous wastes containing organic materials.

Allred, Ronald E.; Salas, Richard M.

1994-01-01

7

A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon

F. J. Dudek; E. J. Daniels; W. A. Morgan; A. W. Kellner; J. Harrison

1992-01-01

8

Controling externalities with asymmetric information: Ferrous Scrap Recycling and the Gold Rush Problem  

E-print Network

Controling externalities with asymmetric information: Ferrous Scrap Recycling and the Gold Rush #12;Controling externalities with asymmetric information: Ferrous Scrap Recycling and the Gold Rush features of the branch. After shedding light on the gold rush problem - the interplay between

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Upgrading nonferrous metal scrap for recycling purposes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reusing materials in the post-consumer phase of a product is very important; however, it is often difficult to separate the metals, resulting in a scrap that is high in impurities and limited in application. To prevent the mixing of scrap, separation at the source is required. Recently, several techniques for separating nonferrous metals have become available, including eddy-current separation to separate nonferrous metals from a mixture of waste, fluid-bed separation to separate light and heavy metals, and image analysis to separate cast and wrought alloys.

Nijhof, Gerrit H.; Rem, Peter C.

1999-08-01

10

Assessment of recycling or disposal alternatives for radioactive scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for evaluation of management alternatives for radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes development of inventory estimates for contaminated metals; investigation of scrap metal market structure, processes, and trends; assessment of radiological and nonradiological effects of recycling; and investigation of social and political factors that are likely to either facilitate or constrain recycling opportunities. In addition, the option of scrap metal disposal is being assessed, especially with regard to the environmental and health impacts of replacing these metals if they are withdrawn from use. This paper focuses on the radiological risk assessment and dose estimate sensitivity analysis. A {open_quotes}tiered{close_quotes} concept for release categories, with and without use restrictions, is being developed. Within the tiers, different release limits may be indicated for specific groupings of radionuclides. Depending on the spectrum of radionuclides that are present and the level of residual activity after decontamination and/or smelting, the scrap may be released for unrestricted public use or for specified public uses, or it may be recycled within the nuclear industry. The conservatism of baseline dose estimates is examined, and both more realistic parameter values and protective measures for workers are suggested.

Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III [US Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-11-01

11

Recycling of nickel-metal hydride battery scrap  

SciTech Connect

Nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery technology is being developed as a NiCd replacement for applications in consumer cells and electric vehicle batteries. The U.S. Bureau of Mines is investigating hydrometallurgical recycling technology that separates and recovers individual components from Ni-MH battery scrap. Acid dissolution and metal recovery techniques such as precipitation and solvent extraction produced purified products of rare-earths, nickel, and other metals associated with AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5} Ni-MH scrap. Tests were conducted on scrap cells of a single chemistry that had been de-canned to reduce iron content. Although recovery techniques have been identified in principal, their applicability to mixed battery waste stream and economic attractiveness remain to be demonstrated. 14 refs.

Lyman, J.W.; Palmer, G.R. [Bureau of Mines, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Salt Lake City Research Center

1994-12-31

12

Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section.

Nichols, F. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Woodland, WA (United States); Balhiser, B. [MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Cignetti, N. [Cignetti Associates, North Canton, OH (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01

13

UTILIZATION OF SCRAP PREPREG WASTES AS A REINFORCEMENT IN A WHOLLY RECYCLED PLASTIC - PHASE I  

EPA Science Inventory

Foster-Miller proposes to utilize scrap prepreg waste as a reinforcement in recycled polyethylene. By reinforcing recycled plastics such as polyethylene with scrap prepreg and suitable binders, an economical useful product can be obtained. At the same time, this innovation ...

14

INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report  

SciTech Connect

DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal.

Funk, D.M.

1994-09-01

15

The recycling of standard quality wrought aluminum alloys from low-grade contaminated scrap  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent decades an increasingly large fraction of the world’s wrought aluminum alloys supply has come from the aluminum scrap recovered from industrial waste and discarded post-consumer items. However, replacing even a minor part of primary aluminum in wrought alloys with recycled counterpart originated from lower grades of scrap (typically scrap contaminated with various non-metallic impurities) without influencing the quality of the allay is very demanding from a metallurgical point of view. This article discusses the two approaches for achieving the requested chemical composition of wrought alloys made from recycled aluminum: (i) before melting, by combining the appropriate qualities and quantities of scrap, primary aluminum, and the alloying elements and (ii) during melting, by diluting impurity content with primary aluminum to the needed level and adding, at the same time, the necessary amount of alloying elements for achieving their standard concentration in diluted melts.

Kevorkjjan, Varužan

2010-08-01

16

Economic and policy instrument analyses in support of the scrap tire recycling program in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Understanding the cost-effectiveness and the role of economic and policy instruments, such as the combined product tax-recycling subsidy scheme or a tradable permit, for scrap tire recycling has been of crucial importance in a market-oriented environmental management system. Promoting product (tire) stewardship on one hand and improving incentive-based recycling policy on the other hand requires a comprehensive analysis of the interfaces and interactions in the nexus of economic impacts, environmental management, environmental valuation, and cost-benefit analysis. This paper presents an assessment of the interfaces and interactions between the implementation of policy instruments and its associated economic evaluation for sustaining a scrap tire recycling program in Taiwan during the era of the strong economic growth of the late 1990s. It begins with an introduction of the management of the co-evolution between technology metrics of scrap tire recycling and organizational changes for meeting the managerial goals island-wide during the 1990s. The database collected and used for such analysis covers 17 major tire recycling firms and 10 major tire manufacturers at that time. With estimates of scrap tire generation and possible scale of subsidy with respect to differing tire recycling technologies applied, economic analysis eventually leads to identify the associated levels of product tax with respect to various sizes of new tires. It particularly demonstrates a broad perspective of how an integrated econometric and engineering economic analysis can be conducted to assist in implementing policy instruments for scrap tire management. Research findings indicate that different subsidy settings for collection, processing, and end use of scrap tires should be configured to ameliorate the overall managerial effectiveness. Removing the existing boundaries between designated service districts could strengthen the competitiveness of scrap tires recycling industry, helping to reduce the required levels of product tax and subsidy. With such initial breakthroughs at hand to handle the complexity of scrap tire recycling technologies, there remains unique management and policy avenues left to explore if a multi-dimensional solution is to be successful in the long run. PMID:17276578

Chang, Ni-Bin

2008-02-01

17

Efficient One-Step Electrolytic Recycling of Low-Grade and Post-Consumer Magnesium Scrap  

SciTech Connect

Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies, Inc. (abbreviated MOxST, pronounced most) and Boston University (BU) have developed a new low-cost process for recycling post-consumer co-mingled and heavily-oxidized magnesium scrap, and discovered a new chemical mechanism for magnesium separations in the process. The new process, designated MagReGenTM, is very effective in laboratory experiments, and on scale-up promises to be the lowest-cost lowest-energy lowest-impact method for separating magnesium metal from aluminum while recovering oxidized magnesium. MagReGenTM uses as little as one-eighth as much energy as today's methods for recycling magnesium metal from comingled scrap. As such, this technology could play a vital role in recycling automotive non-ferrous metals, particularly as motor vehicle magnesium/aluminum ratios increase in order to reduce vehicle weight and increase efficiency.

Adam C. Powell, IV

2012-07-19

18

Bureau of Mines research on recycling scrapped automobiles  

SciTech Connect

Discarded automobiles represent the greatest single resource of reusable metals, plastics, and rubber in the United States. The report presents results of Bureau of Mines research, conducted from 1965 to 1983, on separating and recovering useful materials from the scrapped hulks, using old and new metallurgical techniques combined with standard scrapyard methods. The Bureau determined the materials composition of three composite cars designated as circa 1960, mid-1970's, and early 1980's, and used these cars to study smokeless incineration and hand-sorting techniques.

Dean, K.C.; Sterner, J.W.; Shirts, M.B.; Froisland, L.J.

1986-01-01

19

Health risk and impact evaluation for recycling of radioactive scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The DoE, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for developing international standards for recycling of radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing health, environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes development of international inventory estimates for contaminated metals; investigation of international scrap metal markets; assessment of radiological and non-radiological human health risks; impacts on environmental quality and resources; and investigation of social and political factors. The RSM disposal option is being assessed with regard to the environmental and health impacts of replacing the metals if they are withdrawn from use. Impact estimates are developed for steel as an illustrative example because steel comprises a major portion of the scrap metal inventory. Current and potential sources of RSM include nuclear power plants, fuel cycle and weapons production facilities, industrial and medical facilities and equipment, and petroleum and phosphate rock extraction equipment. Millions of metric tons (t) of scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper, as well as lesser quantities of aluminum, nickel, lead, and zirconium, are likely to become available in the future as these facilities are withdrawn from service.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-03-01

20

ISASMELT™ for the Recycling of E-Scrap and Copper in the U.S. Case Study Example of a New Compact Recycling Plant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As living standards around the world improve and metal consumption increases, extracting raw materials will likely become more challenging in the future. Although already part of the general metal supply stream, metal recycling has to increase if we are to build a more sustainable society. With the recent widespread adoption of a range of consumer and industrial electronics, the recycling of the so-called electronic scrap ("e-scrap") has also increased in importance. One of the leading technologies for the recycling of e-scrap and copper scrap is the ISASMELT™ Top Submerged Lance technology. This article describes new opportunities for the U.S. recycling industry to yield full value from collected, sorted, and separated waste metals, in particular, e-scrap and lower grade copper scrap by the use of ISASMELT™ technology. The article includes the description of a case study example of a regional, compact ISASMELT™ plant in the United States treating a blend of e-scrap and copper scrap, having a total feed capacity of 75000 t/year of feed. Plants of higher or lower capacity are also discussed.

Alvear Flores, Gerardo R. F.; Nikolic, Stanko; Mackey, Phillip J.

2014-05-01

21

Toxicity tests of soil contaminated by recycling of scrap plastics  

SciTech Connect

The present investigation studied the toxicity of soil contaminated by untreated discharge from a factory that recycles used plastics. The nearby agricultural areas and freshwater fish ponds were polluted with high concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Mn. Water extracts from the contaminated soil retarded root growth of Brassica chinensis (Chinese white cabbage) and Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) where their seeds were obtained commercially. The contaminated populations of C. dactylon, Panicum repen (panic grass), and Imperata cylindrica (wooly grass) were able to withstand higher concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Mn, especially C. dactylon, when compared with their uncontaminated counterparts.

Wong, M.H.; Chui, V.W. (Hong Kong Baptist College, Kowloon (Hong Kong))

1990-03-01

22

Cryogenic grinding: an efficient method for recycling scrap rubber  

SciTech Connect

Cryogenic grinding represents an opportunity for expanding recycling capabilities to a broad range of compounds. Many materials that can be reduced to a powder by conventional coarse grinding can be reduced more efficiently by using a super-cold agent such as liquid nitrogen at -320/sup 0/F to embrittle plastic or rubber polymers before grinding. In addition, cryogenic grinding makes possible the size reduction of many materials that cannot be ground by conventional ambient grinding methods. Some experiences of cryogenic grinding in practice at United Tire and Rubber company, Limited, headquartered in Rexdale, Ontario, are noted. A schematic of such a system is shown.

Not Available

1980-06-01

23

Recycling of aluminium scrap for secondary Al-Si alloys.  

PubMed

An increasing amount of recycled aluminium is going into the production of aluminium alloy used for automotive applications. In these applications, it is necessary to control and remove alloy impurities and inclusions. Cleaning and fluxing processes are widely used during processing of the alloys for removal of inclusions, hydrogen and excess of magnesium. These processes use salt fluxes based in the system NaCl-KCl, injection of chlorine or mixture of chlorine with an inert gas. The new systems include a graphite wand and a circulation device to force convection in the melt and permit the bubbling and dispersion of reactive and cleaning agents. This paper discusses the recycling of aluminium alloys in rotary and reverberatory industrial furnaces. It focuses on the removal of magnesium during the melting process. In rotary furnaces, the magnesium lost is mainly due to the oxidation process at high temperatures. The magnesium removal is carried out by the reaction between chlorine and magnesium, with its efficiency associated to kinetic factors such as concentration of magnesium, mixing, and temperature. These factors are also related to emissions generated during the demagging process. Improvements in the metallic yield can be reached in rotary furnaces if the process starts with a proper salt, with limits of addition, and avoiding long holding times. To improve throughput in reverberatories, start the charging with high magnesium content material and inject chlorine gas if the molten metal is at the right temperature. Removal of magnesium through modern technologies can be efficiently performed to prevent environmental problems. PMID:20837560

Velasco, Eulogio; Nino, Jose

2011-07-01

24

Recycling plastic scrap: injection molding. January 1973-August 1988 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-August 1988  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection-molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap that are used in the injection-molding process are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. Ways to utilize plastic scrap from used cars, packaging materials, and waste from polyurethane production are presented. (This updated bibliography contains 102 citations, 13 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1988-08-01

25

Recycling plastic scrap: Injection molding. January 1973-August 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-August 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of scrap plastic produced in the injection-molding process. Plastic pellets made from scrap that are used in the injection-molding process are also discussed. Recycling equipment and automated recycling systems are described. Ways to utilize plastic scrap from used cars, packaging materials, and waste from polyurethane production are presented. (This updated bibliography contains 116 citations, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-09-01

26

An assessment on the recycling opportunities of wastes emanating from scrap metal processing in Mauritius.  

PubMed

This paper presents an assessment on the wastes namely slag, dust, mill scale and sludge resulting from scrap metal processing. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that there are various ways via which scrap metal processing wastes can be reused or recycled in other applications instead of simply diverting them to the landfill. These wastes are briefly described and an overview on the different areas of applications is presented. Based on the results obtained, the waste generation factor developed was 349.3kg per ton of steel produced and it was reported that slag represents 72% of the total wastes emanating from the iron and steel industry in Mauritius. Finally the suitability of the different treatment and valorisation options in the context of Mauritius is examined. PMID:24433820

Mauthoor, Sumayya; Mohee, Romeela; Kowlesser, Prakash

2014-10-01

27

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Vanini, S.; Benettoni, M.; Bonomi, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G.; Squarcia, S.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

2010-08-01

28

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

2010-08-04

29

Recovery of uranium from (U,Gd)O 2 nuclear fuel scrap using dissolution and precipitation in carbonate media  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work studied a process to recover uranium from contaminated (U,Gd)O2 scraps generated from nuclear fuel fabrication processes by using the dissolution of (U,Gd)O2 scraps in a carbonate with H2O2 and the precipitation of the dissolved uranium as UO4. The dissolution characteristics of uranium, Gd, and impurity metal oxides were tested, and the behaviors of UO4 precipitation and Gd solubility

Kwang-Wook Kim; Jun-Taek Hyun; Eil-Hee Lee; Geun-Il Park; Kune-Woo Lee; Myung-June Yoo; Kee-Chan Song; Jei-Kwon Moon

2011-01-01

30

Looking North at Uranium recovery Recycle Tanks in Red Room ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Looking North at Uranium recovery Recycle Tanks in Red Room in Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

31

Environmental risk related to specific processes during scrap computer recycling and disposal.  

PubMed

The purpose of this work was to achieve a better understanding of the generation of toxic chemicals related to specific processes in scrap computer recycling and disposal, such as thermal recycling of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and the landfilling or dumping of cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Tube furnace pyrolysis was carried out to simulate different thermal treatment conditions for the identification of the by-products and potential environmental risk from thermal recycling ofPCBs. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and a column test were used to study the leaching characteristics of lead from waste CRT glass, which is one of the most important environmental concerns arising from the disposal of e-waste. The results indicate that more attention should be paid to the benzene series when recycling PCBs under thermal conditions, especially for workers without any personal protection equipment. The impact of immersion on the leaching of lead from CRT leaded glass was more effective than the impact of washing only by acid rain. Thus when waste leaded glass has to be stored for some reason, the storage facility should be dry. PMID:23437653

Li, Jinhui; Shi, Pixing; Shan, Hongshan; Xie, Yijun

2012-12-01

32

A low-temperature technique for recycling lead/acid battery scrap without wastes and with improved environmental control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A low-temperature technology for recycling battery scrap without producing wastes is suggested for battery plants with small production capabilities. The required reagents are available and their consumption is minimum. Simple and compact equipment is used. The generation of dust and the volume of the process gases are both minimal and are effectively removed by a filter-ventilating unit that has been developed by the ELTA company. Finally, the proposed technology does not require large investment for its realization.

Vaysgant, Z.; Morachevsky, A.; Demidov, A.; Klebanov, E.

33

Recycle of scrap plutonium-238 oxide fuel to support future radioisotope applications  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a development program to recover and purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure feed sources in a glove box environment. A glove box line has been designed and a chemistry flowsheet developed to perform this recovery task at large scale. The initial demonstration effort focused on purification of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel by HNO{sub 3}/HF dissolution, followed by plutonium(III) oxalate precipitation and calcination to an oxide. Decontamination factors for most impurities of concern in the fuel were very good, producing {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel significantly better in purity than specified by General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel powder specifications. The results are encouraging for recycle of relatively impure plutonium-238 oxide and scrap residue items into fuel for useful applications. A sufficient quantity of purified {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel was recovered from the process to allow fabrication of a GPHS unit for testing. The high specific activity of plutonium-238 magnifies the consequences and concerns of radioactive waste generation. This work places an emphasis on development of waste minimization technologies to complement the aqueous processing operation. Results from experiments allowing more time for neutralized solutions of plutonium-238 to precipitate resulted in decontamination to about 1 millicurie/L. Combining ultrafiltration treatment with addition of a water-soluble polymer designed to coordinate Pu, allowed solutions to be decontaminated to about 1 microcurie/L. Efforts continue to develop a capability for efficient, safe, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel.

Schulte, L.D.; Espinoza, J.M.; Ramsey, K.B.; Rinehart, G.H.; Silver, G.L.; Purdy, G.M.; Jarvinen, G.D.

1997-11-01

34

UTILIZATION OF SCRAP PREPREG WASTES AS A REINFORCEMENT IN A WHOLLY RECYCLED PLASTIC - PHASE II  

EPA Science Inventory

Foster-Miller is proposing to combine Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) commingled plastics with a high performance reinforcement (scrap prepreg) to form a durable and cost competitive wood substitute with superior moisture, rodent and insect resistance. This proposed technology ...

35

Refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel radioactive scrap metals, FY 94 bi-annual report  

SciTech Connect

The research addressed under this project is the recycling of metallic nuclear-related by-product materials under the direction of Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). The program addresses the recycling of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) for beneficial re-use within the DOE complex; in particular, this program addresses the recycling of stainless steel RSM. It is anticipated that various stainless steel components under WINCO control at the Idaho Falls Engineering Laboratory (INEL), such as fuel pool criticality barriers and fuel storage racks will begin to be recycled in FY94-95. The end product of this recycling effort is expected to be waste and overpack canisters for densified high level waste for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific components of this problem area that are presently being, or have been, addressed by CAAMSEC are: (1) the melting/remelting of stainless steel RSM into billet form; (2) the melting/remelting initial research focus will be on the use of radioactive surrogates to study; (3) the cost effectiveness of RSM processing oriented towards privatization of RSM reuse and/or resale. Other components of this problem that may be addressed under program extension are: (4) the melting/remelting of carbon steel; (5) the processing of billet material into product form which shall meet all applicable ASTM requirements; and, (6) the fabrication of an actual prototypical product; the present concept of an end product is a low carbon Type 304/316 stainless steel cylindrical container for densified and/or vitrified high level radioactive waste and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific work reported herein covers the melting/remelting of stainless steel {open_quotes}scrap{close_quotes} metal into billet form and the study of surrogate material removal effectiveness by various remelting techniques.

Mizia, R.E. [ed.] [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Metal Recycle; Atteridge, D.G.; Buckentin, J.; Carter, J.; Davis, H.L.; Devletian, J.H.; Scholl, M.R.; Turpin, R.B.; Webster, S.L. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1994-08-01

36

ECONOMICS OF UNIRRADIATED PROCESSING PHASES OF URANIUM FUEL CYCLES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expanding reactor programs prescnt industrial opportunities in their ; fuel processing phases. This . paper considers the manufacture of ; unirradiated uranium fuel materials, including the conversion of uranium ; hexafluoride to uranium metal, uranium dioxide, etc.; their subsequent ; fabrication into fuel elements; and the processing and recycle of accrued scrap. ; The intent is to offer potentinl processors

J. P. Murray; F. S. Patton; R. F. Hibbs; W. L. Griffith

1958-01-01

37

Structural insulated panels produced from recycled Expanded-Polystrene (EPS) foam scrap. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a research project undertaken to assess the feasibility of using scrap reground expanded polystyrene (EPS) in the manufacture of structural insulated panels (SIPs) in order to save material costs and reduce the amount of EPS waste products to be disposed. The project team, managed by Steven Winter Associates, Inc., a Norwalk, Connecticut-based building systems research and consulting firm included: Thermal Foams, Inc., a Buffalo-based manufacturer of EPS products; BASF Corp., the world`s largest producer of EPS beads; Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which performed thermal tests (ASTM C-518); RADCO, Inc. which performed material properties tests: density (ASTM C-303), flexural strength (ASTM C-203), tensile strength (ASTM D-1623), and transverse load test of SIPs panels (ASTM E-72). The report documents the manufacturing and testing process and concludes that there was relatively little difference in the thermal and structural characteristics under normal loading conditions of the panels tested with varying amount of regrind (from 10% - 25%) and those made with 100% virgin beads. The report recommends that additional tests be undertaken, but suggests that, based on the test results, reground EPS can be successfully used in the cores of SIPs in amounts up to 25%.

Grinnell, A.

1996-11-01

38

Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, comprehensive executive summary. Final report, September 30, 1993--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

R&D activities have demonstrated Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to be a robust, one-step process process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. The feed size and composition compatible with CEP have been increased in a short period of time, and additional R&D should lead to the ability to accept a drum (and larger?) size feed of completely uncharacterized waste. Experiments have validated the CPU (Catalytic Processing Unit). Two commercial facilities have been commissioned and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. Expansion of CEP to transuranic and high level wastes should be the next step in the development and deployment of CEP for recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from DOE decontamination and decommissioning activities.

NONE

1997-06-01

39

SCRAP TIRE RECYCLING: CONVINCING BUSINESSES TO INTEGRATE INEXPENSIVE, CUTTING-EDGE TECHNOLOGY TO CONVERT TIRES INTO VARIOUS CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

Scrap tires cause serious environmental pollution and health problems. Although worldwide figures are imprecise, it is known that one-fourth of the 283 million tires scrapped in the United States were landfilled last year. Hundreds of millions more tires ar...

40

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material

T. W. Ellis; F. A. Schmidt

1995-01-01

41

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant

Timothy W. Ellis; Frederick A. Schmidt

1995-01-01

42

The Scrap Map: An Environmental Publication for Grades K-6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains materials for a 10-day teaching unit on solid waste recycling for grades K-6. Included are: (1) "The Scrap Map," which shows recycling cycles for metals and paper, and a cryptic word puzzle; (2) three pamphlets on recycling paper, nonferrous scrap metals, and scrap iron and steel; (3) a list of the chapters of the Institute…

Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc., Washington, DC.

43

Recycling of poly(methyl methacrylate) scrap in the styrene–methyl methacrylate copolymer cast sheet process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, scrap generated during the casting process for PMMA cast sheet is an industrial waste stream, which has a high impact on the PMMA production cost and environment. This paper presents an alternative way to reduce the processing cost of PMMA cast sheet and decrease industrial waste by using styrene (S) as a co-monomer with methyl methacrylate (MMA)

K. Charmondusit; L. Seeluangsawat

2009-01-01

44

FEASIBILITY STUDY OF DUPOLY TO RECYCLE DEPLETED URANIUM.  

SciTech Connect

DUPoly, depleted uranium (DU) powder microencapsulated in a low-density polyethylene binder, has been demonstrated as an innovative and efficient recycle product, a very durable high density material with significant commercial appeal. DUPoly was successfully prepared using uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) ''green salt'' obtained from Fluor Daniel-Fernald, a U.S. Department of Energy reprocessing facility near Cincinnati, Ohio. Samples containing up to 90 wt% UF{sub 4} were produced using a single screw plastics extruder, with sample densities of up to 3.97 {+-} 0.08 g/cm{sup 3} measured. Compressive strength of as-prepared samples (50-90 wt% UF4 ) ranged from 1682 {+-} 116 psi (11.6 {+-} 0.8 MPa) to 3145 {+-} 57 psi (21.7 {+-} 0.4 MPa). Water immersion testing for a period of 90 days produced no visible degradation of the samples. Leach rates were low, ranging from 0.02 % (2.74 x 10{sup {minus}6} gm/gm/d) for 50 wt% UF{sub 4} samples to 0.72 % (7.98 x 10{sup {minus}5} gm/gm/d) for 90 wt% samples. Sample strength was not compromised by water immersion. DUPoly samples containing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), a DU reprocessing byproduct material stockpiled at the Savannah River Site, were gamma irradiated to 1 x 10{sup 9} rad with no visible deterioration. Compressive strength increased significantly, however: up to 200% for samples with 90 wt% UO{sub 3}. Correspondingly, percent deformation (strain) at failure was decreased for all samples. Gamma attenuation data on UO{sub 3} DUPoly samples yielded mass attenuation coefficients greater than those for lead. Neutron removal coefficients were calculated and shown to correlate well with wt% of DU. Unlike gamma attenuation, both hydrogenous and nonhydrogenous materials interact to attenuate neutrons.

ADAMS,J.W.; LAGERAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.; RUTENKROGER,S.P.

1998-02-01

45

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Report on the Production and Use of Recycled Uranium  

SciTech Connect

Recent allegations regarding radiation exposure to radionuclides present in recycled uranium sent to the gaseous diffusion plants prompted the Department of Energy to undertake a system-wide study of recycled uranium. Of particular interest, were the flowpaths from site to site operations and facilities in which exposure to plutonium, neptunium and technetium could occur, and to the workers that could receive a significant radiation dose from handling recycled uranium. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site report is primarily concerned with two locations. Recycled uranium was produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant where highly enriched uranium was recovered from spent fuel. The other facility is the Specific Manufacturing Facility (SMC) where recycled, depleted uranium is manufactured into shapes for use by their customer. The SMC is a manufacturing facility that uses depleted uranium metal as a raw material that is then rolled and cut into shapes. There are no chemical processes that might concentrate any of the radioactive contaminant species. Recyclable depleted uranium from the SMC facility is sent to a private metallurgical facility for recasting. Analyses on the recast billets indicate that there is no change in the concentrations of transuranics as a result of the recasting process. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was built to recover high-enriched uranium from spent nuclear fuel from test reactors. The facility processed diverse types of fuel which required uniquely different fuel dissolution processes. The dissolved fuel was passed through three cycles of solvent extraction which resulted in a concentrated uranyl nitrate product. For the first half of the operating period, the uranium was shipped as the concentrated solution. For the second half of the operating period the uranium solution was thermally converted to granular, uranium trioxide solids. The dose reconstruction project has evaluated work exposure and exposure to the public as the result of normal operations and accidents that occurred at the INEEL. As a result of these studies, the maximum effective dose equivalent from site activities did not exceed seventeen percent of the natural background in Eastern Idaho. There was no year in which the radiation dose to the public exceeded the applicable limits for that year. Worker exposure to recycled uranium was minimized by engineering features that reduced the possibility of direct exposure.

L. C. Lewis; D. C. Barg; C. L. Bendixsen; J. P. Henscheid; D. R. Wenzel; B. L. Denning

2000-09-01

46

Recovery and recycling of post-consumer waste materials. Part 2. Target wastes (glass beverage bottles, plastics, scrap metal and steel cans, end-of-life tyres, batteries and household hazardous waste)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first part of the review paper dealt with general information and covered the specific sectors of paper\\/cardboard and aluminium cans. The present Part 2 should be read in conjunction with Part 1 and assesses the recovery and recycling of additional post-consumer waste sectors, i.e. glass beverage bottles, plastics, scrap metal and steel cans, end-of-life tyres, batteries and household hazardous

Jan Baeyens; Anke Brems; Raf Dewil

2010-01-01

47

Method for forming consumable electrodes from metallic chip scraps  

Microsoft Academic Search

The method relates to metallurgical recycling of waste products, preferably titanium alloys chips scrap. Accordingly after crushing and cleaning, the chip scrap is subjected to vacuum-thermal degassing (VTD); the chip scrap is pressed into briquettes; the briquettes are placed into a mould allowing sufficient remaining space for the addition of molten metal alloy; the mould is pre-heated before filling with

Vladimir Leonidovich Girshov; Arcady Munjyvich Podpalkin; Arnold Nikolayevich Treschevskiy; Alexey Alexandrovich Abramov

2005-01-01

48

Scrap tire management in the mid south region  

SciTech Connect

The Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC) is a North American tire manufacturer-sponsored advocacy organization, created to identify and promote environmentally and economically sound markets for scrap tires. This presentation gives a national overview of the scrap tire situation, and focuses on the Tennessee and Mid-south region. National generation rates and markets for scrap tires are discussed, and markets for scrap tires are described. The major markets identified are fuel, rubber products, and civil engineering applications. Three technologies that may have an impact on scrap tire recycling are discussed: pyrolysis, gasification, and devulcanization.

Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-08-01

49

Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You will be learning all about recycling and asking questions as you learn more about recycling. Afterward, you will be making recycling bins that we will use in our classroom. Click on each of the different links and research about recycling. Find out what recycling is, what can be recycled, and why we should recycle. As you find information, add it to the "describing wheel" that is given to you by Ms. Pollak. Answer the main question: What is recycling? Come ...

sgp0002

2010-03-27

50

WINCO Metal Recycle annual report, FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the first year progress of the WINCO Metal Recycle Program. Efforts were directed towards assessment of radioactive scrap metal inventories, economics and concepts for recycling, technology development, and transfer of technology to the private sector. Seven DOE laboratories worked together to develop a means for characterizing scrap metal. Radioactive scrap metal generation rates were established for several of these laboratories. Initial cost estimates indicate that recycle may be preferable over burial if sufficient decontamination factors can be achieved during melt refining. Radiation levels of resulting ingots must be minimized in order to keep fabrication costs low. Industry has much of the expertise and capability to execute the recycling of radioactive scrap metal. While no single company can sort, melt, refine, roll and fabricate, a combination of two to three can complete this operation. The one process which requires development is in melt refining for removal of radionuclides other than uranium. WINCO is developing this capability in conjunction with academia and industry. This work will continue into FY-94.

Bechtold, T.E. [ed.

1993-12-01

51

Railroading Scrap  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the environmental benefits of recycling mainly iron and steel, as well as the current status of such recycling processes. It also examines some of the economic constraints working against recycling, and offers suggestions for correcting the problem. (Author/MA)

Kakela, Peter

1975-01-01

52

Recycling Of Uranium- And Plutonium-Contaminated Metals From Decommissioning Of The Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of a nuclear facility comprises not only actual dismantling but also, above all, management of the resulting residual materials and waste. Siemens Decommissioning Projects (DP) in Hanau has been involved in this task since 1995 when the decision was taken to decommission and dismantle the Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant. Due to the decommissioning, large amounts of contaminated steel scrap have to be managed. The contamination of this metal scrap can be found almost exclusively in the form of surface contamination. Various decontamination technologies are involved, as there are blasting and wiping. Often these methods are not sufficient to meet the free release limits. In these cases, SIEMENS has decided to melt the scrap at Siempelkamp's melting plant. The plant is licensed according to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance Section 7 (issue of 20.07.2001). The furnace is a medium frequency induction type with a load capacity of 3.2 t and a throughput of 2 t/h for steel melting. For safety reasons, the furnace is widely operated by remote handling. A highly efficient filter system of cyclone, bag filter and HEPA-filter in two lines retains the dust and aerosol activity from the off-gas system. The slag is solidified at the surface of the melt and gripped before pouring the liquid iron into a chill. Since 1989, in total 15,000 t have been molten in the plant, 2,000 t of them having been contaminated steel scrap from the decommissioning of fuel fabrication plants. Decontamination factors could be achieved between 80 and 100 by the high affinity of the uranium to the slag former. The activity is transferred to the slag up to nearly 100 %. Samples taken from metal, slag and dust are analyzed by gamma measurements of the 186 keV line of U235 and the 1001 keV line of Pa234m for U238. All produced ingots showed a remaining activity less than 1 Bq/g and could be released for industrial reuse.

Kluth, T.; Quade, U.; Lederbrink, F. W.

2003-02-26

53

Recycling in the metals industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1990, scrap was a major feedstock component of U.S. metals production. Steel scrap represented 56% of raw steel production, old lead scrap was 66% of total lead production, and purchased aluminum scrap represented 37% of total production. Copper scrap makes up 44% of total U.S. copper consumption annually. Although some recycling operations, such as past (but now obsolete) lead-acid

Harry V. Makar

1996-01-01

54

Recycling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the range of benefits resulting from recycling efforts and projects. Presents information and data related to the recycling of metals, cans, paper, fans, and plastics. Suggestions for motivating and involving youth in recycling programs are also offered. (ML)

Sinker, Barbara

1986-01-01

55

Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What objects can be recycled? 1. Click on link. Watch video. Recycle Guy Video 2. Click on link. Watch video. Talking Trash Video 3. Click on link. Watch video. Recycling At School Video 4. Click on link. Play game. Star Fall Recycling Game 5. Click on link. Play game. National Geographic Recycling Game 6. Click on link. Ask Ms. Owens how to do it. Things We Recycle Chart 7. Please see Miss Owens for instructions on the following ...

2011-04-07

56

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

SciTech Connect

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01

57

Recycle  

SciTech Connect

;Contents: The Problem; What`s In Our Trash; Where Does Trash Go; Where Does Our Trash Go; The Solution; What Is Recycling; Why Should We Recycle; A National Goal of 25%; What Can We Recycle; What Do We Do With Our Recyclables.

