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  1. A screening cascade to identify ERβ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Carly S.; Benod, Cindy; Lou, Xiaohua; Gunamalai, Prem S.; Villagomez, Rosa A.; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Berkenstam, Anders L.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of effective high throughput screening cascades to identify nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that will trigger defined, therapeutically useful sets of NR activities is of considerable importance. Repositioning of existing approved drugs with known side effect profiles can provide advantages because de novo drug design suffers from high developmental failure rates and undesirable side effects which have dramatically increased costs. Ligands that target estrogen receptor β (ERβ) could be useful in a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to neurological to cardiovascular disorders. In this context, it is important to minimize cross-reactivity with ERα, which has been shown to trigger increased rates of several types of cancer. Because of high sequence similarities between the ligand binding domains of ERα and ERβ, preferentially targeting one subtype can prove challenging. Here, we describe a sequential ligand screening approach comprised of complementary in-house assays to identify small molecules that are selective for ERβ. Methods include differential scanning fluorimetry, fluorescence polarization and a GAL4 transactivation assay. We used this strategy to screen several commercially-available chemical libraries, identifying thirty ERβ binders that were examined for their selectivity for ERβ versus ERα, and tested the effects of selected ligands in a prostate cancer cell proliferation assay. We suggest that this approach could be used to rapidly identify candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:25422593

  2. An Xpert screen to identify carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mubin; Nikam, Chaitali; Shetty, Anjali; Rodrigues, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    To prevent the spread of carbapenemases-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) active surveillance, contact isolation and cohorting infected patients should be practiced. Rectal swabs for the Xpert MDRO-assay of 32 patients were included. 71.85% were positive for targets incorporated into the MDRO-assay; whereas 28% were phenotypically not CRE and Xpert negative (9.37% had different mechanism [bla OXA]). The assay identified 59.3%, 9.37% and 3.1% as bla NDM, bla NDM+VIM and bla VIM, respectively. The assay is a screening test that identifies CPE harbouring organism within an hour and can be installed at tertiary-care facilities to screen colonized patients. PMID:27080777

  3. A Screen for Identifying Maladaptive Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Siu L.; Leung, G. M.; Ng, Cecilia; Yu, Effie

    2009-01-01

    A screening tool (in Chinese) for maladaptive internet use was developed in two stages. Thirty-five factors were first extracted from data obtained from 378 adolescents with a 179-item questionnaire. Nine higher-order factors were then obtained from 35 factors. A 26-item screen that measures both endogenous and exogenous factors was constructed on…

  4. 'Goldilocks' suppressor screen identifies web of polarity regulators.

    PubMed

    Seydoux, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing and RNAi have been powerful allies in the quest to assign function to every gene. Systematic RNAi screens identify essential genes efficiently, but are less effective with pleiotropic or redundant genes. A common trick used by geneticists to overcome this problem is to screen for genetic interactors - mutations that enhance or suppress the phenotype of a starting mutation. Now, this classic approach has been combined with the versatility of RNAi to generate an expanded gene network for cell polarity. PMID:23263368

  5. Phenotypic lentivirus screens to identify functional single domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian I; Hanke, Leo; Morin, Benjamin; Brewer, Rebeccah; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P J; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of proteins is key in assessing their in vivo function. Although genetic ablation is straightforward, reversible and specific perturbation of protein function remains a challenge. Single domain antibody fragments, such as camelid-derived VHHs, can serve as inhibitors or activators of intracellular protein function, but functional testing of identified VHHs is laborious. To address this challenge, we have developed a lentiviral screening approach to identify VHHs that elicit a phenotype when expressed intracellularly. We identified 19 antiviral VHHs that protect human A549 cells from lethal infection with influenza A virus (IAV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), respectively. Both negative-sense RNA viruses are vulnerable to VHHs uniquely specific for their respective nucleoproteins. Antiviral VHHs prevented nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins or mRNA transcription, respectively, and may provide clues for novel antiviral reagents. In principle, the screening approach described here should be applicable to identify inhibitors of any pathogen or biological pathway. PMID:27573105

  6. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Molly; Yan, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Lysine demethylases (KDMs) are epigenetic regulators whose dysfunction is implicated in the pathology of many human diseases including various types of cancer, inflammation and X-linked intellectual disability. Particular demethylases have been identified as promising therapeutic targets, and tremendous efforts are being devoted toward developing suitable small-molecule inhibitors for clinical and research use. Several high-throughput screening strategies have been developed to screen for small-molecule inhibitors of KDMs, each with advantages and disadvantages in terms of time, cost, effort, reliability and sensitivity. In this Special Report, we review and evaluate the high-throughput screening methods utilized for discovery of novel small-molecule KDM inhibitors. PMID:25687466

  7. RNAi screening to identify postembryonic phenotypes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Beifuss, Katherine K; Gumienny, Tina L

    2012-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be a valuable model system for the discovery and functional characterization of many genes and gene pathways. More sophisticated tools and resources for studies in this system are facilitating continued discovery of genes with more subtle phenotypes or roles. Here we present a generalized protocol we adapted for identifying C. elegans genes with postembryonic phenotypes of interest using RNAi. This procedure is easily modified to assay the phenotype of choice, whether by light or fluorescence optics on a dissecting or compound microscope. This screening protocol capitalizes on the physical assets of the organism and molecular tools the C. elegans research community has produced. As an example, we demonstrate the use of an integrated transgene that expresses a fluorescent product in an RNAi screen to identify genes required for the normal localization of this product in late stage larvae and adults. First, we used a commercially available genomic RNAi library with full-length cDNA inserts. This library facilitates the rapid identification of multiple candidates by RNAi reduction of the candidate gene product. Second, we generated an integrated transgene that expresses our fluorecently tagged protein of interest in an RNAi-sensitive background. Third, by exposing hatched animals to RNAi, this screen permits identification of gene products that have a vital embryonic role that would otherwise mask a post-embryonic role in regulating the protein of interest. Lastly, this screen uses a compound microscope equipped for single cell resolution. PMID:22353760

  8. Zebrafish screen identifies novel compound with selective toxicity against leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ridges, Suzanne; Heaton, Will L.; Joshi, Deepa; Choi, Henry; Eiring, Anna; Batchelor, Lance; Choudhry, Priya; Manos, Elizabeth J.; Sofla, Hossein; Sanati, Ali; Welborn, Seth; Agarwal, Archana; Spangrude, Gerald J.; Miles, Rodney R.; Cox, James E.; Frazer, J. Kimble; Deininger, Michael; Balan, Kaveri; Sigman, Matthew; Müschen, Markus; Perova, Tatiana; Johnson, Radia; Montpellier, Bertrand; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Jones, David A.

    2012-01-01

    To detect targeted antileukemia agents we have designed a novel, high-content in vivo screen using genetically engineered, T-cell reporting zebrafish. We exploited the developmental similarities between normal and malignant T lymphoblasts to screen a small molecule library for activity against immature T cells with a simple visual readout in zebrafish larvae. After screening 26 400 molecules, we identified Lenaldekar (LDK), a compound that eliminates immature T cells in developing zebrafish without affecting the cell cycle in other cell types. LDK is well tolerated in vertebrates and induces long-term remission in adult zebrafish with cMYC-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). LDK causes dephosphorylation of members of the PI3 kinase/AKT/mTOR pathway and delays sensitive cells in late mitosis. Among human cancers, LDK selectively affects survival of hematopoietic malignancy lines and primary leukemias, including therapy-refractory B-ALL and chronic myelogenous leukemia samples, and inhibits growth of human T-ALL xenografts. This work demonstrates the utility of our method using zebrafish for antineoplastic candidate drug identification and suggests a new approach for targeted leukemia therapy. Although our efforts focused on leukemia therapy, this screening approach has broad implications as it can be translated to other cancer types involving malignant degeneration of developmentally arrested cells. PMID:22490804

  9. Screening for noise in gene expression identifies drug synergies.

    PubMed

    Dar, Roy D; Hosmane, Nina N; Arkin, Michelle R; Siliciano, Robert F; Weinberger, Leor S

    2014-06-20

    Stochastic fluctuations are inherent to gene expression and can drive cell-fate specification. We used such fluctuations to modulate reactivation of HIV from latency-a quiescent state that is a major barrier to an HIV cure. By screening a diverse library of bioactive small molecules, we identified more than 80 compounds that modulated HIV gene-expression fluctuations (i.e., "noise"), without changing mean expression. These noise-modulating compounds would be neglected in conventional screens, and yet, they synergized with conventional transcriptional activators. Noise enhancers reactivated latent cells significantly better than existing best-in-class reactivation drug combinations (and with reduced off-target cytotoxicity), whereas noise suppressors stabilized latency. Noise-modulating chemicals may provide novel probes for the physiological consequences of noise and an unexplored axis for drug discovery, allowing enhanced control over diverse cell-fate decisions. PMID:24903562

  10. Quantitative High-Throughput Luciferase Screening in Identifying CAR Modulators.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Wang, Hongbing; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is responsible for the transcription of multiple drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. There are two possible methods of activation for CAR, direct ligand binding and a ligand-independent method, which makes this a unique nuclear receptor. Both of these mechanisms require translocation of CAR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Interestingly, CAR is constitutively active in immortalized cell lines due to the basal nuclear location of this receptor. This creates an important challenge in most in vitro assay models because immortalized cells cannot be used without inhibiting the high basal activity. In this book chapter, we go into detail of how to perform quantitative high-throughput screens to identify hCAR1 modulators through the employment of a double stable cell line. Using this line, we are able to identify activators, as well as deactivators, of the challenging nuclear receptor, CAR. PMID:27518621

  11. Virtual High-Throughput Screening To Identify Novel Activin Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Mishra, Rama K; Schiltz, Gary E; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Scheidt, Karl A; Mazar, Andrew P; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2015-07-23

    Activin belongs to the TGFβ superfamily, which is associated with several disease conditions, including cancer-related cachexia, preterm labor with delivery, and osteoporosis. Targeting activin and its related signaling pathways holds promise as a therapeutic approach to these diseases. A small-molecule ligand-binding groove was identified in the interface between the two activin βA subunits and was used for a virtual high-throughput in silico screening of the ZINC database to identify hits. Thirty-nine compounds without significant toxicity were tested in two well-established activin assays: FSHβ transcription and HepG2 cell apoptosis. This screening workflow resulted in two lead compounds: NUCC-474 and NUCC-555. These potential activin antagonists were then shown to inhibit activin A-mediated cell proliferation in ex vivo ovary cultures. In vivo testing showed that our most potent compound (NUCC-555) caused a dose-dependent decrease in FSH levels in ovariectomized mice. The Blitz competition binding assay confirmed target binding of NUCC-555 to the activin A:ActRII that disrupts the activin A:ActRII complex's binding with ALK4-ECD-Fc in a dose-dependent manner. The NUCC-555 also specifically binds to activin A compared with other TGFβ superfamily member myostatin (GDF8). These data demonstrate a new in silico-based strategy for identifying small-molecule activin antagonists. Our approach is the first to identify a first-in-class small-molecule antagonist of activin binding to ALK4, which opens a completely new approach to inhibiting the activity of TGFβ receptor superfamily members. in addition, the lead compound can serve as a starting point for lead optimization toward the goal of a compound that may be effective in activin-mediated diseases. PMID:26098096

  12. Virtual High-Throughput Screening To Identify Novel Activin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Mishra, Rama K.; Schiltz, Gary E.; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Scheidt, Karl A.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2015-01-01

    Activin belongs to the TGFβ superfamily, which is associated with several disease conditions, including cancer-related cachexia, preterm labor with delivery, and osteoporosis. Targeting activin and its related signaling pathways holds promise as a therapeutic approach to these diseases. A small-molecule ligand-binding groove was identified in the interface between the two activin βA subunits and was used for a virtual high-throughput in silico screening of the ZINC database to identify hits. Thirty-nine compounds without significant toxicity were tested in two well-established activin assays: FSHβ transcription and HepG2 cell apoptosis. This screening workflow resulted in two lead compounds: NUCC-474 and NUCC-555. These potential activin antagonists were then shown to inhibit activin A-mediated cell proliferation in ex vivo ovary cultures. In vivo testing showed that our most potent compound (NUCC-555) caused a dose-dependent decrease in FSH levels in ovariectomized mice. The Blitz competition binding assay confirmed target binding of NUCC-555 to the activin A:ActRII that disrupts the activin A:ActRII complex’s binding with ALK4-ECD-Fc in a dose-dependent manner. The NUCC-555 also specifically binds to activin A compared with other TGFβ superfamily member myostatin (GDF8). These data demonstrate a new in silico-based strategy for identifying small-molecule activin antagonists. Our approach is the first to identify a first-in-class small-molecule antagonist of activin binding to ALK4, which opens a completely new approach to inhibiting the activity of TGFβ receptor superfamily members. in addition, the lead compound can serve as a starting point for lead optimization toward the goal of a compound that may be effective in activin-mediated diseases. PMID:26098096

  13. A Chemical Screen Identifies Small Molecules that Regulate Hepcidin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gaun, Vera; Patchen, Bonnie; Volovetz, Josephine; Zhen, Aileen W.; Andreev, Aleksandr; Pollastri, Michael P.; Fraenkel, Paula G.

    2014-01-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide hormone produced in the liver, decreases intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release via effects on ferroportin. Bone morphogenic protein and Stat3 signaling regulate Hepcidin's transcription. Hepcidin is a potential drug target for patients with iron overload syndromes because its levels are inappropriately low in these individuals. To generate a tool for identifying small molecules that modulate Hepcidin expression, we stably transfected human hepatocytes (HepG2) cells with a reporter construct containing 2.7 kilobases of the human Hepcidin promoter upstream of a firefly reporter gene. We used high throughput methods to screen 10,169 chemicals in duplicate for their effect on Hepcidin expression and cell viability. Regulators were identified as chemicals that caused a change >3 standard deviations above or >1.5 standard deviations below the mean of the other chemicals (z-score >3 or <-1.5), while not adversely affecting cell viability, quantified by fluorescence assay. Following validation assays, we identified 16 chemicals in a broad range of functional classes that promote Hepcidin expression. All of the chemicals identified increased expression of bone morphogenic protein-dependent and/or Stat3-dependent genes, however none of them strongly increased phosphorylation of Smad1,5,8 or Stat3. PMID:24998898

  14. Large screen approaches to identify novel malaria vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Davies, D Huw; Duffy, Patrick; Bodmer, Jean-Luc; Felgner, Philip L; Doolan, Denise L

    2015-12-22

    Until recently, malaria vaccine development efforts have focused almost exclusively on a handful of well characterized Plasmodium falciparum antigens. Despite dedicated work by many researchers on different continents spanning more than half a century, a successful malaria vaccine remains elusive. Sequencing of the P. falciparum genome has revealed more than five thousand genes, providing the foundation for systematic approaches to discover candidate vaccine antigens. We are taking advantage of this wealth of information to discover new antigens that may be more effective vaccine targets. Herein, we describe different approaches to large-scale screening of the P. falciparum genome to identify targets of either antibody responses or T cell responses using human specimens collected in Controlled Human Malaria Infections (CHMI) or under conditions of natural exposure in the field. These genome, proteome and transcriptome based approaches offer enormous potential for the development of an efficacious malaria vaccine. PMID:26428458

  15. An Unbiased Oncology Compound Screen to Identify Novel Combination Strategies.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Jennifer; Benita, Yair; Feldman, Igor; Chenard, Melissa; Roberts, Brian; Liu, Yaping; Li, Jing; Kral, Astrid; Lejnine, Serguei; Loboda, Andrey; Arthur, William; Cristescu, Razvan; Haines, Brian B; Winter, Christopher; Zhang, Theresa; Bloecher, Andrew; Shumway, Stuart D

    2016-06-01

    Combination drug therapy is a widely used paradigm for managing numerous human malignancies. In cancer treatment, additive and/or synergistic drug combinations can convert weakly efficacious monotherapies into regimens that produce robust antitumor activity. This can be explained in part through pathway interdependencies that are critical for cancer cell proliferation and survival. However, identification of the various interdependencies is difficult due to the complex molecular circuitry that underlies tumor development and progression. Here, we present a high-throughput platform that allows for an unbiased identification of synergistic and efficacious drug combinations. In a screen of 22,737 experiments of 583 doublet combinations in 39 diverse cancer cell lines using a 4 by 4 dosing regimen, both well-known and novel synergistic and efficacious combinations were identified. Here, we present an example of one such novel combination, a Wee1 inhibitor (AZD1775) and an mTOR inhibitor (ridaforolimus), and demonstrate that the combination potently and synergistically inhibits cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo This approach has identified novel combinations that would be difficult to reliably predict based purely on our current understanding of cancer cell biology. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1155-62. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26983881

  16. A Functional Genomic Yeast Screen to Identify Pathogenic Bacterial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slagowski, Naomi L; Kramer, Roger W; Morrison, Monica F; LaBaer, Joshua; Lesser, Cammie F

    2008-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens promote infection and cause disease by directly injecting into host cells proteins that manipulate eukaryotic cellular processes. Identification of these translocated proteins is essential to understanding pathogenesis. Yet, their identification remains limited. This, in part, is due to their general sequence uniqueness, which confounds homology-based identification by comparative genomic methods. In addition, their absence often does not result in phenotypes in virulence assays limiting functional genetic screens. Translocated proteins have been observed to confer toxic phenotypes when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This observation suggests that yeast growth inhibition can be used as an indicator of protein translocation in functional genomic screens. However, limited information is available regarding the behavior of non-translocated proteins in yeast. We developed a semi-automated quantitative assay to monitor the growth of hundreds of yeast strains in parallel. We observed that expression of half of the 19 Shigella translocated proteins tested but almost none of the 20 non-translocated Shigella proteins nor ∼1,000 Francisella tularensis proteins significantly inhibited yeast growth. Not only does this study establish that yeast growth inhibition is a sensitive and specific indicator of translocated proteins, but we also identified a new substrate of the Shigella type III secretion system (TTSS), IpaJ, previously missed by other experimental approaches. In those cases where the mechanisms of action of the translocated proteins are known, significant yeast growth inhibition correlated with the targeting of conserved cellular processes. By providing positive rather than negative indication of activity our assay complements existing approaches for identification of translocated proteins. In addition, because this assay only requires genomic DNA it is particularly valuable for studying pathogens that are difficult to

  17. A Dietary Screening Questionnaire Identifies Dietary Patterns in Older Adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns reflect habitual exposure of foods and nutrients, and are a preferred means to assess diet and disease relationships. Our objective was to design a screening tool to assess diet quality and dietary patterns among older adults, and to relate the patterns to markers of general health ...

  18. RNAi screens in mice identify physiological regulators of oncogenic growth

    PubMed Central

    Beronja, Slobodan; Janki, Peter; Heller, Evan; Lien, Wen-Hui; Keyes, Brice; Oshimori, Naoki; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tissue growth is the multifaceted outcome of a cell’s intrinsic capabilities and its interactions with the surrounding environment. Decoding these complexities is essential for understanding human development and tumorigenesis. Here, we tackle this problem by carrying out the first genome-wide RNAi-mediated screens in mice. Focusing on skin development and oncogenic (HrasG12V-induced) hyperplasia, our screens uncover novel as well as anticipated regulators of embryonic epidermal growth. Among top oncogenic screen hits are Mllt6 and the Wnt effector β-catenin; they maintain HrasG12V-dependent hyperproliferation. We also expose β-catenin as an unanticipated antagonist of normal epidermal growth, functioning through Wnt-independent intercellular adhesion. Finally, we document physiological relevance to mouse and human cancers, thereby establishing the feasibility of in vivo mammalian genome-wide investigations to dissect tissue development and tumorigenesis. By documenting some oncogenic growth regulators, we pave the way for future investigations of other hits and raise promise for unearthing new targets for cancer therapies. PMID:23945586

  19. Activation tag screening to identify novel genes for trichothecene resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of our research is to identify plant genes which enhance trichothecene resistance and, ultimately, Fusarium Head Blight resistance in wheat and barley. We are taking a two pronged approach using Arabidopsis to identify plant genes which confer resistance to trichothecenes. The first approac...

  20. Screening methods to identify TALEN-mediated knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Araki, Kimi; Takeda, Naoki; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Sakuma, Tetsushi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with site-specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases, such as the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system, is becoming the new standard for targeted genome modification in various organisms. Application of these techniques to the manufacture of knockout mice would be greatly aided by simple and easy methods for genotyping of mutant and wild-type pups among litters. However, there are no detailed or comparative reports concerning the identification of mutant mice generated using genome editing technologies. Here, we genotyped TALEN-derived enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) knockout mice using a combination of approaches, including fluorescence observation, heteroduplex mobility assay, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. The detection sensitivities for TALEN-induced mutations differed among these methods, and we therefore concluded that combinatorial testing is necessary for the screening and determination of mutant genotypes. Since the analytical methods tested can be carried out without specialized equipment, costly reagents and/or sophisticated protocols, our report should be of interest to a broad range of researchers who are considering the application of genome editing technologies in various organisms. PMID:24521866

  1. Screening Methods to Identify TALEN-Mediated Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Araki, Kimi; Takeda, Naoki; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Sakuma, Tetsushi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with site-specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases, such as the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system, is becoming the new standard for targeted genome modification in various organisms. Application of these techniques to the manufacture of knockout mice would be greatly aided by simple and easy methods for genotyping of mutant and wild-type pups among litters. However, there are no detailed or comparative reports concerning the identification of mutant mice generated using genome editing technologies. Here, we genotyped TALEN-derived enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) knockout mice using a combination of approaches, including fluorescence observation, heteroduplex mobility assay, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. The detection sensitivities for TALEN-induced mutations differed among these methods, and we therefore concluded that combinatorial testing is necessary for the screening and determination of mutant genotypes. Since the analytical methods tested can be carried out without specialized equipment, costly reagents and/or sophisticated protocols, our report should be of interest to a broad range of researchers who are considering the application of genome editing technologies in various organisms. PMID:24521866

  2. A rapid screening assay for identifying mycobacteria targeted nanoparticle antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Donnellan, Samantha; Tran, Lang; Johnston, Helinor; McLuckie, Joyce; Stevenson, Karen; Stone, Vicki

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem. Nanotechnology offers enormous potential in medicine, yet there is limited knowledge regarding the toxicity of nanoparticles (NP) for mycobacterial species that cause serious human diseases (e.g. tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy). Mycobacterial diseases are a major global health problem; TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills up to 2 million people annually and there are over 200 000 leprosy cases each year caused by Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). Few drugs are effective against these mycobacteria and increasing antibiotic resistance exacerbates the problem. As such, alternative therapies are urgently needed but most current assays used to assess the effectiveness of therapeutics against mycobacteria are slow and expensive. This study aimed to develop a rapid, low-cost assay which can be used for screening the antimicrobial properties of compounds against pathogenic mycobacteria and to assess the toxicity of three NP (silver [Ag], copper oxide [Cu(II)O], and zinc oxide [ZnO]) against a green fluorescent protein reporter strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, a slow growing, pathogenic mycobacterial species causing paratuberculosis in ruminants. Fluorescence was used to monitor mycobacterial growth over time, with NP concentrations of 6.25-100 μg/mL tested for up to 7 days, and a method of data analysis was designed to permit comparison between results. Mycobacterial sensitivity to the NP was found to be NP composition specific and toxicity could be ranked in the following order: Ag > Cu(II)O > ZnO. PMID:26618564

  3. A Yeast Chemical Genetic Screen Identifies Inhibitors of Human Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lai Hong; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Spitzer, Michaela; White, Rachel; Tyers, Mike; Harrington, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Summary Telomerase comprises a reverse transcriptase and an internal RNA template that maintains telomeres in many eukaryotes, and it is a well-validated cancer target. However, there is a dearth of small molecules with efficacy against human telomerase in vivo. We developed a surrogate yeast high-throughput assay to identify human telomerase inhibitors. The reversibility of growth arrest induced by active human telomerase was assessed against a library of 678 compounds preselected for bioactivity in S. cerevisiae. Four of eight compounds identified reproducibly restored growth to strains expressing active human telomerase, and three of these four compounds also specifically inhibited purified human telomerase in vitro. These compounds represent probes for human telomerase function, and potential entry points for development of lead compounds against telomerase-positive cancers. PMID:23521791

  4. A potential method to identify poor breast screening performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Leng; Chen, Yan; Gale, Alastair G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.

    2012-02-01

    In the UK all breast screeners undertake the PERFORMS scheme where they annually read case sets of challenging cases. From the subsequent data it is possible to identify any individual who is performing significantly lower than their peers. This can then facilitate them being offered further targeted training to improve performance. However, currently this under-performance can only be calculated once all screeners have taken part, which means the feedback can potentially take several months. To determine whether such performance outliers could usefully be identified approximately much earlier the data from the last round of the scheme were re-analysed. From the information of 283 participants, 1,000 groups of them were selected randomly for fixed group sizes varying from four to 50 individuals. After applying bootstrapping on 1,000 groups, a distribution of low performance threshold values was constructed. Then the accuracy of estimation was determined by calculating the median value and standard error of this distribution as compared with the known actual results. Data indicate that increasing sample sizes improved the estimation of the median and decreased the standard error. Using information from as few as 25 individuals allowed an approximation of the known outlier cut off value and this improved with larger sample sizes. This approach is now implemented in the PERFORMS scheme to enable individuals who have difficulties, as compared to their peers, to be identified very early after taking part which can then help them to improve their performance.

  5. Screening for Patients with Alcohol Problems: Severity of Patients Identified by the CAGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lairson, David R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Assessed CAGE (first letters of keywords in series of 4 questions about drinking: cut down, annoyed, guilty, eye-opener), instrument in routine screening for alcohol problems among 687 patients of 2 primary care physicians. Results showed that CAGE instrument was useful screening device for identifying those with mild to moderate substance abuse…

  6. In Vitro-Pooled shRNA Screening to Identify Determinants of Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Alessandro; Higgins, Geoff S; Ebner, Daniel V

    2016-01-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-pooled screening is a valuable and cost-effective tool for assaying the contribution of individual genes to cell viability and proliferation on a genomic scale. Here we describe the key considerations for the design and execution of a pooled shRNA screen to identify determinants of radiosensitivity. PMID:27581288

  7. Functional screen identifies regulators of murine hematopoietic stem cell repopulation.

    PubMed

    Holmfeldt, Per; Ganuza, Miguel; Marathe, Himangi; He, Bing; Hall, Trent; Kang, Guolian; Moen, Joseph; Pardieck, Jennifer; Saulsberry, Angelica C; Cico, Alba; Gaut, Ludovic; McGoldrick, Daniel; Finkelstein, David; Tan, Kai; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the molecular regulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) engraftment is paramount to improving transplant outcomes. To discover novel regulators of HSPC repopulation, we transplanted >1,300 mice with shRNA-transduced HSPCs within 24 h of isolation and transduction to focus on detecting genes regulating repopulation. We identified 17 regulators of HSPC repopulation: Arhgef5, Armcx1, Cadps2, Crispld1, Emcn, Foxa3, Fstl1, Glis2, Gprasp2, Gpr56, Myct1, Nbea, P2ry14, Smarca2, Sox4, Stat4, and Zfp251. Knockdown of each of these genes yielded a loss of function, except in the cases of Armcx1 and Gprasp2, whose loss enhanced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) repopulation. The discovery of multiple genes regulating vesicular trafficking, cell surface receptor turnover, and secretion of extracellular matrix components suggests active cross talk between HSCs and the niche and that HSCs may actively condition the niche to promote engraftment. We validated that Foxa3 is required for HSC repopulating activity, as Foxa3(-/-) HSC fails to repopulate ablated hosts efficiently, implicating for the first time Foxa genes as regulators of HSPCs. We further show that Foxa3 likely regulates the HSC response to hematologic stress. Each gene discovered here offers a window into the novel processes that regulate stable HSPC engraftment into an ablated host. PMID:26880577

  8. Identifying Areas for Improvement in the HIV Screening Process of a High-Prevalence Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Jason; Cennimo, David; Sugalski, Gregory; Swaminthan, Shobha

    2016-06-01

    Since 1993, the Centers for Disease Control recommendations for HIV testing were extended to include persons obtaining care in the emergency department (ED). Situated in Newark, New Jersey, the University Hospital (UH) ED serves a community with a greater than 2% HIV prevalence, and a recent study showed a UH ED HIV seroprevalence of 6.5%, of which 33% were unknown diagnoses. Electronic records for patients seen in the UH ED from October 1st, 2014, to February 28th, 2015, were obtained. Information was collected on demographics, ED diagnosis, triage time, and HIV testing. Random sampling of 500 patients was performed to identify those eligible for screening. Univariate and multivariate analysis was done to assess screening characteristics. Only 9% (8.8-9.3%) of patients eligible for screening were screened in the ED. Sixteen percent (15.7-16.6%) of those in the age group18-25 and 12% (11.6-12.3%) of those in the age group 26-35 were screened, whereas 8% (7.8-8.2%) of those in the age group 35-45 were screened. 19.6% (19-20.1%) of eligible patients in fast track were screened versus 1.7% (1.6-1.8%) in the main ED. Eighty-five percent of patients screened were triaged between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. with 90% of all screening tests done by the HIV counseling, testing, and referral services. Due to the high prevalence of HIV, urban EDs play an integral public health role in the early identification and linkage to care of patients with HIV. By evaluating our current screening process, we identified opportunities to improve our screening process and reduce missed opportunities for diagnosis. PMID:27286295

  9. High Throughput Screening Identifies Novel Lead Compounds with Activity against Larval, Juvenile and Adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Nuha R; Paveley, Ross; Gardner, J Mark F; Bell, Andrew S; Parkinson, Tanya; Bickle, Quentin

    2016-04-01

    An estimated 600 million people are affected by the helminth disease schistosomiasis caused by parasites of the genus Schistosoma. There is currently only one drug recommended for treating schistosomiasis, praziquantel (PZQ), which is effective against adult worms but not against the juvenile stage. In an attempt to identify improved drugs for treating the disease, we have carried out high throughput screening of a number of small molecule libraries with the aim of identifying lead compounds with balanced activity against all life stages of Schistosoma. A total of almost 300,000 compounds were screened using a high throughput assay based on motility of worm larvae and image analysis of assay plates. Hits were screened against juvenile and adult worms to identify broadly active compounds and against a mammalian cell line to assess cytotoxicity. A number of compounds were identified as promising leads for further chemical optimization. PMID:27128493

  10. High Throughput Screening Identifies Novel Lead Compounds with Activity against Larval, Juvenile and Adult Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, J. Mark F.; Bell, Andrew S.; Parkinson, Tanya; Bickle, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 600 million people are affected by the helminth disease schistosomiasis caused by parasites of the genus Schistosoma. There is currently only one drug recommended for treating schistosomiasis, praziquantel (PZQ), which is effective against adult worms but not against the juvenile stage. In an attempt to identify improved drugs for treating the disease, we have carried out high throughput screening of a number of small molecule libraries with the aim of identifying lead compounds with balanced activity against all life stages of Schistosoma. A total of almost 300,000 compounds were screened using a high throughput assay based on motility of worm larvae and image analysis of assay plates. Hits were screened against juvenile and adult worms to identify broadly active compounds and against a mammalian cell line to assess cytotoxicity. A number of compounds were identified as promising leads for further chemical optimization. PMID:27128493

  11. A modified reverse one-hybrid screen identifies transcriptional activation in Phyochrome-Interacting Factor 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional activation domains (TAD) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput...

  12. Screening strategies to identify new chemical diversity for drug development to treat kinetoplastid infections.

    PubMed

    Don, Rob; Ioset, Jean-Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has defined and implemented an early discovery strategy over the last few years, in fitting with its virtual R&D business model. This strategy relies on a medium- to high-throughput phenotypic assay platform to expedite the screening of compound libraries accessed through its collaborations with partners from the pharmaceutical industry. We review the pragmatic approaches used to select compound libraries for screening against kinetoplastids, taking into account screening capacity. The advantages, limitations and current achievements in identifying new quality series for further development into preclinical candidates are critically discussed, together with attractive new approaches currently under investigation. PMID:23985066

  13. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L.; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-01-01

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer. PMID:26942566

  14. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-04-12

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer. PMID:26942566

  15. A Drosophila Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Regulators of Steroid Hormone Production and Developmental Timing.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Thomas; Moeller, Morten E; Yamanaka, Naoki; Ou, Qiuxiang; Laursen, Janne M; Soenderholm, Caecilie; Zhuo, Ran; Phelps, Brian; Tang, Kevin; Zeng, Jie; Kondo, Shu; Nielsen, Christian H; Harvald, Eva B; Faergeman, Nils J; Haley, Macy J; O'Connor, Kyle A; King-Jones, Kirst; O'Connor, Michael B; Rewitz, Kim F

    2016-06-20

    Steroid hormones control important developmental processes and are linked to many diseases. To systematically identify genes and pathways required for steroid production, we performed a Drosophila genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen and identified 1,906 genes with potential roles in steroidogenesis and developmental timing. Here, we use our screen as a resource to identify mechanisms regulating intracellular levels of cholesterol, a substrate for steroidogenesis. We identify a conserved fatty acid elongase that underlies a mechanism that adjusts cholesterol trafficking and steroidogenesis with nutrition and developmental programs. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of an autophagosomal cholesterol mobilization mechanism and show that activation of this system rescues Niemann-Pick type C1 deficiency that causes a disorder characterized by cholesterol accumulation. These cholesterol-trafficking mechanisms are regulated by TOR and feedback signaling that couples steroidogenesis with growth and ensures proper maturation timing. These results reveal genes regulating steroidogenesis during development that likely modulate disease mechanisms. PMID:27326933

  16. Quick Screen for Voice and Supplementary Documents for Identifying Pediatric Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Linda; Stemple, Joseph C.; Glaze, Leslie; Kelchner, Lisa N.

    2004-01-01

    Three documents are provided to help the speech-language pathologist (SLP) identify children with voice disorders and educate family members. The first is a quickly administered screening test that covers multiple aspects of voice, respiration, and resonance. It was tested on 3,000 children in kindergarten and first and fifth grades, and on 47…

  17. Novel AI-2 quorum sensing inhibitors in Vibrio harveyi identified through structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Peng, Hanjing; Ni, Nanting; Wang, Binghe; Li, Minyong

    2012-10-15

    In this letter, a high-throughput virtual screening was accomplished to identify potent inhibitors against AI-2 quorum sensing on the basis of Vibrio harveyi LuxPQ crystal structure. Seven compounds were found to inhibit AI-2 quorum sensing with IC(50) values in the micromolar range, and presented low cytotoxicity or no cytotoxicity in V. harveyi. PMID:22963763

  18. A Simultaneous Screening/Assessment Procedure for Identifying the Gifted Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Margaret; Lopatin, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Used four-subtest short form of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised to develop efficient, simultaneous screening/assessment procedure for identifying gifted students for special programs. Estimated statistical relationship between subtest and full-test scores using test score data from 203 students. Found subtest score of 52 both…

  19. Direct screening identifies mature beta-defensin 2 in avian heterophils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to screen avian heterophils in the m/z range of 1-20 kDa with an objective to identify the cell associated peptides that may be reflective of their functional physiology. The MALDI-TOF-MS profiles ...

  20. Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

    2009-06-01

    This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

  1. Yeast functional screen to identify genetic determinants capable of conferring abiotic stress tolerance in Jatropha curcas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmentally inflicted stresses such as salinity and drought limit the plant productivity both in natural and agricultural system. Increasing emphasis has been directed to molecular breeding strategies to enhance the intrinsic ability of plant to survive stress conditions. Functional screens in microorganisms with heterologous genes are a rapid, effective and powerful tool to identify stress tolerant genes in plants. Jatropha curcas (Physic nut) has been identified as a potential source of biodiesel plant. In order to improve its productivity under stress conditions to benefit commercial plantations, we initiated prospecting of novel genes expressed during stress in J. curcas that can be utilized to enhance stress tolerance ability of plant. Results To identify genes expressed during salt tolerance, cDNA expression libraries were constructed from salt-stressed roots of J. curcas, regulated under the control of the yeast GAL1 system. Using a replica based screening, twenty thousand yeast transformants were screened to identify transformants expressing heterologous gene sequences from J. curcas with enhanced ability to tolerate stress. From the screen we obtained 32 full length genes from J. curcas [GenBank accession numbers FJ489601-FJ489611, FJ619041-FJ619057 and FJ623457-FJ623460] that can confer abiotic stress tolerance. As a part of this screen, we optimized conditions for salt stress in J. curcas, defined parameters for salt stress in yeast, as well as isolated three salt hypersensitive yeast strains shs-2, shs-6 and shs-8 generated through a process of random mutagenesis, and exhibited growth retardation beyond 750 mM NaCl. Further, we demonstrated complementation of the salt sensitive phenotypes in the shs mutants, and analyzed the expression patterns for selected J. curcas genes obtained from the screen in both leaf and root tissues after salt stress treatments. Conclusions The approach described in this report provides a rapid and universal

  2. Whole-organism screening for gluconeogenesis identifies activators of fasting metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gut, Philipp; Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Andersson, Olov; Hasenkamp, Laura; Hsiao, Joseph; Hesselson, Daniel; Akassoglou, Katerina; Verdin, Eric; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2012-01-01

    Improving the control of energy homeostasis can lower cardiovascular risk in metabolically compromised individuals. To identify new regulators of whole-body energy control, we conducted a high-throughput screen in transgenic reporter zebrafish for small molecules that modulate the expression of the fasting-inducible gluconeogenic gene pck1. We show that this in vivo strategy identified several drugs that impact gluconeogenesis in humans, as well as metabolically uncharacterized compounds. Most notably, we find that the Translocator Protein (TSPO) ligands PK 11195 and Ro5-4864 are glucose lowering agents despite a strong inductive effect on pck1 expression. We show that these drugs are activators of a fasting-like energy state, and importantly that they protect high-fat diet induced obese mice from hepatosteatosis and glucose intolerance, two pathological manifestations of metabolic dysregulation. Thus, using a whole-organism screening strategy, this study has identified new small molecule activators of fasting metabolism. PMID:23201900

  3. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations.

    PubMed

    Mott, Bryan T; Eastman, Richard T; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Thomas, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  4. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F.; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  5. A small-molecule screen identifies new functions for the plant hormone strigolactone.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Vidaurre, Danielle; Toh, Shigeo; Hanada, Atsushi; Nambara, Eiji; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; McCourt, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Parasitic weeds of the genera Striga and Orobanche are considered the most damaging agricultural agents in the developing world. An essential step in parasitic seed germination is sensing a group of structurally related compounds called strigolactones that are released by host plants. Although this makes strigolactone synthesis and action a major target of biotechnology, little fundamental information is known about this hormone. Chemical genetic screening using Arabidopsis thaliana as a platform identified a collection of related small molecules, cotylimides, which perturb strigolactone accumulation. Suppressor screens against select cotylimides identified light-signaling genes as positive regulators of strigolactone levels. Molecular analysis showed strigolactones regulate the nuclear localization of the COP1 ubiquitin ligase, which in part determines the levels of light regulators such as HY5. This information not only uncovers new functions for strigolactones but was also used to identify rice cultivars with reduced capacity to germinate parasitic seed. PMID:20818397

  6. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Bryan T.; Eastman, Richard T.; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S.; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R.; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D.; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A.; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R.; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D.; Su, Xin-zhuan; Thomas, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  7. Structurally Diverse Mitochondrial Branched Chain Aminotransferase (BCATm) Leads with Varying Binding Modes Identified by Fragment Screening.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Jennifer A; Ancellin, Nicolas; Bertrand, Sophie M; Bingham, Ryan P; Carter, Paul S; Chung, Chun-Wa; Churcher, Ian; Dodic, Nerina; Fournier, Charlène; Francis, Peter L; Hobbs, Andrew; Jamieson, Craig; Pickett, Stephen D; Smith, Sarah E; Somers, Donald O'N; Spitzfaden, Claus; Suckling, Colin J; Young, Robert J

    2016-03-24

    Inhibitors of mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (BCATm), identified using fragment screening, are described. This was carried out using a combination of STD-NMR, thermal melt (Tm), and biochemical assays to identify compounds that bound to BCATm, which were subsequently progressed to X-ray crystallography, where a number of exemplars showed significant diversity in their binding modes. The hits identified were supplemented by searching and screening of additional analogues, which enabled the gathering of further X-ray data where the original hits had not produced liganded structures. The fragment hits were optimized using structure-based design, with some transfer of information between series, which enabled the identification of ligand efficient lead molecules with micromolar levels of inhibition, cellular activity, and good solubility. PMID:26938474

  8. A small-molecule screening strategy to identify suppressors of statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bridget K; Gilbert, Tamara J; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Imamura, Shintaro; Bodycombe, Nicole E; Bon, Robin S; Waldmann, Herbert; Clemons, Paul A; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2011-09-16

    The reduction of plasma low-density lipoprotein levels by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, has had a revolutionary impact in medicine, but muscle-related side effects remain a dose-limiting toxicity in many patients. We describe a chemical epistasis approach that can be useful in refining the mechanism of statin muscle toxicity, as well as in screening for agents that suppress muscle toxicity while preserving the ability of statins to increase the expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Using this approach, we identified one compound that attenuates the muscle side effects in both cellular and animal models of statin toxicity, likely by influencing Rab prenylation. Our proof-of-concept screen lays the foundation for truly high-throughput screens that could help lead to the development of clinically useful adjuvants that can one day be co-administered with statins. PMID:21732624

  9. High-content screening in zebrafish embryos identifies butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia.

    PubMed

    Leet, Jessica K; Lindberg, Casey D; Bassett, Luke A; Isales, Gregory M; Yozzo, Krystle L; Raftery, Tara D; Volz, David C

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic zebrafish (fli1:egfp) that stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within vascular endothelial cells, we recently developed and optimized a 384-well high-content screening (HCS) assay that enables us to screen and identify chemicals affecting cardiovascular development and function at non-teratogenic concentrations. Within this assay, automated image acquisition procedures and custom image analysis protocols are used to quantify body length, heart rate, circulation, pericardial area, and intersegmental vessel area within individual live embryos exposed from 5 to 72 hours post-fertilization. After ranking developmental toxicity data generated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) zebrafish teratogenesis assay, we screened 26 of the most acutely toxic chemicals within EPA's ToxCast Phase-I library in concentration-response format (0.05-50 µM) using this HCS assay. Based on this screen, we identified butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia, as exposure from 0.39 to 3.125 µM butafenacil completely abolished arterial circulation in the absence of effects on all other endpoints evaluated. Butafenacil is an herbicide that inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO)--an enzyme necessary for heme production in vertebrates. Using o-dianisidine staining, we then revealed that severe butafenacil-induced anemia in zebrafish was due to a complete loss of hemoglobin following exposure during early development. Therefore, six additional PPO inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase-I library were screened to determine whether anemia represents a common adverse outcome for these herbicides. Embryonic exposure to only one of these PPO inhibitors--flumioxazin--resulted in a similar phenotype as butafenacil, albeit not as severe as butafenacil. Overall, this study highlights the potential utility of this assay for (1) screening chemicals for cardiovascular toxicity and (2) prioritizing chemicals for future hypothesis-driven and mechanism

  10. High-Content Screening in Zebrafish Embryos Identifies Butafenacil as a Potent Inducer of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Leet, Jessica K.; Lindberg, Casey D.; Bassett, Luke A.; Isales, Gregory M.; Yozzo, Krystle L.; Raftery, Tara D.; Volz, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic zebrafish (fli1:egfp) that stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within vascular endothelial cells, we recently developed and optimized a 384-well high-content screening (HCS) assay that enables us to screen and identify chemicals affecting cardiovascular development and function at non-teratogenic concentrations. Within this assay, automated image acquisition procedures and custom image analysis protocols are used to quantify body length, heart rate, circulation, pericardial area, and intersegmental vessel area within individual live embryos exposed from 5 to 72 hours post-fertilization. After ranking developmental toxicity data generated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) zebrafish teratogenesis assay, we screened 26 of the most acutely toxic chemicals within EPA's ToxCast Phase-I library in concentration-response format (0.05–50 µM) using this HCS assay. Based on this screen, we identified butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia, as exposure from 0.39 to 3.125 µM butafenacil completely abolished arterial circulation in the absence of effects on all other endpoints evaluated. Butafenacil is an herbicide that inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) – an enzyme necessary for heme production in vertebrates. Using o-dianisidine staining, we then revealed that severe butafenacil-induced anemia in zebrafish was due to a complete loss of hemoglobin following exposure during early development. Therefore, six additional PPO inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase-I library were screened to determine whether anemia represents a common adverse outcome for these herbicides. Embryonic exposure to only one of these PPO inhibitors – flumioxazin – resulted in a similar phenotype as butafenacil, albeit not as severe as butafenacil. Overall, this study highlights the potential utility of this assay for (1) screening chemicals for cardiovascular toxicity and (2) prioritizing chemicals for future hypothesis

  11. Heterozygous screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies dosage-sensitive genes that affect chromosome stability.

    PubMed

    Strome, Erin D; Wu, Xiaowei; Kimmel, Marek; Plon, Sharon E

    2008-03-01

    Current techniques for identifying mutations that convey a small increased cancer risk or those that modify cancer risk in carriers of highly penetrant mutations are limited by the statistical power of epidemiologic studies, which require screening of large populations and candidate genes. To identify dosage-sensitive genes that mediate genomic stability, we performed a genomewide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterozygous mutations that increase chromosome instability in a checkpoint-deficient diploid strain. We used two genome stability assays sensitive enough to detect the impact of heterozygous mutations and identified 172 heterozygous gene disruptions that affected chromosome fragment (CF) loss, 45% of which also conferred modest but statistically significant instability of endogenous chromosomes. Analysis of heterozygous deletion of 65 of these genes demonstrated that the majority increased genomic instability in both checkpoint-deficient and wild-type backgrounds. Strains heterozygous for COMA kinetochore complex genes were particularly unstable. Over 50% of the genes identified in this screen have putative human homologs, including CHEK2, ERCC4, and TOPBP1, which are already associated with inherited cancer susceptibility. These findings encourage the incorporation of this orthologous gene list into cancer epidemiology studies and suggest further analysis of heterozygous phenotypes in yeast as models of human disease resulting from haplo-insufficiency. PMID:18245329

  12. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Hallström, Björn M.; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Uhlén, Mathias; Joensson, Haakan N.; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for biotech-based production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals in the food and feed industry and in industrial applications. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among preferred cell factories for recombinant protein production, and there is increasing interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV mutagenesis. Several screening and sorting rounds resulted in the selection of eight yeast clones with significantly improved secretion of recombinant α-amylase. Efficient secretion was genetically stable in the selected clones. We performed whole-genome sequencing of the eight clones and identified 330 mutations in total. Gene ontology analysis of mutated genes revealed many biological processes, including some that have not been identified before in the context of protein secretion. Mutated genes identified in this study can be potentially used for reverse metabolic engineering, with the objective to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could broadly facilitate design of novel cell factories. PMID:26261321

  13. A microfluidic-based genetic screen to identify microbial virulence factors that inhibit dendritic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Laura M.; Xu, Hui; Carden, Sarah E.; Fisher, Samantha; Reyes, Monique; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Monack, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host cells and evade the immune system by multiple mechanisms. For example, Salmonella injects effector proteins into host cells and evades the host immune system in part by inhibiting dendritic cell (DC) migration. The identification of microbial factors that modulate normal host functions should lead to the development of new classes of therapeutics that target these pathways. Current screening methods to identify either host or pathogen genes involved in modulating migration towards a chemical signal are limited because they do not employ stable, precisely controlled chemical gradients. Here, we develop a positive selection microfluidic-based genetic screen that allows us to identify Salmonella virulence factors that manipulate DC migration within stable, linear chemokine gradients. Our screen identified 7 Salmonella effectors (SseF, SifA, SspH2, SlrP, PipB2, SpiC and SseI) that inhibit DC chemotaxis toward CCL19. This method is widely applicable for identifying novel microbial factors that influence normal host cell chemotaxis as well as revealing new mammalian genes involved in directed cell migration. PMID:24599496

  14. A microfluidic-based genetic screen to identify microbial virulence factors that inhibit dendritic cell migration.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Laura M; Xu, Hui; Carden, Sarah E; Fisher, Samantha; Reyes, Monique; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Monack, Denise M

    2014-04-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host cells and evade the immune system by multiple mechanisms. For example, Salmonella injects effector proteins into host cells and evades the host immune system in part by inhibiting dendritic cell (DC) migration. The identification of microbial factors that modulate normal host functions should lead to the development of new classes of therapeutics that target these pathways. Current screening methods to identify either host or pathogen genes involved in modulating migration towards a chemical signal are limited because they do not employ stable, precisely controlled chemical gradients. Here, we develop a positive selection microfluidic-based genetic screen that allows us to identify Salmonella virulence factors that manipulate DC migration within stable, linear chemokine gradients. Our screen identified 7 Salmonella effectors (SseF, SifA, SspH2, SlrP, PipB2, SpiC and SseI) that inhibit DC chemotaxis toward CCL19. This method is widely applicable for identifying novel microbial factors that influence normal host cell chemotaxis as well as revealing new mammalian genes involved in directed cell migration. PMID:24599496

  15. Screening of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecule Compounds Identifies Antifungal Agents Against Candida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Candida species have emerged as important and common opportunistic human pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The current antifungal therapies either have toxic side effects or are insufficiently effect. The aim of this study is develop new small-molecule antifungal compounds by library screening methods using Candida albicans, and to evaluate their antifungal effects on Candida biofilms and cytotoxic effects on human cells. Wild-type C. albicans strain SC5314 was used in library screening. To identify antifungal compounds, we screened a small-molecule library of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC1280TM) using an antifungal susceptibility test (AST). To investigate the antifungal effects of the hit compounds, ASTs were conducted using Candida strains in various growth modes, including biofilms. We tested the cytotoxicity of the hit compounds using human gingival fibroblast (hGF) cells to evaluate their clinical safety. Only 35 compounds were identified by screening, which inhibited the metabolic activity of C. albicans by >50%. Of these, 26 compounds had fungistatic effects and nine compounds had fungicidal effects on C. albicans. Five compounds, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate, ellipticine and CV-3988, had strong fungicidal effects and could inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida biofilms. However, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine were cytotoxic to hGF cells at low concentrations. CV-3988 showed no cytotoxicity at a fungicidal concentration. Four of the compounds identified, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine, had toxic effects on Candida strains and hGF cells. In contrast, CV-3988 had fungicidal effects on Candida strains, but low cytotoxic effects on hGF cells. Therefore, this screening reveals agent, CV-3988 that was previously unknown to be antifungal agent, which could be a novel therapies for superficial mucosal candidiasis. PMID

  16. Large-Scale RNA Interference Screening in Mammalian Cells Identifies Novel Regulators of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Tosaki, Asako; Bauer, Peter O.; Wada, Koji; Kurosawa, Masaru; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases including Huntington's disease (HD), mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms. PMID:24705917

  17. Large-scale RNA interference screening in mammalian cells identifies novel regulators of mutant huntingtin aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Wong, Hon Kit; Tosaki, Asako; Bauer, Peter O; Wada, Koji; Kurosawa, Masaru; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases including Huntington's disease (HD), mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼ 12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms. PMID:24705917

  18. High-Throughput Screen for Identifying Small Molecules That Target Fungal Zinc Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Claudia; Luan, Chi-Hao; Weiss, Eric; O'Halloran, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to traditional antifungal drugs has increased significantly over the past three decades, making identification of novel antifungal agents and new targets an emerging priority. Based on the extraordinary zinc requirement of several fungal pathogens and their well-established sensitivity to zinc deprivation, we developed an efficient cell-based screen to identify new antifungal drugs that target the zinc homeostasis machinery. The screen is based on the zinc-regulated transcription factor Zap1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which regulates transcription of genes like the high-affinity zinc transporter ZRT1. We generated a genetically modified strain of S. cerevisae that reports intracellular zinc deficiency by placing the coding sequence of green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Zap1-regulated ZRT1 promoter. After showing that the GFP fluorescence signal correlates with low intracellular zinc concentrations in this strain, a protocol was developed for screening small-molecule libraries for compounds that induce Zap1-dependent GFP expression. Comparison of control compounds and known modulators of metal metabolism from the library reveals a robust screen (Z′ = 0.74) and validates this approach to the discovery of new classes of antifungal compounds that interfere with the intracellular zinc homeostasis. Given that growth of many pathogenic organisms is significantly impaired by zinc limitation; these results identify new types of antifungal drugs that target critical nutrient acquisition pathways. PMID:21980385

  19. Transcriptional Inhibitors Identified in a 160,000-Compound Small-Molecule DUX4 Viability Screen.

    PubMed

    Choi, Si Ho; Bosnakovski, Darko; Strasser, Jessica M; Toso, Erik A; Walters, Michael A; Kyba, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is a genetically dominant, currently untreatable muscular dystrophy. It is caused by mutations that enable expression of the normally silent DUX4 gene, which encodes a pathogenic transcription factor. A screen based on Tet-on DUX4-induced mouse myoblast death previously uncovered compounds from a 44,000-compound library that protect against DUX4 toxicity. Many of those compounds acted downstream of DUX4 in an oxidative stress pathway. Here, we extend this screen to an additional 160,000 compounds and, using greater stringency, identify a new set of DUX4-protective compounds. From 640 hits, we performed secondary screens, repurchased 46 of the most desirable, confirmed activity, and tested each for activity against other cell death-inducing insults. The majority of these compounds also protected against oxidative stress. Of the 100 repurchased compounds identified through both screens, only SHC40, 75, and 98 inhibited DUX4 target genes, but they also inhibited dox-mediated DUX4 expression. Using a target gene readout on the 640-compound hit set, we discovered three overlooked compounds, SHC351, 540, and 572, that inhibit DUX4 target gene upregulation without nonspecific effects on the Tet-on system. These novel inhibitors of DUX4 transcriptional activity may thus act on pathways or cofactors needed by DUX4 for transcriptional activation in these cells. PMID:27245141

  20. Leishmania chagasi T-cell antigens identified through a double library screen.

    PubMed

    Martins, Daniella R A; Jeronimo, Selma M B; Donelson, John E; Wilson, Mary E

    2006-12-01

    Control of human visceral leishmaniasis in regions where it is endemic is hampered in part by limited accessibility to medical care and emerging drug resistance. There is no available protective vaccine. Leishmania spp. protozoa express multiple antigens recognized by the vertebrate immune system. Since there is not one immunodominant epitope recognized by most hosts, strategies must be developed to optimize selection of antigens for prevention and immunodiagnosis. For this reason, we generated a cDNA library from the intracellular amastigote form of Leishmania chagasi, the cause of South American visceral leishmaniasis. We employed a two-step expression screen of the library to systematically identify T-cell antigens and T-dependent B-cell antigens. The first step was aimed at identifying the largest possible number of clones producing an epitope-containing polypeptide by screening with a pool of sera from Brazilians with documented visceral leishmaniasis. After removal of clones encoding heat shock proteins, positive clones underwent a second-step screen for their ability to cause proliferation and gamma interferon responses in T cells from immune mice. Six unique clones were selected from the second screen for further analysis. The corresponding antigens were derived from glutamine synthetase, a transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase, elongation factor 1gamma, kinesin K39, repetitive protein A2, and a hypothetical conserved protein. Humans naturally infected with L. chagasi mounted both cellular and antibody responses to these proteins. Preparations containing multiple antigens may be optimal for immunodiagnosis and protective vaccines. PMID:17000724

  1. Phenotypic population screen identifies a new mutation in bovine DGAT1 responsible for unsaturated milk fat

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Klaus; Ward, Hamish; Berry, Sarah D.; Ankersmit-Udy, Alex; Burrett, Alayna; Beattie, Elizabeth M.; Thomas, Natalie L.; Harris, Bevin; Ford, Christine A.; Browning, Sharon R.; Rawson, Pisana; Verkerk, Gwyneth A.; van der Does, Yvonne; Adams, Linda F.; Davis, Stephen R.; Jordan, T. William; MacGibbon, Alastair K. H.; Spelman, Richard J.; Snell, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding has strongly reduced the genetic diversity in livestock species, and contemporary breeding practices exclude potentially beneficial rare genetic variation from the future gene pool. Here we test whether important traits arising by new mutations can be identified and rescued in highly selected populations. We screened milks from 2.5 million cows to identify an exceptional individual which produced milk with reduced saturated fat content, and improved unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations. The milk traits were transmitted dominantly to her offspring, and genetic mapping and genome sequencing revealed a new mutation in a previously unknown splice enhancer of the DGAT1 gene. Homozygous carriers show features of human diarrheal disorders, and may be useful for the development of therapeutic strategies. Our study demonstrates that high-throughput phenotypic screening can uncover rich genetic diversity even in inbred populations, and introduces a novel strategy to develop novel milks with improved nutritional properties. PMID:25719731

  2. Genome-Wide RNAi Screens in C. elegans to Identify Genes Influencing Lifespan and Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit; Rae, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a rapid, inexpensive, and highly effective tool used to inhibit gene function. In C. elegans, whole genome screens have been used to identify genes involved with numerous traits including aging and innate immunity. RNAi in C. elegans can be carried out via feeding, soaking, or injection. Here we outline protocols used to maintain, grow, and carry out RNAi via feeding in C. elegans and determine whether the inhibited genes are essential for lifespan or innate immunity. PMID:27581293

  3. Virtual Screening to Identify Lead Inhibitors for Bacterial NAD Synthetase (NADs)

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Whitney Beysselance; Yang, Zhengrong; Kane, Tasha; Brouillette, Christie G.; Brouillette, Wayne J.