NONE

1988-10-01

58

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metals  

SciTech Connect

Recycle of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) from decommissioning of DOE uranium enrichment and nuclear weapons manufacturing facilities is mandatory to recapture the value of these metals and avoid the high cost of disposal by burial. The scrap metals conversion project detailed below focuses on the contaminated nickel associated with the gaseous diffusion plants. Stainless steel can be produced in MSC`s vacuum induction melting process (VIM) to the S30400 specification using nickel as an alloy constituent. Further the case alloy can be rolled in MSC`s rolling mill to the mechanical property specification for S30400 demonstrating the capability to manufacture the contaminated nickel into valuable end products at a facility licensed to handle radioactive materials. Bulk removal of Technetium from scrap nickel is theoretically possible in a reasonable length of time with the high calcium fluoride flux, however the need for the high temperature creates a practical problem due to flux volatility. Bulk decontamination is possible and perhaps more desirable if nickel is alloyed with copper to lower the melting point of the alloy allowing the use of the high calcium fluoride flux. Slag decontamination processes have been suggested which have been proven technically viable at the Colorado School of Mines.

Muth, T.R. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, J.; Olson, D.; Mishra, B. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31

59

Uranium Recycle by Ion Exchange and Calcination - Summary of Design Development and Equipment Design  

SciTech Connect

Technical information for the process of recovery of uranium from uranyl nitrate hexahydrate solutions that was developed as part of the Onsite Uranium Recycle (OSUR) project conducted at the Savannah River Site in the 1980's is summarized. The process involves an ion-exchange process to load the uranyl species from solution onto a cation resin that is subsequently dried using a microwave oven, and then calcined using a rotary calciner to produce U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder. The information in this report was compiled to support critical decisions for new facilities and processes at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The information includes a detailed description of the process and process equipment that were developed for the OSUR project including the technical bases for the materials selection and process conditions. Additional process considerations and recommendations to for a new-design facility are also provided.

Hathcock, D.J.; A.J. Duncan

2005-10-31

60

Characterization of shredded television scrap and implications for materials recovery.  

PubMed

Characterization of TV scrap was carried out by using a variety of methods, such as chemical analysis, particle size and shape analysis, liberation degree analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, sink-float test, and IR spectrometry. A comparison of TV scrap, personal computer scrap, and printed circuit board scrap shows that the content of non-ferrous metals and precious metals in TV scrap is much lower than that in personal computer scrap or printed circuit board scrap. It is expected that recycling of TV scrap will not be cost-effective by utilizing conventional manual disassembly. The result of particle shape analysis indicates that the non-ferrous metal particles in TV scrap formed as a variety of shapes; it is much more heterogeneous than that of plastics and printed circuit boards. Furthermore, the separability of TV scrap using density-based techniques was evaluated by the sink-float test. The result demonstrates that a high recovery of copper could be obtained by using an effective gravity separation process. Identification of plastics shows that the major plastic in TV scrap is high impact polystyrene. Gravity separation of plastics may encounter some challenges in separation of plastics from TV scrap because of specific density variations. PMID:16624540

Cui, Jirang; Forssberg, Eric

2007-01-01

61

Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2} which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

1992-10-01

62

Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO[sub x] emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO[sub x] fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO[sub x] emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO[sub 2] which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

1992-10-01

63

Comparative analysis of thorium and uranium fuel for transuranic recycle in a sodium cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The present paper compares the reactor physics and transmutation performance of sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (FRs) for TRansUranic (TRU) burning with thorium (Th) or uranium (U) as fertile materials. The 1000 MWt Toshiba-Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) conceptual core has been used as benchmark for the comparison. Both burner and breakeven configurations sustained or started with a TRU supply, and assuming full actinide homogeneous recycle strategy, have been developed. State-of-the-art core physics tools have been employed to establish fuel inventory and reactor physics performances for equilibrium and transition cycles. Results show that Th fosters large improvements in the reactivity coefficients associated with coolant expansion and voiding, which enhances safety margins and, for a burner design, can be traded for maximizing the TRU burning rate. A trade-off of Th compared to U is the significantly larger fuel inventory required to achieve a breakeven design, which entails additional blankets at the detriment of core compactness as well as fuel manufacturing and separation requirements. The gamma field generated by the progeny of U-232 in the U bred from Th challenges fuel handling and manufacturing, but in case of full recycle, the high contents of Am and Cm in the transmutation fuel impose remote fuel operations regardless of the presence of U-232.

C. Fiorina; N. E. Stauff; F. Franceschini; M. T. Wenner; A. Stanculescu; T. K. Kim; A. Cammi; M. E. Ricotti; R. N. Hill; T. A. Taiwo; M. Salvatores

2013-12-01

64

Marshall Space Flight Center solid waste characterization and recycling improvement study: General office and laboratory waste, scrap metal, office and flight surplus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objectives of the study were to characterize the solid waste stream for MSFC facilities in Huntsville, Alabama, and to evaluate their present recycling program. The purpose of the study was to determine if improvements could be made in terms of increasing quantities of the present commodities collected, adding more recyclables to the program, and streamlining or improving operational efficiency. In conducting the study, various elements were implemented. These included sampling and sorting representative samples of the waste stream; visually inspecting each refuse bin, recycle bin, and roll-off; interviewing employees and recycling coordinators of other companies; touring local material recycling facilities; contacting experts in the field; and performing a literature search.

Eley, Michael H.; Crews, Lavonne; Johnston, Ben; Lee, David; Colebaugh, James

1995-01-01

65

Application of scrap tires as earth reinforcement for repair of tropical residual soil slope  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need to recycle scrap tires and to design a more environmental friendly, cost effective slope repairs, prompted the study to look into the possibility of using scrap tires as earth reinforcement for slope repair. This paper describes work done on testing for tensile strength of scrap tires where currently there appeared to be no test standard available, design and

Bujang B. K. Huat; Azlan A. Aziz; Loh Wooi Chuan

2008-01-01

66

Current situation of scrap batteries in Turkey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article reports the current situation of waste batteries and policies in Turkey. Turkey is a developing country where the battery consumption per person is around three to four pieces annually. Although the rate of consumption in Europe is around 10, the required amount of battery is growing rapidly with increasing technological development. According to the statistics of the year 2002, 10 million pieces of GSM batteries are consumed, whereas 250 million pieces of other sort of batteries are used in Turkey annually. Consumption figures suggest that the market value of the consumed batteries approximates to US$ 200 million. Based upon the amount of the used battery and marketing values, it is estimated that 10,000 t of scrap batteries will accumulate per annum. Only 1.2% of scrap batteries in Turkey can be recollected through Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality. At present, there is no recycling plant in Turkey to recycle scrap batteries. In this investigation, the variety of batteries used, the situation of scrap battery collection and its capacity and also the possibilities of recycling of scrap batteries in Turkey are put forward.

Akta?, S.; Sirkeci, A. A.; Açma, E.

67

Extracting inorganics from scrap tires  

SciTech Connect

Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31

68

Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project Y-12 National Security Complex Site Report  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to summarize the findings of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) Mass Balance Project and to support preparation of associated U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) site reports. The project was conducted in support of DOE efforts to assess the potential for health and environmental issues resulting from the presence of transuranic (TRU) elements and fission products in recycled uranium (RU) processed by DOE and its predecessor agencies. The United States government used uranium in fission reactors to produce plutonium and tritium for nuclear weapons production. Because uranium was considered scarce relative to demand when these operations began almost 50 years ago, the spent fuel from U.S. fission reactors was processed to recover uranium for recycling. The estimated mass balance for highly enriched RU, which is of most concern for worker exposure and is the primary focus of this project, is summarized in a table. A discrepancy in the mass balance between receipts and shipments (plus inventory and waste) reflects an inability to precisely distinguish between RU and non-RU shipments and receipts involving the Y-12 Complex and Savannah River. Shipments of fresh fuel (non-RU) and sweetener (also non-RU) were made from the Y-12 Complex to Savannah River along with RU shipments. The only way to distinguish between these RU and non-RU streams using available records is by enrichment level. Shipments of {le}90% enrichment were assumed to be RU. Shipments of >90% enrichment were assumed to be non-RU fresh fuel or sweetener. This methodology using enrichment level to distinguish between RU and non-RU results in good estimates of RU flows that are reasonably consistent with Savannah River estimates. Although this is the best available means of distinguishing RU streams, this method does leave a difference of approximately 17.3 MTU between receipts and shipments. Slightly depleted RU streams received by the Y-12 Complex from ORGDP and PGDP are believed to have been returned to the shipping site or disposed of as waste on the Oak Ridge Reservation. No evidence of Y-12 Complex processing of this material was identified in the historical records reviewed by the Project Team.

NONE

2000-12-01

69

Electrorefining of aluminium scrap from chloride melts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of aluminium of primary quality from scrap by electrorefining may become an option of strategic importance. Two important requirements are: (i) substantial energy savings compared to electrowinning, and (ii) easy recycling of alloying elements and molten electrolyte without ecological hazards. The use of molten chloride instead of fluoride electrolytes is preferred as emissions are low, purification of contaminated

V. Schwarz; H. Wendt

1995-01-01

70

Gold recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1998, 175 metric tons (t) of refined gold was recovered by U.S. refiners from old and new scrap. The overall recycling rate was 29 percent when scrap consumption was compared with apparent domestic supply. Sources of old scrap includes discarded jewelry, dental materials, plating solutions, and electronic equipment. A very high old scrap recycling efficiency of 96 percent was reached in 1998, the supply of old scrap peaked, gold prices were at an 18-year low, and substantial amounts of old scrap were exported. U.S. net exports of old scrap had a gold content of 28 t.

Amey, Earle B.

2001-01-01

71

Iron and steel recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Consumption of iron and steel scrap and the health of the scrap industry depend directly on the health of the steelmaking industry. The United States, as well as most of the world, is expected to consume increasing amounts of scrap as a steadily increasing population demands more steel products. World resources of scrap should be sufficient for the foreseeable future. An estimated 75 million metric tons (Mt) of scrap was generated during 1998 in the United States, and 35 Mt of old scrap and 18 Mt of new scrap was consumed. The recycling efficiency was calculated to be 52%, and the recycling rate was found to be 41%. (See appendix for definitions.)

Fenton, Michael D.

2001-01-01

72

Cobalt recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is one of a series of reports on metals recycling. It defines and quantifies the 1998 flow of cobalt-bearing materials in the United States, from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of cobalt?s many and diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 1998, an estimated 32 percent of U.S. cobalt supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of cobalt consumed from new scrap to that from old scrap was estimated to be 50:50. Of all the cobalt in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 68 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

Shedd, Kim B.

2002-01-01

73

Tungsten recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition in 2000, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of tungsten's many diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 2000, an estimated 46 percent of U.S. tungsten supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of tungsten consumed from new scrap to that consumed from old scrap was estimated to be 20:80. Of all the tungsten in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 66 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

Shedd, Kim B.

2011-01-01

74

New type of amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent for the recovery of uranium from seawater. III. Recycle use of adsorbent  

SciTech Connect

An amidoxime-group adsorbent for recovering uranium from seawater was made by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto polymeric fiber, followed by amidoximation. Uranium adsorption of the adsorbent contacted with seawater in a column increased with the increase in flow rate, then leveled off. The relationship between uranium adsorption in a batch process and the ratio of the amount of seawater to that of adsorbent was found to be effective in evaluating adsorbent contacted with any amount of seawater. The conditioning of the adsorbent with an alkaline solution at higher temperature (approx.80/sup 0/C) after the acid desorption recovered the adsorption ability to the original level. This made it possible to apply the adsorbent to recycle use. On the other hand, the adsorbent conditioned at room temperature or that without conditioning lost adsorption ability during recycle use. The increase in water uptake was observed as one of the physical changes produced during recycle use of the alkaline-conditioned adsorbent, while the decrease in water uptake was observed with the unconditioned adsorbent. The IR spectra of the adsorbent showed a probability of reactions of amidoxime groups with acid and alkaline solutions, which can explain the change in uranium adsorption during the adsorption-desorption cycle.

Omichi, H.; Katakai, A.; Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J.

1986-01-01

75

Development and implementation of producer responsibility recycling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to efficiently utilize the human and financial resources of the government used in municipal waste recycling, EPA of Taiwan has mandated the producer responsibility recycling system for several designated post-consumer products. As of the end of 1997, these designated items includes general waste containers, scrap tires, scrap agriculture chemical containers, spent lead-acid batteries, waste lubricant oils, scrap motor

C.-H Lee; C.-T Chang; S.-L Tsai

1998-01-01

76

Aluminum recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports on metals recycling, this report discusses the flow of aluminum from production through its uses with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap) in 2000. This materials flow study includes a description of aluminum supply and demand factors for the United States to illustrate the extent of aluminum recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding the system of materials flow from source to ultimate disposition can assist in improving the management of natural resources in a manner that is compatible with sound environmental practices. In 2000, the old scrap recycling efficiency for aluminum was estimated to be 42 percent. Almost 60 percent of the aluminum that was recycled in 2000 came from new scrap, and the recycling rate was estimated to be 36 percent. The principal source of old scrap was recycled aluminum beverage cans.

Plunkert, Patricia A.

2006-01-01

77

Broadening the markets for scrap tire rubber  

SciTech Connect

Only a couple years ago was the first time that the U.S. first recycled more scrap tires than it discarded. More experienced processors using improved technology and resourceful manufacturers continue to discover more uses of old tires. Soon, they`ll chip away at the 800 million tires stockpiled around the country, not just work to keep up with the waste tires generated each year. After years ago, asphalt roads and highways looked like the answer. This report profiles the utilization of scrap tires.

Hilts, M.E. [ed.

1996-01-01

78

A novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps intended for lithium-ion batteries.  

PubMed

To solve the recycling challenge for aqueous binder based lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), a novel process for recycling and resynthesizing LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from the cathode scraps generated during manufacturing process is proposed in this study. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is employed to separate the cathode material from the aluminum foil. The effects of TFA concentration, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, reaction temperature and time on the separation efficiencies of the cathode material and aluminum foil are investigated systematically. The cathode material can be separated completely under the optimal experimental condition of 15vol.% TFA solution, L/S ratio of 8.0 mL g(-1), reacting at 40°C for 180 min along with appropriate agitation. LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 is successfully resynthesized from the separated cathode material by solid state reaction method. Several kinds of characterizations are performed to verify the typical properties of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 powder. Electrochemical tests show that the initial charge and discharge capacities of the resynthesized LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 are 201 mAh g(-)(1) and 155.4 mAh g(-1) (2.8-4.5 V, 0.1C), respectively. The discharge capacity remains at 129 mAh g(-1) even after 30 cycles with a capacity retention ratio of 83.01%. PMID:24973865

Zhang, Xihua; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin; Nawaz, Faheem; Zhang, Yi

2014-09-01

79

Melting standardized aluminum scrap: A mass balance model for europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although individual aluminum recycling companies have good knowledge of scrap in terms of its characteristic metal yield during melting, an overall view of this industry is still missing. An aluminum mass balance for the aluminum recycling industry in the European Union member states from 1995 to 2004 (EU-15) has been carried out. The objective was to increase the transparency of the complex recycling system and to determine how resource-conservative the industry is when melting aluminum scrap. Results show that in 2002, about 7 million tonnes of purchased, tolled, and internal scrap—with a metal content of 94%—were recycled in the EU-15. By comparing the net metal input to the final product, the study finds a very respectable metal recovery rate of 98%.

Boin, U. M. J.; Bertram, M.

2005-08-01

80

Converting Garbage to Gold: Recycling Our Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recycling conserves energy, fights pollution and inflation, creates jobs, and improves the outlook for the future of materials. But converting a throwaway society to recycling will depend on finding good markets for waste paper and scrap metals. (RM)

Chandler, William U.

1984-01-01

81

Tantalum recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the flow of tantalum in the United States in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which tantalum was recycled/reused. Tantalum was mostly recycled from new scrap that was generated during the manufacture of tantalum-related electronic components and new and old scrap products of tantalum-containing cemented carbides and superalloys. In 1998, about 210 metric tons of tantalum was recycled/reused, with about 43% derived from old scrap. The tantalum recycling rate was calculated to be 21%, and tantalum scrap recycling efficiency, 35%.

Cunningham, Larry D.

2001-01-01

82

A note on scrap in the 1992 U.S. input-output tables  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction A key concern of industrial ecology and life cycle analysis is the disposal and recycling of scrap. One might conclude that the U.S. input-output tables are appropriate tools for analyzing scrap flows. Duchin, for instance, has suggested using input-output analysis for industrial ecology, indicating that input-output economics can trace the stocks and flows of energy and other materials from extraction through production and consumption to recycling or disposal. Lave and others use input-output tables to design life cycle assessment models for studying product design, materials use, and recycling strategies, even with the knowledge that these tables suffer from a lack of comprehensive and detailed data that may never be resolved. Although input-output tables can offer general guidance about the interdependence of economic and environmental processes, data reporting by industry and the economic concepts underlying these tables pose problems for rigorous material flow examinations. This is especially true for analyzing the output of scrap and scrap flows in the United States and estimating the amount of scrap that can be recycled. To show how data reporting has affected the values of scrap in recent input-output tables, this paper focuses on metal scrap generated in manufacturing. The paper also briefly discusses scrap that is not included in the input-output tables and some economic concepts that limit the analysis of scrap flows.

Swisko, George M.

2000-01-01

83

Recycling galvanized steel: Operating experience and benefits  

SciTech Connect

In response to the increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last decade and the problems associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap, with a design capacity of 48,000 tonnes annually, has been in operation in East Chicago, Indiana since early in 1993. The first 450 t of scrap degalvanized in the pilot plant have residual zinc below 0.01% and sodium dragout below 0.01%. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials, environmental compliance, and opportunity costs to steel- and iron-makers. Availability of clean degalvanized scrap may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant and EAF shops to produce flat products without use of high quality scrap alternatives such as DRI, pig iron, or iron carbide. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap. The quantities of zinc available by the year 2000 from prompt and obsolete automotive scrap win approach 25% of zinc consumed in the major automotive production centers of the world. Zinc recycling from galvanized steel scrap, either before or after scrap melting, will have to be implemented.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

1993-08-01

84

Method for forming consumable electrodes from metallic chip scraps  

DOEpatents

The method relates to metallurgical recycling of waste products, preferably titanium alloys chips scrap. Accordingly after crushing and cleaning, the chip scrap is subjected to vacuum-thermal degassing (VTD); the chip scrap is pressed into briquettes; the briquettes are placed into a mould allowing sufficient remaining space for the addition of molten metal alloy; the mould is pre-heated before filling with the molten metal alloy; the mould remaining space is filled with molten metal alloy. After cooling, the electrode is removed from the mould. The method provides a means for 100% use of chip scrap in producing consumable electrodes having increased mechanical strength and reduced interstitial impurities content leading to improved secondary cast alloys.

Girshov, Vladimir Leonidovich (St. Petersburg, RU); Podpalkin, Arcady Munjyvich (St. Petersburg, RU); Treschevskiy, Arnold Nikolayevich (St. Petersburg, RU); Abramov, Alexey Alexandrovich (St. Petersburg, RU)

2005-10-11

85

SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY METAL SOURCES, ARE STORED IN THESE BINS AND LIFTED TO SCALES BY AN ELECTRIC MAGNET. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

86

Role of molten salt flux in melting of used beverage container (UBC) scrap  

SciTech Connect

Recycling of aluminum scrap, such as Used Beverage Container (UBC) scrap is steadily increasing. In secondary remelting of such scrap, it is a common practice to use protective molten salt cover. An appropriate salt protects metal from oxidation, promotes coalescence of the suspended metal droplets, and separates clean metal from the oxide contamination. The molten salt also reacts with metal. This causes metal loss and change of resulting metal composition. In this paper, role of molten salt fluxes in melting of UBC scrap is discussed, and selection criteria for molten salt are provided.

Ye, J.; Sahai, Y. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31

87

Statewide plan for utilization of scrap tires in Kansas. Final report, September 1993-May 1995  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to determine the current and future supply of scrap tire rubber and the feasibility of using scrap tires in Kansas for various purposes. The goal was to determine if a sufficient quantity of recycled rubber existed and what the cost would be to meet the ISTEA (Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act) requirements for 1995 and thereafter. The four tasks included in the study were: surveying scrap tire utilization plans in other states; inventory scrap tires in Kansas; estimating scrap tire generation in the future; and determiming cost effectiveness of various uses of scrap tires. Currently there are 4.5 to 5.5 million scrap tires in Kansas and the annual generation of scrap tires is estimated to be 2 to 3 million. The ISTEA mandate would require an estimated 367,000 scrap tires be recycled annually. KDOT has used more rubber in 1993 and 1994 than will be required by 1997 when the 20% required by ISTEA is in effect.

Nelson, R.G.; Hossain, M.

1995-05-01

88

Beryllium Recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the flow of beryllium in the United States in 2000 with emphasis on the extent to which beryllium was either recycled or reused. Beryllium was recycled mostly from new scrap that was generated during the manufacture of beryllium-related components. In 2000, about 35 metric tons of beryllium was either recycled or reused, about 14 percent of which was derived from old scrap. The beryllium recycling rate was calculated to be about 10 percent, and beryllium scrap recycling efficiency, about 7 percent.

Cunningham, Larry D.

2003-01-01

89

Beryllium recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the flow of beryllium in the United States in 2000 with emphasis on the extent to which beryllium was either recycled or reused. Beryllium was recycled mostly from new scrap that was generated during the manufacture of beryllium-related components. In 2000, about 35 metric tons of beryllium was either recycled or reused, about 14 percent of which was derived from old scrap. The beryllium recycling rate was calculated to be about 10 percent, and beryllium scrap recycling efficiency, about 7 percent.

Cunningham, Larry D.

2004-01-01

90

Improving scrap tire processing  

SciTech Connect

The market for tire-derived materials is growing rapidly, with the largest market being tire-derived fuels. There is therefore a growing demand for higher quality products. This paper describes the processing and removal of steel from scrap tires.

Astafan, C.G. [Columbus McKinnon Corp., Sarasota, FL (United States)

1997-01-01

91

The Application of Life Cycle Assessment in China Recycling Resource Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waste and recycling resource management is one of the most important application areas of life cycle assessment. This article first points out the importance of using the life cycle assessment in waste and recycling resource decision making, and then analyses current life cycle studies in China of different types of recycling resources, such as scrap iron and steel, scrap nonferrous

Yue Zhang

2011-01-01

92

Nickel recycling in the United States in 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of nickel from production through distribution and use, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap) in 2004. This materials flow study includes a description of nickel supply and demand for the United States to illustrate the extent of nickel recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding how materials flow from a source through disposition can aid in improving the management of natural resource delivery systems. In 2004, the old scrap recycling efficiency for nickel was estimated to be 56.2 percent. In 2004, nickel scrap consumption in the United States was as follows: new scrap containing 13,000 metric tons (t) of nickel (produced during the manufacture of products), 12 percent; and old scrap containing 95,000 t of nickel (articles discarded after serving a useful purpose), 88 percent. The recycling rate for nickel in 2004 was 40.9 percent, and the percentage of nickel in products attributed to nickel recovered from nickel-containing scrap was 51.6 percent. Furthermore, U.S. nickel scrap theoretically generated in 2004 had the following distribution: scrap to landfills, 24 percent; recovered and used scrap, 50 percent; and unaccounted for scrap, 26 percent. Of the 50 percent of old scrap generated in the United States that was recovered and then used in 2004, about one-third was exported and two-thirds was consumed in the domestic production of nickel-containing products.

Goonan, Thomas G.

2009-01-01

93

The concept of the use of recycled uranium for increasing the degree of security of export deliveries of fuel for light-water reactors  

SciTech Connect

The present paper deals with investigation of the possibilities for reducing the risk of proliferation of fissionable materials by means of increasing the degree of protection of fresh fuel intended for light-water reactors against unsanctioned use in the case of withdrawal of a recipient country of deliveries from IAEA safeguards. It is shown that the use of recycled uranium for manufacturing export nuclear fuel makes transfer of nuclear material removed from the fuel assemblies for weapons purposes difficult because of the presence of isotope {sup 232}U, whose content increases when one attempts to enrich uranium extracted from fresh fuel. In combination with restricted access to technologies for isotope separation by means of establishing international centers for uranium enrichment, this technical measure can significantly reduce the risk of proliferation associated with export deliveries of fuel made of low-enriched uranium. The assessment of a maximum level of contamination of nuclear material being transferred by isotope {sup 232}U for the given isotope composition of the initial fuel is obtained. The concept of further investigations of the degree of security of export deliveries of fuel assemblies with recycled uranium intended for light-water reactors is suggested.

Alekseev, P. N.; Ivanov, E. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Rumyantsev, A. N.; Shmelev, V. M. [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Borisevich, V. D.; Smirnov, A. Yu.; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Nuclear Research University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15

94

Good desk Bad desk Labeled, scrap paper tray made from old box  

E-print Network

cup Recycled paper pen or reusable outer pen Plastic pens Own sandwiches in reusable container, rule, pens Own stationery on desk � scissors, rule Supply of old carrier bags / bags for life / cotton bags in drawer Own scrap pads made New post-its Toner cartridge refilled rather than recycled (use

95

Management of MSW in Spain and recovery of packaging steel scrap.  

PubMed

Packaging steel is more advantageously recovered and recycled than other packaging material due to its magnetic properties. The steel used for packaging is of high quality, and post-consumer waste therefore produces high-grade ferrous scrap. Recycling is thus an important issue for reducing raw material consumption, including iron ore, coal and energy. Household refuse management consists of collection/disposal, transport, and processing and treatment - incineration and composting being the most widely used methods in Spain. Total Spanish MSW production exceeds 21 million tons per year, of which 28.1% and 6.2% are treated in compost and incineration plants, respectively. This paper presents a comprehensive study of incineration and compost plants in Spain, including a review of the different processes and technologies employed and the characteristics and quality of the recovered ferrous scrap. Of the total amount of packaging steel scrap recovered from MSW, 38% comes from compost plants and 14% from incineration plants. Ferrous scrap from incineration plants presents a high degree of chemical alteration as a consequence of the thermal process to which the MSW is subjected, particularly the conditions in which the slag is cooled, and accordingly its quality diminishes. Fragmentation and magnetic separation processes produce an enhancement of the scrap quality. Ferrous scrap from compost plants has a high tin content, which negatively affects its recycling. Cleaning and detinning processes are required prior to recycling. PMID:17161595

Tayibi, Hanan; Peña, Carmen; López, Félix A; López-Delgado, Aurora

2007-01-01

96

Equipment for shredding rubber scrap  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe a range of machines developed for shredding rubber scrap and discarded rubber articles into crumbs. Technical characteristics of the machine for shredding vulcanized pressed-rubber parts, used rubber articles and scrap from the shoe industry are presented. A machine for shredding rubber scrap from plants making rubber products and from the shoe industry is shown, as is one for producing rubber crumbs from the scrap during the roughing of tires. Another machine is examined which cuts tires with metallic cords.

Rozhkov, V.F.; Golikov, V.N.; Kurglov, V.I.; Cherepkova, R.V.

1987-07-01

97

Preliminary evaluation of electrowinning for nickel scrap processing  

SciTech Connect

Purification of the 70,000 to 245,000 tons of diffusion plant nickel scrap permit its use in a variety of DOE and, with establishment of de minimus standards, foreign and domestic industrial applications. Nickel recycle would also substantially decrease DOE legacy wastes. This report presents data on electrolytes and separations which could be used in electrolytic purification of radiologically contaminated nickel scrap from first generation diffusion plants. Potentiometric scans and plating tests indicate that both industrial electrolytes, buffered nickel sulfate-sodium chloride and nickel chloride, provide good current densities. Electrolytes which contain ammonium thiocyanate or ammonium chloride also perform well. Nickel does not plate appreciably from nitrate solutions because the nitrate was preferentially reduced to nitrite. Solvent extractions of cobalt, a common contaminant in commercial nickel, and pertechnate, a radiological contaminant expected in DOE nickel scrap, are also successful.

Brown, G.M.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

1996-12-01

98

New approaches to the collection of scrap batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lead/acid batteries are by far the largest use of lead and they continue to grow in importance, both as a proportion of total lead use and in actual tonnage terms. They are also well suited to recycling and represent the major source of recoverable lead. As such, they are collected and recycled in large numbers in most countries. Unfortunately, the economics of recycling are not always favourable and recycling rates are therefore prone to fluctuation, tending to fall at times of low lead price and rise when prices are firmer. On top of this, tightening environmental standards are imposing additional costs on those involved in battery collection and recovery and are discouraging some traditional participants from continuing involvement in the process. As a result, considerable attention is being paid to ways of ensuring consistently high rates of battery recovery. Various approaches have been considered, both voluntary and compulsory, and several have been put into practice. Two main collection routes are used: the battery distribution network and the scrap-metal trade. A range of different measures are employed including acceptance of scrap batteries by retailers, compulsory exchange of old batteries for new, prohibitions on disposal of scrap batteries with household waste, returnable deposits on battery sales, and environmental levies. In all cases, the schemes are backed by education campaigns to ensure their effectiveness. The paper examines the principles behind the various approaches and describes several of the schemes that have been piloted or introduced in different countries.

Wilson, David N.

99

R-20: new recycling technology for the 1980s  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycled rubber can now be used because a new rubber recycle process converts cured scrap rubber to a fine powder characterized by a particle size range never before realized with good economics. The recycling process is carried out by mechanical means at ambient temperatures without the use of undesirable chemicals which are used for devulcanization. When the recycled rubber particles

R. A. Swor; H. V. Newton

1980-01-01

100

Chromium Recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this report is to illustrate the extent to which chromium was recycled in the United States in 1998 and to identify chromium-recycling trends. The major use of chromium was in the metallurgical industry to make stainless steel; substantially less chromium was used in the refractory and chemical industries. In this study, the only chromium recycling reported was that which was a part of stainless steel scrap reuse. In 1998, 20 percent of the U.S. apparent consumption of chromium was secondary (from recycling); the remaining 80 percent was based on net chromium commodity imports and stock adjustments. Chromite ore was not mined in the United States in 1998. In 1998, 75,300 metric tons (t) of chromium contained in old scrap was consumed in the United States; it was valued at $66.4 million. Old scrap generated contained 132,000 t of chromium. The old scrap recycling efficiency was 87 percent, and the recycling rate was 20 percent. About 18,000 t of chromium in old scrap was unrecovered. New scrap consumed contained 28,600 t of chromium, which yielded a new-to-old-scrap ratio of 28:72. U.S. chromium-bearing stainless steel scrap net exports were valued at $154 million and were estimated to have contained 41,000 t of chromium.

Papp, John F.

2001-01-01

101

Scrap metal management issues associated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Certain industrial processes sometimes generate waste by-products that contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) at elevated concentrations. Some industries, including the water treatment, geothermal energy, and petroleum industries, generate scrap metal that may be contaminated with NORM wastes. Of these three industries, the petroleum industry probably generates the largest quantity of NORM-contaminated equipment, conservatively estimated at 170,000 tons per year. Equipment may become contaminated when NORM-containing scale or sludge accumulates inside water-handling equipment. The primary radionuclides of concern in these NORM wastes are radium-226 and radium-228. NORM-contaminated equipment generated by the petroleum industry currently is managed several ways. Some equipment is routinely decontaminated for reuse; other equipment becomes scrap metal and may be disposed of by burial at a licensed landfill, encapsulation inside the wellbore of an abandoned well, or shipment overseas for smelting. In view of the increased regulatory activities addressing NORM, the economic burden of managing NORM-contaminated wastes, including radioactive scrap metal, is likely to continue to grow. Efforts to develop a cost-effective strategy for managing radioactive scrap metal should focus on identifying the least expensive disposition options that provide adequate protection of human health and the environment. Specifically, efforts should focus on better characterizing the quantity of radioactive scrap available for recycle or reuse, the radioactivity concentration levels, and the potential risks associated with different disposal options.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.

1995-08-01

102

Characterization of emissions from scrap metal processing facilities  

SciTech Connect

To prepare its members for the permitting requirements under Title 5 of the Clean Act, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) commissioned a project to develop a Title 5 applicability workbook. A critical element in the preparation of the workbook was the characterization of emissions from processes and equipment typically found in the scrap metal processing industry. This paper describes the approach to the preparation of the workbook with emphasis on characterization of specific emission units which are deemed important for Title 5. The paper describes the methodology employed for acquiring existing emissions information from equipment manufacturers, vendors, and scrap recycling facility operators. The data were aggregated and analyzed to develop a variety of emission tabulations for pollutants requiring analysis under Title 5. The project also involved a survey of numerous state and local air pollution agencies to determine regulatory requirements regarding critical issues in the scrap processing industry. The paper describes a methodology for determining Title 5 applicability with emphasis on the use of emission tabulations and example worksheets. Emissions data are presented for metal shredders to demonstrate the methodology and procedures developed during the project. Finally, the paper discusses the structure of the Title 5 applicability workbook and its dissemination to a major industry trade association.