    2009-01-01

    Virtual screening was employed to identify new drug-like inhibitors of NAD synthetase (NADs) as antibacterial agents. Four databases of commercially available compounds were docked against three subsites of the NADs active site using FlexX in conjunction with CScore. Over 200 commercial compounds were purchased and evaluated in enzyme inhibition and antibacterial assays. 18 compounds inhibited NADs at or below 100 μM (7.6% hit rate), and two were selected for future SAR studies. PMID:19249205

  4. A BSL-4 high-throughput screen identifies sulfonamide inhibitors of Nipah virus.

    PubMed

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2014-04-01

    Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-based, high-throughput screen for compounds that inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect. From this pilot effort, 23 compounds were identified with EC50 values ranging from 3.9 to 20.0 μM and selectivities >10. Three sulfonamide compounds with EC50 values <12 μM were further characterized for their point of intervention in the viral replication cycle and for broad antiviral efficacy. Development of HTS capability under BSL-4 containment changes the paradigm for drug discovery for highly pathogenic agents because this platform can be readily modified to identify prophylactic and postexposure therapeutic candidates against other BSL-4 pathogens, particularly Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. PMID:24735442

  5. Functional CRISPR screening identifies the ufmylation pathway as a regulator of SQSTM1/p62.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, Rowena; Moretti, Francesca; McAllister, Gregory; Wang, Zuncai; Bergman, Phil; Liu, Shanming; Frias, Elizabeth; Alford, John; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Lindeman, Alicia; Kelliher, Jennifer; Russ, Carsten; Knehr, Judith; Carbone, Walter; Beibel, Martin; Roma, Guglielmo; Ng, Aylwin; Tallarico, John A; Porter, Jeffery A; Xavier, Ramnik J; Mickanin, Craig; Murphy, Leon O; Hoffman, Gregory R; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    SQSTM1 is an adaptor protein that integrates multiple cellular signaling pathways and whose expression is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level. Here, we describe a forward genetic screening paradigm exploiting CRISPR-mediated genome editing coupled to a cell selection step by FACS to identify regulators of SQSTM1. Through systematic comparison of pooled libraries, we show that CRISPR is superior to RNAi in identifying known SQSTM1 modulators. A genome-wide CRISPR screen exposed MTOR signalling and the entire macroautophagy machinery as key regulators of SQSTM1 and identified several novel modulators including HNRNPM, SLC39A14, SRRD, PGK1 and the ufmylation cascade. We show that ufmylation regulates SQSTM1 by eliciting a cell type-specific ER stress response which induces SQSTM1 expression and results in its accumulation in the cytosol. This study validates pooled CRISPR screening as a powerful method to map the repertoire of cellular pathways that regulate the fate of an individual target protein. PMID:27351204

  6. Functional CRISPR screening identifies the ufmylation pathway as a regulator of SQSTM1/p62

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Rowena; Moretti, Francesca; McAllister, Gregory; Wang, Zuncai; Bergman, Phil; Liu, Shanming; Frias, Elizabeth; Alford, John; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Lindeman, Alicia; Kelliher, Jennifer; Russ, Carsten; Knehr, Judith; Carbone, Walter; Beibel, Martin; Roma, Guglielmo; Ng, Aylwin; Tallarico, John A; Porter, Jeffery A; Xavier, Ramnik J; Mickanin, Craig; Murphy, Leon O; Hoffman, Gregory R; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    SQSTM1 is an adaptor protein that integrates multiple cellular signaling pathways and whose expression is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level. Here, we describe a forward genetic screening paradigm exploiting CRISPR-mediated genome editing coupled to a cell selection step by FACS to identify regulators of SQSTM1. Through systematic comparison of pooled libraries, we show that CRISPR is superior to RNAi in identifying known SQSTM1 modulators. A genome-wide CRISPR screen exposed MTOR signalling and the entire macroautophagy machinery as key regulators of SQSTM1 and identified several novel modulators including HNRNPM, SLC39A14, SRRD, PGK1 and the ufmylation cascade. We show that ufmylation regulates SQSTM1 by eliciting a cell type-specific ER stress response which induces SQSTM1 expression and results in its accumulation in the cytosol. This study validates pooled CRISPR screening as a powerful method to map the repertoire of cellular pathways that regulate the fate of an individual target protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17290.001 PMID:27351204

  7. Functional Genomics Screening Utilizing Mutant Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Novel Radiation-Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loesch, Kimberly; Galaviz, Stacy; Hamoui, Zaher; Clanton, Ryan; Akabani, Gamal; Deveau, Michael; DeJesus, Michael; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C.; Wallis, Deeann

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic determinants of radiation response is crucial to optimizing and individualizing radiotherapy for cancer patients. In order to identify genes that are involved in enhanced sensitivity or resistance to radiation, a library of stable mutant murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), each with a defined mutation, was screened for cell viability and gene expression in response to radiation exposure. We focused on a cancer-relevant subset of over 500 mutant ESC lines. We identified 13 genes; 7 genes that have been previously implicated in radiation response and 6 other genes that have never been implicated in radiation response. After screening, proteomic analysis showed enrichment for genes involved in cellular component disassembly (e.g. Dstn and Pex14) and regulation of growth (e.g. Adnp2, Epc1, and Ing4). Overall, the best targets with the highest potential for sensitizing cancer cells to radiation were Dstn and Map2k6, and the best targets for enhancing resistance to radiation were Iqgap and Vcan. Hence, we provide compelling evidence that screening mutant ESCs is a powerful approach to identify genes that alter radiation response. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to define genetic variants or therapeutic targets that will enhance clinical therapy. PMID:25853515

  8. Crystallization Optimum Solubility Screening: using crystallization results to identify the optimal buffer for protein crystal formation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Bernard; Stevens, Raymond C.; Page, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    It is shown how protein crystallization results can be used to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. An optimal solubility screen is described that uses the results of crystallization trials to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. This screen is useful not only for standard crystallization experiments, but also can easily be implemented into any high-throughput structure-determination pipeline. As a proof of principle, the predicted novel-fold protein AF2059 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which was known to precipitate in most buffers and particularly during concentration experiments, was selected. Using the crystallization results of 192 independent crystallization trials, it was possible to identify a buffer containing 100 mM CHES pH 9.25 that significantly improves its solubility. After transferring AF2059 into this ‘optimum-solubility’ buffer, the protein was rescreened for crystal formation against these same 192 conditions. Instead of extensive precipitation, as observed initially, it was found that 24 separate conditions produced crystals and the exchange of AF2059 into CHES buffer significantly improved crystallization success. Fine-screen optimization of these conditions led to the production of a crystal suitable for high-resolution (2.2 Å) structure determination.

  9. A BSL-4 High-Throughput Screen Identifies Sulfonamide Inhibitors of Nipah Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E. Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-based, high-throughput screen for compounds that inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect. From this pilot effort, 23 compounds were identified with EC50 values ranging from 3.9 to 20.0 μM and selectivities >10. Three sulfonamide compounds with EC50 values <12 μM were further characterized for their point of intervention in the viral replication cycle and for broad antiviral efficacy. Development of HTS capability under BSL-4 containment changes the paradigm for drug discovery for highly pathogenic agents because this platform can be readily modified to identify prophylactic and postexposure therapeutic candidates against other BSL-4 pathogens, particularly Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. PMID:24735442

  10. Yeast-based automated high-throughput screens to identify anti-parasitic lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Williams, Kevin; Moss, Harry J; de Clare, Michaela; Pir, Pinar; Rowland, Jem; Aubrey, Wayne; Pateman, Ron; Young, Mike; Carrington, Mark; King, Ross D; Oliver, Stephen G

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a robust, fully automated anti-parasitic drug-screening method that selects compounds specifically targeting parasite enzymes and not their host counterparts, thus allowing the early elimination of compounds with potential side effects. Our yeast system permits multiple parasite targets to be assayed in parallel owing to the strains' expression of different fluorescent proteins. A strain expressing the human target is included in the multiplexed screen to exclude compounds that do not discriminate between host and parasite enzymes. This form of assay has the advantages of using known targets and not requiring the in vitro culture of parasites. We performed automated screens for inhibitors of parasite dihydrofolate reductases, N-myristoyltransferases and phosphoglycerate kinases, finding specific inhibitors of parasite targets. We found that our 'hits' have significant structural similarities to compounds with in vitro anti-parasitic activity, validating our screens and suggesting targets for hits identified in parasite-based assays. Finally, we demonstrate a 60 per cent success rate for our hit compounds in killing or severely inhibiting the growth of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. PMID:23446112

  11. siRNA screen identifies QPCT as a druggable target for Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Lam, Wun; Tarditi, Alessia; Menzies, Fiona; Dami, Teresa Ed; Xu, Catherine; Gonzalez-Couto, Eduardo; Lazzeroni, Giulia; Heitz, Freddy; Diamanti, Daniela; Massai, Luisa; Satagopam, Venkata P.; Marconi, Guido; Caramelli, Chiara; Nencini, Arianna; Andreini, Matteo; Sardone, Gian Luca; Caradonna, Nicola P.; Porcari, Valentina; Scali, Carla; Schneider, Reinhard; Pollio, Giuseppe; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Caricasole, Andrea; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative condition caused by an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin (HTT). We identified novel modifiers of mutant HTT toxicity by performing a large-scale “druggable genome” siRNA screen in human cultured cells, followed by hit validation in Drosophila. We focused on glutaminyl cyclase (QPCT), which had one of the strongest effects on mutant HTT-induced toxicity and aggregation in the cell-based siRNA screen, and which also rescued these phenotypes in Drosophila. We found that QPCT inhibition induced the levels of the molecular chaperone alpha B-crystallin and reduced the aggregation of diverse proteins. We generated novel QPCT inhibitors using in silico methods followed by in vitro screens, which rescued the HD-related phenotypes in cell, Drosophila and zebrafish HD models. Our data reveal a novel HD druggable target affecting mutant huntingtin aggregation, and provide proof-of-principle for a discovery pipeline from druggable genome screen to drug development. PMID:25848931

  12. siRNA screen identifies QPCT as a druggable target for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Lam, Wun; Hannus, Michael; Sönnichsen, Birte; Imarisio, Sara; Fleming, Angeleen; Tarditi, Alessia; Menzies, Fiona; Ed Dami, Teresa; Xu, Catherine; Gonzalez-Couto, Eduardo; Lazzeroni, Giulia; Heitz, Freddy; Diamanti, Daniela; Massai, Luisa; Satagopam, Venkata P; Marconi, Guido; Caramelli, Chiara; Nencini, Arianna; Andreini, Matteo; Sardone, Gian Luca; Caradonna, Nicola P; Porcari, Valentina; Scali, Carla; Schneider, Reinhard; Pollio, Giuseppe; O'Kane, Cahir J; Caricasole, Andrea; Rubinsztein, David C

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative condition caused by an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin (HTT). We identified new modifiers of mutant HTT toxicity by performing a large-scale 'druggable genome' siRNA screen in human cultured cells, followed by hit validation in Drosophila. We focused on glutaminyl cyclase (QPCT), which had one of the strongest effects on mutant HTT-induced toxicity and aggregation in the cell-based siRNA screen and also rescued these phenotypes in Drosophila. We found that QPCT inhibition induced the levels of the molecular chaperone αB-crystallin and reduced the aggregation of diverse proteins. We generated new QPCT inhibitors using in silico methods followed by in vitro screening, which rescued the HD-related phenotypes in cell, Drosophila and zebrafish HD models. Our data reveal a new HD druggable target affecting mutant HTT aggregation and provide proof of principle for a discovery pipeline from druggable genome screen to drug development. PMID:25848931

  13. An in vivo zebrafish screen identifies organophosphate antidotes with diverse mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shan; Sarkar, Kumar S; Jin, Youngnam N; Liu, Yan; Kokel, David; Van Ham, Tjakko J; Roberts, Lee D; Gerszten, Robert E; Macrae, Calum A; Peterson, Randall T

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphates are a class of highly toxic chemicals that includes many pesticides and chemical weapons. Exposure to organophosphates, either through accidents or acts of terrorism, poses a significant risk to human health and safety. Existing antidotes, in use for over 50 years, have modest efficacy and undesirable toxicities. Therefore, discovering new organophosphate antidotes is a high priority. Early life stage zebrafish exposed to organophosphates exhibit several phenotypes that parallel the human response to organophosphates, including behavioral deficits, paralysis, and eventual death. Here, we have developed a high-throughput zebrafish screen in a 96-well plate format to find new antidotes that counteract organophosphate-induced lethality. In a pilot screen of 1200 known drugs, we identified 16 compounds that suppress organophosphate toxicity in zebrafish. Several in vitro assays coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling enabled determination of mechanisms of action for several of the antidotes, including reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition, cholinergic receptor antagonism, and inhibition of bioactivation. Therefore, the in vivo screen is capable of discovering organophosphate antidotes that intervene in distinct pathways. These findings suggest that zebrafish screens might be a broadly applicable approach for discovering compounds that counteract the toxic effects of accidental or malicious poisonous exposures. PMID:22960781

  14. A small molecule screen identifies a novel compound that induces a homeotic transformation in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Glauber, Kristine M; Dana, Catherine E; Park, Steve S; Colby, David A; Noro, Yukihiko; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Chamberlin, A Richard; Steele, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    Developmental processes such as morphogenesis, patterning and differentiation are continuously active in the adult Hydra polyp. We carried out a small molecule screen to identify compounds that affect patterning in Hydra. We identified a novel molecule, DAC-2-25, that causes a homeotic transformation of body column into tentacle zone. This transformation occurs in a progressive and polar fashion, beginning at the oral end of the animal. We have identified several strains that respond to DAC-2-25 and one that does not, and we used chimeras from these strains to identify the ectoderm as the target tissue for DAC-2-25. Using transgenic Hydra that express green fluorescent protein under the control of relevant promoters, we examined how DAC-2-25 affects tentacle patterning. Genes whose expression is associated with the tentacle zone are ectopically expressed upon exposure to DAC-2-25, whereas those associated with body column tissue are turned off as the tentacle zone expands. The expression patterns of the organizer-associated gene HyWnt3 and the hypostome-specific gene HyBra2 are unchanged. Structure-activity relationship studies have identified features of DAC-2-25 that are required for activity and potency. This study shows that small molecule screens in Hydra can be used to dissect patterning processes. PMID:24255098

  15. A small molecule screen identifies a novel compound that induces a homeotic transformation in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Glauber, Kristine M.; Dana, Catherine E.; Park, Steve S.; Colby, David A.; Noro, Yukihiko; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Chamberlin, A. Richard; Steele, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental processes such as morphogenesis, patterning and differentiation are continuously active in the adult Hydra polyp. We carried out a small molecule screen to identify compounds that affect patterning in Hydra. We identified a novel molecule, DAC-2-25, that causes a homeotic transformation of body column into tentacle zone. This transformation occurs in a progressive and polar fashion, beginning at the oral end of the animal. We have identified several strains that respond to DAC-2-25 and one that does not, and we used chimeras from these strains to identify the ectoderm as the target tissue for DAC-2-25. Using transgenic Hydra that express green fluorescent protein under the control of relevant promoters, we examined how DAC-2-25 affects tentacle patterning. Genes whose expression is associated with the tentacle zone are ectopically expressed upon exposure to DAC-2-25, whereas those associated with body column tissue are turned off as the tentacle zone expands. The expression patterns of the organizer-associated gene HyWnt3 and the hypostome-specific gene HyBra2 are unchanged. Structure-activity relationship studies have identified features of DAC-2-25 that are required for activity and potency. This study shows that small molecule screens in Hydra can be used to dissect patterning processes. PMID:24255098

  16. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matt Q; McCumsey, Stephanie J; Lopez-Darwin, Sereno; Heckscher, Ellie S; Doe, Chris Q

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons) are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence) of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines-chosen for sparse neuronal expression-to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°). A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program. PMID:27172197

  17. Functional Genetic Screen to Identify Interneurons Governing Behaviorally Distinct Aspects of Drosophila Larval Motor Programs

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matt Q.; McCumsey, Stephanie J.; Lopez-Darwin, Sereno; Heckscher, Ellie S.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval crawling is an attractive system to study rhythmic motor output at the level of animal behavior. Larval crawling consists of waves of muscle contractions generating forward or reverse locomotion. In addition, larvae undergo additional behaviors, including head casts, turning, and feeding. It is likely that some neurons (e.g., motor neurons) are used in all these behaviors, but the identity (or even existence) of neurons dedicated to specific aspects of behavior is unclear. To identify neurons that regulate specific aspects of larval locomotion, we performed a genetic screen to identify neurons that, when activated, could elicit distinct motor programs. We used 165 Janelia CRM-Gal4 lines—chosen for sparse neuronal expression—to ectopically express the warmth-inducible neuronal activator TrpA1, and screened for locomotor defects. The primary screen measured forward locomotion velocity, and we identified 63 lines that had locomotion velocities significantly slower than controls following TrpA1 activation (28°). A secondary screen was performed on these lines, revealing multiple discrete behavioral phenotypes, including slow forward locomotion, excessive reverse locomotion, excessive turning, excessive feeding, immobile, rigid paralysis, and delayed paralysis. While many of the Gal4 lines had motor, sensory, or muscle expression that may account for some or all of the phenotype, some lines showed specific expression in a sparse pattern of interneurons. Our results show that distinct motor programs utilize distinct subsets of interneurons, and provide an entry point for characterizing interneurons governing different elements of the larval motor program. PMID:27172197

  18. Testing the Woman Abuse Screening Tool to Identify Intimate Partner Violence in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Livia; Braun, Kathryn L.; Katz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a global public health problem. IPV prevalence in Indonesia has been estimated to be less than 1%, based on reported cases. It is likely that IPV prevalence is underreported in Indonesia, as it is in many other countries. Screening for IPV has been found to increase IPV identification, but no screening tools are in use in Indonesia. The aim of this study was to test the translated Woman Abuse Screening Tool (WAST) for detecting IPV in Indonesia. The WAST was tested against a diagnostic interview by a trained psychologist on 240 women attending two Primary Health Centers in Jakarta. IPV prevalence and the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of the WAST were estimated. Prevalence of IPV by diagnostic interview was 36.3%, much higher than published estimates. The most common forms of IPV identified were psychological (85%) and physical abuse (24%). Internal reliability of the WAST was high (α = .801). A WAST score of 13 (out of 24) is the recommended cutoff for identifying IPV, but only 17% of the Indonesian sample scored 13 or higher. Test sensitivity of the WAST with a cutoff score of 13 was only 41.9%, with a specificity of 96.8%. With a cutoff score of 10, the sensitivity improved to 84.9%, while the specificity decreased to 61.0%. Use of the WAST with a cutoff score of 10 provides good sensitivity and reasonable specificity and would provide a much-needed screening tool for use in Indonesia. Although a lower cutoff would yield a greater proportion of false positives, most of the true cases would be identified, increasing the possibility that women experiencing abuse would receive needed assistance. PMID:25012952

  19. Use of Augmented Meaningful Use Criteria to Identify Patients Eligible for Lung Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Dan J.; Dunham, Rachel; Tiep, Brian; Sandoval, Argelia; Grannis, Frederic; Rotter, Arnold; Kim, Jae Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer screening (LCS) with low dose radiation computed tomography saves lives. Despite recent US Preventative Services Task Force draft endorsement of LCS, a minority of patients eligible is screened. Meaningful use is a set of standards for Electronic Health Records (EHR) established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and includes reporting of smoking status. We sought to improve rates of LCS among patients treated at our institution by identifying eligible patients using augmented smoking-related meaningful use criteria. Methods We launched a LCS program at our institution, an NCCN cancer center, in January 2013. We developed a “Tobacco Screen”, administered by clinic staff to all adult outpatients every 6 months and entered into the EHR. This contained smoking-related meaningful use criteria, as well as a pack-year calculation and quit date, if applicable. Weekly electronic reports of patients who met eligibility criteria for LCS were generated, and EHR review excluded patients who had a chest CT within 12 months or who were undergoing cancer treatment. We then contacted those patients to review eligibility for LCS and communicated with the primary treating physician regarding the plan for LCS. Results During the first 3 months of the program, 4 patients were enrolled, 2 by physician-referral and 2 by self-referral. We then began to utilize the Tobacco Screen reports and identified 418 patients potentially eligible for LCS. Over the next 7 months, we enrolled a total of 110 patients. 58 (53%) were identified from the Tobacco Screen, 32 (29%) were self-referred, and 20 (18%) were physician referrals. Three stage I lung cancers were detected and treated. The tobacco screen was easily implemented by clinic staff and took a median time of 2 minutes to enter for current and former smokers. Lack of response to attempts at telephone contact and objection to paying out-of-pocket costs were the most common reasons for failing to screen

  20. High-content screening identifies a role for Na+ channels in insulin production

    PubMed Central

    Szabat, Marta; Modi, Honey; Ramracheya, Reshma; Girbinger, Vroni; Chan, Forson; Lee, Jason T. C.; Piske, Micah; Kamal, Sepehr; Carol Yang, Yu Hsuan; Welling, Andrea; Rorsman, Patrik; Johnson, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin production is the central feature of functionally mature and differentiated pancreatic β-cells. Reduced insulin transcription and dedifferentiation have been implicated in type 2 diabetes, making drugs that could reverse these processes potentially useful. We have previously established ratiometric live-cell imaging tools to identify factors that increase insulin promoter activity and promote β-cell differentiation. Here, we present a single vector imaging tool with eGFP and mRFP, driven by the Pdx1 and Ins1 promoters, respectively, targeted to the nucleus to enhance identification of individual cells in a high-throughput manner. Using this new approach, we screened 1120 off-patent drugs for factors that regulate Ins1 and Pdx1 promoter activity in MIN6 β-cells. We identified a number of compounds that positively modulate Ins1 promoter activity, including several drugs known to modulate ion channels. Carbamazepine was selected for extended follow-up, as our previous screen also identified this use-dependent sodium channel inhibitor as a positive modulator of β-cell survival. Indeed, carbamazepine increased Ins1 and Ins2 mRNA in primary mouse islets at lower doses than were required to protect β-cells. We validated the role of sodium channels in insulin production by examining Nav1.7 (Scn9a) knockout mice and remarkably islets from these animals had dramatically elevated insulin content relative to wild-type controls. Collectively, our experiments provide a starting point for additional studies aimed to identify drugs and molecular pathways that control insulin production and β-cell differentiation status. In particular, our unbiased screen identified a novel role for a β-cell sodium channel gene in insulin production. PMID:27019722

  1. High-content screening identifies a role for Na(+) channels in insulin production.

    PubMed

    Szabat, Marta; Modi, Honey; Ramracheya, Reshma; Girbinger, Vroni; Chan, Forson; Lee, Jason T C; Piske, Micah; Kamal, Sepehr; Carol Yang, Yu Hsuan; Welling, Andrea; Rorsman, Patrik; Johnson, James D

    2015-12-01

    Insulin production is the central feature of functionally mature and differentiated pancreatic β-cells. Reduced insulin transcription and dedifferentiation have been implicated in type 2 diabetes, making drugs that could reverse these processes potentially useful. We have previously established ratiometric live-cell imaging tools to identify factors that increase insulin promoter activity and promote β-cell differentiation. Here, we present a single vector imaging tool with eGFP and mRFP, driven by the Pdx1 and Ins1 promoters, respectively, targeted to the nucleus to enhance identification of individual cells in a high-throughput manner. Using this new approach, we screened 1120 off-patent drugs for factors that regulate Ins1 and Pdx1 promoter activity in MIN6 β-cells. We identified a number of compounds that positively modulate Ins1 promoter activity, including several drugs known to modulate ion channels. Carbamazepine was selected for extended follow-up, as our previous screen also identified this use-dependent sodium channel inhibitor as a positive modulator of β-cell survival. Indeed, carbamazepine increased Ins1 and Ins2 mRNA in primary mouse islets at lower doses than were required to protect β-cells. We validated the role of sodium channels in insulin production by examining Nav1.7 (Scn9a) knockout mice and remarkably islets from these animals had dramatically elevated insulin content relative to wild-type controls. Collectively, our experiments provide a starting point for additional studies aimed to identify drugs and molecular pathways that control insulin production and β-cell differentiation status. In particular, our unbiased screen identified a novel role for a β-cell sodium channel gene in insulin production. PMID:27019722

  2. A novel yeast cell-based screen identifies flavone as a tankyrase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiroda, Yoko; Hatsugai, Kaori; Takemoto, Yasushi; Saito, Tamio; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Osada, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Minoru

    2010-04-09

    The telomere-associated protein tankyrase 1 is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and is considered to be a promising target for cancer therapy, especially for BRCA-associated cancers. However, an efficient assay system for inhibitor screening has not been established, mainly due to the difficulty of efficient preparation of the enzyme and its substrate. Here, we report a cell-based assay system for detecting inhibitory activity against tankyrase 1. We found that overexpression of the human tankyrase 1 gene causes a growth defect in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Chemicals that restore the growth defect phenotype can be identified as potential tankyrase 1 inhibitors. We performed a high-throughput screen using this system, and identified flavone as a compound that restores the growth of yeast cells overexpressing tankyrase 1. Indeed, flavone inhibited poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of proteins caused by overexpression of tankyrase 1 in yeast cells. This system allows rapid identification of inhibitory activity against tankyrase 1 and is amenable to high-throughput screening using robotics.

  3. A Quantitative High-Throughput Screen Identifies Potential Epigenetic Modulators of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Huang, Wenwei; Jadhav, Ajit; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Martinez, Elisabeth D.

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is essential in embryonic development and contributes to cancer pathology. We used a cell-based imaging assay that measures derepression of a silenced GFP reporter to identify novel classes of compounds involved in epigenetic regulation. This Locus Derepression (LDR) assay was screened against a 69,137-member chemical library using quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS), a titration-response method that assays compounds at multiple concentrations. From structure-activity relationships of the 411 actives recovered from the qHTS, six distinct chemical series were chosen for further study. Forty-eight qHTS actives and analogs were counter screened using the parental line of the LDR cells, which lack the GFP reporter. Three series, 8-hydroxy quinoline, quinoline-8-thiol and 1,3,5-thiadiazinane-2-thione, were not fluorescent and re-confirmed activity in the LDR cells. The three active series did not inhibit histone deacetylase activity in nuclear extracts or reactivate the expression of the densely methylated p16 gene in cancer cells. However, one series induced expression of the methylated CDH13 gene and inhibited the viability of several lung cancer lines at submicromolar concentrations. These results suggest that the identified small molecules act on epigenetic or transcriptional components and validate our approach of using a cell-based imaging assay in conjunction with qHTS. PMID:18211814

  4. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  5. Corifungin, a new drug lead against Naegleria, identified from a high-throughput screen.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Anjan; Tunac, Josefino B; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; McKerrow, James H

    2012-11-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rapidly fatal infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. The drug of choice in treating PAM is the antifungal antibiotic amphotericin B, but its use is associated with severe adverse effects. Moreover, few patients treated with amphotericin B have survived PAM. Therefore, fast-acting and efficient drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of PAM. To facilitate drug screening for this pathogen, an automated, high-throughput screening methodology was developed and validated for the closely related species Naegleria gruberi. Five kinase inhibitors and an NF-kappaB inhibitor were hits identified in primary screens of three compound libraries. Most importantly for a preclinical drug discovery pipeline, we identified corifungin, a water-soluble polyene macrolide with a higher activity against Naegleria than that of amphotericin B. Transmission electron microscopy of N. fowleri trophozoites incubated with different concentrations of corifungin showed disruption of cytoplasmic and plasma membranes and alterations in mitochondria, followed by complete lysis of amebae. In vivo efficacy of corifungin in a mouse model of PAM was confirmed by an absence of detectable amebae in the brain and 100% survival of mice for 17 days postinfection for a single daily intraperitoneal dose of 9 mg/kg of body weight given for 10 days. The same dose of amphotericin B did not reduce ameba growth, and mouse survival was compromised. Based on these results, the U.S. FDA has approved orphan drug status for corifungin for the treatment of PAM. PMID:22869574

  6. Identifying Relationships between High-Risk Sexual Behaviors and Screening Positive for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in School-Wide Screening Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salerno, Jennifer; Darling-Fisher, Cindy; Hawkins, Nicole M.; Fraker, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background: This article describes a school-wide sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening to identify adolescent high-risk sexual behaviors, STI history/incidence, and presence of chlamydia and gonorrhea, and examines relationships between high-risk behaviors and screening positive for chlamydia and gonorrhea in an alternative high school…

  7. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  8. Tetrandrine identified in a small molecule screen to activate mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zijiang; Concannon, John; Ng, Kelvin S.; Seyb, Kathleen; Mortensen, Luke J.; Ranganath, Sudhir; Gu, Fangqi; Levy, Oren; Tong, Zhixiang; Martyn, Keir; Zhao, Weian; Lin, Charles P.; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment or priming of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) prior to transplantation can significantly augment the immunosuppressive effect of MSC-based therapies. In this study, we screened a library of 1402 FDA-approved bioactive compounds to prime MSC. We identified tetrandrine as a potential hit that activates the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent immunosuppressive agent, by MSC. Tetrandrine increased MSC PGE2 secretion through the NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathway. When co-cultured with mouse macrophages (RAW264.7), tetrandrine-primed MSC attenuated the level of TNF-α secreted by RAW264.7. Furthermore, systemic transplantation of primed MSC into a mouse ear skin inflammation model significantly reduced the level of TNF-α in the inflamed ear, compared to unprimed cells. Screening of small molecules to pre-condition cells prior to transplantation represents a promising strategy to boost the therapeutic potential of cell therapy. PMID:27457881

  9. Complementary Genomic Screens Identify SERCA as a Therapeutic Target in NOTCH1 Mutated Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roti, Giovanni; Carlton, Anne; Ross, Kenneth N.; Markstein, Michele; Pajcini, Kostandin; Su, Angela H.; Perrimon, Norbert; Pear, Warren S.; Kung, Andrew L.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Aster, Jon C.; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Notch1 is a rational therapeutic target in several human cancers, but as a transcriptional regulator, it poses a drug discovery challenge. To identify Notch1 modulators, we performed two cell-based, high-throughput screens for small-molecule inhibitors and cDNA enhancers of a NOTCH1 allele bearing a leukemia-associated mutation. SERCA calcium channels emerged at the intersection of these complementary screens. SERCA inhibition preferentially impairs the maturation and activity of mutated Notch1 receptors and induces a G0/G1 arrest in NOTCH1-mutated human leukemia cells. A small-molecule SERCA inhibitor has on-target activity in two mouse models of human leukemia and interferes with Notch signaling in Drosophila. These studies “credential” SERCA as a therapeutic target in cancers associated with NOTCH1 mutations. PMID:23434461

  10. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery.

  11. A forward genetic screen identifies erythrocyte CD55 as essential for Plasmodium falciparum invasion **

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Elizabeth S.; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Moechtar, Mischka A.; Barteneva, Natasha S.; Weekes, Michael P.; Nobre, Luis V.; Gygi, Steven P.; Paulo, Joao A.; Frantzreb, Charles; Tani, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Junko; Watanabe, Seishi; Goldberg, Jonathan; Paul, Aditya S.; Brugnara, Carlo; Root, David E.; Wiegand, Roger C.; Doench, John G.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify host determinants for malaria have been hindered by the absence of a nucleus in erythrocytes, precluding genetic manipulation in the cell where the parasite replicates. We used cultured red blood cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells to carry out a forward genetic screen for Plasmodium falciparum host determinants. We found that CD55 is an essential host factor for P. falciparum invasion. CD55-null erythrocytes were refractory to invasion by all isolates of P. falciparum because parasites failed to attach properly to the erythrocyte surface. Thus, CD55 is an attractive target for the development of malaria therapeutics. Hematopoietic stem cell-based forward genetic screens may be valuable for the identification of additional host determinants of malaria pathogenesis. PMID:25954012

  12. Combinatorial Library Screening Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Valuable Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Camperi, Silvia A; Giudicessi, Silvana L; Martínez-Ceron, María C; Gurevich-Messina, Juan M; Saavedra, Soledad L; Acosta, Gerardo; Cascone, Osvaldo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial library screening coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is a practical approach to identify useful peptides. Cyclic peptides can have high biological activity, selectivity, and affinity for target proteins, and high stability against proteolytic degradation. Here we describe two strategies to prepare combinatorial libraries suitable for MS analysis to accelerate the discovery of cyclic peptide structures. Both approaches use ChemMatrix resin and the linker 4-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid. One strategy involves the synthesis of a one-bead-two-peptides library in which each bead contains both the cyclic peptide and its linear counterpart to facilitate MS analysis. The other protocol is based on the synthesis of a cyclic depsipeptide library in which a glycolamidic ester group is incorporated by adding glycolic acid. After library screening, the ring is opened and the peptide is released simultaneously for subsequent MS analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27258690

  13. Genotype-Selective Combination Therapies for Melanoma Identified by High Throughput Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Held, Matthew A.; Langdon, Casey G.; Platt, James T.; Graham-Steed, Tisheeka; Liu, Zongzhi; Chakraborty, Ashok; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Koo, Andrew; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Stern, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance and partial responses to targeted monotherapy are major obstacles in cancer treatment. Systematic approaches to identify efficacious drug combinations for cancer are not well established, especially in the context of genotype. To address this, we have tested pairwise combinations of an array of small molecule inhibitors on early passage melanoma cultures using combinatorial drug screening. Results reveal several inhibitor combinations effective for melanomas with activating RAS or BRAF mutations, including mutant BRAF melanomas with intrinsic or acquired resistance to vemurafenib. Inhibition of both EGFR and AKT sensitized treatment-resistant BRAF-mutant melanoma cultures to vemurafenib. Melanomas with RAS mutations were more resistant to combination therapies relative to BRAF mutants, but were sensitive to combinations of statins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate the utility of combinatorial drug screening for discovering unique treatment regimens that overcome resistance phenotypes of mutant BRAF and RAS driven melanomas. PMID:23239741

  14. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  15. Tetrandrine identified in a small molecule screen to activate mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zijiang; Concannon, John; Ng, Kelvin S; Seyb, Kathleen; Mortensen, Luke J; Ranganath, Sudhir; Gu, Fangqi; Levy, Oren; Tong, Zhixiang; Martyn, Keir; Zhao, Weian; Lin, Charles P; Glicksman, Marcie A; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment or priming of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) prior to transplantation can significantly augment the immunosuppressive effect of MSC-based therapies. In this study, we screened a library of 1402 FDA-approved bioactive compounds to prime MSC. We identified tetrandrine as a potential hit that activates the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent immunosuppressive agent, by MSC. Tetrandrine increased MSC PGE2 secretion through the NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathway. When co-cultured with mouse macrophages (RAW264.7), tetrandrine-primed MSC attenuated the level of TNF-α secreted by RAW264.7. Furthermore, systemic transplantation of primed MSC into a mouse ear skin inflammation model significantly reduced the level of TNF-α in the inflamed ear, compared to unprimed cells. Screening of small molecules to pre-condition cells prior to transplantation represents a promising strategy to boost the therapeutic potential of cell therapy. PMID:27457881

  16. High Throughput Screen Identifies Small Molecule Inhibitors Specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phosphoserine Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  17. High throughput screen identifies small molecule inhibitors specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoserine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Arora, Garima; Tiwari, Prabhakar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Gupta, Arpit; Sharma, Deepak; Saha, Sudipto; Singh, Ramandeep

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis makes identification and validation of newer drug targets a global priority. Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a key essential metabolic enzyme involved in conversion of O-phospho-l-serine to l-serine, was characterized in this study. The M. tuberculosis genome harbors all enzymes involved in l-serine biosynthesis including two PSP homologs: Rv0505c (SerB1) and Rv3042c (SerB2). In the present study, we have biochemically characterized SerB2 enzyme and developed malachite green-based high throughput assay system to identify SerB2 inhibitors. We have identified 10 compounds that were structurally different from known PSP inhibitors, and few of these scaffolds were highly specific in their ability to inhibit SerB2 enzyme, were noncytotoxic against mammalian cell lines, and inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in vitro. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the relative binding for these inhibitors. The two best hits identified in our screen, clorobiocin and rosaniline, were bactericidal in activity and killed intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. We have also identified amino acid residues critical for these SerB2-small molecule interactions. This is the first study where we validate that M. tuberculosis SerB2 is a druggable and suitable target to pursue for further high throughput assay system screening. PMID:25037224

  18. Combined Gene Expression and RNAi Screening to Identify Alkylation Damage Survival Pathways from Fly to Human

    PubMed Central

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Dashnamoorthy, Ravi; Loranc, Eva; de Souza, Luis H. T.; Moreira, José C. F.; Suresh, Uthra; Chen, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a key component of cancer chemotherapy. Several cellular mechanisms are known to be important for its survival, particularly DNA repair and xenobiotic detoxification, yet genomic screens indicate that additional cellular components may be involved. Elucidating these components has value in either identifying key processes that can be modulated to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy or may be altered in some cancers to confer chemoresistance. We therefore set out to reevaluate our prior Drosophila RNAi screening data by comparison to gene expression arrays in order to determine if we could identify any novel processes in alkylation damage survival. We noted a consistent conservation of alkylation survival pathways across platforms and species when the analysis was conducted on a pathway/process level rather than at an individual gene level. Better results were obtained when combining gene lists from two datasets (RNAi screen plus microarray) prior to analysis. In addition to previously identified DNA damage responses (p53 signaling and Nucleotide Excision Repair), DNA-mRNA-protein metabolism (transcription/translation) and proteasome machinery, we also noted a highly conserved cross-species requirement for NRF2, glutathione (GSH)-mediated drug detoxification and Endoplasmic Reticulum stress (ER stress)/Unfolded Protein Responses (UPR) in cells exposed to alkylation. The requirement for GSH, NRF2 and UPR in alkylation survival was validated by metabolomics, protein studies and functional cell assays. From this we conclude that RNAi/gene expression fusion is a valid strategy to rapidly identify key processes that may be extendable to other contexts beyond damage survival. PMID:27100653

  19. Quantitative High-Throughput Screen Identifies Inhibitors of the Schistosoma mansoni Redox Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Sayed, Ahmed A.; Wang, Yuhong; Nelson, Michael E.; Thomas, Craig J.; Inglese, James; Williams, David L.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease associated with high morbidity and mortality, currently affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Praziquantel is the only drug used to treat the disease, and with its increased use the probability of developing drug resistance has grown significantly. The Schistosoma parasites can survive for up to decades in the human host due in part to a unique set of antioxidant enzymes that continuously degrade the reactive oxygen species produced by the host's innate immune response. Two principal components of this defense system have been recently identified in S. mansoni as thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) and as such these enzymes present attractive new targets for anti-schistosomiasis drug development. Inhibition of TGR/Prx activity was screened in a dual-enzyme format with reducing equivalents being transferred from NADPH to glutathione via a TGR-catalyzed reaction and then to hydrogen peroxide via a Prx-catalyzed step. A fully automated quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) experiment was performed against a collection of 71,028 compounds tested as 7- to 15-point concentration series at 5 µL reaction volume in 1536-well plate format. In order to generate a robust data set and to minimize the effect of compound autofluorescence, apparent reaction rates derived from a kinetic read were utilized instead of end-point measurements. Actives identified from the screen, along with previously untested analogues, were subjected to confirmatory experiments using the screening assay and subsequently against the individual targets in secondary assays. Several novel active series were identified which inhibited TGR at a range of potencies, with IC50s ranging from micromolar to the assay response limit (∼25 nM). This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a large-scale HTS to identify lead compounds for a helminthic disease, and provides a paradigm that can be used to jump-start development of novel

  20. A genome scale RNAi screen identifies GLI1 as a novel gene regulating vorinostat sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, K J; Newbold, A; Gould, C M; Luu, J; Trapani, J A; Matthews, G M; Simpson, K J; Johnstone, R W

    2016-07-01

    Vorinostat is an FDA-approved histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that has proven clinical success in some patients; however, it remains unclear why certain patients remain unresponsive to this agent and other HDACis. Constitutive STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) activation, overexpression of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins and loss of HR23B have been identified as potential biomarkers of HDACi resistance; however, none have yet been used to aid the clinical utility of HDACi. Herein, we aimed to further elucidate vorinostat-resistance mechanisms through a functional genomics screen to identify novel genes that when knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) sensitized cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis. A synthetic lethal functional screen using a whole-genome protein-coding RNAi library was used to identify genes that when knocked down cooperated with vorinostat to induce tumor cell apoptosis in otherwise resistant cells. Through iterative screening, we identified 10 vorinostat-resistance candidate genes that sensitized specifically to vorinostat. One of these vorinostat-resistance genes was GLI1, an oncogene not previously known to regulate the activity of HDACi. Treatment of vorinostat-resistant cells with the GLI1 small-molecule inhibitor, GANT61, phenocopied the effect of GLI1 knockdown. The mechanism by which GLI1 loss of function sensitized tumor cells to vorinostat-induced apoptosis is at least in part through interactions with vorinostat to alter gene expression in a manner that favored apoptosis. Upon GLI1 knockdown and vorinostat treatment, BCL2L1 expression was repressed and overexpression of BCL2L1 inhibited GLI1-knockdown-mediated vorinostat sensitization. Taken together, we present the identification and characterization of GLI1 as a new HDACi resistance gene, providing a strong rationale for development of GLI1 inhibitors for clinical use in combination with HDACi therapy. PMID:26868908

  1. A kinome wide screen identifies novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Vuorenpää, Anne; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jørgensen, Trine N; Gether, Ulrik

    2016-09-01

    The high affinity transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, play a key role in controlling monoaminergic neurotransmission. It is believed that the transporters (DAT, NET and SERT, respectively) are subject to tight regulation by the cellular signaling machinery to maintain monoaminergic homeostasis. Kinases constitute a pivotal role in cellular signaling, however, the regulation of monoamine transporters by the entire ensemble of kinases is unknown. Here, we perform a whole human kinome RNA interference screen to identify novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function and surface expression. A primary screen in HEK 293 cells stably expressing DAT or SERT with siRNAs against 573 human kinases revealed 93 kinases putatively regulating transporter function. All 93 hits, which also included kinases previously implicated in monoamine transporter regulation, such as Protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), were validated with a new set of siRNAs in a secondary screen. In this screen we assessed both changes in uptake and surface expression leading to selection of 11 kinases for further evaluation in HEK 293 cells transiently expressing DAT, SERT or NET. Subsequently, three kinases; salt inducible kinase 3 (SIK3), cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PKA C-α) and protein kinase X-linked (PrKX); were selected for additional exploration in catecholaminergic CATH.a differentiated cells (CAD) and rat chromocytoma (PC12) cells. Whereas SIK3 likely transcriptionally regulated expression of the three transfected transporters, depletion of PKA C-α was shown to decrease SERT function. Depletion of PrKX caused decreased surface expression and function of DAT without changing protein levels, suggesting that PrKX stabilizes the transporter at the cell surface. Summarized, our data provide novel insight into kinome regulation of the monoamine transporters and

  2. A cell-based quantitative high-throughput image screening identified novel autophagy modulators.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; McGreal, Steven; Zhao, Jean; Huang, Ruili; Zhou, Yan; Zhong, Hua; Xia, Menghang; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2016-08-01

    Macroautophagy is a major cellular degradation pathway for long-lived proteins and cellular organelles to maintain cellular homeostasis. Reduced autophagy has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic syndrome, and tumorigenesis. In contrast, increased autophagy has been shown to protect against tissue injury and aging. Here we employed a cell-based quantitative high-throughput image screening (qHTS) for autophagy modulators using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) that are stably expressing GFP-LC3. The library of pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC) was used to screen for the autophagy modulators in compounds alone or in combination with the lysosome inhibitor chloroquine (CQ). The GFP-LC3 puncta were then quantified to measure autophagic flux. The primary screening revealed 173 compounds with efficacy more than 40%. These compounds were cherry-picked and re-tested at multiple different concentrations using the same assay. A number of novel autophagy inducers, inhibitors, and modulators with dual-effects on autophagy were identified from the cherry-pick screening. Interestingly, we found a group of compounds that induce autophagy are related to dopamine receptors and are commonly used as clinical psychiatric drugs. Among them, indatraline hydrochloride (IND), a dopamine inhibitor, and chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) and fluphenazine dihydrochloride (FPZ), two dopamine receptor antagonists, were further evaluated. We found that FPZ-induced autophagy through mTOR inhibition but IND and CPZ induced autophagy in an mTOR-independent manner. Our data suggest that image-based autophagic flux qHTS can efficiently identify autophagy inducers and inhibitors. PMID:27168224

  3. A Virtual Screening Approach For Identifying Plants with Anti H5N1 Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  4. A virtual screening approach for identifying plants with anti H5N1 neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Nur Kusaira Khairul; Durrant, Jacob D; Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Zalaludin, Ayunni Salihah; Purwitasari, Neny; Mohamed, Nornisah; Rahim, Aisyah Saad Abdul; Lam, Chan Kit; Normi, Yahaya M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Amaro, Rommie E; Wahab, Habibah A

    2015-02-23

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  5. Transposon activation mutagenesis as a screening tool for identifying resistance to cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of resistance to chemotherapies represents a significant barrier to successful cancer treatment. Resistance mechanisms are complex, can involve diverse and often unexpected cellular processes, and can vary with both the underlying genetic lesion and the origin or type of tumor. For these reasons developing experimental strategies that could be used to understand, identify and predict mechanisms of resistance in different malignant cells would be a major advance. Methods Here we describe a gain-of-function forward genetic approach for identifying mechanisms of resistance. This approach uses a modified piggyBac transposon to generate libraries of mutagenized cells, each containing transposon insertions that randomly activate nearby gene expression. Genes of interest are identified using next-gen high-throughput sequencing and barcode multiplexing is used to reduce experimental cost. Results Using this approach we successfully identify genes involved in paclitaxel resistance in a variety of cancer cell lines, including the multidrug transporter ABCB1, a previously identified major paclitaxel resistance gene. Analysis of co-occurring transposons integration sites in single cell clone allows for the identification of genes that might act cooperatively to produce drug resistance a level of information not accessible using RNAi or ORF expression screening approaches. Conclusion We have developed a powerful pipeline to systematically discover drug resistance in mammalian cells in vitro. This cost-effective approach can be readily applied to different cell lines, to identify canonical or context specific resistance mechanisms. Its ability to probe complex genetic context and non-coding genomic elements as well as cooperative resistance events makes it a good complement to RNAi or ORF expression based screens. PMID:23442791

  6. A Genome-Wide Screen with Nicotinamide to Identify Sirtuin-Dependent Pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Choy, John S.; Qadri, Bayan; Henry, Leah; Shroff, Kunal; Bifarin, Olatomiwa; Basrai, Munira A.

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved NAD-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the cleavage of NAD+ into nicotinamide (NAM), which can act as a pan-sirtuin inhibitor in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Sirtuins regulate processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, chromosome segregation, and longevity extension in yeast and metazoans. The founding member of the evolutionarily conserved sirtuin family, SIR2, was first identified in budding yeast. Subsequent studies led to the identification of four yeast SIR2 homologs HST1, HST2, HST3, and HST4. Understanding the downstream physiological consequences of inhibiting sirtuins can be challenging since most studies focus on single or double deletions of sirtuins, and mating defects in SIR2 deletions hamper genome-wide screens. This represents an important gap in our knowledge of how sirtuins function in highly complex biological processes such as aging, metabolism, and chromosome segregation. In this report, we used a genome-wide screen to explore sirtuin-dependent processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by identifying deletion mutants that are sensitive to NAM. We identified 55 genes in total, 36 of which have not been previously reported to be dependent on sirtuins. We find that genome stability pathways are particularly vulnerable to loss of sirtuin activity. Here, we provide evidence that defects in sister chromatid cohesion renders cells sensitive to growth in the presence of NAM. The results of our screen provide a broad view of the biological pathways sensitive to inhibition of sirtuins, and advance our understanding of the function of sirtuins and NAD+ biology. PMID:26646153

  7. A modifier screen identifies DNAJB6 as a cardiomyopathy susceptibility gene

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yonghe; Long, Pamela A.; Bos, J. Martijn; Shih, Yu-Huan; Ma, Xiao; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Chen, Jianhua; Jiang, Yiwen; Zhao, Liqun; Hu, Xinyang; Wang, Jianan; Shi, Yongyong; Ackerman, Michael J.; Lin, Xueying; Ekker, Stephen C.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Olson, Timothy M.; Xu, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Mutagenesis screening is a powerful forward genetic approach that has been successfully applied in lower-model organisms to discover genetic factors for biological processes. This phenotype-based approach has yet to be established in vertebrates for probing major human diseases, largely because of the complexity of colony management. Herein, we report a rapid strategy for identifying genetic modifiers of cardiomyopathy (CM). Based on the application of doxorubicin stress to zebrafish insertional cardiac (ZIC) mutants, we identified 4 candidate CM-modifying genes, of which 3 have been linked previously to CM. The long isoform of DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 6b (dnajb6b(L)) was identified as a CM susceptibility gene, supported by identification of rare variants in its human ortholog DNAJB6 from CM patients. Mechanistic studies indicated that the deleterious, loss-of-function modifying effects of dnajb6b(L) can be ameliorated by inhibition of ER stress. In contrast, overexpression of dnajb6(L) exerts cardioprotective effects on both fish and mouse CM models. Together, our findings establish a mutagenesis screening strategy that is scalable for systematic identification of genetic modifiers of CM, feasible to suggest therapeutic targets, and expandable to other major human diseases.

  8. High Throughput Screening Identifies a Novel Compound Protecting Cardiomyocytes from Doxorubicin-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Szabolcs; Hegedűs, Csaba; Lakatos, Petra; Kovács, Katalin; Gáspár, Renáta; Csont, Tamás; Virág, László

    2015-01-01

    Antracyclines are effective antitumor agents. One of the most commonly used antracyclines is doxorubicin, which can be successfully used to treat a diverse spectrum of tumors. Application of these drugs is limited by their cardiotoxic effect, which is determined by a lifetime cumulative dose. We set out to identify by high throughput screening cardioprotective compounds protecting cardiomyocytes from doxorubicin-induced injury. Ten thousand compounds of ChemBridge's DIVERSet compound library were screened to identify compounds that can protect H9C2 rat cardiomyocytes against doxorubicin-induced cell death. The most effective compound proved protective in doxorubicin-treated primary rat cardiomyocytes and was further characterized to demonstrate that it significantly decreased doxorubicin-induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death and inhibited doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK MAP kinase without having considerable radical scavenging effect or interfering with the antitumor effect of doxorubicin. In fact the compound identified as 3-[2-(4-ethylphenyl)-2-oxoethyl]-1,2-dimethyl-1H-3,1-benzimidazol-3-ium bromide was toxic to all tumor cell lines tested even without doxorubicine treatment. This benzimidazole compound may lead, through further optimalization, to the development of a drug candidate protecting the heart from doxorubicin-induced injury. PMID:26137186

  9. Novel high-throughput screening system for identifying STAT3-SH2 antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Yutaka; Mochizuki, Masato; Matsuno, Kenji; Haino, Takeharu; Asai, Akira

    2009-03-13

    Constitutive activation of the oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 frequently occurs in various human malignancies. STAT3 activation involves dimerization via intermolecular pTyr-SH2 interaction. Thus, antagonizing this interaction is a feasible approach to inhibit STAT3 activation for cancer therapy. In order to identify selective STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a biochemical HTS system based on AlphaScreen technology, which measures the abilities of test compounds to antagonize pTyr-SH2 interactions. We screened our chemical libraries using this system and identified 5,15-diphenylporphyrin (5,15-DPP) as a selective STAT3-SH2 antagonist. Selective inhibition of STAT3 nuclear translocation and DNA biding activity was observed in cells treated with 5,15-DPP. IL-6-dependent dimerization of STAT3, c-myc promoter binding and c-myc protein expression were all suppressed by 5,15-DPP, whereas no decrement in either expression or phosphorylation level of STAT3 was observed. Thus, the HTS assay system represented herein may be useful for identifying novel STAT3-SH2 antagonists.