Norco, J.E. [Versar, Inc., Lombard, IL (United States); Tyler, T. [Inst. of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31

103

Removal of contaminants in leachate from landfill by waste steel scrap and converter slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study may be the first investigation to be performed into the potential benefits of recycling industrial waste in controlling\\u000a contaminants in leachate. Batch reactors were used to evaluate the efficacy of waste steel scrap and converter slag to treat\\u000a mixed contaminants using mimic leachate solution. The waste steel scrap was prepared through pre-treatment by an acid-washed\\u000a step, which retained

Byung-Taek Oh; Jai-Young Lee; Jeyong Yoon

2007-01-01

104

REWORK/SCRAP COST  

E-print Network

This paper addresses the problem of reworking of defective items and develops an integrated cost model so as to minimize the extra costs of reworking/scraping of work pieces. Items to be reworked are the results of quality problem. To improve a product’s quality, the selection of process target is extremely important since it directly affects the process defective rate, material cost, rework or scrap cost, and loss to customer due to deviation of product from desired specification. The amount of investment necessary to economically correct a defective process is still an issue of research. This research is a contribution to this type of problem. In addition to cost estimation, the integrated cost model focuses on optimal tolerance, and optimal mean and variance of the output characteristics. The symmetrical truncated loss function is used to evaluate the cost of poor quality in a production system. Specifically, we investigate the possible economic investment in a process improvement to reduce its variance and shifting the process mean close to its target, resulting in the reduction of waste like rework/scrap. Numerical examples are presented to show all the steps involved and to verify the proposed model. Utilizing this model, decision-makers can evaluate any quality investment in order to achieve a significant financial return

Walid Abdul-kader; Ozhand Ganjavi

2008-01-01

105

Manganese recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the flow and processing of manganese within the U.S. economy in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which manganese is recycled. Manganese was used mostly as an alloying agent in alloys in which it was a minor component. Manganese was recycled mostly within scrap of iron and steel. A small amount was recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Very little manganese was recycled from materials being recovered specifically for their manganese content. For the United States in 1998, 218,000 metric tons of manganese was estimated to have been recycled from old scrap, of which 96% was from iron and steel scrap. Efficiency of recycling was estimated as 53% and recycling rate as 37%. Metallurgical loss of manganese was estimated to be about 1.7 times that recycled. This loss was mostly into slags from iron and steel production, from which recovery of manganese has yet to be shown economically feasible.

Jones, Thomas S.

2001-01-01

106

An Industrial Method for Determining the Amount of Organics in Representative Samples of Aluminum Scrap  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recycling plants, especially those specializing in the recycling of low-grade aluminum scrap for wrought aluminum alloys, timely and accurate information about the amount of organics and other impurities in the incoming scrap is an important parameter in achieving both economic benefits and standard metallurgical quality of the recycled metal. To use aluminum scrap combined with organics as a source of aluminum for producing wrought aluminum alloys of standard quality, its metallurgical composition and the content of organic and other impurities should be quickly and cost-effectively analyzed on representative samples. In this work, an industrial thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis of representative scrap samples was developed as an efficient analytical methodology for analyzing the humidity and organic impurities in incoming scrap. When performed in continuous mode, under a flowing atmosphere of argon with 1 wt.% of oxygen, this methodology enables a routine measurement of the humidity, the quantity of organics, and the carbon content in representative samples of incoming scrap in less than 15 min within an accuracy of ±0.5%.

Kevorkijan, Varuzan; Skapin, Sreco Davor; Dosler, Urban

2012-08-01

107

Proceedings of the waste recycling workshop  

SciTech Connect

Recorded are seventeen talks from five sessions at the workshop. FERMCO`s recycling program, state of the art recycling technology, and an integrated demonstration of deactivation, decommissioning and decommissioning are presented in the plenary session. In the concrete session, decontamination and recycling are discussed. In the transite session, regulations are considered along with recycling and decontamination. In the metals session, radioactive scrap metals are emphasized. And in the regulatory considerations and liabilities session, DOE and EPA viewpoints are discussed. (GHH)

Bailey, R.E.; Thomas, A.F.; Ries, M.A. [eds.] [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [eds.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-12-31

108

Puncturing the scrap tire problem  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of scrap tires is making major headway in the 1990s. In 1994, an estimated 55 percent of all scrap tires generated were diverted from landfills, compared to 11 percent five years ago. Within three to five years, the Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC), an industry group, predicts that there will be markets for 100 percent of the estimated 250 million plus scrap tires generated in the U.S. annually. At that point, it should be possible to start making a serious dent in the estimated 800 to 850 million scrap tires stockpiled around the country. About 4.5 million scrap tires get transformed into ground rubber products. Despite that relatively small number, this category holds significant promise. It also is the area with perhaps the most entrepreneurial activity. The reason is clear when the value added from increasingly intensive processing of tires is examined. When scrap rubber is ground for use in asphalt, new tires or a host of other products - the value goes up tremendously. A quarter inch minus grind generally sells for 14 to 22 cents/lb., or $280 to $440/ton. With smallerpieces, the value continues to climb. An `80 mesh,` or rubber that passes through a screen with 80 holes/linear inch, sells for30 to 45 cents/ lb. ($600 to $900/ton), which is higher than prices for aluminum cans two years ago.

Steuteville, R.

1995-10-01

109

Update on Recovering Lead From Scrap Batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous work at the Bureau of Mines Rolla Research Center, U.S. Department of the Interior, resulted in successful development of a bench-scale, combination electrorefining-electrowinning method for recycling lead from scrap batteries by using waste fluosilicic acid (H2SiF6) as electrolyte.1,2 This paper describes larger scale experiments. Prior attempts to electrowin lead failed because large quantities of insoluble lead dioxide were deposited on the anodes at the expense of lead deposition on the cathodes. A major breakthrough was achieved with the discovery that lead dioxide formation at the anodes is prevented by adding a small amount of phosphorus to the electrolyte. The amount of PbO2 formed on the anodes during lead electrowinning was less than 1% of the total lead deposited on the cathodes. This work recently won the prestigious IR·100 award as one of the 100 most significant technological advances of 1984.

Cole, E. R.; Lee, A. Y.; Paulson, D. L.

1985-02-01

110

Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect

Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material`s decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting.

Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

1996-04-01

111

Information scraps : understanding and design  

E-print Network

In this thesis I investigate information scraps - personal information whose content has been scribbled on Post-it notes, scrawled on the corners of sheets of paper, stuck in our pockets, sent in e-mail messages to ourselves, ...

Bernstein, Michael (Michael Scott)

2008-01-01

112

Columbium (niobium) recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the flow of columbium in the United States in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which columbium (niobium) was recycled/reused. Columbium was mostly recycled from products of columbium-bearing steels and superalloys; little was recovered from products specifically for their columbium content. In 1998, about 1,800 metric tons of columbium was recycled/reused, with about 55% derived from old scrap. The columbium recycling rate was calculated to be 22%, and columbium scrap recycling efficiency, 50%.

Cunningham, Larry D.

2001-01-01

113

Platinum recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the United States, catalytic converters are the major source of secondary platinum for recycling. Other sources of platinum scrap include reforming and chemical process catalysts. The glass industry is a small but significant source of platinum scrap. In North America, it has been estimated that in 1998 more than 20,000 kilograms per year of platinum-group metals from automobile catalysts were available for recycling. In 1998, an estimated 7,690 kilograms of platinum were recycled in the United States. U.S. recycling efficiency was calculated to have been 76 percent in 1998; the recycling rate was estimated at 16 percent.

Hilliard, Henry E.

2001-01-01

114

ENDOGENOUS CONSUMER PARTICIPATION AND THE RECYCLING PROBLEM &ast  

Microsoft Academic Search

We endogenise the extent of consumer participation in the recycling process, and analyse its effect on the ‘recycling problem’. When recycling requires consumers to undertake costly sorting activities to separate scrap from household waste, they will participate only if the net reward from sorting is positive. Consumers' sorting cost is subject to a network effect arising due to social norms.

SOHAM BAKSI; NGO VAN LONG

2009-01-01

115

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

In October 1993, Manufacturing Sciences Corporation was awarded DOE contract DE-AC21-93MC30170 to develop and test recycling of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) to high value and intermediate and final product forms. This work was conducted to help solve the problems associated with decontamination and reuse of the diffusion plant barrier nickel and other radioactively contaminated scrap metals present in the diffusion plants. Options available for disposition of the nickel include decontamination and subsequent release or recycled product manufacture for restricted end use. Both of these options are evaluated during the course of this research effort. work during phase I of this project successfully demonstrated the ability to make stainless steel from barrier nickel feed. This paved the way for restricted end use products made from stainless steel. Also, after repeated trials and studies, the inducto-slag nickel decontamination process was eliminated as a suitable alternative. Electro-refining appeared to be a promising technology for decontamination of the diffusion plant barrier material. Goals for phase II included conducting experiments to facilitate the development of an electro-refining process to separate technetium from nickel. In parallel with those activities, phase II efforts were to include the development of the necessary processes to make useful products from radioactive scrap metal. Nickel from the diffusion plants as well as stainless steel and carbon steel could be used as feed material for these products.

MacNair, V.; Muth, T.; Shasteen, K.; Liby, A.; Hradil, G.; Mishra, B.

1996-12-31

116

Decontamination and reuse of ORGDP aluminum scrap  

SciTech Connect

The Gaseous Diffusion Plants, or GDPs, have significant amounts of a number of metals, including nickel, aluminum, copper, and steel. Aluminum was used extensively throughout the GDPs because of its excellent strength to weight ratios and good resistance to corrosion by UF{sub 6}. This report is concerned with the recycle of aluminum stator and rotor blades from axial compressors. Most of the stator and rotor blades were made from 214-X aluminum casting alloy. Used compressor blades were contaminated with uranium both as a result of surface contamination and as an accumulation held in surface-connected voids inside of the blades. A variety of GDP studies were performed to evaluate the amounts of uranium retained in the blades; the volume, area, and location of voids in the blades; and connections between surface defects and voids. Based on experimental data on deposition, uranium content of the blades is 0.3%, or roughly 200 times the value expected from blade surface area. However, this value does correlate with estimated internal surface area and with lengthy deposition times. Based on a literature search, it appears that gaseous decontamination or melt refining using fluxes specific for uranium removal have the potential for removing internal contamination from aluminum blades. A melt refining process was used to recycle blades during the 1950s and 1960s. The process removed roughly one-third of the uranium from the blades. Blade cast from recycled aluminum appeared to perform as well as blades from virgin material. New melt refining and gaseous decontamination processes have been shown to provide substantially better decontamination of pure aluminum. If these techniques can be successfully adapted to treat aluminum 214-X alloy, internal and, possibly, external reuse of aluminum alloys may be possible.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

1996-12-01

117

Optimization of scrap tire pyrolysis using a continuous-feed steam environment  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the generation of scrap tires produced in the United States are on the order of 2 million tons per year. Although these tires contain a high percentage of useful hydrocarbons, steel and carbon black, approximately 70% are not effectively recycled. Recently, pyrolytic recycling of scrap tire (thermal decomposition in the absence of O{sub 2}) is receiving renewed interest because of its ability to produce valuable hydrocarbon products. We have developed a process which permits a continuous feed processing of scrap tires in a non-combustible stream environment. This system utilizes a soft seal system that operates at atmospheric pressures while minimizing any fugitive emissions. This process increases the efficiency and control of present approaches by lowering the energy requirements while maximizing the collection of valuable products. Initial bench-scale results will be presented.

Burrell, T.W.; Frank, S.R.; Rich, M.L. [Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-01

118

Minerals yearbook, 1992: Materials recycling. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

A large variety of materials are recycled by different sectors of our society. The materials recycling that is mainly addressed in this writing is from waste that is generated after manufacturing and use. Included is recycling that is generally more obvious to the public: the collection, reprocessing, and remanufacture of materials into new products from post-consumer UBC's, scrap metal, glass containers, paper goods, increasingly plastics, as well as rubber tires and other used goods.

Tanner, A.O.

1992-01-01

119

Process for recovering niobium from uranium-niobium alloys  

DOEpatents

Niobium is recovered from scrap uranium-niobium alloy by melting the scrap with tin, solidifying the billet thus formed, heating the billet to combine niobium with tin therein, placing the billet in hydrochloric acid to dissolve the uranium and leave an insoluble residue of niobium stannide, then separating the niobium stannide from the acid.

Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN); Creech, Edward T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Northcutt, Walter G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01

120

Management of MSW in Spain and recovery of packaging steel scrap  

Microsoft Academic Search

Packaging steel is more advantageously recovered and recycled than other packaging material due to its magnetic properties. The steel used for packaging is of high quality, and post-consumer waste therefore produces high-grade ferrous scrap. Recycling is thus an important issue for reducing raw material consumption, including iron ore, coal and energy.Household refuse management consists of collection\\/disposal, transport, and processing and

Hanan Tayibi; Carmen Peña; Félix A. López; Aurora López-Delgado

2007-01-01

121

Managing the disposition of potentially radioactive scrap metal.  

PubMed

In 2002, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) issued Report No. 141, Managing Potentially Radioactive Scrap Metal. The report evaluates management policy and related issues regarding scrap metal generated in regulated facilities that have been under radiological control or have radiological concerns. It has been estimated that more than 9 million metric tons of scrap metal of all types that have been associated with the production or use of radioactive materials will be generated during the coming decades at various facilities across the United States. Currently, disposition of such metal has encountered particular obstacles, primarily because of the lack of a consistent disposition policy, systematic regulatory provisions, and, above all, public understanding. Without clarity in the regulatory passage, much of the scrap metal, including metal that has not been contaminated, could be mischaracterized as low-level radioactive waste, resulting in a costly disposition operation. NCRP Report No. 141 identifies this general category of metal as "potentially radioactive scrap metal" (PRSM) and discusses the viable disposition options for facilitating its management. Because much of the PRSM has been found to contain very low residual radioactivity or even none at all, one consideration is to release such metal outside of the radiological control framework. This would require the development and implementation of a set of strict release standards in the United States that would necessarily be risk-based and supported by a comprehensive management scheme. Developing a policy of this kind, however, would entail the resolution of many issues, not the least of which would be public acceptance, including that of the metal industry, of the possible recycling of PRSM in the general commerce. PMID:17033456

Chen, S Y

2006-11-01

122

Recycling of plastic material in design world: examples from automotive industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, plastic materials recycling, which has the environmental and economic values, discussion with studies and design applications especially automotive industry are included. Pollution of sources and recycling of scrap materials are the two strong reasons for recycling concept. The designers, consumers, producers and governments are constrained to comprehend recycling subject because of the fact of increasing on consumption

Ceyda Vatan

123

Cadmium Recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recycling of cadmium is a young and growing industry that has been influenced by environmental concerns and regulatory constraints. Domestic recycling of cadmium began in 1989 as a byproduct of processing of spent nickel-cadmium batteries. In 1995, International Metals Reclamation Co. Inc. expanded its operations by building a dedicated cadmium recycling plant. In 2000, an estimated 13 percent of cadmium consumption in the United States was sourced from recycled cadmium, which is derived mainly from old scrap or, to lesser degree, new scrap. The easiest forms of old scrap to recycle are small spent nickel-cadmium batteries followed by flue dust generated during recycling of galvanized steel and small amounts of alloys that contain cadmium. Most of new scrap is generated during manufacturing processes, such as nickel-cadmium battery production. All other uses of cadmium are in low concentrations and, therefore, difficult to recycle. Consequently, much of this cadmium is dissipated and lost. The amount of cadmium in scrap that was unrecovered in 2000 was estimated to be 2,030 t, and an estimated 285 t was recovered. Recycling efficiency was estimated to be about 15 percent.

Plachy, Jozef

2003-01-01

124

Cadmium recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recycling of cadmium is a young and growing industry that has been influenced by environmental concerns and regulatory constraints. Domestic recycling of cadmium began in 1989 as a byproduct of processing of spent nickel-cadmium batteries. In 1995, International Metals Reclamation Co. Inc. expanded its operations by building a dedicated cadmium recycling plant. In 2000, an estimated 13 percent of cadmium consumption in the United States was sourced from recycled cadmium, which is derived mainly from old scrap or, to lesser degree, new scrap. The easiest forms of old scrap to recycle are small spent nickel-cadmium batteries followed by flue dust generated during recycling of galvanized steel and small amounts of alloys that contain cadmium. Most of new scrap is generated during manufacturing processes, such as nickel-cadmium battery production. All other uses of cadmium are in low concentrations and, therefore, difficult to recycle. Consequently, much of this cadmium is dissipated and lost. The amount of cadmium in scrap that was unrecovered in 2000 was estimated to be 2,030 metric tons, and an estimated 285 tons was recovered. Recycling efficiency was estimated to be about 15 percent.

Plachy, Jozef

2003-01-01

125

Electrolytic method for recovery of lead from scrap batteries: scale-up study using 20-liter multielectrode cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior work at the Bureau of Mines resulted in the successful development of a bench-scale, combination electrorefining-electrowinning method for recycling the lead from scrap batteries using waste fluosilicic acid (HâSiFâ) as electrolyte. This paper describes larger scale experiments. Anodes cast from scrap battery lead were electrorefined in a 20-L multielectrode cell for 3 to 7 days. The anodes, containing 2

A. Y. Lee; E. R. Jr. Cole; D. L. Paulson

1984-01-01

126

Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal  

DOEpatents

A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

Duerksen, Walter K. (Norris, TN)

1988-01-01

127

New developments in materials recycling by the US Bureau of Mines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mineral based waste products generated by industry and the consuming public as potential secondary mineral resources to be used for recycling materials are considered. Technical solutions are presented to complex recycling problems, such as: recovery of cobalt, nickel, and chromium from superalloy scrap; the separation, recovery, and reuse of nickel and chromium from stainless and specialty steel wastes; precious metal recovery from electronic scrap; an environmentally acceptable method for recyclng lead acid batteries; recovery of nonferrous metals from scrap automobiles; and rapid scrap identification methods suitable for today's modern alloys.

Horton, R. C.; Kenahan, C. B.

1984-04-01

128

Pyrolysis process for scrap tires  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process for disposal of scrap tires was developed in which the shredded tires are pyrolyzed in an indirectly heated rotary kiln at 600°C to produce mainly fuel oil and char. The operating temperature was determined as the temperature which produces the char that gives carbon black with optimum properties as reinforcing filler for rubber. The oil is condensed in

K. Inoue; T. Sakai; S. Kawakami; H. Tanaka

1979-01-01

129

Scrap tires: STATEing the facts  

SciTech Connect

Starting with a piece of Minnesota legislation passed in 1984, state governments have spent the last 10 years attempting to clean up and find markets for decades worth of stockpiled tires, as well as the millions more generated each year. The US EPA estimates that 242 million scrap tires were generated in the US in 1990 alone. Of these, an alarming 188 million were disposed of illegally. At least 34 states have bans on the landfilling of whole, and in some cases even shredded, tires. Last year, 37 states considered scrap-tire-related bills, most of which were amendments to earlier legislation. Among the scrap tire legislation passed in the past year are comprehensive laws in Ohio and Colorado, including fees for the disposal of tires, most of which are paid by the consumer. Fees were increased in North Carolina and Texas, and a $2-per-tire fee was begun in Connecticut, while hauler registration requirements were enacted in California. This article discusses what five states are doing with the management of scrap tires. They are: Minnesota; Wisconsin; Texas; Oklahoma; and Illinois.

Dabaie, M.

1994-10-01

130

Uranium  

SciTech Connect

The two important oxidation states for uranium in natural environments are 4+ and 6+. Compounds containing quadrivalent uranium are insoluble in mildly acidic to alkaline conditions; whereas, those containing the linearly uranyl moiety (O=U=O)2+, are highly soluble and mobile. In solution, UO22+ forms soluble complexes with carbonate, oxalate, and hydroxide; UO22+ is also highly susceptible to adsorption either by organic matter, Fe oxyhydroxides, or precipitation with various anions, such as silicate, vanadate, arsenate, and phosphate. In ground water systems U(VI) is reduced to U(IV) if an effective reductant is present, such as H2S. Other reducing agents may be fossil plants, methane, and transported humic material. Uranium minerals display an extraordinary range structural and chemical variability, resulting from the different chemical conditions under which U minerals are formed.

Grenthe, Ingmar; Buck, Edgar C.; Drozdynski, J.; Fujino, T.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas; Wolf, Steven F.

2006-07-31

131

Uranium*  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uranium compounds have been used as colorants since Roman times (Caley, 1948). Uranium was discovered as a chemical element in a pitchblende specimen by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who published the results of his work in 1789. Pitchblende is an impure uranium oxide, consisting partly of the most reduced oxide uraninite (UO2) and partly of U3O8. Earlier mineralogists had considered this mineral to be a complex oxide of iron and tungsten or of iron and zinc, but Klaproth showed by dissolving it partially in strong acid that the solutions yielded precipitates that were different from those of known elements. Therefore he concluded that it contained a new element (Mellor, 1932); he named it after the planet Uranus, which had been discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, who named it after the ancient Greek deity of the Heavens.

Grenthe, Ingmar; Dro?d?y?ski, Janusz; Fujino, Takeo; Buck, Edgar C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Wolf, Stephen F.

132

Cost-Effective Consolidation of Fine Aluminum Scrap for Increased Remelting Effieciency  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this research was to develop a new re-melting process for fine or light gauge aluminum scrap products that exhibits dramatic improvements in energy efficiency. Light gauge aluminum scrap in the form of chips, turnings, and borings has historically been underutilized in the aluminum recycling process due to its high surface area to volume ratio resulting in low melt recovery. Laboratory scale consolidation experiments were performed using loose aluminum powder as a modeling material as well as shredded aluminum wire scrap. The processing parameters necessary to create consolidated aluminum material were determined. Additionally, re-melting experiments using consolidated and unconsolidated aluminum powder confirmed the hypothesis that metal recovery using consolidated material will significantly improve by as much as 20%. Based on this research, it is estimated that approximately 495 billion Btu/year can be saved by implementation of this technology in one domestic aluminum rolling plant alone. The energy savings are realized by substituting aluminum scrap for primary aluminum, which requires large amounts of energy to produce. While there will be an initial capital investment, companies will benefit from the reduction of dependence on primary aluminum thus saving considerable costs. Additionally, the technology will allow companies to maintain in-house alloy scrap, rather than purchasing from other vendors and eliminate the need to discard the light gauge scrap to landfills.

William Van Geertruyden

2005-09-22

133

Environmentally acceptable recycling in Europe  

SciTech Connect

The modern concept of ecologically sound recycling is to ensure, as far as possible, effective use or reuse of all materials arising during the production of a component, and also the component itself at the end of its useful life. The recycling circle is well established for widely used metals such as iron and steel, aluminium and zinc. However, for magnesium, although recycled secondary scrap was a major input into magnesium casting production in the 1950`s recycling of this type of material back to components is currently almost nonexistent. The current rapid growth in use of magnesium die castings by the automotive industry will eventually result in a significant growth in availability of secondary magnesium scrap, which will present new challenges and opportunities to the skillful recyclers. However this has not yet happened, and the major preoccupation of most recyclers is to satisfy the demands of the growing die-casting industry, balancing the triple requirements of: (1) recycling or disposing of all products arising from the die-casting operation at a price, or cost, perceived as fair by the die caster; (2) satisfying our public demands to safeguard the environment in terms of emissions, effluents and disposal to land fill; and (3) establishing and maintaining a viable business activity while satisfying (1) and (2). It is to this area that the remainder of this paper is dedicated.

King, J.F. [Magnesium Elektron, Manchester (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31

134

H. R. 871: This Act may be cited as the Tire Recycling Incentives Act, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, February 6, 1991  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to encourage greater recycling of scrap tires. Americans generate more than 250 million scrap tires annually. Currently, 2 1/2 to 3 billion scrap tires are stockpiled across America. H.R.871 was introduced into the US House of Representatives on February 6, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to require producers and importers of tires to recycle a certain percentage of scrap tires each year. This legislation calls for the administrator of the EPA to establish a recycling credit system for carrying out these recycling requirements, and to establish a management and tracking system for such tires.

Not Available

1991-01-01

135

Scrap metals industry perspective on radioactive materials.  

PubMed

With more than 80 reported/confirmed accidental melts worldwide since 1983 and still counting, potential contamination by radioactive materials remains as a major concern among recycled scrap and steel companies. Some of these events were catastrophic and have cost the industry millions of dollars in business and, at the same time, resulted in declining consumer confidence. It is also known that more events with confirmed radioactive contamination have occurred that involve mining of old steel slag and skull dumps. Consequently, the steel industry has since undergone massive changes that incurred unprecedented expenses through the installation of radiation monitoring systems in hopes of preventing another accidental melt. Despite such extraordinary efforts, accidental melts continue to occur and plague the industry. One recent reported/confirmed event occurred in the Republic of China in 2004, causing the usual lengthy shutdown for expensive decontamination efforts before the steel mill could resume operations. With this perspective in mind, the metal industry has a long-standing opposition to the release of radioactive materials of any kind to commerce for fear of contamination and the potential consequences. PMID:17033460

Turner, Ray

2006-11-01

136

Magnesium recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As concern for the environment has grown in recent years, the importance of recycling has become more evident. The more materials that are recycled, the fewer natural resources will be consumed and the fewer waste products will end up in landfills, the water, and the air. As one of a series of reports on metals recycling, this report discusses the 1998 flow of magnesium in the United States from extraction through its uses with particular emphasis on recycling. In 1998, the recycling efficiency for magnesium was estimated to be 33 percent--almost 60 percent of the magnesium that was recycled came from new scrap, primarily waste from die-casting operations. The principal source of old scrap was recycled aluminum beverage cans.

Kramer, Deborah A.

2002-01-01

137

Magnesium recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As concern for the environment has grown in recent years, the importance of recycling has become more evident. The more materials that are recycled, the fewer natural resources will be consumed and the fewer waste products will end up in landfills, in the water, and in the air. As one of a series of reports on metals recycling, this report discusses the 1998 flow of magnesium from extraction through its uses with particular emphasis on recycling. In 1998, the recycling rate for magnesium was estimated to be 33 percent?almost 60 percent of the magnesium that was recycled came from new scrap, primarily waste from diecasting operations. The principal source of old scrap was recycled aluminum beverage cans.

Kramer, Deborah A.

2001-01-01

138

Advanced technologies for decomtamination and conversion of scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ``Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a laser cutting demonstration, an investigation of commercial markets for RSM, and refinement of methods to quantify isotopic elements.

Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

1999-05-27

139

Radiochronological Age of a Uranium Metal Sample from an Abandoned Facility  

SciTech Connect

A piece of scrap uranium metal bar buried in the dirt floor of an old, abandoned metal rolling mill was analyzed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (MC-ICP-MS). The mill rolled uranium rods in the 1940s and 1950s. Samples of the contaminated dirt in which the bar was buried were also analyzed. The isotopic composition of uranium in the bar and dirt samples were both the same as natural uranium, though a few samples of dirt also contained recycled uranium; likely a result of contamination with other material rolled at the mill. The time elapsed since the uranium metal bar was last purified can be determined by the in-growth of the isotope {sup 230}Th from the decay of {sup 234}U, assuming that only uranium isotopes were present in the bar after purification. The age of the metal bar was determined to be 61 years at the time of this analysis and corresponds to a purification date of July 1950 {+-} 1.5 years.

Meyers, L A; Williams, R W; Glover, S E; LaMont, S P; Stalcup, A M; Spitz, H B

2012-03-16

140

Recovering precious metals from electronic scrap  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article characterizes electronic scrap in terms of origin and composition and describes the steps in preliminary processing: sorting, calcination, combustion, shredding, and sampling. Hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical process technologies for the concentration and recovery of precious-metals values in scrap are reviewed, and some downstream processing options are outlined. The article concludes with some caveats concerning the risky but potentially profitable business of recovery of precious metals from electronic scrap.

Hoffmann, James E.

1992-07-01

141

Effective Technology for Recycling Metal. Proceedings of Two Special Workshops.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Association of Secondary Material Industries (NASMI) and the Bureau of Mines have cooperated to sponsor two technically-oriented workshops related to the role of metals recycling and air pollution control technology. The proceedings of these workshops, "Effective Technology and Research for Scrap Metal Recycling" and "Air Pollution…

National Association of Secondary Material Industries, Inc., New York, NY.

142

R-20: new recycling technology for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

Recycled rubber can now be used because a new rubber recycle process converts cured scrap rubber to a fine powder characterized by a particle size range never before realized with good economics. The recycling process is carried out by mechanical means at ambient temperatures without the use of undesirable chemicals which are used for devulcanization. When the recycled rubber particles are used to extend high quality compounds, the degree of retention of key properties of the extended compounds surpasses that of compounds extended with conventional recycled materials. Tests using the recycled rubber in recapped tires and results are described.

Swor, R.A.; Newton, H.V.

1980-06-01

143

32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.  

...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National...Land and Improvements § 644.522 Clearance of military scrap. Military scrap can contain or be contaminated...

2014-07-01

144

32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National...Land and Improvements § 644.522 Clearance of military scrap. Military scrap can contain or be contaminated...

2012-07-01

145

32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National...Land and Improvements § 644.522 Clearance of military scrap. Military scrap can contain or be contaminated...

2011-07-01

146

32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National...Land and Improvements § 644.522 Clearance of military scrap. Military scrap can contain or be contaminated...

2010-07-01

147

28 CFR 25.56 - Responsibilities of junk yards and salvage yards and auto recyclers.  

...to report under the salvage-yard requirements. (h) Scrap metal processors and shredders that receive automobiles for recycling where the condition of such vehicles generally prevent VINs from being identified are not required to report to the...

2014-07-01

148

Application and feasibility of coal fly ash and scrap tire fiber as wood wall insulation supplements in residential buildings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each year, nearly 55% of the fly ash (FA) produced by coal burning power plants in the United States is disposed of in landfills and ash ponds, while the amount of recycled fiber from scrap tires that is beneficially used in end-user markets is virtually negligible. This paper presents the results of a study carried out to investigate whether it

J. W. van de Lindt; J. A. H. Carraro; P. R. Heyliger; C. Choi

2008-01-01

149

Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans in the aluminium recycling process  

Microsoft Academic Search

At a pilot-scale rotary furnace, aluminium scrap, to which organic material was attached, was molten together with salt at temperatures of ?700–800°C. Because these conditions are favorable for the production of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD\\/F) the following measures were investigated to reduce PCDD\\/F emissions from the aluminium recycling process: (a) alternative duct configuration; (b) type of scrap feeding; and

A Kaune; K.-W Schramm; R Lehnardt; A Kettrup; I Ollenschläger; H Rossel

1999-01-01

150

What do we know about metal recycling rates?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The recycling of metals is widely viewed as a fruitful sustainability strategy, but little information is available on the degree to which recycling is actually taking place. This article provides an overview on the current knowledge of recycling rates for 60 metals. We propose various recycling metrics, discuss relevant aspects of recycling processes, and present current estimates on global end-of-life recycling rates (EOL-RR; i.e., the percentage of a metal in discards that is actually recycled), recycled content (RC), and old scrap ratios (OSRs; i.e., the share of old scrap in the total scrap flow). Because of increases in metal use over time and long metal in-use lifetimes, many RC values are low and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Because of relatively low efficiencies in the collection and processing of most discarded products, inherent limitations in recycling processes, and the fact that primary material is often relatively abundant and low-cost (which thereby keeps down the price of scrap), many EOL-RRs are very low: Only for 18 metals (silver, aluminum, gold, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, niobium, nickel, lead, palladium, platinum, rhenium, rhodium, tin, titanium, and zinc) is the EOL-RR above 50% at present. Only for niobium, lead, and ruthenium is the RC above 50%, although 16 metals are in the 25% to 50% range. Thirteen metals have an OSR greater than 50%. These estimates may be used in considerations of whether recycling efficiencies can be improved; which metric could best encourage improved effectiveness in recycling; and an improved understanding of the dependence of recycling on economics, technology, and other factors. ?? 2011 by Yale University.

Graedel, T.E.; Allwood, J.; Birat, J.-P.; Buchert, M.; Hageluken, C.; Reck, B.K.; Sibley, S.F.; Sonnemann, G.

2011-01-01

151

Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

2012-03-15

152

Recycling Trends in the Plastics Manufacturing and Recycling Companies in Malaysia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study presents the findings from a study on the consumption of recycled materials and recycling practices in the plastics manufacturing industry and recycling companies in Malaysia. The findings were obtained from a survey conducted in twenty plastic manufacturing companies and detailed case studies in three recycling companies. The survey conducted in the plastic manufacturing companies` shows that the consumption rate for poly-olefins (PP and PE) is the highest among the resin types and the industrial sector that consumes the most plastic materials is the electrical and electronics sector. The consumption of recycled materials is high among the local manufacturing companies (80%) which are largely due to cost savings; about 20% of these companies conducted in-house recycling. The study has also shown that the medium scale industry consumes the most recycled materials as compared to the large and small scale industry. The rate of disposal for plastic materials in the local industry is approximately 5%. The detailed case studies conducted in the recycling companies have successfully identified the main processes involved in plastic recycling namely manual sorting, cleaning, drying, meshing/pelletising and packaging. These recycling companies obtained recycled materials from various sources including industrial scrap, dumping sites, local producers as well as imported sources. Pricing of recycled materials were based on classification according to grade and quality of the recycled materials. The study has reflected the extent of in-house recycling trends in the local plastic manufacturing companies and their dependency on the supply from the local recycling companies.

Wahab, D. A.; Abidin, A.; Azhari, C. H.

153

Discussion of and reply to ``Processing of scrap tires: Technology and market applications``  

SciTech Connect

Publication of this paper by Michael H. Blumenthal provides an excellent overview of scrap tire market opportunities, processing options, and some legislative background. The authors present some comments and areas that need addition coverage or clarification. These include the following: durability of new tires made from recycled rubber; cost data; tire derived fuel; landfilling of tires; composition of tires; processing equipment; and processing problems. This article also contains Mr. Blumenthal`s reply to the comments and questions.