  10. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies. PMID:26026149

  11. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies a new transcriptional module required for self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guang; Kim, Jonghwan; Xu, Qikai; Leng, Yumei; Orkin, Stuart H; Elledge, Stephen J

    2009-04-01

    We performed a genome-wide siRNA screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to identify genes essential for self-renewal, and found 148 genes whose down-regulation caused differentiation. Many of the identified genes function in gene regulation and/or development, and are highly expressed in ES cells and embryonic tissues. We further identified target genes of two transcription regulators Cnot3 and Trim28. We discovered that Cnot3 and Trim28 co-occupy many putative gene promoters with c-Myc and Zfx, but not other pluripotency-associated transcription factors. They form a unique module in the self-renewal transcription network, separate from the core module formed by Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. The transcriptional targets of this module are enriched for genes involved in cell cycle, cell death, and cancer. This supports the idea that regulatory networks controlling self-renewal in stem cells may also be active in certain cancers and may represent novel anti-cancer targets. Our screen has implicated over 100 new genes in ES cell self-renewal, and illustrates the power of RNAi and forward genetics for the systematic study of self-renewal. PMID:19339689

  12. A chemical rescue screen identifies a Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast inhibitor targeting MEP isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wesley; Herrera, Zachary; Ebert, Danny; Baska, Katie; Cho, Seok H; DeRisi, Joseph L; Yeh, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The apicoplast is an essential plastid organelle found in Plasmodium parasites which contains several clinically validated antimalarial-drug targets. A chemical rescue screen identified MMV-08138 from the "Malaria Box" library of growth-inhibitory antimalarial compounds as having specific activity against the apicoplast. MMV-08138 inhibition of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth is stereospecific and potent, with the most active diastereomer demonstrating a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 110 nM. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 drug-resistant parasite populations from two independent selections revealed E688Q and L244I mutations in P. falciparum IspD, an enzyme in the MEP (methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate) isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast. The active diastereomer of MMV-08138 directly inhibited PfIspD activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.0 nM. MMV-08138 is the first PfIspD inhibitor to be identified and, together with heterologously expressed PfIspD, provides the foundation for further development of this promising antimalarial drug candidate lead. Furthermore, this report validates the use of the apicoplast chemical rescue screen coupled with target elucidation as a discovery tool to identify specific apicoplast-targeting compounds with new mechanisms of action. PMID:25367906

  13. Novel glycoside hydrolases identified by screening a Chinese Holstein dairy cow rumen-derived metagenome library.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Jiaqi; Bu, Dengpan; Liu, Kailang; Zhu, Yaxin; Dong, Zhiyang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2010-10-01

    One clone encoding glycoside hydrolases was identified through functional screening of a rumen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Of the 68 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted, one ORF encodes a novel endo-β-1,4-xylanase with two catalytic domains of family GH43 and two cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) of family IV. Partial characterization showed that this endo-xylanase has a greater specific activity than a number of other xylanases over a wide temperature range at neutral pH and could be useful in some industrial applications. PMID:20709844

  14. New aldehyde tag sequences identified by screening formylglycine generating enzymes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rush, Jason S; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2008-09-17

    Formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE) performs a critical posttranslational modification of type I sulfatases, converting cysteine within the motif CxPxR to the aldehyde-bearing residue formylglycine (FGly). This concise motif can be installed within heterologous proteins as a genetically encoded "aldehyde tag" for site-specific labeling with aminooxy- or hydrazide-functionalized probes. In this report, we screened FGEs from M. tuberculosis and S. coelicolor against synthetic peptide libraries and identified new substrate sequences that diverge from the canonical motif. We found that E. coli's FGE-like activity is similarly promiscuous, enabling the use of novel aldehyde tag sequences for in vivo modification of recombinant proteins. PMID:18722427

  15. A Genome-Wide siRNA Screen to Identify Modulators of Insulin Sensitivity and Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruojing; Lacson, Raul G.; Castriota, Gino; Zhang, Xiaohua D.; Liu, Yaping; Zhao, Wenqing; Einstein, Monica; Camargo, Luiz Miguel; Qureshi, Sajjad; Wong, Kenny K.; Zhang, Bei B.; Ferrer, Marc; Berger, Joel P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatic insulin resistance impairs insulin’s ability to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) and contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although the interests to discover novel genes that modulate insulin sensitivity and HGP are high, it remains challenging to have a human cell based system to identify novel genes. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify genes that modulate hepatic insulin signaling and HGP, we generated a human cell line stably expressing beta-lactamase under the control of the human glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC) promoter (AH-G6PC cells). Both beta-lactamase activity and endogenous G6PC mRNA were increased in AH-G6PC cells by a combination of dexamethasone and pCPT-cAMP, and reduced by insulin. A 4-gene High-Throughput-Genomics assay was developed to concomitantly measure G6PC and pyruvate-dehydrogenase-kinase-4 (PDK4) mRNA levels. Using this assay, we screened an siRNA library containing pooled siRNA targeting 6650 druggable genes and identified 614 hits that lowered G6PC expression without increasing PDK4 mRNA levels. Pathway analysis indicated that siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of genes known to positively or negatively affect insulin signaling increased or decreased G6PC mRNA expression, respectively, thus validating our screening platform. A subset of 270 primary screen hits was selected and 149 hits were confirmed by target gene KD by pooled siRNA and 7 single siRNA for each gene to reduce G6PC expression in 4-gene HTG assay. Subsequently, pooled siRNA KD of 113 genes decreased PEPCK and/or PGC1alpha mRNA expression thereby demonstrating their role in regulating key gluconeogenic genes in addition to G6PC. Last, KD of 61 of the above 113 genes potentiated insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that they suppress gluconeogenic gene by enhancing insulin signaling. Conclusions/Significance These results support the proposition that the proteins encoded by the genes identified in our cell

  16. Functional Screening Identifies miRNAs Influencing Apoptosis and Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Juha; Kallioniemi, Olli; Rasmussen, Mads H.; Ostenfeld, Marie S.; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Øster, Bodil; Schepeler, Troels; Tobiasen, Heidi; Thorsen, Kasper; Sieber, Oliver M.; Gibbs, Peter; Lamy, Philippe; Hansen, Torben F.; Jakobsen, Anders; Riising, Eva M.; Helin, Kristian; Lubinski, Jan; Hagemann-Madsen, Rikke; Laurberg, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Andersen, Claus L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in many biological processes and are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. Particular miRNAs function either as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and appear to have diagnostic and prognostic significance. Although numerous miRNAs are dys-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) only a small fraction has been characterized functionally. Using high-throughput functional screening and miRNA profiling of clinical samples the present study aims at identifying miRNAs important for the control of cellular growth and/or apoptosis in CRC. The high-throughput functional screening was carried out in six CRC cell lines transfected with a pre-miR library including 319 synthetic human pre-miRs. Phenotypic alterations were evaluated by immunostaining of cleaved cPARP (apoptosis) or MKI67 (proliferation). Additionally, TaqMan Human MicroRNA Array Set v2.0 was used to profile the expression of 667 miRNAs in 14 normal colon mucosa and 46 microsatellite stable stage II CRC patients. Among the miRNAs that induced growth arrest and apoptosis in the CRC cell lines, and at same time were dys-regulated in the clinical samples, miR-375 was selected for further analysis. Independent in vitro analysis of transient and stable transfected CRC cell lines confirmed that miR-375 reduces cell viability through the induction of apoptotic death. We identified YAP1 as a direct miR-375 target in CRC and show that HELLS and NOLC1 are down-stream targets. Knock-down of YAP1 mimicked the phenotype induced by miR-375 over-expression indicating that miR-375 most likely exerts its pro-apoptotic role through YAP1 and its anti-apoptotic down-stream targets BIRC5 and BCL2L1. Finally, in vivo analysis of mouse xenograft tumors showed that miR-375 expression significantly reduced tumor growth. We conclude that the high-throughput screening successfully identified miRNAs that induce apoptosis and/or inhibit proliferation in CRC cells. Finally, combining the functional screening

  17. Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies genes inhibiting the migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Fan, Jing; Li, Ying; Li, Fuhai; Chen, Peikai; Fan, Yubo; Xia, Xiaofeng; Wong, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) cells are highly invasive, infiltrating into the surrounding normal brain tissue, making it impossible to completely eradicate GBM tumors by surgery or radiation. Increasing evidence also shows that these migratory cells are highly resistant to cytotoxic reagents, but decreasing their migratory capability can re-sensitize them to chemotherapy. These evidences suggest that the migratory cell population may serve as a better therapeutic target for more effective treatment of GBM. In order to understand the regulatory mechanism underlying the motile phenotype, we carried out a genome-wide RNAi screen for genes inhibiting the migration of GBM cells. The screening identified a total of twenty-five primary hits; seven of them were confirmed by secondary screening. Further study showed that three of the genes, FLNA, KHSRP and HCFC1, also functioned in vivo, and knocking them down caused multifocal tumor in a mouse model. Interestingly, two genes, KHSRP and HCFC1, were also found to be correlated with the clinical outcome of GBM patients. These two genes have not been previously associated with cell migration. PMID:23593504

  18. Substrate-Free High-Throughput Screening Identifies Selective Inhibitors for Uncharacterized Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Brown, Steven J.; Rosen, Hugh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2009-01-01

    Target-based high-throughput screening (HTS) is essential for the discovery of small-molecule modulators of proteins. Typical screening methods for enzymes rely on extensively tailored substrate assays, which are not available for targets of poorly characterized biochemical activity. Here, we report a general, substrate-free platform for HTS that overcomes this problem by monitoring the reaction of broad-spectrum, activity-based probes with enzymes using fluorescence polarization. We show that this platform is applicable to enzymes from multiple mechanistic classes, regardless of their degree of functional annotation, and can be coupled with secondary competitive activity-based proteomic assays to rapidly determine the specificity of screening hits. Using this platform, we identified the bioactive alkaloid emetine as a selective inhibitor of the uncharacterized cancer-associated hydrolase RBBP9. We furthermore show that the detoxification enzyme GSTO1, also implicated in cancer, is inhibited by several electrophilic compounds found in public libraries, some of which display high selectivity for this enzyme. PMID:19329999

  19. Genome-wide Screen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Identifies New Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zrieq, Rafat; Sana, Thibault G.; Vergin, Sandra; Garvis, Steve; Volfson, Irina; Bleves, Sophie; Voulhoux, Romé; Hegemann, Johannes H.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that causes mortality in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. While many virulence factors of this pathogen have already been identified, several remain to be discovered. In this respect we set an unprecedented genome-wide screen of a P. aeruginosa expression library based on a yeast growth phenotype. Fifty-one candidates were selected in athree-round screening process. The robustness of the screen was validated by the selection of three well known secreted proteins including one demonstrated virulence factor, the protease LepA. Further in silico sorting of the 51 candidates highlighted three potential new Pseudomonas effector candidates (Pec). By testing the cytotoxicity of wild type P. aeruginosa vs. pec mutants toward macrophages and the virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrated that the three selected Pecs are novel virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Additional cellular localization experiments in the host revealed specific localization for Pec1 and Pec2 that could inform about their respective functions. PMID:26636043

  20. High-throughput screening of mouse gene knockouts identifies established and novel skeletal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brommage, Robert; Liu, Jeff; Hansen, Gwenn M; Kirkpatrick, Laura L; Potter, David G; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian; Powell, David R; Vogel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Screening gene function in vivo is a powerful approach to discover novel drug targets. We present high-throughput screening (HTS) data for 3 762 distinct global gene knockout (KO) mouse lines with viable adult homozygous mice generated using either gene-trap or homologous recombination technologies. Bone mass was determined from DEXA scans of male and female mice at 14 weeks of age and by microCT analyses of bones from male mice at 16 weeks of age. Wild-type (WT) cagemates/littermates were examined for each gene KO. Lethality was observed in an additional 850 KO lines. Since primary HTS are susceptible to false positive findings, additional cohorts of mice from KO lines with intriguing HTS bone data were examined. Aging, ovariectomy, histomorphometry and bone strength studies were performed and possible non-skeletal phenotypes were explored. Together, these screens identified multiple genes affecting bone mass: 23 previously reported genes (Calcr, Cebpb, Crtap, Dcstamp, Dkk1, Duoxa2, Enpp1, Fgf23, Kiss1/Kiss1r, Kl (Klotho), Lrp5, Mstn, Neo1, Npr2, Ostm1, Postn, Sfrp4, Slc30a5, Slc39a13, Sost, Sumf1, Src, Wnt10b), five novel genes extensively characterized (Cldn18, Fam20c, Lrrk1, Sgpl1, Wnt16), five novel genes with preliminary characterization (Agpat2, Rassf5, Slc10a7, Slc26a7, Slc30a10) and three novel undisclosed genes coding for potential osteoporosis drug targets. PMID:26273529

  1. Yeast functional screen to identify genes conferring salt stress tolerance in Salicornia europaea

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Yoshiki; Sawabe, Shogo; Kainuma, Kenta; Katsuhara, Maki; Shibasaka, Mineo; Suzuki, Masanori; Yamamoto, Kosuke; Oguri, Suguru; Sakamoto, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is a critical environmental factor that adversely affects crop productivity. Halophytes have evolved various mechanisms to adapt to saline environments. Salicornia europaea L. is one of the most salt-tolerant plant species. It does not have special salt-secreting structures like a salt gland or salt bladder, and is therefore a good model for studying the common mechanisms underlying plant salt tolerance. To identify candidate genes encoding key proteins in the mediation of salt tolerance in S. europaea, we performed a functional screen of a cDNA library in yeast. The library was screened for genes that allowed the yeast to grow in the presence of 1.3 M NaCl. We obtained three full-length S. europaea genes that confer salt tolerance. The genes are predicted to encode (1) a novel protein highly homologous to thaumatin-like proteins, (2) a novel coiled-coil protein of unknown function, and (3) a novel short peptide of 32 residues. Exogenous application of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 32 residues improved salt tolerance of Arabidopsis. The approach described in this report provides a rapid assay system for large-scale screening of S. europaea genes involved in salt stress tolerance and supports the identification of genes responsible for such mechanisms. These genes may be useful candidates for improving crop salt tolerance by genetic transformation. PMID:26579166

  2. Identifying the Optimal Age to Perform Newborn Screening for Hearing Loss in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, M; Redshaw, E; Crossley, E; Phillips, C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Permanent congenital hearing loss affects up to 6/1000 births in developing countries. Currently, in Uganda there is no newborn screening for hearing loss (NSHL) program and no published work on this topic. Within the existing healthcare system there are two opportunities to deliver screening, at birth or 6 weeks of age when infants receive their immunizations. Aim: This study explored the outcomes of otoacoustic emission (OAE) testing in infants at birth and 6 weeks of age, to identify the optimal age for screening. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional pilot study recruited 60 consecutive infants from two health centres in Kampala, Uganda. Thirty infants were newborns recruited from the postnatal ward and 30 were aged 4–8 weeks from the immunization clinic, we performed OAE testing on all infants. Results: The results showed 56.7% (17/30) of newborn infants passed OAE testing compared with 90.0% (27/30) of the immunization infants, P < 0.01. Furthermore, of the 11 newborn infants aged ≥24 h of age 90.9% (10/11) passed, compared with the 19 infants <24 h of age where 37% (7/19) passed, P < 0.01. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a higher pass rate for OAE testing for infants ≥24 h of age compared to those <24 h of age. The overall lower pass rate of the newborn infants could be due to external ear debris and middle ear fluid compromising the OAE testing. These findings would support a NSHL programme in Uganda that offers screening to infants ≥24 h of age, to maximize the cost-effectiveness of the program. PMID:27057378

  3. A large-scale genetic screen in Arabidopsis to identify genes involved in pollen exine production.

    PubMed

    Dobritsa, Anna A; Geanconteri, Aliza; Shrestha, Jay; Carlson, Ann; Kooyers, Nicholas; Coerper, Daniel; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Bench, Bennie J; Sumner, Lloyd W; Swanson, Robert; Preuss, Daphne

    2011-10-01

    Exine, the outer plant pollen wall, has elaborate species-specific patterns, provides a protective barrier for male gametophytes, and serves as a mediator of strong and species-specific pollen-stigma adhesion. Exine is made of sporopollenin, a material remarkable for its strength, elasticity, and chemical durability. The chemical nature of sporopollenin, as well as the developmental mechanisms that govern its assembly into diverse patterns in different species, are poorly understood. Here, we describe a simple yet effective genetic screen in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that was undertaken to advance our understanding of sporopollenin synthesis and exine assembly. This screen led to the recovery of mutants with a variety of defects in exine structure, including multiple mutants with novel phenotypes. Fifty-six mutants were selected for further characterization and are reported here. In 14 cases, we have mapped defects to specific genes, including four with previously demonstrated or suggested roles in exine development (MALE STERILITY2, CYP703A2, ANTHER-SPECIFIC PROTEIN6, TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE/DIHYDROFLAVONOL-4-REDUCTASE-LIKE1), and a number of genes that have not been implicated in exine production prior to this screen (among them, fatty acid ω-hydroxylase CYP704B1, putative glycosyl transferases At1g27600 and At1g33430, 4-coumarate-coenzyme A ligase 4CL3, polygalacturonase QUARTET3, novel gene At5g58100, and nucleotide-sugar transporter At5g65000). Our study illustrates that morphological screens of pollen can be extremely fruitful in identifying previously unknown exine genes and lays the foundation for biochemical, developmental, and evolutionary studies of exine production. PMID:21849515

  4. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins

    PubMed Central

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J.; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  5. Screen Identifying Arabidopsis Transcription Factors Involved in the Response to 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Walper, Elisabeth; Weiste, Christoph; Mueller, Martin J; Hamberg, Mats; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13-Lipoxygenase-derived oxylipins, such as jasmonates act as potent signaling molecules in plants. Although experimental evidence supports the impact of oxylipins generated by the 9-Lipoxygenase (9-LOX) pathway in root development and pathogen defense, their signaling function in plants remains largely elusive. Based on the root growth inhibiting properties of the 9-LOX-oxylipin 9-HOT (9-hydroxy-10,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid), we established a screening approach aiming at identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in signaling and/or metabolism of this oxylipin. Making use of the AtTORF-Ex (Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor Open Reading Frame Expression) collection of plant lines overexpressing TF genes, we screened for those TFs which restore root growth on 9-HOT. Out of 6,000 lines, eight TFs were recovered at least three times and were therefore selected for detailed analysis. Overexpression of the basic leucine Zipper (bZIP) TF TGA5 and its target, the monoxygenase CYP81D11 reduced the effect of added 9-HOT, presumably due to activation of a detoxification pathway. The highly related ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs ERF106 and ERF107 induce a broad detoxification response towards 9-LOX-oxylipins and xenobiotic compounds. From a set of 18 related group S-bZIP factors isolated in the screen, bZIP11 is known to participate in auxin-mediated root growth and may connect oxylipins to root meristem function. The TF candidates isolated in this screen provide starting points for further attempts to dissect putative signaling pathways involving 9-LOX-derived oxylipins. PMID:27073862

  6. Screening and referral to identify children at risk for FASD: Search for new methods 2006-2013.

    PubMed

    Koren, Gideon; Chudley, Albert; Loock, Christine; MacLeod, Stuart M; Orrbine, Elaine; Rosales, Ted; Rosenbaum, Charlotte; Sarkar, Moumita

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres Taskforce on FASD Screening commitment to further pilot, validate and evaluate the multiple components of the Canadian FASD Screening Tool Kit, it was deemed necessary that recent developments and/or improvements in FASD screening were identified and considered. In 2008 a literature review of methods for screening for FASD was published until 2006 and identified five tools which met pre-set criteria. A review of all new papers was published from the period January 2006 until July 1, 2013. Out of 1392 papers, two new screening methods met the inclusion criteria: Clarren et al's new norms for palpebral fissure length by age in Canada; and Breiner et al's extension of the Neurobehavioral Screening Test (NST) to age 4 years. Further work is needed to validate these methods in other settings.  PMID:25019303

  7. Yeast-Based High-Throughput Screens to Identify Novel Compounds Active against Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Bilsland, Elizabeth; Bean, Daniel M.; Devaney, Eileen; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the parasitic worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi or B. timori, which are transmitted via the bites from infected mosquitoes. Once in the human body, the parasites develop into adult worms in the lymphatic vessels, causing severe damage and swelling of the affected tissues. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people in 58 countries are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis. Very few drugs are available to treat patients infected with these parasites, and these have low efficacy against the adult stages of the worms, which can live for 7–15 years in the human body. The requirement for annual treatment increases the risk of drug-resistant worms emerging, making it imperative to develop new drugs against these devastating diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a yeast-based, high-throughput screening system whereby essential yeast genes are replaced with their filarial or human counterparts. These strains are labeled with different fluorescent proteins to allow the simultaneous monitoring of strains with parasite or human genes in competition, and hence the identification of compounds that inhibit the parasite target without affecting its human ortholog. We constructed yeast strains expressing eight different Brugia malayi drug targets (as well as seven of their human counterparts), and performed medium-throughput drug screens for compounds that specifically inhibit the parasite enzymes. Using the Malaria Box collection (400 compounds), we identified nine filarial specific inhibitors and confirmed the antifilarial activity of five of these using in vitro assays against Brugia pahangi. Conclusions/Significance We were able to functionally complement yeast deletions with eight different Brugia malayi enzymes that represent potential drug targets. We demonstrated that our yeast-based screening platform is efficient in identifying compounds that can discriminate between

  8. A genomewide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis genes identifies a locus on chromosome 7q

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jayant M.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Schneider, Daniel; Naclerio, Robert M.; Ober, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is an important public health problem with substantial impact on patient quality of life and health care costs. We hypothesized that genetic variation may be one factor that affects this disease. Objective To identify genetic variation underlying susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using a genome-wide approach. Methods We studied a religious isolate that practices a communal lifestyle and shares common environmental exposures. Using physical examination, medical interviews, and a review of medical records, we identified 8 individuals with chronic rhinosinusitis out of 291 screened. These 8 individuals were related to each other in a single 60 member, 9 generation pedigree. A genome-wide screen for loci influencing susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using 1123 genome-wide markers was conducted. Results The largest linkage peak (P = 0.0023; 127.15 cM, equivalent to LOD=2.01) was on chromosome 7q31.1-7q32.1, 7q31 (127.15 cM; 1-LOD support region: 115cM to 135cM) and included the CFTR locus. Genotyping of 38 mutations in the CFTR gene did not reveal variation accounting for this linkage signal. Conclusion Understanding the genes involved in chronic rhinosinusitis may lead to improvements in its diagnosis and treatment. Our results represent the first genome-wide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis and suggest that a locus on 7q31.1-7q32.1 influences disease susceptibility. This may be the CFTR gene or another nearby locus. PMID:18622306

  9. MOBILE SCREENING TO IDENTIFY AND FOLLOW-UP WITH HIGH RISK, HIV NEGATIVE YOUTH

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Ian David; Cleland, Charles M.; Perlman, David C.; Rajan, Sonali; Sun, Wendy; Ferraris, Christopher; Mayer, Jennifer; Ferris, David C.; Bania, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV prevalence remains disproportionately high among youth, especially among young men who have sex with men, young people with substance use disorders, and recently incarcerated youth. However, youth may not report behavioral risks because they fear stigma or legal consequences. While routine HIV screening programs have increased testing, current programs are not designed to identify, or provide prevention services to, high-risk patients who test HIV negative. Aims To examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of: a tablet-based screening designed to facilitate HIV risk reporting and testing among a sample of young urban emergency department (ED) patients; and a text message-based follow up protocol for patients who test HIV-negative and report increased behavioral risk. Methods 100 ED patients aged 18 – 24, who declined HIV tests offered at triage, completed a tablet-based intervention that included a risk screening, an educational video, and offered participants HIV tests. If patients accepted testing and reported increased risk, the tablets offered follow-up text messages. Results 30 participants accepted HIV tests following the intervention and 21 participants, identified by custom software as high-risk, agreed to receive text messages. Two thirds (66.7%) of text recipients responded to questions at week 6, more than half (57.1%) responded at week 8, one (4.76%) re-tested after week 12. Conclusion Results indicate our intervention provides a feasible way to facilitate risk reporting, increase HIV testing, and maintain ongoing contact with hard-to-reach youth via tablet computers and text messages. PMID:27110294

  10. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Identifies 8-Hydroxyquinolines as Cell-Active Histone Demethylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akane; Rose, Nathan R.; Ng, Stanley S.; Quinn, Amy M.; Rai, Ganesha; Mott, Bryan T.; Beswick, Paul; Klose, Robert J.; Oppermann, Udo; Jadhav, Ajit; Heightman, Tom D.; Maloney, David J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background Small molecule modulators of epigenetic processes are currently sought as basic probes for biochemical mechanisms, and as starting points for development of therapeutic agents. Nε-Methylation of lysine residues on histone tails is one of a number of post-translational modifications that together enable transcriptional regulation. Histone lysine demethylases antagonize the action of histone methyltransferases in a site- and methylation state-specific manner. Nε-Methyllysine demethylases that use 2-oxoglutarate as co-factor are associated with diverse human diseases, including cancer, inflammation and X-linked mental retardation; they are proposed as targets for the therapeutic modulation of transcription. There are few reports on the identification of templates that are amenable to development as potent inhibitors in vivo and large diverse collections have yet to be exploited for the discovery of demethylase inhibitors. Principal Findings High-throughput screening of a ∼236,000-member collection of diverse molecules arrayed as dilution series was used to identify inhibitors of the JMJD2 (KDM4) family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone demethylases. Initial screening hits were prioritized by a combination of cheminformatics, counterscreening using a coupled assay enzyme, and orthogonal confirmatory detection of inhibition by mass spectrometric assays. Follow-up studies were carried out on one of the series identified, 8-hydroxyquinolines, which were shown by crystallographic analyses to inhibit by binding to the active site Fe(II) and to modulate demethylation at the H3K9 locus in a cell-based assay. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that diverse compound screening can yield novel inhibitors of 2OG dependent histone demethylases and provide starting points for the development of potent and selective agents to interrogate epigenetic regulation. PMID:21124847

  11. Barcode Sequencing Screen Identifies SUB1 as a Regulator of Yeast Pheromone Inducible Genes.

    PubMed

    Sliva, Anna; Kuang, Zheng; Meluh, Pamela B; Boeke, Jef D

    2016-01-01

    The yeast pheromone response pathway serves as a valuable model of eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and transcription of their downstream targets. Here, we describe application of a screening method combining two technologies: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-Seq). Using this screening method, and pFUS1-GFP as a reporter for MAPK pathway activation, we readily identified mutants in known mating pathway components. In this study, we also include a comprehensive analysis of the FUS1 induction properties of known mating pathway mutants by flow cytometry, featuring single cell analysis of each mutant population. We also characterized a new source of false positives resulting from the design of this screen. Additionally, we identified a deletion mutant, sub1Δ, with increased basal expression of pFUS1-GFP. Here, in the first ChIP-Seq of Sub1, our data shows that Sub1 binds to the promoters of about half the genes in the genome (tripling the 991 loci previously reported), including the promoters of several pheromone-inducible genes, some of which show an increase upon pheromone induction. Here, we also present the first RNA-Seq of a sub1Δ mutant; the majority of genes have no change in RNA, but, of the small subset that do, most show decreased expression, consistent with biochemical studies implicating Sub1 as a positive transcriptional regulator. The RNA-Seq data also show that certain pheromone-inducible genes are induced less in the sub1Δ mutant relative to the wild type, supporting a role for Sub1 in regulation of mating pathway genes. The sub1Δ mutant has increased basal levels of a small subset of other genes besides FUS1, including IMD2 and FIG1, a gene encoding an integral membrane protein necessary for efficient mating. PMID:26837954

  12. Barcode Sequencing Screen Identifies SUB1 as a Regulator of Yeast Pheromone Inducible Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sliva, Anna; Kuang, Zheng; Meluh, Pamela B.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2016-01-01

    The yeast pheromone response pathway serves as a valuable model of eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and transcription of their downstream targets. Here, we describe application of a screening method combining two technologies: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-Seq). Using this screening method, and pFUS1-GFP as a reporter for MAPK pathway activation, we readily identified mutants in known mating pathway components. In this study, we also include a comprehensive analysis of the FUS1 induction properties of known mating pathway mutants by flow cytometry, featuring single cell analysis of each mutant population. We also characterized a new source of false positives resulting from the design of this screen. Additionally, we identified a deletion mutant, sub1Δ, with increased basal expression of pFUS1-GFP. Here, in the first ChIP-Seq of Sub1, our data shows that Sub1 binds to the promoters of about half the genes in the genome (tripling the 991 loci previously reported), including the promoters of several pheromone-inducible genes, some of which show an increase upon pheromone induction. Here, we also present the first RNA-Seq of a sub1Δ mutant; the majority of genes have no change in RNA, but, of the small subset that do, most show decreased expression, consistent with biochemical studies implicating Sub1 as a positive transcriptional regulator. The RNA-Seq data also show that certain pheromone-inducible genes are induced less in the sub1Δ mutant relative to the wild type, supporting a role for Sub1 in regulation of mating pathway genes. The sub1Δ mutant has increased basal levels of a small subset of other genes besides FUS1, including IMD2 and FIG1, a gene encoding an integral membrane protein necessary for efficient mating. PMID:26837954

  13. High-throughput screening identifies artesunate as selective inhibitor of cancer stemness: Involvement of mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Amit; Futamura, Yushi; Nishi, Mayuko; Ryo, Akihide; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have robust systems to maintain cancer stemness and drug resistance. Thus, targeting such robust systems instead of focusing on individual signaling pathways should be the approach allowing the identification of selective CSC inhibitors. Here, we used the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay to identify inhibitors for cancer stemness in induced cancer stem-like (iCSCL) cells. We screened several compounds from natural product chemical library and evaluated hit compounds for their efficacy on cancer stemness in iCSCL tumorspheres. We identified artesunate, an antimalarial drug, as a selective inhibitor of cancer stemness. Artesunate induced mitochondrial dysfunction that selectively inhibited cancer stemness of iCSCL cells, indicating an essential role of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer stemness. PMID:27363336

  14. Aetiologic diagnosis of hearing loss in children identified through newborn hearing screening testing.

    PubMed

    Forli, F; Giuntini, G; Bruschini, L; Berrettini, S

    2016-02-01

    With the implementation of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) programmes and early diagnosis and treatment of hearing problems, the need has clearly emerged to implement and carry out a systematic and coordinated protocol for the aetiological diagnosis of permanent hearing impairment (PHI). Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", it has been decided to consider the problems relative to aetiological diagnosis of child PHI within UNHS programmes. The specific objective was to apply a shared diagnostic protocol that can identify the cause in at least 70% of cases of PHI. For this part of the project, four main recommendations were identified that can be useful for an efficient aetiological diagnosis in children affected by PHI and that can offer valid suggestions to optimise resources and produce positive changes for third-level audiologic centres. PMID:27054388

  15. A functional genomic screen in planarians identifies novel regulators of germ cell development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuying; Stary, Joel M.; Wilhelm, James E.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    Germ cells serve as intriguing examples of differentiated cells that retain the capacity to generate all cell types of an organism. Here we used functional genomic approaches in planarians to identify genes required for proper germ cell development. We conducted microarray analyses and in situ hybridization to discover and validate germ cell-enriched transcripts, and then used RNAi to screen for genes required for discrete stages of germ cell development. The majority of genes we identified encode conserved RNA-binding proteins, several of which have not been implicated previously in germ cell development. We also show that a germ cell-specific subunit of the conserved transcription factor CCAAT-binding protein/nuclear factor-Y is required for maintaining spermatogonial stem cells. Our results demonstrate that conserved transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms regulate germ cell development in planarians. These findings suggest that studies of planarians will inform our understanding of germ cell biology in higher organisms. PMID:20844018

  16. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  17. A high-content cellular senescence screen identifies candidate tumor suppressors, including EPHA3.

    PubMed

    Lahtela, Jenni; Corson, Laura B; Hemmes, Annabrita; Brauer, Matthew J; Koopal, Sonja; Lee, James; Hunsaker, Thomas L; Jackson, Peter K; Verschuren, Emmy W

    2013-02-15

    Activation of a cellular senescence program is a common response to prolonged oncogene activation or tumor suppressor loss, providing a physiological mechanism for tumor suppression in premalignant cells. The link between senescence and tumor suppression supports the hypothesis that a loss-of-function screen measuring bona fide senescence marker activation should identify candidate tumor suppressors. Using a high-content siRNA screening assay for cell morphology and proliferation measures, we identify 12 senescence-regulating kinases and determine their senescence marker signatures, including elevation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, DNA damage and p53 or p16 (INK4a) expression. Consistent with our hypothesis, SNP array CGH data supports loss of gene copy number of five senescence-suppressing genes across multiple tumor samples. One such candidate is the EPHA3 receptor tyrosine kinase, a gene commonly mutated in human cancer. We demonstrate that selected intracellular EPHA3 tumor-associated point mutations decrease receptor expression level and/or receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity. Our study therefore describes a new strategy to mine for novel candidate tumor suppressors and provides compelling evidence that EPHA3 mutations may promote tumorigenesis only when key senescence-inducing pathways have been inactivated. PMID:23324396

  18. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    George, Amee J; Purdue, Brooke W; Gould, Cathryn M; Thomas, Daniel W; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A; Morgan, Kylie A; Simpson, Kaylene J; Thomas, Walter G; Hannan, Ross D

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R-EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R-EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R-EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR-EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  19. A high-content cellular senescence screen identifies candidate tumor suppressors, including EPHA3

    PubMed Central

    Lahtela, Jenni; Corson, Laura B.; Hemmes, Annabrita; Brauer, Matthew J.; Koopal, Sonja; Lee, James; Hunsaker, Thomas L.; Jackson, Peter K.; Verschuren, Emmy W.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of a cellular senescence program is a common response to prolonged oncogene activation or tumor suppressor loss, providing a physiological mechanism for tumor suppression in premalignant cells. The link between senescence and tumor suppression supports the hypothesis that a loss-of-function screen measuring bona fide senescence marker activation should identify candidate tumor suppressors. Using a high-content siRNA screening assay for cell morphology and proliferation measures, we identify 12 senescence-regulating kinases and determine their senescence marker signatures, including elevation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, DNA damage and p53 or p16INK4a expression. Consistent with our hypothesis, SNP array CGH data supports loss of gene copy number of five senescence-suppressing genes across multiple tumor samples. One such candidate is the EPHA3 receptor tyrosine kinase, a gene commonly mutated in human cancer. We demonstrate that selected intracellular EPHA3 tumor-associated point mutations decrease receptor expression level and/or receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity. Our study therefore describes a new strategy to mine for novel candidate tumor suppressors and provides compelling evidence that EPHA3 mutations may promote tumorigenesis only when key senescence-inducing pathways have been inactivated. PMID:23324396

  20. Kinase-interacting substrate screening is a novel method to identify kinase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Mutsuki; Hamaguchi, Tomonari; Shohag, Md. Hasanuzzaman; Kozawa, Kei; Kato, Katsuhiro; Zhang, Xinjian; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kataoka, Chikako; Nishioka, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play pivotal roles in numerous cellular functions; however, the specific substrates of each protein kinase have not been fully elucidated. We have developed a novel method called kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS). Using this method, 356 phosphorylation sites of 140 proteins were identified as candidate substrates for Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK2), including known substrates. The KISS method was also applied to additional kinases, including PKA, MAPK1, CDK5, CaMK1, PAK7, PKN, LYN, and FYN, and a lot of candidate substrates and their phosphorylation sites were determined, most of which have not been reported previously. Among the candidate substrates for Rho-kinase, several functional clusters were identified, including the polarity-associated proteins, such as Scrib. We found that Scrib plays a crucial role in the regulation of subcellular contractility by assembling into a ternary complex with Rho-kinase and Shroom2 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that the KISS method is a comprehensive and useful substrate screen for various kinases. PMID:26101221

  1. Integrative screening approach identifies regulators of polyploidization and targets for acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qiang; Goldenson, Benjamin; Silver, Serena J.; Schenone, Monica; Dancik, Vladimir; Huang, Zan; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Lewis, Timothy; An, W. Frank; Li, Xiaoyu; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Thiollier, Clarisse; Diebold, Lauren; Gilles, Laure; Vokes, Martha S.; Moore, Christopher B.; Bliss-Moreau, Meghan; VerPlank, Lynn; Tolliday, Nicola J.; Mishra, Rama; Vemula, Sasidhar; Shi, Jianjian; Wei, Lei; Kapur, Reuben; Lopez, Cécile K.; Gerby, Bastien; Ballerini, Paola; Pflumio, Francoise; Gilliland, D. Gary; Goldberg, Liat; Birger, Yehudit; Izraeli, Shai; Gamis, Alan S.; Smith, Franklin O.; Woods, William G.; Taub, Jeffrey; Scherer, Christina A.; Bradner, James; Goh, Boon-Cher; Mercher, Thomas; Carpenter, Anne E.; Gould, Robert J.; Clemons, Paul A.; Carr, Steven A.; Root, David E.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Stern, Andrew M.; Crispino, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The mechanism by which cells decide to skip mitosis to become polyploid is largely undefined. Here we used a high-content image-based screen to identify small-molecule probes that induce polyploidization of megakaryocytic leukemia cells and serve as perturbagens to help understand this process. We found that dimethylfasudil (diMF, H-1152P) selectively increased polyploidization, mature cell-surface marker expression, and apoptosis of malignant megakaryocytes. A broadly applicable, highly integrated target identification approach employing proteomic and shRNA screening revealed that a major target of diMF is Aurora A kinase (AURKA), which has not been studied extensively in megakaryocytes. Moreover, we discovered that MLN8237 (Alisertib), a selective inhibitor of AURKA, induced polyploidization and expression of mature megakaryocyte markers in AMKL blasts and displayed potent anti-AMKL activity in vivo. This research provides the rationale to support clinical trials of MLN8237 and other inducers of polyploidization in AMKL. Finally, we have identified five networks of kinases that regulate the switch to polyploidy. PMID:22863010

  2. An interaction screen identifies headcase as a regulator of large-scale pruning

    PubMed Central

    Loncle, Nicolas; Williams, Darren W

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale pruning, the removal of long neuronal processes, is deployed widely within the developing nervous system and is essential for proper circuit formation. In Drosophila the dendrites of the class IV dendritic arborization sensory neuron ddaC undergo large-scale pruning by local degeneration controlled by the steroid hormone ecdysone. The molecular mechanisms that control such events are largely unknown. To identify new molecules that orchestrate this developmental degeneration we performed a genetic interaction screen. Our approach combines the strength of Drosophila forward genetics with detailed in vivo imaging of ddaC neurons. This screen allowed us to identify headcase (hdc) as a new gene involved in dendrite pruning. hdc is evolutionarily conserved, but the protein’s function is unknown. Here we show that hdc is expressed just prior to metamorphosis in sensory neurons that undergo remodeling. hdc is required in a cell autonomous manner to control dendrite severing, the first phase of pruning. Our epistasis experiments with known regulators of dendrite pruning reveal hdc as a founding member of a new pathway downstream of ecdysone signaling. PMID:23197702

  3. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A.; Marot, Jessica E.; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling. PMID:27260999

  4. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Mala; Edmund, Hendia; Ennis, Darragh; Schlueter, Marissa A; Marot, Jessica E; Tambasco, Janet; Barlow, Ida; Sigurbjornsdottir, Sara; Mathew, Renjith; Vallés, Ana Maria; Wojciech, Waldemar; Roth, Siegfried; Davis, Ilan; Leptin, Maria; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling. PMID:27260999

  5. High-Throughput Chemical Screens Identify Disulfiram as an Inhibitor of Human Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hothi, Parvinder; Martins, Timothy J.; Chen, LiPing; Deleyrolle, Loic; Yoon, Jae-Geun; Reynolds, Brent; Foltz, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) continues to have a poor patient prognosis despite optimal standard of care. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been implicated as the presumed cause of tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy. With this in mind, we screened a diverse chemical library of 2,000 compounds to identify therapeutic agents that inhibit GSC proliferation and therefore have the potential to extend patient survival. High-throughput screens (HTS) identified 78 compounds that repeatedly inhibited cellular proliferation, of which 47 are clinically approved for other indications and 31 are experimental drugs. Several compounds (such as digitoxin, deguelin, patulin and phenethyl caffeate) exhibited high cytotoxicity, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) in the low nanomolar range. In particular, the FDA approved drug for the treatment of alcoholism, disulfiram (DSF), was significantly potent across multiple patient samples (IC50 of 31.1 nM). The activity of DSF was potentiated by copper (Cu), which markedly increased GSC death. DSF–Cu inhibited the chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity in cultured GSCs, consistent with inactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the subsequent induction of tumor cell death. Given that DSF is a relatively non-toxic drug that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, we suggest that DSF should be tested (as either a monotherapy or as an adjuvant) in pre-clinical models of human GBM. Data also support targeting of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of GBM. PMID:23165409

  6. Genome-wide functional screen identifies a compendium of genes affecting sensitivity to tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Pereira, Ana M.; Sims, David; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Therapies that target estrogen signaling have made a very considerable contribution to reducing mortality from breast cancer. However, resistance to tamoxifen remains a major clinical problem. Here we have used a genome-wide functional profiling approach to identify multiple genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to tamoxifen. Combining whole-genome shRNA screening with massively parallel sequencing, we have profiled the impact of more than 56,670 RNA interference reagents targeting 16,487 genes on the cellular response to tamoxifen. This screen, along with subsequent validation experiments, identifies a compendium of genes whose silencing causes tamoxifen resistance (including BAP1, CLPP, GPRC5D, NAE1, NF1, NIPBL, NSD1, RAD21, RARG, SMC3, and UBA3) and also a set of genes whose silencing causes sensitivity to this endocrine agent (C10orf72, C15orf55/NUT, EDF1, ING5, KRAS, NOC3L, PPP1R15B, RRAS2, TMPRSS2, and TPM4). Multiple individual genes, including NF1, a regulator of RAS signaling, also correlate with clinical outcome after tamoxifen treatment. PMID:21482774

  7. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  8. A Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen identifies new genes and pathways driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Moriarity, Branden S; Otto, George M; Rahrmann, Eric P; Rathe, Susan K; Wolf, Natalie K; Weg, Madison T; Manlove, Luke A; LaRue, Rebecca S; Temiz, Nuri A; Molyneux, Sam D; Choi, Kwangmin; Holly, Kevin J; Sarver, Aaron L; Scott, Milcah C; Forster, Colleen L; Modiano, Jaime F; Khanna, Chand; Hewitt, Stephen M; Khokha, Rama; Yang, Yi; Gorlick, Richard; Dyer, Michael A; Largaespada, David A

    2015-06-01

    Osteosarcomas are sarcomas of the bone, derived from osteoblasts or their precursors, with a high propensity to metastasize. Osteosarcoma is associated with massive genomic instability, making it problematic to identify driver genes using human tumors or prototypical mouse models, many of which involve loss of Trp53 function. To identify the genes driving osteosarcoma development and metastasis, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based forward genetic screen in mice with and without somatic loss of Trp53. Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 119 primary tumors and 134 metastatic nodules identified 232 sites associated with osteosarcoma development and 43 sites associated with metastasis, respectively. Analysis of CIS-associated genes identified numerous known and new osteosarcoma-associated genes enriched in the ErbB, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several oncogenes involved in axon guidance, including Sema4d and Sema6d, which we functionally validated as oncogenes in human osteosarcoma. PMID:25961939

  9. A loss-of-function genetic screening identifies novel mediators of thyroid cancer cell viability.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Maria Carmela; Parascandolo, Alessia; Perälä, Merja; Allocca, Chiara; Fey, Vidal; Sahlberg, Niko; Merolla, Francesco; Basolo, Fulvio; Laukkanen, Mikko O; Kallioniemi, Olli Pekka; Santoro, Massimo; Castellone, Maria Domenica

    2016-05-10

    RET, BRAF and other protein kinases have been identified as major molecular players in thyroid cancer. To identify novel kinases required for the viability of thyroid carcinoma cells, we performed a RNA interference screening in the RET/PTC1(CCDC6-RET)-positive papillary thyroid cancer cell line TPC1 using a library of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the human kinome and related proteins. We identified 14 hits whose silencing was able to significantly reduce the viability and the proliferation of TPC1 cells; most of them were active also in BRAF-mutant BCPAP (papillary thyroid cancer) and 8505C (anaplastic thyroid cancer) and in RAS-mutant CAL62 (anaplastic thyroid cancer) cells. These included members of EPH receptor tyrosine kinase family as well as SRC and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) families. Importantly, silencing of the identified hits did not affect significantly the viability of Nthy-ori 3-1 (hereafter referred to as NTHY) cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, suggesting cancer cell specificity. The identified proteins are worth exploring as potential novel druggable thyroid cancer targets. PMID:27058903

  10. BFH-OST, a new predictive screening tool for identifying osteoporosis in postmenopausal Han Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhao; Yang, Yong; Lin, JiSheng; Zhang, XiaoDong; Meng, Qian; Wang, BingQiang; Fei, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a simple new clinical screening tool to identify primary osteoporosis by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in postmenopausal women and to compare its validity with the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) in a Han Chinese population. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted, enrolling 1,721 community-dwelling postmenopausal Han Chinese women. All the subjects completed a structured questionnaire and had their bone mineral density measured using DXA. Using logistic regression analysis, we assessed the ability of numerous potential risk factors examined in the questionnaire to identify women with osteoporosis. Based on this analysis, we build a new predictive model, the Beijing Friendship Hospital Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (BFH-OST). Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to compare the validity of the new model and OSTA in identifying postmenopausal women at increased risk of primary osteoporosis as defined according to the World Health Organization criteria. Results At screening, it was found that of the 1,721 subjects with DXA, 22.66% had osteoporosis and a further 47.36% had osteopenia. Of the items screened in the questionnaire, it was found that age, weight, height, body mass index, personal history of fracture after the age of 45 years, history of fragility fracture in either parent, current smoking, and consumption of three of more alcoholic drinks per day were all predictive of osteoporosis. However, age at menarche and menopause, years since menopause, and number of pregnancies and live births were irrelevant in this study. The logistic regression analysis and item reduction yielded a final tool (BFH-OST) based on age, body weight, height, and history of fracture after the age of 45 years. The BFH-OST index (cutoff =9.1), which performed better than OSTA, had a sensitivity of 73.6% and a specificity of 72.7% for identifying osteoporosis, with an area under the receiver operating

  11. Drug Repurposing Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Effectively Inhibit Toxoplasma gondii Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Ashley J.; Drozda, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies has spawned the development of repurposing screens in which well-studied drugs and other types of compounds are tested for potential off-label uses. As a proof-of-principle screen to identify compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a collection of 1,120 compounds for the ability to significantly reduce Toxoplasma replication. A total of 94 compounds blocked parasite replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <5 µM. A significant number of these compounds are established inhibitors of dopamine or estrogen signaling. Follow-up experiments with the dopamine receptor inhibitor pimozide revealed that the drug impacted both parasite invasion and replication but did so independently of inhibition of dopamine or other neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Tamoxifen, which is an established inhibitor of the estrogen receptor, also reduced parasite invasion and replication. Even though Toxoplasma can activate the estrogen receptor, tamoxifen inhibits parasite growth independently of this transcription factor. Tamoxifen is also a potent inducer of autophagy, and we find that the drug stimulates recruitment of the autophagy marker light chain 3-green fluorescent protein onto the membrane of the vacuolar compartment in which the parasite resides and replicates. In contrast to other antiparasitic drugs, including pimozide, tamoxifen treatment of infected cells leads to a time-dependent elimination of intracellular parasites. Taken together, these data suggest that tamoxifen restricts Toxoplasma growth by inducing xenophagy or autophagic destruction of this obligate intracellular parasite. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat microbial infections, and the repurposing of well-characterized compounds is emerging as one approach to achieving this goal. Using the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a library of 1,120 compounds and identified several

  12. Drug Repurposing Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Effectively Inhibit Toxoplasma gondii Growth.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Ashley J; Drozda, Allison A; Blader, Ira J

    2016-01-01

    The urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies has spawned the development of repurposing screens in which well-studied drugs and other types of compounds are tested for potential off-label uses. As a proof-of-principle screen to identify compounds effective against Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a collection of 1,120 compounds for the ability to significantly reduce Toxoplasma replication. A total of 94 compounds blocked parasite replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations of <5 µM. A significant number of these compounds are established inhibitors of dopamine or estrogen signaling. Follow-up experiments with the dopamine receptor inhibitor pimozide revealed that the drug impacted both parasite invasion and replication but did so independently of inhibition of dopamine or other neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Tamoxifen, which is an established inhibitor of the estrogen receptor, also reduced parasite invasion and replication. Even though Toxoplasma can activate the estrogen receptor, tamoxifen inhibits parasite growth independently of this transcription factor. Tamoxifen is also a potent inducer of autophagy, and we find that the drug stimulates recruitment of the autophagy marker light chain 3-green fluorescent protein onto the membrane of the vacuolar compartment in which the parasite resides and replicates. In contrast to other antiparasitic drugs, including pimozide, tamoxifen treatment of infected cells leads to a time-dependent elimination of intracellular parasites. Taken together, these data suggest that tamoxifen restricts Toxoplasma growth by inducing xenophagy or autophagic destruction of this obligate intracellular parasite. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat microbial infections, and the repurposing of well-characterized compounds is emerging as one approach to achieving this goal. Using the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, we screened a library of 1,120 compounds and identified several

  13. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  14. Screening of a Leptospira biflexa Mutant Library To Identify Genes Involved in Ethidium Bromide Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Leptospira spp. are spirochete bacteria comprising both pathogenic and free-living species. The saprophyte L. biflexa is a model bacterium for studying leptospiral biology due to relative ease of culturing and genetic manipulation. In this study, we constructed a library of 4,996 random transposon mutants in L. biflexa. We screened the library for increased susceptibility to the DNA intercalating agent, ethidium bromide (EtBr), in order to identify genetic determinants that reduce L. biflexa susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. By phenotypic screening, using subinhibitory EtBr concentrations, we identified 29 genes that, when disrupted via transposon insertion, led to increased sensitivity of the bacteria to EtBr. At the functional level, these genes could be categorized by function as follows: regulation and signaling (n = 11), transport (n = 6), membrane structure (n = 5), stress response (n = 2), DNA damage repair (n = 1), and other processes (n = 3), while 1 gene had no predicted function. Genes involved in transport (including efflux pumps) and regulation (two-component systems, anti-sigma factor antagonists, etc.) were overrepresented, demonstrating that these genes are major contributors to EtBr tolerance. This finding suggests that transport genes which would prevent EtBr to enter the cell cytoplasm are critical for EtBr resistance. We identified genes required for the growth of L. biflexa in the presence of sublethal EtBr concentration and characterized their potential as antibiotic resistance determinants. This study will help to delineate mechanisms of adaptation to toxic compounds, as well as potential mechanisms of antibiotic resistance development in pathogenic L. interrogans. PMID:25063661

  15. Dual Myxovirus Screen Identifies a Small-Molecule Agonist of the Host Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dan; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Sun, Aiming; Steinhauer, David A.; Luo, Ming; Moore, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    As we are confronted with an increasing number of emerging and reemerging viral pathogens, the identification of novel pathogen-specific and broad-spectrum antivirals has become a major developmental objective. Targeting of host factors required for virus replication presents a tangible approach toward obtaining novel hits with a broadened indication range. However, the identification of developable host-directed antiviral candidates remains challenging. We describe a novel screening protocol that interrogates the myxovirus host-pathogen interactome for broad-spectrum drug candidates and simultaneously probes for conventional, pathogen-directed hits. With resource efficiency and pan-myxovirus activity as the central developmental parameters, we explored coscreening against two distinct, independently traceable myxoviruses in a single-well setting. Having identified a pair of unrelated pathogenic myxoviruses (influenza A virus and measles virus) with comparable replication kinetics, we observed unimpaired coreplication of both viruses, generated suitable firefly and Renilla luciferase reporter constructs, respectively, and validated the protocol for up to a 384-well plate format. Combined with an independent counterscreen using a recombinant respiratory syncytial virus luciferase reporter, implementation of the protocol identified candidates with a broadened antimyxovirus profile, in addition to pathogen-specific hits. Mechanistic characterization revealed a newly discovered broad-spectrum lead that does not block viral entry but stimulates effector pathways of the innate cellular antiviral response. In summary, we provide proof of concept for the efficient discovery of broad-spectrum myxovirus inhibitors in parallel to para- and orthomyxovirus-specific hit candidates in a single screening campaign. The newly identified compound provides a basis for the development of a novel broad-spectrum small-molecule antiviral class. PMID:23926334

  16. Potent Plasmodium falciparum gametocytocidal activity of diaminonaphthoquinones, lead antimalarial chemotypes identified in an antimalarial compound screen.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Guiguemde, W Armand; Barnett, David S; Maron, Maxim I; Min, Jaeki; Connelly, Michele C; Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Guy, R Kiplin; Williamson, Kim C

    2015-03-01

    Forty percent of the world's population is threatened by malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasites and results in an estimated 200 million clinical cases and 650,000 deaths each year. Drug resistance has been reported for all commonly used antimalarials and has prompted screens to identify new drug candidates. However, many of these new candidates have not been evaluated against the parasite stage responsible for transmission, gametocytes. If Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are not eliminated, patients continue to spread malaria for weeks after asexual parasite clearance. Asymptomatic individuals can also harbor gametocyte burdens sufficient for transmission, and a safe, effective gametocytocidal agent could also be used in community-wide malaria control programs. Here, we identify 15 small molecules with nanomolar activity against late-stage gametocytes. Fourteen are diaminonaphthoquinones (DANQs), and one is a 2-imino-benzo[d]imidazole (IBI). One of the DANQs identified, SJ000030570, is a lead antimalarial candidate. In contrast, 94% of the 650 compounds tested are inactive against late-stage gametocytes. Consistent with the ineffectiveness of most approved antimalarials against gametocytes, of the 19 novel compounds with activity against known anti-asexual-stage targets, only 3 had any strong effect on gametocyte viability. These data demonstrate the distinct biology of the transmission stages and emphasize the importance of screening for gametocytocidal activity. The potent gametocytocidal activity of DANQ and IBI coupled with their efficacy against asexual parasites provides leads for the development of antimalarials with the potential to prevent both the symptoms and the spread of malaria. PMID:25512421

  17. Potent Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytocidal Activity of Diaminonaphthoquinones, Lead Antimalarial Chemotypes Identified in an Antimalarial Compound Screen

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Guiguemde, W. Armand; Barnett, David S.; Maron, Maxim I.; Min, Jaeki; Connelly, Michele C.; Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    Forty percent of the world's population is threatened by malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasites and results in an estimated 200 million clinical cases and 650,000 deaths each year. Drug resistance has been reported for all commonly used antimalarials and has prompted screens to identify new drug candidates. However, many of these new candidates have not been evaluated against the parasite stage responsible for transmission, gametocytes. If Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are not eliminated, patients continue to spread malaria for weeks after asexual parasite clearance. Asymptomatic individuals can also harbor gametocyte burdens sufficient for transmission, and a safe, effective gametocytocidal agent could also be used in community-wide malaria control programs. Here, we identify 15 small molecules with nanomolar activity against late-stage gametocytes. Fourteen are diaminonaphthoquinones (DANQs), and one is a 2-imino-benzo[d]imidazole (IBI). One of the DANQs identified, SJ000030570, is a lead antimalarial candidate. In contrast, 94% of the 650 compounds tested are inactive against late-stage gametocytes. Consistent with the ineffectiveness of most approved antimalarials against gametocytes, of the 19 novel compounds with activity against known anti-asexual-stage targets, only 3 had any strong effect on gametocyte viability. These data demonstrate the distinct biology of the transmission stages and emphasize the importance of screening for gametocytocidal activity. The potent gametocytocidal activity of DANQ and IBI coupled with their efficacy against asexual parasites provides leads for the development of antimalarials with the potential to prevent both the symptoms and the spread of malaria. PMID:25512421

  18. Targeting the Akt1 allosteric site to identify novel scaffolds through virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Oya Gursoy; Olmez, Elif Ozkirimli; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data and tumor specimen studies report that AKT kinases are related to many human cancers. Therefore, identification and development of small molecule inhibitors targeting AKT and its signaling pathway can be therapeutic in treatment of cancer. Numerous studies report inhibitors that target the ATP-binding pocket in the kinase domains, but the similarity of this site, within the kinase family makes selectivity a major problem. The sequence identity amongst PH domains is significantly lower than that in kinase domains and developing more selective inhibitors is possible if PH domain is targeted. This in silico screening study is the first time report toward the identification of potential allosteric inhibitors expected to bind the cavity between kinase and PH domains of Akt1. Structural information of Akt1 was used to develop structure-based pharmacophore models comprising hydrophobic, acceptor, donor and ring features. The 3D structural information of previously identified allosteric Akt inhibitors obtained from literature was employed to develop a ligand-based pharmacophore model. Database was generated with drug like subset of ZINC and screening was performed based on 3D similarity to the selected pharmacophore hypotheses. Binding modes and affinities of the ligands were predicted by Glide software. Top scoring hits were further analyzed considering 2D similarity between the compounds, interactions with Akt1, fitness to pharmacophore models, ADME, druglikeness criteria and Induced-Fit docking. Using virtual screening methodologies, derivatives of 3-methyl-xanthine, quinoline-4-carboxamide and 2-[4-(cyclohexa-1,3-dien-1-yl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]phenol were proposed as potential leads for allosteric inhibition of Akt1. PMID:24291487

  19. Gametocytocidal Screen Identifies Novel Chemical Classes with Plasmodium falciparum Transmission Blocking Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Natalie G.; Sullivan, David J.; Mlambo, Godfree; Dimopoulos, George; Tripathi, Abhai K.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of transmission blocking compounds is an important intervention strategy necessary to eliminate and eradicate malaria. To date only a small number of drugs that inhibit gametocyte development and thereby transmission from the mosquito to the human host exist. This limitation is largely due to a lack of screening assays easily adaptable to high throughput because of multiple incubation steps or the requirement for high gametocytemia. Here we report the discovery of new compounds with gametocytocidal activity using a simple and robust SYBR Green I- based DNA assay. Our assay utilizes the exflagellation step in male gametocytes and a background suppressor, which masks the staining of dead cells to achieve healthy signal to noise ratio by increasing signal of viable parasites and subtracting signal from dead parasites. By determining the contribution of exflagellation to fluorescent signal and using appropriate cutoff values, we were able to screen for gametocytocidal compounds. After assay validation and optimization, we screened an FDA approved drug library of approximately 1500 compounds, as well as the 400 compound MMV malaria box and identified 44 gametocytocidal compounds with sub to low micromolar IC50s. Major classes of compounds with gametocytocidal activity included quaternary ammonium compounds with structural similarity to choline, acridine-like compounds similar to quinacrine and pyronaridine, as well as antidepressant, antineoplastic, and anthelminthic compounds. Top drug candidates showed near complete transmission blocking in membrane feeding assays. This assay is simple, reproducible and demonstrated robust Z-factor values at low gametocytemia levels, making it amenable to HTS for identification of novel and potent gametocytocidal compounds. PMID:25157792

  20. In vivo RNAi screen identifies NLK as a negative regulator of mesenchymal activity in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Jin; Lee, Jin-Ku; Kim, Gi-Soo; Han, Suji; Kim, Woon Jin; Shin, Yong Jae; Joo, Kyeung Min; Paddison, Patrick J.; Ishitani, Tohru; Lee, Jeongwu; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal brain cancer with profound genomic alterations. While the bona fide tumor suppressor genes such as PTEN, NF1, and TP53 have high frequency of inactivating mutations, there may be the genes with GBM-suppressive roles for which genomic mutation is not a primary cause for inactivation. To identify such genes, we employed in vivo RNAi screening approach using the patient-derived GBM xenograft models. We found that Nemo-Like Kinase (NLK) negatively regulates mesenchymal activities, a characteristic of aggressive GBM, in part via inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling. Consistent with this, we found that NLK expression is especially low in a subset of GBMs that harbors high WNT/mesenchymal activities. Restoration of NLK inhibited WNT and mesenchymal activities, decreased clonogenic growth and survival, and impeded tumor growth in vivo. These data unravel a tumor suppressive role of NLK and support the feasibility of combining oncogenomics with in vivo RNAi screen. PMID:26023737

  1. High efficacy vasopermeability drug candidates identified by screening in an ex ovo chorioallantoic membrane model

    PubMed Central

    Pink, Desmond; Luhrs, Keith A.; Zhou, Longen; Schulte, Wendy; Chase, Jennifer; Frosch, Christian; Haberl, Udo; Nguyen, Van; Roy, Aparna I.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries; Parseghian, Missag H.

    2015-01-01

    The use of rodent models to evaluate efficacy during testing is accompanied by significant economic and regulatory hurdles which compound the costs of screening for promising drug candidates. Vasopermeation Enhancement Agents (VEAs) are a new class of biologics that are designed to increase the uptake of cancer therapeutics at the tumor site by modifying vascular permeability in the tumor to increase the therapeutic index of co-administered drugs. To evaluate the efficacy of a panel of VEA clinical candidates, we compared the rodent Miles assay to an equivalent assay in the ex ovo chicken embryo model. Both model systems identified the same candidate (PVL 10) as the most active promoter of vasopermeation in non-tumor tissues. An ex ovo chicken embryo system was utilized to test each candidate VEA in two human tumor models at a range of concentrations. Vasopermeation activity due to VEA was dependent on tumor type, with HEp3 tumors displaying higher levels of vasopermeation than MDA-MB-435. One candidate (PVL 10) proved optimal for HEp3 tumors and another (PVL 2) for MDA-MB-435. The use of the ex ovo chicken embryo model provides a rapid and less costly alternative to the use of rodent models for preclinical screening of drug candidates. PMID:26510887

  2. RNAi screening identifies mediators of NOD2 signaling: Implications for spatial specificity of MDP recognition

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Simone; Grabe, Nils; Jacobs, Gunnar; Billmann-Born, Susanne; Till, Andreas; Häsler, Robert; Aden, Konrad; Paulsen, Maren; Arlt, Alexander; Kraemer, Lars; Hagemann, Nina; Erdmann, Kai Sven; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) receptor detects bacteria-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and activates the transcription factor NF-κB. Here we describe the regulatome of NOD2 signaling using a systematic RNAi screen. Using three consecutive screens, we identified a set of 20 positive NF-κB regulators including the known pathway members RIPK2, RELA, and BIRC4 (XIAP) as well as FRMPD2 (FERM and PDZ domain-containing 2). FRMPD2 interacts with NOD2 via leucine-rich repeats and forms a complex with the membrane-associated protein ERBB2IP. We demonstrate that FRMPD2 spatially assembles the NOD2-signaling complex, hereby restricting NOD2-mediated immune responses to the basolateral compartment of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. We show that genetic truncation of the NOD2 leucine-rich repeat domain, which is associated with Crohn disease, impairs the interaction with FRMPD2, and that intestinal inflammation leads to down-regulation of FRMPD2. These results suggest a structural mechanism for how polarity of epithelial cells acts on intestinal NOD-like receptor signaling to mediate spatial specificity of bacterial recognition and control of immune responses. PMID:23213202

  3. Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Faltermeier, Claire M.; Drake, Justin M.; Clark, Peter M.; Smith, Bryan A.; Zong, Yang; Volpe, Carmen; Mathis, Colleen; Morrissey, Colm; Castor, Brandon; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutationally activated kinases play an important role in the progression and metastasis of many cancers. Despite numerous oncogenic alterations implicated in metastatic prostate cancer, mutations of kinases are rare. Several lines of evidence suggest that nonmutated kinases and their pathways are involved in prostate cancer progression, but few kinases have been mechanistically linked to metastasis. Using a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics dataset in concert with gene expression analysis, we selected over 100 kinases potentially implicated in human metastatic prostate cancer for functional evaluation. A primary in vivo screen based on overexpression of candidate kinases in murine prostate cells identified 20 wild-type kinases that promote metastasis. We queried these 20 kinases in a secondary in vivo screen using human prostate cells. Strikingly, all three RAF family members, MERTK, and NTRK2 drove the formation of bone and visceral metastasis confirmed by positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging and histology. Immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays indicated that these kinases are highly expressed in human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer tissues. Our functional studies reveal the strong capability of select wild-type protein kinases to drive critical steps of the metastatic cascade, and implicate these kinases in possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26621741

  4. Discovery of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors identified by pharmacophore modeling and sequential virtual screening techniques.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikhar; Fallarero, Adyary; Järvinen, Päivi; Karlsson, Daniela; Johnson, Mark S; Vuorela, Pia M; Mohan, C Gopi

    2011-02-15

    Dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are promising for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). They alleviate the cognitive deficits and AD-modifying agents, by inhibiting the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregation, through binding to both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites, the so called dual binding site of the AChE enzyme. In this Letter, chemical features based 3D-pharmacophore models were developed based on the eight potent and structurally diverse AChE inhibitors (I-VIII) obtained from high-throughput in vitro screening technique. The best 3D-pharmacophore model, Hypo1, consists of two hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, one hydrophobe, and two hydrophobic aliphatic features obtained by Catalyst/HIPHOP algorithm adopted in Discovery studio program. Hypo1 was used as a 3D query in sequential virtual screening study to filter three small compound databases. Further, a total of nine compounds were selected and followed on in vitro analysis. Finally, we identified two leads--Specs1 (IC(50)=3.279 μM) and Spec2 (IC(50)=5.986 μM) dual binding site compounds from Specs database, having good AChE enzyme inhibitory activity. PMID:21273074

  5. Small molecule regulators of autophagy identified by an image-based high-throughput screen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihong; Yu, Jia; Pan, Heling; Hu, Ping; Hao, Yan; Cai, Wenqing; Zhu, Hong; Yu, Albert D.; Xie, Xin; Ma, Dawei; Yuan, Junying

    2007-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent cellular catabolic mechanism mediating the turnover of intracellular organelles and long-lived proteins. Reduction of autophagy activity has been shown to lead to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in neurons and may be involved in chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease. To explore the mechanism of autophagy and identify small molecules that can activate it, we developed a series of high-throughput image-based screens for small-molecule regulators of autophagy. This series of screens allowed us to distinguish compounds that can truly induce autophagic degradation from those that induce the accumulation of autophagosomes as a result of causing cellular damage or blocking downstream lysosomal functions. Our analyses led to the identification of eight compounds that can induce autophagy and promote long-lived protein degradation. Interestingly, seven of eight compounds are FDA-approved drugs for treatment of human diseases. Furthermore, we show that these compounds can reduce the levels of expanded polyglutamine repeats in cultured cells. Our studies suggest the possibility that some of these drugs may be useful for the treatment of Huntington's and other human diseases associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins. PMID:18024584

  6. Development of a screening method to identify regulators of MICA shedding.

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Takahiro; Otsuka, Motoyuki; Ohno, Motoko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sato, Masaya; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-01

    Immune cells, such as natural killer (NK) cells, recognize virally infected and transformed cells, and eliminate them through the interaction between NKG2D receptors on NK cells and NKG2D ligands on pathogenic cells. Shedding of NKG2D ligands is thought to be a type of counter-mechanism employed by pathogenic cells to evade from NKG2D-mediated immune surveillance. MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) is a prototypical NKG2D ligand. We previously reported that, in soluble form, MICA expression levels are significantly associated with hepatitis virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we report a MICA shedding assay that utilizes membrane-bound MICA tagged at its N-terminus with a nano-luciferase reporter to quantify MICA shedding into culture media. Using this method, we screened a compound library and identified putative regulators of MICA shedding that have the potential to enhance the immune reaction by simultaneously increasing cell surface MICA levels and decreasing soluble MICA levels. This shedding assay may be useful for screening regulators of cell surface molecule shedding. PMID:26299929

  7. Large genetic screens for gynogenesis and androgenesis haploid inducers in Arabidopsis thaliana failed to identify mutants

    PubMed Central

    Portemer, Virginie; Renne, Charlotte; Guillebaux, Alexia; Mercier, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Gynogenesis is a process in which the embryo genome originates exclusively from female origin, following embryogenesis stimulation by a male gamete. In contrast, androgenesis is the development of embryos that contain only the male nuclear genetic background. Both phenomena are of great interest in plant breeding as haploidization is an efficient tool to reduce the length of breeding schemes to create varieties. Although few inducer lines have been described, the genetic control of these phenomena is poorly understood. We developed genetic screens to identify mutations that would induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ability of mutant pollen to induce either gynogenesis or androgenesis was tested by crossing mutagenized plants as males. Seedlings from these crosses were screened with recessive phenotypic markers, one genetically controlled by the female genome and another by the male genome. Positive and negative controls confirmed the unambiguous detection of both gynogenesis and androgenesis events. This strategy was applied to 1,666 EMS-mutagenised lines and 47 distant Arabidopsis strains. While an internal control suggested that the mutagenesis reached saturation, no gynogenesis or androgenesis inducer was found. However, spontaneous gynogenesis was observed at a frequency of 1/10,800. Altogether, these results suggest that no simple EMS-induced mutation in the male genome is able to induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:25814999

  8. A CRISPR-based screen identifies genes essential for West Nile virus-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N.; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-01-01

    Summary West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. PMID:26190106

  9. Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Faltermeier, Claire M; Drake, Justin M; Clark, Peter M; Smith, Bryan A; Zong, Yang; Volpe, Carmen; Mathis, Colleen; Morrissey, Colm; Castor, Brandon; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-01-12

    Mutationally activated kinases play an important role in the progression and metastasis of many cancers. Despite numerous oncogenic alterations implicated in metastatic prostate cancer, mutations of kinases are rare. Several lines of evidence suggest that nonmutated kinases and their pathways are involved in prostate cancer progression, but few kinases have been mechanistically linked to metastasis. Using a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics dataset in concert with gene expression analysis, we selected over 100 kinases potentially implicated in human metastatic prostate cancer for functional evaluation. A primary in vivo screen based on overexpression of candidate kinases in murine prostate cells identified 20 wild-type kinases that promote metastasis. We queried these 20 kinases in a secondary in vivo screen using human prostate cells. Strikingly, all three RAF family members, MERTK, and NTRK2 drove the formation of bone and visceral metastasis confirmed by positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging and histology. Immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays indicated that these kinases are highly expressed in human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer tissues. Our functional studies reveal the strong capability of select wild-type protein kinases to drive critical steps of the metastatic cascade, and implicate these kinases in possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26621741

  10. Nickel-Resistance Determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM Identified by Genome-Wide Functional Screening

    PubMed Central

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Mirete, Salvador; Alcolea, Pedro J.; Gomez, Manuel J.; Amils, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Pastor, Jose E.

    2014-01-01

    Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY). This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms. PMID:24740277

  11. A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Saima M; Huet, Diego; Ganesan, Suresh M; Huynh, My-Hang; Wang, Tim; Nasamu, Armiyaw S; Thiru, Prathapan; Saeij, Jeroen P J; Carruthers, Vern B; Niles, Jacquin C; Lourido, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are leading causes of human and livestock diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis, yet most of their genes remain uncharacterized. Here, we present the first genome-wide genetic screen of an apicomplexan. We adapted CRISPR/Cas9 to assess the contribution of each gene from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii during infection of human fibroblasts. Our analysis defines ∼200 previously uncharacterized, fitness-conferring genes unique to the phylum, from which 16 were investigated, revealing essential functions during infection of human cells. Secondary screens identify as an invasion factor the claudin-like apicomplexan microneme protein (CLAMP), which resembles mammalian tight-junction proteins and localizes to secretory organelles, making it critical to the initiation of infection. CLAMP is present throughout sequenced apicomplexan genomes and is essential during the asexual stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. These results provide broad-based functional information on T. gondii genes and will facilitate future approaches to expand the horizon of antiparasitic interventions. PMID:27594426

  12. In vivo RNAi screening identifies a mechanism of sorafenib resistance in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudalska, Ramona; Dauch, Daniel; Longerich, Thomas; McJunkin, Katherine; Wuestefeld, Torsten; Kang, Tae-Won; Hohmeyer, Anja; Pesic, Marina; Leibold, Josef; von Thun, Anne; Schirmacher, Peter; Zuber, Johannes; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Powers, Scott; Malek, Nisar P; Eilers, Martin; Sipos, Bence; Lowe, Scott W; Geffers, Robert; Laufer, Stefan; Zender, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In solid tumors, resistance to therapy inevitably develops upon treatment with cytotoxic drugs or molecularly targeted therapies. Here, we describe a system that enables pooled shRNA screening directly in mouse hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in vivo to identify genes likely to be involved in therapy resistance. Using a focused shRNA library targeting genes located within focal genomic amplifications of human HCC, we screened for genes whose inhibition increased the therapeutic efficacy of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. Both shRNA-mediated and pharmacological silencing of Mapk14 (p38α) were found to sensitize mouse HCC to sorafenib therapy and prolong survival by abrogating Mapk14-dependent activation of Mek-Erk and Atf2 signaling. Elevated Mapk14-Atf2 signaling predicted poor response to sorafenib therapy in human HCC, and sorafenib resistance of p-Mapk14-expressing HCC cells could be reverted by silencing Mapk14. Our results suggest that a combination of sorafenib and Mapk14 blockade is a promising approach to overcoming therapy resistance of human HCC. PMID:25216638

  13. In Vivo RNA Interference Screening Identifies a Leukemia-Specific Dependence on Integrin Beta 3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Peter G.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Hartwell, Kimberly A.; Chu, Lisa P.; Järås, Marcus; Puram, Rishi V.; Puissant, Alexandre; Callahan, Kevin P.; Ashton, John; McConkey, Marie E.; Poveromo, Luke P.; Cowley, Glenn S.; Kharas, Michael G.; Labelle, Myriam; Shterental, Sebastian; Fujisaki, Joji; Silberstein, Lev; Alexe, Gabriela; Al-Hajj, Muhammad A.; Shelton, Christopher A.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Root, David E.; Scadden, David T.; Hynes, Richard O.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Jordan, Craig T.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We used an in vivo short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening approach to identify genes that are essential for MLL-AF9 acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that Integrin Beta 3 (Itgb3) is essential for murine leukemia cells in vivo, and for human leukemia cells in xenotransplantation studies. In leukemia cells, Itgb3 knockdown impaired homing, downregulated LSC transcriptional programs, and induced differentiation via the intracellular kinase, Syk. In contrast, loss of Itgb3 in normal HSPCs did not affect engraftment, reconstitution, or differentiation. Finally, we confirmed that Itgb3 is dispensable for normal hematopoiesis and required for leukemogenesis using an Itgb3 knockout mouse model. Our results establish the significance of the Itgb3 signaling pathway as a potential therapeutic target in AML. PMID:23770013

  14. A screening procedure for identifying acid-sensitive lakes from catchment characteristics.

    PubMed

    Berg, N H; Gallegos, A; Dell, T; Frazier, J; Procter, T; Sickman, J; Grant, S; Blett, T; Arbaugh, M

    2005-06-01

    Monitoring of Wilderness lakes for potential acidification requires information on lake sensitivity to acidification. Catchment properties can be used to estimate the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of lakes. Conceptual and general linear models were developed to predict the ANC of lakes in high-elevation (> or = 2170 m) Wilderness Areas in California's Sierra Nevada mountains. Catchment-to-lake area ratio, lake perimeter-to-area ratio, bedrock lithology, vegetation cover, and lake headwater location are significant variables explaining ANC. The general linear models were validated against independently collected water chemistry data and were used as part of a first stage screen to identify Wilderness lakes with low ANC. Expanded monitoring of atmospheric deposition is essential for improving the predictability of lake ANC. PMID:15952524

  15. Pharmaceutical screen identifies novel target processes for activation of autophagy with a broad translational potential.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Santosh; Ahmed, Zahra; Bradfute, Steven B; Arko-Mensah, John; Mandell, Michael A; Won Choi, Seong; Kimura, Tomonori; Blanchet, Fabien; Waller, Anna; Mudd, Michal H; Jiang, Shanya; Sklar, Larry; Timmins, Graham S; Maphis, Nicole; Bhaskar, Kiran; Piguet, Vincent; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved homeostatic process active in all human cells and affecting a spectrum of diseases. Here we use a pharmaceutical screen to discover new mechanisms for activation of autophagy. We identify a subset of pharmaceuticals inducing autophagic flux with effects in diverse cellular systems modelling specific stages of several human diseases such as HIV transmission and hyperphosphorylated tau accumulation in Alzheimer's disease. One drug, flubendazole, is a potent inducer of autophagy initiation and flux by affecting acetylated and dynamic microtubules in a reciprocal way. Disruption of dynamic microtubules by flubendazole results in mTOR deactivation and dissociation from lysosomes leading to TFEB (transcription factor EB) nuclear translocation and activation of autophagy. By inducing microtubule acetylation, flubendazole activates JNK1 leading to Bcl-2 phosphorylation, causing release of Beclin1 from Bcl-2-Beclin1 complexes for autophagy induction, thus uncovering a new approach to inducing autophagic flux that may be applicable in disease treatment. PMID:26503418

  16. A chemical screen to identify inducers of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rauthan, Manish; Pilon, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that inhibition of the mevalonate pathway in C. elegans causes inhibition of protein prenylation, developmental arrest and lethality. We also showed that constitutive activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, UPRmt, is an effective way for C. elegans to become resistant to the negative effects of mevalonate pathway inhibition. This was an important finding since statins, a drug class prescribed to lower cholesterol levels in patients, act by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway, and it is therefore possible that some of their undesirable side effects could be alleviated by activating the UPRmt. Here, we screened a chemical library and identified 4 compounds that specifically activated the UPRmt. One of these compounds, methacycline hydrochloride (a tetracycline antibiotic) also protected C. elegans and mammalian cells from statin toxicity. Methacycline hydrochloride and ethidium bromide, a known UPRmt activator, were also tested in mice: only ethidium bromide significantly activate the UPRmt in skeletal muscles. PMID:27123370

  17. Ligand-based virtual screening identifies a family of selective cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Christou, Ivy; Bataille, Carole J.R.; Cross, Rebecca L.; Wynne, Graham M.; Greaves, David R.; Russell, Angela J.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) has been linked with the regulation of inflammation, and selective receptor activation has been proposed as a target for the treatment of a range of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and arthritis. In order to identify selective CB2R agonists with appropriate physicochemical and ADME properties for future evaluation in vivo, we first performed a ligand-based virtual screen. Subsequent medicinal chemistry optimisation studies led to the identification of a new class of selective CB2R agonists. Several examples showed high levels of activity (EC50 < 200 nM) and binding affinity (Ki < 200 nM) for the CB2R, and no detectable activity at the CB1R. The most promising example, DIAS2, also showed favourable in vitro metabolic stability and absorption properties along with a clean selectivity profile when evaluated against a panel of GPCRs and kinases. PMID:25487422

  18. A Zebrafish Genetic Screen Identifies Neuromedin U as a Regulator of Sleep/Wake States.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Cindy N; Rihel, Jason; Lee, Daniel A; Singh, Chanpreet; Mosser, Eric A; Chen, Shijia; Sapin, Viveca; Pham, Uyen; Engle, Jae; Niles, Brett J; Montz, Christin J; Chakravarthy, Sridhara; Zimmerman, Steven; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Vidal, Marc; Schier, Alexander F; Prober, David A

    2016-02-17

    Neuromodulation of arousal states ensures that an animal appropriately responds to its environment and engages in behaviors necessary for survival. However, the molecular and circuit properties underlying neuromodulation of arousal states such as sleep and wakefulness remain unclear. To tackle this challenge in a systematic and unbiased manner, we performed a genetic overexpression screen to identify genes that affect larval zebrafish arousal. We found that the neuropeptide neuromedin U (Nmu) promotes hyperactivity and inhibits sleep in zebrafish larvae, whereas nmu mutant animals are hypoactive. We show that Nmu-induced arousal requires Nmu receptor 2 and signaling via corticotropin releasing hormone (Crh) receptor 1. In contrast to previously proposed models, we find that Nmu does not promote arousal via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, but rather probably acts via brainstem crh-expressing neurons. These results reveal an unexpected functional and anatomical interface between the Nmu system and brainstem arousal systems that represents a novel wake-promoting pathway. PMID:26889812

  19. Identifying preschool children at risk of later reading difficulties: evaluation of two emergent literacy screening tools.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Shauna B; Lonigan, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    Emergent literacy skills are predictive of children's early reading success, and literacy achievement in early schooling declines more rapidly for children who are below-average readers. It is therefore important for teachers to identify accurately children at risk for later reading difficulty so children can be exposed to effective emergent literacy interventions. In this study, 176 preschoolers were administered two screening tools, the Revised Get Ready to Read! (GRTR-R) and the Individual Growth and Development Indicators (IGDIs), and a diagnostic measure at two time points. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that, at optimal cut scores, GRTR-R provided more accurate classification of children's overall emergent literacy skills than did IGDIs. However, neither measure was particularly good at classifying specific emergent literacy skills. PMID:19822699

  20. Pharmaceutical screen identifies novel target processes for activation of autophagy with a broad translational potential

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Santosh; Ahmed, Zahra; Bradfute, Steven B.; Arko-Mensah, John; Mandell, Michael A.; Won Choi, Seong; Kimura, Tomonori; Blanchet, Fabien; Waller, Anna; Mudd, Michal H.; Jiang, Shanya; Sklar, Larry; Timmins, Graham S.; Maphis, Nicole; Bhaskar, Kiran; Piguet, Vincent; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved homeostatic process active in all human cells and affecting a spectrum of diseases. Here we use a pharmaceutical screen to discover new mechanisms for activation of autophagy. We identify a subset of pharmaceuticals inducing autophagic flux with effects in diverse cellular systems modelling specific stages of several human diseases such as HIV transmission and hyperphosphorylated tau accumulation in Alzheimer's disease. One drug, flubendazole, is a potent inducer of autophagy initiation and flux by affecting acetylated and dynamic microtubules in a reciprocal way. Disruption of dynamic microtubules by flubendazole results in mTOR deactivation and dissociation from lysosomes leading to TFEB (transcription factor EB) nuclear translocation and activation of autophagy. By inducing microtubule acetylation, flubendazole activates JNK1 leading to Bcl-2 phosphorylation, causing release of Beclin1 from Bcl-2-Beclin1 complexes for autophagy induction, thus uncovering a new approach to inducing autophagic flux that may be applicable in disease treatment. PMID:26503418

  1. A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

    2009-01-01

    A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19196968

  2. An Effective Virtual Screening Protocol To Identify Promising p53-MDM2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Durante, Milena; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Bertamino, Alessia; Campiglia, Pietro; Loiodice, Fulvio; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia; Agamennone, Mariangela

    2016-06-27

    The p53-MDM2 interaction is a well-known protein-protein contact, and its disruption is a key event for p53 activation and induction of its oncosuppressor response. The design of small molecules that can block the p53-MDM2 interaction and reactivate the p53 function is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. To date, several compounds have been identified as p53-MDM2 inhibitors, and X-ray structures of MDM2 complexed with several ligands are available in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. These data have been exploited to compile a hierarchical virtual screening protocol. The first steps were aimed at selecting a focused library, which was submitted in parallel to docking and pharmacophore model alignment. Selected compounds were subjected to inhibition assays of both cellular vitality (MTT) and p53-MDM2 interaction (ELISA and co-immunoprecipitation), disclosing four nanomolar inhibitors. PMID:27269808

  3. Identifying GSK-3β kinase inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease: Virtual screening, enzyme, and cell assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hsin; Hsieh, Yu-Shao; Wu, Yih-Ru; Hsu, Chia-Jen; Chen, Hsuan-Chiang; Huang, Wun-Han; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei; Su, Ming-Tsan; Sun, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen

    2016-06-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) is widely known as a critical target protein for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized virtual screening to search databases for compounds with the potential to be used in drugs targeting GSK-3β kinase, and kinase as well as cell assays to investigate top-scored, selected compounds. Virtual screening of >1.1 million compounds in the ZINC and in-house databases was conducted using an optimized computational protocol in the docking program GOLD. Of the top-ranked compounds, 16 underwent a luminescent kinase assay and a cell assay using HEK293 cells expressing DsRed-tagged ΔK280 in the repeat domain of tau (tauRD). The compounds VB-003 (a potent GSK-3β inhibitor) and VB-008 (AM404, an anandamide transport inhibitor), with determined IC50 values of 0.25 and 5.4μM, respectively, were identified as reducing tau aggregation. Both compounds increased expression of phospho-GSK-3β (Ser9) and reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation at the sites of Ser202, Thr231, and Ser396. In the ∆K280 tauRD-DsRed SH-SY5Y cells, VB-008, but not VB-003, enhanced HSPB1 and GRP78 expression, increased ∆K280 tauRD-DsRed solubility, and promoted neurite outgrowth. Thus VB-008 performed best to the end of the present study. The identified compound VB-008 may guide the identification and synthesis of potential inhibitors analogous to this compound. PMID:27094783

  4. Macrophage Replication Screen Identifies a Novel Francisella Hydroperoxide Resistance Protein Involved in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn, Anna C.; Bina, James E.; Weiss, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Recently, genome-wide screens have identified Francisella genes required for virulence in mice. However, the mechanisms by which most of the corresponding proteins contribute to pathogenesis are still largely unknown. To further elucidate the roles of these virulence determinants in Francisella pathogenesis, we tested whether each gene was required for replication of the model pathogen F. novicida within macrophages, an important virulence trait. Fifty-three of the 224 genes tested were involved in intracellular replication, including many of those within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI), validating our results. Interestingly, over one third of the genes identified are annotated as hypothetical, indicating that F. novicida likely utilizes novel virulence factors for intracellular replication. To further characterize these virulence determinants, we selected two hypothetical genes to study in more detail. As predicted by our screen, deletion mutants of FTN_0096 and FTN_1133 were attenuated for replication in macrophages. The mutants displayed differing levels of attenuation in vivo, with the FTN_1133 mutant being the most attenuated. FTN_1133 has sequence similarity to the organic hydroperoxide resistance protein Ohr, an enzyme involved in the bacterial response to oxidative stress. We show that FTN_1133 is required for F. novicida resistance to, and degradation of, organic hydroperoxides as well as resistance to the action of the NADPH oxidase both in macrophages and mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that F. holarctica LVS, a strain derived from a highly virulent human pathogenic species of Francisella, also requires this protein for organic hydroperoxide resistance as well as replication in macrophages and mice. This study expands our knowledge of Francisella's largely uncharacterized intracellular lifecycle and demonstrates that FTN_1133 is

  5. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types. PMID:26568031

  6. From The Cover: Genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies previously undescribed regulators of polyglutamine aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollen, Ellen A. A.; Garcia, Susana M.; van Haaften, Gijs; Kim, Soojin; Chavez, Alejandro; Morimoto, Richard I.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.

    2004-04-01

    Protein misfolding and the formation of aggregates are increasingly recognized components of the pathology of human genetic disease and hallmarks of many neurodegenerative disorders. As exemplified by polyglutamine diseases, the propensity for protein misfolding is associated with the length of polyglutamine expansions and age-dependent changes in protein-folding homeostasis, suggesting a critical role for a protein homeostatic buffer. To identify the complement of protein factors that protects cells against the formation of protein aggregates, we tested transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing polyglutamine expansion yellow fluorescent protein fusion proteins at the threshold length associated with the age-dependent appearance of protein aggregation. We used genome-wide RNA interference to identify genes that, when suppressed, resulted in the premature appearance of protein aggregates. Our screen identified 186 genes corresponding to five principal classes of polyglutamine regulators: genes involved in RNA metabolism, protein synthesis, protein folding, and protein degradation; and those involved in protein trafficking. We propose that each of these classes represents a molecular machine collectively comprising the protein homeostatic buffer that responds to the expression of damaged proteins to prevent their misfolding and aggregation. protein misfolding | neurodegenerative diseases

  7. A Screen for Modifiers of Hedgehog Signaling in Drosophila melanogaster Identifies swm and mts

    PubMed Central

    Casso, David J.; Liu, Songmei; Iwaki, D. David; Ogden, Stacey K.; Kornberg, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Signaling by Hedgehog (Hh) proteins shapes most tissues and organs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, and its misregulation has been implicated in many human diseases. Although components of the signaling pathway have been identified, key aspects of the signaling mechanism and downstream targets remain to be elucidated. We performed an enhancer/suppressor screen in Drosophila to identify novel components of the pathway and identified 26 autosomal regions that modify a phenotypic readout of Hh signaling. Three of the regions include genes that contribute constituents to the pathway—patched, engrailed, and hh. One of the other regions includes the gene microtubule star (mts) that encodes a subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. We show that mts is necessary for full activation of Hh signaling. A second region includes the gene second mitotic wave missing (swm). swm is recessive lethal and is predicted to encode an evolutionarily conserved protein with RNA binding and Zn+ finger domains. Characterization of newly isolated alleles indicates that swm is a negative regulator of Hh signaling and is essential for cell polarity. PMID:18245841

  8. Gene Expression-Based Screen for Parkinson's Disease Identifies GW8510 as a Neuroprotective Agent.

    PubMed

    Wimalasena, Nivanthika K; Le, Viet Q; Wimalasena, Kandatege; Schreiber, Stuart L; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2016-07-20

    We carried out a gene expression-based in silico screen in order to identify small molecules with gene-expression profiles that are anticorrelated with a gene-expression profile for Parkinson's disease (PD). We identified the cyclin-dependent kinase 2/5 (CDK2/5) inhibitor GW8510 as our most significant hit and characterized its effects in rodent MN9D cells and in human neuronal cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. GW8510 demonstrated neuroprotective ability in MN9D cells in the presence of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridium (MPP(+)), a widely used neurotoxin model for Parkinson's disease. In order to delineate the nature and extent of GW8510's neuroprotective properties, we studied GW8510 in human neuronal cells in the context of various mechanisms of cellular stress. We found that GW8510 was protective against small-molecule mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stressors. Our findings illustrate an approach to using small-molecule gene expression libraries to identify compounds with therapeutic potential in human diseases. PMID:27270122

  9. A high-content screening assay in transgenic zebrafish identifies two novel activators of fgf signaling.

    PubMed

    Saydmohammed, Manush; Vollmer, Laura L; Onuoha, Ezenwa Obi; Vogt, Andreas; Tsang, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Zebrafish have become an invaluable vertebrate animal model to interrogate small molecule libraries for modulators of complex biological pathways and phenotypes. We have recently described the implementation of a quantitative, high-content imaging assay in multi-well plates to analyze the effects of small molecules on Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) signaling in vivo. Here we have evaluated the capability of the assay to identify compounds that hyperactivate FGF signaling from a test cassette of agents with known biological activities. Using a transgenic zebrafish reporter line for FGF activity, we screened 1040 compounds from an annotated library of known bioactive agents, including FDA-approved drugs. The assay identified two molecules, 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate and pyrithione zinc, that enhanced FGF signaling in specific areas of the brain. Subsequent studies revealed that both compounds specifically expanded FGF target gene expression. Furthermore, treatment of early stage embryos with either compound resulted in dorsalized phenotypes characteristic of hyperactivation of FGF signaling in early development. Documented activities for both agents included activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), consistent with FGF hyperactivation. To conclude, we demonstrate the power of automated quantitative high-content imaging to identify small molecule modulators of FGF. PMID:21932436

  10. Clinical manifestations of hemochromatosis in HFE C282Y homozygotes identified by screening

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Gordon D; McLaren, Christine E; Adams, Paul C; Barton, James C; Reboussin, David M; Gordeuk, Victor R; Acton, Ronald T; Harris, Emily L; Speechley, Mark R; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Dawkins, Fitzroy W; Snively, Beverly M; Vogt, Thomas M; Eckfeldt, John H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hemochromatosis may suffer organ damage from iron overload, often with serious clinical consequences. OBJECTIVE: To assess prevalences of self-reported symptoms and clinical signs and conditions in persons homozygous for the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutation (C282Y) identified by screening. METHODS: Participants were adults 25 years of age or older enrolled in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. C282Y homozygotes (n=282) were compared with control participants without the HFE C282Y or H63D alleles (ie, wild type/wild type; n=364). RESULTS: Previously diagnosed C282Y homozygotes and newly diagnosed homozygotes with elevated serum ferritin levels had higher prevalences of certain symptoms such as chronic fatigue (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.34 to 5.95, and OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.07 to 3.75, respectively), and had more hyperpigmentation on physical examination (OR 4.7; 95% CI 1.50 to 15.06, and OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.10 to 12.16, respectively) and swelling or tenderness of the second and third metacarpophalangeal joints (OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.37 to 13.03, and OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.17 to 9.49, respectively) than control subjects. Joint stiffness was also more common among newly diagnosed C282Y homozygotes with elevated serum ferritin than among control subjects (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.38 to 5.30). However, the sex- and age-adjusted prevalences of self-reported symptoms and signs of liver disease, heart disease, diabetes and most other major clinical manifestations of hemochromatosis were similar in C282Y homozygotes and control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Some symptoms and conditions associated with hemochromatosis were more prevalent among C282Y homozygotes identified by screening than among control subjects, but prevalences of most outcomes were similar in C282Y homozygotes and controls in this primary care-based study. PMID:19018338

  11. A Screening Instrument for Identifying Elderly at Risk of Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwalek, Melanie A.; Sengstock, Mary C.

    Recently more attention has been focused on elder abuse, with laws enacted requiring reporting of this crime. Since service providers often do not recognize elder abuse, a validated screening tool for elder abuse is needed. A screening tool called the Hwalek-Sengstock Elder Abuse Screening Protocol has been developed and is currently being…

  12. Identifying novel mycobacterial stress associated genes using a random mutagenesis screen in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Joshi, Shrilaxmi V; Sridhar, Aditi; Dutta, Sayantanee; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2015-12-10

    Cell envelope associated components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) have been implicated in stress response, immune modulation and in vivo survival of the pathogen. Although many such factors have been identified, there is a large disparity between the number of genes predicted to be involved in functions linked to the envelope and those described in the literature. To identify and characterise novel stress related factors associated with the mycobacterial cell envelope, we isolated colony morphotype mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), based on the hypothesis that mutants with unusual colony morphology may have defects in the biosynthesis of cell envelope components. On testing their susceptibility to stress conditions relevant to M.tb physiology, multiple mutants were found to be sensitive to Isoniazid, Diamide and H2O2, indicative of altered permeability due to changes in cell envelope composition. Two mutants showed defects in biofilm formation implying possible roles for the target genes in antibiotic tolerance and/or virulence. These assays identified novel stress associated roles for several mycobacterial genes including sahH, tatB and aceE. Complementation analysis of selected mutants with the M. smegmatis genes and their M.tb homologues showed phenotypic restoration, validating their link to the observed phenotypes. A mutant carrying an insertion in fhaA encoding a forkhead associated domain containing protein, showed reduced survival in THP-1 macrophages, providing in vivo validation to this screen. Taken together, these results suggest that the M.tb homologues of a majority of the identified genes may play significant roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:26211627

  13. Complementary cell-based high-throughput screens identify novel modulators of the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Fribley, Andrew M; Cruz, Patricia G; Miller, Justin R; Callaghan, Michael U; Cai, Peter; Narula, Neha; Neubig, Richard R; Showalter, Hollis D; Larsen, Scott D; Kirchhoff, Paul D; Larsen, Martha J; Burr, Douglas A; Schultz, Pamela J; Jacobs, Renju R; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Ron, David; Sherman, David H; Kaufman, Randal J

    2011-09-01

    Despite advances toward understanding the prevention and treatment of many cancers, patients who suffer from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) confront a survival rate that has remained unimproved for more than 2 decades, indicating our ability to treat them pharmacologically has reached a plateau. In an ongoing effort to improve the clinical outlook for this disease, we previously reported that an essential component of the mechanism by which the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (PS-341, Velcade) induced apoptosis in OSCC required the activation of a terminal unfolded protein response (UPR). Predicated on these studies, the authors hypothesized that high-throughput screening (HTS) of large diverse chemical libraries might identify more potent or selective small-molecule activators of the apoptotic arm of the UPR to control or kill OSCC. They have developed complementary cell-based assays using stably transfected CHO-K1 cell lines that individually assess the PERK/eIF2α/CHOP (apoptotic) or the IRE1/XBP1 (adaptive) UPR subpathways. An 66 K compound collection was screened at the University of Michigan Center for Chemical Genomics that included a unique library of prefractionated natural product extracts. The mycotoxin methoxycitrinin was isolated from a natural extract and found to selectively activate the CHOP-luciferase reporter at 80 µM. A series of citrinin derivatives was isolated from these extracts, including a unique congener that has not been previously described. In an effort to identify more potent compounds, the authors examined the ability of citrinin and the structurally related mycotoxins ochratoxin A and patulin to activate the UPR. Strikingly, it was found that patulin at 2.5 to 10 µM induced a terminal UPR in a panel of OSCC cells that was characterized by an increase in CHOP, GADD34, and ATF3 gene expression and XBP1 splicing. A luminescent caspase assay and the induction of several BH3-only genes indicated that patulin could induce apoptosis

  14. A small-molecule inducer of PDX1 expression identified by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yuan; Hartland, Kate; Boskovic, Zarko; Wang, Yikai; Walpita, Deepika; Lysy, Philippe A.; Zhong, Cheng; Young, Damian W.; Kim, Young-kwon; Tolliday, Nicola J; Sokal, Etienne M.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), a member of the homedomain-containing transcription factor family, is a key transcription factor important for both pancreas development and mature beta-cell function. The ectopic overexpression of Pdx1, Neurog3, and MafA in mice reprograms acinar cells to insulin-producing cells. We developed a qPCR-based gene-expression assay to screen >60,000 compounds for expression of each of these genes in the human PANC-1 ductal carcinoma cell line. We identified BRD7552, which up-regulated PDX expression in both primary human islets and ductal cells, and induced epigenetic changes in the PDX1 promoter consistent with transcriptional activation. Prolonged compound treatment induced insulin mRNA and protein, and enhanced insulin expression induced by the three-gene combination. These results provide a proof of principle for identifying small molecules that induce expression of transcription factors to control cellular reprogramming. PMID:24290880

  15. Yeast Two-Hybrid and One-Hybrid Screenings Identify Regulators of hsp70 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Saito, Youhei; Nakagawa, Takanobu; Kakihana, Ayana; Nakamura, Yoshia; Nabika, Tomomi; Kasai, Michihiro; Takamori, Mai; Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Hatayama, Takumi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian stress protein Hsp105β, which is specifically expressed during mild heat shock and localizes to the nucleus, induces the major stress protein Hsp70. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid and one-hybrid screenings to identify the regulators of Hsp105β-mediated hsp70 gene expression. Six and two proteins were detected as Hsp105β- and hsp70 promoter-binding proteins, respectively. A luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that hsp70 promoter activation is enhanced by the transcriptional co-activator AF9 and splicing mediator SNRPE, but suppressed by the coiled-coil domain-containing protein CCDC127. Of these proteins, the knockdown of SNRPE suppressed the expression of Hsp70 irrespective of the presence of Hsp105β, indicating that SNRPE essentially functions as a transcriptional activator of hsp70 gene expression. The overexpression of HSP70 in tumor cells has been associated with cell survival and drug resistance. We here identified novel regulators of Hsp70 expression in stress signaling and also provided important insights into Hsp70-targeted anti-cancer therapy. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2109-2117, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26873636

  16. An oncogenomics-based in vivo RNAi screen identifies tumor suppressors in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zender, Lars; Xue, Wen; Zuber, Johannes; Semighini, Camile P.; Krasnitz, Alexander; Ma, Beicong; Zender, Peggy; Kubicka, Stefan; Luk, John M.; Schirmacher, Peter; McCombie, Richard W.; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James; Hannon, Gregory J.; Powers, Scott; Lowe, Scott W.

    2010-01-01

    Cancers are highly heterogeneous and contain many passenger and driver mutations. To functionally identify tumor suppressor genes relevant to human cancer, we compiled pools of short harpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the mouse orthologs of genes recurrently deleted in a series of human hepatocellular carcinomas, and tested their ability to promote tumorigenesis in a mosaic mouse model. In contrast to randomly selected shRNA pools, many deletion-specific pools accelerated hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Through further analysis, we identified and validated 13 tumor suppressor genes, 12 of which had not been linked to cancer before. One gene, XPO4, encodes a nuclear export protein whose substrate EIF5A2 is amplified in human tumors, is required for proliferation of XPO4-deficient tumor cells, and promotes hepatocellular carcinoma in mice. Our results establish the feasibility of in vivo RNAi screens and illustrate how combining cancer genomics, RNA interference, and mosaic mouse models can facilitate the functional annotation of the cancer genome. PMID:19012953

  17. High-content screening identifies kinase inhibitors that overcome venetoclax resistance in activated CLL cells.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Sina; Ylanko, Jarkko; Shi, Yonghong; Hariharan, Santosh; Oakes, Christopher C; Brauer, Patrick M; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan C; Leber, Brian; Spaner, David E; Andrews, David W

    2016-08-18

    Novel agents such as the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199) are changing treatment paradigms for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) but important problems remain. Although some patients exhibit deep and durable responses to venetoclax as a single agent, other patients harbor subpopulations of resistant leukemia cells that mediate disease recurrence. One hypothesis for the origin of resistance to venetoclax is by kinase-mediated survival signals encountered in proliferation centers that may be unique for individual patients. An in vitro microenvironment model was developed with primary CLL cells that could be incorporated into an automated high-content microscopy-based screen of kinase inhibitors (KIs) to identify agents that may improve venetoclax therapy in a personalized manner. Marked interpatient variability was noted for which KIs were effective; nevertheless, sunitinib was identified as the most common clinically available KI effective in overcoming venetoclax resistance. Examination of the underlying mechanisms indicated that venetoclax resistance may be induced by microenvironmental signals that upregulate antiapoptotic Bcl-xl, Mcl-1, and A1, which can be counteracted more efficiently by sunitinib than by ibrutinib or idelalisib. Although patient-specific drug responses are common, for many patients, combination therapy with sunitinib may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of venetoclax. PMID:27297795

  18. Screens for piwi suppressors in Drosophila identify dosage-dependent regulators of germline stem cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Smulders-Srinivasan, Tora K; Lin, Haifan

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila piwi gene is the founding member of the only known family of genes whose function in stem cell maintenance is highly conserved in both animal and plant kingdoms. piwi mutants fail to maintain germline stem cells in both male and female gonads. The identification of piwi-interacting genes is essential for understanding how stem cell divisions are regulated by piwi-mediated mechanisms. To search for such genes, we screened the Drosophila third chromosome ( approximately 36% of the euchromatic genome) for suppressor mutations of piwi2 and identified six strong and three weak piwi suppressor genes/sequences. These genes/sequences interact negatively with piwi in a dosage-sensitive manner. Two of the strong suppressors represent known genes--serendipity-delta and similar, both encoding transcription factors. These findings reveal that the genetic regulation of germline stem cell division involves dosage-sensitive mechanisms and that such mechanisms exist at the transcriptional level. In addition, we identified three other types of piwi interactors. The first type consists of deficiencies that dominantly interact with piwi2 to cause male sterility, implying that dosage-sensitive regulation also exists in the male germline. The other two types are deficiencies that cause lethality and female-specific lethality in a piwi2 mutant background, revealing the zygotic function of piwi in somatic development. PMID:14704180

  19. A FACS-Optimized Screen Identifies Regulators of Genome Stability in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Feri, Adeline; Nguyen, Marie; Maufrais, Corinne; Yansouni, Jennifer; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) plays important roles in genome dynamics, notably, during tumorigenesis. In the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, LOH contributes to the acquisition of antifungal resistance. In order to investigate the mechanisms that regulate LOH in C. albicans, we have established a novel method combining an artificial heterozygous locus harboring the blue fluorescent protein and green fluorescent protein markers and flow cytometry to detect LOH events at the single-cell level. Using this fluorescence-based method, we have confirmed that elevated temperature, treatment with methyl methanesulfonate, and inactivation of the Mec1 DNA damage checkpoint kinase triggered an increase in the frequency of LOH. Taking advantage of this system, we have searched for C. albicans genes whose overexpression triggered an increase in LOH and identified four candidates, some of which are known regulators of genome dynamics with human homologues contributing to cancer progression. Hence, the approach presented here will allow the implementation of new screens to identify genes that are important for genome stability in C. albicans and more generally in eukaryotic cells. PMID:25595446

  20. Screening and prioritisation of chemical risks from metal mining operations, identifying exposure media of concern.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jilang; Oates, Christopher J; Ihlenfeld, Christian; Plant, Jane A; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2010-04-01

    Metals have been central to the development of human civilisation from the Bronze Age to modern times, although in the past, metal mining and smelting have been the cause of serious environmental pollution with the potential to harm human health. Despite problems from artisanal mining in some developing countries, modern mining to Western standards now uses the best available mining technology combined with environmental monitoring, mitigation and remediation measures to limit emissions to the environment. This paper develops risk screening and prioritisation methods previously used for contaminated land on military and civilian sites and engineering systems for the analysis and prioritisation of chemical risks from modern metal mining operations. It uses hierarchical holographic modelling and multi-criteria decision making to analyse and prioritise the risks from potentially hazardous inorganic chemical substances released by mining operations. A case study of an active platinum group metals mine in South Africa is used to demonstrate the potential of the method. This risk-based methodology for identifying, filtering and ranking mining-related environmental and human health risks can be used to identify exposure media of greatest concern to inform risk management. It also provides a practical decision-making tool for mine acquisition and helps to communicate risk to all members of mining operation teams. PMID:19353294

  1. Cell-Based Screening Identifies Paroxetine as an Inhibitor of Diabetic Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Módis, Katalin; Oláh, Gabor; Coletta, Ciro; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a phenotypic screening in endothelial cells exposed to elevated extracellular glucose (an in vitro model of hyperglycemia) to identify compounds that prevent hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation without adversely affecting cell viability. From a focused library of >6,000 clinically used drug-like and pharmacologically active compounds, several classes of active compounds emerged, with a confirmed hit rate of <0.5%. Follow-up studies focused on paroxetine, a clinically used antidepressant compound that has not been previously implicated in the context of hyperglycemia or diabetes. Paroxetine reduced hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial ROS formation, mitochondrial protein oxidation, and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage, without interfering with mitochondrial electron transport or cellular bioenergetics. The ability of paroxetine to improve hyperglycemic endothelial cell injury was unique among serotonin reuptake blockers and can be attributed to its antioxidant effect, which primarily resides within its sesamol moiety. Paroxetine maintained the ability of vascular rings to respond to the endothelium-dependent relaxant acetylcholine, both during in vitro hyperglycemia and ex vivo, in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Thus, the current work identifies a novel pharmacological action of paroxetine as a protector of endothelial cells against hyperglycemic injury and raises the potential of repurposing of this drug for the experimental therapy of diabetic cardiovascular complications. PMID:23223176

  2. A gemcitabine sensitivity screen identifies a role for NEK9 in the replication stress response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott C.; Petrova, Aleksandra V.; Madden, Matthew Z.; Wang, Hongyan; Pan, Yunfeng; Warren, Matthew D.; Hardy, Claire W.; Liang, Dong; Liu, Elaine A.; Robinson, M. Hope; Rudra, Soumon; Wang, Jie; Ehdaivand, Shahrzad; Torres, Mylin A.; Wang, Ya; Yu, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The Replication Stress Response (RSR) is a signaling network that recognizes challenges to DNA replication and coordinates diverse DNA repair and cell-cycle checkpoint pathways. Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analogue that causes cytotoxicity by inducing DNA replication blocks. Using a synthetic lethal screen of a RNAi library of nuclear enzymes to identify genes that when silenced cause gemcitabine sensitization or resistance in human triple-negative breast cancer cells, we identified NIMA (never in mitosis gene A)-related kinase 9 (NEK9) as a key component of the RSR. NEK9 depletion in cells leads to replication stress hypersensitivity, spontaneous accumulation of DNA damage and RPA70 foci, and an impairment in recovery from replication arrest. NEK9 protein levels also increase in response to replication stress. NEK9 complexes with CHK1, and moreover, NEK9 depletion impairs CHK1 autophosphorylation and kinase activity in response to replication stress. Thus, NEK9 is a critical component of the RSR that promotes CHK1 activity, maintaining genome integrity following challenges to DNA replication. PMID:25217585

  3. High-content screening identifies kinase inhibitors that overcome venetoclax resistance in activated CLL cells

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, Sina; Ylanko, Jarkko; Shi, Yonghong; Hariharan, Santosh; Oakes, Christopher C.; Brauer, Patrick M.; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan C.; Leber, Brian; Spaner, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Novel agents such as the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199) are changing treatment paradigms for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) but important problems remain. Although some patients exhibit deep and durable responses to venetoclax as a single agent, other patients harbor subpopulations of resistant leukemia cells that mediate disease recurrence. One hypothesis for the origin of resistance to venetoclax is by kinase-mediated survival signals encountered in proliferation centers that may be unique for individual patients. An in vitro microenvironment model was developed with primary CLL cells that could be incorporated into an automated high-content microscopy-based screen of kinase inhibitors (KIs) to identify agents that may improve venetoclax therapy in a personalized manner. Marked interpatient variability was noted for which KIs were effective; nevertheless, sunitinib was identified as the most common clinically available KI effective in overcoming venetoclax resistance. Examination of the underlying mechanisms indicated that venetoclax resistance may be induced by microenvironmental signals that upregulate antiapoptotic Bcl-xl, Mcl-1, and A1, which can be counteracted more efficiently by sunitinib than by ibrutinib or idelalisib. Although patient-specific drug responses are common, for many patients, combination therapy with sunitinib may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of venetoclax. PMID:27297795

  4. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  5. A genetic screen identifies genes essential for development of myelinated axons in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Sternheim, Nitzan; Lyons, David A; Diamond, Brianne; Hawkins, Thomas A; Woods, Ian G; Bhatt, Dimple H; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Dominguez, Claudia; Arana, Naomi; Jacobs, Jennifer; Nix, Rebecca; Fetcho, Joseph R; Talbot, William S

    2006-10-01

    The myelin sheath insulates axons in the vertebrate nervous system, allowing rapid propagation of action potentials via saltatory conduction. Specialized glial cells, termed Schwann cells in the PNS and oligodendrocytes in the CNS, wrap axons to form myelin, a compacted, multilayered sheath comprising specific proteins and lipids. Disruption of myelinated axons causes human diseases, including multiple sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth peripheral neuropathies. Despite the progress in identifying human disease genes and other mutations disrupting glial development and myelination, many important unanswered questions remain about the mechanisms that coordinate the development of myelinated axons. To address these questions, we began a genetic dissection of myelination in zebrafish. Here we report a genetic screen that identified 13 mutations, which define 10 genes, disrupting the development of myelinated axons. We present the initial characterization of seven of these mutations, defining six different genes, along with additional characterization of mutations that we have described previously. The different mutations affect the PNS, the CNS, or both, and phenotypic analyses indicate that the genes affect a wide range of steps in glial development, from fate specification through terminal differentiation. The analysis of these mutations will advance our understanding of myelination, and the mutants will serve as models of human diseases of myelin. PMID:16875686

  6. A Transposon Screen Identifies Genetic Determinants of Vibrio cholerae Resistance to High-Molecular-Weight Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Tobias; Delgado, Fernanda; Umans, Benjamin D; Gerding, Matthew A; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-08-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are notoriously resistant to a variety of high-molecular-weight antibiotics due to the limited permeability of their outer membrane (OM). The basis of OM barrier function and the genetic factors required for its maintenance remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed transposon insertion sequencing to identify genes required for Vibrio cholerae resistance to vancomycin and bacitracin, antibiotics that are thought to be too large to efficiently penetrate the OM. The screen yielded several genes whose protein products are predicted to participate in processes important for OM barrier functions and for biofilm formation. In addition, we identified a novel factor, designated vigA (for vancomycin inhibits growth), that has not previously been characterized or linked to outer membrane function. The vigA open reading frame (ORF) codes for an inner membrane protein, and in its absence, cells became highly sensitive to glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin and ramoplanin) and bacitracin but not to other large antibiotics or detergents. In contrast to wild-type (WT) cells, the vigA mutant was stained with fluorescent vancomycin. These observations suggest that VigA specifically prevents the periplasmic accumulation of certain large antibiotics without exerting a general role in the maintenance of OM integrity. We also observed marked interspecies variability in the susceptibilities of Gram-negative pathogens to glycopeptides and bacitracin. Collectively, our findings suggest that the OM barrier is not absolute but rather depends on specific OM-antibiotic interactions. PMID:27216069

  7. Drug Repurposing Screen Identifies Foxo1-Dependent Angiopoietin-2 Regulation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chandra C.; Thamm, Kristina; Berghelli, Anthony V.; Schrimpf, Claudia; Maski, Manish R.; Abid, Tanaz; Milam, Katelyn E.; Rajakumar, Augustine; Santel, Ansgar; Kielstein, Jan T.; Ahmed, Asif; Thickett, David; Wang, Keqin; Chase, Maureen; Donnino, Michael W.; Aird, William C.; Haller, Hermann; David, Sascha; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The recent withdrawal of a targeted sepsis therapy has diminished pharmaceutical enthusiasm for developing novel drugs for the treatment of sepsis. Angiopoietin-2 is an endothelial-derived protein that potentiates vascular inflammation and leak-age and may be involved in sepsis pathogenesis. We screened approved compounds for putative inhibitors of angiopoietin-2 production and investigated underlying molecular mechanisms. Design Laboratory and animal research plus prospective placebo- controlled randomized controlled trial (NCT00529139) and retrospective analysis (NCT00676897). Setting Research laboratories of Hannover Medical School and Harvard Medical School. Patients Septic patients/C57Bl/6 mice and human endothelial cells. Interventions Food and Drug Administration–approved library screening. Measurements and Main Results In a cell-based screen of more than 650 Food and Drug Administration–approved compounds, we identified multiple members of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor drug class (referred to as statins) that suppressed angiopoietin-2. Simvastatin inhibited 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase, which in turn activated PI3K-kinase. Downstream of this signaling, PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription factor Foxo1 at key amino acids inhibited its ability to shuttle to the nucleus and bind cis-elements in the angiopoietin-2 promoter. In septic mice, transient inhibition of angiopoietin-2 expression by liposomal siRNA in vivo improved absolute survival by 50%. Simvastatin had a similar effect, but the combination of angiopoietin-2 siRNA and simvastatin showed no additive benefit. To verify the link between statins and angiopoietin-2 in humans, we performed a pilot matched case-control study and a small randomized placebo-controlled trial demonstrating beneficial effects on angiopoietin-2. Conclusions 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors may operate through a novel Foxo1-angiopoietin-2

  8. RNAi screen identifies Brd4 as a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Rappaport, Amy R.; Herrmann, Harald; Sison, Edward A.; Magoon, Daniel; Qi, Jun; Blatt, Katharina; Wunderlich, Mark; Taylor, Meredith J.; Johns, Christopher; Chicas, Agustin; Mulloy, James C.; Kogan, Scott C.; Brown, Patrick; Valent, Peter; Bradner, James E.; Lowe, Scott W.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic pathways can regulate gene expression by controlling and interpreting chromatin modifications. Cancer cells are characterized by altered epigenetic landscapes, and commonly exploit the chromatin regulatory machinery to enforce oncogenic gene expression programs1. Although chromatin alterations are, in principle, reversible and often amenable to drug intervention, the promise of targeting such pathways therapeutically has been limited by an incomplete understanding of cancer-specific dependencies on epigenetic regulators. Here we describe a non-biased approach to probe epigenetic vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), an aggressive haematopoietic malignancy that is often associated with aberrant chromatin states2. By screening a custom library of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting known chromatin regulators in a genetically defined AML mouse model, we identify the protein bromodomain-containing 4 (Brd4) as being critically required for disease maintenance. Suppression of Brd4 using shRNAs or the small-molecule inhibitor JQ1 led to robust antileukaemic effects in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by terminal myeloid differentiation and elimination of leukaemia stem cells. Similar sensitivities were observed in a variety of human AML cell lines and primary patient samples, revealing that JQ1 has broad activity in diverse AML subtypes. The effects of Brd4 suppression are, at least in part, due to its role in sustaining Myc expression to promote aberrant self-renewal, which implicates JQ1 as a pharmacological means to suppress MYC in cancer. Our results establish small-molecule inhibition of Brd4 as a promising therapeutic strategy in AML and, potentially, other cancers, and highlight the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) screening for revealing epigenetic vulnerabilities that can be exploited for direct pharmacological intervention. PMID:21814200

  9. An in vivo RNA interference screen identifies gene networks controlling Drosophila melanogaster blood cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In metazoans, the hematopoietic system plays a key role both in normal development and in defense of the organism. In Drosophila, the cellular immune response involves three types of blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells and lamellocytes. This last cell type is barely present in healthy larvae, but its production is strongly induced upon wasp parasitization or in mutant contexts affecting larval blood cell homeostasis. Notably, several zygotic mutations leading to melanotic mass (or "tumor") formation in larvae have been associated to the deregulated differentiation of lamellocytes. To gain further insights into the gene regulatory network and the mechanisms controlling larval blood cell homeostasis, we conducted a tissue-specific loss of function screen using hemocyte-specific Gal4 drivers and UAS-dsRNA transgenic lines. Results By targeting around 10% of the Drosophila genes, this in vivo RNA interference screen allowed us to recover 59 melanotic tumor suppressor genes. In line with previous studies, we show that melanotic tumor formation is associated with the precocious differentiation of stem-cell like blood progenitors in the larval hematopoietic organ (the lymph gland) and the spurious differentiation of lamellocytes. We also find that melanotic tumor formation can be elicited by defects either in the fat body, the embryo-derived hemocytes or the lymph gland. In addition, we provide a definitive confirmation that lymph gland is not the only source of lamellocytes as embryo-derived plasmatocytes can differentiate into lamellocytes either upon wasp infection or upon loss of function of the Friend of GATA cofactor U-shaped. Conclusions In this study, we identify 55 genes whose function had not been linked to blood cell development or function before in Drosophila. Moreover our analyses reveal an unanticipated plasticity of embryo-derived plasmatocytes, thereby shedding new light on blood cell lineage relationship, and pinpoint the Friend of GATA

  10. hERG Channel Blocking Ipecac Alkaloids Identified by Combined In Silico - In Vitro Screening.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Jadel M; Mair, Christina E; Oettl, Sarah K; Saxena, Priyanka; Scheel, Olaf; Schuster, Daniela; Hering, Steffen; Rollinger, Judith M

    2016-07-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel blocking is associated with QT interval prolongation and increased risk of potentially fatal arrhythmias. As natural products keep increasing in popularity, there is an urgent need for studies assessing human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel-related cardiotoxic risks. We selected 49 plant species based on the results of a pharmacophore-based virtual screening campaign, in parallel with a literature data survey concerning highly consumed herbal medicines with reported cardiac liabilities. Lead-like enhanced extracts were prepared, an initial in vitro screening was performed at 100 µg/mL by voltage clamp on Xenopus oocytes, and five human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel blocking extracts were identified. In accordance to the six virtually predicted alkaloids, the root extract of Carapichea ipecacuanha inhibited human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel currents by 32.5 %. A phytochemical workflow resulted in the isolation and identification of five out of the six virtually predicted alkaloids. All isolates blocked human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel currents to different extents. The major ipecac constituents emetine (1) and cephaeline (2) showed IC50 values of 21.4 and 5.3 µM, respectively, measured by whole-cell patch clamp in HEK293 cells. This is the first report on human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel blockers from C. ipecacuanha. Its roots and rhizomes are used to produce different pharmacopeial ipecac preparations that are mainly used as emetics for poisoning treatment. Our findings raise further questions regarding the safety and over-the-counter appropriateness of these herbal products. PMID:27145237

  11. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi; Simon, Nathan; Pasetto, Matteo; Keller, Jonathan; Huang, Manjie; Angelus, Evan; Pastan, Ira; Ferrer, Marc; FitzGerald, David J.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE), potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as ‘enhancers’ and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided. PMID:27556570

  12. A study looking at the effectiveness of developmental screening in identifying learning disabilities in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, O; Nualláin, S O

    2001-05-01

    This is a retrospective study of children under six years of age referred to the Brothers of Charity Early Intervention Services in County Galway, a service that caters for children under 6 years with learning disabilities. The aim in doing this study was to assess the value of routine developmental screening in identifying children with learning difficulties. This study also investigates the patterns and sources of referral to the remedial services provided by the Brothers of Charity and highlights possible avoidable delays in referral. The results showed that many children were referred for remedial services late. The reasons for late referral included late identification of some children with problems, insufficient co-ordination of community-based services and a lack of awareness of the importance of early intervention in some cases. As some communication disorders such as autism, autistic spectrum disorders and specific language delay may not express themselves until the later part of the second year of life, the 18-24 month developmental assessment is of vital importance. However identification of these disorders can present difficulties and may call for additional training for professionals involved in the developmental screening of children in that age group. The interval between initial identification and referral for remedial care in many cases was more than twelve months. We propose that, in order to minimize this time, children requiring a more in-depth assessment should be assessed by a community-based multidisciplinary team, enabling integrated assessment by the different disciplines and thus speedier referral to remedial services. PMID:11474856

  13. Selected Approaches for Rational Drug Design and High Throughput Screening to Identify Anti-Cancer Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hedvat, Michael; Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K.; Kim, Keetae; Dasgupta, Santanu; Thomas, Shibu; Hu, Bin; Zhu, Shan; Dash, Rupesh; Quinn, Bridget A.; Oyesanya, Regina A.; Kegelman, Timothy P.; Sokhi, Upneet K.; Sarkar, Siddik; Erdogan, Eda; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Bhoopathi, Praveen; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Pomper, Martin G.; Wei, Jun; Wu, Bainan; Stebbins, John L.; Diaz, Paul W.; Reed, John C.; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Structure-based modeling combined with rational drug design, and high throughput screening approaches offer significant potential for identifying and developing lead compounds with therapeutic potential. The present review focuses on these two approaches using explicit examples based on specific derivatives of Gossypol generated through rational design and applications of a cancer-specific-promoter derived from Progression Elevated Gene-3. The Gossypol derivative Sabutoclax (BI-97C1) displays potent anti-tumor activity against a diverse spectrum of human tumors. The model of the docked structure of Gossypol bound to Bcl-XL provided a virtual structure-activity-relationship where appropriate modifications were predicted on a rational basis. These structure-based studies led to the isolation of Sabutoclax, an optically pure isomer of Apogossypol displaying superior efficacy and reduced toxicity. These studies illustrate the power of combining structure-based modeling with rational design to predict appropriate derivatives of lead compounds to be empirically tested and evaluated for bioactivity. Another approach to cancer drug discovery utilizes a cancer-specific promoter as readouts of the transformed state. The promoter region of Progression Elevated Gene-3 is such a promoter with cancer-specific activity. The specificity of this promoter has been exploited as a means of constructing cancer terminator viruses that selectively kill cancer cells and as a systemic imaging modality that specifically visualizes in vivo cancer growth with no background from normal tissues. Screening of small molecule inhibitors that suppress the Progression Elevated Gene-3-promoter may provide relevant lead compounds for cancer therapy that can be combined with further structure-based approaches leading to the development of novel compounds for cancer therapy. PMID:22931411

  14. An Essential Signal Peptide Peptidase Identified in an RNAi Screen of Serine Peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Catherine X.; Brown, Elaine; Hamilton, Alana; Van der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2015-01-01

    The serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei have been viewed as potential drug targets. In particular, the S9 prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily is thought to be a good avenue for drug discovery. This is based on the finding that some S9 peptidases are secreted and active in the mammalian bloodstream, and that they are a class of enzyme against which drugs have successfully been developed. We collated a list of all serine peptidases in T. brucei, identifying 20 serine peptidase genes, of which nine are S9 peptidases. We screened all 20 serine peptidases by RNAi to determine which, if any, are essential for bloodstream form T. brucei survival. All S9 serine peptidases were dispensable for parasite survival in vitro, even when pairs of similar genes, coding for oligopeptidase B or prolyl oligopeptidase, were targeted simultaneously. We also found no effect on parasite survival in an animal host when the S9 peptidases oligopeptidase B, prolyl oligopeptidase or dipeptidyl peptidase 8 were targeted. The only serine peptidase to emerge from the RNAi screen as essential was a putative type-I signal peptide peptidase (SPP1). This gene was essential for parasite survival both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defect conferred by RNAi depletion of SPP1 was rescued by expression of a functional peptidase from an RNAi resistant SPP1 gene. However, expression of catalytically inactive SPP1 was unable to rescue cells from the SPP1 depleted phenotype, demonstrating that SPP1 serine peptidase activity is necessary for T. brucei survival. PMID:25816352

  15. RNA Interference Screen to Identify Kinases That Suppress Rescue of ΔF508-CFTR*

    PubMed Central

    Trzcińska-Daneluti, Agata M.; Chen, Anthony; Nguyen, Leo; Murchie, Ryan; Jiang, Chong; Moffat, Jason; Pelletier, Lawrence; Rotin, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). ΔF508-CFTR, the most common disease-causing CF mutant, exhibits folding and trafficking defects and is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is targeted for proteasomal degradation. To identify signaling pathways involved in ΔF508-CFTR rescue, we screened a library of endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs) that target ∼750 different kinases and associated signaling proteins. We identified 20 novel suppressors of ΔF508-CFTR maturation, including the FGFR1. These were subsequently validated by measuring channel activity by the YFP halide-sensitive assay following shRNA-mediated knockdown, immunoblotting for the mature (band C) ΔF508-CFTR and measuring the amount of surface ΔF508-CFTR by ELISA. The role of FGFR signaling on ΔF508-CFTR trafficking was further elucidated by knocking down FGFRs and their downstream signaling proteins: Erk1/2, Akt, PLCγ-1, and FRS2. Interestingly, inhibition of FGFR1 with SU5402 administered to intestinal organoids (mini-guts) generated from the ileum of ΔF508-CFTR homozygous mice resulted in a robust ΔF508-CFTR rescue. Moreover, combination of SU5402 and VX-809 treatments in cells led to an additive enhancement of ΔF508-CFTR rescue, suggesting these compounds operate by different mechanisms. Chaperone array analysis on human bronchial epithelial cells harvested from ΔF508/ΔF508-CFTR transplant patients treated with SU5402 identified altered expression of several chaperones, an effect validated by their overexpression or knockdown experiments. We propose that FGFR signaling regulates specific chaperones that control ΔF508-CFTR maturation, and suggest that FGFRs may serve as important targets for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of CF. PMID:25825526

  16. RNAi Screen Identifies Novel Regulators of RNP Granules in the Caenorhabditis elegans Germ Line

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Megan P.; Hollis, Angela; Severance, Ashley L.; Karrick, Megan L.; Schisa, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Complexes of RNA and RNA binding proteins form large-scale supramolecular structures under many cellular contexts. In Caenorhabditis elegans, small germ granules are present in the germ line that share characteristics with liquid droplets that undergo phase transitions. In meiotically-arrested oocytes of middle-aged hermaphrodites, the germ granules appear to aggregate or condense into large assemblies of RNA-binding proteins and maternal mRNAs. Prior characterization of the assembly of large-scale RNP structures via candidate approaches has identified a small number of regulators of phase transitions in the C. elegans germ line; however, the assembly, function, and regulation of these large RNP assemblies remain incompletely understood. To identify genes that promote remodeling and assembly of large RNP granules in meiotically-arrested oocytes, we performed a targeted, functional RNAi screen and identified over 300 genes that regulate the assembly of the RNA-binding protein MEX-3 into large granules. Among the most common GO classes are several categories related to RNA biology, as well as novel categories such as cell cortex, ER, and chromosome segregation. We found that arrested oocytes that fail to localize MEX-3 into cortical granules display reduced oocyte quality, consistent with the idea that the larger RNP assemblies promote oocyte quality when fertilization is delayed. Interestingly, a relatively small number of genes overlap with the regulators of germ granule assembly during normal development, or with the regulators of solid RNP granules in cgh-1 oocytes, suggesting fundamental differences in the regulation of RNP granule phase transitions during meiotic arrest. PMID:27317775

  17. RNAi Screen Identifies Novel Regulators of RNP Granules in the Caenorhabditis elegans Germ Line.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan P; Hollis, Angela; Severance, Ashley L; Karrick, Megan L; Schisa, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Complexes of RNA and RNA binding proteins form large-scale supramolecular structures under many cellular contexts. In Caenorhabditis elegans, small germ granules are present in the germ line that share characteristics with liquid droplets that undergo phase transitions. In meiotically-arrested oocytes of middle-aged hermaphrodites, the germ granules appear to aggregate or condense into large assemblies of RNA-binding proteins and maternal mRNAs. Prior characterization of the assembly of large-scale RNP structures via candidate approaches has identified a small number of regulators of phase transitions in the C. elegans germ line; however, the assembly, function, and regulation of these large RNP assemblies remain incompletely understood. To identify genes that promote remodeling and assembly of large RNP granules in meiotically-arrested oocytes, we performed a targeted, functional RNAi screen and identified over 300 genes that regulate the assembly of the RNA-binding protein MEX-3 into large granules. Among the most common GO classes are several categories related to RNA biology, as well as novel categories such as cell cortex, ER, and chromosome segregation. We found that arrested oocytes that fail to localize MEX-3 into cortical granules display reduced oocyte quality, consistent with the idea that the larger RNP assemblies promote oocyte quality when fertilization is delayed. Interestingly, a relatively small number of genes overlap with the regulators of germ granule assembly during normal development, or with the regulators of solid RNP granules in cgh-1 oocytes, suggesting fundamental differences in the regulation of RNP granule phase transitions during meiotic arrest. PMID:27317775

  18. How to Identify Students for School-based Depression Intervention: Can School Record Review Be Substituted for Universal Depression Screening?