Cosulich, J. [Los Angeles County Sanitation District, Whittier, CA (United States); Smisko, J. [County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Commerce, CA (United States); Niessen, W.R. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Blumenthal, M.H. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-11-01

154

From Trash to Treasure: Recycling Scrap Metal into Steel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trash is having a global impact not only on land, but at sea--making its way into the ocean and creating large islands of floating debris. One such island is The Great Pacific Trash Patch, which is located in the North Pacific and is made up of floating trash and debris that is spread out in an area as much as one and a half times the size of the…

Cantu, Diana

2011-01-01

155

Recycling Somalia from the Scrap Merchants of Mogadishu  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2002 Kenya “reconciliation” conference established the current “transitional federal government” of Somalia which despite Ethiopian military support in 2006 has not been able to establish its claimed authority in Somalia since it lacks public support and is not regarded as a legitimate government by the majority of the Somali population. It is in fact an imposed regime for external

I. M. Lewis

2009-01-01

156

Neptunium - Uranium - Plutonium Co-Extraction in TBP-based Solvent Extraction Processes for Spent Nuclear Fuel Recycling  

SciTech Connect

The US, through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, is currently engaged in efforts aimed at closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neptunium behavior is important to understand for transuranic recycling because of its complex oxidation chemistry. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is investigating neptunium oxidation chemistry in the context of the PUREX process. Neptunium extraction in the PUREX process relies on maintaining either IV or V oxidation states. Qualitative conversion of neptunium(V) to neptunium(VI) was achieved within 5 hours in 6 M nitric acid at 95 deg. C. However, the VI state was not maintained during a batch contact test simulating the PUREX process and neptunium reduced to the V state, rendering it inextractable. Vanadium(V) was found to be effective in maintaining neptunium(VI) by adding it to a simulated irradiated nuclear fuel feed in 6 M nitric acid and to the scrub acid in the batch contact simulation of the PUREX process. Computer simulations of the PUREX process with a typical irradiated nuclear fuel in 6 M nitric acid as feed indicated little impact of the higher acid concentration on the behavior of fission products of moderate extractability. We plan to perform countercurrent tests of this modified PUREX process in the near future. (authors)

Arm, S.T.; Abrefah, J.; Lumetta, G.J.; Sinkov, S.I. [Battelle PNWD, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, PO Box 999, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2007-07-01

157

Modelling the material flow of recycling processes for aluminium alloys by means of technical recycling quotas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The amount of aluminium alloys used for different applications such as cars, packaging or buildings has risen considerably during the past 20 years. This will effect a growing amount of scrap being available for recycling in the future. The special properties of the metal aluminium require sophisticated processing of different types of aluminium containing material prior to re-melting and refining.

H. Hoberg; S. Wolf; J. Meier-Kortwig

158

Closed loop recycling of lead/acid batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The traditional lead/acid battery is a recycleable product, irrespective whether it is of an automotive, traction or standby design. The product benefits from the traditional lead metallurgy that has been developed for both primary (mines) and secondary (recycling) smelting. Secondary smelting accounts for 60% of total lead production in Europe, and this market lead the most effectively metal. In secondary smelters, scrapped batteries are crushed and smelted. The polypropylene from the boxes is recycled to produce secondary plastic for battery, automotive, or other miscellaneous uses. The lead metal is refined to be re-used in the battery industry. The acid is retreated. Recycling requires a collection network. The lead/acid battery benefits from the traditional collection network that has been established for scrap-iron and non-ferrous metal scrap. In Western Europe, the recycling rate for scrapped batteries is estimated to be 80 to 90%. All participants in the battery recycling loop agree that the process must be a clean cycle for it to be credible. The collection organization is improving the quality of storage and transportation, especially with regard to the acid that can only be neutralized in correctly-controlled facilities, generally located at the smelters. The smelters themselves tend, through local regulations, to run at the optimum level of protection of the environment.

Bied-Charreton, B.

159

Using Established Regulations to Recycle Contaminated Metals  

SciTech Connect

DOE restoration projects require acceptable standards for processing volumetrically contaminated metals: • NRC has no regulations addressing recycling of scrap metal containing residual volumetric radioactivity. • DOE is currently restricting outside radioactive scrap metal sales; however, previous Fernald and Ohio State clean-ups have released metals with measurable levels of radioactivity into the open market. • Public sensitivity to the subject of non-governmental disposal of materials with residual radioactivity was heightened with the Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) issue. There are no clear guidelines for free release of volumetrically contaminated material.

Loewen, Eric Paul

2000-09-01

160

Measurement of 137Cs in dust from steel scrap smelting  

PubMed

This paper deals with the measurement of 137Cs content in dust produced during steel scrap smelting and in the material produced from recycling the dust to recover the zinc oxide component. The measured samples have different densities and chemical compositions. The addition of radioactive standards to this kind of material to prepare a calibration standard is rather difficult. A theoretical analysis of the attenuation coefficient for this material together with its experimental measurement, show a linear relationship between the coefficient and density independent of chemical composition that allows the use of a soil sample to prepare calibration standards. An analysis of the validity of the method, as well as the development of a density correction factor is detailed. This factor is calculated incorporating the linear relationship between attenuation coefficient and density to the integral representing detection efficiency, and evaluating the integral by means of a Monte-Carlo program. PMID:10879835

Legarda; Herranz

2000-07-01

161

7 CFR 29.1029 - Leaf scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Flue-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 11, 12, 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1029 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of...

2010-01-01

162

AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

163

Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-12-01

164

Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included. (Contains a minimum of 83 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01

165

Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included. (Contains a minimum of 76 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-01-01

166

Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-11-01

167

Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01

168

Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01

169

Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01

170

Recycling, Inc.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggestions for creating a successful office recycling system are enumerated from start up plans to waste reduction and paper recycling. Contact information for recycling equipment, potential buyers of recycled materials, recycled products for purchase, and ideas for promotion and education of staff are included. (MCO)

Martin, Amy

1992-01-01

171

Process for removing and detoxifying cadmium from scrap metal including mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

Cadmium-bearing scrap from nuclear applications, such as neutron shielding and reactor control and safety rods, must usually be handled as mixed waste since it is radioactive and the cadmium in it is both leachable and highly toxic. Removing the cadmium from this scrap, and converting it to a nonleachable and minimally radioactive form, would greatly simplify disposal or recycling. A process now under development will do this by shredding the scrap; leaching it with reagents which selectively dissolve out the cadmium; reprecipitating the cadmium as its highly insoluble sulfide; then fusing the sulfide into a glassy matrix to bring its leachability below EPA limits before disposal. Alternatively, the cadmium may be recovered for reuse. A particular advantage of the process is that all reagents (except the glass frit) can easily be recovered and reused in a nearly closed cycle, minimizing the risk of radioactive release. The process does not harm common metals such as aluminum, iron and stainless steel, and is also applicable to non-nuclear cadmium-bearing scrap such as nickel-cadmium batteries.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-07-01

172

Recycling asphalt pavements. January 1975-January 1990 (a Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for January 1975-January 1990  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt-containing pavement materials. Articles include examples of recycling asphalt pavements; performance testing of recycled paving; methods including cold in-place, cold off-site, and hot-mix recycling; additives in recycled pavement for better performance; use of scrap roofing asphalt in conjunction with recycled paving; economics of recycling; process design; and process variables. Recycling of other materials is considered in related bibliographies. (Contains 130 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1990-03-01

173

40 CFR 63.10885 - What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? 63.10885 Section 63...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? (a) Metallic scrap management...are drained of free liquids. (b) Mercury requirements. For scrap...

2011-07-01

174

40 CFR 63.10885 - What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? 63.10885 Section 63...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? (a) Metallic scrap management...are drained of free liquids. (b) Mercury requirements. For scrap...

2010-07-01

175

40 CFR 63.10885 - What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? 63.10885 Section 63...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? (a) Metallic scrap management...are drained of free liquids. (b) Mercury requirements. For scrap...

2012-07-01

176

40 CFR 63.10885 - What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? 63.10885 Section 63...management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches? (a) Metallic scrap management...are drained of free liquids. (b) Mercury requirements. For scrap...

2013-07-01

177

Titanium recycling in the United States in 2004, chap. Y of Sibley, S.F., ed., Flow studies for recycling metal commodities in the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the titanium metal fraction of the titanium economy, which generates and uses titanium metal scrap in its operations. Data for 2004 were selected to demonstrate the titanium flows associated with these operations. This report includes a description of titanium metal supply and demand in the United States to illustrate the extent of titanium recycling and to identify recycling trends. In 2004, U.S. apparent consumption of titanium metal (contained in various titanium-bearing products) was 45,000 metric tons (t) of titanium, which was distributed as follows: 25,000 t of titanium recovered as new scrap, 9,000 t of titanium as titanium metal and titanium alloy products delivered to the U.S. titanium products reservoir, 7,000 t of titanium consumed by steelmaking and other industries, and 4,000 t of titanium contained in unwrought and wrought products exported. Titanium recycling is concentrated within the titanium metals sector of the total titanium market. The titanium market is otherwise dominated by pigment (titanium oxide) products, which generate dissipative losses instead of recyclable scrap. In 2004, scrap (predominantly new scrap) was the source of roughly 54 percent of the titanium metal content of U.S.-produced titanium metal products.

Goonan, Thomas G.

2010-01-01

178

THE ROLE OF HYDROMETALLURGY IN THE RECYCLING OF ZINC, COPPER AND LEAD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metals recycling remains an important industrial activity for both economic and environmental reasons, and the role of hydrometallurgical processing in the recycling of zinc, copper and lead is discussed. Hydrometallurgical processes are being developed to leach zinc from galvanized steel scrap prior to remelting, and both alkaline and acid leaching technologies are being evaluated to eliminate zinc from electric arc

179

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers\\/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and

B. J. Jody; E. J. Daniels; C. M. Duranceau; J. A. Pomykala; J. S. Spangenberger

2011-01-01

180

Waste-tire and shingle scrap/bituminous paving test sections on the Willard Munger recreational trail gateway segment. Interim report, 1990-91  

SciTech Connect

The need to reduce our states dependence on land fills resulted in a unique cooperative venture by three state agencies. A partnership was forged between the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) to investigate the use of recycled tire rubber and processed asphalt shingle scrap. The result is a two mile section of the Willard Munger Recreational Trail in St. Paul constructed with asphalt paving mixtures which contain varying percentages of recycled tire rubber and shingle scrap. Conventional mixing and paving equipment was utilized for construction. The application appears to be a viable alternative to landfilling these materials. However, costs for the mixtures containing rubber increased from 35% to 50% over the cost of the conventional mixture. Since the use of shingle scrap was negotiated by the private companies involved, no comparable cost data is available.

Turgeon, C.M.

1991-02-01

181

Scrap tire derived fuel: Markets and issues  

SciTech Connect

More than 250 million scrap tires are generated annually in the United States and their proper management continues to be a solid waste management concern. Sound markets for scrap tires are growing and are consuming an ever increasing percentage of annual generation, with market capacity reaching more than 75% of annual generation in 1996. Of the three major markets - fuel, civil engineering applications, and ground rubber markets - the use of tires as a fuel is by far the largest market. The major fuel users include cement kilns, pulp and paper mills, electrical generation facilities, and some industrial facilities. Current issues that may impact the tire fuel market include continued public concern over the use of tires as fuels, the new EPA PM 2.5 standard, possible additional Clean Air emissions standards, access to adequate supplies of scrap tires, quality of processed tire derived fuel, and the possibility of creating a commodity market through the development of ASTM TDF standards.

Serumgard, J. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-01

182

Responsible recycling  

SciTech Connect

The issues that affect the recycling of lead-acid batteries and the challenges that this issue brings to both the lead industry and to the battery manufacturers are covered. Topics include the lead market (its size and structure), the economic constraints on the recycling system, recycling rates for batteries, the technology of recycling, and future considerations.

Pugh, A. (Britannia Refined Metals, Northfleet (United Kingdom))

1993-05-01

183

Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (Contains a minimum of 160 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01

184

Updated 9/23/2010 HOW TO RECYCLE  

E-print Network

and Film · Photographic Slides · Photographs · Pipette Tip Boxes · Pizza Delivery Boxes · Plastic Bags · Plastic Bottles & Jars · Plastic Film · Plywood · Printer/Copier Components · Refrigerators · Scrap Metal (Styrofoam PEANUTS will continue to be recycled in the large hallway bags). Whenever you have Styrofoam

Clark, John

185

Silver recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2000, the global silver supply deficit (the difference between mine and scrap supply and silver demand) was more than 3,000 metric tons. U.S. silver demand for photographic applications alone was nearly equal to annual U.S. silver production. Until 1968, the U.S. silver deficit was filled by withdrawals from the U.S. Treasury reserves. In 2000, the deficit was filled by destocking, imports, and recycling. Photographic wastes, spent catalysts, and electronic scrap are the major sources of materials for silver recycling. Nearly 1,800 metric tons of silver contained in these materials were available for recycling in 2000. Other recyclable silver-bearing materials include dental alloys, jewelry, and silverware. In 2000, an estimated 1,700 tons of silver were recovered from secondary sources in the United States. The U.S. recycling efficiency for old scrap was calculated to have been 97 percent in 2000; the recycling rate was estimated to be 32 percent.

Hilliard, Henry E.

2003-01-01

186

Silver Recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2000, the global silver supply deficit (the difference between mine and scrap supply and silver demand) was more than 3,000 metric tons. U.S. silver demand for photographic applications alone was nearly equal to annual U.S. silver production. Until 1968, the U.S. silver deficit was filled by withdrawals from the U.S. Treasury reserves. In 2000, the deficit was filled by destocking, imports, and recycling. Photographic wastes, spent catalysts, and electronic scrap are the major sources of materials for silver recycling. Nearly 1,800 tons of silver contained in these materials were available for recycling in 2000. Other recyclable silver-bearing materials include dental alloys, jewelry, and silverware. In 2000, an estimated 1,700 tons of silver were recovered from secondary sources in the United States. The U.S. recycling efficiency for old scrap was calculated to have been 97 percent in 2000; the recycling rate was estimated to be 32 percent.

Hilliard, Henry E.

2003-01-01

187

Recycling: General studies. January 1987-November 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data-Base). Rept. for Jan 87-Nov 91  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 177 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-10-01

188

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01

189

Modeling of Scrap Heating by Burners  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficiency and productivity of Electric Arc Furnace steelmaking has improved with a number of new technologies. One of these is the use of oxy-fuel burners to assist the electric heating. Initially burners were just used to melt the scrap at the slag door where arc heating is inefficient. At present virtually all modern EAF use oxy-fuels burners to decrease

Kamalesh Mandal

2010-01-01

190

Design and Optimization of Photovoltaics Recycling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

With the growing production and installation of photovoltaics (PV) around the world constrained by the limited availability of resources, end-of-life management of PV is becoming very important. A few major PV manufacturers currently are operating several PV recycling technologies at the process level. The management of the total recycling infrastructure, including reverse-logistics planning, is being started in Europe. In this paper, we overview the current status of photovoltaics recycling planning and discuss our mathematic modeling of the economic feasibility and the environmental viability of several PV recycling infrastructure scenarios in Germany; our findings suggest the optimum locations of the anticipated PV take-back centers. Short-term 5-10 year planning for PV manufacturing scraps is the focus of this article. Although we discuss the German situation, we expect the generic model will be applicable to any region, such as the whole of Europe and the United States.

Choi, J.K.; Fthenakis, V.

2010-10-01

191

S. 396: This Act may be cited as the Tire Recycling Incentives Act, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, February 7, 1991  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to encourage greater recycling of scrap tires. Americans generate more than 250 million scrap tires annually, of which less than 30% are recycled. Every year, 84.5% of these scrap tires are landfilled, stockpiled, or illegally dumped. This bill was introduced into the Senate of the United States on Feb. 7, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act. One purpose of this legislation is to require producers and importers of tires to recycle a certain percentage of scrap tires each year. In addition, the administrator of the EPA is required to establish a recycling credit system for carrying out these recycling requirement, and to establish a management and tracking system for such tires.

Not Available

1991-01-01

192

Aluminum recycling in the automotive industry. (Latest citations from the Aluminum Industry Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning design and development of processes to recycle aluminum from automobiles. Scrap separation, shredding, and processing are covered including new equipment. Aluminum market information is included with respect to material selection for automobiles and new products developed from recycled material. References also discuss changes in automobile design to increase recycling oppertunities. (Contains a minimum of 107 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-06-01

193

Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling  

SciTech Connect

Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

Lee, C.H. [Da-Yeh Univ., Chang-Hwa (Taiwan, Province of China)

1998-12-31

194

Selenium Recycling in the United States in 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The vast majority of selenium consumption in the United States is in dissipative uses, such as alloys, animal feeds, fertilizers, glass decolorizer, and pigments. The nondissipative use as a photoreceptor for xerographic copiers is declining. As a result of a lack of a substantial supply of selenium-containing scrap, there are no longer selenium recycling facilities in the United States. Selenium-containing materials collected for recycling, primarily selenium-containing photocopier drums, are exported for processing in other countries. Of the estimated 350 metric tons (t) of selenium products that went to the U.S. market in 2004, an estimated 300 t went to dissipative uses. An estimated 4 t was recovered from old scrap and exported for recycling.

George, Micheal W.; Wagner, Lorie A.

2009-01-01

195

RECYCLING TODAY  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We have probably heard of recycling but what is it really and why is it so improtant to do? Please answer the questions below as well as visiting the different websites to explore what recycling really is. Form groups of 4 and explore the following websites as well as answer the questions which follow. The first website is of Recycle City where you will be exploring the City and how they recycle. Recyle City Why Recycling is Important Now please answer the following questions on paper. 1. What are the 3 R's? Explain in further ...

Smith, Miss

2010-12-03

196

Single Stream Recycling is coming to UNH campus wide! The Facilities Division along with departmental representatives from the Sustainability Institute,  

E-print Network

in the cart. *Pizza boxes (with greasy liner removed) Tin/aluminum, scrap metal Examples include: ` Items-mingled for collection and removal from campus. Sorting will take place off site. The goal is to make recycling so easy and educational institutions. Single Stream Recycling Guidelines Container preparation * Remove all plastic bags

New Hampshire, University of

197

Recycled materials in asphalt pavements, January 1980-June 1991 (citations from the NTIS database). Rept. for Jan 80-Jun 91  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (The bibliography contains 75 citations.) (Also includes title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-06-01

198

Process for removing cadmium from scrap metal  

DOEpatents

A process for the recovery of a metal, in particular, cadmium contained in scrap, in a stable form. The process comprises the steps of mixing the cadmium-containing scrap with an ammonium carbonate solution, preferably at least a stoichiometric amount of ammonium carbonate, and/or free ammonia, and an oxidizing agent to form a first mixture so that the cadmium will react with the ammonium carbonate to form a water-soluble ammine complex; evaporating the first mixture so that ammine complex dissociates from the first mixture leaving carbonate ions to react with the cadmium and form a second mixture that includes cadmium carbonate; optionally adding water to the second mixture to form a third mixture; adjusting the pH of the third mixture to the acid range whereby the cadmium carbonate will dissolve; and adding at least a stoichiometric amount of sulfide, preferably in the form of hydrogen sulfide or an aqueous ammonium sulfide solution, to the third mixture to precipitate cadmium sulfide. This mixture of sulfide is then preferably digested by heating to facilitate precipitation of large particles of cadmium sulfide. The scrap may be divided by shredding or breaking up to exposure additional surface area. Finally, the precipitated cadmium sulfide can be mixed with glass formers and vitrified for permanent disposal.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-01-01

199

S. 2462: This Act may be cited as the Tire Recycling Incentives Act of 1990. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, April 19, 1990  

SciTech Connect

S. 2462 is a bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to require the producers and importers of tires to recycle a certain percentage of scrap tires each year, to require the Environmental Protection Agency to establish a recycling credit system for carrying out such recycling requirement, to establish a management and tracking system for such tires, and for other purposes.

Not Available

1990-01-01

200

H. R. 4147: This Act may be cited as the Tire Recycling Incentives Act of 1990. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, February 28, 1990  

SciTech Connect

H.R. 4147 is a bill to amend the Solid Waste disposal Act to require the producers and importers of tires to recycle a certain percentage of scrap tires each year, to require the Environmental Protection Agency to establish a recycling credit system for carrying out such recycling requirement, to establish a management and tracking system for such tires, and for other purposes.

Not Available

1990-01-01

201

Outlook for recycling large and small batteries in the future  

SciTech Connect

Although there are many kinds and varieties of batteries, batteries can be subdivided into two basic types, large lead-acid batteries and small disposable batteries. Small cells contain different metals depending upon the configuration. These materials include iron, zinc, nickel, cadmium, manganese, mercury, silver, and potassium. Recycling these materials is not economically attractive. Most small batteries are thrown away and constitute a small fraction of municipal solid waste (perhaps 1/10%). There is no effective energy savings or economic incentive for recycling and, with the exception of Ni-Cad batteries, no significant environmental incentive. Any recycle scheme would require a significant reward (probably financial) to the consumer for returning the scrap battery. Without a reward, recovery is unlikely. Large batteries of the lead-acid type are composed of lead, acid, and plastic. There is an established recycle mechanism for lead-acid batteries which works quite well. The regulations written under the Hazardous and Solid Waste Disposal Amendments (1985) favor more recycling efforts by scrap metal operators. The reason for this is that recycled batteries are exempt from EPA regulation. If batteries are not recycled, any generator disposing of 6 or more batteries per month is required to have a special EPA license or premit. Currently, working against this incentive is a decreasing demand and low market price for lead which affects waste battery salvage.

Dodds, J.; Goldsberry, J.

1986-03-01

202

40 CFR 63.10885 - What are my management practices for metallic scrap and mercury switches?  

...a) Metallic scrap management program. ...to ensure the proper management of the mercury switches...throughout the scrap supply chain the need to promote...throughout the scrap supply chain the need to...

2014-07-01

203

40 CFR 63.10685 - What are the requirements for the control of contaminants from scrap?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...contains scrap from motor vehicle bodies, engine blocks, oil filters, oily...contains scrap from motor vehicle bodies, engine blocks, oil filters, oily turnings...post-consumer oil filters, or oily...does not apply to motor vehicle scrap...

2010-07-01

204

40 CFR 63.10685 - What are the requirements for the control of contaminants from scrap?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...contains scrap from motor vehicle bodies, engine blocks, oil filters, oily...contains scrap from motor vehicle bodies, engine blocks, oil filters, oily turnings...post-consumer oil filters, or oily...does not apply to motor vehicle scrap...

2011-07-01

205

Recycling production designs: the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an intermediate recycling facility that can reprocess the secondary materials into a liquid product Two downstream aluminum remelters will incorporate the liquid products into their aluminum alloy production schedules. Energy and environmental benefits result from delivering the products as liquid but coordination challenges persist because of the energy cost to maintain the liquid. Further coordination challenges result from the necessity to establish a long term recycling production plan in the presence of long term downstream aluminum remelter production uncertainty and inherent variation in the daily order schedule of the downstream aluminum remelters. In this context a fundamental question arises, considering the metallurgical complexities of dross reprocessing, what is the value of operating a coordinated set of by-product reprocessing plants and remelting cast houses? A methodology is presented to calculate the optimal recycling center production parameters including 1) the number of recycled products, 2) the volume of recycled products, 3) allocation of recycled materials across recycled products, 4) allocation of recycled products across finished alloys, 4) the level of flexibility for the recycling center to operate. The methods implemented include, 1) an optimization model to describe the long term operations of the recycling center, 2) an uncertainty simulation tool, 3) a simulation optimization method, 4) a dynamic simulation tool with four embedded daily production optimization models of varying degrees of flexibility. This methodology is used to quantify the performance of several recycling center production designs of varying levels of coordination and flexibility. This analysis allowed the identification of the optimal recycling center production design based on maximizing liquid recycled product incorporation and minimizing cast sows. The long term production optimization model was used to evaluate the theoretical viability of the proposed two stage scrap and aluminum dross reprocessing operation including the impact of reducing coordination on model performance. Reducing the coordination between the recycling center and downstream remelters by reducing the number of recycled products from ten to five resulted in only 1.3% less secondary materials incorporated into downstream production. The dynamic simulation tool was used to evaluate the performance of the calculated recycling center production plan when resolved on a daily timeframe for varying levels of operational flexibility. The dynamic simulation revealed the optimal performance corresponded to the fixed recipe with flexible production daily optimization model formulation. Calculating recycled product characteristics using the proposed simulation optimization method increased profitability in cases of uncertain downstream remelter production and expensive aluminum dross and post-consumed secondary materials. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

Brommer, Tracey H.

206

Pyrolysis of scrap tyres with zeolite USY.  

PubMed

A zeolite catalyst of ultrastable Y-type (USY) was investigated in the research of two staged pyrolysis-catalysis of scrap tyres. Scrap tyres were pyrolysed in a fixed bed reactor and the evolved pyrolysis gases were passed through a secondary catalytic reactor. The main objective of this paper was to investigate the effect of zeolite USY on the yield of products and the composition of derived oil. The influences of several parameters such as pyrolysis temperature, catalytic temperature, catalyst/tyre ratio, heating rate, etc. on the yield of the derived oil, char and gas were investigated. It showed that the increase of catalytic temperature and catalyst/tyre ratio resulted in high yield of gas at the expense of the oil yield. For example, when the catalyst/tyre ratio increased from 0.25 to 1.0, the yield of gas increased from 30.5 to 49.9 wt.%, and the oil yield decreased nearly two-fold from 31.6 to 12.7 wt.%. The concentration of light naphtha (boiling point < 160 degrees C) was also investigated in this study. And the high catalyst/tyre ratio favored to increase the concentration of light naphtha (< 160 degrees C) in oil. In order to study the composition of derived oil, a distilled fraction (< 280 degrees C), which was 92.5 wt.% of the oil obtained from catalytic pyrolysis of scrap tyre at a pyrolysis temperature, catalytic temperature and catalyst/tyre ratio of 500, 400 degrees C and 0.5, respectively, was analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The distillate was found to contain 1.23 wt.% benzene, 9.35 wt.% toluene, 3.68 wt.% ethylbenzene, 12.64 wt.% xylenes, 1.81 wt.% limonene and 13.89 wt.% PAHs, etc., where the single ring aromatics represented a significant potential use as chemicals. PMID:16704900

Shen, Boxiong; Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Rui; Guo, Binbin; Liang, Cai

2006-09-21

207

Recycling batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hundreds of millions of large and billions of small batteries are used up annually in the service of all manner of electronic devices. Until recently, the tons of toxic materials in these batteries would wind up in the garbage, but the systematic collection and recycling of spent batteries is growing. Effective recycling involves changes at all stages of battery life,

F. C. McMichael; C. Henderson

1998-01-01

208

Major issues associated with DOE commercial recycling initiatives  

SciTech Connect

Major initiatives are underway within DOE to recycle large volumes of scrap material generated during cleanup of the DOE Weapons Complex. These recycling initiatives are driven not only by the desire to conserve natural resources, but also by the recognition that shallow level burial is not a politically acceptable option. The Fernald facility is in the vanguard of a number of major DOE recycling efforts. These early efforts have brought issues to light that can have a major impact on the ability of Fernald and other major DOE sites to expand recycling efforts in the future. Some of these issues are; secondary waste deposition, title to material and radioactive contaminants, mixed waste generated during recycling, special nuclear material possession limits, cost benefit, transportation of waste to processing facilities, release criteria, and uses for beneficially reused products.

Motl, G.P.; Burns, D.D. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rast, D.M. [USDOE Fernald Field Office, OH (United States)

1994-07-27

209

46 CFR 148.265 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 148.265 Section 148.265 Shipping ...Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.265 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) This part does not...

2012-10-01

210

49 CFR 173.218 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 173.218 Section 173.218 Transportation...Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.218 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) Except as provided in...

2011-10-01

211

49 CFR 173.218 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 173.218 Section 173.218 Transportation...Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.218 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) Except as provided in...

2013-10-01

212

49 CFR 173.218 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 173.218 Section 173.218 Transportation...Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.218 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) Except as provided in...

2012-10-01

213

46 CFR 148.265 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 148.265 Section 148.265 Shipping ...Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.265 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) This part does not...

2011-10-01

214

46 CFR 148.265 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 148.265 Section 148.265 Shipping ...Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.265 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) This part does not...

2013-10-01

215

49 CFR 173.218 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 173.218 Section 173.218 Transportation...Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.218 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) Except as provided in...

2010-10-01

216

46 CFR 148.265 - Fish meal or fish scrap.  

...Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fish meal or fish scrap. 148.265 Section 148.265 Shipping ...Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.265 Fish meal or fish scrap. (a) This part does not...

2014-10-01

217

Chemical State of Complex Uranium Oxides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report here the first direct observation of U(V) in uranium binary oxides and analyze the gradual conversion of the U oxidation state in the mixed uranium systems. Our finding clarifies previous contradicting results and provides important input for the geological disposal of spent fuel, recycling applications, and chemistry of uranium species.

Kvashnina, K. O.; Butorin, S. M.; Martin, P.; Glatzel, P.

2013-12-01

218

Scrap tire reuse through surface-modification technology  

SciTech Connect

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing a novel approach for reusing scrap tire rubber. The process involves the combination of scrap tire rubber particles with other materials to form higher value and higher performance composites. The process begins by grinding scrap tire to a fine particle size, and removing steel and fabric. The key to this approach is a proprietary surface-modification step which is critical for enhancing the compatibility with and bonding to other continuous phase matrix materials. Of all approaches for scrap tire rubber reuse, this approach offers the potential to recover (or save) the greatest amount of energy. Furthermore, this is the only approach which is clearly economically viable with current pricing and without a scrap tire tax. The process is environmentally innocuous, and capital requirements for large scale processing plants are projected to be modest. 7 figs.

Bauman, B.D.

1991-01-01

219

Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. October 1973-November 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for October 1973-November 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt-pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (Contains 110 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-12-01

220

Extreme Recycling  

E-print Network

Broadcast Transcript: Singing the recycling blues because you have to separate your chipboard from your newspaper, your steel from your aluminum, your #1 from your #2 plastic? Pantywaists! The residents of Kamikatsu, Japan have no fewer than 34...

Hacker, Randi

2009-01-14

221

Ideas: Recycling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents classroom ideas focusing on connections among mathematics, concern for the environment, and conservation of natural resources, including decomposition, water conservation, packaging materials, use of manufactured cans, and recycling. Includes reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

Chessin, Debby A.; And Others

1994-01-01

222

Recycle City  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recycling made fun. The Environmental Protection Agency's Recycle City Web site offers students an interactive way to learn how recycling can affect their environment. Users can click any part of the cartoon drawing of the city to learn about that particular building or site and what can be done to decrease waste. The site also contains a more involved exercise called the Dumptown game, where visitors click on City Hall to view various recycling programs and choose the program(s) the city will implement. Once implemented, that activity can be seen taking place in Dumptown. Although the Dumptown exercise may require the help of a teacher to navigate for younger students, both exercises are excellent for K-12 teachers and students.

1997-01-01

223

Potential Application of Recycled Rubber in Oil Pollution Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The abundance and indiscriminate disposal of scrap tyres inurban areas in Nigeria create serious health and environmentalproblems. The potential of using rubber recycled from scraptyres as an absorbent in crude oil clean up was investigated.Rubber particles of mesh sizes within the range of 0.15 to2.36 mm were used to absorb crude oil at different temperatures(5 to 40 °C). The rapid

F. A. Aisien; F. K. Hymore; R. O. Ebewele

2003-01-01

224

Batteries: Disposal, recycling and recovery. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the environmental problems caused by discarded batteries. Citations examine improved collection methods which could enable more batteries to be recycled; recovery of toxic substances such as lead, cadmium, and mercury from scrap batteries; and design of batteries which contain little or no heavy metals. The remediation of contaminated soils, and legislation requiring safe battery disposal or recycling are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 57 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01

225

Batteries: Disposal, recycling and recovery. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the environmental problems caused by discarded batteries. Citations examine improved collection methods which could enable more batteries to be recycled; recovery of toxic substances such as lead, cadmium, and mercury from scrap batteries; and design of batteries which contain little or no heavy metals. The remediation of contaminated soils, and legislation requiring safe battery disposal or recycling are discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01

226

Batteries: Disposal, recycling and recovery. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the environmental problems caused by discarded batteries. Citations examine improved collection methods which could enable more batteries to be recycled; recovery of toxic substances such as lead, cadmium, and mercury from scrap batteries; and design of batteries which contain little or no heavy metals. The remediation of contaminated soils, and legislation requiring safe battery disposal or recycling are discussed.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01

227

Batteries: Disposal, recycling and recovery. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the environmental problems caused by discarded batteries. Citations examine improved collection methods which could enable more batteries to be recycled; recovery of toxic substances such as lead, cadmium, and mercury from scrap batteries; and design of batteries which contain little or no heavy metals. The remediation of contaminated soils, and legislation requiring safe battery disposal or recycling are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 58 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01

228

U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

1998-05-01

229

Reducing the solid waste stream: reuse and recycling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) increased its solid waste diversion by 365 percent over FY 1992 in five solid waste categories - paper, cardboard, wood, metals, and miscellaneous. (LLNL`s fiscal year is from October 1 to September 30.) LLNL reused\\/ recycled 6,387 tons of waste, including 340 tons of paper, 455 tons of scrap wood,

1997-01-01

230

Impact of materials and design changes on the recycling of automobiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current and prospective changes in automotive materials and design will in time affect the recycling of discarded automobiles. These changes are already altering the pattern of materials consumption and process-scrap generation in terms of size reduction, the use of ferrous metals, aluminum, plastics and composites, as well as of some other materials that will be used in future automobiles. Likely

1980-01-01

231

SCRAP BEING FED INTO HARRIS TGS200 BALER. BLOCKS OF COMPACTED ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

SCRAP BEING FED INTO HARRIS TGS-200 BALER. BLOCKS OF COMPACTED SCRAP, CALLED "CABBAGES", ARE MELTED DOWN IN THE CAST SHOP,ALONG WITH RAW METAL AND ALLOYS. BALED SCRAP MELTS MORE RAPIDLY THAN LOOSE SCRAP. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

232

Textile recycling  

SciTech Connect

The most common household textiles include clothing, linens, draperies, carpets, shoes, handbags, and rugs. Old clothing, of course, is the most readily reused and/or recycled residentially generated textile category. State and/or local mandates to recycle a percentage of the waste stream are providing the impetus to add new materials to existing collection programs. Concurrently, the textile industry is aggressively trying to increase its throughput by seeking new sources of material to meet increased world demand for product. As experienced with drop-off programs for traditional materials, a majority of residents will not recycle materials unless the collection programs are convenient, i.e., curbside collection. The tonnage of marketable textiles currently being landfilled provide evidence of this. It is the authors' contention that if textile recycling is made convenient and accessible to every household in a municipality or region, then the waste stream disposed may be reduced in a similar fashion as when traditional recyclables are included in curbside programs.