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Elena S.; Stoep, Ann Vander; Herting, Jerald R.; Grupp, Katherine; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Problem Early identification and intervention is critical for reducing the adverse effects of depression on academic and occupational performance. Cost-effective approaches are needed for identifying adolescents at high depression risk. This study evaluated the utility of school record review versus universal school-based depression screening for determining eligibility for an indicated depression intervention program implemented in the middle school setting. Methods Algorithms derived from grades, attendance, suspensions, and basic demographic information were evaluated with regard to their ability to predict students’ depression screening scores. Findings The school information-based algorithms proved poor proxies for individual students’ depression screening results. However, school records showed promise for identifying low, medium, and high yield subgroups on the basis of which efficient screening targeting decisions could be made. Conclusions Study results will help to guide school nurses who coordinate indicated depression intervention programs in school settings as they evaluate options of approaches for determining which students are eligible for participation. PMID:23351107

  19. Use of large-scale expression cloning screens in the Xenopus laevis tadpole to identify gene function.

    PubMed

    Grammer, T C; Liu, K J; Mariani, F V; Harland, R M

    2000-12-15

    We have conducted an expression cloning screen of approximately 50, 000 cDNAs from a tadpole stage Xenopus laevis cDNA library to functionally identify genes affecting a wide range of cellular and developmental processes. Fifty-seven cDNAs were isolated for their ability to alter gross tadpole morphology or the expression patterns of tissue-specific markers. Thirty-seven of the cDNAs have not been previously described for Xenopus, and 15 of these show little or no similarity to sequences in the NCBI database. The screen and the identified genes are presented in this paper to demonstrate the power, ease, speed, and flexibility of expression cloning in the X. laevis embryo. Future screens such as this one can be done on a larger scale and will complement the sequence-based screens and genome-sequencing projects which are producing a large body of novel genes without ascribed functions. PMID:11112324

  20. A Comparison of Teacher Nomination and Screening to Identify Behavioral and Emotional Risk within a Sample of Underrepresented Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Erin; Doane, Kymberly; Eklund, Katie; Dever, Bridget V.

    2013-01-01

    Early identification of behavioral and emotional risk has been identified as one strategy to help decrease rates of childhood behavioral and emotional problems. This study compares two methods for early identification (teacher nomination and universal screening) to determine how each strategy may differentially identify at-risk students. A sample…

  1. A Haploid Genetic Screen Identifies Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Supporting Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riblett, Amber M.; Blomen, Vincent A.; Jae, Lucas T.; Altamura, Louis A.; Doms, Robert W.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent insect-borne epizootics throughout the African continent, and infection of humans can lead to a lethal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. Deep mutagenesis of haploid human cells was used to identify host factors required for RVFV infection. This screen identified a suite of enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biogenesis and transport, including several components of the cis-oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex, one of the central components of Golgi complex trafficking. In addition, disruption of PTAR1 led to RVFV resistance as well as reduced heparan sulfate surface levels, consistent with recent observations that PTAR1-deficient cells exhibit altered Golgi complex morphology and glycosylation defects. A variety of biochemical and genetic approaches were utilized to show that both pathogenic and attenuated RVFV strains require GAGs for efficient infection on some, but not all, cell types, with the block to infection being at the level of virion attachment. Examination of other members of the Bunyaviridae family for GAG-dependent infection suggested that the interaction with GAGs is not universal among bunyaviruses, indicating that these viruses, as well as RVFV on certain cell types, employ additional unidentified virion attachment factors and/or receptors. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging pathogen that can cause severe disease in humans and animals. Epizootics among livestock populations lead to high mortality rates and can be economically devastating. Human epidemics of Rift Valley fever, often initiated by contact with infected animals, are characterized by a febrile disease that sometimes leads to encephalitis or hemorrhagic fever. The global burden of the pathogen is increasing because it has recently disseminated beyond Africa, which is of particular concern because the virus can be transmitted by widely distributed mosquito species. There are no FDA-licensed vaccines or antiviral

  2. ED-based screening programs for hepatitis C (HCV) highlight significant opportunity to identify patients, prevent downstream costs/complications.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest there is a huge opportunity for EDs to identify patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and link them into care before downstream complications lead to higher medical costs and adverse outcomes. Early results from a pilot study at the University of Alabama Medical Center in Birmingham show that at least 12% of the targeted baby boomer population being screened for HCV in the ED is testing positive for HCV, with confirmatory tests showing that about 9% of the screened population is infected with the disease. Both the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and the US Preventive Services Task Force recommend one-time HCV screening for patients who were born between 1945 and 1965. Public health experts say 75% of HCV infections occur in patients born during the baby boomer years, and that roughly half of them are unaware of their HCV status. Researchers at UAB report that so many patients are testing positive for HCV that demand for care can quickly overwhelm the health system if new primary care/specialty resources are not identified. Administrators of ED-based HCV screening programs in both Birmingham and Houston note that EDs with existing screening programs for HIV should have the easiest time implementing HCV screening. They also stress that patients are more accepting of HCV screening, and that the counseling process is easier. PMID:24432549

  3. Comparative Genome-Wide Screening Identifies a Conserved Doxorubicin Repair Network That Is Diploid Specific in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Westmoreland, Tammy J.; Wickramasekara, Sajith M.; Guo, Andrew Y.; Selim, Alice L.; Winsor, Tiffany S.; Greenleaf, Arno L.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Olson, John A.; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Bennett, Craig B.

    2009-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOX) induces DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage. In order to identify conserved genes that mediate DOX resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid deletion collection and identified 376 deletion strains in which exposure to DOX was lethal or severely reduced growth fitness. This diploid screen identified 5-fold more DOX resistance genes than a comparable screen using the isogenic haploid derivative. Since DSB damage is repaired primarily by homologous recombination in yeast, and haploid cells lack an available DNA homolog in G1 and early S phase, this suggests that our diploid screen may have detected the loss of repair functions in G1 or early S phase prior to complete DNA replication. To test this, we compared the relative DOX sensitivity of 30 diploid deletion mutants identified under our screening conditions to their isogenic haploid counterpart, most of which (n = 26) were not detected in the haploid screen. For six mutants (bem1Δ, ctf4Δ, ctk1Δ, hfi1Δ,nup133Δ, tho2Δ) DOX-induced lethality was absent or greatly reduced in the haploid as compared to the isogenic diploid derivative. Moreover, unlike WT, all six diploid mutants displayed severe G1/S phase cell cycle progression defects when exposed to DOX and some were significantly enhanced (ctk1Δ and hfi1Δ) or deficient (tho2Δ) for recombination. Using these and other “THO2-like” hypo-recombinogenic, diploid-specific DOX sensitive mutants (mft1Δ, thp1Δ, thp2Δ) we utilized known genetic/proteomic interactions to construct an interactive functional genomic network which predicted additional DOX resistance genes not detected in the primary screen. Most (76%) of the DOX resistance genes detected in this diploid yeast screen are evolutionarily conserved suggesting the human orthologs are candidates for mediating DOX resistance by impacting on checkpoint and recombination functions in G1 and/or early S phases. PMID:19503795

  4. An RNA Interference Phenotypic Screen Identifies a Role for FGF Signals in Colon Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Leushacke, Marc; Spörle, Ralf; Bernemann, Christof; Brouwer-Lehmitz, Antje; Fritzmann, Johannes; Theis, Mirko; Buchholz, Frank; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Morkel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    In tumor cells, stepwise oncogenic deregulation of signaling cascades induces alterations of cellular morphology and promotes the acquisition of malignant traits. Here, we identified a set of 21 genes, including FGF9, as determinants of tumor cell morphology by an RNA interference phenotypic screen in SW480 colon cancer cells. Using a panel of small molecular inhibitors, we subsequently established phenotypic effects, downstream signaling cascades, and associated gene expression signatures of FGF receptor signals. We found that inhibition of FGF signals induces epithelial cell adhesion and loss of motility in colon cancer cells. These effects are mediated via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rho GTPase cascades. In agreement with these findings, inhibition of the MEK1/2 or JNK cascades, but not of the PI3K-AKT signaling axis also induced epithelial cell morphology. Finally, we found that expression of FGF9 was strong in a subset of advanced colon cancers, and overexpression negatively correlated with patients' survival. Our functional and expression analyses suggest that FGF receptor signals can contribute to colon cancer progression. PMID:21853123

  5. Chemical Screening Identifies EUrd as a Novel Inhibitor Against Temozolomide-Resistant Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yoshihiro; Ohtsu, Naoki; Echizenya, Smile; Otsuguro, Satoko; Ogura, Ryosuke; Natsumeda, Manabu; Isogawa, Mizuho; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Sakaitani, Masahiro; Matsuda, Akira; Maenaka, Katsumi; Fujii, Yukihiko; Kondo, Toru

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), one of the most malignant human cancers, frequently recurs despite multimodal treatment with surgery and chemo/radiotherapies. GBM-initiating cells (GICs) are the likely cell-of-origin in recurrences, as they proliferate indefinitely, form tumors in vivo, and are resistant to chemo/radiotherapies. It is therefore crucial to find chemicals that specifically kill GICs. We established temozolomide (the standard medicine for GBM)-resistant GICs (GICRs) and used the cells for chemical screening. Here, we identified 1-(3-C-ethynyl-β-d-ribopentofuranosyl) uracil (EUrd) as a selective drug for targeting GICRs. EUrd induced the death in GICRs more effectively than their parental GICs, while it was less toxic to normal neural stem cells. We demonstrate that the cytotoxic effect of EUrd on GICRs partly depended on the increased expression of uridine-cytidine kinase-like 1 (UCKL1) and the decreased one of 5'-nucleotidase cytosolic III (NT5C3), which regulate uridine-monophosphate synthesis positively and negatively respectively. Together, these findings suggest that EUrd can be used as a new therapeutic drug for GBM with the expression of surrogate markers UCKL1 and NT5C3. Stem Cells 2016;34:2016-2025. PMID:27090194

  6. Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Novel Host Proteins Required for Alphavirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen M.; Kielian, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ), a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:24367265

  7. Identifying genes of agronomic importance in maize by screening microsatellites for evidence of selection during domestication

    PubMed Central

    Vigouroux, Y.; McMullen, M.; Hittinger, C. T.; Houchins, K.; Schulz, L.; Kresovich, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Doebley, J.

    2002-01-01

    Crop species experienced strong selective pressure directed at genes controlling traits of agronomic importance during their domestication and subsequent episodes of selective breeding. Consequently, these genes are expected to exhibit the signature of selection. We screened 501 maize genes for the signature of selection using microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs). We applied the Ewens–Watterson test, which can reveal deviations from a neutral-equilibrium model, as well as two nonequilibrium tests that incorporate the domestication bottleneck. We investigated two classes of SSRs: those known to be polymorphic in maize (Class I) and those previously classified as monomorphic in maize (Class II). Fifteen SSRs exhibited some evidence for selection in maize and 10 showed evidence under stringent criteria. The genes containing nonneutral SSRs are candidates for agronomically important genes. Because demographic factors can bias our tests, further independent tests of these candidates are necessary. We applied such an additional test to one candidate, which encodes a MADS box transcriptional regulator, and confirmed that this gene experienced a selective sweep during maize domestication. Genomic scans for the signature of selection offer a means of identifying new genes of agronomic importance even when gene function and the phenotype of interest are unknown. PMID:12105270

  8. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Chī, Xi Olì; D Ng, Lián; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Jozwick, Lucas; Clester, Jeremiah C; Cooper, Christopher L; Courier, Duane; Langan, David P; Underwood, Knashka; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Sun, Mei G; Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shu Qìng; Burk, Robin; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kota, Krishna; Kuhn, Jens H; Bavari, Sina

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2) expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1-PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling. PMID:27031835

  9. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Chī, Xiǎolì; Dǒng, Lián; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Jozwick, Lucas; Clester, Jeremiah C.; Cooper, Christopher L.; Courier, Duane; Langan, David P.; Underwood, Knashka; Kuehl, Kathleen A.; Sun, Mei G.; Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shuǐqìng; Burk, Robin; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kota, Krishna; Kuhn, Jens H.; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2) expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1–PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling. PMID:27031835

  10. A chemical screen to identify inducers of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Rauthan, Manish; Pilon, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that inhibition of the mevalonate pathway in C. elegans causes inhibition of protein prenylation, developmental arrest and lethality. We also showed that constitutive activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, UPR(mt), is an effective way for C. elegans to become resistant to the negative effects of mevalonate pathway inhibition. This was an important finding since statins, a drug class prescribed to lower cholesterol levels in patients, act by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway, and it is therefore possible that some of their undesirable side effects could be alleviated by activating the UPR(mt). Here, we screened a chemical library and identified 4 compounds that specifically activated the UPR(mt). One of these compounds, methacycline hydrochloride (a tetracycline antibiotic) also protected C. elegans and mammalian cells from statin toxicity. Methacycline hydrochloride and ethidium bromide, a known UPR(mt) activator, were also tested in mice: only ethidium bromide significantly activate the UPR(mt) in skeletal muscles. PMID:27123370

  11. A Serial shRNA Screen for Roadblocks to Reprogramming Identifies the Protein Modifier SUMO2.

    PubMed

    Borkent, Marti; Bennett, Brian D; Lackford, Brad; Bar-Nur, Ori; Brumbaugh, Justin; Wang, Li; Du, Ying; Fargo, David C; Apostolou, Effie; Cheloufi, Sihem; Maherali, Nimet; Elledge, Stephen J; Hu, Guang; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2016-05-10

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated cells following forced expression of OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, and C-MYC (OKSM) is slow and inefficient, suggesting that transcription factors have to overcome somatic barriers that resist cell fate change. Here, we performed an unbiased serial shRNA enrichment screen to identify potent repressors of somatic cell reprogramming into iPSCs. This effort uncovered the protein modifier SUMO2 as one of the strongest roadblocks to iPSC formation. Depletion of SUMO2 both enhances and accelerates reprogramming, yielding transgene-independent, chimera-competent iPSCs after as little as 38 hr of OKSM expression. We further show that the SUMO2 pathway acts independently of exogenous C-MYC expression and in parallel with small-molecule enhancers of reprogramming. Importantly, suppression of SUMO2 also promotes the generation of human iPSCs. Together, our results reveal sumoylation as a crucial post-transcriptional mechanism that resists the acquisition of pluripotency from fibroblasts using defined factors. PMID:26947976

  12. High-throughput ectopic expression screen for tamoxifen resistance identifies an atypical kinase that blocks autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Malerva, Laura; Park, Jaehong; Zou, Lihua; Hu, Yanhui; Moradpour, Zahra; Pearlberg, Joseph; Sawyer, Jacqueline; Stevens, Hallam; Harlow, Ed; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to tamoxifen in breast cancer patients is a serious therapeutic problem and major efforts are underway to understand underlying mechanisms. Resistance can be either intrinsic or acquired. We derived a series of subcloned MCF7 cell lines that were either highly sensitive or naturally resistant to tamoxifen and studied the factors that lead to drug resistance. Gene-expression studies revealed a signature of 67 genes that differentially respond to tamoxifen in sensitive vs. resistant subclones, which also predicts disease-free survival in tamoxifen-treated patients. High-throughput cell-based screens, in which >500 human kinases were independently ectopically expressed, identified 31 kinases that conferred drug resistance on sensitive cells. One of these, HSPB8, was also in the expression signature and, by itself, predicted poor clinical outcome in one cohort of patients. Further studies revealed that HSPB8 protected MCF7 cells from tamoxifen and blocked autophagy. Moreover, silencing HSBP8 induced autophagy and caused cell death. Tamoxifen itself induced autophagy in sensitive cells but not in resistant ones, and tamoxifen-resistant cells were sensitive to the induction of autophagy by other drugs. These results may point to an important role for autophagy in the sensitivity to tamoxifen. PMID:21233418

  13. Genome-wide gain-of-function screen identifies novel regulators of pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Abujarour, Ramzey; Efe, Jem; Ding, Sheng

    2010-09-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are characterized by the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into all the cell types of the body. To identify novel regulators of pluripotency, we screened cDNA libraries (>30,000 clones) in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells for factors that modulate the expression of a luciferase reporter driven by the promoter of the pluripotency master regulator Nanog. Ninety confirmed hits activated the reporter and 14 confirmed hits inhibited the reporter by more than two-fold. The identified hits were evaluated by gain- and loss-of-functions approaches. The reporter-activating hits Timp2, Hig2, and Mki67ip promoted embryonic stem (ES) cell self-renewal when episomally overexpressed in ES cells, whereas the reporter-inhibiting hits PU.1/Spi1, Prkaca, and Jun induced differentiation of ES cells. Conversely, the knockdown of the activating hits Timp2, Mki67ip, Esrrg, and Dusp7 in ES cells induced differentiation, whereas the knockdown of the reporter-inhibiting hit PU.1/Spi1 led to inhibition of differentiation. One of the novel hits, the RNA-binding protein Mki67ip was further characterized, and found to be overexpressed in ES cells and in early development and downregulated during differentiation. The knockdown of Mki67ip led to the differentiation of ES cells, decreased growth rate, reduction in pluripotency markers, and induction of lineage-specific markers. In addition, colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Mki67ip promotes ES cell self-renewal via a mechanism involving nucleophosmin, a multifunctional nucleolar protein upregulated in stem cells and cancer. PMID:20629179

  14. Ectopic Expression Screen Identifies Genes Affecting Drosophila Mesoderm Development Including the HSPG Trol

    PubMed Central

    Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2014-01-01

    Gastrulation of the embryo involves coordinate cell movements likely supported by multiple signaling pathways, adhesion molecules, and extracellular matrix components. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) have a major role in Drosophila melanogaster mesoderm migration; however, few other inputs are known and the mechanism supporting cell movement is unclear. To provide insight, we performed an ectopic expression screen to identify secreted or membrane-associated molecules that act to support mesoderm migration. Twenty-four UAS insertions were identified that cause lethality when expressed in either the mesoderm (Twi-Gal4) or the ectoderm (69B-Gal4). The list was narrowed to a subset of 10 genes that were shown to exhibit loss-of-function mutant phenotypes specifically affecting mesoderm migration. These include the FGF ligand Pyramus, α-integrins, E-cadherin, Cueball, EGFR, JAK/STAT signaling components, as well as the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) Terribly reduced optic lobes (Trol). Trol encodes the ortholog of mammalian HSPG Perlecan, a demonstrated FGF signaling cofactor. Here, we examine the role of Trol in Drosophila mesoderm migration and compare and contrast its role with that of Syndecan (Sdc), another HSPG previously implicated in this process. Embryos mutant for Trol or Sdc were obtained and analyzed. Our data support the view that both HSPGs function to support FGF-dependent processes in the early embryo as they share phenotypes with FGF mutants: Trol in terms of effects on mesoderm migration and caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) migration and Sdc in terms of dorsal mesoderm specification. The differential roles uncovered for these two HSPGs suggest that HSPG cofactor choice may modify FGF-signaling outputs. PMID:25538103

  15. A yeast-based genetic screening to identify human proteins that increase homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Collavoli, Anita; Comelli, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Galli, Alvaro

    2008-05-01

    To identify new human proteins implicated in homologous recombination (HR), we set up 'a papillae assay' to screen a human cDNA library using the RS112 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing an intrachromosomal recombination substrate. We isolated 23 cDNAs, 11 coding for complete proteins and 12 for partially deleted proteins that increased HR when overexpressed in yeast. We characterized the effect induced by the overexpression of the complete human proteasome subunit beta 2, the partially deleted proteasome subunits alpha 3 and beta 8, the ribosomal protein L12, the brain abundant membrane signal protein (BASP1) and the human homologue to v-Ha-RAS (HRAS), which elevated HR by 2-6.5-fold over the control. We found that deletion of the RAD52 gene, which has a key role in most HR events, abolished the increase of HR induced by the proteasome subunits and HRAS; by contrast, the RAD52 deletion did not affect the high level of HR due to BASP1 and RPL12. This suggests that the proteins stimulated yeast HR via different mechanisms. Overexpression of the complete beta 2 human proteasome subunit or the partially deleted alpha 3 and beta 8 subunits increased methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) resistance much more in the rad52 Delta mutant than in the wild-type. Overexpression of RPL12 and BASP1 did not affect MMS resistance in both the wild-type and the rad52 Delta mutant, whereas HRAS decreased MMS resistance in the rad52 Delta mutant. The results indicate that these proteins may interfere with the pathway(s) involved in the repair of MMS-induced DNA damage. Finally, we provide further evidence that yeast is a helpful tool to identify human proteins that may have a regulatory role in HR. PMID:18248415

  16. No evidence for intracellular magnetite in putative vertebrate magnetoreceptors identified by magnetic screening.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Nathaniel B; Fritz, Tanja; Nimpf, Simon; Pichler, Paul; Lauwers, Mattias; Hickman, Robert W; Papadaki-Anastasopoulou, Artemis; Ushakova, Lyubov; Heuser, Thomas; Resch, Guenter P; Saunders, Martin; Shaw, Jeremy A; Keays, David A

    2015-01-01

    The cellular basis of the magnetic sense remains an unsolved scientific mystery. One theory that aims to explain how animals detect the magnetic field is the magnetite hypothesis. It argues that intracellular crystals of the iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4) are coupled to mechanosensitive channels that elicit neuronal activity in specialized sensory cells. Attempts to find these primary sensors have largely relied on the Prussian Blue stain that labels cells rich in ferric iron. This method has proved problematic as it has led investigators to conflate iron-rich macrophages with magnetoreceptors. An alternative approach developed by Eder et al. [Eder SH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(30):12022-12027] is to identify candidate magnetoreceptive cells based on their magnetic moment. Here, we explore the utility of this method by undertaking a screen for magnetic cells in the pigeon. We report the identification of a small number of cells (1 in 476,000) with large magnetic moments (8-106 fAm(2)) from various tissues. The development of single-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) permitted subcellular analysis of magnetic cells. This revealed the presence of extracellular structures composed of iron, titanium, and chromium accounting for the magnetic properties of these cells. Application of single-cell CLEM to magnetic cells from the trout failed to identify any intracellular structures consistent with biogenically derived magnetite. Our work illustrates the need for new methods to test the magnetite hypothesis of magnetosensation. PMID:25535350

  17. In vitro functional screening as a means to identify new plasticizers devoid of reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Annie; Jones, Steven; Issop, Leeyah; Erythropel, Hanno C; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Culty, Martine

    2016-10-01

    Plasticizers are indispensable additives providing flexibility and malleability to plastics. Among them, several phthalates, including di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), have emerged as endocrine disruptors, leading to their restriction in consumer products and creating a need for new, safer plasticizers. The goal of this project was to use in vitro functional screening tools to select novel non-toxic plasticizers suitable for further in vivo evaluation. A panel of novel compounds with satisfactory plasticizer properties and biodegradability were tested, along with several commercial plasticizers, such as diisononyl-cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DINCH®). MEHP, the monoester metabolite of DEHP was also included as reference compound. Because phthalates target mainly testicular function, including androgen production and spermatogenesis, we used the mouse MA-10 Leydig and C18-4 spermatogonial cell lines as surrogates to examine cell survival, proliferation, steroidogenesis and mitochondrial integrity. The most promising compounds were further assessed on organ cultures of rat fetal and neonatal testes, corresponding to sensitive developmental windows. Dose-response studies revealed the toxicity of most maleates and fumarates, while identifying several dibenzoate and succinate plasticizers as innocuous on Leydig and germ cells. Interestingly, DINCH®, a plasticizer marketed as a safe alternative to phthalates, exerted a biphasic effect on steroid production in MA-10 and fetal Leydig cells. MEHP was the only plasticizer inducing the formation of multinucleated germ cells (MNG) in organ culture. Overall, organ cultures corroborated the cell line data, identifying one dibenzoate and one succinate as the most promising candidates. The adoption of such collaborative approaches for developing new chemicals should help prevent the development of compounds potentially harmful to human health. PMID:27423704

  18. A functional screen for copper homeostasis genes identifies a pharmacologically tractable cellular system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Copper is essential for the survival of aerobic organisms. If copper is not properly regulated in the body however, it can be extremely cytotoxic and genetic mutations that compromise copper homeostasis result in severe clinical phenotypes. Understanding how cells maintain optimal copper levels is therefore highly relevant to human health. Results We found that addition of copper (Cu) to culture medium leads to increased respiratory growth of yeast, a phenotype which we then systematically and quantitatively measured in 5050 homozygous diploid deletion strains. Cu’s positive effect on respiratory growth was quantitatively reduced in deletion strains representing 73 different genes, the function of which identify increased iron uptake as a cause of the increase in growth rate. Conversely, these effects were enhanced in strains representing 93 genes. Many of these strains exhibited respiratory defects that were specifically rescued by supplementing the growth medium with Cu. Among the genes identified are known and direct regulators of copper homeostasis, genes required to maintain low vacuolar pH, and genes where evidence supporting a functional link with Cu has been heretofore lacking. Roughly half of the genes are conserved in man, and several of these are associated with Mendelian disorders, including the Cu-imbalance syndromes Menkes and Wilson’s disease. We additionally demonstrate that pharmacological agents, including the approved drug disulfiram, can rescue Cu-deficiencies of both environmental and genetic origin. Conclusions A functional screen in yeast has expanded the list of genes required for Cu-dependent fitness, revealing a complex cellular system with implications for human health. Respiratory fitness defects arising from perturbations in this system can be corrected with pharmacological agents that increase intracellular copper concentrations. PMID:24708151

  19. Identifying Barriers to Colonoscopy Screening for Nonadherent African American Participants in a Patient Navigation Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sly, Jamilia R.; Edwards, Tiffany; Shelton, Rachel C.; Jandorf, Lina

    2013-01-01

    African Americans have a higher rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality than other racial/ethnic groups. This disparity is alarming given that CRC is largely preventable through the use of endoscopy (screening colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy), yet rates of CRC screening among African Americans is suboptimal. Only 48.9% of African Americans are…

  20. A Preliminary Screening Program to Identify Functioning Strengths and Weaknesses in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundson, Marian Stuehrenberg

    The purpose of this study was to compare two instruments for screening preschool children for potential learning problems. The two instruments used were the Metropolitan Readiness Tests (MRT) and the Wizard of Oz Preschool Preliminary Screening Program. The children tested on both measures were members of a self-contained kindergarten class. MRT…

  1. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  2. Structure- and Ligand-Based Virtual Screening Identifies New Scaffolds for Inhibitors of the Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Douglas R.; Yen, Li-Hsuan; Pettit, Simon; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the field of ligand discovery is to identify chemically useful fragments that can be developed into inhibitors of specific protein-protein interactions. Low molecular weight fragments (with molecular weight less than 250 Da) are likely to bind weakly to a protein’s surface. Here we use a new virtual screening procedure which uses a combination of similarity searching and docking to identify chemically tractable scaffolds that bind to the p53-interaction site of MDM2. The binding has been verified using capillary electrophoresis which has proven to be an excellent screening method for such small, weakly binding ligands. PMID:25884407

  3. Automated NMR Fragment Based Screening Identified a Novel Interface Blocker to the LARG/RhoA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jia; Ma, Rongsheng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Na; Sasaki, Ryan; Snyderman, David; Wu, Jihui; Ruan, Ke

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase cycles between the inactive GDP form and the activated GTP form, catalyzed by the upstream guanine exchange factors. The modulation of such process by small molecules has been proven to be a fruitful route for therapeutic intervention to prevent the over-activation of the small GTPase. The fragment based approach emerging in the past decade has demonstrated its paramount potential in the discovery of inhibitors targeting such novel and challenging protein-protein interactions. The details regarding the procedure of NMR fragment screening from scratch have been rarely disclosed comprehensively, thus restricts its wider applications. To achieve a consistent screening applicable to a number of targets, we developed a highly automated protocol to cover every aspect of NMR fragment screening as possible, including the construction of small but diverse libray, determination of the aqueous solubility by NMR, grouping compounds with mutual dispersity to a cocktail, and the automated processing and visualization of the ligand based screening spectra. We exemplified our streamlined screening in RhoA alone and the complex of the small GTPase RhoA and its upstream guanine exchange factor LARG. Two hits were confirmed from the primary screening in cocktail and secondary screening over individual hits for LARG/RhoA complex, while one of them was also identified from the screening for RhoA alone. HSQC titration of the two hits over RhoA and LARG alone, respectively, identified one compound binding to RhoA.GDP at a 0.11 mM affinity, and perturbed the residues at the switch II region of RhoA. This hit blocked the formation of the LARG/RhoA complex, validated by the native gel electrophoresis, and the titration of RhoA to 15N labeled LARG in the absence and presence the compound, respectively. It therefore provides us a starting point toward a more potent inhibitor to RhoA activation catalyzed by LARG. PMID:24505392

  4. Screening of antitubercular compound library identifies novel shikimate kinase inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Vikrant S; Mehra, Rukmankesh; Kumar, Sanjay; Nargotra, Amit; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Khan, Inshad Ali

    2016-06-01

    Shikimate kinase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids through shikimate pathway. The enzyme is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis and is absent from mammals, thus providing an excellent opportunity for identifying new chemical entities to combat tuberculosis with a novel mechanism of action. In this study, an antitubercular library of 1000 compounds was screened against M. tuberculosis shikimate kinase (MtSK). This effort led to the identification of 20 inhibitors, among which five promising leads exhibited half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values below 10 μM. The most potent inhibitor ("5631296") showed an IC50 value of 5.10 μM ± 0.6. The leads were further evaluated for the activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, mode of action, docking simulations, and combinatorial study with three frontline anti-TB drugs. Compound "5491210" displayed a nearly synergistic activity with rifampicin, isoniazid, and ethambutol while compound "5631296" was synergistic with rifampicin. In vitro cytotoxicity against HepG2 cell line was evaluated and barring one compound; all were found to be non-toxic (SI > 10). In order to rule out mitochondrial toxicity, the promising inhibitors were also evaluated for cell cytotoxicity using galactose medium where compounds "5631296" and "5122752" appeared non-toxic. Upon comprehensive analysis, compound "5631296" was found to be the most promising MtSK inhibitor that was safe, synergistic with rifampicin, and bactericidal against M. tuberculosis. PMID:26887318

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitor screening identifies HC toxin as the most effective in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjie; Chen, Xiaoxun; He, Ke; Xiao, Jinfeng; Duan, Xiaopeng; Huang, Rui; Xia, Zhenglin; He, Jingliang; Zhang, Jinqian; Xiang, Guoan

    2016-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are highly expressed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and are associated with poor prognosis of these patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HDAC inhibitors on ICC cells and identify effective and sensitive drugs for ICC. Effects of 34 HDAC inhibitors were screened through two rounds of cell viability assays, and HC toxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide first isolated from the secondary metabolite of Helminthosporium carbonum, exhibited an antitumor activity superior to that of the other HDAC inhibitors and gemcitabine. The mechanisms involved in the inhibitory effects of HC toxin on CCLP-1 cells were investigated by cell counting, colony formation assay, cell morphological observation, real-time PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry. It was demonstrated that HC toxin inhibited the cell proliferation and clone formation ability of the CCLP-1 cells. HC toxin increased the acetyl-histone H4 level and this was associated with the inhibitory effect of HC toxin on the CCLP-1 cells. We also found that HC toxin reduced the level of HDAC1 protein in a post-transcriptional manner. Morphological observation showed multiple morphological changes and indicated the possibility of cell differentiation owing to HC toxin. With increasing concentration of HC toxin, the cell cycle was gradually arrested at the G0/G1 stage and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased which was not mainly through the caspase-3-dependent ways. These results indicated that HC toxin was the most effective among the various HDAC inhibitors with multiple functions in the suppression of ICC in vitro. Thus, HC may be a potential chemotherapeutic for ICC. PMID:26935789

  6. A cellular screen identifies ponatinib and pazopanib as inhibitors of necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fauster, A; Rebsamen, M; Huber, K V M; Bigenzahn, J W; Stukalov, A; Lardeau, C-H; Scorzoni, S; Bruckner, M; Gridling, M; Parapatics, K; Colinge, J; Bennett, K L; Kubicek, S; Krautwald, S; Linkermann, A; Superti-Furga, G

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a form of regulated necrotic cell death mediated by receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK3. Necroptotic cell death contributes to the pathophysiology of several disorders involving tissue damage, including myocardial infarction, stroke and ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, no inhibitors of necroptosis are currently in clinical use. Here we performed a phenotypic screen for small-molecule inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced necroptosis in Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD)-deficient Jurkat cells using a representative panel of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We identified two anti-cancer agents, ponatinib and pazopanib, as submicromolar inhibitors of necroptosis. Both compounds inhibited necroptotic cell death induced by various cell death receptor ligands in human cells, while not protecting from apoptosis. Ponatinib and pazopanib abrogated phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) upon TNF-α-induced necroptosis, indicating that both agents target a component upstream of MLKL. An unbiased chemical proteomic approach determined the cellular target spectrum of ponatinib, revealing key members of the necroptosis signaling pathway. We validated RIPK1, RIPK3 and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) as novel, direct targets of ponatinib by using competitive binding, cellular thermal shift and recombinant kinase assays. Ponatinib inhibited both RIPK1 and RIPK3, while pazopanib preferentially targeted RIPK1. The identification of the FDA-approved drugs ponatinib and pazopanib as cellular inhibitors of necroptosis highlights them as potentially interesting for the treatment of pathologies caused or aggravated by necroptotic cell death. PMID:25996294

  7. Kinase inhibitor screening identifies CDK4 as a potential therapeutic target for melanoma

    PubMed Central

    MAHGOUB, T.; EUSTACE, A.J.; COLLINS, D.M.; WALSH, N.; O'DONOVAN, N.; CROWN, J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in targeted therapies and immunotherapies metastatic melanoma remains only rarely curable. The objective of the present study was to identify novel therapeutic targets for metastatic melanoma. A library of 160 well-characterised and potent protein kinase inhibitors was screened in the BRAF mutant cell line Sk-Mel-28, and the NRAS mutant Sk-Mel-2, using proliferation assays. Of the 160 inhibitors tested, 20 achieved >50% growth inhibition in both cell lines. Six of the 20 were cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, including two CDK4 inhibitors. Fascaplysin, a synthetic CDK4 inhibitor, was further tested in 8 melanoma cell lines. The concentration of fascaplysin required to inhibit growth by 50% (IC50 value) ranged from 0.03 to 0.22 μM. Fascaplysin also inhibited clonogenic growth and induced apoptosis. Sensitivity to PD0332991, a therapeutic CDK4/6 inhibitor was also evaluated in the melanoma cell lines. PD0332991 IC50 values ranged from 0.13 to 2.29 μM. Similar to fascaplysin, PD0332991 inhibited clonogenic growth of melanoma cells and induced apoptosis. Higher levels of CDK4 protein correlated with lower sensitivity to PD0332991 in the cell lines. Combined treatment with PD0332991 and the BRAF inhibitor PLX4032, showed additive anti-proliferative effects in the BRAF mutant cell line Malme-3M. In summary, targeting CDK4 inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in melanoma cells in vitro, suggesting that CDK4 may be a rational therapeutic target for metastatic melanoma. PMID:26201960

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitor screening identifies HC toxin as the most effective in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, WENJIE; CHEN, XIAOXUN; HE, KE; XIAO, JINFENG; DUAN, XIAOPENG; HUANG, RUI; XIA, ZHENGLIN; HE, JINGLIANG; ZHANG, JINQIAN; XIANG, GUOAN

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are highly expressed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and are associated with poor prognosis of these patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HDAC inhibitors on ICC cells and identify effective and sensitive drugs for ICC. Effects of 34 HDAC inhibitors were screened through two rounds of cell viability assays, and HC toxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide first isolated from the secondary metabolite of Helminthosporium carbonum, exhibited an antitumor activity superior to that of the other HDAC inhibitors and gemcitabine. The mechanisms involved in the inhibitory effects of HC toxin on CCLP-1 cells were investigated by cell counting, colony formation assay, cell morphological observation, real-time PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry. It was demonstrated that HC toxin inhibited the cell proliferation and clone formation ability of the CCLP-1 cells. HC toxin increased the acetyl-histone H4 level and this was associated with the inhibitory effect of HC toxin on the CCLP-1 cells. We also found that HC toxin reduced the level of HDAC1 protein in a post-transcriptional manner. Morphological observation showed multiple morphological changes and indicated the possibility of cell differentiation owing to HC toxin. With increasing concentration of HC toxin, the cell cycle was gradually arrested at the G0/G1 stage and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased which was not mainly through the caspase-3-dependent ways. These results indicated that HC toxin was the most effective among the various HDAC inhibitors with multiple functions in the suppression of ICC in vitro. Thus, HC may be a potential chemotherapeutic for ICC. PMID:26935789

  9. Small Molecule Screening Identifies Regulators of the Transcription Factor ΔFosB

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ΔFosB protein accumulates in the striatum in response to chronic administration of drugs of abuse, L-DOPA, or stress, triggering long lasting neural and behavioral changes that underlie aspects of drug addiction, abnormal involuntary movements (dyskinesia), and depression. ΔFosB binds AP-1 DNA consensus sequences found in promoters of many genes and can both repress or activate gene transcription. In the striatum, ΔFosB is thought to dimerize with JunD to form a functional transcription factor, though strikingly JunD does not accumulate in parallel. One explanation is that ΔFosB can recruit different partners, including itself, depending on the neuron type in which it is induced and the chronic stimulus, generating protein complexes with different effects on gene transcription. To develop chemical probes to study ΔFosB, a high-throughput screen was carried out to identify small molecules that modulate ΔFosB function. Two compounds with low micromolar activity, termed C2 and C6, disrupt the binding of ΔFosB to DNA via different mechanisms, and in in vitro assays stimulate ΔFosB-mediated transcription. In cocaine-treated mice, C2 significantly elevates mRNA levels of the AMPA glutamate receptor GluR2 subunit with specificity, a known target gene of ΔFosB that plays a role in drug addiction and endogenous resilience mechanisms. C2 and C6 show different activities against ΔFosB homodimers compared to ΔFosB/JunD heterodimers, suggesting that these compounds can be used as probes to study the contribution of different ΔFosB-containing complexes on the regulation of gene transcription in biological systems and to assess the utility of ΔFosB as a therapeutic target. PMID:22860224

  10. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies proteins modulating aberrant FLT3-ITD signaling

    PubMed Central

    Caldarelli, A; Müller, J P; Paskowski-Rogacz, M; Herrmann, K; Bauer, R; Koch, S; Heninger, A K; Krastev, D; Ding, L; Kasper, S; Fischer, T; Brodhun, M; Böhmer, F-D; Buchholz, F

    2013-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 is a commonly mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia, with about one-third of patients carrying an internal-tandem duplication of the juxtamembrane domain in the receptor (FLT3-ITD). FLT3-ITD exhibits altered signaling quality, including aberrant activation of STAT5. To identify genes affecting FLT3-ITD-mediated STAT5 signaling, we performed an esiRNA-based RNAi screen utilizing a STAT5-driven reporter assay. Knockdowns that caused reduced FLT3-ITD-mediated STAT5 signaling were enriched for genes encoding proteins involved in protein secretion and intracellular protein transport, indicating that modulation of protein transport processes could potentially be used to reduce constitutive STAT5 signaling in FLT3-ITD-positive cells. The relevance of KDELR1, a component involved in the Golgi-ER retrograde transport, was further analyzed. In FLT3-ITD-expressing leukemic MV4-11 cells, downregulation of KDELR1 resulted in reduced STAT5 activation, proliferation and colony-forming capacity. Stable shRNA-mediated depletion of KDELR1 in FLT3-ITD-expressing 32D cells likewise resulted in reduced STAT5 signaling and cell proliferation. Importantly, these cells also showed a reduced capacity to generate a leukemia-like disease in syngeneic C3H/HeJ mice. Together our data suggest intracellular protein transport as a potential target for FLT3-ITD driven leukemias, with KDELR1 emerging as a positive modulator of oncogenic FLT3-ITD activity. PMID:23508117

  11. High throughput Screening to Identify Natural Human Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, E; Deiab, S; Park, K; Soliman, KFA

    2012-01-01

    Age-related increase in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) may contribute to CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, MAO-B inhibitors are used in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson disease as preliminary monotherapy or adjunct therapy with L-dopa. To date, meager natural sources of MAO-B inhibitors have been identified, and the relative strength, potency and rank of many plants relative to standard drugs such as Selegiline (L-deprenyl, Eldepryl) are not known. In this work, we developed and utilized a high throughput enzyme microarray format to screen and evaluate 905 natural product extracts (0.025–.7 mg/ml) to inhibit human MAO-B derived from BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. The protein sequence of purified enzyme was confirmed using 1D gel electrophoresis-matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-tandem mass spectroscopy, and enzyme activity was confirmed by [1] substrate conversion (3-mM benzylamine) to H202 and [2] benzaldehyde. Of the 905 natural extracts tested, the lowest IC50s [<0.07 mg/ml] were obtained with extracts of Amur Corktree (Phellodendron amurense), Bakuchi Seed(Cyamopsis psoralioides), Licorice Root (Glycyrrhiza glabra/uralensis), Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia seed). The data also show, albeit to a lesser extent, inhibitory properties of herbs originating from the mint family (Lamiaceae) and Turmeric, Comfrey, Bringraj, Skullcap, Kava-kava, Wild Indigo, Gentian and Green Tea. In conclusion, the data reflect relative potency information by rank of commonly used herbs and plants that contain human MAO-B inhibitory properties in their natural form. PMID:22887993

  12. Functional screening identifies CRLF2 in precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akinori; Yoda, Yuka; Chiaretti, Sabina; Bar-Natan, Michal; Mani, Kartik; Rodig, Scott J; West, Nathan; Xiao, Yun; Brown, Jennifer R; Mitsiades, Constantine; Sattler, Martin; Kutok, Jeffrey L; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Wadleigh, Martha; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Dal Cin, Paola; Bradner, James E; Griffin, James D; Anderson, Kenneth C; Stone, Richard M; Ritz, Jerome; Foà, Robin; Aster, Jon C; Frank, David A; Weinstock, David M

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for adults with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) remains poor, in part from a lack of therapeutic targets. We identified the type I cytokine receptor subunit CRLF2 in a functional screen for B-ALL-derived mRNA transcripts that can substitute for IL3 signaling. We demonstrate that CRLF2 is overexpressed in approximately 15% of adult and high-risk pediatric B-ALL that lack MLL, TCF3, TEL, and BCR/ABL rearrangements, but not in B-ALL with these rearrangements or other lymphoid malignancies. CRLF2 overexpression can result from translocation with the IGH locus or intrachromosomal deletion and is associated with poor outcome. CRLF2 overexpressing B-ALLs share a transcriptional signature that significantly overlaps with a BCR/ABL signature, and is enriched for genes involved in cytokine receptor and JAK-STAT signaling. In a subset of cases, CRLF2 harbors a Phe232Cys gain-of-function mutation that promotes constitutive dimerization and cytokine independent growth. A mutually exclusive subset harbors activating mutations in JAK2. In fact, all 22 B-ALLs with mutant JAK2 that we analyzed overexpress CRLF2, distinguishing CRLF2 as the key scaffold for mutant JAK2 signaling in B-ALL. Expression of WT CRLF2 with mutant JAK2 also promotes cytokine independent growth that, unlike CRLF2 Phe232Cys or ligand-induced signaling by WT CRLF2, is accompanied by JAK2 phosphorylation. Finally, cells dependent on CRLF2 signaling are sensitive to small molecule inhibitors of either JAKs or protein kinase C family kinases. Together, these findings implicate CRLF2 as an important factor in B-ALL with diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. PMID:20018760

  13. The challenge of small lung nodules identified in CT screening: can biomarkers assist diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giulia; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Infante, Maurizio; Alloisio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Various biomarkers have been developed as noninvasive tests to indicate the presence of lung cancer in asymptomatic persons, and in particular to provide evidence as to whether indeterminate lung nodules detected by screening are malignant. We performed an overview of the range of biomarkers reported in the literature and described those that can complement low-dose computed tomography screening. Several have promising sensitivity and specificity. However to our knowledge, only three techniques have reached the prospective screening phase (phase 4) of the five-phase biomarker development process. Two miRNA signatures (the miR-Test for serum and the miRNA signature classifier test for plasma) are being assessed in prospective screening trials, as is the EarlyCDT-Lung test based on autoantibodies. All will need to undergo prospective studies to determine their ability to improve outcomes before they can become an established adjunct to lung cancer control strategies. PMID:26764294

  14. Wide Screening of Phage-Displayed Libraries Identifies Immune Targets in Planta

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Cristina; Van Wees, Saskia C.; Charlton, Keith A.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Lorenzo, Oscar; García-Sánchez, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns and virulence effectors are recognized by plants as a first step to mount a defence response against potential pathogens. This recognition involves a large family of extracellular membrane receptors and other immune proteins located in different sub-cellular compartments. We have used phage-display technology to express and select for Arabidopsis proteins able to bind bacterial pathogens. To rapidly identify microbe-bound phage, we developed a monitoring method based on microarrays. This combined strategy allowed for a genome-wide screening of plant proteins involved in pathogen perception. Two phage libraries for high-throughput selection were constructed from cDNA of plants infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, or from combined samples of the virulent isolate DC3000 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and its avirulent variant avrRpt2. These three pathosystems represent different degrees in the specificity of plant-microbe interactions. Libraries cover up to 2×107 different plant transcripts that can be displayed as functional proteins on the surface of T7 bacteriophage. A number of these were selected in a bio-panning assay for binding to Pseudomonas cells. Among the selected clones we isolated the ethylene response factor ATERF-1, which was able to bind the three bacterial strains in competition assays. ATERF-1 was rapidly exported from the nucleus upon infiltration of either alive or heat-killed Pseudomonas. Moreover, aterf-1 mutants exhibited enhanced susceptibility to infection. These findings suggest that ATERF-1 contains a microbe-recognition domain with a role in plant defence. To identify other putative pathogen-binding proteins on a genome-wide scale, the copy number of selected-vs.-total clones was compared by hybridizing phage cDNAs with Arabidopsis microarrays. Microarray analysis revealed a set of 472 candidates with significant fold change. Within this set defence-related genes, including well

  15. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartin, Samantha N.; Hudson, Martin L.; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The C. elegans proteins PTP-3/LAR-RPTP and SDN-1/Syndecan are conserved cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in either ptp-3 or sdn-1 result in low penetrance embryonic developmental defects. Work from other systems has shown that syndecans can function as ligands for LAR receptors in vivo. We used double mutant analysis to test whether ptp-3 and sdn-1 function in a linear genetic pathway during C. elegans embryogenesis. Results We found animals with LOF in both sdn-1 and ptp-3 exhibited a highly penetrant synthetic lethality (SynLet), with only a small percentage of animals surviving to adulthood. Analysis of the survivors demonstrated that these animals had a synergistic increase in the penetrance of embryonic developmental defects. Together, these data strongly suggested PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in parallel during embryogenesis. We subsequently used RNAi to knockdown ~3,600 genes predicted to encode secreted and/or transmembrane molecules to identify genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin-44 caused defects in the polarization and migration of endodermal precursors during gastrulation, a previously undescribed role for lin-44 that is strongly enhanced by the loss of sdn-1. Conclusions PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in compensatory pathways during C. elegans embryonic and larval development, as simultaneous loss of both genes has dire consequences for organismal survival. The Wnt ligand lin-44 contributes to the early stages of gastrulation in parallel to sdn-1, but in a genetic pathway with ptp-3. Overall, the SynLet phenotype provides a robust platform to identify ptp-3 and sdn-1 interacting genes, as well as other genes that function in development, yet might be missed in traditional forward genetic screens. PMID:25938228

  16. A MULTI-SCALE SCREENING PROCESS TO IDENTIFY LEAST-DISTURBED STREAM SITES FOR USE IN WATER QUALITY MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a four-step screening procedure to identify least-disturbed stream sites for an EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) pilot project being conducted in twelve western states. In this project, biological attributes at least-disturbed sites are use...

  17. Newborn screening for severe T and B cell lymphopenia identifies a fraction of patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borte, Stephan; Fasth, Anders; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Winiarski, Jacek; Hammarström, Lennart

    2014-11-01

    The lack or marked reduction of recently formed T and B cells provides a basis for neonatal screening for severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). Newborns with other conditions are also identified if a severe T or B cell lymphopenia is present at birth. We retrospectively analyzed Guthrie card samples from 11 children with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), a rare disease that requires early diagnosis and treatment, to determine whether combined T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) screening could identify these patients. 4 of 11 patients showed markedly reduced TREC or KREC copy numbers in their DBS as compared to storage-time matched controls and prospectively screened Swedish and German newborns. No correlation was observed between the WAS gene mutations, the clinical severity/course and the result of the screening assay. A diagnosis of WAS should thus be considered in newborns with positive TREC or KREC screening results. PMID:25217881

  18. Quantitative specificity-based display library screening identifies determinants of antibody-epitope binding specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sejal S; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2009-01-01

    Despite the critical importance of molecular specificity in bimolecular systems, in vitro display technologies have been applied extensively for affinity maturation of peptides and antibodies without explicitly measuring the specificity of the desired interaction. We devised a general strategy to measure, screen, and evolve specificity of protein ligand interactions analogous to widely used affinity maturation strategies. The specificity of binding to target and nontarget antibodies labeled with spectrally distinct fluorophores was measured simultaneously in protein mixtures via multiparameter flow cytometry, thereby enabling screening for high target antibody specificity. Isolated antibody specific ligands exhibited varying specificity, revealing critical amino acid determinants for target recognition and nontarget avoidance in complex mixtures. Molecular specificity in the mixture was further enhanced by quantitative directed evolution, yielding a family of epitopes exhibiting improved specificities equivalent, or superior to, the native peptide antigen to which the antibody was raised. Specificity screening simultaneously favored affinity, yielding ligands with three-fold improved affinity relative to the parent epitope. Quantitative specificity screening will be useful to screen, evolve, and characterize the specificity of protein and peptide interactions for molecular recognition applications. PMID:19610073

  19. Challenges remain for ED-based screening program adept at identifying hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    In a six-month study, investigators evaluating an ED-based screening program for hepatitis C have found that when they target screening toward groups deemed most at risk for the infectious disease, more than 10% of those who accept testing do, in fact, test positive for hepatitis C. However, nurses offering the screening have concerns about protecting patient privacy as well as slowing down the triage process. Further, there are multiple barriers involved with ushering patients through the required testing algorithm and linking those who test positive for the disease to care. Groups targeted for screening during triage include baby boomers, IV drug users, and patients with an unspecified liver disease. Investigators say adding the hepatitis C screening questions at triage adds 30 seconds to one minute to the process. While improvements in testing have enabled EDs to integrate hepatitis C testing into the normal lab workflow process, many patients are discharged before test results return, creating barriers for disclosure and linkage to confirmatory testing. With limited appointments available for specialty hepatitis C care, patients must typically wait several months before seeing a specialist. PMID:26447260

  20. High-Throughput Screening of Myometrial Calcium-Mobilization to Identify Modulators of Uterine Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Herington, Jennifer L.; Swale, Daniel R.; Brown, Naoko; Shelton, Elaine L.; Choi, Hyehun; Williams, Charles H.; Hong, Charles C.; Paria, Bibhash C.; Denton, Jerod S.; Reese, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The uterine myometrium (UT-myo) is a therapeutic target for preterm labor, labor induction, and postpartum hemorrhage. Stimulation of intracellular Ca2+-release in UT-myo cells by oxytocin is a final pathway controlling myometrial contractions. The goal of this study was to develop a dual-addition assay for high-throughput screening of small molecular compounds, which could regulate Ca2+-mobilization in UT-myo cells, and hence, myometrial contractions. Primary murine UT-myo cells in 384-well plates were loaded with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent probe, and then screened for inducers of Ca2+-mobilization and inhibitors of oxytocin-induced Ca2+-mobilization. The assay exhibited robust screening statistics (Z´ = 0.73), DMSO-tolerance, and was validated for high-throughput screening against 2,727 small molecules from the Spectrum, NIH Clinical I and II collections of well-annotated compounds. The screen revealed a hit-rate of 1.80% for agonist and 1.39% for antagonist compounds. Concentration-dependent responses of hit-compounds demonstrated an EC50 less than 10μM for 21 hit-antagonist compounds, compared to only 7 hit-agonist compounds. Subsequent studies focused on hit-antagonist compounds. Based on the percent inhibition and functional annotation analyses, we selected 4 confirmed hit-antagonist compounds (benzbromarone, dipyridamole, fenoterol hydrobromide and nisoldipine) for further analysis. Using an ex vivo isometric contractility assay, each compound significantly inhibited uterine contractility, at different potencies (IC50). Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that high-throughput small-molecules screening of myometrial Ca2+-mobilization is an ideal primary approach for discovering modulators of uterine contractility. PMID:26600013

  1. CRISPR knockout screening outperforms shRNA and CRISPRi in identifying essential genes.

    PubMed

    Evers, Bastiaan; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Heijmans, Jeroen P M; Grernrum, Wipawadee; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Bernards, Rene

    2016-06-01

    High-throughput genetic screens have become essential tools for studying a wide variety of biological processes. Here we experimentally compare systems based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) or its transcriptionally repressive variant, CRISPR-interference (CRISPRi), with a traditional short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-based system for performing lethality screens. We find that the CRISPR technology performed best, with low noise, minimal off-target effects and consistent activity across reagents. PMID:27111720

  2. High-throughput screening identifies idarubicin as a preferential inhibitor of smooth muscle versus endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shakti A; Guo, Lian-Wang; Wang, Bowen; Guo, Song; Roenneburg, Drew; Ananiev, Gene E; Hoffmann, F Michael; Kent, K Craig

    2014-01-01

    Intimal hyperplasia is the cause of the recurrent occlusive vascular disease (restenosis). Drugs currently used to treat restenosis effectively inhibit smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, but also inhibit the growth of the protective luminal endothelial cell (EC) lining, leading to thrombosis. To identify compounds that selectively inhibit SMC versus EC proliferation, we have developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) format using human cells and have employed this to screen a multiple compound collection (NIH Clinical Collection). We developed an automated, accurate proliferation assay in 96-well plates using human aortic SMCs and ECs. Using this HTS format we screened a 447-drug NIH Clinical Library. We identified 11 compounds that inhibited SMC proliferation greater than 50%, among which idarubicin exhibited a unique feature of preferentially inhibiting SMC versus EC proliferation. Concentration-response analysis revealed this differential effect most evident over an ∼10 nM-5 µM window. In vivo testing of idarubicin in a rat carotid injury model at 14 days revealed an 80% reduction of intimal hyperplasia and a 45% increase of lumen size with no significant effect on re-endothelialization. Taken together, we have established a HTS assay of human vascular cell proliferation, and identified idarubicin as a selective inhibitor of SMC versus EC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Screening of larger and more diverse compound libraries may lead to the discovery of next-generation therapeutics that can inhibit intima hyperplasia without impairing re-endothelialization. PMID:24586708

  3. Large-Scale Computational Screening Identifies First in Class Multitarget Inhibitor of EGFR Kinase and BRD4

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bryce K.; Mehta, Saurabh; Ember, Stewart W. J.; Schonbrunn, Ernst; Ayad, Nagi; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of cancer-promoting kinases is an established therapeutic strategy for the treatment of many cancers, although resistance to kinase inhibitors is common. One way to overcome resistance is to target orthogonal cancer-promoting pathways. Bromo and Extra-Terminal (BET) domain proteins, which belong to the family of epigenetic readers, have recently emerged as promising therapeutic targets in multiple cancers. The development of multitarget drugs that inhibit kinase and BET proteins therefore may be a promising strategy to overcome tumor resistance and prolong therapeutic efficacy in the clinic. We developed a general computational screening approach to identify novel dual kinase/bromodomain inhibitors from millions of commercially available small molecules. Our method integrated machine learning using big datasets of kinase inhibitors and structure-based drug design. Here we describe the computational methodology, including validation and characterization of our models and their application and integration into a scalable virtual screening pipeline. We screened over 6 million commercially available compounds and selected 24 for testing in BRD4 and EGFR biochemical assays. We identified several novel BRD4 inhibitors, among them a first in class dual EGFR-BRD4 inhibitor. Our studies suggest that this computational screening approach may be broadly applicable for identifying dual kinase/BET inhibitors with potential for treating various cancers. PMID:26596901

  4. A screening method to identify genes commonly overexpressed in carcinomas and the identification of a novel complementary DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J A; Tomasetto, C; Garnier, J M; Rouyer, N; Mattei, M G; Bellocq, J P; Rio, M C; Basset, P

    1995-07-01

    We describe a differential screening method for cDNA libraries which used a combination of subtracted and PCR-amplified cDNA probes, and which can be applied to the selection of genes expressed in multiple tissues. This technique was used to identify genes commonly overexpressed in breast and basal cell carcinomas. These represent stromally dependent, invasive tumors with and without metastatic capacity. Thus, this screening sought to identify genes involved in the early stages of tumor progression. We identified a total of 16 genes, including c-erbB-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 whose products have been implicated in tumorigenesis or invasion. We also identified a novel sequence (D52) showing little homology with others described in any species, which maps to the human chromosomal band 8q21. In situ RNA hybridizations of breast carcinoma sections indicated that the D52 gene was expressed in cancer cells, whereas other genes identified in the differential screening were expressed in fibroblastic or inflammatory cells within the tumor stroma. Thus, the procedure developed in this study selected genes expressed in a diversity of cell types, indicating its potential usefulness in other systems. PMID:7796418

  5. Identifying Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review of Selected Screening Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    There has been a dramatic worldwide increase in reported cases of autism over the past decade. Autism is much more prevalent than previously thought, especially when viewed as a spectrum of disorders (autism spectrum disorders; ASD). School-based professionals are now more likely to be asked to participate in the screening and identification of…

  6. DIETARY PATTERNS OF OLDER ADULTS IDENTIFIED BY A DIETARY QUALITY SCREENING TOOL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns (DP) have been associated with nutritional and health status of older adults. DP assessment is typically based on comprehensive dietary assessment methods (i.e. 24-h recall, FFQ), which are not intended for broad-based screening. We created a diet quality screener questionnaire (D...

  7. Identifying Adolescents at Risk through Voluntary School-Based Mental Health Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husky, Mathilde M.; Kaplan, Adam; McGuire, Leslie; Flynn, Laurie; Chrostowski, Christine; Olfson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This study compares referrals for mental health services among high school students randomized to two means of referral to mental health services: referral via systematic identification through a brief mental health screening procedure (n = 365) or referral via the usual process of identification by school personnel, parents, or students…

  8. Using in Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays to Identify Potential Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 20 years, an increased focus on detecting environmental chemicals posing a risk of adverse effects due to endocrine disruption has driven the creation of the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Thousands of chemicals are subject to the EDSP, whic...

  9. DIETARY PATTERNS OF OLDER ADULTS IDENTIFIED BY A DIETARY QUALITY SCREENING TOOL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns (DP) have been associated with nutritional and health status of older adults. DP assessment is typically based on comprehensive dietary assessment methods (i.e. 24-h recall, FFQ), which are not intended for broad-based screening. We created a diet quality screener questionnaire (DQS...

  10. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies factors required for distinct stages of C. elegans piRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Wee-Siong Sho; Seah, Jun Wen Eugene; Harrison, Emily J.; Chen, Caifu; Hammell, Christopher M.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In animals, piRNAs and their associated Piwi proteins guard germ cell genomes against mobile genetic elements via an RNAi-like mechanism. In Caenorhabditis elegans, 21U-RNAs comprise the piRNA class, and these collaborate with 22G RNAs via unclear mechanisms to discriminate self from nonself and selectively and heritably silence the latter. Recent work indicates that 21U-RNAs are post-transcriptional processing products of individual transcription units that produce ∼26-nucleotide capped precursors. However, nothing is known of how the expression of precursors is controlled or how primary transcripts give rise to mature small RNAs. We conducted a genome-wide RNAi screen to identify components of the 21U biogenesis machinery. Screening by direct, quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based measurements of mature 21U-RNA levels, we identified 22 genes important for 21U-RNA production, termed TOFUs (Twenty-One-u Fouled Ups). We also identified seven genes that normally repress 21U production. By measuring mature 21U-RNA and precursor levels for the seven strongest hits from the screen, we assigned factors to discrete stages of 21U-RNA production. Our work identifies for the first time factors separately required for the transcription of 21U precursors and the processing of these precursors into mature 21U-RNAs, thereby providing a resource for studying the biogenesis of this important small RNA class. PMID:24696458

  11. Novel chemical library screen identifies naturally occurring plant products that specifically disrupt glioblastoma-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Barone, Amy; Marasa, Jayne; Taylor, Sara; Jackson, Erin; Warrington, Nicole M; Rao, Shyam; Kim, Albert H; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rubin, Joshua B

    2015-07-30

    Tumor growth is not solely a consequence of autonomous tumor cell properties. Rather, tumor cells act upon and are acted upon by their microenvironment. It is tumor tissue biology that ultimately determines tumor growth. Thus, we developed a compound library screen for agents that could block essential tumor-promoting effects of the glioblastoma (GBM) perivascular stem cell niche (PVN). We modeled the PVN with three-dimensional primary cultures of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in Matrigel. We previously demonstrated stimulated growth of GBM cells in this PVN model and used this to assay PVN function. We screened the Microsource Spectrum Collection library for drugs that specifically blocked PVN function, without any direct effect on GBM cells themselves. Three candidate PVN-disrupting agents, Iridin, Tigogenin and Triacetylresveratrol (TAR), were identified and evaluated in secondary in vitro screens against a panel of primary GBM isolates as well as in two different in vivo intracranial models. Iridin and TAR significantly inhibited intracranial tumor growth and prolonged survival in these mouse models. Together these data identify Iridin and TAR as drugs with novel GBM tissue disrupting effects and validate the importance of preclinical screens designed to address tumor tissue function rather than the mechanisms of autonomous tumor cell growth. PMID:26286961

  12. Small molecule drug screening in Drosophila identifies the 5HT2A receptor as a feeding modulation target

    PubMed Central

    Gasque, Gabriel; Conway, Stephen; Huang, Juan; Rao, Yi; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of eating behavior can lead to obesity, which affects 10% of the adult population worldwide and accounts for nearly 3 million deaths every year. Despite this burden on society, we currently lack effective pharmacological treatment options to regulate appetite. We used Drosophila melanogaster larvae to develop a high-throughput whole organism screen for drugs that modulate food intake. In a screen of 3630 small molecules, we identified the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) receptor antagonist metitepine as a potent anorectic drug. Using cell-based assays we show that metitepine is an antagonist of all five Drosophila 5-HT receptors. We screened fly mutants for each of these receptors and found that serotonin receptor 5-HT2A is the sole molecular target for feeding inhibition by metitepine. These results highlight the conservation of molecular mechanisms controlling appetite and provide a method for unbiased whole-organism drug screens to identify novel drugs and molecular pathways modulating food intake. PMID:23817146

  13. Target Mechanism-Based Whole-Cell Screening Identifies Bortezomib as an Inhibitor of Caseinolytic Protease in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Wilfried; Ngan, Grace J. Y.; Low, Jian Liang; Poulsen, Anders; Chia, Brian C. S.; Ang, Melgious J. Y.; Yap, Amelia; Fulwood, Justina; Lakshmanan, Umayal; Lim, Jolander; Khoo, Audrey Y. T.; Flotow, Horst; Hill, Jeffrey; Raju, Ravikiran M.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel type of antibacterial screening method, a target mechanism-based whole-cell screening method, was developed to combine the advantages of target mechanism- and whole-cell-based approaches. A mycobacterial reporter strain with a synthetic phenotype for caseinolytic protease (ClpP1P2) activity was engineered, allowing the detection of inhibitors of this enzyme inside intact bacilli. A high-throughput screening method identified bortezomib, a human 26S proteasome drug, as a potent inhibitor of ClpP1P2 activity and bacterial growth. A battery of secondary assays was employed to demonstrate that bortezomib indeed exerts its antimicrobial activity via inhibition of ClpP1P2: Down- or upmodulation of the intracellular protease level resulted in hyper- or hyposensitivity of the bacteria, the drug showed specific potentiation of translation error-inducing aminoglycosides, ClpP1P2-specific substrate WhiB1 accumulated upon exposure, and growth inhibition potencies of bortezomib derivatives correlated with ClpP1P2 inhibition potencies. Furthermore, molecular modeling showed that the drug can bind to the catalytic sites of ClpP1P2. This work demonstrates the feasibility of target mechanism-based whole-cell screening, provides chemical validation of ClpP1P2 as a target, and identifies a drug in clinical use as a new lead compound for tuberculosis therapy. PMID:25944857

  14. Novel chemical library screen identifies naturally occurring plant products that specifically disrupt glioblastoma-endothelial cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Marasa, Jayne; Taylor, Sara; Jackson, Erin; Warrington, Nicole M.; Rao, Shyam; Kim, Albert H.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rubin, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor growth is not solely a consequence of autonomous tumor cell properties. Rather, tumor cells act upon and are acted upon by their microenvironment. It is tumor tissue biology that ultimately determines tumor growth. Thus, we developed a compound library screen for agents that could block essential tumor-promoting effects of the glioblastoma (GBM) perivascular stem cell niche (PVN). We modeled the PVN with three-dimensional primary cultures of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in Matrigel. We previously demonstrated stimulated growth of GBM cells in this PVN model and used this to assay PVN function. We screened the Microsource Spectrum Collection library for drugs that specifically blocked PVN function, without any direct effect on GBM cells themselves. Three candidate PVN-disrupting agents, Iridin, Tigogenin and Triacetylresveratrol (TAR), were identified and evaluated in secondary in vitro screens against a panel of primary GBM isolates as well as in two different in vivo intracranial models. Iridin and TAR significantly inhibited intracranial tumor growth and prolonged survival in these mouse models. Together these data identify Iridin and TAR as drugs with novel GBM tissue disrupting effects and validate the importance of preclinical screens designed to address tumor tissue function rather than the mechanisms of autonomous tumor cell growth. PMID:26286961

  15. A screening approach for identifying environmental justice issues in environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect

    Schexnayder, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Executive Order 12898 and the accompanying memorandum addressed to Federal agency heads, both issued on February 11, 1994, require NEPA processes to incorporate environmental justice. The NEPA processes affected are: (1) public involvement formats, (2) analyses of potential impacts. The Executive Order clearly indicates that research strategies and mitigation measure should be developed with the input of the populations mentioned in the Executive Order, i.e., minority and low-income populations. However, an enhanced public involvement process may not occur because the NEPA activity may have been underway before the Executive Order was issued or because the agency chooses not to change traditional public participation mechanisms. It is also possible that enhanced mechanisms may not effectively elicit involvement. In either case, analysis that considers environmental justice must proceed. These analyses could be highly data-intensive--requiring new or modified methodological approaches-- and time-intensive, particularly if the process elements of the executive order are interpreted broadly, Federal agencies and NEPA project managers already have expressed concern about the potential cost of conducting exhaustive environmental justice related analyses where they may not be warranted. Also, the time and resources required to conduct a full environmental justice analysis is counter to recent trends to streamline the NEPA process. In light of this, a process to screen for indicators of the potential for environmental justice issues has been developed. The method incorporates separate screens for human health impacts, socioeconomic impacts, and social structural impacts. Positive results of any screen indicates the need for full-scale, environmental-justice-related analysis of that category of impact. The screen is intended as a useful tool in implementing environmental justice in environmental impact statements.

  16. Glycated hemoglobin screening identifies patients admitted for retreatment of tuberculosis at risk for diabetes in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sariko, Margaretha L; Mpagama, Stellah G; Gratz, Jean; Kisonga, Riziki; Saidi, Queen; Kibiki, Gibson S; Heysell, Scott K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization recommendations of bidirectional screening for tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes have been met with varying levels of uptake by national TB programs in resource-limited settings. Methodology Kibong’oto Infectious Diseases Hospital (KIDH) is a referral hospital for TB from northern Tanzania, and the national referral hospital for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Glycated hemoglobin (HgbA1c) testing was done on patients admitted to KIDH for newly diagnosed TB, retreatment TB, and MDR-TB, to determine the point prevalence of diabetes (HgbA1c ≥ 6.5%) and prediabetes (HgbA1c 5.7%– 6.4%). Results Of 148 patients hospitalized at KIDH over a single week, 59 (38%) had no prior TB treatment, 22 (15%) were retreatment cases, and 69 (47%) had MDR-TB. Only 3 (2%) had a known history of diabetes. A total of 144 (97%) had successful screening, of which 110 (77%) had an HgbA1c ≤ 5.6%, 28 (19%) had ≥ 5.7 < 6.5, and 6 (4%) had ≥ 6.5. Comparing subjects with prediabetes or diabetes to those with normal A1c levels, retreatment patients were significantly more likely to have a A1c ≥ 5.7% (odds ratio: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2–9.0; p = 0.02) compared to those without prior TB treatment. No retreatment case was a known diabetic, thus the number needed to screen to diagnose one new case of diabetes among retreatment cases was 11. Conclusions Diabetes prevalence by HgbA1c was less common than expected, but higher HgA1c values were significantly more frequent among retreatment cases, allowing for a rational, resource-conscious screening approach. PMID:27131008

  17. Niche-based screening identifies small-molecule inhibitors of leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Kahn, Alissa R; Stewart, Alison L; Logan, David J; Negri, Joseph M; Duvet, Mildred; Järås, Marcus; Puram, Rishi; Dancik, Vlado; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Kindler, Thomas; Tothova, Zuzana; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; Hasaka, Thomas; Narayan, Rajiv; Dai, Mingji; Huang, Christina; Shterental, Sebastian; Chu, Lisa P; Haydu, J Erika; Shieh, Jae Hung; Steensma, David P; Munoz, Benito; Bittker, Joshua A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clemons, Paul A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Carpenter, Anne E; Gilliland, D Gary; Stern, Andrew M; Moore, Malcolm A S; Scadden, David T; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ebert, Benjamin L; Golub, Todd R

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to develop more effective therapies for acute leukemia may benefit from high-throughput screening systems that reflect the complex physiology of the disease, including leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and supportive interactions with the bone-marrow microenvironment. The therapeutic targeting of LSCs is challenging because LSCs are highly similar to normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and are protected by stromal cells in vivo. We screened 14,718 compounds in a leukemia-stroma co-culture system for inhibition of cobblestone formation, a cellular behavior associated with stem-cell function. Among those that inhibited malignant cells but spared HSPCs was the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Lovastatin showed anti-LSC activity in vitro and in an in vivo bone marrow transplantation model. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effect was on-target, via inhibition of HMGCoA reductase. These results illustrate the power of merging physiologically-relevant models with high-throughput screening. PMID:24161946

  18. Drosophila glucome screening identifies Ck1alpha as a regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ugrankar, Rupali; Berglund, Eric; Akdemir, Fatih; Tran, Christopher; Kim, Min Soo; Noh, Jungsik; Schneider, Rebekka; Ebert, Benjamin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating carbohydrates are an essential energy source, perturbations in which are pathognomonic of various diseases, diabetes being the most prevalent. Yet many of the genes underlying diabetes and its characteristic hyperglycaemia remain elusive. Here we use physiological and genetic interrogations in D. melanogaster to uncover the ‘glucome', the complete set of genes involved in glucose regulation in flies. Partial genomic screens of ∼1,000 genes yield ∼160 hyperglycaemia ‘flyabetes' candidates that we classify using fat body- and muscle-specific knockdown and biochemical assays. The results highlight the minor glucose fraction as a physiological indicator of metabolism in Drosophila. The hits uncovered in our screen may have conserved functions in mammalian glucose homeostasis, as heterozygous and homozygous mutants of Ck1alpha in the murine adipose lineage, develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that glucose has a role in fly biology and that genetic screenings carried out in flies may increase our understanding of mammalian pathophysiology. PMID:25994086

  19. High throughput screening identifies ATP-competitive inhibitors of the NLRP1 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Harris, Philip A; Duraiswami, Chaya; Fisher, Donald T; Fornwald, James; Hoffman, Sandra J; Hofmann, Glenn; Jiang, Ming; Lehr, Ruth; McCormick, Patricia M; Nickels, Leng; Schwartz, Benjamin; Wu, Zining; Zhang, Guofeng; Marquis, Robert W; Bertin, John; Gough, Peter J

    2015-07-15

    Nod-like receptors (NLRs) are cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors that are promising targets for the development of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Drug discovery efforts targeting NLRs have been hampered by their inherent tendency to form aggregates making protein generation and the development of screening assays very challenging. Herein we report the results of an HTS screen of NLR family member NLRP1 (NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 1) which was achieved through the large scale generation of recombinant GST-His-Thrombin-NLRP1 protein. The screen led to the identification of a diverse set of ATP competitive inhibitors with micromolar potencies. Activity of these hits was confirmed in a FP binding assay, and two homology models were employed to predict the possible binding mode of the leading series and facilitate further lead-optimization. These results highlight a promising strategy for the identification of inhibitors of NLR family members which are rapidly emerging as key drivers of inflammation in human disease. PMID:26022841

  20. New Compound Sets Identified from High Throughput Phenotypic Screening Against Three Kinetoplastid Parasites: An Open Resource

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Imanol; Pilar Manzano, M.; Cantizani, Juan; Kessler, Albane; Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Bardera, Ana I.; Alvarez, Emilio; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Cotillo, Ignacio; Roquero, Irene; de Dios-Anton, Francisco; Barroso, Vanessa; Rodriguez, Ana; Gray, David W.; Navarro, Miguel; Kumar, Vinod; Sherstnev, Alexander; Drewry, David H.; Brown, James R.; Fiandor, Jose M.; Julio Martin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Using whole-cell phenotypic assays, the GlaxoSmithKline high-throughput screening (HTS) diversity set of 1.8 million compounds was screened against the three kinetoplastids most relevant to human disease, i.e. Leishmania donovani, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. Secondary confirmatory and orthogonal intracellular anti-parasiticidal assays were conducted, and the potential for non-specific cytotoxicity determined. Hit compounds were chemically clustered and triaged for desirable physicochemical properties. The hypothetical biological target space covered by these diversity sets was investigated through bioinformatics methodologies. Consequently, three anti-kinetoplastid chemical boxes of ~200 compounds each were assembled. Functional analyses of these compounds suggest a wide array of potential modes of action against kinetoplastid kinases, proteases and cytochromes as well as potential host–pathogen targets. This is the first published parallel high throughput screening of a pharma compound collection against kinetoplastids. The compound sets are provided as an open resource for future lead discovery programs, and to address important research questions. PMID:25740547

  1. A Quick Drinking Screen for identifying women at risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dum, Mariam; Sobell, Linda Carter; Sobell, Mark B; Heinecke, Nicholas; Voluse, Andrew; Johnson, Kenneth

    2009-09-01

    Two previous studies comparing the Quick Drinking Screen (QDS) with the Timeline Followback (TLFB) found that these two instruments yielded similar reports of alcohol use for clinical and nonclinical populations of problem drinkers. The current study evaluated the correspondence between these two drinking measures with women at risk of an Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy (AEP). Participants were 355 women who voluntarily participated in a research study during 2005 through 2007 designed to prevent AEPs. All women were screened by phone for eligibility using the QDS and approximately 2 weeks later completed a 3-month TLFB by mail. Results of this study, analyzed in 2008, paralleled previous studies showing that the QDS and the TLFB, two very different drinking measures, collected similar aggregate drinking data for women who drink heavily and are at risk of an AEP. Correspondence between the two drinking measures met acceptable levels of reliability. The present study found that the QDS has demonstrated efficacy for screening women whose level of alcohol use puts them at risk for an AEP. Although the QDS does not yield detailed drinking information, it could be used when it is not possible or necessary to gather daily drinking data. PMID:19406583

  2. Quantitative high-throughput screening: A titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Simeonov, Anton; Yasgar, Adam; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the primary screen and reliably profile the range of biological activities associated with large chemical libraries. Traditional HTS, which tests compounds at a single concentration, is not suited to this task, because HTS is burdened by frequent false positives and false negatives and requires extensive follow-up testing. We have developed a paradigm, quantitative HTS (qHTS), tested with the enzyme pyruvate kinase, to generate concentration–response curves for >60,000 compounds in a single experiment. We show that this method is precise, refractory to variations in sample preparation, and identifies compounds with a wide range of activities. Concentration–response curves were classified to rapidly identify pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors with a variety of potencies and efficacies and elucidate structure–activity relationships directly from the primary screen. Comparison of qHTS with traditional single-concentration HTS revealed a high prevalence of false negatives in the single-point screen. This study demonstrates the feasibility of qHTS for accurately profiling every compound in large chemical libraries (>105 compounds). qHTS produces rich data sets that can be immediately mined for reliable biological activities, thereby providing a platform for chemical genomics and accelerating the identification of leads for drug discovery. PMID:16864780

  3. The E-SCREEN assay as a tool to identify estrogens: an update on estrogenic environmental pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C; Chung, K L; Fernandez, M F; Olea, N; Serrano, F O

    1995-01-01

    Estrogens are defined by their ability to induce the proliferation of cells of the female genital tract. The wide chemical diversity of estrogenic compounds precludes an accurate prediction of estrogenic activity on the basis of chemical structure. Rodent bioassays are not suited for the large-scale screening of chemicals before their release into the environment because of their cost, complexity, and ethical concerns. The E-SCREEN assay was developed to assess the estrogenicity of environmental chemicals using the proliferative effect of estrogens on their target cells as an end point. This quantitative assay compares the cell number achieved by similar inocula of MCF-7 cells in the absence of estrogens (negative control) and in the presence of 17 beta-estradiol (positive control) and a range of concentrations of chemicals suspected to be estrogenic. Among the compounds tested, several "new" estrogens were found; alkylphenols, phthalates, some PCB congeners and hydroxylated PCBs, and the insecticides dieldrin, endosulfan, and toxaphene were estrogenic by the E-SCREEN assay. In addition, these compounds competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor and increased the levels of progesterone receptor and pS2 in MCF-7 cells, as expected from estrogen mimics. Recombinant human growth factors (bFGF, EGF, IGF-1) and insulin did not increase in cell yields. The aims of the work summarized in this paper were a) to validate the E-SCREEN assay; b) to screen a variety of chemicals present in the environment to identify those that may be causing reproductive effects in wildlife and humans; c) to assess whether environmental estrogens may act cumulatively; and finally d) to discuss the reliability of this and other assays to screen chemicals for their estrogenicity before they are released into the environment. PMID:8593856

  4. Structure based virtual screening to identify inhibitors against MurE Enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using AutoDock Vina

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shilpi; Bajpai, Urmi; Lynn, Andrew Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Mur E enzyme of Mur pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an attractive drug target as it is unique to bacteria and is absent in mammalian cells. The virtual screening of large libraries of drug like molecules against a protein target is a common strategy used to identify novel inhibitors. However, the method has a large number of pitfalls, with large variations in accuracy caused in part by inaccurate protocols, use of improper standards and libraries, and system dependencies such as the potential for nonspecific docking from large active-site cavities. The screening of drug-like small molecules from diversity sets can, however, be used to short-list potential fragments as building blocks to generate leads with improved specificity. We describe a protocol to implement this strategy, which involves an analysis of the active site and known inhibitors to identify orthospecific determinants, virtual screening of a drug-like diversity library to identify potential drug primitives, and inspection of the potential docked fragments for both binding potential and toxicity. The protocol is implemented on the M.tb Mur E protein which has a large active site with poor enrichment of known positives and a set of drug-like molecules that meets this criteria is presented for further analysis. Abbreviations MTB - Mycobacterium tuberculosis, NCI - National Cancer Institute, PDB - Protein Databank. PMID:25512687

  5. Sensitized phenotypic screening identifies gene dosage sensitive region on chromosome 11 that predisposes to disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Olga; Piszczek, Lukasz; Luciani, Luisa; Cavalli, Florence M G; Ferreira, Tiago; Farley, Dominika; Rizzo, Stefania; Paolicelli, Rosa Chiara; Al-Banchaabouchi, Mumna; Nerlov, Claus; Moriggl, Richard; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Gross, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    The identification of susceptibility genes for human disease is a major goal of current biomedical research. Both sequence and structural variation have emerged as major genetic sources of phenotypic variability and growing evidence points to copy number variation as a particularly important source of susceptibility for disease. Here we propose and validate a strategy to identify genes in which changes in dosage alter susceptibility to disease-relevant phenotypes in the mouse. Our approach relies on sensitized phenotypic screening of megabase-sized chromosomal deletion and deficiency lines carrying altered copy numbers of ∼30 linked genes. This approach offers several advantages as a method to systematically identify genes involved in disease susceptibility. To examine the feasibility of such a screen, we performed sensitized phenotyping in five therapeutic areas (metabolic syndrome, immune dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cancer and behaviour) of a 0.8 Mb reciprocal chromosomal duplication and deficiency on chromosome 11 containing 27 genes. Gene dosage in the region significantly affected risk for high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome, antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity, ApoE-induced atherosclerosis, and home cage activity. Follow up studies on individual gene knockouts for two candidates in the region showed that copy number variation in Stat5 was responsible for the phenotypic variation in antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity and metabolic syndrome. These data demonstrate the power of sensitized phenotypic screening of segmental aneuploidy lines to identify disease susceptibility genes. PMID:21204268

  6. An in vivo screen identifies ependymoma oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M.; Currle, David S.; White, Elsie; Boulos, Nidal; Dapper, Jason; Eden, Christopher; Nimmervoll, Birgit; Thiruvenkatam, Radhika; Connelly, Michele; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Neale, Geoffrey; Olsen, Scott; Wang, Yong-Dong; Finkelstein, David; Wright, Karen; Gupta, Kirti; Ellison, David W.; Thomas, Arzu Onar; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancers are characterized by non-random, chromosome copy number alterations that presumably contain oncogenes and tumor–suppressor genes (TSGs). The affected loci are often large, making it difficult to pinpoint which genes are driving the cancer. Here, we report a cross-species in vivo screen of 84 candidate oncogenes and 39 candidate TSGs, located within 28 recurrent chromosomal alterations in ependymoma. Through a series of mouse models we validate eight new ependymoma oncogenes and 10 ependymoma TSGs that converge on a small number of cell functions including vesicle trafficking, DNA modification and cholesterol biosynthesis, pinpointing these as potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:26075792

  7. Promising Aedes aegypti Repellent Chemotypes Identified through Integrated QSAR, Virtual Screening, Synthesis, and Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Oliferenko, Polina V.; Oliferenko, Alexander A.; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Osolodkin, Dmitry I.; Pillai, Girinath G.; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Tsikolia, Maia; Agramonte, Natasha M.; Clark, Gary G.; Linthicum, Kenneth J.; Katritzky, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular field topology analysis, scaffold hopping, and molecular docking were used as complementary computational tools for the design of repellents for Aedes aegypti, the insect vector for yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue fever. A large number of analogues were evaluated by virtual screening with Glide molecular docking software. This produced several dozen hits that were either synthesized or procured from commercial sources. Analysis of these compounds by a repellent bioassay resulted in a few highly active chemicals (in terms of minimum effective dosage) as viable candidates for further hit-to-lead and lead optimization effort. PMID:24039693

  8. Complexity of the alpha-globin genotypes identified with thalassemia screening in Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Paglietti, Maria E; Sollaino, Maria C; Desogus, Maria F; Barella, Susanna; Loi, Daniela; Galanello, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia commonly results from deletions or point mutations in one or both α-globin genes located on chromosome 16p13.3 giving rise to complex and variable genotypes and phenotypes. Rarely, unusual non-deletion defects or atypical deletions down-regulate the expression of the α-globin gene. In the last decade of the program for β-thalassemia carrier screening and genetic counseling in Sardinia, the association of new techniques of molecular biology such as gene sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) to conventional methods has allowed to better define several thalassemic genotypes and the complex variability of the α-cluster with its flanking regions, with a high frequency of different genotypes and compound heterozygosity for two α mutations even in the same family. The exact molecular definition of the genotypes resulting from the interactions among the large number of α-thalassemia determinants and with β-thalassemia, is important for a correct correlation of genotype-phenotype and to prevent underdiagnosis of carrier status which could hamper the effectiveness of a screening program particularly in those regions where a high frequency of hemoglobinopathies is present. PMID:23896219

  9. A Yeast/Drosophila Screen to Identify New Compounds Overcoming Frataxin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Alexandra; Monnier, Véronique; Palandri, Amandine; Bihel, Frédéric; Rera, Michael; Schmitt, Martine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Tricoire, Hervé; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is a rare neurodegenerative disease which is very debilitating for the patients who progressively lose their autonomy. The lack of efficient therapeutic treatment of the disease strongly argues for urgent need to search for new active compounds that may stop the progression of the disease or prevent the appearance of the symptoms when the genetic defect is diagnosed early enough. In the present study, we used a yeast strain with a deletion of the frataxin homologue gene as a model of FA cells in a primary screen of two chemical libraries, a fraction of the French National Chemical Library (5500 compounds) and the Prestwick collection (880 compounds). We ran a secondary screen on Drosophila melanogaster flies expressing reduced levels of frataxin during larval development. Half of the compounds selected in yeast appeared to be active in flies in this developmental paradigm, and one of the two compounds with highest activities in this assay partially rescued the heart dilatation phenotype resulting from heart specific depletion of frataxin. The unique complementarity of these two frataxin-deficient models, unicellular and multicellular, appears to be very efficient to select new compounds with improved selectivity, bringing significant perspectives towards improvements in FA therapy. PMID:26523199

  10. Bioavailable inhibitors of HIV-1 RNA biogenesis identified through a Rev-based screen.

    PubMed

    Prado, Silvia; Beltrán, Manuela; Coiras, Mayte; Bedoya, Luis M; Alcamí, José; Gallego, José

    2016-05-01

    New antiretroviral agents with alternative mechanisms are needed to complement the combination therapies used to treat HIV-1 infections. Here we report the identification of bioavailable molecules that interfere with the gene expression processes of HIV-1. The compounds were detected by screening a small library of FDA-approved drugs with an assay based on measuring the displacement of Rev, and essential virus-encoded protein, from its high-affinity RNA binding site. The antiretroviral activity of two hits was based on interference with post-integration steps of the HIV-1 cycle. Both hits inhibited RRE-Rev complex formation in vitro, and blocked LTR-dependent gene expression and viral transcription in cellular assays. The best compound altered the splicing pattern of HIV-1 transcripts in a manner consistent with Rev inhibition. This mechanism of action is different from those used by current antiretroviral agents. The screening hits recognized the Rev binding site in the viral RNA, and the best compound did so with substantial selectivity, allowing the identification of a new RNA-binding scaffold. These results may be used for developing novel antiretroviral drugs. PMID:26896646

  11. High-throughput small molecule screen identifies inhibitors of aberrant chromatin accessibility.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Samantha G; Simon, Jeremy M; Wali, Aminah; Jayakody, Chatura N; Troutman, Jacob; McFadden, Andrew W; Wooten, Joshua; Wood, Cameron C; Frye, Stephen V; Janzen, William P; Davis, Ian J

    2016-03-15

    Mutations in chromatin-modifying proteins and transcription factors are commonly associated with a wide variety of cancers. Through gain- or loss-of-function, these mutations may result in characteristic alterations of accessible chromatin, indicative of shifts in the landscape of regulatory elements genome-wide. The identification of compounds that reverse a specific chromatin signature could lead to chemical probes or potential therapies. To explore whether chromatin accessibility could serve as a platform for small molecule screening, we adapted formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE), a chemical method to enrich for nucleosome-depleted genomic regions, as a high-throughput, automated assay. After demonstrating the validity and robustness of this approach, we applied this method to screen an epigenetically targeted small molecule library by evaluating regions of aberrant nucleosome depletion mediated by EWSR1-FLI1, the chimeric transcription factor critical for the bone and soft tissue tumor Ewing sarcoma. As a class, histone deacetylase inhibitors were greatly overrepresented among active compounds. These compounds resulted in diminished accessibility at targeted sites by disrupting transcription of EWSR1-FLI1. Capitalizing on precise differences in chromatin accessibility for drug discovery efforts offers significant advantages because it does not depend on the a priori selection of a single molecular target and may detect novel biologically relevant pathways. PMID:26929321

  12. A Large-Scale Behavioral Screen to Identify Neurons Controlling Motor Programs in the Drosophila Brain

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Thomas F.; Gorczyca, Michael; White, Benjamin H.; Ito, Kei; Yoshihara, Motojiro

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila is increasingly used for understanding the neural basis of behavior through genetically targeted manipulation of specific neurons. The primary approach in this regard has relied on the suppression of neuronal activity. Here, we report the results of a novel approach to find and characterize neural circuits by expressing neuronal activators to stimulate subsets of neurons to induce behavior. Classical electrophysiological studies demonstrated that stimulation of command neurons could activate neural circuits to trigger fixed action patterns. Our method was designed to find such command neurons for diverse behaviors by screening flies in which random subsets of brain cells were activated. We took advantage of the large collection of Gal4 lines from the NP project and crossed 835 Gal4 strains with relatively limited Gal4 expression in the brain to flies carrying a UAS transgene encoding TRPM8, a cold-sensitive ion channel. Low temperatures opened the TRPM8 channel in Gal4-expressing cells, leading to their excitation, and in many cases induced overt behavioral changes in adult flies. Paralysis was reproducibly observed in the progeny of crosses with 84 lines, whereas more specific behaviors were induced with 24 other lines. Stimulation performed using the heat-activated channel, TrpA1, resulted in clearer and more robust behaviors, including flight, feeding, and egg-laying. Through follow-up studies starting from this screen, we expect to find key components of the neural circuits underlying specific behaviors, thus providing a new avenue for their functional analysis. PMID:23934998

  13. A SMALL MOLECULE SCREEN IDENTIFIES SELECTIVE INHIBITORS OF UREA TRANSPORTER UT-A

    PubMed Central

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O.; Verkman, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Urea transporter (UT) proteins, including UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta microvessels, facilitate urinary concentrating function. A screen for UT-A inhibitors was developed in MDCK cells expressing UT-A1, water channel aquaporin-1, and YFP-H148Q/V163S. An inwardly directed urea gradient produces cell shrinking followed by UT-A1-dependent swelling, which was monitored by YFP-H148Q/V163S fluorescence. Screening of ~90,000 synthetic small molecules yielded four classes of UT-A1 inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 that fully and reversibly inhibited urea transport by a non-competitive mechanism. Structure-activity analysis of >400 analogs revealed UT-A1-selective and UT-A1/UT-B non-selective inhibitors. Docking computations based on homology models of UT-A1 suggested inhibitor binding sites. UT-A inhibitors may be useful as diuretics (‘urearetics’) with a novel mechanism of action that may be effective in fluid-retaining conditions in which conventional salt transport-blocking diuretics have limited efficacy. PMID:24055006

  14. A Yeast/Drosophila Screen to Identify New Compounds Overcoming Frataxin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Alexandra; Monnier, Véronique; Palandri, Amandine; Bihel, Frédéric; Rera, Michael; Schmitt, Martine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Tricoire, Hervé; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is a rare neurodegenerative disease which is very debilitating for the patients who progressively lose their autonomy. The lack of efficient therapeutic treatment of the disease strongly argues for urgent need to search for new active compounds that may stop the progression of the disease or prevent the appearance of the symptoms when the genetic defect is diagnosed early enough. In the present study, we used a yeast strain with a deletion of the frataxin homologue gene as a model of FA cells in a primary screen of two chemical libraries, a fraction of the French National Chemical Library (5500 compounds) and the Prestwick collection (880 compounds). We ran a secondary screen on Drosophila melanogaster flies expressing reduced levels of frataxin during larval development. Half of the compounds selected in yeast appeared to be active in flies in this developmental paradigm, and one of the two compounds with highest activities in this assay partially rescued the heart dilatation phenotype resulting from heart specific depletion of frataxin. The unique complementarity of these two frataxin-deficient models, unicellular and multicellular, appears to be very efficient to select new compounds with improved selectivity, bringing significant perspectives towards improvements in FA therapy. PMID:26523199

  15. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Kidney Toxic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Susanne; Adler, Melanie; Vaidya, Vishal S

    2016-01-01

    Kidney toxicity due to drugs and chemicals poses a significant health burden for patients and a financial risk for pharmaceutical companies. However, currently no sensitive and high-throughput in vitro method exists for predictive nephrotoxicity assessment. Primary human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HPTECs) possess characteristics of differentiated epithelial cells, making them a desirable model to use in in vitro screening systems. Additionally, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein expression is upregulated as a protective mechanism during kidney toxicant-induced oxidative stress or inflammation in HPTECs and can therefore be used as a biomarker for nephrotoxicity. In this article, we describe two different methods to screen for HO-1 increase: A homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) assay and an immunofluorescence assay. The latter provides lower throughput but higher sensitivity due to the combination of two readouts, HO-1 intensity and cell number. The methods described in the protocol are amendable for other cell types as well. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479365

  16. First quantitative high-throughput screen in zebrafish identifies novel pathways for increasing pancreatic β-cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangliang; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Delaspre, Fabien; Walker, Steven L; White, David T; Ceasrine, Alexis; Kuruvilla, Rejji; Li, Ruo-jing; Shim, Joong S; Liu, Jun O; Parsons, Michael J; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Whole-organism chemical screening can circumvent bottlenecks that impede drug discovery. However, in vivo screens have not attained throughput capacities possible with in vitro assays. We therefore developed a method enabling in vivo high-throughput screening (HTS) in zebrafish, termed automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv). In this study, ARQiv was combined with robotics to fully actualize whole-organism HTS (ARQiv-HTS). In a primary screen, this platform quantified cell-specific fluorescent reporters in >500,000 transgenic zebrafish larvae to identify FDA-approved (Federal Drug Administration) drugs that increased the number of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. 24 drugs were confirmed as inducers of endocrine differentiation and/or stimulators of β-cell proliferation. Further, we discovered novel roles for NF-κB signaling in regulating endocrine differentiation and for serotonergic signaling in selectively stimulating β-cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the power of ARQiv-HTS for drug discovery and provide unique insights into signaling pathways controlling β-cell mass, potential therapeutic targets for treating diabetes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08261.001 PMID:26218223

  17. First quantitative high-throughput screen in zebrafish identifies novel pathways for increasing pancreatic β-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangliang; Rajpurohit, Surendra K; Delaspre, Fabien; Walker, Steven L; White, David T; Ceasrine, Alexis; Kuruvilla, Rejji; Li, Ruo-Jing; Shim, Joong S; Liu, Jun O; Parsons, Michael J; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Whole-organism chemical screening can circumvent bottlenecks that impede drug discovery. However, in vivo screens have not attained throughput capacities possible with in vitro assays. We therefore developed a method enabling in vivo high-throughput screening (HTS) in zebrafish, termed automated reporter quantification in vivo (ARQiv). In this study, ARQiv was combined with robotics to fully actualize whole-organism HTS (ARQiv-HTS). In a primary screen, this platform quantified cell-specific fluorescent reporters in >500,000 transgenic zebrafish larvae to identify FDA-approved (Federal Drug Administration) drugs that increased the number of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. 24 drugs were confirmed as inducers of endocrine differentiation and/or stimulators of β-cell proliferation. Further, we discovered novel roles for NF-κB signaling in regulating endocrine differentiation and for serotonergic signaling in selectively stimulating β-cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the power of ARQiv-HTS for drug discovery and provide unique insights into signaling pathways controlling β-cell mass, potential therapeutic targets for treating diabetes. PMID:26218223

  18. Validation of a rapid type 1 diabetes autoantibody screening assay for community-based screening of organ donors to identify subjects at increased risk for the disease.

    PubMed

    Wasserfall, C; Montgomery, E; Yu, L; Michels, A; Gianani, R; Pugliese, A; Nierras, C; Kaddis, J S; Schatz, D A; Bonifacio, E; Atkinson, M A

    2016-07-01

    The Network for Pancreatic Organ donors with Diabetes (nPOD) programme was developed in response to an unmet research need for human pancreatic tissue obtained from individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus and people at increased risk [i.e. autoantibody (AAb)-positive] for the disease. This necessitated the establishment of a type 1 diabetes-specific AAb screening platform for organ procurement organizations (OPOs). Assay protocols for commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (elisas) determining AAb against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), insulinoma-associated protein-2 (IA-2A) and zinc transporter-8 (ZnT8A) were modified to identify AAb-positive donors within strict time requirements associated with organ donation programmes. These rapid elisas were evaluated by the international islet AAb standardization programme (IASP) and used by OPO laboratories as an adjunct to routine serological tests evaluating donors for organ transplantation. The rapid elisas performed well in three IASPs (2011, 2013, 2015) with 98-100% specificity for all three assays, including sensitivities of 64-82% (GADA), 60-64% (IA-2A) and 62-68% (ZnT8A). Since 2009, nPOD has screened 4442 organ donors by rapid elisa; 250 (5·6%) were identified as positive for one AAb and 14 (0.3%) for multiple AAb with 20 of these cases received by nPOD for follow-up studies (14 GADA+, two IA-2A(+) , four multiple AAb-positive). Rapid screening for type 1 diabetes-associated AAb in organ donors is feasible, allowing for identification of non-diabetic, high-risk individuals and procurement of valuable tissues for natural history studies of this disease. PMID:27029857

  19. A multi-element screening method to identify metal targets for blood biomonitoring in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Villa, C A; Finlayson, S; Limpus, C; Gaus, C

    2015-04-15

    Biomonitoring of blood is commonly used to identify and quantify occupational or environmental exposure to chemical contaminants. Increasingly, this technique has been applied to wildlife contaminant monitoring, including for green turtles, allowing for the non-lethal evaluation of chemical exposure in their nearshore environment. The sources, composition, bioavailability and toxicity of metals in the marine environment are, however, often unknown and influenced by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. These factors can vary considerably across time and space making the selection of the most informative elements for biomonitoring challenging. This study aimed to validate an ICP-MS multi-element screening method for green turtle blood in order to identify and facilitate prioritisation of target metals for subsequent fully quantitative analysis. Multi-element screening provided semiquantitative results for 70 elements, 28 of which were also determined through fully quantitative analysis. Of the 28 comparable elements, 23 of the semiquantitative results had an accuracy between 67% and 112% relative to the fully quantified values. In lieu of any available turtle certified reference materials (CRMs), we evaluated the use of human blood CRMs as a matrix surrogate for quality control, and compared two commonly used sample preparation methods for matrix related effects. The results demonstrate that human blood provides an appropriate matrix for use as a quality control material in the fully quantitative analysis of metals in turtle blood. An example for the application of this screening method is provided by comparing screening results from blood of green turtles foraging in an urban and rural region in Queensland, Australia. Potential targets for future metal biomonitoring in these regions were identified by this approach. PMID:25655987

  20. A Chemical Genetic Screen for Modulators of Exocytic Transport Identifies Inhibitors of a Transport Mechanism Linked to GTR2 Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisha; Huang, Min; Harsay, Edina

    2010-01-01

    Membrane and protein traffic to the cell surface is mediated by partially redundant pathways that are difficult to perturb in ways that yield a strong phenotype. Such robustness is expected in a fine-tuned process, regulated by environmental cues, that is required for controlled cell surface growth and cell proliferation. Synthetic genetic interaction screens are especially valuable for investigating complex processes involving partially redundant pathways or mechanisms. In a previous study, we used a triple-synthetic-lethal yeast mutant screen to identify a novel component of the late exocytic transport machinery, Avl9. In a chemical-genetic version of the successful mutant screen, we have now identified small molecules that cause a rapid (within 15 min) accumulation of secretory cargo and abnormal Golgi compartment-like membranes at low concentration (<2 μM), indicating that the compounds likely target the exocytic transport machinery at the Golgi. We screened for genes that, when overexpressed, suppress the drug effects, and found that the Ras-like small GTPase, Gtr2, but not its homolog and binding partner, Gtr1, efficiently suppresses the toxic effects of the compounds. Furthermore, assays for suppression of the secretory defect caused by the compounds suggest that Gtr proteins can regulate a pathway that is perturbed by the compounds. Because avl9Δ and gtr mutants share some phenotypes, our results indicate that the small molecules identified by our chemical-genetic strategy are promising tools for understanding Avl9 function and the mechanisms that control late exocytic transport. PMID:19897736

  1. Ionomic screening of field-grown soybeans identifies mutants with altered seed elemental composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean seeds contain high levels of mineral nutrients essential for human and animal nutrition. High throughput elemental profiling (ionomics) has identified mutants in model plant species grown in controlled environments. Here, we describe a method for identifying potential soybean ionomics mutant...

  2. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies Cohesin Genes as Modifiers of Renewal and Differentiation in Human HSCs.

    PubMed

    Galeev, Roman; Baudet, Aurélie; Kumar, Praveen; Rundberg Nilsson, Alexandra; Nilsson, Björn; Soneji, Shamit; Törngren, Therese; Borg, Åke; Kvist, Anders; Larsson, Jonas

    2016-03-29

    To gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), we employed a genome-wide RNAi screen in human cord-blood derived cells and identified candidate genes whose knockdown maintained the HSC phenotype during culture. A striking finding was the identification of members of the cohesin complex (STAG2, RAD21, STAG1, and SMC3) among the top 20 genes from the screen. Upon individual validation of these cohesin genes, we found that their knockdown led to an immediate expansion of cells with an HSC phenotype in vitro. A similar expansion was observed in vivo following transplantation to immunodeficient mice. Transcriptome analysis of cohesin-deficient CD34(+) cells showed an upregulation of HSC-specific genes, demonstrating an immediate shift toward a more stem-cell-like gene expression signature upon cohesin deficiency. Our findings implicate cohesin as a major regulator of HSCs and illustrate the power of global RNAi screens to identify modifiers of cell fate. PMID:26997282

  3. A Functional Genome-Wide In Vivo Screen Identifies New Regulators of Signalling Pathways during Early Xenopus Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Li, Jingjing; Lea, Robert; Amaya, Enrique; Dorey, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development requires exquisite regulation of several essential processes, such as patterning of tissues and organs, cell fate decisions, and morphogenesis. Intriguingly, these diverse processes are controlled by only a handful of signalling pathways, and mis-regulation in one or more of these pathways may result in a variety of congenital defects and diseases. Consequently, investigating how these signalling pathways are regulated at the molecular level is essential to understanding the mechanisms underlying vertebrate embryogenesis, as well as developing treatments for human diseases. Here, we designed and performed a large-scale gain-of-function screen in Xenopus embryos aimed at identifying new regulators of MAPK/Erk, PI3K/Akt, BMP, and TGF-β/Nodal signalling pathways. Our gain-of-function screen is based on the identification of gene products that alter the phosphorylation state of key signalling molecules, which report the activation state of the pathways. In total, we have identified 20 new molecules that regulate the activity of one or more signalling pathways during early Xenopus development. This is the first time that such a functional screen has been performed, and the findings pave the way toward a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of important signalling pathways under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24244509

  4. Quantitative high throughput screening identifies inhibitors of anthrax-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ping Jun; Hobson, Peyton; Southall, Noel; Qiu, Cunping; Thomas, Craig J.; Lu, Jiamo; Inglese, James; Zheng, Wei; Leppla, Stephen H.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Austin, Christopher P.; Liu, Shihui

    2009-01-01

    Here, we report the results of a quantitative high-throughput screen (qHTS) measuring the endocytosis and translocation of a β-lactamase-fused-lethal factor and the identification of small molecules capable of obstructing the process of anthrax toxin internalization. Several small molecules protect RAW264.7 macrophages and CHO cells from anthrax lethal toxin and protected cells from an LF-Pseudomonas exotoxin fusion protein and diphtheria toxin. Further efforts demonstrated that these compounds impaired the PA heptamer pre-pore to pore conversion in cells expressing the CMG2 receptor, but not the related TEM8 receptor, indicating that these compounds likely interfere with toxin internalization. PMID:19540764

  5. A high-throughput screening assay to identify bacterial antagonists against Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput antagonistic assay was developed to screen for bacterial isolates capable of controlling the maize fungal phytopathogen Fusarium verticillioides. This assay combines a straightforward methodology, in which the fungus is challenged with bacterial isolates in liquid medium, with a novel approach that uses the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) coupled to a fluorophore (Alexa-Fluor® 488) under the commercial name of WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. The assay is performed in a 96-well plate format, which reduces the required laboratory space and streamlines quantitation and automation of the process, making it fast and accurate. The basis of our assay is that fungal biomass can be assessed by WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate staining, which recognizes the chitin in the fungal cell wall and thus permits the identification of potential antagonistic bacteria that inhibit fungal growth. This principle was validated by chitin-competition binding assays against WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate; confocal laser microscopy confirmed that the fluorescent WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate binds to the chitin of the fungal cell wall. The majority of bacterial isolates did not bind to the WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. Furthermore, including washing steps significantly reduced any bacterial staining to background levels, even in the rare cases where bacterial isolates were capable of binding to WGA. Confirmatory conventional agar plate antagonistic assays were also conducted to validate our technique. We are now successfully employing this large-scale antagonistic assay as a pre-screening step for potential fungal antagonists in extensive bacteria collections (on the order of thousands of isolates). PMID:23787812

  6. siRNA Screening to Identify Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like System Regulators of Biological Pathways in Cultured Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bett, John S.; Ibrahim, Adel F. M.; Garg, Amit K.; Rocha, Sonia; Hay, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like molecules (UBLs) is emerging as a dynamic cellular signaling network that regulates diverse biological pathways including the hypoxia response, proteostasis, the DNA damage response and transcription.  To better understand how UBLs regulate pathways relevant to human disease, we have compiled a human siRNA “ubiquitome” library consisting of 1,186 siRNA duplex pools targeting all known and predicted components of UBL system pathways. This library can be screened against a range of cell lines expressing reporters of diverse biological pathways to determine which UBL components act as positive or negative regulators of the pathway in question.  Here, we describe a protocol utilizing this library to identify ubiquitome-regulators of the HIF1A-mediated cellular response to hypoxia using a transcription-based luciferase reporter.  An initial assay development stage is performed to establish suitable screening parameters of the cell line before performing the screen in three stages: primary, secondary and tertiary/deconvolution screening.  The use of targeted over whole genome siRNA libraries is becoming increasingly popular as it offers the advantage of reporting only on members of the pathway with which the investigators are most interested.  Despite inherent limitations of siRNA screening, in particular false-positives caused by siRNA off-target effects, the identification of genuine novel regulators of the pathways in question outweigh these shortcomings, which can be overcome by performing a series of carefully undertaken control experiments. PMID:24893647

  7. Use of genome-wide RNAi screens to identify regulators of embryonic stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaofeng; Hu, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by two defining features: pluripotency and self-renewal. They hold tremendous promise for both basic research and regenerative medicine. To fully realize their potentials, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating ESC pluripotency and self-renewal. The development of RNA interference (RNAi) technology has revolutionized functional genetic studies in mammalian cells. In recent years, genome-wide RNAi screens have been adopted to systematically study ESC pluripotency and self-renewal, and have uncovered many previously unknown regulators, including transcription factors, chromatin remodelers, and post-transcriptional modulators. Here, we describe a method for the identification of regulators of ESC pluripotency and self-renewal using RNAi screens, as well as assays for further validation and characterization of the identified candidates. With modifications, this method can also be adapted to study the fate specification events during ESC differentiation. PMID:24743997

  8. A high-content EMT screen identifies multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with activity on TGFβ receptor.

    PubMed

    Lotz-Jenne, Carina; Lüthi, Urs; Ackerknecht, Sabine; Lehembre, François; Fink, Tobias; Stritt, Manuel; Wirth, Matthias; Pavan, Simona; Bill, Ruben; Regenass, Urs; Christofori, Gerhard; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie

    2016-05-01

    An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) enables epithelial tumor cells to break out of the primary tumor mass and to metastasize. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EMT in more detail will provide important tools to interfere with the metastatic process. To identify pharmacological modulators and druggable targets of EMT, we have established a novel multi-parameter, high-content, microscopy-based assay and screened chemical compounds with activities against known targets. Out of 3423 compounds, we have identified 19 drugs that block transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced EMT in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG). The active compounds include inhibitors against TGFβ receptors (TGFBR), Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK), myosin II, SRC kinase and uridine analogues. Among the EMT-repressing compounds, we identified a group of inhibitors targeting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, and biochemical profiling of these multi-kinase inhibitors reveals TGFBR as a thus far unknown target of their inhibitory spectrum. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-parameter, high-content microscopy screen to identify modulators and druggable targets of EMT. Moreover, the newly discovered "off-target" effects of several receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have important consequences for in vitro and in vivo studies and might beneficially contribute to the therapeutic effects observed in vivo. PMID:27036020

  9. A Modified Reverse One-Hybrid Screen Identifies Transcriptional Activation Domains in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Jutta C.; Bätz, Ulrike; Liu, Jason; Curie, Gemma L.; Quail, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (TADs) are difficult to predict and identify, since they are not conserved and have little consensus. Here, we describe a yeast-based screening method that is able to identify individual amino acid residues involved in transcriptional activation in a high throughput manner. A plant transcriptional activator, PIF3 (phytochrome interacting factor 3), was fused to the yeast GAL4-DNA-binding Domain (BD), driving expression of the URA3 (Orotidine 5′-phosphate decarboxylase) reporter, and used for negative selection on 5-fluroorotic acid (5FOA). Randomly mutagenized variants of PIF3 were then selected for a loss or reduction in transcriptional activation activity by survival on FOA. In the process, we developed a strategy to eliminate false positives from negative selection that can be used for both reverse-1- and 2-hybrid screens. With this method we were able to identify two distinct regions in PIF3 with transcriptional activation activity, both of which are functionally conserved in PIF1, PIF4, and PIF5. Both are collectively necessary for full PIF3 transcriptional activity, but neither is sufficient to induce transcription autonomously. We also found that the TAD appear to overlap physically with other PIF3 functions, such as phyB binding activity and consequent phosphorylation. Our protocol should provide a valuable tool for identifying, analyzing and characterizing novel TADs in eukaryotic transcription factors, and thus potentially contribute to the unraveling of the mechanism underlying transcriptional activation. PMID:27379152

  10. High performance screening, structural and molecular dynamics analysis to identify H1 inhibitors from TCM Database@Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Sen; Huang, Hung-Jin; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2011-12-01

    New-type oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses have been a major threat to human health since the 2009 flu pandemic. To resolve the drug resistance issue, we aimed to identify a new type of inhibitors against H1 from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) by employing the world's largest TCM database () for virtual screening and molecular dynamics (MD). From the virtual screening results, sodium (+)-isolaricireinol-2 alpha-sulfate, sodium 3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxybenzoic acid methyl ester-4-sulfate, sodium (E)-7-hydroxy-1,7-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)hept-5-ene-3S-sulfonate, and 3-methoxytyramine-betaxanthin were identified as potential drug-like compounds. MD simulation of the binding poses with the key residues Asp103 and Glu83, as well as other binding site residues, identified higher numbers of hydrogen bonds than N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine (NAG), the natural ligand of the esterase domain in H1. Ionic bonds, salt bridges, and electrostatic energy also contribute to binding stability. Key binding residues include Lys71, Glu83, Asp103, and Arg238. Structural moieties promoting H-bond or salt bridge formations at these locations greatly contribute to a stable ligand-protein complex. An available sodium atom for ionic interactions with Asp103 can further stabilize the ligands. Based on virtual screening, MD simulation, and interaction energy evaluation, TCM candidates demonstrate good potential as novel H1 inhibitors. In addition, the identified stabilizing features can provide insights for designing highly stable H1 inhibitors. PMID:22012120

  11. An In Vivo Pharmacological Screen Identifies Cholinergic Signaling as a Therapeutic Target in Glial-Based Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Messing, Albee

    2016-01-01

    The role that glia play in neurological disease is poorly understood but increasingly acknowledged to be critical in a diverse group of disorders. Here we use a simple genetic model of Alexander disease, a progressive and severe human degenerative nervous system disease caused by a primary astroglial abnormality, to perform an in vivo screen of 1987 compounds, including many FDA-approved drugs and natural products. We identify four compounds capable of dose-dependent inhibition of nervous system toxicity. Focusing on one of these hits, glycopyrrolate, we confirm the role for muscarinic cholinergic signaling in pathogenesis using additional pharmacologic reagents and genetic approaches. We further demonstrate that muscarinic cholinergic signaling works through downstream Gαq to control oxidative stress and death of neurons and glia. Importantly, we document increased muscarinic cholinergic receptor expression in Alexander disease model mice and in postmortem brain tissue from Alexander disease patients, and that blocking muscarinic receptors in Alexander disease model mice reduces oxidative stress, emphasizing the translational significance of our findings. We have therefore identified glial muscarinic signaling as a potential therapeutic target in Alexander disease, and possibly in other gliopathic disorders as well. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the urgent need for better treatments for neurological diseases, drug development for these devastating disorders has been challenging. The effectiveness of traditional large-scale in vitro screens may be limited by the lack of the appropriate molecular, cellular, and structural environment. Using a simple Drosophila model of Alexander disease, we performed a moderate throughput chemical screen of FDA-approved drugs and natural compounds, and found that reducing muscarinic cholinergic signaling ameliorated clinical symptoms and oxidative stress in Alexander disease model flies and mice. Our work demonstrates that small

  12. Can selected functional movement screen assessments be used to identify movement deficiencies that could affect multidirectional speed and jump performance?