Jablonowski, E. (Killam Associates, Millburn, NJ (United States)); Carlton, J.

1995-01-01

233

Vanadium recycling in the United States in 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of vanadium in the U.S. economy in 2004. This report includes a description of vanadium supply and demand in the United States and illustrates the extent of vanadium recycling and recycling trends. In 2004, apparent vanadium consumption, by end use, in the United States was 3,820 metric tons (t) in steelmaking and 232 t in manufacturing, of which 17 t was for the production of superalloys and 215 t was for the production of other alloys, cast iron, catalysts, and chemicals. Vanadium use in steel is almost entirely dissipative because recovery of vanadium from steel scrap is chemically impeded under the oxidizing conditions in steelmaking furnaces. The greatest amount of vanadium recycling is in the superalloy, other-alloy, and catalyst sectors of the vanadium market. Vanadium-bearing catalysts are associated with hydrocarbon recovery and refining in the oil industry. In 2004, 2,850 t of vanadium contained in alloy scrap and spent catalysts was recycled, which amounted to about 44 percent of U.S. domestic production. About 94 percent of vanadium use in the United States was dissipative (3,820 t in steel/4,050 t in steel+fabricated products).

Goonan, Thomas G.

2011-01-01

234

Energy implications of glass-container recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01

235

INEL metal recycle annual report, FY-94  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, the mission of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was changed from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to development of technologies for conditioning of spent nuclear fuels and other high-level wastes for disposal in a geologic repository. In addition, the Department of Energy (DOE) directed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a program plan addressing the management of radioactive contaminated scrap metal (RSM) within the DOE complex. Based on discussions with the EM-30 organization, the INEL Metal Recycle program plan was developed to address all issues of RSM management. Major options considered for RSM management were engineered interim storage, land disposal as low-level waste, and beneficial reuse/recycle. From its inception, the Metal Recycle program has emphasized avoidance of storage and disposal costs through beneficial reuse of RSM. The Metal Recycle program plan includes three major activities: Site-by-site inventory of RSM resources; validation of technologies for conversion of RSM to usable products; and identification of parties prepared to participate in development of a RSM recycle business.

Bechtold, T.E. [ed.

1994-09-01

236

Nutritional characterisation of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) P. Kumm. produced using paper scraps as substrate.  

PubMed

Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) P. Kumm. is the third most produced edible mushroom worldwide, due to its ability to colonise and degrade a large variety of lignocellulosic substrates. Therefore, the objective of this work was to evaluate the chemical composition of fruiting bodies of P. ostreatus grown on blank and printed paper substrates, in comparison with samples grown on oat straw (control). The nutritional properties of the control sample were similar to values reported in the literature, while the chemical composition of the samples obtained using paper scraps, either blank or printed, was highly satisfactory. The results obtained validated the nutritional characteristics of the samples, highlighting a profitable means to recycle paper. PMID:25236243

Fernandes, Ângela; Barros, Lillian; Martins, Anabela; Herbert, Paulo; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

2015-02-15

237

U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. The Center has gotten off to a fast start. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-12 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer software, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, produce pollution prevention information and documentation, manage their materials inventory, produce independent government estimates, and implement sale/service contracts. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrap yard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums. Members of the Center look forward to working with all DOE sites, regulatory authorities, the private sector, and other stakeholders to achieve the metals recycle goals.

Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L. [Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

1998-06-01

238

46 CFR Sec. 12 - Disposition of removed equipment and scrap.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 12 Disposition of removed equipment and scrap. (a) Article 8 of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract provides that any ship equipment,...

2013-10-01

239

Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap  

DOEpatents

Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA)

1992-12-29

240

Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap  

DOEpatents

Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

1992-12-29

241

Properties of concrete containing scrap-tire rubber – an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid waste management is one of the major environmental concerns in the United States. Over 5 billion tons of non-hazardous solid waste materials are generated in USA each year. Of these, more than 270 million scrap-tires (approximately 3.6 million tons) are generated each year. In addition to this, about 300 million scrap-tires have been stockpiled. Several studies have been carried

Rafat Siddique; Tarun R. Naik

2004-01-01

242

Integrated steel producers race the recycling clock  

SciTech Connect

When classed as waste, the leftover oxides of blast furnaces and oxygen furnaces must go into landfill. That is an expensive option. Assuming there is space and permission for land disposal, this may be only a temporary solution. Finally, there is an economic incentive to replace some amount of scrap with the iron units in waste. The various factors have brought a concerted recycling push. With increased use of galvanized scrap, a growing portion of the waste is zinc coated. Unlike electric furnace dust, the waste from blast furnaces and oxygen furnaces doesn`t have enough zinc to be classed as hazardous. In theory, repeated cycling will concentrate the zinc but there is uncertainty about what actually happens. There are ways to remove zinc from waste, however, favorable economics have tended to require high concentrations of zinc. New processes and conditions could change the economic equation. The ultimate answer to recycling could be a facility specifically designed for converting waste into usable metal.

McManus, G.J.

1996-01-01

243

Recycling of gold from electronics: Cost-effective use through ‘Design for Recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

With over 300 tonnes of gold used in electronics each year, end-of-life electronic equipment offers an important recycling\\u000a potential for the secondary supply of gold. With gold concentrations reaching 300-350 g\\/t for mobile phone handsets and 200-250\\u000a g\\/t for computer circuit boards, this “urban mine” is significantly richer than what is available in primary ores.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a However, the “mineralogy” in scrap

Christian Hagelüken; Christopher W Corti

2010-01-01

244

Endocytic recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

After endocytosis, most membrane proteins and lipids return to the cell surface, but some membrane components are delivered to late endosomes or the Golgi. We now understand that the pathways taken by internalized molecules that eventually recycle to the cell surface can be surprisingly complex and can involve a series of sorting events that occur in several organelles. The molecular

Frederick R. Maxfield; Timothy E. McGraw

2004-01-01

245

Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment  

SciTech Connect

Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanyder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

1994-03-01

246

Steel Recycling Institute (SRI)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Steel Recycling Institute (SRI) provides information and statistics on steel recycling; it was founded by a group of steel companies and the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Originally a grassroots effort focused only on the recycling of steel cans, the SRI now promotes the recycling of all steel products. The SRI homepage provides online access to its three publications, The Dockside Recycler, The Recycling Magnet, and The Appliance Recycler. Recycling information is divided into four categories: cans, cars, appliances, and construction material. Users can use the recycling database to find the nearest steel recycling location. Links provides a large list of both commercial and non-commercial steel sites.

1998-01-01

247

Value analysis of neodymium content in shredder feed: toward enabling the feasibility of rare earth magnet recycling.  

PubMed

In order to facilitate the development of recycling technologies for rare earth magnets from postconsumer products, we present herein an analysis of the neodymium (Nd) content in shredder scrap. This waste stream has been chosen on the basis of current business practices for the recycling of steel, aluminum, and copper from cars and household appliances, which contain significant amounts of rare earth magnets. Using approximations based on literature data, we have calculated the average Nd content in the ferrous shredder product stream to be between 0.13 and 0.29 kg per ton of ferrous scrap. A value analysis considering rare earth metal prices between 2002 and 2013 provides values between $1.32 and $145 per ton of ferrous scrap for this material, if recoverable as pure Nd metal. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the content and value of other rare earths (Pr, Dy, Tb). PMID:24934194

Bandara, H M Dhammika; Darcy, Julia W; Apelian, Diran; Emmert, Marion H

2014-06-17

248

Precipitation Recycling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

1996-01-01

249

REGULATIONS ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE DISPOSAL AND RECYCLING.  

SciTech Connect

Environmental regulations can have a significant impact on product use, disposal, and recycling. This report summarizes the basic aspects of current federal, state and international regulations which apply to end-of-life photovoltaic (PV) modules and PV manufacturing scrap destined for disposal or recycling. It also discusses proposed regulations for electronics that may set the ground of what is to be expected in this area in the near future. In the US, several states have started programs to support the recycling of electronic equipment, and materials destined for recycling often are excepted from solid waste regulations during the collection, transfer, storage and processing stages. California regulations are described separately because they are different from those of most other states. International agreements on the movement of waste between different countries may pose barriers to cross-border shipments. Currently waste moves freely among country members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and between the US and the four countries with which the US has bilateral agreements. However, it is expected, that the US will adopt the rules of the Basel Convention (an agreement which currently applies to 128 countries but not the US) and that the Convection's waste classification system will influence the current OECD waste-handling system. Some countries adopting the Basel Convention consider end-of-life electronics to be hazardous waste, whereas the OECD countries consider them to be non-hazardous. Also, waste management regulations potentially affecting electronics in Germany and Japan are mentioned in this report.

FTHENAKIS,V.

2001-01-29

250

Computer Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Given current rates of computer consumerism and technological advances, one might expect to find a lot of computers out there in the world. What happens to these old computers? This Topic in Depth explores this issue, reviews some options for recycling computers, and provides tips for anyone considering purchasing a refurbished computer. The first article from BBC News (1) reports on research which suggests that "the number of personal computers worldwide is expected to double by 2010 to 1.3 billion machines." The second article from Oasis, a project of the Irish eGovernment initiative, (2) reviews some of the issues surrounding waste from electrical and electronic equipment. This next article from PC World (3) gives some ideas for how to dispose of an old notebook computer. One option, of course, is to donate your notebook, which is discussed in this article from Tech Soup (4). Another resource for information on computer recycling and reuse is this website from CompuMentor (5). Given the current market for computers, many are considering refurbished computers. This article from Vnunet (6 ) explains what a refurbished computer is while the next website provides some tips for buying a refurbished computer (7 ). Finally, this article from About.com reports on the recently introduced National Computer Recycling Act (8).

251

Radiation survey of aircraft and heavy machinery scrap.  

PubMed

This study was conducted primarily to survey aircraft and heavy machinery at 30 locations within Khartoum State using handheld radiation survey meters to detect and identify any radiation sources that might be present and to estimate radiation dose levels. The survey has resulted in detection of 16 sealed sources of (90)Sr and one of (226)Ra in aircraft scrap. Of course, (90)Sr sources are used in military aircraft as temperature sensors while (226)Ra is used for indicating fuel levels. These sources were found intact without spreading radioactivity contamination; however, none was detected in heavy machine scrap. The levels of radiation dose measured at 0.1m from the source fall within the range of 25.1-40.2 ?Sv/h with an average value of 33.52 ± 4.06 ?Sv/h. These orphan sources have been separated from the scrap, tested for possible leakage, conditioned and stored in waste management facility. The result of this study has revealed without doubt that the scrap constitute a serious source of public exposure and highlights the importance of legislation making radiation monitoring of scrap in the country mandatory before it is sold to metal industry for reprocessing. PMID:23041388

Idriss, Hajo; Salih, Isam; Gumaa, Elsadig; Yassin, Abbas; Yousif, E H; Abdel Hamid, Saad Eldeen M; Sam, A K

2012-12-01

252

Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes  

ScienceCinema

Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

None

2013-04-19

253

Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes  

SciTech Connect

Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

None

2012-01-01

254

Model institutional infrastructures for recycling of photovoltaic modules  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes model approaches to designing an institutional infrastructure for the recycling of decommissioned photovoltaic modules; more detailed discussion of the information presented in this paper is contained in Reaven et al., (1996)[1]. The alternative approaches are based on experiences in other industries, with other products and materials. In the aluminum, scrap iron, and container glass industries, where recycling is a long-standing, even venerable practice, predominantly private, fully articulated institutional infrastructures exist. Nevertheless, even in these industries, arrangements are constantly evolving in response to regulatory changes, competition, and new technological developments. Institutional infrastructures are less settled for younger large- scale recycling industries that target components of the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream, such as cardboard and newspaper, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) plastics, and textiles. In these industries the economics, markets, and technologies are rapidly changing. Finally, many other industries are developing projects to ensure that their products are recycled (and recyclable) e.g., computers, non-automotive batteries, communications equipment, motor and lubrication oil and oil filters, fluorescent lighting fixtures, automotive plastics and shredder residues, and bulk industrial chemical wastes. The lack of an an adequate recycling infrastructure, attractive end-markets, and clear the economic incentives, can be formidable impediments to a self- sustaining recycling system.

Moscowitz, P.D.; Reaven, J.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1996-07-01

255

Green Science: Revisiting Recycling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling

Palliser, Janna

2011-01-01

256

Recycling Lesson Plans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains lesson plans about recycling for teachers in grades K-12. Titles include: (1) "Waste--Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?" (2) "Litter Detectives," (3) "Classroom Paper Recycling," (4) "Recycling Survey," (5) "Disposal and Recycling Costs," (6) "Composting Project," (7) Used Motor Oil Recycling," (8) "Unwrapping…

Pennsylvania State Dept. of Environmental Resources, Harrisburg.

257

40 CFR 63.10685 - What are the requirements for the control of contaminants from scrap?  

...and the need to ensure the proper management of the mercury switches removed...suppliers throughout the scrap supply chain the need to promote the removal...suppliers throughout the scrap supply chain the need to promote the...

2014-07-01

258

Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method  

DOEpatents

Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

1992-02-11

259

Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method  

DOEpatents

Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA); Lincoln, Lanny P. (Woodward, IA)

1992-02-11

260

Long-term strategies for increased recycling of automotive aluminum and its alloying elements.  

PubMed

Aluminum recycling currently occurs in a cascading fashion, where some alloys, used in a limited number of applications, absorb most of the end-of-life scrap. An expected increase in scrap supply in coming decades necessitates restructuring of the aluminum cycle to open up new recycling paths for alloys and avoid a potential scrap surplus. This paper explores various interventions in end-of-life management and recycling of automotive aluminum, using a dynamic substance flow analysis model of aluminum and its alloying elements with resolution on component and alloy level (vehicle-component-alloy-element model). It was found that increased component dismantling before vehicle shredding can be an effective, so far underestimated, intervention in the medium term, especially if combined with development of safety-relevant components such as wheels from secondary material. In the long term, automatic alloy sorting technologies are most likely required, but could at the same time reduce the need for magnesium removal in refining. Cooperation between the primary and secondary aluminum industries, the automotive industry, and end-of-life vehicle dismantlers is therefore essential to ensure continued recycling of automotive aluminum and its alloying elements. PMID:24655476

Løvik, Amund N; Modaresi, Roja; Müller, Daniel B

2014-04-15

261

Directory of Arizona Recyclers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Environmental Quality is providing a current directory of Arizona recyclers listed alphabetically by counties and types of recyclable materials. Local recyclers are listed alphabetically by name, address and phone number, along with the ...

1990-01-01

262

Comparison of the U.S. lead recycling industry in 1998 and 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1998, the structure of the lead recycling industry has changed and trade patterns of the domestic lead recycling industry have shifted. Although the domestic demand for lead has remained relatively constant since 1998, production of lead has increasingly shifted to the domestic secondary lead industry. The last primary lead smelter in the United States closed at the end of 2013, at which time the secondary lead industry became the sole source of domestic lead production. The amount of lead recovered annually from scrap batteries generally increased from about 900,000 metric tons in 1995 to more than 1,100,000 metric tons in 2012. The percentage of total U.S. lead production attributed to battery scrap increased from 65 percent in 1995 to 87 percent in 2012. Since the North American Free Trade Agreement took effect in 1994, trade patterns among the United States, Canada, and Mexico have changed for recycled lead products. In the late 1990s, the principal sources of lead waste and scrap not derived from batteries were Canada, Mexico, and South America; by 2011, the principal sources were Central America and Asia, with decreasing amounts from Canada and South America. Since 1998, the amount of lead derived from imported batteries and scrap from Canada has ranged from 50 to 90 percent, and the amount imported from Mexico has ranged from 3 to 20 percent. Canada received about 50 percent of the lead contained in spent lead-acid batteries and scrap exported from the United States in 1998, and Mexico received about 4 percent. By 2012, however, the amount of lead scrap exported to Canada had decreased to about 10 percent, and the amount of lead-based scrap products, primarily batteries, exported to Mexico from the United States had increased to 47 percent. Vertical integration of the domestic secondary lead industry and higher costs required to implement more stringent ambient air standards in the United States have led some companies to shift lead recycling operations to Mexico. U.S. secondary lead producers are increasingly competing with Canadian and Mexican facilities for market share.

Wilburn, David R.

2014-01-01

263

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect

Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems)

2011-02-22

264

Component- and Alloy-Specific Modeling for Evaluating Aluminum Recycling Strategies for Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies indicated that the availability of mixed shredded aluminum scrap from end-of-life vehicles (ELV) is likely to surpass the capacity of secondary castings to absorb this type of scrap, which could lead to a scrap surplus unless suitable interventions can be identified and implemented. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing potential solutions to this problem, among others, because of a lack of component- and alloy-specific information in the models. In this study, we developed a dynamic model of aluminum in the global vehicle stock (distinguishing 5 car segments, 14 components, and 7 alloy groups). The forecasts made up to the year 2050 for the demand for vehicle components and alloy groups, for the scrap supply from discarded vehicles, and for the effects of different ELV management options. Furthermore, we used a source-sink diagram to identify alloys that could potentially serve as alternative sinks for the growing scrap supply. Dismantling the relevant components could remove up to two-thirds of the aluminum from the ELV stream. However, the use of these components for alloy-specific recycling is currently limited because of the complex composition of components (mixed material design and applied joining techniques), as well as provisions that practically prevent the production of safety-relevant cast parts from scrap. In addition, dismantling is more difficult for components that are currently penetrating rapidly. Therefore, advanced alloy sorting seems to be a crucial step that needs to be developed over the coming years to avoid a future scrap surplus and prevent negative energy use and emission consequences.

Modaresi, Roja; Løvik, Amund N.; Müller, Daniel B.

2014-11-01

265

Component- and Alloy-Specific Modeling for Evaluating Aluminum Recycling Strategies for Vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous studies indicated that the availability of mixed shredded aluminum scrap from end-of-life vehicles (ELV) is likely to surpass the capacity of secondary castings to absorb this type of scrap, which could lead to a scrap surplus unless suitable interventions can be identified and implemented. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing potential solutions to this problem, among others, because of a lack of component- and alloy-specific information in the models. In this study, we developed a dynamic model of aluminum in the global vehicle stock (distinguishing 5 car segments, 14 components, and 7 alloy groups). The forecasts made up to the year 2050 for the demand for vehicle components and alloy groups, for the scrap supply from discarded vehicles, and for the effects of different ELV management options. Furthermore, we used a source-sink diagram to identify alloys that could potentially serve as alternative sinks for the growing scrap supply. Dismantling the relevant components could remove up to two-thirds of the aluminum from the ELV stream. However, the use of these components for alloy-specific recycling is currently limited because of the complex composition of components (mixed material design and applied joining techniques), as well as provisions that practically prevent the production of safety-relevant cast parts from scrap. In addition, dismantling is more difficult for components that are currently penetrating rapidly. Therefore, advanced alloy sorting seems to be a crucial step that needs to be developed over the coming years to avoid a future scrap surplus and prevent negative energy use and emission consequences.

Modaresi, Roja; Løvik, Amund N.; Müller, Daniel B.

2014-03-01

266

BRONZE FOUNDRY SCRAP STORED IN THE BINS TO THE RIGHT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

BRONZE FOUNDRY SCRAP STORED IN THE BINS TO THE RIGHT ARE LOADED INTO THE BOTTOM DROPPING CHARGE BUCKET IN THE BACKGROUND BEFORE BEING CHARGED INTO ONE OF THE ELECTRIC ARC FURNACES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Brass Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

267

Scrap biofuels targets and focus on improved public transport  

E-print Network

Scrap biofuels targets and focus on improved public transport Friends of the Earth's biofuels campaigner Kenneth Richter argues that biofuel targets are a distraction from tried-and-tested ways to biofuel crops such as rapeseed have changed as more research has been done into their impact

268

Recovery of cadmium and nickel from scrap batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cyclic leaching process was developed for selectively leaching and recovering cadmium from nickel--cadmium scrap battery waste. The six major steps in the process are the following: washing the plates to remove KOH electrolyte: roasting at 550 to 600C to oxidize metallic cadmium and decompose cadmium and nickel salts; leaching with an ammonium nitrate solution; precipitation of the leached cadmium

D. A. Wilson; B. J. Jr. Wiegard

1971-01-01

269

INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND OTHER COMPONENTS ARE MELTED TO CREATE DUCTILE IRON. BRIGHT FLASH IN BACKGROUND RESULTS FROM MOLTEN METAL (DUCTILE IRON) BEING POURED FROM CUPOLA INTO TRANSFER LADLE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

270

Scrap tires: Black gold or fool`s gold?  

SciTech Connect

Three years ago, a US EPA report estimated there were between 2 and 3 billion tires stockpiled in the US. Currently, according to the Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC, Washington, DC), the number of stockpiled tires totals 850 million. However, this reduction is not due to federal or state legislation; simply, the number was overestimated. Whatever the actual number, scrap tire mounds have been large enough to prompt 34 states to developed scrap tire funding programs aimed at eliminating the stockpiling of the some 250 million tires generated per year, while gradually eliminating the tires already stockpiled. However, of the 34 states, only Illinois, Oregon, Florida, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, are aggressively tackling the problem. In each of these five cases, state officials claim, the only viable way to reduce large quantities of tires quickly is through energy reuse, and, like any other disposal method, it costs money. To compensate for the costs of elimination, states are developing funding for scrap tire reduction programs by placing fees on tire disposal, tire purchase, or vehicle title transfer and registration.

Glaz, S.

1995-10-01

271

Recycling lead to recover refractory precious metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lead recycling has many benefits. For example, it provides an alternative to virgin lead, thereby avoiding the environmental impacts of primary lead smelting. In addition, as with other secondary metal operations, it consumes less energy at a lower cost than primary production. An emerging process has been evaluated in which these attributes are leveraged to process refractory precious metals ores. Direct cyanidation of refractory gold and silver ore yields poor gold and silver recoveries. In fact, some ores are simply not amenable to direct cyanidation. The process described in this paper consists of smelting lead-bearing material together with argentopyrite concentrate that contains precious metals. Sodium carbonate is used as a fluxing agent and scrap iron is used as a reductant. The reaction product is molten lead bullion enriched with the precious metals. Smelting recoveries of both silver and gold can be as high as 98%.

Parga, J. R.; Muzquiz, G. G.; Valenzuela, J. L.; Ojebuoboh, F. K.

2001-12-01

272

WASTE DESCRIPTION RECYCLED OR  

E-print Network

Batteries Recycled 7,250 Hazardous Waste $36,250 $0 $36,250 Estimate 50 lbs./battery and avoided disposalWASTE DESCRIPTION REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2000 WASTE TYPE POTENTIAL COSTS FOR TREATMENT & DISPOSAL COST OF RECYCLE, PREVENTION ESTIMATED

273

Effects of Amendments to the Basel Convention on battery recycling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Basel Convention was originally designed to prevent the uncontrolled dumping of toxic waste and focused particularly on shipments of materials from OECD countries to the developing world. Amendments to the Basel Convention now restrict trade in waste materials destined for recycling, reprocessing and reuse. There are serious consequences for the secondary lead industry and the world community if the regulations prohibit the environmentally sound reprocessing of scrap batteries. It is incumbent on the industry to understand the implications of the recent and proposed amendments, and to address the potential problems posed by the legislation.

Stone, Hillary

274

Reverse logistics system planning for recycling electrical appliances and computers in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the disposition of end-of-life home appliances has caused tremendous attention, Taiwan recently promulgated a Scrap Home Appliances and Computers Recycling Regulation that mandates manufacturers and importers to take back their products. Reverse logistics system planning shall become vital as the take-back rate increases and the service area expands in the future. This study utilizes a mixed integer programming model

Li-Hsing Shih

2001-01-01

275

Recycling of pavement materials  

E-print Network

materials. A comparison was made between the recycled pavements and typical conventional asphalt concrete pavements. An economic asse?sment of thc recycled pavements was made to determine thc economic feasibility of recycling. Results of laboratory... evaluations show that: recycled pavement mixtures possess properties equivalent to conventional asphalt concrete mixtures; and rccvcl inI' con ho accom- plished with conventional ertuapment. kyar po I'lotion associated with hot-mix recycling of asphalt...

O'Neal, Randy Jim

2012-06-07

276

Health assessment for Union Scrap Iron and Metal, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, Region 5. Cerclis No. MND022949192 (December 23, 1991). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Union Scrap Iron and Metal Company (Union Scrap) site was listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the National Priorities List (NPL). The company recycled batteries at the site from approximately 1972 to 1983, which resulted in high concentrations of lead in the soil, surface-water runoff and air. Other metals, as well as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were also present. In a series of emergency removal actions by EPA, battery parts and contaminated soil have been removed, and a building on the site has been decontaminated, demolished, and removed. The Remedial Investigation (RI) indicated that no significant quantities of metals (particularly lead) or PCBs remain in the top 13 feet of soil on the site, which indicates that potential human exposure to contaminants in soil via ingestion, inhalation or dermal contact is no longer a problem at the Union Scrap site. Concentrations of lead in remaining site soil are below levels of public health concern. Based on the information reviewed, MDH has concluded that the site poses no apparent public health hazard under current conditions because it is unlikely that human exposure to contaminants is occurring.

Not Available

1991-12-23

277

Health assessment for Union Scrap Iron and Metal, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, Region 5. Cerclis No. MND022949192 (February 12, 1992). Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Union Scrap Iron and Metal Company (Union Scrap) site was listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the National Priorities List (NPL). The company recycled batteries at the site from approximately 1972 to 1983, which resulted in high concentrations of lead in the soil, surface-water runoff and air. Other metals, as well as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were also present. In a series of emergency removal actions by EPA, battery parts and contaminated soil have been removed, and a building on the site has been decontaminated, demolished, and removed. The Remedial Investigation (RI) indicated that no significant quantities of metals (particularly lead) or PCBs remain in the top 13 feet of soil on the site, which indicates that potential human exposure to contaminants in soil via ingestion, inhalation or dermal contact is no longer a problem at the Union Scrap site. Concentrations of lead in remaining site soil are below levels of public health concern. Based on the information reviewed, MDH has concluded that the site poses no apparent public health hazard under current conditions because it is unlikely that human exposure to contaminants is occurring. In the past, workers at the site have been exposed to levels of lead which were of health concern, as evidenced by blood lead levels which exceeded health based guidelines.

Not Available

1992-02-12

278

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01

279

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01

280

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01

281

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-07-01

282

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01

283

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fibrous and other waste materials from textile production. Citations discuss recycled materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, cottons, wools, and waste dusts for use in fabric products, building materials, thermal insulation, textile-reinforced materials, and geotextiles. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Citations concerning heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are covered in separate bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01

284

Wastes from plutonium conversion and scrap recovery operations  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with the handling of defense-related wastes associated with plutonium processing. It first defines the different waste categories along with the techniques used to assess waste content. It then discusses the various treatment approaches used in recovering plutonium from scrap. Next, it addresses the various waste management approaches necessary to handle all wastes. Finally, there is a discussion of some future areas for processing with emphasis on waste reduction. 91 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

Christensen, D.C.; Bowersox, D.F.; McKerley, B.J.; Nance, R.L.

1988-03-01

285

Use of scrap rubber in asphalt pavement surfaces. Special report  

SciTech Connect

Scrap tire rubber was mixed into an asphalt concrete wearing course to study the effect of ice disbonding from the pavement surface under traffic. Rubber contents of 0, 3, 6, and 12% by weight were studied. Initial laboratory ice disbonding test results led to the development of a new paving material, Chunk Rubber Asphalt Concrete (CRAC), that uses larger pieces of rubber in a much denser asphalt concrete mix. Strength values doubled and ice disbonding performance was enhanced.

Eaton, R.A.; Roberts, R.J.; Blackburn, R.R.

1991-12-01

286

4. VIEW OF PLUTONIUM CANISTER ON CHAINVEYOR. SCRAP PLUTONIUM WAS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. VIEW OF PLUTONIUM CANISTER ON CHAINVEYOR. SCRAP PLUTONIUM WAS COLLECTED INTO CANS AT INDIVIDUAL WORKSTATIONS. THE CANS WERE TRANSFERRED VIA THE CHAIN CONVEYOR TO A WORKSTATION IN MODULE C WHERE THE MATERIAL WAS COMPRESSED INTO BRIQUETTES FOR LATER USE. (6/20/93) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

287

Surface-modification technology for scrap tire reuse  

SciTech Connect

This technical briefing report describes the DOE-Air Products project to develop the surface-modification technology for scrap tire rubber. It introduces the technology; discusses the project history, status, and feasibility studies; and reviews the potential benefits of the technology with respect to energy use and economics. Prelimary analyses indicate energy savings of approximately 60,000 Btu/lb by substituting surface-modified rubber in polyurethane systems.

Not Available

1992-09-01

288

Recycled Art: Create Puppets Using Recycled Objects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity from "Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils" for making puppets using recycled food packaging materials. Includes background information, materials, instructions, literature links, resources, and benchmarks. (NB)

Clearing, 2003

2003-01-01

289

Recycle Used Oil on America Recycles Day.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains that motor oils can be reused and recycled. Educates students about environmental hazards and oil management and includes classroom activities. Addresses the National Science Education Standards. (YDS)

White, Boyd W.

2000-01-01

290

The use of scrap tires in rotary cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

The use of scrap tires as a supplemental fuel in the United States Portland cement industry has increased significantly in the past six years. In 1990, there were two kilns using tire-derived fuel (TDF), today 30 kilns use TDF. The outlook for continued and expanded use of TDF in the U.S. cement industry should be considered favorable, with 15 kilns conducting tests to determine TDF`s applicability or in the permitting process. The Council`s estimates are that by the end of 1996, the cement industry could be consuming some 75-100 million of the 253 million annually generated scrap tires in the United States. This level of TDF usage will make the cement industry the largest market segments for scrap tires in the United States. While the long-term outlook is at present positive, there are a series of factors that have, and will likely continue to adversely impact the near-term usage of TDF. These issues, as well as the factors that are likely to positively impact the cement kiln TDF market are the subject of this presentation.

Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31

291

The recycling dilemma for advanced materials use: Automobile materials substitution  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the difficulties associated with imposing recycling imperatives upon advanced materials development by examining the case of automotive materials substitution and its impacts upon the recyclability of the automobile. Parallels are drawn between today's issues, which focus upon the recyclability of the increasing polymeric fraction in automobile shredder fluff, and the junked automobile problem of the 1960's, when the problem of abandoned automobiles became a part of the environmental and legislative agenda in the US and overseas. In the 1960's, both the source and the resolution of the junk automobile problem arose through a confluence of technological and economic factors, rather than through any set of regulatory influences. The rise of electric arc furnace steelmaking and the development of the automobile shredder were sufficient to virtually eliminate the problem - so much so that today's problems are incorrectly viewed as novelties. Today's automobile recycling problem again derives from technological and economic factors, but regulatory influences have spurred some of them. While there are no lack of technological solutions to the problem of automobile shredder fluff, none of these solutions yet provides scrap processors with the kind of profit opportunity necessary to implement them. In some ways, it is implicit in advanced materials markets that there is little to no demand for recycled forms of these materials, and, in the absence of these markets, there are few reasons to expect that the solution to today's problems will be quite so neat.

Field, F.R. III; Clark, J.P. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

1991-01-01

292

Recycling the plastic components in today's lead/acid battery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With production facilities first established in 1988 at Villefranche in the Rhone valley, the author's company aims to produce 40 tonnes of polypropylene granules from 50 000 scrap battery cases every day. Following a doubling of capacity in 1991, the company now has an annual sales turnover of 40 million FFand an output of 10 000 tonnes which makes the operation one of the largest in Europe for the production of recycled polypropylene. The technology developed and used by the Company enables the process to separate, reclaim and produce high-quality constituent materials that are suitable for use by the automotive industry at a price competitive with virgin materials. The new line, installed in 1991, has enabled the Company to add glass-fibre, rubber and other materials into the recycled product to prepare special types of high-quality material with added value. The overall process is carefully controlled and should soon be certified to ISO standard 9002.

de Feraudy, H.

293

One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility  

SciTech Connect

Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

Malloy, M.G.

1997-11-01

294

ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling  

E-print Network

ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling #12;Recycled ConcreteRecycled Concrete ·· Whatever steel goes into PCC must comeWhatever steel goes into PCC must come out for recycleout for recycle ·· Aggregates have a big impact on the costAggregates have a big impact on the cost of recyclingof recycling

295

Federal Recycling Program Printed on Recycled Paper  

E-print Network

Federal Recycling Program Printed on Recycled Paper The Forest Service, U.S. Department activities: · Protection and management of resources on 191 million acres of National Forest System lands, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or familial status. (Not all

Standiford, Richard B.

296

Recycling Rules: Understanding Recycling and a MRF  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners simulate the separation techniques that materials recovery facilities (MRFs) use and then design their own series of recycling techniques. Learners identify four ways recyclable materials can be separated and sorted at a MRF: conveyor belts, blowers, flotation, and magnetism.

Keep America Beautiful, Inc.

2010-01-01

297

Recycling advanced batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

This abstract introduces results from OnTo Technology's innovative recycling process to produce new materials for new batteries from materials from spent batteries. Recycling spent batteries is a growing problem for the consumer electronics electric vehicle industries.

Steven E. Sloop

2008-01-01

298

Recycling overview in Sweden  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the recycling programs currently in use in Sweden. Recycling of newspapers, batteries, plastics are all mentioned in this report by the Swedish Association of Public Cleansing and Solid Waste Management.