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Schultz, Adrian B; Jordan, Corrin A; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Luczo, Tawni M

    2015-01-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) includes lower-body focused tests (deep squat [DS], hurdle step, in-line lunge) that could assist in identifying movement deficiencies affecting multidirectional sprinting and jumping, which are important qualities for team sports. However, the hypothesized relationship with athletic performance lacks supportive research. This study investigated relationships between the lower-body focused screens and overall FMS performance and multidirectional speed and jumping capabilities in team sport athletes. Twenty-two healthy men were assessed in the FMS, and multidirectional speed (0- to 5-m, 0- to 10-m, 0- to 20-m sprint intervals; 505 and between-leg turn differences, modified T-test and differences between initial movement to the left or right); and bilateral and unilateral multidirectional jumping (vertical [VJ], standing long [SLJ], and lateral jump) tests. Pearson's correlations (r) were used to calculate relationships between screening scores and performance tests (p ≤ 0.05). After the determination of any screens relating to athletic performance, subjects were stratified into groups (3 = high-performing group; 2 = intermediate-performing group; 1 = low-performing group) to investigate movement compensations. A 1-way analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) determined any between-group differences. There were few significant correlations. The DS did moderately correlate with between-leg 505 difference (r = -0.423), and bilateral VJ (r = -0.428) and SLJ (r = -0.457). When stratified into groups according to DS score, high performers had a 13% greater SLJ when compared with intermediate performers, which was the only significant result. The FMS seems to have minimal capabilities for identifying movement deficiencies that could affect multidirectional speed and jumping in male team sport athletes. PMID:25028993

  13. EGFR inhibitors identified as a potential treatment for chordoma in a focused compound screen.

    PubMed

    Scheipl, Susanne; Barnard, Michelle; Cottone, Lucia; Jorgensen, Mette; Drewry, David H; Zuercher, William J; Turlais, Fabrice; Ye, Hongtao; Leite, Ana P; Smith, James A; Leithner, Andreas; Möller, Peter; Brüderlein, Silke; Guppy, Naomi; Amary, Fernanda; Tirabosco, Roberto; Strauss, Sandra J; Pillay, Nischalan; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumour with a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. We undertook a focused compound screen (FCS) against 1097 compounds on three well-characterized chordoma cell lines; 154 compounds were selected from the single concentration screen (1 µm), based on their growth-inhibitory effect. Their half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 ) values were determined in chordoma cells and normal fibroblasts. Twenty-seven of these compounds displayed chordoma selective cell kill and 21/27 (78%) were found to be EGFR/ERBB family inhibitors. EGFR inhibitors in clinical development were then studied on an extended cell line panel of seven chordoma cell lines, four of which were sensitive to EGFR inhibition. Sapitinib (AstraZeneca) emerged as the lead compound, followed by gefitinib (AstraZeneca) and erlotinib (Roche/Genentech). The compounds were shown to induce apoptosis in the sensitive cell lines and suppressed phospho-EGFR and its downstream pathways in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of substituent patterns suggested that EGFR-inhibitors with small aniline substituents in the 4-position of the quinazoline ring were more effective than inhibitors with large substituents in that position. Sapitinib showed significantly reduced tumour growth in two xenograft mouse models (U-CH1 xenograft and a patient-derived xenograft, SF8894). One of the resistant cell lines (U-CH2) was shown to express high levels of phospho-MET, a known bypass signalling pathway to EGFR. Neither amplifications (EGFR, ERBB2, MET) nor mutations in EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB4, PIK3CA, BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, PTEN, MET or other cancer gene hotspots were detected in the cell lines. Our findings are consistent with the reported (p-)EGFR expression in the majority of clinical samples, and provide evidence for exploring the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of patients with chordoma and studying possible resistance mechanisms to these compounds in vitro and in vivo. © 2016

  14. An Investigation to Validate the Grammar and Phonology Screening (GAPS) Test to Identify Children with Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    van der Lely, Heather K. J.; Payne, Elisabeth; McClelland, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Background The extraordinarily high incidence of grammatical language impairments in developmental disorders suggests that this uniquely human cognitive function is “fragile”. Yet our understanding of the neurobiology of grammatical impairments is limited. Furthermore, there is no “gold-standard” to identify grammatical impairments and routine screening is not undertaken. An accurate screening test to identify grammatical abilities would serve the research, health and education communities, further our understanding of developmental disorders, and identify children who need remediation, many of whom are currently un-diagnosed. A potential realistic screening tool that could be widely administered is the Grammar and Phonology Screening (GAPS) test – a 10 minute test that can be administered by professionals and non-professionals alike. Here we provide a further step in evaluating the validity and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of the GAPS test in identifying children who have Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Methods and Findings We tested three groups of children; two groups aged 3;6–6:6, a typically developing (n = 30) group, and a group diagnosed with SLI: (n = 11) (Young (Y)-SLI), and a further group aged 6;9–8;11 with SLI (Older (O)-SLI) (n = 10) who were above the test age norms. We employed a battery of language assessments including the GAPS test to assess the children's language abilities. For Y-SLI children, analyses revealed a sensitivity and specificity at the 5th and 10th percentile of 1.00 and 0.98, respectively, and for O-SLI children at the 10th and 15th percentile .83 and .90, respectively. Conclusions The findings reveal that the GAPS is highly accurate in identifying impaired vs. non-impaired children up to 6;8 years, and has moderate-to-high accuracy up to 9 years. The results indicate that GAPS is a realistic tool for the early identification of grammatical abilities and impairment in young children. A larger

  15. An RNAi screen identifies KIF15 as a novel regulator of the endocytic trafficking of integrin.

    PubMed

    Eskova, Anastasia; Knapp, Bettina; Matelska, Dorota; Reusing, Susanne; Arjonen, Antti; Lisauskas, Tautvydas; Pepperkok, Rainer; Russell, Robert; Eils, Roland; Ivaska, Johanna; Kaderali, Lars; Erfle, Holger; Starkuviene, Vytaute

    2014-06-01

    α2β1 integrin is one of the most important collagen-binding receptors, and it has been implicated in numerous thrombotic and immune diseases. α2β1 integrin is a potent tumour suppressor, and its downregulation is associated with increased metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. Currently, very little is known about the mechanism that regulates the cell-surface expression and trafficking of α2β1 integrin. Here, using a quantitative fluorescence-microscopy-based RNAi assay, we investigated the impact of 386 cytoskeleton-associated or -regulatory genes on α2 integrin endocytosis and found that 122 of these affected the intracellular accumulation of α2 integrin. Of these, 83 were found to be putative regulators of α2 integrin trafficking and/or expression, with no observed effect on the internalization of epidermal growth factor (EGF) or transferrin. Further interrogation and validation of the siRNA screen revealed a role for KIF15, a microtubule-based molecular motor, as a significant inhibitor of the endocytic trafficking of α2 integrin. Our data suggest a novel role for KIF15 in mediating plasma membrane localization of the alternative clathrin adaptor Dab2, thus impinging on pathways that regulate α2 integrin internalization. PMID:24659801

  16. An Unbiased Screen Identifies the DEP-1 Tumour Suppressor as a Phosphatase Controlling EGFR Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarcic, Gabi; Boguslavsky, Shlomit K.; Wakim, Jean; Kiuchi, Tai; Liu, Angela; Reinitz, Felicia; Nathanson, David; Takahashi, Takamune; Mischel, Paul S.; Ng, Tony; Yarden, Yosef

    2009-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF-receptor (EGFR). This event precedes signalling from both the plasma membrane and from endosomes, and it is essential for recruitment of an ubiquitin ligase, CBL, that sorts activated receptors to endosomes and degradation. Because hyper-phosphorylation of EGFR is involved in oncogenic pathways, we performed an unbiased screen of siRNA oilgonucleotides targeting all human tyrosine phosphatases. Results We report the identification of PTPRK and PTPRJ (DEP-1) as EGFR-targeting phosphatases. DEP-1 is a tumour suppressor that dephosphorylates, thereby stabilizes EGFR by hampering its ability to associate with the CBL-GRB2 ubiquitin ligase complex. DEP-1 silencing enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of endosomal EGFRs and, accordingly, increased cell proliferation. In line with functional interactions, EGFR and DEP-1 form physical associations, and EGFR phosphorylates a substrtae trapping mutant of DEP-1. Interestingly, the interactions of DEP-1 and EGFR are followed by physical segregation: whereas EGFR undergoes endocytosis, DEP-1 remains confined to the cell surface. Conclusions EGFR and DEP-1 physically interact at the cell surface and maitain bidirectional enzyme-substrate interactions, which are relevant to their respective oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions. These observations highlight the emerging roles of vesicular trafficking in malignant processes. PMID:19836242

  17. In Silico Screening Identifies a Novel Potential PARP1 Inhibitor Targeting Synthetic Lethality in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Nan; Cai, Peiling; Bao, Jinku

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality describes situations in which defects in two different genes or pathways together result in cell death. This concept has been applied to drug development for cancer treatment, as represented by Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARPs) inhibitors. In the current study, we performed a computational screening to discover new PARP inhibitors. Among the 11,247 compounds analyzed, one natural product, ZINC67913374, stood out by its superior performance in the simulation analyses. Compared with the FDA approved PARP1 inhibitor, olaparib, our results demonstrated that the ZINC67913374 compound achieved a better grid score (−86.8) and amber score (−51.42). Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the PARP1-ZINC67913374 complex was more stable than olaparib. The binding free energy for ZINC67913374 was −177.28 kJ/mol while that of olaparib was −159.16 kJ/mol. These results indicated ZINC67913374 bound to PARP1 with a higher affinity, which suggest ZINC67913374 has promising potential for cancer drug development. PMID:26907257

  18. Brain Slices as Models for Neurodegenerative Disease and Screening Platforms to Identify Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Bowlby, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    Recent improvements in brain slice technology have made this biological preparation increasingly useful for examining pathophysiology of brain diseases in a tissue context. Brain slices maintain many aspects of in vivo biology, including functional local synaptic circuitry with preserved brain architecture, while allowing good experimental access and precise control of the extracellular environment, making them ideal platforms for dissection of molecular pathways underlying neuronal dysfunction. Importantly, these ex vivo systems permit direct treatment with pharmacological agents modulating these responses and thus provide surrogate therapeutic screening systems without recourse to whole animal studies. Virus or particle mediated transgenic expression can also be accomplished relatively easily to study the function of novel genes in a normal or injured brain tissue context. In this review we will discuss acute brain injury models in organotypic hippocampal and co-culture systems and the effects of pharmacological modulation on neurodegeneration. The review will also cover the evidence of developmental plasticity in these ex vivo models, demonstrating emergence of injury-stimulated neuronal progenitor cells, and neurite sprouting and axonal regeneration following pathway lesioning. Neuro-and axo-genesis are emerging as significant factors contributing to brain repair following many acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore brain slice models may provide a critical contextual experimental system to explore regenerative mechanisms in vitro. PMID:18615151

  19. In Silico Screening Identifies a Novel Potential PARP1 Inhibitor Targeting Synthetic Lethality in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Nan; Cai, Peiling; Bao, Jinku

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality describes situations in which defects in two different genes or pathways together result in cell death. This concept has been applied to drug development for cancer treatment, as represented by Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARPs) inhibitors. In the current study, we performed a computational screening to discover new PARP inhibitors. Among the 11,247 compounds analyzed, one natural product, ZINC67913374, stood out by its superior performance in the simulation analyses. Compared with the FDA approved PARP1 inhibitor, olaparib, our results demonstrated that the ZINC67913374 compound achieved a better grid score (-86.8) and amber score (-51.42). Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the PARP1-ZINC67913374 complex was more stable than olaparib. The binding free energy for ZINC67913374 was -177.28 kJ/mol while that of olaparib was -159.16 kJ/mol. These results indicated ZINC67913374 bound to PARP1 with a higher affinity, which suggest ZINC67913374 has promising potential for cancer drug development. PMID:26907257

  20. Effective Schoolwide Screening to Identify Students at Risk for Social and Behavioral Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bridget A.

    2010-01-01

    Many schools are developing a continuum of services and supports for students who may be struggling in school, whether through a response to intervention (RTI) model or a schoolwide positive behavior supports (SWPBS) model. Study results suggest that schools will not be effective if they focus solely on identifying and responding to student…

  1. A forward genetic screen in mice identifies mutants with abnormal cortical patterning.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seungshin; Stottmann, Rolf W; Furley, Andrew J; Beier, David R

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a 6-layered cortical plate and axon tract patterning are key features of cerebral cortex development. Abnormalities of these processes may be the underlying cause for a range of functional disabilities seen in human neurodevelopmental disorders. To identify mouse mutants with defects in cortical lamination or corticofugal axon guidance, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis was performed using mice expressing LacZ reporter genes in layers II/III and V of the cortex (Rgs4-lacZ) or in corticofugal axons (TAG1-tau-lacZ). Four lines with abnormal cortical lamination have been identified. One of these was a splice site mutation in reelin (Reln) that results in a premature stop codon and the truncation of the C-terminal region (CTR) domain of reelin. Interestingly, this novel allele of Reln did not display cerebellar malformation or ataxia, and this is the first report of a Reln mutant without a cerebellar defect. Four lines with abnormal cortical axon development were also identified, one of which was found by whole-genome resequencing to carry a mutation in Lrp2. These findings demonstrated that the application of ENU mutagenesis to mice carrying transgenic reporters marking cortical anatomy is a sensitive and specific method to identify mutations that disrupt patterning of the developing brain. PMID:23968836

  2. An activation tagging screen to identify novel genes for Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this project is to identify plant genes that confer resistance against FHB and reduced DON accumulation. The identification of such genes offers the possibility to more fully understand the mechanisms of Fusarium susceptibility and to design transgenic strategies to increase FHB resistan...

  3. High-Throughput Genetic Screens Identify a Large and Diverse Collection of New Sporulation Genes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Jacqueline; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Bernhardt, Thomas G.; Rudner, David Z.

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis into a dormant spore is among the most well-characterized developmental pathways in biology. Classical genetic screens performed over the past half century identified scores of factors involved in every step of this morphological process. More recently, transcriptional profiling uncovered additional sporulation-induced genes required for successful spore development. Here, we used transposon-sequencing (Tn-seq) to assess whether there were any sporulation genes left to be discovered. Our screen identified 133 out of the 148 genes with known sporulation defects. Surprisingly, we discovered 24 additional genes that had not been previously implicated in spore formation. To investigate their functions, we used fluorescence microscopy to survey early, middle, and late stages of differentiation of null mutants from the B. subtilis ordered knockout collection. This analysis identified mutants that are delayed in the initiation of sporulation, defective in membrane remodeling, and impaired in spore maturation. Several mutants had novel sporulation phenotypes. We performed in-depth characterization of two new factors that participate in cell–cell signaling pathways during sporulation. One (SpoIIT) functions in the activation of σE in the mother cell; the other (SpoIIIL) is required for σG activity in the forespore. Our analysis also revealed that as many as 36 sporulation-induced genes with no previously reported mutant phenotypes are required for timely spore maturation. Finally, we discovered a large set of transposon insertions that trigger premature initiation of sporulation. Our results highlight the power of Tn-seq for the discovery of new genes and novel pathways in sporulation and, combined with the recently completed null mutant collection, open the door for similar screens in other, less well-characterized processes. PMID:26735940

  4. A Gain-of-Function Screen Identifying Genes Required for Growth and Pattern Formation of the Drosophila melanogaster Wing

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Cristina; Glavic, Alvaro; Casado, Mar; de Celis, Jose F.

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster wing is a model system for analyzing the genetic control of organ size, shape, and pattern formation. The formation of the wing involves a variety of processes, such as cell growth, proliferation, pattern formation, and differentiation. These developmental processes are under genetic control, and many genes participating in specific aspects of wing development have already being characterized. In this work, we aim to identify novel genes regulating wing growth and patterning. To this end, we have carried out a gain-of-function screen generating novel P-UAS (upstream activating sequences) insertions allowing forced gene expression. We produced 3340 novel P-UAS insertions and isolated 300 that cause a variety of wing phenotypes in combination with a Gal4 driver expressed exclusively in the central domain of the presumptive wing blade. The mapping of these P-UAS insertion sites allowed us to identify the gene that causes the gain-of-function phenotypes. We show that a fraction of these phenotypes are related to the induction of cell death in the domain of ectopic gene expression. Finally, we present a preliminary characterization of a gene identified in the screen, the function of which is required for the development of the L5 longitudinal vein. PMID:19737745

  5. A Visual Screen of a Gfp-Fusion Library Identifies a New Type of Nuclear Envelope Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Melissa M.; Stein, Pascal A.; Taylor, Stephen S.; Ha, Edward; McKeon, Frank; Rapoport, Tom A.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is a distinct subdomain of the ER, but few membrane components have been described that are specific to it. We performed a visual screen in tissue culture cells to identify proteins targeted to the NE. This approach does not require assumptions about the nature of the association with the NE or the physical separation of NE and ER. We confirmed that screening a library of fusions to the green fluorescent protein can be used to identify proteins targeted to various subcompartments of mammalian cells, including the NE. With this approach, we identified a new NE membrane protein, named nurim. Nurim is a multispanning membrane protein without large hydrophilic domains that is very tightly associated with the nucleus. Unlike the known NE membrane proteins, it is neither associated with nuclear pores, nor targeted like lamin-associated membrane proteins. Thus, nurim is a new type of NE membrane protein that is localized to the NE by a distinct mechanism. PMID:10402458

  6. A Genome-Scale RNA–Interference Screen Identifies RRAS Signaling as a Pathologic Feature of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John P.; Yates, Bridget E.; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Berman, Ari E.; Sanhueza, Mario; Kim, Eugene; de Haro, Maria; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Torcassi, Cameron; Holcomb, Jennifer; Gafni, Juliette; Mooney, Sean D.; Botas, Juan; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Hughes, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    A genome-scale RNAi screen was performed in a mammalian cell-based assay to identify modifiers of mutant huntingtin toxicity. Ontology analysis of suppressor data identified processes previously implicated in Huntington's disease, including proteolysis, glutamate excitotoxicity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition to established mechanisms, the screen identified multiple components of the RRAS signaling pathway as loss-of-function suppressors of mutant huntingtin toxicity in human and mouse cell models. Loss-of-function in orthologous RRAS pathway members also suppressed motor dysfunction in a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease. Abnormal activation of RRAS and a down-stream effector, RAF1, was observed in cellular models and a mouse model of Huntington's disease. We also observe co-localization of RRAS and mutant huntingtin in cells and in mouse striatum, suggesting that activation of R-Ras may occur through protein interaction. These data indicate that mutant huntingtin exerts a pathogenic effect on this pathway that can be corrected at multiple intervention points including RRAS, FNTA/B, PIN1, and PLK1. Consistent with these results, chemical inhibition of farnesyltransferase can also suppress mutant huntingtin toxicity. These data suggest that pharmacological inhibition of RRAS signaling may confer therapeutic benefit in Huntington's disease. PMID:23209424

  7. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  8. Actinoramide A Identified as a Potent Antimalarial from Titration-Based Screening of Marine Natural Product Extracts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ken Chih-Chien; Cao, Shugeng; Raveh, Avi; MacArthur, Ryan; Dranchak, Patricia; Chlipala, George; Okoneski, Matthew T; Guha, Rajarshi; Eastman, Richard T; Yuan, Jing; Schultz, Pamela J; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Clardy, Jon; Sherman, David H; Inglese, James

    2015-10-23

    Methods to identify the bioactive diversity within natural product extracts (NPEs) continue to evolve. NPEs constitute complex mixtures of chemical substances varying in structure, composition, and abundance. NPEs can therefore be challenging to evaluate efficiently with high-throughput screening approaches designed to test pure substances. Here we facilitate the rapid identification and prioritization of antimalarial NPEs using a pharmacologically driven, quantitative high-throughput-screening (qHTS) paradigm. In qHTS each NPE is tested across a concentration range from which sigmoidal response, efficacy, and apparent EC50s can be used to rank order NPEs for subsequent organism reculture, extraction, and fractionation. Using an NPE library derived from diverse marine microorganisms we observed potent antimalarial activity from two Streptomyces sp. extracts identified from thousands tested using qHTS. Seven compounds were isolated from two phylogenetically related Streptomyces species: Streptomyces ballenaensis collected from Costa Rica and Streptomyces bangulaensis collected from Papua New Guinea. Among them we identified actinoramides A and B, belonging to the unusually elaborated nonproteinogenic amino-acid-containing tetrapeptide series of natural products. In addition, we characterized a series of new compounds, including an artifact, 25-epi-actinoramide A, and actinoramides D, E, and F, which are closely related biosynthetic congeners of the previously reported metabolites. PMID:26465675

  9. High-throughput RNAi screening of human kinases identifies predictors of clinical outcome in colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ajian; Tang, Erjiang; Peng, Jian; Tang, Wenxian; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Liang; Xiao, Yihua; Wei, Qing; Yin, Lu; Li, Huaguang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify protein kinase genes that modulate oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in vitro and evaluate the roles of these genes in predicting clinical outcomes in CRC patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. A high-throughput RNAi screening targeting 626 human kinase genes was performed to identify kinase genes whose inhibition potentiates oxaliplatin sensitivity in CRC cells. The associations between copy numbers of the candidate genes and recurrence-free survival and overall survival were analyzed in 142 stage III CRC patients receiving first-line oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy who were enrolled from two independent hospitals. HT-RNAi screening identified 40 kinase genes whose inhibition potentiated oxaliplatin cytotoxicity in DLD1 cells. The relative copy number (RCN) of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 were associated with increased risks of both recurrence and death. Moreover, significant genes-based risk score and the ratios of RCN of different genes can further categorize patients into subgroups with distinctly differing outcomes. The estimated AUC for the prediction models including clinical variables plus kinase biomarkers was 0.77 for the recurrence and 0.82 for the survival models. The copy numbers of MAP4K1 and CDKL4 can predict clinical outcomes in CRC patients treated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:25904054

  10. A Complete Analytical Screening Identifies the Real Pesticide Contamination of Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschet, Christoph; Wittmer, Irene; Simovic, Jelena; Junghans, Marion; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian; Leu, Christian; Hollender, Juliane

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive assessment of pesticides in surface waters is challenging due to the large number of potential contaminants. In Switzerland for example, roughly 500 active ingredients are registered as either plant protection agent (PPA) or as biocide. In addition, an unlimited number of transformations products (TPs) can enter or be formed in surfaced waters. Most scientific publications or regulatory monitoring authorities have implemented 15-40 pesticides in their analytics. Only a few TPs are normally included. Interpretations of the surface water quality based on these subsets remains error prone. In the presented study, we carried out a nearly complete analytical screening covering 86% of all polar organic pesticides (from agricultural and urban sources) in Switzerland (300 substances) and 134 TPs with limits of quantification in the low ng/L range. The comprehensive pesticide screening was conducted by liquid-chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Five medium-sized rivers (Strahler stream order 3-4, catchment size 35-105 km2), containing high percentiles of diverse crops, orchards and urban settlements in their catchments, were sampled from March till July 2012. Nine subsequent time-proportional bi-weekly composite samples were taken in order to quantify average concentrations. In total, 104 different active ingredients could be detected in at least one of the five rivers. Thereby, 82 substances were only registered as PPA, 20 were registered as PPA and as biocide and 2 were only registered as biocide. Within the PPAs, herbicides had the most frequent detections and the highest concentrations, followed by fungicides and insecticides. Most concentrations were found between 1 and 50 ng/L; however 31 substances (mainly herbicides) had concentrations above 100 ng/L and 3 herbicides above 1000 ng/L. It has to be noted that the measured concentrations are average concentrations over two weeks in medium sized streams and that maximum

  11. Results of a screening programme to identify plants or plant extracts that inhibit ruminal protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Selje, N; Hoffmann, E M; Muetzel, S; Ningrat, R; Wallace, R J; Becker, K

    2007-07-01

    One aim of the EC Framework V project, 'Rumen-up' (QLK5-CT-2001-00 992), was to find plants or plant extracts that would inhibit the nutritionally wasteful degradation of protein in the rumen. A total of 500 samples were screened in vitro using 14C-labelled casein in a 30-min incubation with ruminal digesta. Eight were selected for further investigation using a batch fermentation system and soya protein and bovine serum albumin as proteolysis substrates; proteolysis was monitored over 12 h by the disappearance of soluble protein and the production of branched SCFA and NH3. Freeze-dried, ground foliage of Peltiphyllum peltatum, Helianthemum canum, Arbutus unedo, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Knautia arvensis inhibited proteolysis (P < 0.05), while Daucus carota, Clematis vitalba and Erica arborea had little effect. Inhibition by the first four samples appeared to be caused by the formation of insoluble tannin-protein complexes. The samples were rich in phenolics and inhibition was reversed by polyethyleneglycol. In contrast, K. arvensis contained low concentrations of phenolics and no tannins, had no effect in the 30-min assay, yet inhibited the degradation rate of soluble protein (by 14 %, P < 0.0001) and the production of branched SCFA (by 17 %, P < 0.05) without precipitating protein in the 12-h batch fermentation. The effects showed some resemblance to those obtained in parallel incubations containing 3 mum-monensin, suggesting that K. arvensis may be a plant-derived feed additive that can suppress growth and activity of key proteolytic ruminal micro-organisms in a manner similar to that already well known for monensin. PMID:17445338

  12. High-Throughput Screening to Identify Plant Derived Human LDH-A Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Deiab, S.; Mazzio, E.; Messeha, S.; Mack, N.; Soliman, K. F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A is highly expressed in diverse human malignant tumors, parallel to aggressive metastatic disease, resistance to radiation/chemotherapy and clinically poor outcome. Although this enzyme constitutes a plausible target in treatment of advanced cancer, there are few known LDH-A inhibitors. Study Design In this work, we utilized a high-throughput enzyme micro-array format to screen and evaluate > 900 commonly used medicinal plant extracts (0.00001-.5 mg/ml) for capacity to inhibit activity of recombinant full length human LDHA; EC .1.1.1.27. Methodology The protein sequence of purified enzyme was confirmed using 1D gel electrophoresis- MALDI-TOF-MS/MS, enzyme activity was validated by oxidation of NADH (500μM) and kinetic inhibition established in the presence of a known inhibitor (Oxalic Acid). Results Of the natural extracts tested, the lowest IC50s [<0.001 mg/ml] were obtained by: Chinese Gallnut (Melaphis chinensis gallnut), Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus), Kelp (Laminaria Japonica) and Babul (Acacia Arabica). Forty-six additional herbs contained significant LDH-A inhibitory properties with IC50s [<0.07 mg/ml], some of which have common names of Arjun, Pipsissewa, Cinnamon, Pink Rose Buds/Petals, Wintergreen, Cat’s Claw, Witch Hazel Root and Rhodiola Root. Conclusion These findings reflect relative potency by rank of commonly used herbs and plants that contain human LDH-A inhibitory properties. Future research will be required to isolate chemical constituents within these plants responsible for LDH-A inhibition and investigate potential therapeutic application. PMID:24478981

  13. E-pharmacophore-based virtual screening to identify GSK-3β inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Priyadarshini, Vani; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Manne, Munikumar; Swargam, Sandeep; Kanipakam, Hema; Bhuma, Vengamma; Amineni, Umamaheswari

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is a serine/threonine kinase which has attracted significant attention during recent years in drug design studies. The deregulation of GSK-3β increased the loss of hippocampal neurons by triggering apoptosis-mediating production of neurofibrillary tangles and alleviates memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Given its role in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles leading to AD, it has been a major therapeutic target for intervention in AD, hence was targeted in the present study. Twenty crystal structures were refined to generate pharmacophore models based on energy involvement in binding co-crystal ligands. Four common e-pharmacophore models were optimized from the 20 pharmacophore models. Shape-based screening of four e-pharmacophore models against nine established small molecule databases using Phase v3.9 had resulted in 1800 compounds having similar pharmacophore features. Rigid receptor docking (RRD) was performed for 1800 compounds and 20 co-crystal ligands with GSK-3β to generate dock complexes. Interactions of the best scoring lead obtained through RRD were further studied with quantum polarized ligand docking (QPLD), induced fit docking (IFD) and molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area. Comparing the obtained leads to 20 co-crystal ligands resulted in 18 leads among them, lead1 had the lowest docking score, lower binding free energy and better binding orientation toward GSK-3β. The 50 ns MD simulations run confirmed the stable nature of GSK-3β-lead1 docking complex. The results from RRD, QPLD, IFD and MD simulations confirmed that lead1 might be used as a potent antagonist for GSK-3β. PMID:27305963

  14. Screening of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channel Activators Identifies Novel Neurotrophic Piperazine Compounds.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Seishiro; Hatano, Masahiko; Takada, Yoshinori; Hino, Kyosuke; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Tanikawa, Jun; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hase, Hideharu; Nakao, Akito; Hirano, Mitsuru; Rotrattanadumrong, Rachapun; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Masayuki X; Nishida, Motohiro; Hu, Yaopeng; Inoue, Ryuji; Nagata, Ryu; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) proteins form Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels activated upon stimulation of metabotropic receptors coupled to phospholipase C. Among the TRPC subfamily, TRPC3 and TRPC6 channels activated directly by diacylglycerol (DAG) play important roles in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, promoting neuronal development and survival. In various disease models, BDNF restores neurologic deficits, but its therapeutic potential is limited by its poor pharmacokinetic profile. Elucidation of a framework for designing small molecules, which elicit BDNF-like activity via TRPC3 and TRPC6, establishes a solid basis to overcome this limitation. We discovered, through library screening, a group of piperazine-derived compounds that activate DAG-activated TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 channels. The compounds [4-(5-chloro-2-methylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl](3-fluorophenyl)methanone (PPZ1) and 2-[4-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-N-(2-ethoxyphenyl)acetamide (PPZ2) activated, in a dose-dependent manner, recombinant TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 channels, but not other TRPCs, in human embryonic kidney cells. PPZ2 activated native TRPC6-like channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit portal vein. Also, PPZ2 evoked cation currents and Ca(2+) influx in rat cultured central neurons. Strikingly, both compounds induced BDNF-like neurite growth and neuroprotection, which were abolished by a knockdown or inhibition of TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 in cultured neurons. Inhibitors of Ca(2+) signaling pathways, except calcineurin, impaired neurite outgrowth promotion induced by PPZ compounds. PPZ2 increased activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) signaling mediated by activation of DAG-activated TRPC channels underlies neurotrophic effects of PPZ compounds. Thus, piperazine-derived activators of DAG-activated TRPC channels provide important insights for future development of a

  15. Novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors identified via a high throughput replicon-based screen.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Jeremy R; VerPlank, Lynn; Ludeke, Barbara; McLeod, Sarah M; Lee, Maurice D; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Mulrooney, Carol A; Le Quement, Sebastian; Yu, Qin; Palmer, Michelle A; Fleming, Paul; Fearns, Rachel; Foley, Michael A; Scherer, Christina A

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections affect millions of children and adults every year. Despite the significant disease burden, there are currently no safe and effective vaccines or therapeutics. We employed a replicon-based high throughput screen combined with live-virus triaging assays to identify three novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived scaffolds with activity against RSV. One of these small molecules is shown to target the RSV polymerase (L protein) to inhibit viral replication and transcription; the mechanisms of action of the other small molecules are currently unknown. The compounds described herein may provide attractive inhibitors for lead optimization campaigns. PMID:27059228

  16. A microarray method for identifying tumor antigens by screening a tumor cDNA expression library against cancer sera

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, Kurt; Sykes, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The immune system responds to tumor cells. The challenge has been how to effectively use these responses to treat or protect against cancer. Toward the goal of developing a cancer vaccine, we are pursuing methodologies for the discovery and testing of useful antigens. We present an array-based approach for discovering these B cell antigens by directly screening for specific host-sera reactivity to lysates from tumor-derived cDNA expression libraries. Several cancer-specific antigens were identified, and these are currently being validated as potential candidates. PMID:23851590

  17. Novel Glycoside Hydrolases Identified by Screening a Chinese Holstein Dairy Cow Rumen-Derived Metagenome Library ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Jiaqi; Bu, Dengpan; Liu, Kailang; Zhu, Yaxin; Dong, Zhiyang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2010-01-01

    One clone encoding glycoside hydrolases was identified through functional screening of a rumen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Of the 68 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted, one ORF encodes a novel endo-β-1,4-xylanase with two catalytic domains of family GH43 and two cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) of family IV. Partial characterization showed that this endo-xylanase has a greater specific activity than a number of other xylanases over a wide temperature range at neutral pH and could be useful in some industrial applications. PMID:20709844

  18. An in vivo antilymphatic screen in zebrafish identifies novel inhibitors of mammalian lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic-mediated metastasis.

    PubMed

    Astin, Jonathan W; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Eng, Tiffany C Y; Flores, Maria V; Misa, June P; Chien, Annie; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2014-10-01

    The growth of new lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis) in tumors is an integral step in the metastatic spread of tumor cells, first to the sentinel lymph nodes that surround the tumor and then elsewhere in the body. Currently, no selective agents designed to prevent lymphatic vessel growth have been approved for clinical use, and there is an important potential clinical niche for antilymphangiogenic agents. Using a zebrafish phenotype-based chemical screen, we have identified drug compounds, previously approved for human use, that have antilymphatic activity. These include kaempferol, a natural product found in plants; leflunomide, an inhibitor of pyrimidine biosynthesis; and cinnarizine and flunarizine, members of the type IV class of calcium channel antagonists. Antilymphatic activity was confirmed in a murine in vivo lymphangiogenesis Matrigel plug assay, in which kaempferol, leflunomide, and flunarizine prevented lymphatic growth. We show that kaempferol is a novel inhibitor of VEGFR2/3 kinase activity and is able to reduce the density of tumor-associated lymphatic vessels as well as the incidence of lymph node metastases in a metastatic breast cancer xenograft model. However, in this model, kaempferol administration was also associated with tumor deposits in the pancreas and diaphragm, and flunarizine was found to be tumorigenic. Although this screen revealed that zebrafish is a viable platform for the identification and development of mammalian antilymphatic compounds, it also highlights the need for focused secondary screens to ensure appropriate efficacy of hits in a tumor context. PMID:25053822

  19. Quantitative High Throughput Screening Using a Live Cell cAMP Assay Identifies Small Molecule Agonists of the TSH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steve; Neumann, Susanne; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Michael, Sam; Klumpp, Carleen; Yasgar, Adam; Shinn, Paul; Thomas, Craig J.; Inglese, Jim; Gershengorn, Marvin C.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) belongs to the glycoprotein hormone receptor subfamily of seven-transmembrane spanning receptors. TSHR is expressed in thyroid follicular cells and is activated by TSH, which regulates growth and function of these cells. Recombinant TSH is used in diagnostic screens for thyroid cancer, especially in patients after thyroid cancer surgery. Currently, no selective small molecule agonist of the TSHR is available. To screen for novel TSHR agonists, we miniaturized a cell-based cAMP assay into 1536-well plate format. This assay uses a HEK293 cell line stably expressing the TSHR and a cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel (CNG), which functions as a biosensor. From a quantitative high-throughput screen of 73,180 compounds in parallel with a parental cell line (without the TSHR), 276 primary active compounds were identified. The activities of the selected active compounds were further confirmed in an orthogonal HTRF cAMP-based assay. 49 compounds in several structural classes have been confirmed as small molecule TSHR agonists that will serve as starting compounds for chemical optimization and studies of thyroid physiology in health and disease. PMID:18216391

  20. Three classes of glucocerebrosidase inhibitors identified by quantitative high-throughput screening are chaperone leads for Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Padia, Janak; Urban, Daniel J.; Jadhav, Ajit; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Simeonov, Anton; Goldin, Ehud; Auld, Douglas; LaMarca, Mary E.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Sidransky, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene. Missense mutations result in reduced enzyme activity that may be due to misfolding, raising the possibility of small-molecule chaperone correction of the defect. Screening large compound libraries by quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) provides comprehensive information on the potency, efficacy, and structure–activity relationships (SAR) of active compounds directly from the primary screen, facilitating identification of leads for medicinal chemistry optimization. We used qHTS to rapidly identify three structural series of potent, selective, nonsugar glucocerebrosidase inhibitors. The three structural classes had excellent potencies and efficacies and, importantly, high selectivity against closely related hydrolases. Preliminary SAR data were used to select compounds with high activity in both enzyme and cell-based assays. Compounds from two of these structural series increased N370S mutant glucocerebrosidase activity by 40–90% in patient cell lines and enhanced lysosomal colocalization, indicating chaperone activity. These small molecules have potential as leads for chaperone therapy for Gaucher disease, and this paradigm promises to accelerate the development of leads for other rare genetic disorders. PMID:17670938

  1. Three classes of glucocerebrosidase inhibitors identified by quantitative high-throughput screening are chaperone leads for Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Padia, Janak; Urban, Daniel J; Jadhav, Ajit; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Simeonov, Anton; Goldin, Ehud; Auld, Douglas; LaMarca, Mary E; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Sidransky, Ellen

    2007-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene. Missense mutations result in reduced enzyme activity that may be due to misfolding, raising the possibility of small-molecule chaperone correction of the defect. Screening large compound libraries by quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) provides comprehensive information on the potency, efficacy, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of active compounds directly from the primary screen, facilitating identification of leads for medicinal chemistry optimization. We used qHTS to rapidly identify three structural series of potent, selective, nonsugar glucocerebrosidase inhibitors. The three structural classes had excellent potencies and efficacies and, importantly, high selectivity against closely related hydrolases. Preliminary SAR data were used to select compounds with high activity in both enzyme and cell-based assays. Compounds from two of these structural series increased N370S mutant glucocerebrosidase activity by 40-90% in patient cell lines and enhanced lysosomal colocalization, indicating chaperone activity. These small molecules have potential as leads for chaperone therapy for Gaucher disease, and this paradigm promises to accelerate the development of leads for other rare genetic disorders. PMID:17670938

  2. A systematic screening to identify de novo mutations causing sporadic early-onset Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Ganos, Christos; Guerreiro, Rita; Schneider, Susanne A.; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Darwent, Lee; Holmans, Peter; Singleton, Andrew; Bhatia, Kailash; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Despite the many advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of Mendelian forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), a large number of early-onset cases still remain to be explained. Many of these cases, present with a form of disease that is identical to that underlined by genetic causes, but do not have mutations in any of the currently known disease-causing genes. Here, we hypothesized that de novo mutations may account for a proportion of these early-onset, sporadic cases. We performed exome sequencing in full parent–child trios where the proband presents with typical PD to unequivocally identify de novo mutations. This approach allows us to test all genes in the genome in an unbiased manner. We have identified and confirmed 20 coding de novo mutations in 21 trios. We have used publicly available population genetic data to compare variant frequencies and our independent in-house dataset of exome sequencing in PD (with over 1200 cases) to identify additional variants in the same genes. Of the genes identified to carry de novo mutations, PTEN, VAPB and ASNA1 are supported by various sources of data to be involved in PD. We show that these genes are reported to be within a protein–protein interaction network with PD genes and that they contain additional rare, case-specific, mutations in our independent cohort of PD cases. Our results support the involvement of these three genes in PD and suggest that testing for de novo mutations in sporadic disease may aid in the identification of novel disease-causing genes. PMID:26362251

  3. Researchers Use a Kinome Screen to Identify New Therapeutic Targets | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The tumor suppressor p53 is mutated in over 50% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), yet there are currently no available therapies to target it. CTD2 researchers at the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center hypothesized that HNSCC cancer cells with p53 mutations are dependent on particular kinases for survival. In a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, they sought to identify these kinases using RNAi against known kinase genes in mouse and human cell lines.

  4. A systematic screening to identify de novo mutations causing sporadic early-onset Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Ganos, Christos; Guerreiro, Rita; Schneider, Susanne A; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Darwent, Lee; Holmans, Peter; Singleton, Andrew; Bhatia, Kailash; Bras, Jose

    2015-12-01

    Despite the many advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of Mendelian forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), a large number of early-onset cases still remain to be explained. Many of these cases, present with a form of disease that is identical to that underlined by genetic causes, but do not have mutations in any of the currently known disease-causing genes. Here, we hypothesized that de novo mutations may account for a proportion of these early-onset, sporadic cases. We performed exome sequencing in full parent-child trios where the proband presents with typical PD to unequivocally identify de novo mutations. This approach allows us to test all genes in the genome in an unbiased manner. We have identified and confirmed 20 coding de novo mutations in 21 trios. We have used publicly available population genetic data to compare variant frequencies and our independent in-house dataset of exome sequencing in PD (with over 1200 cases) to identify additional variants in the same genes. Of the genes identified to carry de novo mutations, PTEN, VAPB and ASNA1 are supported by various sources of data to be involved in PD. We show that these genes are reported to be within a protein-protein interaction network with PD genes and that they contain additional rare, case-specific, mutations in our independent cohort of PD cases. Our results support the involvement of these three genes in PD and suggest that testing for de novo mutations in sporadic disease may aid in the identification of novel disease-causing genes. PMID:26362251

  5. Small molecule screening with laser cytometry can be used to identify pro-survival molecules in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Sean P; Pyle, April D

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide an unlimited source of cells for use in regenerative medicine. The recent derivation of human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs) provides a potential supply of pluripotent cells that avoid immune rejection and could provide patient-tailored therapy. In addition, the use of pluripotent cells for drug screening could enable routine toxicity testing and evaluation of underlying disease mechanisms. However, prior to establishment of patient specific cells for cell therapy it is important to understand the basic regulation of cell fate decisions in hESCs. One critical issue that hinders the use of these cells is the fact that hESCs survive poorly upon dissociation, which limits genetic manipulation because of poor cloning efficiency of individual hESCs, and hampers production of large-scale culture of hESCs. To address the problems associated with poor growth in culture and our lack of understanding of what regulates hESC signaling, we successfully developed a screening platform that allows for large scale screening for small molecules that regulate survival. In this work we developed the first large scale platform for hESC screening using laser scanning cytometry and were able to validate this platform by identifying the pro-survival molecule HA-1077. These small molecules provide targets for both improving our basic understanding of hESC survival as well as a tool to improve our ability to expand and genetically manipulate hESCs for use in regenerative applications. PMID:23383009

  6. A sex-associated sequence identified by RAPD screening in gynogenetic individuals of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Vale, Luis; Dieguez, Rebeca; Sánchez, Laura; Martínez, Paulino; Viñas, Ana

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of sex determination mechanisms is essential for improving the productivity of farmed aquaculture fish species like turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). In culture conditions turbot males grow slower than females starting from eight months post-hatch, and this differential growth rate is maintained until sexual maturation is reached, being mature females almost twice as big as males of the same age. The goal of this study was to identify sex-specific DNA markers in turbot using comparative random amplified polymorphism DNA (RAPD) profiles in males and females to get new insights of the genetic architecture related to sex determination. In order to do this, we analyzed 540 commercial 10-mer RAPD primers in male and female pools of a gynogenetic family because of its higher inbreeding, which facilitates the detection of associations across the genome. Two sex-linked RAPD markers were identified in the female pool and one in the male pool. After the analysis of the three markers on individual samples of each pool and also in unrelated individuals, only one RAPD showed significant association with females. This marker was isolated, cloned and sequenced, containing two sequences, a microsatellite (SEX01) and a minisatellite (SEX02), which were mapped in the turbot reference map. From this map position, through a comparative mapping approach, we identified Foxl2, a relevant gene related to initial steps of sex differentiation, and Wnt4, a gene related with ovarian development, close to the microsatellite and minisatellite markers, respectively. The position of Foxl2 and Wnt4 was confirmed by linkage mapping in the reference turbot map. PMID:24415295

  7. An RNA-Seq Screen of the Drosophila Antenna Identifies a Transporter Necessary for Ammonia Detection

    PubMed Central

    Menuz, Karen; Larter, Nikki K.; Park, Joori; Carlson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Many insect vectors of disease detect their hosts through olfactory cues, and thus it is of great interest to understand better how odors are encoded. However, little is known about the molecular underpinnings that support the unique function of coeloconic sensilla, an ancient and conserved class of sensilla that detect amines and acids, including components of human odor that are cues for many insect vectors. Here, we generate antennal transcriptome databases both for wild type Drosophila and for a mutant that lacks coeloconic sensilla. We use these resources to identify genes whose expression is highly enriched in coeloconic sensilla, including many genes not previously implicated in olfaction. Among them, we identify an ammonium transporter gene that is essential for ammonia responses in a class of coeloconic olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), but is not required for responses to other odorants. Surprisingly, the transporter is not expressed in ORNs, but rather in neighboring auxiliary cells. Thus, our data reveal an unexpected non-cell autonomous role for a component that is essential to the olfactory response to ammonia. The defective response observed in a Drosophila mutant of this gene is rescued by its Anopheles ortholog, and orthologs are found in virtually all insect species examined, suggesting that its role is conserved. Taken together, our results provide a quantitative analysis of gene expression in the primary olfactory organ of Drosophila, identify molecular components of an ancient class of olfactory sensilla, and reveal that auxiliary cells, and not simply ORNs, play an essential role in the coding of an odor that is a critical host cue for many insect vectors of human disease. PMID:25412082

  8. Novel immune-modulator identified by a rapid, functional screen of the parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus) genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The success of new sequencing technologies and informatic methods for identifying genes has made establishing gene product function a critical rate limiting step in progressing the molecular sciences. We present a method to functionally mine genomes for useful activities in vivo, using an unusual property of a member of the poxvirus family to demonstrate this screening approach. Results The genome of Parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus) was sequenced, annotated, and then used to PCR-amplify its open-reading-frames. Employing a cloning-independent protocol, a viral expression-library was rapidly built and arrayed into sub-library pools. These were directly delivered into mice as expressible cassettes and assayed for an immune-modulating activity associated with parapoxvirus infection. The product of the B2L gene, a homolog of vaccinia F13L, was identified as the factor eliciting immune cell accumulation at sites of skin inoculation. Administration of purified B2 protein also elicited immune cell accumulation activity, and additionally was found to serve as an adjuvant for antigen-specific responses. Co-delivery of the B2L gene with an influenza gene-vaccine significantly improved protection in mice. Furthermore, delivery of the B2L expression construct, without antigen, non-specifically reduced tumor growth in murine models of cancer. Conclusion A streamlined, functional approach to genome-wide screening of a biological activity in vivo is presented. Its application to screening in mice for an immune activity elicited by the pathogen genome of Parapoxvirus ovis yielded a novel immunomodulator. In this inverted discovery method, it was possible to identify the adjuvant responsible for a function of interest prior to a mechanistic study of the adjuvant. The non-specific immune activity of this modulator, B2, is similar to that associated with administration of inactivated particles to a host or to a live viral infection. Administration of B2 may provide the

  9. Cell-Based Small-Molecule Compound Screen Identifies Fenretinide as Potential Therapeutic for Translocation-Positive Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Herrero Martín, David; Boro, Aleksandar; Schäfer, Beat W.

    2013-01-01

    A subset of paediatric sarcomas are characterized by chromosomal translocations encoding specific oncogenic transcription factors. Such fusion proteins represent tumor specific therapeutic targets although so far it has not been possible to directly inhibit their activity by small-molecule compounds. In this study, we hypothesized that screening a small-molecule library might identify already existing drugs that are able to modulate the transcriptional activity of PAX3/FOXO1, the fusion protein specifically found in the pediatric tumor alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS). Towards this end, we established a reporter cell line based on the well characterized PAX3/FOXO1 target gene AP2ß. A library enriched in mostly FDA approved drugs was screened using specific luciferase activity as read-out and normalized for cell viability. The most effective inhibitor identified from this screen was Fenretinide. Treatment with this compound resulted in down-regulation of PAX3/FOXO1 mRNA and protein levels as well as in reduced expression of several of its direct target genes, but not of wild-type FOXO1, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, fenretinide induced reactive oxygen species and apoptosis as shown by caspase 9 and PARP cleavage and upregulated miR-9. Importantly, it demonstrated a significant anti-tumor effect in vivo. These results are similar to earlier reports for two other pediatric tumors, namely neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma, where fenretinide is under clinical development. Our results suggest that fenretinide might represent a novel treatment option also for translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:23372815

  10. An Arrayed Genome-Scale Lentiviral-Enabled Short Hairpin RNA Screen Identifies Lethal and Rescuer Gene Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Ramirez, Christina N.; Shum, David; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Radu, Constantin; Frattini, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract RNA interference technology is becoming an integral tool for target discovery and validation.; With perhaps the exception of only few studies published using arrayed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries, most of the reports have been either against pooled siRNA or shRNA, or arrayed siRNA libraries. For this purpose, we have developed a workflow and performed an arrayed genome-scale shRNA lethality screen against the TRC1 library in HeLa cells. The resulting targets would be a valuable resource of candidates toward a better understanding of cellular homeostasis. Using a high-stringency hit nomination method encompassing criteria of at least three active hairpins per gene and filtered for potential off-target effects (OTEs), referred to as the Bhinder–Djaballah analysis method, we identified 1,252 lethal and 6 rescuer gene candidates, knockdown of which resulted in severe cell death or enhanced growth, respectively. Cross referencing individual hairpins with the TRC1 validated clone database, 239 of the 1,252 candidates were deemed independently validated with at least three validated clones. Through our systematic OTE analysis, we have identified 31 microRNAs (miRNAs) in lethal and 2 in rescuer genes; all having a seed heptamer mimic in the corresponding shRNA hairpins and likely cause of the OTE observed in our screen, perhaps unraveling a previously unknown plausible essentiality of these miRNAs in cellular viability. Taken together, we report on a methodology for performing large-scale arrayed shRNA screens, a comprehensive analysis method to nominate high-confidence hits, and a performance assessment of the TRC1 library highlighting the intracellular inefficiencies of shRNA processing in general. PMID:23198867

  11. High-throughput screening identifies aclacinomycin as a radiosensitizer of EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Daniel C; Charest, Jonathan; Sebolt, Katrina; Lehrman, Mark; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Contessa, Joseph N

    2013-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) provides a specialized environment for the folding and modification of trans-membrane proteins, including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), which are vital for the growth and survival of malignancies. To identify compounds which disrupt the function of the ER and thus could potentially impair cancer cell survival signaling, we adapted a set of glycosylation-sensitive luciferase reporters for the development and optimization of a cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS). Secondary screens for false-positive luciferase activation and tertiary lectin-based and biochemical analyses were also devised for compound triage. Through a pilot screen of 2802 compounds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) chemical libraries, we identified aclacinomycin (Acm) as a compound that preferentially affects ER function. We report that Acm reduces plasma membrane expression of glycoproteins including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Met but does not inhibit N-linked glycosylation or generalized protein translation. Fluorescence microscopy co-localization experiments were also performed and demonstrated Acm accumulation in the ER in further support of the overall HTS design. The consequences of Acm treatment on cell survival were analyzed through clonogenic survival analysis. Consistent with the reduction of EGFR levels, pretreatment with Acm sensitizes the EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines HCC827 and HCC2935 to ionizing radiation and did not affect the sensitivity of the RTK-independent and KRAS-mutant A549 NSCLC cell line. Thus, Acm and similar compounds targeting the ER may represent a novel approach for radiosensitizing tumor cells dependent on RTK function. PMID:23730419

  12. Novel Anti-Campylobacter Compounds Identified Using High Throughput Screening of a Pre-selected Enriched Small Molecules Library

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Drozd, Mary; Pina-Mimbela, Ruby; Xu, Xiulan; Helmy, Yosra A.; Antwi, Janet; Fuchs, James R.; Nislow, Corey; Templeton, Jillian; Blackall, Patrick J.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and infections can be fatal. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter spp. necessitates the development of new antimicrobials. We identified novel anti-Campylobacter small molecule inhibitors using a high throughput growth inhibition assay. To expedite screening, we made use of a “bioactive” library of 4182 compounds that we have previously shown to be active against diverse microbes. Screening for growth inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni, identified 781 compounds that were either bactericidal or bacteriostatic at a concentration of 200 μM. Seventy nine of the bactericidal compounds were prioritized for secondary screening based on their physico-chemical properties. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration against a diverse range of C. jejuni and a lack of effect on gut microbes, we selected 12 compounds. No resistance was observed to any of these 12 lead compounds when C. jejuni was cultured with lethal or sub-lethal concentrations suggesting that C. jejuni is less likely to develop resistance to these compounds. Top 12 compounds also possessed low cytotoxicity to human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 cells) and no hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells. Next, these 12 compounds were evaluated for ability to clear C. jejuni in vitro. A total of 10 compounds had an anti-C. jejuni effect in Caco-2 cells with some effective even at 25 μM concentrations. These novel 12 compounds belong to five established antimicrobial chemical classes; piperazines, aryl amines, piperidines, sulfonamide, and pyridazinone. Exploitation of analogs of these chemical classes may provide Campylobacter specific drugs that can be applied in both human and animal medicine. PMID:27092106

  13. Cell-based small-molecule compound screen identifies fenretinide as potential therapeutic for translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Herrero Martín, David; Boro, Aleksandar; Schäfer, Beat W

    2013-01-01

    A subset of paediatric sarcomas are characterized by chromosomal translocations encoding specific oncogenic transcription factors. Such fusion proteins represent tumor specific therapeutic targets although so far it has not been possible to directly inhibit their activity by small-molecule compounds. In this study, we hypothesized that screening a small-molecule library might identify already existing drugs that are able to modulate the transcriptional activity of PAX3/FOXO1, the fusion protein specifically found in the pediatric tumor alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS). Towards this end, we established a reporter cell line based on the well characterized PAX3/FOXO1 target gene AP2ß. A library enriched in mostly FDA approved drugs was screened using specific luciferase activity as read-out and normalized for cell viability. The most effective inhibitor identified from this screen was Fenretinide. Treatment with this compound resulted in down-regulation of PAX3/FOXO1 mRNA and protein levels as well as in reduced expression of several of its direct target genes, but not of wild-type FOXO1, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, fenretinide induced reactive oxygen species and apoptosis as shown by caspase 9 and PARP cleavage and upregulated miR-9. Importantly, it demonstrated a significant anti-tumor effect in vivo. These results are similar to earlier reports for two other pediatric tumors, namely neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma, where fenretinide is under clinical development. Our results suggest that fenretinide might represent a novel treatment option also for translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:23372815

  14. RNA interference screening identifies lenalidomide sensitizers in multiple myeloma, including RSK2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Yin, Hongwei; Bruins, Laura A.; Shi, Chang-Xin; Jedlowski, Patrick; Aziz, Meraj; Sereduk, Chris; Kortuem, Klaus Martin; Schmidt, Jessica E.; Champion, Mia; Braggio, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    To identify molecular targets that modify sensitivity to lenalidomide, we measured proliferation in multiple myeloma (MM) cells transfected with 27 968 small interfering RNAs in the presence of increasing concentrations of drug and identified 63 genes that enhance activity of lenalidomide upon silencing. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RPS6KA3 or RSK2) was the most potent sensitizer. Other notable gene targets included 5 RAB family members, 3 potassium channel proteins, and 2 peroxisome family members. Single genes of interest included I-κ-B kinase-α (CHUK), and a phosphorylation dependent transcription factor (CREB1), which associate with RSK2 to regulate several signaling pathways. RSK2 knockdown induced cytotoxicity across a panel of MM cell lines and consistently increased sensitivity to lenalidomide. Accordingly, 3 small molecular inhibitors of RSK2 demonstrated synergy with lenalidomide cytotoxicity in MM cells even in the presence of stromal contact. Both RSK2 knockdown and small molecule inhibition downregulate interferon regulatory factor 4 and MYC, and provides an explanation for the synergy between lenalidomide and RSK2 inhibition. Interestingly, RSK2 inhibition also sensitized MM cells to bortezomib, melphalan, and dexamethasone, but did not downregulate Ikaros or influence lenalidomide-mediated downregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α or increase lenalidomide-induced IL-2 upregulation. In summary, inhibition of RSK2 may prove a broadly useful adjunct to MM therapy. PMID:25395420

  15. A mitochondrial RNAi screen defines cellular bioenergetic determinants and identifies an adenylate kinase as a key regulator of ATP levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanning, Nathan J.; Looyenga, Brendan D.; Kauffman, Audra L.; Niemi, Natalie M.; Sudderth, Jessica; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Altered cellular bioenergetics and mitochondrial function are major features of several diseases including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. Given this important link to human health, we sought to define proteins within mitochondria that are critical for maintaining homeostatic ATP levels. We screened an RNAi library targeting >1,000 nuclear-encoded genes whose protein products localize to the mitochondria in multiple metabolic conditions to examine their effect on cellular ATP levels. We identified a mechanism by which electron transport chain perturbation under glycolytic conditions increased ATP production through enhanced glycolytic flux; thereby highlighting the cellular potential for metabolic plasticity. Additionally, we identified a mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK4) that regulates cellular ATP levels, AMPK signaling, and whose expression significantly correlates with glioma patient survival. As a result, this study maps the bioenergetic landscape of >1,000 mitochondrial proteins in the context of varied metabolic substrates and begins to link key metabolic genes with clinical outcome. PMID:24767988

  16. Whole-animal genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks regulating male germline stem cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Ge, Qinglan; Chan, Brian; Liu, Hanhan; Singh, Shree Ram; Manley, Jacob; Lee, Jae; Weideman, Ann Marie; Hou, Gerald; Hou, Steven X.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regulated both intrinsically and externally, including by signals from the local environment and distant organs. To identify genes and pathways that regulate stem-cell fates in the whole organism, we perform a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen through ubiquitous gene knockdowns, focusing on regulators of adult Drosophila testis germline stem cells (GSCs). Here we identify 530 genes that regulate GSC maintenance and differentiation. Of these, we further knock down 113 selected genes using cell-type-specific Gal4s and find that more than half were external regulators, that is, from the local microenvironment or more distal sources. Some genes, for example, versatile (vers), encoding a heterochromatin protein, regulates GSC fates differentially in different cell types and through multiple pathways. We also find that mitosis/cytokinesis proteins are especially important for male GSC maintenance. Our findings provide valuable insights and resources for studying stem cell regulation at the organismal level. PMID:27484291

  17. Whole-animal genome-wide RNAi screen identifies networks regulating male germline stem cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ge, Qinglan; Chan, Brian; Liu, Hanhan; Singh, Shree Ram; Manley, Jacob; Lee, Jae; Weideman, Ann Marie; Hou, Gerald; Hou, Steven X

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regulated both intrinsically and externally, including by signals from the local environment and distant organs. To identify genes and pathways that regulate stem-cell fates in the whole organism, we perform a genome-wide transgenic RNAi screen through ubiquitous gene knockdowns, focusing on regulators of adult Drosophila testis germline stem cells (GSCs). Here we identify 530 genes that regulate GSC maintenance and differentiation. Of these, we further knock down 113 selected genes using cell-type-specific Gal4s and find that more than half were external regulators, that is, from the local microenvironment or more distal sources. Some genes, for example, versatile (vers), encoding a heterochromatin protein, regulates GSC fates differentially in different cell types and through multiple pathways. We also find that mitosis/cytokinesis proteins are especially important for male GSC maintenance. Our findings provide valuable insights and resources for studying stem cell regulation at the organismal level. PMID:27484291

  18. cDNA Library Screening Identifies Protein Interactors Potentially Involved in Non-Telomeric Roles of Arabidopsis Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Dokládal, Ladislav; Honys, David; Rana, Rajiv; Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B.; Sýkorová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase-reverse transcriptase (TERT) plays an essential catalytic role in maintaining telomeres. However, in animal systems telomerase plays additional non-telomeric functional roles. We previously screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the C-terminal extension (CTE) TERT domain and identified a nuclear-localized protein that contains an RNA recognition motif (RRM). This RRM-protein forms homodimers in both plants and yeast. Mutation of the gene encoding the RRM-protein had no detectable effect on plant growth and development, nor did it affect telomerase activity or telomere length in vivo, suggesting a non-telomeric role for TERT/RRM-protein complexes. The gene encoding the RRM-protein is highly expressed in leaf and reproductive tissues. We further screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the RRM-protein and identified five interactors. These proteins are involved in numerous non-telomere-associated cellular activities. In plants, the RRM-protein, both alone and in a complex with its interactors, localizes to nuclear speckles. Transcriptional analyses in wild-type and rrm mutant plants, as well as transcriptional co-analyses, suggest that TERT, the RRM-protein, and the RRM-protein interactors may play important roles in non-telomeric cellular functions. PMID:26617625

  19. cDNA Library Screening Identifies Protein Interactors Potentially Involved in Non-Telomeric Roles of Arabidopsis Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Dokládal, Ladislav; Honys, David; Rana, Rajiv; Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B; Sýkorová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase-reverse transcriptase (TERT) plays an essential catalytic role in maintaining telomeres. However, in animal systems telomerase plays additional non-telomeric functional roles. We previously screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the C-terminal extension (CTE) TERT domain and identified a nuclear-localized protein that contains an RNA recognition motif (RRM). This RRM-protein forms homodimers in both plants and yeast. Mutation of the gene encoding the RRM-protein had no detectable effect on plant growth and development, nor did it affect telomerase activity or telomere length in vivo, suggesting a non-telomeric role for TERT/RRM-protein complexes. The gene encoding the RRM-protein is highly expressed in leaf and reproductive tissues. We further screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the RRM-protein and identified five interactors. These proteins are involved in numerous non-telomere-associated cellular activities. In plants, the RRM-protein, both alone and in a complex with its interactors, localizes to nuclear speckles. Transcriptional analyses in wild-type and rrm mutant plants, as well as transcriptional co-analyses, suggest that TERT, the RRM-protein, and the RRM-protein interactors may play important roles in non-telomeric cellular functions. PMID:26617625

  20. Inhibitors of ROS production by the ubiquinone-binding site of mitochondrial complex I identified by chemical screening.