Not Available

1989-07-01

299

Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements.

Maxwell, S.L. III [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Jones, V.D.

1998-07-01

300

The Economics of Recycling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the findings of a study that documented 1992 costs of residential curbside recycling versus disposal systems in four Washington State cities: Seattle, Spokane, Bellingham, and Vancouver. Results indicated that recycling can be less expensive than disposal when the revenues obtained from selling recycled materials are considered. (MDH)

Bogert, Susan; Morris, Jeffrey

1993-01-01

301

The Sustainability of Recycling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the need for closing the business cycle in the recycling process. Discusses whether the government should mandate or the free market create uses for recycled products. Presents challenges associated with marketing recycled materials including what has been and what needs to be done to stimulate markets, encourage business, and balance…

Juniper, Christopher

1993-01-01

302

Cryogenic processing and recycling  

SciTech Connect

This article examines cryogenic processing and recycling of rubber and rubber products. The topics discussed include utilization of cryogenically recycled materials in the rubber industry, current status of the industry, economic benefit, performance advantage, environmental benefit, technology assessment, the future of cryogenic process and recycling.

Leyden, J.J.

1991-03-01

303

Varying views raise fear: is there enough uranium  

Microsoft Academic Search

If President Carter's assumption that we have enough uranium supplies to last into the next century is wrong, then deferment of the breeder reactor and fuel recycling may cause serious power shortages. The expected growth of nuclear energy's share from eight percent to a third of the power generation was planned with the breeder and fuel-recycling programs in mind. Estimations

Beiser

1977-01-01

304

Multi-Recycling of Transuranic Elements in a Modified PWR Fuel Assembly  

E-print Network

. The radiotoxicity of both multi-recycled assemblies is significantly lower than the UOX and MOX with the TRU+Cm fuel being the lowest. When Curium is recycled only 28,000 years are required for the radiotoxicity of the waste to reach that of natural Uranium and when...

Chambers, Alex

2012-10-19

305

Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant  

DOEpatents

A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

2002-11-05

306

Recycling galvanized steel: Operating experience and benefits  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to the increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last decade and the problems associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is

F. J. Dudek; E. J. Daniels; W. A. Morgan

1993-01-01

307

Radioactive materials in recycled metals--an update.  

PubMed

In April 1995, Health Physics published a review paper titled "Radioactive Materials in Recycled Metals." At that time, 35 accidental meltings of radioactive sources in metal mills were reported, including 22 in the U.S., along with 293 other events in the U.S. where radioactive material was found in metals for recycling. Since that date, there have been additional accidental meltings of radioactive sources in metal mills both in the U.S. and elsewhere. There also was an incident in Texas that involved stolen radioactive devices, which resulted in exposures of members of the general public. Also, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission took steps to address the underlying problem of inadequate control and accountability of radioactive materials licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Steel Manufacturers Association made available data collected by its members beginning in 1994 that expanded the database for radioactive materials found by the metal recycling industry in recycled metal scrap to over 2,300 reports as of 30 June 1997. PMID:9482594

Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

1998-03-01

308

Computer-munching microbes: metal leaching from electronic scrap by bacteria and fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbiological processes were applied to mobilize metals from electronic waste materials. Bacteria (Thiobacillus thiooxidans, T. ferrooxidans) and fungi (Aspergillus niger, Penicillium simplicissimum) were grown in the presence of electronic scrap. The formation of inorganic and organic acids caused the mobilization of metals. Initial experiments showed that microbial growth was inhibited when the concentration of scrap in the medium exceeded 10

H Brandl; R Bosshard; M Wegmann

2001-01-01

309

Manufacturing of aluminum flake powder from foil scrap by dry ball milling process  

Microsoft Academic Search

A feasibility study for producing aluminum flake powder from aluminum foil scrap by dry ball milling under an inert argon with a few % of oxygen was carried out. It was found that the pieces of aluminum foil scrap were laminated to each other, elongated by micro-forging of the falling balls, fragmented into small pieces of foil and finally formed

Seong-Hyeon Hong; Dong-Won Lee; Byoung-Kee Kim

2000-01-01

310

Fuzzy chance constrained linear programming model for optimizing the scrap charge in steel production  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optimizing the charge in secondary steel production is challenging because the chemical composition of the scrap is highly uncertain. The uncertainty can cause a considerable risk of the scrap mix failing to satisfy the composition requirements for the final product. In this paper, we represent the uncertainty based on fuzzy set theory and constrain the failure risk based on a

Aiying Rong; Risto Lahdelma

2008-01-01

311

Direct electrorefining of copper scrap using a titanium anode-support system in a monopolar cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the application of an anode-support system to the direct electrorefining of copper scrap (> 95%) in sulphuric acid medium. The authors have established that it is possible to utilize a basket of titanium mesh as the anode-support, with chopped scrap inside the basket. It is feasible to utilize this system under the same operational conditions used for

M. Figueroa; R. Gana; L. Kattan; A. Parodi

1994-01-01

312

Review of PennDOT Publication 408 for the use of recycled co-product materials: Summary recommendations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to decrease the institutional or perceived institutional barriers for the use of recycled and co-product materials including glass, steel slag, foundry sand, fly ash, shingle tabs, reclaimed Portland cement concrete, and scrap tires in the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation`s (PennDOT) Publications 408, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Specifications. This report reviews potential uses of each material, identifies the project that used these materials, and provides direction for future specification development.

Van Tassel, E.L.; Tikalsky, P.J.; Christensen, D.W.

1999-04-30

313

Design and fabrication of the uranium drum standards  

SciTech Connect

The segmented gamma scanner has become an important instrument for assaying the special nuclear material content of low-density scrap and waste in 55-gal. drums. To perform these assays accurately, we need appropriate standards to calibrate the response of the system including the detector efficiency, the absorber in front of the detector, and the collimator geometry. A set of three uranium drum standards has been fabricated at Los Alamos. This paper discusses a Monte Carlo calculation to optimize the design of the drums. The drum standards are prepared using 20 modular 4-{ell} bottles in each drum. This paper also describes the fabrication procedure, which includes weighing the uranium oxide and the chemical analyzing of the uranium concentration. Also presented is the vertical scanning data of the 4- {ell} bottles to assure uniform mixing of the uranium and the diluent. Finally, the nondestructive measurements for checking consistency among the three drum standards am discussed.

Hsue, F.; Long, S.M.; Hsue, S.T.; Miller, M.C.

1993-08-01

314

Producing ground scrap tire rubber: A comparison between ambient and cryogenic technologies  

SciTech Connect

Prior to 1985, few, if any scrap tires were processed. The Minnesota program changed all that. The equipment first introduced to process scrap tires consisted of redesigned wood or metal shredders. The performance of these systems left much to be desired. In the past 10 years, many companies and equipment systems, designed especially for scrap tires, have come into existence. Until recently, scrap tires were typically processed by ambient systems. These systems consist of a mechanical process, which cuts and or grinds whole tire rubber into the desired sized particle at room temperatures. Historically, producing ground rubber, like all other rubber processing, was done by an ambient processes system. Within the last several years, cryogenic processing of scrap tires has been introduced for the preparation of ground rubber. In the cryogenic process, rubber is introduced into a bath of liquid nitrogen, instantly freezing the rubber. Once embrittled, the rubber is struck with an impact devise, effectively shattering the rubber.

Blumenthal, M.H. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-09-01

315

Some functional properties of composite material based on scrap tires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The utilization of scrap tires still obtains a remarkable importance from the aspect of unloading the environment from non-degradable waste [1]. One of the most prospective ways for scrap tires reuse is a production of composite materials [2] This research must be considered as a continuation of previous investigations [3, 4]. It is devoted to the clarification of some functional properties, which are considered important for the view of practical applications, of the composite material. Some functional properties of the material were investigated, for instance, the compressive stress at different extent of deformation of sample (till 67% of initial thickness) (LVS EN 826) [5] and the resistance to UV radiation (modified method based on LVS EN 14836) [6]. Experiments were realized on the purposefully selected samples. The results were evaluated in the correlation with potential changes of Shore C hardness (Shore scale, ISO 7619-1, ISO 868) [7, 8]. The results showed noticeable resistance of the composite material against the mechanical influence and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The correlation with the composition of the material, activity of binder, definite technological parameters, and the conditions supported during the production, were determined. It was estimated that selected properties and characteristics of the material are strongly dependent from the composition and technological parameters used in production of the composite material, and from the size of rubber crumb. Obtained results show possibility to attain desirable changes in the composite material properties by changing both the composition and technological parameters of examined material.

Plesuma, Renate; Malers, Laimonis

2013-09-01

316

Volatilisation and oxidation of aluminium scraps fed into incineration furnaces.  

PubMed

Ferrous and non-ferrous metal scraps are increasingly recovered from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash and used in the production of secondary steel and aluminium. However, during the incineration process, metal scraps contained in the waste undergo volatilisation and oxidation processes, which determine a loss of their recoverable mass. The present paper evaluates the behaviour of different types of aluminium packaging materials in a full-scale waste to energy plant during standard operation. Their partitioning and oxidation level in the residues of the incineration process are evaluated, together with the amount of potentially recoverable aluminium. About 80% of post-consumer cans, 51% of trays and 27% of foils can be recovered through an advanced treatment of bottom ash combined with a melting process in the saline furnace for the production of secondary aluminium. The residual amount of aluminium concentrates in the fly ash or in the fine fraction of the bottom ash and its recovery is virtually impossible using the current eddy current separation technology. The average oxidation levels of the aluminium in the residues of the incineration process is equal to 9.2% for cans, 17.4% for trays and 58.8% for foils. The differences between the tested packaging materials are related to their thickness, mechanical strength and to the alloy. PMID:22749723

Biganzoli, Laura; Gorla, Leopoldo; Nessi, Simone; Grosso, Mario

2012-12-01

317

St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to  

E-print Network

St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to allow you to recycle the following materials: To find your nearest Recycling Point please visit www.fifedirect.org.uk/wasteaware or call the Recycling Helpline on 08451 55 00 22. R&A GOLF CLUB OLD COURSE HOTEL UNIVERSITY NORTH HAUGH

St Andrews, University of

318

Recycling Service Learning Activity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The recycling project begins with students learning about waste and resources. They complete background assignments about the energy and materials required to manufacture paper, aluminum, etc. They study landfills and the issues related to space, pollution, etc. They look at what is different if these things are recycled. The students work in groups of two or three and adopt and academic building on campus. They educate the staff and faculty about recycling - what can be recycled and where. They arrange to pick-up paper from each office. My hope is that the college faculty, staff and students will eventually recycle paper at common bins and that our project will progress to adding other recyclables to our project.

Faatz, Renee

319

Recycle plastics into feedstocks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation

H. Kastner; W. Kaminsky

1995-01-01

320

Purification of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} scrap for heat source fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a development program to recover and purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure feed sources in a glove box environment. A glove box line has been designed and a chemistry flowsheet developed to perform this recovery task at large scale. The initial demonstration effort focused on purification of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel by HNO{sub 3}/HF dissolution, followed by plutonium(III) oxalate precipitation and calcination to an oxide. Decontamination factors for most impurities of concern in the fuel were very good, producing {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel significantly better in purity than specified by General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel powder specifications. A sufficient quantity of purified {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel was recovered from the process to allow fabrication of a GPHS unit for testing. The results are encouraging for recycle of relatively impure plutonium-238 oxide and scrap residue items into fuel for useful applications. The high specific activity of plutonium-238 magnifies the consequences and concerns of radioactive waste generation. This work places an emphasis on development of waste minimization technologies to complement the aqueous processing operation. Results from experiments on neutralized solutions of plutonium-238 resulted in decontamination to about 1 millicurie/L. Combining ultrafiltration treatment with addition of a water soluble polymer designed to coordinate Pu, allowed solutions to be decontaminated to about 1 microcurie/L. Efforts continue to develop a capability for efficient, safe, cost effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel.

Schulte, L.D.; Purdy, G.M.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ramsey, K.; Silver, G.L.; Espinoza, J.; Rinehart, G.H.

1997-10-01

321

Announcing: All Recycling Reduce your  

E-print Network

Announcing: All Recycling Go Green! Reduce your contribution to the landfill, by choosing to voluntarily recycle acceptable items in the green All Recycling toters and containers around campus. ONLY THE ITEMS BELOW ARE ACCEPTED FOR ALL RECYCLING Please do not contaminate the recycling containers with trash

Papautsky, Ian

322

Factors Influencing Household Recycling Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate factors encouraging or deterring recycling, telephone interviews were used to study recycling behavior, attitudes, and knowledge of 221 randomly selected adults in a suburban city that had begun a citywide curbside recycling program within the past year. Approximately 40% reported participation in the curbside recycling program, and nearly 20% more claimed that their household had been recycling in

Stuart Oskamp; Maura J. Harrington; Todd C. Edwards; Deborah L. Sherwood; Shawn M. Okuda; Deborah C. Swanson

1991-01-01

323

Welding of a powder metallurgy uranium alloy  

SciTech Connect

The interest at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in powder metallurgy (P/M) uranium parts is due to the potential cost savings in the fabrication of the material, to achieving a more homogeneous product, and to the reduction of uranium scrap. The joining of P/M uranium-6 wt-% niobium (U-6Nb) alloys by the electron beam (EB) welding process results in weld porosity. Varying the EB welding parameters did not eliminate the porosity. Reducing the oxygen and nitrogen content in this P/M uranium material did minimize the weld porosity, but this step made the techniques of producing the material more difficult. Therefore, joining wrought and P/M U-6Nb rods with the inertia welding technique is considered. Since no gases will be evolved with the solid-state welding process and the weld area will be compacted, porosity should not be a problem in the inertia welding of uranium alloys. The welds that are evaluated are wrought-to-wrought, wrought-to-P/M, and P/M-to-P/M U-6Nb samples.

Holbert, R.K.; Doughty, M.W.; Alexander-Morrison, G.M. (Fairchild Space Co., Germantown, MD (USA))

1989-05-01

324

Michigan Recycled Materials Market Directory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Michigan Recycled Materials Market Directory is being made available to commercial, industrial, municipal and institutional recyclers in the State of Michigan to assist in finding markets for accumulated or collected recyclable materials. The director...

1990-01-01

325

Detection and decontamination of residual energetics from ordnance and explosives scrap.  

PubMed

Extensive manufacturing of explosives in the last century has resulted in widespread contamination of soils and waters. Decommissioning and cleanup of these materials has also led to concerns about the explosive hazards associated with residual energetics still present on the surfaces of ordnance and explosives scrap. Typically, open burning or detonation is used to decontaminate ordinance and explosive scrap. Here the use of an anaerobic microbiological system applied as a bioslurry to decontaminate energetics from the surfaces of metal scrap is described. Decontamination of model metal scrap artificially contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and of decommissioned mortar rounds still containing explosives residue was examined. A portable ion mobility spectrometer was employed for the detection of residual explosives residues on the surfaces of the scrap. The mixed microbial populations of the bioslurries effectively decontaminated both the scrap and the mortar rounds. Use of the ion mobility spectrometer was an extremely sensitive field screening method for assessing decontamination and is a method by which minimally trained personnel can declare scrap clean with a high level of certainty. PMID:14971856

Jung, Carina M; Newcombe, David A; Crawford, Don L; Crawford, Ronald L

2004-02-01

326

DOE (Department of Energy) funds awarded for scrap tire research  

SciTech Connect

After promising initial results in demonstrating the technical and commercial feasibility of modifying the surface of finely ground scrap tires to produce adhesion properties needed for reuse in polymers such as polyurethanes and epoxies, the US Department of Energy increased its research contract with Air Products and Chemicals to $850,000. The additional monies will be used to evaluate a second approach to surface modification that will extend the use of the rubber to other polymers and rubber formulations. Supplies to the surface-modified rubber particles should be available by late summer for customer evaluation. The initial applications for the new rubber particles are expected to include polyurethane, for the manufacture of carpet underlayment, shoe soles and newly developed polyurethane spare tires, improving the impact resistance of polystyrene, PVC and engineering plastics and automotive belts, gaskets and seals.

Not Available

1990-07-01

327

Plastic Recycling Toter -ORANGE  

E-print Network

Plastic Recycling Toter - ORANGE Glass Recycling Toter - TEAL Garbage Yellow sharps container - bulk rinsing for small items - Clear Glass - Broken glass is ok - rinsed 3 times - may have contained - Plastic disposable pipettes - Micropipette tips - Petri dishes - cell well plates - racks - Glass

Toronto, University of

328

Reuse, Reduce, Recycle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of recycling paper in law libraries is also applicable to other types of libraries. Results of surveys of law libraries that investigated recycling practices in 1987 and again in 1990 are reported, and suggestions for reducing the amount of paper used and reusing as much as possible are offered. (LRW)

Briscoe, Georgia

1991-01-01

329

Recycling and Composting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students learn about the value of renewable resources. Using multimedia intractives, video, and classroom activities, they learn to identify examples of renewable resources and how humans use them, understand what recycling and conservation are, learn about composting, and identify food waste and household items that can be recycled or composted.

2005-01-01

330

Recycling into Art  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interdisciplinary unit weaves art and science together to help students appreciate the importance of recycling. In this engaging activity, students collected items worthy of recycling from home, and with the help of the art teacher, used a loom to cr

Fioranelli, Debra

2000-10-01

331

The Fermilab recycler ring  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

Martin Hu

2001-07-24

332

Partnership: Recycling $/$ Outdoor Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ottawa Board of Education (Ontario, Canada) has committed revenues generated by a districtwide recycling program to help fund the MacSkimming Outdoor Education Centre. A partnership between recycling and outdoor education is valuable in developing an environmental ethic among students and in finding new ways to fund outdoor education. (LP)

Weir, Phil

1996-01-01

333

Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum conditions  

SciTech Connect

Scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum is attractive because it allows easier product condensation and control of composition (gas, liquid and solid). With the aim of determining the effect of vacuum on the pyrolysis kinetics, a study has been carried out in thermobalance. Two data analysis methods have been used in the kinetic study: (i) the treatment of experimental data of weight loss and (ii) the deconvolution of DTG (differential thermogravimetry) curve. The former allows for distinguishing the pyrolysis of the three main components (volatile components, natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber) according to three successive steps. The latter method identifies the kinetics for the pyrolysis of individual components by means of DTG curve deconvolution. The effect of vacuum in the process is significant. The values of activation energy for the pyrolysis of individual components of easier devolatilization (volatiles and NR) are lower for pyrolysis under vacuum with a reduction of 12 K in the reaction starting temperature. The kinetic constant at 503 K for devolatilization of volatile additives at 0.25 atm is 1.7 times higher than that at 1 atm, and that corresponding to styrene-butadiene rubber at 723 K is 2.8 times higher. Vacuum enhances the volatilization and internal diffusion of products in the pyrolysis process, which contributes to attenuating the secondary reactions of the repolymerization and carbonization of these products on the surface of the char (carbon black). The higher quality of carbon black is interesting for process viability. The large-scale implementation of this process in continuous mode requires a comparison to be made between the economic advantages of using a vacuum and the energy costs, which will be lower when the technologies used for pyrolysis require a lower ratio between reactor volume and scrap tyre flow rate.

Lopez, Gartzen; Aguado, Roberto [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Olazar, Martin [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: martin.olazar@ehu.es; Arabiourrutia, Miriam; Bilbao, Javier [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

2009-10-15

334

An economic and technical assessment of black-dross and salt-cake-recycling systems for application in the secondary aluminum industry  

SciTech Connect

The secondary aluminum industry annually disposes of large amounts of dross residues and salt cake, which are by-products from the processing of scrap aluminum for reuse. These wastes contain as much as 50% salts and are presently disposed of in conventional landfills. As the costs of landfill space increase and the availability of landfill space decreases, disposal of the residues will increasingly compromise the economics of recycling aluminum. Alternative processes exist by which the major constituents of the various drosses and salt cakes can be recovered for recycling. In this study, we review available recycling technologies and processes relevant to the recycling of black dross and salt cake and discuss new concepts that have the potential to improve the cost-effectiveness of recycling technologies.

Karvelas, D.; Daniels, E.; Jody, B.; Bonsignore, P.

1991-12-01

335

Depleted Uranium  

MedlinePLUS

... Toll Free Numbers VA » Health Care » Public Health » Military Exposures » Depleted Uranium Public Health Public Health Public Health Home Military Exposures Military Exposures Home 4 Ways to Find ...

336

Recycle Used Oil on America Recycles Day  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Motor oil doesn't wear out--it just gets dirty. Students and the general public may not know that used oil can be reused or recycled. The fact is, used oil can be re-fined, blended with additives, and used again. When you consider that 1.4 billion gallons

White, Boyd W.

2000-11-01

337

Industrial waste recycling at an automotive component manufacturing facility  

SciTech Connect

The AC Rochester Division of General Motors Corporation (GM) develops and manufacturers automotive components for engine management systems at nine facilities in the US. Its largest facility is located in flint, Michigan, and is known as the Flint East site. The Flint East site covers nearly two square miles and consists of several plants housing manufacturing operations for spark plugs, glow plugs, oil filters, air filters, air cleaner assemblies, fuel pumps, fuel level sensors, cruise control systems, and other components. The volume and diversity of the scrap and wastes generated from these operations require skillful waste management to provide environmentally safe and cost-effective disposal options. Over time, a full-scale recycling and waste disposal operation evolved at Flint East. The operation has grown over the past thirty years to handle over 68,000 tons of material annually. Flint East`s program is regarded as a model industrial waste reduction and recycling operation. Elements of the program are presented here as a guide to establishing a successful industrial recycling program.

Jaffurs, J.A.; Hubler, R.L.; Behaylo, D.P. [General Motors Corp., Flint, MI (United States). AC Rochester Div.

1995-09-01

338

RecycleMania! Improving Waste Reduction and Recycling on  

E-print Network

RecycleMania! Improving Waste Reduction and Recycling on Campus from Universities to Big Business #12;Contact Information Tracy Artley Recycling Coordinator University of Michigan Tel: 734-763-5539 Email: recycle@umich.edu #12;Agenda Waste Impacts of Large Institutions Unique Challenges Overcoming

Awtar, Shorya

339

40 CFR 761.72 - Scrap metal recovery ovens and smelters.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING...person may dispose of residual PCBs associated with PCB-Contaminated...which includes a standard for PCBs. (2) Scrap metal...

2010-07-01

340

Motivation recycling: pre-recycling case study in Minsk, Belarus.  

PubMed

Given the aim of motivating householders to behave in a recycling-friendly manner, there is a need to understand consumers' recycling behaviour. This paper documents and analyses acceptability and awareness of a pre-recycling society, through a survey carried out in the region of Minsk, Belarus. The results show a large number of people have no strong awareness about separate collection of household waste for recycling. By analysing the pre-recycling behaviour of Minsk citizens and substantive comparison with literature studies of a more mature recycling society such as Sweden, we indicate common sociodemographic variables for both cases and determine that these sociodemographic characteristics will directly influence recycling behaviour in countries like Belarus. It is also noted that the lack of recycling habit cannot directly predict subsequent recycling behaviour on the stage of implementation the recycling system. PMID:20124319

Miafodzyeva, Sviatlana; Brandt, Nils; Olsson, Monika

2010-04-01

341

GNB battery recycling plant  

SciTech Connect

The most technologically and environmentally advanced recycling plant in the world has just been completed in Columbus, Georgia, according to GNB. GNB Technologies is a wholly owned subsidiary of Pacific Dunlop. With a capacity of 9 million spent batteries per year, or 30,000 batteries a day, this new $50 million dollar plant replaces GNB`s 35-year old recycling plant in Columbus and increases recycling capacity there five-fold. The new plant will not produce any hazardous waste or sulfur emissions and the operation continuously reuses process water, completely eliminating effluent. The plant produces sodium sulfate from the battery acid, creating a third marketable product besides plastic and lead.

Hopkins, G.E.

1995-08-01

342

Dragnet: Nonprofit Computer Recyclers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you have ever wondered what happens to obsolete computers, check out these current awareness Websites. The disposal of computers is classified as hazardous waste, which has become an environmental concern as the number of obsolete computers rises. In fact, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the State of Massachusetts have banned computer equipment from landfills. Dragnet: Nonprofit Computer Recyclers is an EPA-licensed computer recycling organization that reuses all acceptable components and systems or recycles damaged or unusable components. Rebuilt computer systems are given to "persons with disabilities and persons living in disadvantaged situations."

343

Uranium reduction.  

PubMed

The dramatic decrease in solubility accompanying the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), producing the insoluble mineral uraninite, has been viewed as a potential mechanism for sequestration of environmental uranium contamination. In the past 15 years, it has been firmly established that a variety of bacteria exhibit this reductive capacity. To obtain an understanding of the microbial metal metabolism, to develop a practical approach for the acceleration of in situ bioreduction, and to predict the long-term fate of environmental uranium, several aspects of the microbial process have been experimentally explored. This review briefly addresses the research to identify specific uranium reductases and their cellular location, competition between uranium and other electron acceptors, attempts to stimulate in situ reduction, and mechanisms of reoxidation of reduced uranium minerals. PMID:16704344

Wall, Judy D; Krumholz, Lee R

2006-01-01

344

ELECTROSLAG REMELTING OF AISI M41 HIGH SPEED TOOL STEEL SCRAP  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tools of pipes' internal threading manufactured from AISI M 41 high-speed tool steel.The scrap of these tools can not be reformed to a lower dimensions tool due to their complicated form. On the other hand AISI M41 steel con- tains expensive and sensitive alloying elements such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten. The traditional melting process of such scraps in-

Taha Mattar

345

Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

None

2011-08-17

346

Waste recycling in the textile industry. July 1983-September 1989 (Citations from World Textile abstracts). Report for July 1983-September 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations on the recycling of waste-fibrous materials for textile production, and the recycling of textile-waste materials. Topics include use of wastes as raw materials for textile and fabric manufacturing; reuse of waste cloth, scraps, fibers, and polymeric materials from textile manufacturing; and the equipment used to collect, sort, and process textile wastes. Materials considered include cellulosic wastes, polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass-fiber wastes, and waste dusts. Applications discussed include textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related published bibliographies. (Contains 242 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-12-01

347

RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by  

E-print Network

NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

Laughlin, Robert B.

348

Authorization Recycling in RBAC Systems  

E-print Network

Authorization Recycling in RBAC Systems 1Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems ·motivation ·recycling approach recycling algorithms experimental evaluations summary & future work #12 issued before (precise recycling) #12;6 Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems

349

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING  

E-print Network

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING EFFICIENCY.EFFICIENCY. A l GA leaner Green #12 t R li Management Recycling Staff The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in 1990, we have 14 full time staff positions. ·We collect over 40

Howitt, Ivan

350

Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling  

E-print Network

5015/03/08 Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling Water and fizzy drinks bottles the caps from any bottles you recycle. Please rinse all plastic bottles and containers before putting them in the recycling bins. #12;5015/03/08 Nottingham Trent University Paper Recycling Office paper Catalogues

Evans, Paul

351

Process for removing copper in a recoverable form from solid scrap metal  

DOEpatents

A process for removing copper in a recoverable form from a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix is disclosed. The process begins by placing a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix into a reactor vessel. The atmosphere within the reactor vessel is purged with an inert gas or oxidizing while the reactor vessel is heated in the area of the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix to raise the temperature within the reactor vessel to a selected elevated temperature. Air is introduced into the reactor vessel and thereafter hydrogen chloride is introduced into the reactor vessel to obtain a desired air-hydrogen chloride mix. The air-hydrogen chloride mix is operable to form an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere which provides a protective oxide coating on the surface of the solid ferrous scrap metal in the mix and simultaneously oxidizes/chloridizes the copper in the mix to convert the copper to a copper monochloride gas for transport away from the solid ferrous scrap metal. After the copper is completely removed from the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix, the flows of air and hydrogen chloride are stopped and the copper monochloride gas is collected for conversion to a recoverable copper species.

Hartman, Alan D. (Albany, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); White, Jack C. (Albany, OR)

1995-01-01

352

Regulatory impacts and affects of emissions of the combustion of scrap tires  

SciTech Connect

Scrap tires have several advantages as a fuel for combustion. Combustion of scrap tires as a supplement to existing fuel is an economically viable alternative. In addition, policies that would reduce the growing stockpiles of scrap tires would also reduce its potential environmental hazards (emissions of toxic compounds from arson-caused fires and breeding ground for disease-carrying insects). The growing number of industrial applications as a supplemental fuel include cement kilns, the pulp and paper industry, and utility boilers. A growing body of studies of air emissions from scrap tire and tire-derived fuel (TDF-) supplemented combustion has been conducted over the past decade. For some pollutants and applications, co-combustion with TDF has been shown to decrease emissions. This paper summarizes trends in the effects of supplementing combustion with TDF on emissions of different pollutants. At the same time, scrap tire and TDF combustion are not currently regulated by a specific NSPS or MACT standard because these standards typically regulate an emission unit, not a fuel type. The USEPA is currently debating how to regulate facilities which supplement their combustion with scrap tires. This paper discusses some options that the USEPA is considering.

Karell, M.A.; Blumenthal, M.H.

1999-07-01

353

Evaluation of segmented gamma scanner measurements on cans of recoverable scrap  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site (SRS) has had a long-standing concern about the inability to measure recoverable scrap. A segmented gamma scanner (SGS) was evaluated for use in measuring cans of scrap materials. Four scrap cans were selected and re-packaged into containers that could be measured using calorimetry and gamma spectrometry. These scrap cans were later used as working standards for the SGS. In addition, replicate measurements were made on all cans of scrap currently stored with estimated values. Before accepting the SGS measurements on the cans, data from the replicate measurements of the standards and a limited number of process cans were analyzed to determine if there was a significant bias between the SGS and the calorimeter-gamma spectrometer measurements, if the random replication error would be acceptable for accountability, to set control limits for the workings standards, and to determine acceptable differences between replicate measurements. After completing the measurement of all process scrap cans in the inventory, the the final data were analyzed and estimates based on the two sets of data compared. The methodology used to determine the appropriate measurement error model, to estimate the measurement errors, to set control limits, and to determine the significance of the bias will be described as well as a comparison of the error estimates based on the preliminary versus final data.

Shull, A.H.; Weber, J.H.; MacMurdo, K.W.; Baker, L.B.

1991-12-31

354

Evaluation of segmented gamma scanner measurements on cans of recoverable scrap  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site (SRS) has had a long-standing concern about the inability to measure recoverable scrap. A segmented gamma scanner (SGS) was evaluated for use in measuring cans of scrap materials. Four scrap cans were selected and re-packaged into containers that could be measured using calorimetry and gamma spectrometry. These scrap cans were later used as working standards for the SGS. In addition, replicate measurements were made on all cans of scrap currently stored with estimated values. Before accepting the SGS measurements on the cans, data from the replicate measurements of the standards and a limited number of process cans were analyzed to determine if there was a significant bias between the SGS and the calorimeter-gamma spectrometer measurements, if the random replication error would be acceptable for accountability, to set control limits for the workings standards, and to determine acceptable differences between replicate measurements. After completing the measurement of all process scrap cans in the inventory, the the final data were analyzed and estimates based on the two sets of data compared. The methodology used to determine the appropriate measurement error model, to estimate the measurement errors, to set control limits, and to determine the significance of the bias will be described as well as a comparison of the error estimates based on the preliminary versus final data.

Shull, A.H.; Weber, J.H.; MacMurdo, K.W.; Baker, L.B.

1991-01-01

355

Making Recycled Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity on page 11 of the PDF, learners follow simple steps to recycle old newspaper into new paper. Use this activity to introduce conservation as well as the chemistry of cellulose and how paper products are made.

Society, American C.

2011-01-01

356

Geodynamics: Christmas recycling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanisms for forming the abundant volcanic islands on ocean floors are debated. The geochemical signature of volcanic rocks from the northeast Indian Ocean suggests that seamounts there formed from melting recycled ancient continental rocks.

Gibson, Sally A.

2011-12-01

357

Coming round to recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing numbers of people are trying to reduce and recycle their domestic waste, but hospitals have been slower to get the message. David Hutchins and Stuart White look at the potential environmental and financial benefits

David C J Hutchins; Stuart M White

2009-01-01

358

Fermilab recycler diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet storage ring for the storage and cooling of antiprotons. The following note describes the diagnostic tools currently available for commissioning, as well as the improvements and upgrades planned for the near future.

Martin Hu

2001-07-24

359

MaTrace: tracing the fate of materials over time and across products in open-loop recycling.  

PubMed

Even for metals, open-loop recycling is more common than closed-loop recycling due, among other factors, to the degradation of quality in the end-of-life (EoL) phase. Open-loop recycling is subject to loss of functionality of original materials, dissipation in forms that are difficult to recover, and recovered metals might need dilution with primary metals to meet quality requirements. Sustainable management of metal resources calls for the minimization of these losses. Imperative to this is quantitative tracking of the fate of materials across different stages, products, and losses. A new input-output analysis (IO) based model of dynamic material flow analysis (MFA) is presented that can trace the fate of materials over time and across products in open-loop recycling taking explicit consideration of losses and the quality of scrap into account. Application to car steel recovered from EoL vehicles (ELV) showed that after 50 years around 80% of the steel is used in products, mostly buildings and civil engineering (infrastructure), with the rest mostly resided in unrecovered obsolete infrastructure and refinery losses. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of changes in product lifespan, and the quality of scrap. PMID:24872019

Nakamura, Shinichiro; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

2014-07-01

360

Constitutive model development for lightly cemented scrap rubber tire chips  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rubber-soil (lightly cemented scrap rubber tire chips) is a promising solution for the global scrap tire problem. It is also a promising material for various geotechnical engineering applications because of its advantageous properties such as lightweight, high permeability, high ductility and ease to cast. Intensive laboratory studies, mostly under triaxial testing, are conducted and a constitutive model is proposed. Firstly, the effective stress principle is proven applicable for Rubber-soil under normal engineering stress level although the inter-particle contact area is large. Secondly, because of the gravel-sized surface voids on the testing samples, membrane penetration is serious so an integrated remedy method is proposed, where the surface voids are patched up first and then a lubricated reinforced membrane is dressed on. It is found that the volumetric deformation of Rubber-soil is very recoverable even after 20% volume contraction but the over consolidation results illustrate a decreasing stiffness, which is believed due to volumetric damage. Shearing on the sample gives typical results as sands where clear phase transformation is observed, but the strains involved are higher and more recoverable. Besides, shear stiffness is observed decreasing with deformation, which is believed due to shear damage. There are other observations such as the difference in the curvatures of unloading and reloading curves in CD tests, which might be a frictional phenomenon. Based on the laboratory observations and on the analogy of a continuum spring-block system, a constitutive model termed as Analogical Model is proposed. Fifteen model parameters are involved but most of them are typical soil parameters. The remaining ones have clear physical meanings and can be easily calibrated. It is found that the model can satisfactorily capture many features observed from the experiments, such as hardening, softening, apparent permanent deformations, stiffness decay due to damage, cyclic damage that leads to accumulation of strains and the frictional phenomenon of different curvatures between unloading and reloading curves. The model utilizes the hypothesis of the competition between bond mobilization, friction activation and bond degradation. It is believed that this model may be generalized to other bonded frictional materials although there are still many rooms for improvement.

Tsoi, Wa Yeung

361

White goods recycling in the United States: Economic and technical issues in recovering, reclaiming, and reusing nonmetallic materials  

SciTech Connect

Obsolete white goods (appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, washers, dryers, ranges, dishwashers, water heaters, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners) contain significant quantities of recyclable materials, but because of economic and environmental concerns, only limited quantities of these scrap materials are currently being recycled. Appliances are manufactured from a mix of materials, such as metals, polymers, foam, and fiberglass; metals represent more than 75% of the total weight. Appliance recycling is driven primarily by the value of the steel in the appliances. Over the last 15 years, however, the use of polymers in appliance manufacturing has increased substantially at the expense of metals. The shift in the materials composition of appliances may threaten the economics of the use of obsolete appliances as a source for scrap metals. To increase the recycling of white goods, cost-effective and environmentally acceptable technologies must be developed to separate, recover, reclaim, and reuse polymers from discarded appliances. Argonne National Laboratory is currently conducting research, with industry support, to develop cost-effective processes and methods for recovering and reclaiming acrylonitrile butadiene-styrene and High-density polystyrene from discarded appliances. This collaborative research focuses on developing a combination of mechanical/physical and chemical separation methods for recovering and reusing these high-value plastics. In addition, cost-effective methods for improving the performance characteristics of the recovered plastics are being investigated with the goal of recycling these plastics to their original application. In this paper, we examine the technical and economic issues that affect the recycling of white goods and present results of Argonne`s white goods recycling research and development activities.

Karvelas, D.E.; Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.

1995-02-01

362

GNB battery recycling plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most technologically and environmentally advanced recycling plant in the world has just been completed in Columbus, Georgia, according to GNB. GNB Technologies is a wholly owned subsidiary of Pacific Dunlop. With a capacity of 9 million spent batteries per year, or 30,000 batteries a day, this new $50 million dollar plant replaces GNB`s 35-year old recycling plant in Columbus

1995-01-01

363

Recyclability Index for Automobiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rating system was developed to quantify the environmental impacts of light-duty motor vehicles at the end of their life-cycle based on recyclability, toxic material content and ultimate disposal. Each year, 10-11 million vehicles are retired from service in the United States. The vehicle material not recycled is called automotive shredder residue (ASR). About 4.5 to 5 million tons of

Alexander Tsuji; Yarrow Nelson; Andrew Kean; Samuel A. Vigil

2006-01-01

364

Climate Kids: Recycle This!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The site features an online game in which participants keep recyclable items out of the trash by guiding them into proper bins. Accompanying the game is a list of three categories of items that can be recycled, along with the benefits of doing so. This lesson is part of the Climate Kids website, a NASA education resource featuring articles, videos, images and games focused on the science of climate change.

365

Recycling of nonmetallics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The first factor determining recyclability is the composition of the material itself. Metals, for example, can be reused with little or no loss in quality. Paper and rubber, by this criterion, are less recyclable. Each time paper is recycled, some cellulose fibers are broken. Shorter fibers can mean weaker paper of perceived lower quality and value. Vulcanizing is an irreversible chemical process that precludes recycling rubber in its original form. Both materials may be reused in other applications often of lower value than the original one. To be recyclable, the discarded material must have a collection infrastructure at the source of waste generation, at a central collection site, or at curbside. The recovered material must also have a market. If it is priced noncompetitively or no market exists, if it does not meet specifications, or if it requires special technology investments which cannot be recovered through future sales, the recovered material may be stockpiled or discarded rather than recycled. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Amey, E.B.; Kelly, T.D.

1996-01-01

366

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01

367

Resource recovery of scrap silicon solar battery cell.  

PubMed

In order to minimize pollution problems and to conserve limited natural resources, a hydrometallurgical procedure was developed in this study to recover the valuable resources of silicon (Si), silver (Ag) and aluminum (Al) from scrap silicon solar battery cells. In this study, several methods of leaching, crystallization, precipitation, electrolysis and replacement were employed to investigate the recovery efficiency of Ag and Al from defective monocrystalline silicon solar battery cells. The defective solar battery cells were ground into powder followed by composition analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The target metals Ag and Al weight percentage were found to be 1.67 and 7.68 respectively. A leaching process was adopted with nitric acid (HNO3), hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and sodium hydroxide as leaching reagent to recover Ag and Al from a ground solar battery cell. Aluminum was leached 100% with 18N H2SO4 at 70°C and Ag was leached 100% with 6N HNO3. Pure Si of 100% was achieved from the leaching solution after the recovery of Ag and Al, and was analyzed by scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectroscopy. Aluminum was recovered by crystallization process and silver was recovered by precipitation, electrolysis and replacement processes. These processes were applied successfully in the recovery of valuable metal Ag of 98-100%. PMID:23460539

Lee, Ching-Hwa; Hung, Chi-En; Tsai, Shang-Lin; Popuri, Srinivasa R; Liao, Ching-Hua

2013-05-01

368

Distillation of granulated scrap tires in a pilot plant.  

PubMed

This paper reports the pyrolytic treatment of granulated scrap tires (GST) in a pilot distillation unit at moderate temperature (550°C) and atmospheric pressure, to produce oil, char and gas products. Tire-derived oil is a complex mixture of organic C(5)-C(24) compounds, including a very large proportion of aromatic compounds. This oil has a high gross calorific value (? 43 MJ kg(-1)) and N and S contents of 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively, falling within the specifications of certain heating fuels. The distillation gas is composed of hydrocarbons; methane and n-butane are the most abundant, investing the distillation gas with a very high gross calorific value (? 68 MJ Nm(-3)). This gas is transformed into electric power by a co-generation turbine. The distillation char is mostly made of carbon but with significant inorganic impurities (? 12 wt%). The quality of the solid residue of the process is comparable to that of some commercial chars. The quantity of residual solids, and the qualities of the gas, liquid and solid fractions, are similar to those obtained by conventional pyrolytic treatments of waste tires. However, the simplicity of the proposed technology and its low investment costs make it a very attractive alternative. PMID:21493004

López, Félix A; Centeno, Teresa A; Alguacil, Francisco José; Lobato, Belén

2011-06-15

369

Pyrolysis of scrap tires: Can it be profitable?  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis--the thermal degradation in the absence of oxygen--is one way to reprocess scrap tires. The products are fuel gas, oils, and a solid residue (char), which contains appreciable quantities of mineral matter and low-grade carbon black. The three products have comparable yields by weight. The two most important factors affecting process economics are the tipping fees charged for tire disposal and the selling prices of the products. Selling prices of the products yield low returns because of the low market value of the fuels and the low quality of the recovered char or carbon black. Therefore, to obtain a positive cash flow, it would be desirable to develop a process based on the recovery of value-added products such as high-grade carbon black, activated carbon, or valuable chemicals (e.g., benzene, toluene, and xylene). The authors believe that significant improvement in the economics can be accomplished by upgrading the primary pyrolysis products to secondary products of higher value.

Wojtowicz, M.A.; Serio, M.A.

1996-10-01

370

Electronic scraps - Recovering of valuable materials from parallel wire cables  

SciTech Connect

Every year, the number of discarded electro-electronic products is increasing. For this reason recycling is needed, to avoid wasting non-renewable natural resources. The objective of this work is to study the recycling of materials from parallel wire cable through unit operations of mineral processing. Parallel wire cables are basically composed of polymer and copper. The following unit operations were tested: grinding, size classification, dense medium separation, electrostatic separation, scrubbing, panning, and elutriation. It was observed that the operations used obtained copper and PVC concentrates with a low degree of cross contamination. It was concluded that total liberation of the materials was accomplished after grinding to less than 3 mm, using a cage mill. Separation using panning and elutriation presented the best results in terms of recovery and cross contamination.

Pinheiro Bezerra de Araujo, Mishene Christie [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo, Av Prof. Mello Moraes 2464, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Pinto Chaves, Arthur [Department of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo, Av Prof. Mello Moraes 2373, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Crocce Romano Espinosa, Denise [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo, Av Prof. Mello Moraes 2464, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo, Av Prof. Mello Moraes 2464, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil)], E-mail: jtenorio@usp.br

2008-11-15

371

Recycling of Magnesium Alloy Employing Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pure magnesium was recycled from partially oxidized 50.5 wt pct Mg-Al scrap alloy and AZ91 Mg alloy (9 wt pct Al, 1 wt pct Zn). Refining experiments were performed using a eutectic mixture of MgF2-CaF2 molten salt (flux). During the experiments, potentiodynamic scans were performed to determine the electrorefining potentials for magnesium dissolution and magnesium bubble nucleation in the flux. The measured electrorefining potential for magnesium bubble nucleation increased over time as the magnesium content inside the magnesium alloy decreased. Potentiostatic holds and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to measure the electronic and ionic resistances of the flux. The electronic resistivity of the flux varied inversely with the magnesium solubility. Up to 100 pct of the magnesium was refined from the Mg-Al scrap alloy by dissolving magnesium and its oxide into the flux followed by argon-assisted evaporation of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. Solid oxide membrane electrolysis was also employed in the system to enable additional magnesium recovery from magnesium oxide in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. In an experiment employing AZ91 Mg alloy, only the refining step was carried out. The calculated refining yield of magnesium from the AZ91 alloy was near 100 pct.

Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter A.; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

2013-04-01

372

Recycle Experience of Dismantled Cask Handling Crane by Surface Removal Sampling at Kori Unit No.1  

SciTech Connect

The Kori No.1, which began operation in 1978, replaced its cask handling crane in 2000. To prove the safety of recycling and reuse of crane scrap, a particular calculation method for surface contamination was used. Because surface radioactive contamination of steel is limited to a few-microns-thick layer, we can calculate the total(removable and fixed contamination) activity of the sample conservatively by this surface removal sampling means. If we multiply the ratio of total surface and the area of the selected surface by its activity, total activity of the scrap can be estimated. Conservatively, the sampled portion can be used as a representative sample of the scrap. Both the inner and outer part of the scrap was sampled separately, and gamma spectra were analyzed to check whether activation had occurred. Before sampling, the entire surface of the steel is scan surveyed by several kinds of GM and GP detectors. Contaminated parts were segregated, or decontaminated to the background. Almost one sample per one ton of steel was collected. Gamma spectra of 62 samples were analyzed by 100% efficiency HP Ge detector. Only 60Co was detected, and its highest activity was 0.01 Bq/g,. This level of activity is much lower than the ''clearance levels'' outlined in IAEA TecDoc-855.(4). The total alpha and total beta for 6 samples were measured in the laboratory by low background alpha, using a beta gas proportional counter. Activities were much lower than 0.005 Bq/g. A representative sample was taken from the complete mixture of 62 samples. Gamma activities of nuclides were measured to estimate the dose to the public. This study revealed that activities of nuclides were lower than 'clearance levels' if decontaminated until the lower limit of detection level of the portable field instrument. New surface removal sampling method was tested. This method allows us to easily calculate the specific activity for the solid material.

Kim, K. D.; Baeg, C. Y.; Son, J. K.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. A.; Song, M. J.

2002-02-25

373

Coprocessing of hydrocarbonaceous wastes and residual oil - a novel approach to recycling  

SciTech Connect

The Plastic and Rubber Recycling (PARR) Process being developed by Kilborn Inc., and Canadian Energy Developments Inc., offers a unique approach to the recovery and recycle of waste hydrocarbonaceous materials as they are simultaneously hydrogenated with low quality residual oil to yield basic petrochemicals and virgin plastic and synthetic rubber compounds. Laboratory scale experiments with used tire rubber crumb, scrap polystyrene and heavy oil residuum as the coprocessing medium gave encouraging results. In excess of 90 percent of the carbonaceous matter was converted to distillate oil product that, upon secondary hydrotreating, could be considered high quality ethylene cracking furnace feedstock or aromatics extraction plant feedstock. This presentation will discuss the technical and economic potential of the PARR Process, the planned technology development program and initial commercialization plans.

Anderson, N.E. [Kilborn Inc., Toronto (Canada); Berger, D.J. [Canadian Energy Developments Inc., Edmonton (Canada)

1993-12-31

374

Assessment of damage to geomembrane liners by shredded scrap tires  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a field and laboratory study performed to assess damage to the geomembrane liner caused by using shredded scrap tires as a leachate drainage layer material in landfills. The field testing was performed to assess the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liner during construction and included nine tests conducted with different combinations of tire chip size and thickness, both with a geotextile and without a geotextile overlying the geomembrane, and under different loading conditions. The laboratory testing was performed to characterize the shredded tires, particularly their size distribution, hydraulic conductivity, compressibility, and chemical resistance. The laboratory testing also included performing simulation testing to determine the extent of damage that occurs to the geomembrane liner by the shredded tires under long-term waste-loading conditions. the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liners in both field tests and simulated laboratory tests was determined by visual observations as well as by conducting multi-axial tension tests, wide strip tension tests, and water vapor transmission tests on the exhumed geomembrane samples. Based on these results, a 0.46-m thick layer of secondary shred tire chips, with an average size of 7.6 cm, placed over a 543-g/m{sup 2} geotextile installed over a geomembrane liner using low-ground-pressure (<58 kPa) equipment was determined to provide adequate protection in the geomembrane liner during construction. The degree of protection offered under long-term loading conditions depends on the normal stress and the random orientation of the shredded tire chips at the geomembrane interface.

Reddy, K.R.; Saichek, R.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Materials Engineering

1998-12-01

375

Recycled Aluminum Ornaments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan from ATEEC will explain the principles of recycling. The activity would be most appropriate for technology studies or high school science classes. In all, it would require 2-5 hours of class time to complete. The purpose of the lesson is to demonstrate how aluminum is recycled. This laboratory activity does require some special equipment including a heat source capable of melting aluminum and an outdoor work area. Extension activities are also provided. The lesson plan is available for download as a PDF; users must create a free, quick login with ATEEC to access the materials.

Wishart, Ray

2013-06-14

376

Power recycling for an interferometric gravitational wave  

E-print Network

THESIS Power recycling for an interferometric gravitational wave detector Masaki Ando Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 3.3 Power recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.1 Principle of power recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.2 Recycling cavity

Ejiri, Shinji

377

Boiling water reactor uranium utilization improvement potential  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of design and operational simulation studies to assess the potential for reduction of BWR uranium requirements. The impact of the improvements on separative work requirements and other fuel cycle requirements also were evaluated. The emphasis was on analysis of the improvement potential for once-through cycles, although plutonium recycle also was evaluated. The improvement potential was analyzed for several design alternatives including axial and radial natural uranium blankets, low-leakage refueling patterns, initial core enrichment distribution optimization, reinsert of initial core discharge fuel, preplanned end-of-cycle power coastdown and feedwater temperature reduction, increased discharge burnup, high enrichment discharge fuel rod reassembly and reinsert, lattice and fuel bundle design optimization, coolant density spectral shift with flow control, reduced burnable absorber residual, boric acid for cold shutdown, six-month subcycle refueling, and applications of a once-through thorium cycle design and plutonium recycle.

Wei, P.; Crowther, R.L.; Fennern, L.E.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Tilley, R.M.; Townsend, D.B.; Wolters, R.A.

1980-06-01

378

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions  

SciTech Connect

An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20?25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

Peterson, E.S.; Trudeau, J.; Cleary, B.; Hackett, M.; Greene, W.A.

2003-04-30

379

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions  

SciTech Connect

An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20–25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

Eric S. Peterson; Jessica Trudeau; Bill Cleary; Michael Hackett; William A. Greene

2003-04-01

380

Minerals Yearbook, 1992: Materials Recycling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A large variety of materials are recycled by different sectors of our society. The materials recycling that is mainly addressed in this writing is from waste that is generated after manufacturing and use. Included is recycling that is generally more obvio...

A. O. Tanner

1992-01-01

381

Recycling Behavior: A Multidimensional Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work centers on the study of consumer recycling roles to examine the sociodemographic and psychographic profile of the distribution of recycling tasks and roles within the household. With this aim in mind, an empirical work was carried out, the results of which suggest that recycling behavior is multidimensional and comprises the undertaking…

Meneses, Gonzalo Diaz; Palacio, Asuncion Beerli

2005-01-01

382

CHERRY: CHECKPOINTED EARLY RESOURCE RECYCLING  

E-print Network

1 2 3 CHERRY: CHECKPOINTED EARLY RESOURCE RECYCLING Jos´e F. Mart´inez1 , Jose Renau2 Michael C. Huang3 , Milos Prvulovic2 , and Josep Torrellas2 #12;Cherry: Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling efficient use by aggressive recycling Opportunity: Resources reserved until retirement § ¦ ¤ ¥ Solution

Torrellas, Josep

383

Mercury recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reclamation and recycling of mercury from used mercury- containing products and treatment of byproduct mercury from gold mining is vital to the continued, though declining, use of this metal. Mercury is reclaimed from mercury-containing waste by treatment in multistep high-temperature retorts-the mercury is volatized and then condensed for purification and sale. Some mercury-containing waste, however, may be landfilled, and landfilled material represents loss of a recyclable resource and a threat to the environment. Related issues include mercury disposal and waste management, toxicity and human health, and regulation of mercury releases in the environment. End-users of mercury-containing products may face fines and prosecution if these products are improperly recycled or not recycled. Local and State environmental regulations require adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act to regulate generation, treatment, and disposal of mercury-containing products. In the United States, several large companies and a number of smaller companies collect these products from a variety of sources and then reclaim and recycle the mercury. Because mercury has not been mined as a principal product in the United States since 1992, mercury reclamation from fabricated products has become the main source of mercury. Principal product mercury and byproduct mercury from mining operations are considered to be primary materials. Mercury may also be obtained as a byproduct from domestic or foreign gold-processing operations. In the early 1990s, U.S. manufacturers used an annual average that ranged from 500 to 600 metric tons of recycled and imported mercury for fabrication of automobile convenience switches, dental amalgam, fluorescent lamps, medical uses and thermometers, and thermostats. The amount now used for fabrication is estimated to be 200 metric tons per year or less. Much of the data on mercury is estimated because it is a low-volume commodity and its production, use, and disposal is difficult to track. The prices and volumes of each category of mercury-containing material may change dramatically from year to year. For example, the average price of mercury was approximately $150 per flask from 2000 until 2003 and then rose sharply to $650 per flask in fall 2004 and approximately $850 per flask in spring 2005. Since 1927, the common unit for measuring and pricing mercury has been the flask in order to conform to the system used at Almaden, Spain (Meyers, 1951). One flask weighs 34.5 kilograms, and 29 flasks of mercury are contained in a metric ton. In the United States, the chlorine-caustic soda industry, which is the leading end-user of elemental mercury, recycles most of its mercury in-plant as home scrap. Annual purchases of replacement mercury by the chlorine-caustic soda industry indicate that some mercury may be lost through evaporation to the environment, put into a landfill as industrial waste, or trapped within pipes in the plant. Impending closure of domestic and foreign mercury-cell chlorine-caustic soda plants and the shift to nonmercury technology for chlorine-caustic soda production could ultimately result in a significant volume of elemental mercury for recycling, sale, or storage. Globally, mercury is widely used in artisanal, or small-scale, gold mining. Most of that mercury is lost to the environment and is not recycled. The recycling rate for mercury was not available owing to insufficient data in 2000, and the efficiency of mercury recycling was estimated to be 62 percent.

Brooks, William E.; Matos, Grecia R.

2005-01-01

384

Fuels from Recycling Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three systems, operating at sufficient scale, produce fuels that may be alternatives to oil and gas. These three recycling systems are: Black Clawson Fiberclaim, Franklin, Ohio; Union Carbide, South Charleston, West Virginia; and Union Electric, St. Louis, Missouri. These produce a wet fuel, a pyrolytic gas, and a dry fuel, respectively. (BT)

Tillman, David A.

1975-01-01

385

Recycle Your Own Paper!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity (page 2 of PDF), learners will prepare sheets of homemade recycled paper from several different source pulps. Once dry, each sample will be drawn on with a marker to test how far ink spreads in the fibers of the different kinds of papers. Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV GPS: Garbology.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2007-01-01

386

Helium-Recycling Plant  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

Cook, Joseph

1996-01-01

387

Recycling Study Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study guide was designed to help teachers and students understand the problems surrounding solid wastes. It includes an overview of solid waste and recycling, a glossary, suggested activities and a list of resource publications, audiovisual materials and organizations. There are 19 activity suggestions included in this guide designed for use…

Hallowell, Anne; And Others

388

The Recycle Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide provides lessons that enable students to learn how important it is for each of us to take care of the environment by minimizing the problems caused by too much trash. In the 10 lessons included here, students and their families learn how they can be part of the solution by practicing source reduction and by reusing, recycling, and…

Scott, Roger; And Others

389

Glass recycling and reuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods are surveyed for recycling and\\/or reusing post-consumer glass products to determine which methods are most favorable. The following topics are included: the properties of glass, glass manufacture; analyses of alternatives to direct disposal of glass products; reuse of waste glass for glass manufacture; techniques for the separation of glass from municipal refuse; the development of degradable glass containers; returnable

H. R. Samtur

1974-01-01

390

Recycling and Restoration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video explains how Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest near Louisville, Kentucky used recycled cypress from pickle vats to build its visitor center and then “paid back” nature by creating a cypress-tupelo swamp at one end of a lake on the park grounds.

Ket

2011-01-11

391

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Boys and girls, grab your nose-plugs because today we are going to be digging through some garbage! We use a lot of garbage; the average American throws away nearly four pounds everyday. That\\'s a whopping 1,600 pounds a year! That means that every year, EACH one of you toss enough trash to equal the weight of all the students in our class...COMBINED! That\\'s a lot of garbage. Our world is big, but you might not have realized just how small it really is when it comes to holding all this trash. Would you want garbage in your backyard? Your playground? The park? There\\'s only so many places to store our waste. So, what do we do? We RECYCLE! What Does It Mean To Recycle? Recycling is taking things we use and would normally through into the trash can and putting them in a separate container. Instead of going to the dump, it goes to a recycling plant. Things like paper, newspaper, cardboard, plastic, glass, and aluminum are all products ...

Nicole

2008-11-19

392

Computer Recycling Farm USA  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

USGS conducted a study of plastic pollution at this rural US site in the Midwest.  The recycler was receiving computers from companies at a rate which greatly exceeded the capacity of the operation.  Approximately 50,000 computers remained outdoors on 15 acres for nearly a decade.  The site has sinc...

2010-08-13

393

Thermogravimetric characteristics and kinetics of scrap tyre and Juglans regia shell co-pyrolysis.  

PubMed

The degradation kinetics of Juglans regia shell, scrap tyre and their blends were investigated using a thermogravimetric analysis method. Experiments were performed under dynamic conditions and a nitrogen atmosphere in the range 293 to 973?K at different heating rates. During pyrolysis of J. regia shell three mass loss zones were specified as removal of water, decomposition of hemicelluloses and cellulose, and decomposition of lignin. The degradation curves of scrap tyre showed merely one stage which was due to decomposition of styrene butadiene rubber. The kinetic parameters were calculated using both Arrhenius and Coats-Redfern methods. By adopting the Arrhenius method, the average value of activation energies of J. regia shell, scrap tyre and their 1?:?1 blends were found to be 69.22, 71.48 and 47.03?kJ?mol(-1), respectively. Additionally, by using the Coats-Redfern method, the average value of activation energies of J. regia shell, scrap tyre and their 1?:?1 blend were determined as 99.85, 78.72 and 63.81?kJ?mol(-1), respectively. The addition of J. regia shell to scrap tyre caused a reduction in the activation energies. The difference of weight loss was measured to examine interactions between raw materials. The maximum difference between experimental and theoretical mass loss was 5% at about 648?K with a heating rate of 20?K?min(-1). These results indicated a significant synergistic effect was available during co-pyrolysis of J. regia shell and scrap tyre in the high temperature region. PMID:25030024

Uzun, Bb; Yaman, E

2014-10-01

394

DUPoly process for treatment of depleted uranium and production of beneficial end products  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a process of encapsulating depleted uranium by forming a homogeneous mixture of depleted uranium and molten virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer into desired shapes. Separate streams of depleted uranium and virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer are simultaneously subjected to heating and mixing conditions. The heating and mixing conditions are provided by a thermokinetic mixer, continuous mixer or an extruder and preferably by a thermokinetic mixer or continuous mixer followed by an extruder. The resulting DUPoly shapes can be molded into radiation shielding material or can be used as counter weights for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships, missiles, armor or projectiles.

Kalb, P.D.; Adams, J.W.; Lageraaen, P.R.; Cooley, C.R.

2000-02-29

395

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Agate Lake Scrap Yard Site, MN, December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Agate Lake Scrap Yard Site in Fairview Township, Minnesota. The selected remedial action for the Agate Lake Scrap Yard site addresses only the groundwater contamination. The major components of the selected remedial action include: Institutional controls that prevent installation of drinking water wells within the vicinity of the contaminated ground water boundaries and disturbances of fill material until health based remedial action goals have been achieved; Installation of four additional wells and a ground water monitoring program to confirm the adequacy of the natural attenuation of residual contaminated ground water.

Not Available

1994-09-01

396

Evaluation of products recovered from scrap tires for use as asphalt modifiers  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute performed rheological tests and water sensitivity tests on asphalt cements that had been modified with carbonous residues obtained from the pyrolysis of scrap tires and waste motor oil. These tests are part of an ongoing program at the University of Wyoming Chemical Engineering Department to evaluate, as asphalt additives, solid carbonous products recovered from the scrap tire and waste motor oil pyrolysis experiments conducted at the University. The tests showed that carbonous residues increased the viscosity and decreased the elasticity of AC-10 and AC-20 asphalts. The tests also indicatedthat asphalt cements modified with carbonous residues were less sensitive to water damage and age embrittlement than unmodified asphalt cements.

McKay, J.

1992-05-01

397

Machining of uranium and uranium alloys  

SciTech Connect

Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures.

Morris, T.O.

1981-12-14

398

Leaching studies for tin recovery from waste e-scrap.  

PubMed

Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the most essential components of all electrical and electronic equipments, which contain noteworthy quantity of metals, some of which are toxic to life and all of which are valuable resources. Therefore, recycling of PCBs is necessary for the safe disposal/utilization of these metals. Present paper is a part of developing Indo-Korean recycling technique consists of organic swelling pre-treatment technique for the liberation of thin layer of metallic sheet and the treatment of epoxy resin to remove/recover toxic soldering material. To optimize the parameters required for recovery of tin from waste PCBs, initially the bench scale studies were carried out using fresh solder (containing 52.6% Sn and 47.3% Pb) varying the acid concentration, temperature, mixing time and pulp density. The experimental data indicate that 95.79% of tin was leached out from solder material using 5.5M HCl at fixed pulp density 50 g/L and temperature 90°C in mixing time 165 min. Kinetic studies followed the chemical reaction controlled dense constant size cylindrical particles with activation energy of 117.68 kJ/mol. However, 97.79% of tin was found to be leached out from solder materials of liberated swelled epoxy resin using 4.5M HCl at 90°C, mixing time 60 min and pulp density 50 g/L. From the leach liquor of solder materials of epoxy resin, the precipitate of sodium stannate as value added product was obtained at pH 1.9. The Pb from the leach residue was removed by using 0.1M nitric acid at 90°C in mixing time 45 min and pulp density 10g/L. The metal free epoxy resin could be disposed-of safely/used as filling material without affecting the environment. PMID:22647503

Jha, Manis Kumar; Choubey, Pankaj Kumar; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumari, Archana; Lee, Jae-Chun; Kumar, Vinay; Jeong, Jinki

2012-10-01

399

Leaching studies for tin recovery from waste e-scrap  

SciTech Connect

Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the most essential components of all electrical and electronic equipments, which contain noteworthy quantity of metals, some of which are toxic to life and all of which are valuable resources. Therefore, recycling of PCBs is necessary for the safe disposal/utilization of these metals. Present paper is a part of developing Indo-Korean recycling technique consists of organic swelling pre-treatment technique for the liberation of thin layer of metallic sheet and the treatment of epoxy resin to remove/recover toxic soldering material. To optimize the parameters required for recovery of tin from waste PCBs, initially the bench scale studies were carried out using fresh solder (containing 52.6% Sn and 47.3% Pb) varying the acid concentration, temperature, mixing time and pulp density. The experimental data indicate that 95.79% of tin was leached out from solder material using 5.5 M HCl at fixed pulp density 50 g/L and temperature 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 165 min. Kinetic studies followed the chemical reaction controlled dense constant size cylindrical particles with activation energy of 117.68 kJ/mol. However, 97.79% of tin was found to be leached out from solder materials of liberated swelled epoxy resin using 4.5 M HCl at 90 Degree-Sign C, mixing time 60 min and pulp density 50 g/L. From the leach liquor of solder materials of epoxy resin, the precipitate of sodium stannate as value added product was obtained at pH 1.9. The Pb from the leach residue was removed by using 0.1 M nitric acid at 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 45 min and pulp density 10 g/L. The metal free epoxy resin could be disposed-of safely/used as filling material without affecting the environment.

Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: maniskrjha@gmail.com [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Choubey, Pankaj Kumar; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumari, Archana [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Lee, Jae-chun, E-mail: jclee@kigam.re.kr [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Vinay [Metal Extraction and Forming Division, National Metallurgical Laboratory (NML), Jamshedpur 831 007 (India); Jeong, Jinki [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15

400

Accumulation of uranium by immobilized persimmon tannin  

SciTech Connect

We have discovered that the extracted juice of unripe astringent persimmon fruit, designated as kakishibu or shibuol, has an extremely high affinity for uranium. To develop efficient adsorbents for uranium, we tried to immobilize kakishibu (persimmon tannin) with various aldehydes and mineral acids. Persimmon tannin immobilized with glutaraldehyde can accumulate 1.71 g (14 mEq U) of uranium per gram of the adsorbent. The uranium accumulating capacity of this adsorbent is several times greater than that of commercially available chelating resins (2-3 mEq/g). Immobilized persimmon tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The uranium retained on immobilized persimmon tannin can be quantitatively and easily eluted with a very dilute acid, and the adsorbent can thus be easily recycled in the adsorption-desorption process. Immobilized persimmon tannin also has a high affinity for thorium. 23 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira (Miyazaki Medical College (Japan))

1994-01-01

401

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01

402

Requirements for, and benefits of, environmentally sound and economically viable management of battery recycling in the Philippines in the wake of Basel Convention trade restrictions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ban on the export of used lead-acid batteries (ULAB) from Annex VII to non-Annex VII countries pursuant to decision III/1 of the Basel Convention reduced the availability of imported scrap feedstock for battery recycling in the Philippines. As ULAB supply from other developing countries becomes scarcer, the ban is likely to encourage and enhance collection and recuperation for domestically generated scrap. From a short-term perspective, this study explores the technological and managerial opportunities for improving the environmental and occupational health performance of the formal battery recycling sector and unregulated reconditioning. From a medium- and long-term point of view, the study investigates restructuring the informal ULAB's collection and recycling sector. The objective has been to make the smaller battery recyclers and reconditioners in the informal sector part of an effective and efficient collection infrastructure that supports an environmentally sound secondary lead sector. This approach gradually phases out uncontrolled, inefficient and environmentally unacceptable methods of secondary lead recovery. Due attention has also been paid to the logistical peculiarities of an archipelago, in particular the regional spread of collection infrastructure, collection and shipment costs as well as the assurance of environmentally safe transport.

Hoffmann, U.; Wilson, B.

403

Uranium industry annual, 1991  

SciTech Connect

In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ``The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States`` is included in this report.

Not Available

1992-10-01

404

Uranium industry annual, 1991  

SciTech Connect

In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report.

Not Available

1992-10-01

405

The impact of radioactive steel recycling on the public and professionals.  

PubMed

The decommissioning of nuclear power plants represents a complex process resulting in the generation of large amounts of waste materials, e.g. steel scrap containing various concentrations of radionuclides. Recycling some of these materials is highly desirable due to numerous reasons. Herein presented scenarios of recycling of radioactive steel within the nuclear as well as civil engineering industry are analyzed from the radiation protection point of view. An approach based on the dose constraints principle is chosen. The aim of the study is to derive conditional clearance levels (maximal specific mass activity of material allowing its recycling/clearance) for analyzed radionuclides ensuring that the detrimental impact on human health is kept on a negligible level. Determined conditional clearance levels, as the result of performed software calculations, are valid for the reuse of radioactive steel in four selected scenarios. Calculation results indicate that the increase of the amount of recyclable radioactive steel due to its reuse in specific applications may be feasible considering the radiation impact on the public and professionals. However, issues connected with public acceptance, technical difficulties and financing of potential realization are still open and they have to be examined in more detail. PMID:23608061

Hrncir, Tomas; Panik, Michal; Ondra, Frantisek; Necas, Vladimir

2013-06-15

406

COBAT: collection and recycling spent lead/acid batteries in Italy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The European Economic Community (EEC) introduced a very clear Directive (157/91) aimed at solving the problem of collecting and recycling scrap accumulators and lead/acid batteries. This waste has a potentially harmful effect on the environment if the recycling process is not carried out correctly at all stages. COBAT is a Consortium created in 1990 in order to meet the requirements of the Italian law 475/88 which preceded the above-mentioned EEC Directive. This Consortium has a broad basis comprising all sectors involved in the battery cycle life (battery producers, battery fitters, collectors and recyclers). So far the organization, using the following approach has had very positive results since its inception three years ago. The public sector, representatives from the Environmental Ministry and the Ministry of Industry are responsible for supplying guidelines and the overall supervision, whereas the private sector is in charge of the organization and the enforcement of the law. This paper explains in detail the structure and tasks of COBAT, and will proceed on to explain how COBAT is organized and how the collection network and recycling plants work. The economical aspects will be examined in detail, and emphasis will be put on how little the public will have to pay in order to safeguard the environment, and the harmful effect of a competitively run regime to the ecosystem.

Sancilio, Cosmo

407

Opportunities and Barriers to Resource Recovery and Recycling from Shredder Residue in the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shredder residue is the by-product remaining after ferrous and nonferrous metals have been recovered from the processing of vehicles, white goods, and peddler scrap. Shredder residue consists of glass, plastics, rubber, dirt, and small amounts of metal. It is estimated that 5-7 million tons of this shredder residue are landfilled each year in the United States. Technical advancements, coupled with European Union directives and the economic climate, have transformed the recycling of shredder residue in Europe. In the United States, however, regulatory controls and the cheap cost of landfill have worked against the advancement of recycling and recovery of this resource. The Argonne National Laboratory, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, has investigated the effectiveness of recycling shredder residue into polymers. Other research has examined the use of shredder residue in waste-to-energy applications. To improve our ability to process and recycle shredder residue, an investigation of the regulatory, economic, and technological challenges was undertaken. The objective was to conduct a comprehensive review of work done to date, to document the composition of typical shredder output and to identify potential recoverable items (residual metals, plastics, rubber, foam, etc.). Along with uncovering potential new markets, the research would identify the technical, regulatory, and economic barriers to developing those markets.

Nayak, Naren; Apelian, Diran

2014-11-01

408

Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted  

E-print Network

reaction. Generation of Electricity at Nuclear Power Plants Electricity is generated by nuclear power is concentrated in a solid substance called"yellowcake." Chemical Conversion Plants convert the uranium plants with reactors that use water for moderating nuclear reactions and cooling. Spent Nuclear Fuel Used

409

Geometallurgy of uranium deposits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mineralogical controls exert significant control over the extraction of uranium from its ores. Uranium speciation, associated mineralogy, deportment and uranium mineral availability are all factors for consideration when assessing leachability. This study presents data from laboratory uranium extractions undertaken on several contrasting uranium ores from a wide range of orebodies. The results provide insight into the mineralogical factors of importance

R. J. Bowell; J. Grogan; M. Hutton-Ashkenny; C. Brough; K. Penman; D. J. Sapsford

2011-01-01

410

A Generic Recursion Toolbox for Haskell Or: Scrap Your Boilerplate Systematically  

E-print Network

. The scrap-your-boilerplate approach proposed by L¨ammel and Peyton Jones tries to solve this problem that the programmers can focus on the code that performs the actual transformation. In practice we often encounter mechanism and is ev- erything but trivial. In this paper we analyze the problem domain of recursive traver

Erwig, Martin

411

Continuous fermentation of food scraps with constant pH control to produce carboxylic acids  

E-print Network

feedstock to the MixAlco process. Batch fermentation with various temperatures, buffers, and pH control methods elucidated the behavior of food scraps during fermentation. The pH and reactor configuration were limiting factors when maximizing production. A...

Coleman Jr., Stanley Albert

2009-05-15

412

Continuous fermentation of food scraps with constant pH control to produce carboxylic acids  

E-print Network

feedstock to the MixAlco process. Batch fermentation with various temperatures, buffers, and pH control methods elucidated the behavior of food scraps during fermentation. The pH and reactor configuration were limiting factors when maximizing production. A...

Coleman Jr., Stanley Albert

2008-10-10

413

Behavior of antimony in desulfation of the active substance of lead battery scrap  

Microsoft Academic Search

A search for ecologically safe methods for recovering lead battery scrap is one of the urgent problems facing nonferrous reprocessing metallurgy. Desulfation of the active substance of positive and negative plates with solutions of sodium hydroxide or carbonate may become one of the central operations in such methods. Here the authors study the behavior of antimony, which is an admixture

A. G. Morachevskii; Z. I. Vaisgant

1995-01-01

414

CHARACTERIZATION OF AIR POLLUTANTS EMITTED FROM A SIMULATED SCRAP TIRE FIRE  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper describes a small-scale combustion study, designed to collect, identify, and quantify products emitted during the simulated open combustion of scrap tires. he study found that total estimated emissions of semi-volatile organics ranged from 10 to 50 g/kg of tire material...

415

Processing of plastic waste and scrap tires into chemical raw materials, especially by pyrolysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An account of the occurrence of pyrolyzable material and the state of development of pyrolysis processes in the USA and Japan is followed by a description of laboratory and pilot-scale experiments designed to exploit the raw material content of pyrolyzable substances rather than the heating value. Plastic waste and scrap tires can be pyrolyzed to give up to 40 percent

Walter Kaminsky

1976-01-01

416

Pyrolysis of scrap tires and conversion of chars to activated carbon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary objective of this work was to demonstrate the conversion of scrap tires to activated carbon. The authors have been successful in this endeavor, producing carbons with surface areas greater than 500 m[sup 2]\\/g and significant micropore volumes. Tire shreddings were pyrolyzed in batch reactors, and the pyrolysis chars activated by reaction with superheated steam. Solid products of pyrolysis

Akbar A. Merchant; Mark A. Petrich

1993-01-01

417

MUTAGENICITY OF EMISSIONS FROM THE SIMULATED OPEN BURNING OF SCRAP RUBBER TIRES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes a follow-up to a small-scale combustion study to collect, identify, and quantify products emitted during the simulated open combustion of scrap tires. The initial study found that total estimated emissions of semi-volatile organics ranged from 10 to 50 g/kg o...

418

MUTAGENICITY AND CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF EMISSIONS FROM THE OPEN BURNING OF SCRAP RUBBER TIRES  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the use of the Salmonella mutagenicity assay to perform bioassay-directed chemical analysis of emissions from the open burning of scrap rubber tires in both a small laboratory study using tires cut into two sizes (CHUNK and SHRED) and a field study of the larg...

419

CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS FROM THE SIMULATED OPEN BURNING OF SCRAP TIRES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a small-scale combustion study, designed to collect, identify, and quantify products emitted during the simulated open burning of scrap tires. Fixed combustion gas, volatile and semi-volatile organic, particulate, and airborne metals data were collecte...

420

Liquid metal extraction of Nd from NdFeB magnet scrap  

SciTech Connect

This research involves using molten magnesium (Mg) to remove neodymium (Nd) from NdFeB magnet scrap by diffusion. The results show that liquid metal extraction of Nd may be a viable and inexpensive method for recovering the expensive rare earth element Nd for use in Mg castings.

Xu, Yanchen

1999-12-10

421

OFFGAS GENERATION FROM THE DISPOSITION OF SCRAP PLUTONIUM BY VITRIFICATION SIMULANT TESTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is supporting R&D for the conceptual design of the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC to reduce the attractiveness of plutonium scrap by fabricating a durable plutonium oxide glass form and immobilizing this form within the high-level waste glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. A

J Zamecnik; P Patricia Toole; D David Best; T Timothy Jones; W Whitney Thomas; V Vickie Williams

2008-01-01

422

US Department of Energy`s weapons complex scrap metal inventory. Research report  

SciTech Connect

Two tasks comprise the thrust of this contracted effort. Task 1 is the development of a Source List and is based on determining a list of public documents pertaining to contaminated/uncontaminated scrap metals, equipment, and other materials of value, were they not contaminated or could they be decontaminated. Task 2 is to develop an inventory of such materials from the Task 1 list of public documentation. In more detail, the Task 2 Inventory Report is based upon fulfillment of the following requirement to prepare and submit an Inventory Report based on the information obtained in the Source List. The Inventory Report shall define the type, quantity, and location of used equipment, scrap metal, and other materials existing within DOE`s system. The Inventory Report shall list: the site where the equipment, scrap metal, or other material resides; the type and size of equipment; the type and volume and/or weight of scrap metal or other material; its source; the type and level of contamination; its accessibility; the current annual rate of generation; and the projected annual rate of generation of the material.

Duda, J.R.

1993-07-01

423

Municipal solid waste recycling issues  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste (MSW) recycling targets have been set nationally and in many states. Unfortunately, the definitions of recycling, rates of recycling, and the appropriate components of MSW vary. MSW recycling has been found to be costly for most municipalities compared to landfill disposal. MSW recycling policy should be determined by the cost to the community and to society more generally. In particular, recycling is a good policy only if environmental impacts and the resources used to collect, sort, and recycle a material are less than the environmental impacts and resources needed to provide equivalent virgin material plus the resources needed to dispose of the postconsumer material safely. From a review of the existing economic experience with recycling and an analysis of the environmental benefits (including estimation of external social costs), the authors find that, for most communities, curbside recycling is only justifiable for some postconsumer waste, such as aluminum and other metals. They argue that alternatives to curbside recycling collection should be explored, including product takeback for products with a toxic content (such as batteries) or product redesign to permit more effective product remanufacture.

Lave, L.B.; Hendrickson, C.T.; Conway-Schempf, N.M.; McMichael, F.C. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1999-10-01

424

Novel process for recycling magnesium alloy employing refining and solid oxide membrane electrolysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnesium is the least dense engineering metal, with an excellent stiffness-to-weight ratio. Magnesium recycling is important for both economic and environmental reasons. This project demonstrates feasibility of a new environmentally friendly process for recycling partially oxidized magnesium scrap to produce very pure magnesium at low cost. It combines refining and solid oxide membrane (SOM) based oxide electrolysis in the same reactor. Magnesium and its oxide are dissolved in a molten flux. This is followed by argon-assisted evaporation of dissolved magnesium, which is subsequently condensed in a separate condenser. The molten flux acts as a selective medium for magnesium dissolution, but not aluminum or iron, and therefore the magnesium collected has high purity. Potentiodynamic scans are performed to monitor the magnesium content change in the scrap as well as in solution in the flux. The SOM electrolysis is employed in the refining system to enable electrolysis of the magnesium oxide dissolved in the flux from the partially oxidized scrap. During the SOM electrolysis, oxygen anions are transported out of the flux through a yttria stabilized zirconia membrane to a liquid silver anode where they are oxidized. Simultaneously, magnesium cations are transported through the flux to a steel cathode where they are reduced. The combination of refining and SOM electrolysis yields close to 100% removal of magnesium metal from partially oxidized magnesium scrap. The magnesium recovered has a purity of 99.6w%. To produce pure oxygen it is critical to develop an inert anode current collector for use with the non-consumable liquid silver anode. In this work, an innovative inert anode current collector is successfully developed and used in SOM electrolysis experiments. The current collector employs a sintered strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (La0.8Sr0.2MnO 3-delta or LSM) bar, an Inconel alloy 601 rod, and a liquid silver contact in between. SOM electrolysis experiments with the new LSM-Inconel current collector are carried out and performance comparable to the state-of-the-art SOM electrolysis for Mg production employing the non-inert anode has been demonstrated. In both refining and SOM electrolysis, magnesium solubility in the flux plays an important role. High magnesium solubility in the flux facilitates refining. On the other hand, lower magnesium solubility benefits the SOM electrolysis. The dissolution of magnesium imparts electronic conductivity to the flux. The effects of the electronic conductivity of the flux on the SOM electrolysis performance are examined in detail through experiments and modeling. Methods for mitigating the negative attributes of the electronic conductivity during SOM electrolysis are presented.

Guan, Xiaofei

425

Understanding recycling behavior in Kentucky: Who recycles and why  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recycling behavior and the motivations behind recycling are being analyzed in a collaborative study between the Sloan Industry Center for a Sustainable Aluminum Industry, the Center for Aluminum Technology, Secat, and the Gatton College of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. The goals of this study are to determine why people recycle and to find ways to motivate people to recycle more, using Fayette County, Kentucky, as a sample study. It is hoped that the information gathered through educational and motivational efforts in this county can be used on a larger scale in communities throughout the United States.

Morgan, Fred W.; Hughes, Margaret V.

2006-08-01

426

Using vacuum pyrolysis and mechanical processing for recycling waste printed circuit boards.  

PubMed

The constant growth in generation of waste printed circuit boards (WPCB) poses a huge disposal problem because they consist of a heterogeneous mixture of organic and metallic chemicals as well as glass fiber. Also the presence of heavy metals, such as Pb and Cd turns this scrap into hazardous waste. Therefore, recycling of WPCB is an important subject not only from the recovery of valuable materials but also from the treatment of waste. The aim of this study was to present a recycling process without negative impact to the environment as an alternative for recycling WPCB. In this work, a process technology containing vacuum pyrolysis and mechanical processing was employed to recycle WPCB. At the first stage of this work, the WPCB was pyrolyzed under vacuum in a self-made batch pilot-scale fixed bed reactor to recycle organic resins contained in the WPCB. By vacuum pyrolysis the organic matter was decomposed to gases and liquids which could be used as fuels or chemical material resources, however, the inorganic WPCB matter was left unaltered as solid residues. At the second stage, the residues obtained at the first stage were investigated to separate and recover the copper through mechanical processing such as crushing, screening, and gravity separation. The copper grade of 99.50% with recovery of 99.86% based on the whole WPCB was obtained. And the glass fiber could be obtained by calcinations in a muffle furnace at 600 degrees C for 10 min. This study had demonstrated the feasibility of vacuum pyrolysis and mechanical processing for recycling WPCB. PMID:20060640

Long, Laishou; Sun, Shuiyu; Zhong, Sheng; Dai, Wencan; Liu, Jingyong; Song, Weifeng

2010-05-15

427

Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices  

E-print Network

Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices Metal Bins Deskside Bins with Side Saddle Rubbermaid Bins.58 for auxiliaries. And Non-Public Areas Public Offices Non-Public Recyclables Recyclables RecyclablesTrash Trash Trash #12;New Recycling Bin Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions (as of December 2008) · Why

Kirschner, Denise

428

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-print Network

GENERAL Significant reserves of uranium have been identifieduranium deposit at Kvanefjeld, the Ilimaussaq intrusion, South Greenland, geology, reservesreserves well in excess of ten thousand tons of uranium

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01

429

Emulsified industrial oils recycling  

SciTech Connect

The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

Gabris, T.

1982-04-01

430

Energy and Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Energy and Garbage is one section of a US Department of Energy's educational Web site for kids. Features of this Web site include a section detailing the connection between energy and garbage, a thorough introduction to the history of garbage that includes facts and figures on how much waste we produce, information on recycling and reducing garbage at the source, and much more. The information in this Web site is presented in a friendly, narrative style. A short downloadable activity titled Energy from Garbage, created by the National Energy Education Development Project, is also available (grades 4-6).

431

Recycled rubber roads  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes several innovative approaches for recycling old tires in the construction of roads. In one, 18 inches of shredded tire chips (2 X 2 inches) were used on top of 6-8 inches of small stone to construct a road across a sanitary landfill. No compacting or linders were needed. In another application, sidewall mats linked together with steel strapping were used as a sub-base for a road across a swampy area. A third application uses 1/2 inch bits of groundup rubber tires as a replacement for aggregate in an asphalt road base.

Not Available

1989-02-01

432

Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood  

E-print Network

Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated WoodDisposal problem Recycling potentialRecycling potential ValueValue--added productsadded products Closed loop recyclingClosed loop recycling #12;Major Current Disposal OptionsMajor Current Disposal Options Incineration

433

Occurrence of Metastudtite (Uranium Peroxide Dihydrate) at a FUSRAP Site  

SciTech Connect

Uranium concentrations in groundwater in a localized area of a site exceed the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) by a factor of one thousand. Although the groundwater seepage velocity ranges up to 0.7 meters per day (m/day), data indicate that the uranium is not migrating in groundwater. We believe that the uranium is not mobile because of local geochemical conditions and the unstable nature of the uranium compound present at the site; uranium peroxide dihydrate (metastudtite). Metastudtite [UO{sub 4}.2(H{sub 2}O) or (U(O{sub 2})|O|(OH){sub 2}).3H{sub 2}O] has been identified at other sites as an alteration product in casks of spent nuclear fuel, but neither enriched nor depleted uranium were present at this site. Metastudtite was first identified as a natural mineral in 1983, although documented occurrences in the environment are uncommon. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a remedial investigation at the DuPont Chambers Works in Deep water New Jersey under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to evaluate radioactive contamination resulting from historical activities conducted in support of Manhattan Engineering District operations. From 1942 to 1947, Chambers Works converted uranium oxides to uranium tetrafluoride and uranium metal. More than half of the production at this facility resulted from the recovery process, where uranium-bearing dross and scrap were reacted with hydrogen peroxide to produce uranium peroxide dihydrate. The 280-hectare Chambers Works has produced some 600 products, including petrochemicals, aromatics, fluoro-chemicals, polymers, and elastomers. Contaminants resulting from these processes, including separate-phase petrochemicals, have also been detected within the boundaries of the FUSRAP investigation. USACE initiated remedial investigation field activities in 2002. The radionuclides of concern are natural uranium (U{sub nat}) and its short-lived progeny. Areas of impacted soil generally correspond to the footprints of the former production buildings. U{sub nat} concentrations in soil exceed the investigative screening value, 518 Becquerels per kilogram (Bq/kg) [14 pico-curies per gram (pCi/g)], to an approximate depth of 2.5 m. This depth corresponds to the depth of buried demolition debris from the uranium processing site. Aqueous-phase uranium has also been confirmed at the site and appears to coincide with uranium-impacted soils. Soil textures in the impacted area consist mainly of fine-grained silty sand and rubble. The hydraulic conductivities range from 5 E-6 to 1 E-5 m/s. Groundwater seepage velocity ranges from 0.003 m/day to 0.7 m/day in the impacted area. Groundwater investigations conducted throughout the FUSRAP site indicate that redox conditions in the shallow groundwater are reducing, with low dissolved oxygen concentrations, as would be expected underlying a petrochemical facility. In contrast, groundwater in the uranium source area is an oxidizing microenvironment, with elevated pH conditions, despite the presence of free-phase liquid hydrocarbons in close proximity. Dissolved oxygen is elevated in the uranium source area, which may be due to the presence of metastudtite. Metastudtite has been shown to produce hydrogen peroxide through the process of alpha irradiation of water molecules. Uranium peroxide dihydrate is more soluble in water than other hexavalent mineral forms. The literature suggests that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, metastudtite is unstable in groundwater. Although the presence of metastudtite in the source area may have caused locally high levels of aqueous-phase uranium to form, the uranium ions may not be mobile outside of this small area because of significant abrupt changes in geochemical conditions. The ongoing groundwater investigation includes tasks to confirm the presence of metastudtite and hydrogen peroxide, and monitor for seasonal geochemical or hydrogeologic changes. (authors)

Young, C.M.; Nelson, K.A. [Cabrera Services, Inc., 103 East Mount Royal Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21202 (United States); Stevens, G.T.; Grassi, V.J. [US Army Corps of Engineers, Philadelphia District, 100 Penn Square East, Philadelphia, PA 19107-3390 (United States)

2006-07-01

434

Decontamination of uranium-contaminated steel surfaces by hydroxycarboxylic acid with uranium recovery.  

PubMed

We developed a simple, safe method to remove uranium from contaminated metallic surfaces so that the materials can be recycled or disposed of as low-level radioactive or nonradioactive waste. Surface analysis of rusted uranium-contaminated plain carbon-steel coupons by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy showed that uranium was predominantly associated with ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, and magnetite, or occluded in the matrix of the corrosion product as uranyl hydroxide and schoepite (UO3 x 2H2O). Citric acid formulations, consisting of oxalic acid-hydrogen peroxidecitric acid (OPC) or citric acid-hydrogen peroxidecitric acid (CPC), were used to remove uranium from the coupons. The efficiency of uranium removal varied from 68% to 94% depending on the extent of corrosion, the association of uranium with the iron oxide matrix, and the accessibility of the occluded contaminant. Decontaminated coupons clearly showed evidence of the extensive removal of rust and uranium. The waste solutions containing uranium and iron from decontamination by OPC and CPC were treated first by subjecting them to biodegradation followed by photodegradation. Biodegradation of a CPC solution by Pseudomonas fluorescens resulted in the degradation of the citric acid with concomitant precipitation of Fe (>96%), whereas U that remained in solution was recovered (>99%) by photodegradation as schoepite. In contrast, in an OPC solution citric acid was biodegraded but not oxalic acid, and both Fe and U remained in solution. Photodegradation of this OPC solution resulted in the precipitation of iron as ferrihydrite and uranium as uranyl hydroxide. PMID:16053105

Francis, A J; Dodge, C J; McDonald, J A; Halada, G P

2005-07-01

435

RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE  

E-print Network

RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University recycling and waste management facilities in Swansea university To ensure that Waste Management Objectives

Harman, Neal.A.

436

The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia  

E-print Network

The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia Alexander P. Miller Hang T. Nguyen Samantha D, and the recycling contacts from the participating Solid Waste Planning Units discussed in this study. #12;3 Table Determinants of Recycling_______________________________ 12 State Reports

Lewis, Robert Michael

437

RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY  

E-print Network

RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY Panel Discussion Roundtable Moderator: S, although higher market values for recyclable will certainly stimulate increased interest in collection in recycling and deinking technologies and process design among North American, European, and Pacific Rim

Abubakr, Said

438

Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov  

E-print Network

Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education delivery channels with speculatively pre- computed authorizations and actively recycling them on a just Security Keywords authorization recycling, authorization flooding, access con- trol, authorization, publish

439

16 CFR 260.12 - Recyclable claims.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...otherwise recovered from the waste stream through an established recycling program for reuse or use...about the availability of recycling programs and collection sites to consumers. (1) When recycling facilities are available...

2013-01-01

440

16 CFR 260.12 - Recyclable claims.  

...otherwise recovered from the waste stream through an established recycling program for reuse or use...about the availability of recycling programs and collection sites to consumers. (1) When recycling facilities are available...

2014-01-01

441

Thermoset recycling via high-pressure high-temperature sintering: Revisiting the effect of interchange chemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1844 Charles Goodyear obtained U.S. Patent #3,633 for his "Gum Elastic Composition". In a published circular, which describes his patent for the sulfur vulcanization of gum elastic composition, he stated: "No degree of heat, without blaze, can melt it (rubber)... It resists the most powerful chemical reagents. Aquafortis (nitric acid), sulphuric acid, essential and common oils, turpentine and other solvents... ..." Goodyear's sulfur vulcanization of rubber fueled much of the industrial revolution and made transportation possible, as it exists today. In doing so, Goodyear created one of the most difficult materials to recycle. Rubber will not melt, dissolve, or lend itself to the usual methods of chemical decomposition. Ironically, Goodyear recognized this problem and in 1853 he patented the process of adding ground rubber to virgin material, now currently known as regrind blending. Today, scrap tires represent one of the most serious sources of pollution in the world. Studies estimate that there are roughly 2 billion scrap tires in U.S. landfills and more are being added at a rate of over 273 million tires per year. Current methods of recycling waste tires are crude, ineffective, and use rubber powder as a low cost filler instead of a new rubber. The groundwork for a very simple and effective method of producing high-quality rubber goods using 100% scrap rubber was discovered in 1944 by A. V. Tobolsky et al. This application, however, was not recognized until recently in our laboratory. The process as studied to date represents a method of creating quality, high-value added rubber goods with nothing other than heat and pressure. High pressure is required to obtain a void-free compaction of the rubber particles by forcing all of the free surfaces into intimate contact. High temperature then activates the chemical rearrangement, scission, and reformation of the chemical bonds thus providing new bridges between the once fractured interfaces. This occurs both within and between particles. The technique of high-pressure high-temperature sintering has worked on all types of thermoset materials. Typical mechanical properties for sintered SBR powder rubber are as follows: 1.3 MPa 100% Modulus, 12.0 MPa Tensile Strength and 300% Elongation at Break. The goal of this research is two-fold. First, to gain an understanding of the variables that control the process of high-pressure high-temperature sintering. Second, to study the factors governing the mechanism of fusion with the hope of controlling and exploiting this process so that tires can be recycled to produce high quality and high-value added products.

Morin, Jeremy Edward

442

Finders/keepers: A longitudinal study of people managing information scraps in a micro-note tool  

E-print Network

Mainstream PIM tools capture only a portion of the information that people need to manage. Many information scraps seem to exist that don't make their way into these tools, instead being relegated to sticky notes, text ...

Van Kleek, Max G.

443

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Oakwood Apartments Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the outside

Sibille, Etienne

444

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Brackenridge Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom

Sibille, Etienne

445

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Lothrop Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashrooms. Paper

Sibille, Etienne

446

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Darragh Street Apartments Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled

Sibille, Etienne

447

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Forbes-Craig Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the outside toters

Sibille, Etienne

448

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered McCormick Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom

Sibille, Etienne

449

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing s Plastics Numbered Litchfield Towers Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom

Sibille, Etienne

450

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Pennsylvania Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom

Sibille, Etienne

451

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Sutherland Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom

Sibille, Etienne

452

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing and Food Plastics Numbered Forbes Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom

Sibille, Etienne

453

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Ruskin Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashrooms. Paper

Sibille, Etienne

454

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Fraternity Houses Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the outside

Sibille, Etienne

455

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Centre Plaza Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled by the elevators. Paper

Sibille, Etienne

456

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Panther Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom. Paper

Sibille, Etienne

457

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Bruce Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the laundry room. Paper

Sibille, Etienne

458

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Bouquet Gardens Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the outside toters

Sibille, Etienne

459

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Amos Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the kitchen. Paper

Sibille, Etienne

460

PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!  

E-print Network

for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other Plastics Paper Glass Ink cartridges Batteries Cell Phones Can be recycled at drop-off boxes around campus of Housing Plastics Numbered Holland Hall Metals, Glass and Plastics can be recycled in the trashroom. Paper

Sibille, Etienne

461

Recycled Wind: A Sound Installation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycled Wind is a sound installation in which a visitor's breath is emulated mechanically. Sensors detect the breath and trigger small fans, which blow sound-making objects such as wind chimes and leaves. Like the wind itself, the chimes and leaves are emulated, constructed of recycled materials such as jar lids and grocery bags.

Adam Scott Neal

462

Tritium recycling (processing) facility design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The maintenance of a nuclear weapons capability requires the periodic replacement of tritium contained in each of the weapons in the nuclear weapons stockpile because the radioactive decay of tritium reduces its quantity by about 5.5 percent per year. The Tritium Recycling Plant (TRP) performs the activities necessary to recover, purify, and recycle tritium returned from the field. Tritium is

J. Metzler; T. Le

1995-01-01

463

Bacterial cell-wall recycling  

PubMed Central

Many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria recycle a significant proportion of the peptidoglycan components of their cell walls during their growth and septation. In many—and quite possibly all—bacteria, the peptidoglycan fragments are recovered and recycled. While cell-wall recycling is beneficial for the recovery of resources, it also serves as a mechanism to detect cell-wall–targeting antibiotics and to regulate resistance mechanisms. In several Gram-negative pathogens, anhydro-MurNAc-peptide cell-wall fragments regulate AmpC ?-lactamase induction. In some Gram-positive organisms, short peptides derived from the cell wall regulate the induction of both ?-lactamase and ?-lactam-resistant penicillin-binding proteins. The involvement of peptidoglycan recycling with resistance regulation suggests that inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the recycling might synergize with cell-wall-targeted antibiotics. Indeed, such inhibitors improve the potency of ?-lactams in vitro against inducible AmpC ?-lactamase-producing bacteria. We describe the key steps of cell-wall remodeling and recycling, the regulation of resistance mechanisms by cell-wall recycling, and recent advances toward the discovery of cell-wall recycling inhibitors. PMID:23163477

Johnson, Jarrod W.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

2012-01-01

464

Review Article: Recycling of Polystyrene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycling of polystyrene can be done by mechanical, chemical, and thermal methods. High impact polystyrene is a promising material for mechanical recycling since its properties are not extremely affected even after multiple processing of upto nine cycles. Production of liquid products and gaseous products are highly dependent on the reaction condition. The catalysts used are highly selective for the production

T. Maharana; Y. S. Negi; B. Mohanty

2007-01-01

465

TOMATO CLEANING AND WATER RECYCLE  

EPA Science Inventory

A full-scale dump tank water recycle system was developed and demonstrated. A false bottom-ejector transport system removed soil from the water. Clarified water was either recycled back to the dump tank or discharged to the sewer. A vacuum belt was developed for dewatering the mu...

466

The use of carbonate lixiviants to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to design an extraction media and procedure that would selectively remove uranium without adversely affecting the soils` physicochemical characteristics or generating secondary waste forms difficult to manage or dispose of. Investigations centered around determining the best lixivant and how the various factors such as pH, time, and temperature influenced extraction efficiency. Other factors investigated included the influence of attrition scrubbing, the effect of oxidants and reductants and the recycling of lixiviants. Experimental data obtained at the bench- and pilot-scale levels indicated 80 to 95% of the uranium could be removed from the uranium-contaminated soils by using a carbonate lixiviant. The best treatment was three successive extractions with 0.25 M carbonate-bicarbonate (in presence of KMnO{sub 4} as an oxidant) at 40 C followed with two water rinses.

Francis, C.W.; Lee, S.Y.; Wilson, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-08-01

467

Issues in uranium availability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry,

J. J. Jr. Schanz; S. S. Adams; R. L. Gordon

1982-01-01

468

Shear fracture of a rapidly-solidified Al scrap alloy in tension  

SciTech Connect

Rapid solidification processing (RSP) has been among important alternatives for improving the performance of Al scrap alloys. While fracture by pure shearing process has long been recognized as a typical failure mode of single crystals, its occurrence in some polycrystalline metals has also been documented in literature. The observations were mostly concentrated on the conventionally processed Al alloys. Partial shear fracture has been found in some cases to relate to delamination/splitting processes as in Al-Li alloys and identified as a toughening mechanism for these alloys. As for Al alloys fabricated using RSP, the shear fracture has not been systematically studied. It is the aim of the present study to investigate the mechanisms of shear fracture in an aluminum scrap alloy with the melt spinning solidification.

Li, D.M.; Bakker, A. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Materials Science)

1994-02-01

469

Mutagenicity and chemical analysis of emissions from the open burning of scrap rubber tires  

SciTech Connect

The Salmonella mutagenicity assay and chemical analyses were used to evaluate the emissions from the open burning of scrap rubber tires that had been cut into either of two sizes, CHUNK or SHRED. The mutagenic potencies in strain TA98 of the dichloromethane-extractable particulate organics were generally greater than that of the semivolatiles. In addition, the open burning of CHUNK tires produced a higher burn rate and more potent organics in the presence of S9 than did SHRED tires. These results demonstrate for the first time that the open burning of scrap rubber tires produces a high mutagenic emission factor, posing potential environmental and health effects. (Copyright (c) 1993 American Chemical Society.)

DeMarini, D.M.; Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V.; Brooks, L.R.; Williams, R.W.

1994-01-01

470

Characterization of air pollutants emitted from a simulated scrap tire fire  

SciTech Connect

Discarded automobile tires have become a concern to the general public, largely because the growing number of stockpile fires has focused attention on the potentially harmful combustion products as well as products of incomplete combustion (PICs) emitted into the atmosphere from uncontrolled burning of scrap tires. This paper describes a small-scale combustion study that was designed to collect, identify, and quantify the products emitted during the simulated open combustion of scrap tires. During the study, it was found that total estimated emissions of semivolatile organics ranged from 10 to 50 g/kg of tire material burned. Alkyl-substituted mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons were the predominant emission products identified. Elevated levels of zinc and lead were also measured. 17 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Lemieux, P.M. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)); Ryan, J.V. (Acurex Environmental Corp., Durham, NC (United States))

1993-08-01

471

Muon Tomography as a Tool to Detect Radioactive Source Shielding in Scrap Metal Containers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Muon tomography was recently proposed as a tool to inspect large volumes with the purpose of recognizing high density materials immersed in lower density matrices. The MU-STEEL European project (RFCS-CT-2010-000033) studied the application of such a technique to detect radioactive source shielding in truck containers filled with scrap metals entering steel mill foundries. A description of the muon tomography technique, of the MU-STEEL project and of the obtained results will be presented.

Bonomi, G.; Cambiaghi, D.; Dassa, L.; Donzella, A.; Subieta, M.; Villa, V.; Zenoni, A.; Furlan, M.; Rigoni, A.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Zanuttigh, P.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S.

2014-02-01

472

Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the pyrolysis of scrap tires  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work investigated the PAHs generated in a waste-tire pyrolysis process and the PAHs removal by a wet scrubber (WSB) and a flare. IND, DBA, and BaP were found to dominate in the powders of scrap tires before the pyrolysis. The PAHs in the carbon blacks formed in the pyrolysis were mainly 2-, 3-, 6-, and 7-ring PAHs. Nap was

Shui-Jen Chen; Hung-Bin Su; Juu-En Chang; Wen-Jhy Lee; Kuo-Lin Huang; Lien-Te Hsieh; Yi-Chu Huang; Wen-Yinn Lin; Chih-Chung Lin

2007-01-01