    PubMed

    Orr, Adam L; Ashok, Deepthi; Sarantos, Melissa R; Shi, Tong; Hughes, Robert E; Brand, Martin D

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species is often considered an unavoidable consequence of aerobic metabolism and currently cannot be manipulated without perturbing oxidative phosphorylation. Antioxidants are widely used to suppress effects of reactive oxygen species after formation, but they can never fully prevent immediate effects at the sites of production. To identify site-selective inhibitors of mitochondrial superoxide/H2O2 production that do not interfere with mitochondrial energy metabolism, we developed a robust small-molecule screen and secondary profiling strategy. We describe the discovery and characterization of a compound (N-cyclohexyl-4-(4-nitrophenoxy)benzenesulfonamide; CN-POBS) that selectively inhibits superoxide/H2O2 production from the ubiquinone-binding site of complex I (site I(Q)) with no effects on superoxide/H2O2 production from other sites or on oxidative phosphorylation. Structure/activity studies identified a core structure that is important for potency and selectivity for site I(Q). By employing CN-POBS in mitochondria respiring on NADH-generating substrates, we show that site I(Q) does not produce significant amounts of superoxide/H2O2 during forward electron transport on glutamate plus malate. Our screening platform promises to facilitate further discovery of direct modulators of mitochondrially derived oxidative damage and advance our ability to understand and manipulate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production under both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23994103

  1. Comprehensive RNAi-based screening of human and mouse TLR pathways identifies species-specific preferences in signaling protein use.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Dutta, Bhaskar; Vayttaden, Sharat J; Lin, Bin; Ebert, Thomas S; De Nardo, Dominic; Davis, Joie; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Lounsbury, Nicolas W; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Latz, Eicke; Hornung, Veit; Fraser, Iain D C

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a major class of pattern recognition receptors, which mediate the responses of innate immune cells to microbial stimuli. To systematically determine the roles of proteins in canonical TLR signaling pathways, we conducted an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen in human and mouse macrophages. We observed a pattern of conserved signaling module dependencies across species, but found notable species-specific requirements at the level of individual proteins. Among these, we identified unexpected differences in the involvement of members of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family between the human and mouse TLR pathways. Whereas TLR signaling in mouse macrophages depended primarily on IRAK4 and IRAK2, with little or no role for IRAK1, TLR signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production in human macrophages depended on IRAK1, with knockdown of IRAK4 or IRAK2 having less of an effect. Consistent with species-specific roles for these kinases, IRAK4 orthologs failed to rescue signaling in IRAK4-deficient macrophages from the other species, and only mouse macrophages required the kinase activity of IRAK4 to mediate TLR responses. The identification of a critical role for IRAK1 in TLR signaling in humans could potentially explain the association of IRAK1 with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, this study demonstrated how systematic screening can be used to identify important characteristics of innate immune responses across species, which could optimize therapeutic targeting to manipulate human TLR-dependent outputs. PMID:26732763

  2. RNA interference screening identifies a novel role for PCTK1/CDK16 in medulloblastoma with c-Myc amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ćwiek, Paulina; Leni, Zaira; Salm, Fabiana; Dimitrova, Valeriya; Styp-Rekowska, Beata; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Carroll, Michael; Höland, Katrin; Djonov, Valentin; Scapozza, Leonardo; Guiry, Patrick; Arcaro, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor in children and is associated with a poor outcome. cMYC amplification characterizes a subgroup of MB with very poor prognosis. However, there exist so far no targeted therapies for the subgroup of MB with cMYC amplification. Here we used kinome-wide RNA interference screening to identify novel kinases that may be targeted to inhibit the proliferation of c-Myc-overexpressing MB. The RNAi screen identified a set of 5 genes that could be targeted to selectively impair the proliferation of c-Myc-overexpressing MB cell lines: AKAP12 (A-kinase anchor protein), CSNK1α1 (casein kinase 1, alpha 1), EPHA7 (EPH receptor A7) and PCTK1 (PCTAIRE protein kinase 1). When using RNAi and a pharmacological inhibitor selective for PCTK1, we could show that this kinase plays a crucial role in the proliferation of MB cell lines and the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In addition, pharmacological PCTK1 inhibition reduced the expression levels of c-Myc. Finally, targeting PCTK1 selectively impaired the tumor growth of c-Myc-overexpressing MB cells in vivo. Together our data uncover a novel and crucial role for PCTK1 in the proliferation and survival of MB characterized by cMYC amplification. PMID:25402633

  3. Large-Scale Chemical Similarity Networks for Target Profiling of Compounds Identified in Cell-Based Chemical Screens

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu-Chen; Senese, Silvia; Li, Chien-Ming; Hu, Qiyang; Huang, Yong; Damoiseaux, Robert; Torres, Jorge Z.

    2015-01-01

    Target identification is one of the most critical steps following cell-based phenotypic chemical screens aimed at identifying compounds with potential uses in cell biology and for developing novel disease therapies. Current in silico target identification methods, including chemical similarity database searches, are limited to single or sequential ligand analysis that have limited capabilities for accurate deconvolution of a large number of compounds with diverse chemical structures. Here, we present CSNAP (Chemical Similarity Network Analysis Pulldown), a new computational target identification method that utilizes chemical similarity networks for large-scale chemotype (consensus chemical pattern) recognition and drug target profiling. Our benchmark study showed that CSNAP can achieve an overall higher accuracy (>80%) of target prediction with respect to representative chemotypes in large (>200) compound sets, in comparison to the SEA approach (60–70%). Additionally, CSNAP is capable of integrating with biological knowledge-based databases (Uniprot, GO) and high-throughput biology platforms (proteomic, genetic, etc) for system-wise drug target validation. To demonstrate the utility of the CSNAP approach, we combined CSNAP's target prediction with experimental ligand evaluation to identify the major mitotic targets of hit compounds from a cell-based chemical screen and we highlight novel compounds targeting microtubules, an important cancer therapeutic target. The CSNAP method is freely available and can be accessed from the CSNAP web server (http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/CSNAP/). PMID:25826798

  4. Two-dimensional combinatorial screening and the RNA Privileged Space Predictor program efficiently identify aminoglycoside–RNA hairpin loop interactions

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dustin J.; Seedhouse, Steven J.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we report the identification of RNA hairpin loops that bind derivatives of kanamycin A, tobramycin, neamine, and neomycin B via two-dimensional combinatorial screening, a method that screens chemical and RNA spaces simultaneously. An arrayed aminoglycoside library was probed for binding to a 6-nucleotide RNA hairpin loop library (4096 members). Members of the loop library that bound each aminoglycoside were excised from the array, amplified and sequenced. Sequences were analyzed with our newly developed RNA Privileged Space Predictor (RNA-PSP) program, which analyzes selected sequences to identify statistically significant trends. RNA-PSP identified the following unique trends: 5′UNNNC3′ loops for the kanamycin A derivative (where N is any nucleotide); 5′UNNC3′ loops for the tobramycin derivative; 5′UNC3′ loops for the neamine derivative; and 5′UNNG3′ loops for the neomycin B derivative. The affinities and selectivities of a subset of the ligand–hairpin loop interactions were determined. The selected interactions have Kd values ranging from 10 nM to 605 nM. Selectivities ranged from 0.4 to >200-fold. Interestingly, the results from RNA-PSP are able to qualitatively predict specificity based on overlap between the RNA sequences selected for the ligands. These studies expand the information available on small molecule–RNA motif interactions, which could be useful to design ligands targeting RNA. PMID:19726586

  5. High-throughput screening system to identify small molecules that induce internalization and degradation of HER2.

    PubMed

    Isa, Masayuki; Asanuma, Daisuke; Namiki, Shigeyuki; Kumagai, Kazuo; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hirose, Kenzo

    2014-10-17

    Overexpression of growth factor receptors in cancers, e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in ovarian and breast cancers, is associated with aggressiveness. A possible strategy to treat cancers that overexpress those receptors is blockade of receptor signaling by inducing receptor internalization and degradation. In this study, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) system to identify small molecules that induce HER2 internalization by employing our recently developed acidic-pH-activatable probe in combination with protein labeling technology. Our HTS system enabled facile and reliable quantification of HER2 internalization with a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 44.6. As proof of concept, we used the system to screen a ∼155,000 small-molecule library and identified three hits that induced HER2 internalization and degradation via at least two distinct mechanisms. This HTS platform should be adaptable to other disease-related receptors in addition to HER2. PMID:25140805

  6. Screening and Identifying Erosive Esophagitis in Children with Non-cardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Won; Choi, You Jin; Jeong, Su Jin

    2016-02-01

    Non-cardiac chest pain is a common disorder that leads to costly evaluations to distinguish it from cardiac pain. The present study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of erosive esophagitis in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Ninety nine patients (mean age, 9.55 ± 2.95 years, 49 girls) with non-cardiac chest pain were enrolled. Patients were classified into two groups: erosive esophagitis and non-erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Children in the erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain group were significantly older (10.95 ± 2.54 years vs. 8.52 ± 2.83 years). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the following predictors of gastroesophageal reflux: chest pain related to sleep (odds ratio = 18.05, 95% confidence interval: 3.18-102.49); unfavorable dietary habits (odds ratio = 7.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-32.87); chest pain related to food (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.37-18.86); epigastric pain (odds ratio = 3.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.12-12.33); and nausea, vomiting, and/or regurgitation (odds ratio = 4.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-15.54). Gastroesophageal reflux disease should be considered first in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Children with gastroesophageal reflux disease should receive medical treatment and lifestyle modifications. PMID:26839482

  7. Screening and Identifying Erosive Esophagitis in Children with Non-cardiac Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-cardiac chest pain is a common disorder that leads to costly evaluations to distinguish it from cardiac pain. The present study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of erosive esophagitis in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Ninety nine patients (mean age, 9.55 ± 2.95 years, 49 girls) with non-cardiac chest pain were enrolled. Patients were classified into two groups: erosive esophagitis and non-erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Children in the erosive esophagitis-related non-cardiac chest pain group were significantly older (10.95 ± 2.54 years vs. 8.52 ± 2.83 years). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the following predictors of gastroesophageal reflux: chest pain related to sleep (odds ratio = 18.05, 95% confidence interval: 3.18–102.49); unfavorable dietary habits (odds ratio = 7.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.53–32.87); chest pain related to food (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.37–18.86); epigastric pain (odds ratio = 3.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.12–12.33); and nausea, vomiting, and/or regurgitation (odds ratio = 4.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.22–15.54). Gastroesophageal reflux disease should be considered first in children with non-cardiac chest pain. Children with gastroesophageal reflux disease should receive medical treatment and lifestyle modifications. PMID:26839482

  8. Screen of whole blood responses to flagellin identifies TLR5 variation associated with outcome in melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Chantratita, Narisara; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Myers, Nicolle D.; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Robertson, Johanna D.; Mahavanakul, Weera; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Emond, Mary J.; Peacock, Sharon J.; West, T. Eoin

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe infection caused by the flagellated bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. The nonsense polymorphism TLR51174C>T is associated with improved outcome in Thais with melioidosis. We hypothesized that other TLR5 variants may modulate the host response and determine outcome in melioidosis. We genotyped 12 TLR5 variants selected de novo from the HapMap database and examined the association of each with cytokines induced by flagellin stimulation of whole blood from healthy Thai subjects. We found a blunted cytokine response for three related markers that were in linkage disequilibrium with a non-synonymous variant, TLR51846T>C. Carriers of TLR51846T>C had broadly impaired cytokine responses induced by flagellin. TLR51846T>C was associated with protection against death in melioidosis patients (OR 0.62, 95% CI: 0.42-0.93, p=0.021). We observed no impairment in TLR51846C-dependent NF-κB activation, however, suggesting an alternative mechanism for the effect. We found that TLR51846T>C was in strong linkage disequilibrium with TLR51174C>T. Many of the blunted cytokine responses observed and the association of TLR51846T>C with survival in melioidosis patients may be attributable to TLR51174C>T, but we could not exclude an independent effect of TLR51846T>C. These data identify novel associations for TLR51846T>C, enhance our understanding of TLR5 genetic architecture in Thais, and provide future directions of study. PMID:24285178

  9. Synthetic Lethality Screen Identifies RPS6KA2 as Modifier of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Milosevic, Nada; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Mühlberg, Leonie; Ripka, Stefanie; Griesmann, Heidi; Lölkes, Carolin; Buchholz, Malte; Aust, Daniela; Pilarsky, Christian; Krug, Sebastian; Gress, Thomas; Michl, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by a high degree of resistance to chemotherapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition using the small-molecule inhibitor erlotinib was shown to provide a small survival benefit in a subgroup of patients. To identify kinases whose inhibition acts synergistically with erlotinib, we employed a kinome-wide small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based loss-of-function screen in the presence of erlotinib. Of 779 tested kinases, we identified several targets whose inhibition acted synergistically lethal with EGFR inhibition by erlotinib, among them the S6 kinase ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (RPS6KA2)/ribosomal S6 kinase 3. Activated RPS6KA2 was expressed in approximately 40% of 123 human pancreatic cancer tissues. RPS6KA2 was shown to act downstream of EGFR/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and was activated by EGF independently of the presence of KRAS mutations. Knockdown of RPS6KA2 by siRNA led to increased apoptosis only in the presence of erlotinib, whereas RPS6KA2 activation or overexpression rescued from erlotinib- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. This effect was at least in part mediated by downstream activation of ribosomal protein S6. Genetic as well as pharmacological inhibition of RPS6KA2 by the inhibitor BI-D1870 acted synergistically with erlotinib. By applying this synergistic lethality screen using a kinome-wide RNA interference-library approach, we identified RPS6KA2 as potential drug target whose inhibition synergistically enhanced the effect of erlotinib on tumor cell survival. This kinase therefore represents a promising drug candidate suitable for the development of novel inhibitors for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:24403857

  10. A high-content, multiplexed screen in human breast cancer cells identifies profilin-1 inducers with anti-migratory activities.

    PubMed

    Joy, Marion E; Vollmer, Laura L; Hulkower, Keren; Stern, Andrew M; Peterson, Cameron K; Boltz, R C Dutch; Roy, Partha; Vogt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Profilin-1 (Pfn-1) is a ubiquitously expressed actin-binding protein that is essential for normal cell proliferation and migration. In breast cancer and several other adenocarcinomas, Pfn-1 expression is downregulated when compared to normal tissues. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that genetically modulating Pfn-1 expression significantly impacts proliferation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro, and mammary tumor growth, dissemination, and metastatic colonization in vivo. Therefore, small molecules that can modulate Pfn-1 expression could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. The overall goal of this study was to perform a multiplexed phenotypic screen to identify compounds that inhibit cell motility through upregulation of Pfn-1. Screening of a test cassette of 1280 compounds with known biological activities on an Oris™ Pro 384 cell migration platform identified several agents that increased Pfn-1 expression greater than two-fold over vehicle controls and exerted anti-migratory effects in the absence of overt cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Concentration-response confirmation and orthogonal follow-up assays identified two bona fide inducers of Pfn-1, purvalanol and tyrphostin A9, that confirmed in single-cell motility assays and Western blot analyses. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of Pfn-1 abrogated the inhibitory effect of tyrphostin A9 on cell migration, suggesting Pfn-1 is mechanistically linked to tyrphostin A9's anti-migratory activity. The data illustrate the utility of the high-content cell motility assay to discover novel targeted anti-migratory agents by integrating functional phenotypic analyses with target-specific readouts in a single assay platform. PMID:24520372

  11. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L.; Tomas, Juan M.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  12. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  13. Genome-wide siRNA Screen Identifies the Radiosensitizing Effect of Downregulation of MASTL and FOXM1 in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Remco; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Buijze, Marijke; van den Berg, Jaap; van der Meulen, Ida H; Hodzic, Jasmina; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Jiménez, Connie R; van Beusechem, Victor W; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and on top of that has a very poor prognosis, which is reflected by a 5-year survival rate of 5% to 15%. Radiotherapy is an integral part of most treatment regimens for this type of tumor, often combined with radiosensitizing cytotoxic drugs. In this study, we identified many genes that could potentially be exploited for targeted radiosensitization using a genome-wide siRNA screen in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The screen identified 433 siRNAs that potentially sensitize lung cancer cells to radiation. Validation experiments showed that knockdown of expression of Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) or microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) indeed causes radiosensitization in a panel of NSCLC cells. Strikingly, this effect was not observed in primary human fibroblasts, suggesting that the observed radiosensitization is specific for cancer cells. Phosphoproteomics analyses with and without irradiation showed that a number of cell-cycle-related proteins were significantly less phosphorylated after MASTL knockdown in comparison to the control, while there were no changes in the levels of phosphorylation of DNA damage response proteins. Subsequent analyses showed that MASTL knockdown cells respond differently to radiation, with a significantly shortened G2-M phase arrest and defects in cytokinesis, which are followed by a cell-cycle arrest. In summary, we have identified many potential therapeutic targets that could be used for radiosensitization of NSCLC cells, with MASTL being a very promising and druggable target to combine with radiotherapy. PMID:25808837

  14. A Genomewide Overexpression Screen Identifies Genes Involved in the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pathway in the Human Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Koushik, Amrita B.; Welter, Brenda H.; Rock, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. E. histolytica relies on motility, phagocytosis, host cell adhesion, and proteolysis of extracellular matrix for virulence. In eukaryotic cells, these processes are mediated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Thus, PI3K may be critical for virulence. We utilized a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose products may operate in the PI3K pathway in E. histolytica. We treated a population of trophozoites that were overexpressing genes from a cDNA library with a near-lethal dose of the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. This screen was based on the rationale that survivors would be overexpressing gene products that directly or indirectly function in the PI3K pathway. We sequenced the overexpressed genes in survivors and identified a cDNA encoding a Rap GTPase, a protein previously shown to participate in the PI3K pathway. This supports the validity of our approach. Genes encoding a coactosin-like protein, EhCoactosin, and a serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) were also identified. Cells overexpressing EhCoactosin or SREHP were also less sensitive to a second PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. This corroborates the link between these proteins and PI3K. Finally, a mutant cell line with an increased level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, the product of PI3K activity, exhibited increased expression of SREHP and EhCoactosin. This further supports the functional connection between these proteins and PI3K in E. histolytica. To our knowledge, this is the first forward-genetics screen adapted to reveal genes participating in a signal transduction pathway in this pathogen. PMID:24442890

  15. Three-step HPLC-ESI-MS/MS procedure for screening and identifying non-target flavonoid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Gábor; Fodor, Péter; Abrankó, László

    2010-02-01

    A three-step HPLC-ESI-MS/MS procedure is designed for screening and identification of non-target flavonoid derivatives of selected flavonoid aglycones. In this method the five commonly appearing aglycones (apigenin, luteolin, myricetin, naringenin and quercetin) were selected. The method consists of three individual mass spectrometric experiments of which the first two were implemented within a single chromatographic acquisition. The third step was carried out during a replicate chromatographic run using the same RP-HPLC conditions. The first step, a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) scan of the aglycones was performed to define the number of derivatives relating to the selected aglycones. For this purpose the characteristic aglycone parts of the unknowns were used as specific tags of the molecules, which were generated as in-source fragments. Secondly, a full scan MS experiment is performed to identify the masses of the potential derivatives of the selected aglycones. Finally, the third step had the capability to confirm the supposed derivatives. The developed method was applied to a commercially available black currant juice to demonstrate its capability to detect and identify various flavonoid glycosides without any preliminary information about their presence in the sample. As a result 13 compounds were detected and identified in total. Namely, 3 different myricetin glycosides and the myricetin aglycone 2 luteolin glycosides plus the aglycone and 3 quercetin glycosides plus the aglycone could be identified from the tested black currant sample. In the case of apigenin and naringenin only the aglycones could be detected.

  16. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kirienko, Daniel R.; Revtovich, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and

  17. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kirienko, Daniel R; Revtovich, Alexey V; Kirienko, Natalia V

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and increased host

  18. Flavones as Quorum Sensing Inhibitors Identified by a Newly Optimized Screening Platform Using Chromobacterium violaceum as Reporter Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Skogman, Malena E; Kanerva, Sonja; Manner, Suvi; Vuorela, Pia M; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is the process by which bacteria produce and detect signal molecules to coordinate their collective behavior. This intercellular communication is a relevant target for anti-biofilm therapies. Here we have optimized a screening-applicable assay to search for new quorum sensing inhibitors from natural compound libraries. In this system, QS is correlated with the production of violacein, which is directly controlled by the LuxI/LuxR system in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 31532. The parallel use of C. violaceum Tn5-mutant CV026, which depends on auto-inducer addition, allows simultaneous discrimination of compounds that act as quenchers of the AHL signal (quorum quenchers). The incorporation of a redox stain into the platform allowed further distinction between QS inhibitors, quorum quenchers and antibacterial compounds. A pilot screening was performed with 465 natural and synthetic flavonoids. All the most active compounds were flavones and they displayed potencies (IC50) in the range of 3.69 to 23.35 μM. These leads were particularly promising as they inhibited the transition from microcolonies into mature biofilms from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. This approach can be very effective in identifying new antimicrobials posing lesser risks of resistance. PMID:27626397

  19. Screening and Identifying a Novel ssDNA Aptamer against Alpha-fetoprotein Using CE-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lili; Tan, Qiwen; Ye, Wei; Liu, Dongli; Chen, Haifeng; Hu, Hongwei; Wen, Duo; Liu, Yang; Cao, Ya; Kang, Jingwu; Fan, Jia; Guo, Wei; Wu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a liver cancer associated protein and has long been utilized as a serum tumor biomarker of disease progression. AFP is usually detected in HCC patients by an antibody based system. Recently, however, aptamers generated from systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) were reported to have an alternative potential in targeted imaging, diagnosis and therapy. In this study, AFP-bound ssDNA aptamers were screened and identified using capillary electrophoresis (CE) SELEX technology. After cloning, sequencing and motif analysis, we successfully confirmed an aptamer, named AP273, specifically targeting AFP. The aptamer could be used as a probe in AFP immunofluorescence imaging in HepG2, one AFP positive cancer cell line, but not in A549, an AFP negative cancer cell line. More interesting, the aptamer efficiently inhibited the migration and invasion of HCC cells after in vivo transfection. Motif analysis revealed that AP273 had several stable secondary motifs in its structure. Our results indicate that CE-SELEX technology is an efficient method to screen specific protein-bound ssDNA, and AP273 could be used as an agent in AFP-based staining, diagnosis and therapy, although more works are still needed. PMID:26497223

  20. Virtual Screening and Experimental Validation Identify Novel Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Atg8-Atg3 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Hain, Adelaide U P; Miller, Alexia S; Levitskaya, Jelena; Bosch, Jürgen

    2016-04-19

    New therapies are needed against malaria, a parasitic infection caused by Plasmodium falciparum, as drug resistance emerges against the current treatment, artemisinin. We previously characterized the Atg8-Atg3 protein-protein interaction (PPI), which is essential for autophagy and parasite survival. Herein we illustrate the use of virtual library screening to selectively block the PPI in the parasite without inhibiting the homologous interaction in humans by targeting the A-loop of PfAtg8. This A-loop is important for Atg3 binding in Plasmodium, but is absent from the human Atg8 homologues. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate a shift in lipidation state of PfAtg8 and inhibition of P. falciparum growth in both blood- and liver-stage cultures upon drug treatment. Our results illustrate how in silico screening and structure-aided drug design against a PPI can be used to identify new hits for drug development. Additionally, as we targeted a region of Atg8 that is conserved within apicomplexans, we predict that our small molecule will have cross-reactivity against other disease-causing apicomplexans, such as Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, Theileria, Neospora, Eimeria, and Babesia. PMID:26748931

  1. Pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, molecular docking studies and density functional theory approaches to identify novel ketohexokinase (KHK) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Rengarajan; Karunagaran, Subramanian; Chandrabose, Subramaniam Subhash; Lee, Keun Woo; Meganathan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-12-01

    Fructose catabolism starts with phosphorylation of d-fructose to fructose 1-phosphate, which is performed by ketohexokinase (KHK). Fructose metabolism may be the key to understand the long-term consumption of fructose in human's obesity, diabetes and metabolic states in western populations. The inhibition of KHK has medicinally potential roles in fructose metabolism and the metabolic syndrome. To identify the essential chemical features for KHK inhibition, a three-dimensional (3D) chemical-feature-based QSAR pharmacophore model was developed for the first time by using Discovery Studio v2.5 (DS). The best pharmacophore hypothesis (Hypo1) consisting two hydrogen bond donor, two hydrophobic features and has exhibited high correlation co-efficient (0.97), cost difference (76.1) and low RMS (0.66) value. The robustness and predictability of Hypo1 was validated by fisher's randomization method, test set, and the decoy set. Subsequently, chemical databases like NCI, Chembridge and Maybridge were screened for validated Hypo1. The screened compounds were further analyzed by applying drug-like filters such as Lipinski's rule of five, ADME properties, and molecular docking studies. Further, the highest occupied molecular orbital, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and energy gap values were calculated for the hits compounds using density functional theory. Finally, 3 hit compounds were selected based on their good molecular interactions with key amino acids in the KHK active site, GOLD fitness score, and lowest energy gaps. PMID:26521124

  2. High-throughput kinetic screening of hybridomas to identify high-affinity antibodies using bio-layer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lad, Latesh; Clancy, Sheila; Kovalenko, Maria; Liu, Chian; Hui, Terence; Smith, Victoria; Pagratis, Nikos

    2015-04-01

    Kinetic analysis of antibodies is crucial in both clone selection and characterization. Historically, antibodies in supernatants from hybridomas are selected based on a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in which the antigen is immobilized on the assay plate. ELISA selects clones based on a combination of antibody concentration in the supernatant and affinity. The antibody concentration in the supernatant can vary significantly and is typically unknown. Using the ELISA method, clones that express high levels of a low-affinity antibody can give an equivalent signal as clones that express low levels of a high-affinity antibody. As a consequence, using the ELISA method, superior clones can be overshadowed by inferior clones. In this study, we have applied Bio-Layer Interferometry to screen hybridoma clones based on disassociation rates using the OctetRED 384 platform. Using the OctetRED platform, we were able to screen 2000 clones within 24 hours and select clones containing high-affinity antibodies for further expansion and subsequent characterization. Using this method, we were able to identify several clones producing high-affinity antibodies that were missed by ELISA. PMID:25425568

  3. Genome-wide screen identifies novel machineries required for both ciliogenesis and cell cycle arrest upon serum starvation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Ki, Soo Mi; Joung, Je-Gun; Scott, Eric; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Kwon, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G; Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-06-01

    Biogenesis of the primary cilium, a cellular organelle mediating various signaling pathways, is generally coordinated with cell cycle exit/re-entry. Although the dynamic cell cycle-associated profile of the primary cilium has been largely accepted, the mechanism governing the link between ciliogenesis and cell cycle progression has been poorly understood. Using a human genome-wide RNAi screen, we identify genes encoding subunits of the spliceosome and proteasome as novel regulators of ciliogenesis. We demonstrate that 1) the mRNA processing-related hits are essential for RNA expression of molecules acting in cilia disassembly, such as AURKA and PLK1, and 2) the ubiquitin-proteasome systems (UPS)-involved hits are necessary for proteolysis of molecules acting in cilia assembly, such as IFT88 and CPAP. In particular, we show that these screen hit-associated mechanisms are crucial for both cilia assembly and cell cycle arrest in response to serum withdrawal. Finally, our data suggest that the mRNA processing mechanism may modulate the UPS-dependent decay of cilia assembly regulators to control ciliary resorption-coupled cell cycle re-entry. PMID:27033521

  4. Pooled RNAi screen identifies ubiquitin ligase Itch as crucial for influenza A virus release from the endosome during virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yung-Chia; Tseng, Chung-Hsin; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Tung, Kuo-Feng; Jeng, King-Song; Lai, Michael M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses, like other viruses, rely on host factors to support their life cycle as viral proteins usually “hijack,” or collaborate with, cellular proteins to execute their functions. Identification and understanding of these factors can increase the knowledge of molecular mechanisms manipulated by the viruses and facilitate development of antiviral drugs. To this end, we developed a unique genome-wide pooled shRNA screen to search for cellular factors important for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. We identified an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Itch, as an essential factor for an early step in the viral life cycle. In Itch knockdown cells, the incorporation of viral ribonucleoprotein complex into endosomes was normal, but its subsequent release from endosomes and transport to the nucleus was retarded. In addition, upon virus infection, Itch was phosphorylated and recruited to the endosomes, where virus particles were located. Furthermore, Itch interacted with viral M1 protein and ubiquitinated M1 protein. Collectively, our findings unravel a critical role of Itch in mediating IAV release from the endosome and offer insights into the mechanism for IAV uncoating during virus entry. These findings also highlight the feasibility of pooled RNAi screening for exploring the cellular cofactors of lytic viruses. PMID:24101521

  5. A synthetic lethal screen identifies the Vitamin D receptor as a novel gemcitabine sensitizer in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, V; Zhou, Y; Yen, TJ

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer (PCa) cells should significantly extend patient survival. The current treatment modalities rely on a variety of DNA damaging agents including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and Abraxane that activate cell cycle checkpoints, which allows cells to survive these drug treaments. Indeed, these treatment regimens have only extended patient survival by a few months. The complex microenvironment of PCa tumors has been shown to complicate drug delivery thus decreasing the sensitivity of PCa tumors to chemotherapy. In this study, a genome-wide siRNA library was used to conduct a synthetic lethal screen of Panc1 cells that was treated with gemcitabine. A sublethal dose (50 nM) of the drug was used to model situations of limiting drug availability to PCa tumors in vivo. Twenty-seven validated sensitizer genes were identified from the screen including the Vitamin D receptor (VDR). Gemcitabine sensitivity was shown to be VDR dependent in multiple PCa cell lines in clonogenic survival assays. Sensitization was not achieved through checkpoint override but rather through disrupting DNA repair. VDR knockdown disrupted the cells’ ability to form phospho-γH2AX and Rad51 foci in response to gemcitabine treatment. Disruption of Rad51 foci formation, which compromises homologous recombination, was consistent with increased sensitivity of PCa cells to the PARP inhibitor Rucaparib. Thus inhibition of VDR in PCa cells provides a new way to enhance the efficacy of genotoxic drugs. PMID:25558828

  6. Pooled RNAi screen identifies ubiquitin ligase Itch as crucial for influenza A virus release from the endosome during virus entry.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yung-Chia; Tseng, Chung-Hsin; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Tung, Kuo-Feng; Jeng, King-Song; Lai, Michael M C

    2013-10-22

    Influenza viruses, like other viruses, rely on host factors to support their life cycle as viral proteins usually "hijack," or collaborate with, cellular proteins to execute their functions. Identification and understanding of these factors can increase the knowledge of molecular mechanisms manipulated by the viruses and facilitate development of antiviral drugs. To this end, we developed a unique genome-wide pooled shRNA screen to search for cellular factors important for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. We identified an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Itch, as an essential factor for an early step in the viral life cycle. In Itch knockdown cells, the incorporation of viral ribonucleoprotein complex into endosomes was normal, but its subsequent release from endosomes and transport to the nucleus was retarded. In addition, upon virus infection, Itch was phosphorylated and recruited to the endosomes, where virus particles were located. Furthermore, Itch interacted with viral M1 protein and ubiquitinated M1 protein. Collectively, our findings unravel a critical role of Itch in mediating IAV release from the endosome and offer insights into the mechanism for IAV uncoating during virus entry. These findings also highlight the feasibility of pooled RNAi screening for exploring the cellular cofactors of lytic viruses. PMID:24101521

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM

  8. A Genome-Wide Screen for Promoter Methylation in Lung Cancer Identifies Novel Methylation Markers for Multiple Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shames, David S; Girard, Luc; Gao, Boning; Sato, Mitsuo; Lewis, Cheryl M; Shivapurkar, Narayan; Jiang, Aixiang; Perou, Charles M; Kim, Young H; Pollack, Jonathan R; Fong, Kwun M; Lam, Chi-Leung; Wong, Maria; Shyr, Yu; Nanda, Rita; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Gerald, William; Euhus, David M; Shay, Jerry W; Gazdar, Adi F; Minna, John D

    2006-01-01

    Background Promoter hypermethylation coupled with loss of heterozygosity at the same locus results in loss of gene function in many tumor cells. The “rules” governing which genes are methylated during the pathogenesis of individual cancers, how specific methylation profiles are initially established, or what determines tumor type-specific methylation are unknown. However, DNA methylation markers that are highly specific and sensitive for common tumors would be useful for the early detection of cancer, and those required for the malignant phenotype would identify pathways important as therapeutic targets. Methods and Findings In an effort to identify new cancer-specific methylation markers, we employed a high-throughput global expression profiling approach in lung cancer cells. We identified 132 genes that have 5′ CpG islands, are induced from undetectable levels by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in multiple non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and are expressed in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. As expected, these genes were also expressed in normal lung, but often not in companion primary lung cancers. Methylation analysis of a subset (45/132) of these promoter regions in primary lung cancer (n = 20) and adjacent nonmalignant tissue (n = 20) showed that 31 genes had acquired methylation in the tumors, but did not show methylation in normal lung or peripheral blood cells. We studied the eight most frequently and specifically methylated genes from our lung cancer dataset in breast cancer (n = 37), colon cancer (n = 24), and prostate cancer (n = 24) along with counterpart nonmalignant tissues. We found that seven loci were frequently methylated in both breast and lung cancers, with four showing extensive methylation in all four epithelial tumors. Conclusions By using a systematic biological screen we identified multiple genes that are methylated with high penetrance in primary lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers. The cross-tumor methylation

  9. Genome-wide RNAi Screening Identifies Protein Modules Required for 40S Subunit Synthesis in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Badertscher, Lukas; Wild, Thomas; Montellese, Christian; Alexander, Leila T; Bammert, Lukas; Sarazova, Marie; Stebler, Michael; Csucs, Gabor; Mayer, Thomas U; Zamboni, Nicola; Zemp, Ivo; Horvath, Peter; Kutay, Ulrike

    2015-12-29

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process requiring many assisting factors. Studies in yeast have yielded comprehensive knowledge of the cellular machinery involved in this process. However, many aspects of ribosome synthesis are different in higher eukaryotes, and the global set of mammalian ribosome biogenesis factors remains unexplored. We used an imaging-based, genome-wide RNAi screen to find human proteins involved in 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Our analysis identified ∼ 300 factors, many part of essential protein modules such as the small subunit (SSU) processome, the eIF3 and chaperonin complexes, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We demonstrate a role for the vertebrate-specific factor RBIS in ribosome synthesis, uncover a requirement for the CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in nucleolar ribosome biogenesis, and reveal that intracellular glutamine synthesis supports 40S subunit production. PMID:26711351

  10. Identifying Preschool Children At-Risk of Later Reading Difficulties: Evaluation of two Emergent Literacy Screening Tools

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Shauna B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Emergent literacy skills are predictive of children’s early reading success, and literacy achievement in early schooling declines more rapidly for children who are below-average readers. It is therefore important for teachers to identify accurately children at risk for later reading difficulty so children can be exposed to good emergent literacy interventions. In this study, 176 preschoolers were administered two screening tools, the Revised Get Ready to Read! (GRTR-R) and the Individual Growth and Development Indicators (IGDIs), and a diagnostic measure at two time points. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that at optimal cut scores, GRTR-R provided more accurate classification of children’s overall emergent literacy skills than did IGDIs. However, neither measure was particularly good at classifying specific emergent literacy skills. PMID:19822699

  11. High-Throughput Screen in Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Novel Molecular Scaffold That Inhibits Cell Wall Integrity Pathway Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is one of the most important human fungal pathogens; however, no new therapies have been developed in over 50 years. Fungicidal activity is crucially important for an effective anticryptococal agent and, therefore, we screened 361,675 molecules against C. neoformans using an adenylate kinase release assay that specifically detects fungicidal activity. A set of secondary assays narrowed the set of hits to molecules that interfere with fungal cell wall integrity and identified three benzothioureas with low in vitro mammalian toxicity and good in vitro anticryptococcal (minimum inhibitory concentration = 4 μg/mL). This scaffold inhibits signaling through the cell wall integrity MAP kinase cascade. Structure–activity studies indicate that the thiocarbonyl moiety is crucial for activity. Genetic and biochemical data suggest that benzothioureas inhibit signaling upstream of the kinase cascade. Thus, the benzothioureas appear to be a promising new scaffold for further exploration in the search for new anticryptococcal agents. PMID:26807437

  12. A cell-based screen identifies ATR inhibitors with synthetic lethal properties for cancer-associated mutations

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Luis I.; Murga, Matilde; Zur, Rafal; Soria, Rebeca; Rodriguez, Antonio; Martinez, Sonia; Oyarzabal, Julen; Pastor, Joaquin; Bischoff, James R.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogene activation has been shown to generate replication-born DNA damage, also known as replicative stress (RS). Notably, the ATR kinase –and not ATM- is the primary responder to RS. One limitation for the study of ATR is the lack of potent inhibitors. We here describe a cell-based screening strategy that has allowed us to identify compounds with ATR inhibitory activity in the nanomolar range. Pharmacological inhibition of ATR generates RS, leading to chromosomal breakage in the presence of conditions that stall replication forks. Moreover, ATR inhibition is particularly toxic for p53 deficient cells, this toxicity being exacerbated by RS-generating conditions such as the overexpression of cyclin E. Importantly, one of the compounds is NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor that is currently being tested for cancer chemotherapy, but which we now show is also very potent against ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs. PMID:21552262

  13. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Haggie, Peter M; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    Pendrin (SLC26A4) is a Cl(-)/anion exchanger expressed in the epithelium of inflamed airways where it is thought to facilitate Cl(-) absorption and HCO3 (-) secretion. Studies using pendrin knockout mice and airway epithelial cells from hearing-impaired subjects with pendrin loss of function suggest involvement of pendrin in inflammatory lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), perhaps by regulation of airway surface liquid (ASL) volume. Here we identified small-molecule pendrin inhibitors and demonstrated their efficacy in increasing ASL volume. A cell-based, functional high-throughput screen of ∼36,000 synthetic small molecules produced 3 chemical classes of inhibitors of human pendrin. After structure-activity studies, tetrahydropyrazolopyridine and pyrazolothiophenesulfonamide compounds reversibly inhibited pendrin-facilitated Cl(-) exchange with SCN(-), I(-), NO3 (-), and HCO3 (-) with drug concentration causing 50% inhibition down to ∼2.5 μM. In well-differentiated primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells from non-CF and CF subjects, treatment with IL-13, which causes inflammation with strong pendrin up-regulation, strongly increased Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange and the increase was blocked by pendrin inhibition. Pendrin inhibition significantly increased ASL depth (by ∼8 μm) in IL-13-treated non-CF and CF cells but not in untreated cells. These studies implicate the involvement of pendrin-facilitated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) in the regulation of ASL volume and suggest the utility of pendrin inhibitors in inflammatory lung diseases, including CF.-Haggie, P. M., Phuan, P.-W., Tan, J.-A., Zlock, L., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Inhibitors of pendrin anion exchange identified in a small molecule screen increase airway surface liquid volume in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26932931

  14. Phenotypic assays to identify agents that induce reactive gliosis: a counter-screen to prioritize compounds for preclinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Samuel R; Jimenez, Joaquin E; Shi, Yan; Al-Ali, Hassan; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2015-09-01

    Astrocyte phenotypes change in a process called reactive gliosis after traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury. Astrogliosis is characterized by expansion of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) cytoskeleton, adoption of stellate morphologies, and differential expression of some extracellular matrix molecules. The astrocytic response immediately after injury is beneficial, but in the chronic injury phase, reactive astrocytes produce inhibitory factors (i.e., chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans [CSPGs]) that limit the regrowth of injured axons. There are no drugs that promote axon regeneration or functional recovery after CNS trauma in humans. To develop novel therapeutics for the injured CNS, we screened various libraries in a phenotypic assay to identify compounds that promote neurite outgrowth. However, the effects these compounds have on astrocytes are unknown. Specifically, we were interested in whether compounds could alter astrocytes in a manner that mimics the glial reaction to injury. To test this hypothesis, we developed cell-based phenotypic bioassays to measure changes in (1) GFAP morphology/localization and (2) CSPG expression/immunoreactivity from primary astrocyte cultures. These assays were optimized for six-point dose-response experiments in 96-well plates. The GFAP morphology assay is suitable for counter-screening with a Z-factor of 0.44±0.03 (mean±standard error of the mean; N=3 biological replicates). The CSPG assay is reproducible and informative, but does not satisfy common metrics for a "screenable" assay. As proof of principle, we tested a small set of hit compounds from our neurite outgrowth bioassay and identified one that can enhance axon growth without exacerbating the deleterious characteristics of reactive gliosis. PMID:26230074

  15. Systematic Phenotypic Screen of Arabidopsis Peroxisomal Mutants Identifies Proteins Involved in β-Oxidation1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Hu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic and multifunctional organelles essential to development. Plant peroxisomes accommodate a multitude of metabolic reactions, many of which are related to the β-oxidation of fatty acids or fatty acid-related metabolites. Recently, several dozens of novel peroxisomal proteins have been identified from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) through in silico and experimental proteomic analyses followed by in vivo protein targeting validations. To determine the functions of these proteins, we interrogated their transfer DNA insertion mutants with a series of physiological, cytological, and biochemical assays to reveal peroxisomal deficiencies. Sugar dependence and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid response assays uncovered statistically significant phenotypes in β-oxidation-related processes in mutants for 20 of 27 genes tested. Additional investigations uncovered a subset of these mutants with abnormal seed germination, accumulation of oil bodies, and delayed degradation of long-chain fatty acids during early seedling development. Mutants for seven genes exhibited deficiencies in multiple assays, strongly suggesting the involvement of their gene products in peroxisomal β-oxidation and initial seedling growth. Proteins identified included isoforms of enzymes related to β-oxidation, such as acyl-CoA thioesterase2, acyl-activating enzyme isoform1, and acyl-activating enzyme isoform5, and proteins with functions previously unknown to be associated with β-oxidation, such as Indigoidine synthase A, Senescence-associated protein/B12D-related protein1, Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, and Unknown protein5. This multipronged phenotypic screen allowed us to reveal β-oxidation proteins that have not been discovered by single assay-based mutant screens and enabled the functional dissection of different isoforms of multigene families involved in β-oxidation. PMID:25253886

  16. Yeast-based high-throughput screen identifies Plasmodium falciparum equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 inhibitors that kill malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Frame, I J; Deniskin, Roman; Rinderspacher, Alison; Katz, Francine; Deng, Shi-Xian; Moir, Robyn D; Adjalley, Sophie H; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Fidock, David A; Willis, Ian M; Landry, Donald W; Akabas, Myles H

    2015-03-20

    Equilibrative transporters are potential drug targets; however, most functional assays involve radioactive substrate uptake that is unsuitable for high-throughput screens (HTS). We developed a robust yeast-based growth assay that is potentially applicable to many equilibrative transporters. As proof of principle, we applied our approach to Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfENT1). PfENT1 inhibitors might serve as novel antimalarial drugs since PfENT1-mediated purine import is essential for parasite proliferation. To identify PfENT1 inhibitors, we screened 64 560 compounds and identified 171 by their ability to rescue the growth of PfENT1-expressing fui1Δ yeast in the presence of a cytotoxic PfENT1 substrate, 5-fluorouridine (5-FUrd). In secondary assays, nine of the highest activity compounds inhibited PfENT1-dependent growth of a purine auxotrophic yeast strain with adenosine as the sole purine source (IC50 0.2-2 μM). These nine compounds completely blocked [(3)H]adenosine uptake into PfENT1-expressing yeast and erythrocyte-free trophozoite-stage parasites (IC50 5-50 nM), and inhibited chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasite proliferation (IC50 5-50 μM). Wild-type (WT) parasite IC50 values were up to 4-fold lower compared to PfENT1-knockout (pfent1Δ) parasites. pfent1Δ parasite killing showed a delayed-death phenotype not observed with WT. We infer that, in parasites, the compounds inhibit both PfENT1 and a secondary target with similar efficacy. The secondary target identity is unknown, but its existence may reduce the likelihood of parasites developing resistance to PfENT1 inhibitors. Our data support the hypothesis that blocking purine transport through PfENT1 may be a novel and compelling approach for antimalarial drug development. PMID:25602169

  17. Cdc25B Dual-Specificity Phosphatase Inhibitors Identified in a High-Throughput Screen of the NIH Compound Library

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Caleb A.; Tierno, Marni Brisson; Shun, Tong Ying; Shinde, Sunita N.; Paquette, William D.; Brummond, Kay M.; Wipf, Peter; Lazo, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The University of Pittsburgh Molecular Library Screening Center (Pittsburgh, PA) conducted a screen with the National Institutes of Health compound library for inhibitors of in vitro cell division cycle 25 protein (Cdc25) B activity during the pilot phase of the Molecular Library Screening Center Network. Seventy-nine (0.12%) of the 65,239 compounds screened at 10 μM met the active criterion of ≥50% inhibition of Cdc25B activity, and 25 (31.6%) of these were confirmed as Cdc25B inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values <50 μM. Thirteen of the Cdc25B inhibitors were represented by singleton chemical structures, and 12 were divided among four clusters of related structures. Thirteen (52%) of the Cdc25B inhibitor hits were quinone-based structures. The Cdc25B inhibitors were further characterized in a series of in vitro secondary assays to confirm their activity, to determine their phosphatase selectivity against two other dual-specificity phosphatases, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 and MKP-3, and to examine if the mechanism of Cdc25B inhibition involved oxidation and inactivation. Nine Cdc25B inhibitors did not appear to affect Cdc25B through a mechanism involving oxidation because they did not generate detectable amounts of H2O2 in the presence of dithiothreitol, and their Cdc25B IC50 values were not significantly affected by exchanging the dithiothreitol for β-mercaptoethanol or reduced glutathione or by adding catalase to the assay. Six of the nonoxidative hits were selective for Cdc25B inhibition versus MKP-1 and MKP-3, but only the two bisfuran-containing hits, PubChem substance identifiers 4258795 and 4260465, significantly inhibited the growth of human MBA-MD-435 breast and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. To confirm the structure and biological activity of 4260465, the compound was resynthesized along with two analogs. Neither of the substitutions to the two analogs was tolerated, and only the

  18. Genome-Wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Identifies MicroRNAs That Regulate Myeloid Leukemia Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ruozhen; Mosbruger, Timothy L.; Dahlem, Timothy J.; Stephens, W. Zac; Rao, Dinesh S.; Round, June L.; O’Connell, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian microRNA expression is dysregulated in human cancer. However, the functional relevance of many microRNAs in the context of tumor biology remains unclear. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we performed a global loss-of-function screen to simultaneously test the functions of individual microRNAs and protein-coding genes during the growth of a myeloid leukemia cell line. This approach identified evolutionarily conserved human microRNAs that suppress or promote cell growth, revealing that microRNAs are extensively integrated into the molecular networks that control tumor cell physiology. miR-155 was identified as a top microRNA candidate promoting cellular fitness, which we confirmed with two distinct miR-155-targeting CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral constructs. Further, we performed anti-correlation functional profiling to predict relevant microRNA-tumor suppressor gene or microRNA-oncogene interactions in these cells. This analysis identified miR-150 targeting of p53, a connection that was experimentally validated. Taken together, our study describes a powerful genetic approach by which the function of individual microRNAs can be assessed on a global level, and its use will rapidly advance our understanding of how microRNAs contribute to human disease. PMID:27081855

  19. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  20. shRNA library screening identifies nucleocytoplasmic transport as a mediator of BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent resistance.

    PubMed

    Khorashad, Jamshid S; Eiring, Anna M; Mason, Clinton C; Gantz, Kevin C; Bowler, Amber D; Redwine, Hannah M; Yu, Fan; Kraft, Ira L; Pomicter, Anthony D; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Iovino, Anthony J; Zabriskie, Matthew S; Heaton, William L; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Chenchik, Alex; Bonneau, Kyle; Ullman, Katharine S; O'Hare, Thomas; Deininger, Michael W

    2015-03-12

    The mechanisms underlying tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients lacking explanatory BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations are incompletely understood. To identify mechanisms of TKI resistance that are independent of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity, we introduced a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) library targeting ∼5000 cell signaling genes into K562(R), a CML cell line with BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance expressing exclusively native BCR-ABL1. A customized algorithm identified genes whose shRNA-mediated knockdown markedly impaired growth of K562(R) cells compared with TKI-sensitive controls. Among the top candidates were 2 components of the nucleocytoplasmic transport complex, RAN and XPO1 (CRM1). shRNA-mediated RAN inhibition or treatment of cells with the XPO1 inhibitor, KPT-330 (Selinexor), increased the imatinib sensitivity of CML cell lines with kinase-independent TKI resistance. Inhibition of either RAN or XPO1 impaired colony formation of CD34(+) cells from newly diagnosed and TKI-resistant CML patients in the presence of imatinib, without effects on CD34(+) cells from normal cord blood or from a patient harboring the BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. These data implicate RAN in BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent imatinib resistance and show that shRNA library screens are useful to identify alternative pathways critical to drug resistance in CML. PMID:25573989

  1. A Global In Vivo Drosophila RNAi Screen Identifies a Key Role of Ceramide Phosphoethanolamine for Glial Ensheathment of Axons

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Aniket; Kling, Tina; Snaidero, Nicolas; Sampaio, Julio L.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Gras, Heribert; Geurten, Bart; Göpfert, Martin C.; Schulz, Jörg B.; Voigt, Aaron; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Glia are of vital importance for all complex nervous system. One of the many functions of glia is to insulate and provide trophic and metabolic support to axons. Here, using glial-specific RNAi knockdown in Drosophila, we silenced 6930 conserved genes in adult flies to identify essential genes and pathways. Among our screening hits, metabolic processes were highly represented, and genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways appeared to be essential in glia. One critical pathway identified was de novo ceramide synthesis. Glial knockdown of lace, a subunit of the serine palmitoyltransferase associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies in humans, resulted in ensheathment defects of peripheral nerves in Drosophila. A genetic dissection study combined with shotgun high-resolution mass spectrometry of lipids showed that levels of ceramide phosphoethanolamine are crucial for axonal ensheathment by glia. A detailed morphological and functional analysis demonstrated that the depletion of ceramide phosphoethanolamine resulted in axonal defasciculation, slowed spike propagation, and failure of wrapping glia to enwrap peripheral axons. Supplementing sphingosine into the diet rescued the neuropathy in flies. Thus, our RNAi study in Drosophila identifies a key role of ceramide phosphoethanolamine in wrapping of axons by glia. PMID:24348263

  2. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A.; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K.; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A.; Stewart, Rodney A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, called Tg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to produce sox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis of Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. Treating Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RA in vivo and raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  3. A synthetic lethal screen identifies ATR-inhibition as a novel therapeutic approach for POLD1-deficient cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hocke, Sandra; Guo, Yang; Job, Albert; Orth, Michael; Ziesch, Andreas; Lauber, Kirsten; De Toni, Enrico N; Gress, Thomas M.; Herbst, Andreas; Göke, Burkhard; Gallmeier, Eike

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase ATR represents a central checkpoint regulator and mediator of DNA-repair. Its inhibition selectively eliminates certain subsets of cancer cells in various tumor types, but the underlying genetic determinants remain enigmatic. Here, we applied a synthetic lethal screen directed against 288 DNA-repair genes using the well-defined ATR knock-in model of DLD1 colorectal cancer cells to identify potential DNA-repair defects mediating these effects. We identified a set of DNA-repair proteins, whose knockdown selectively killed ATR-deficient cancer cells. From this set, we further investigated the profound synthetic lethal interaction between ATR and POLD1. ATR-dependent POLD1 knockdown-induced cell killing was reproducible pharmacologically in POLD1-depleted DLD1 cells and a panel of other colorectal cancer cell lines by using chemical inhibitors of ATR or its major effector kinase CHK1. Mechanistically, POLD1 depletion in ATR-deficient cells caused caspase-dependent apoptosis without preceding cell cycle arrest and increased DNA-damage along with impaired DNA-repair. Our data could have clinical implications regarding tumor genotype-based cancer therapy, as inactivating POLD1 mutations have recently been identified in small subsets of colorectal and endometrial cancers. POLD1 deficiency might thus represent a predictive marker for treatment response towards ATR- or CHK1-inhibitors that are currently tested in clinical trials. PMID:26755646

  4. New molecular scaffolds for the design of Mycobacterium tuberculosis type II dehydroquinase inhibitors identified using ligand and receptor based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Miertus, Stanislav

    2010-04-01

    Using ligand and receptor based virtual screening approaches we have identified potential virtual screening hits targeting type II dehydroquinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an effective and validated anti-mycobacterial target. Initially, we applied a virtual screening workflow based on a combination of 2D structural fingerprints, 3D pharmacophore and molecular docking to identify compounds that rigidly match specific aspects of ligand bioactive conformation. Subsequently, the resulting compounds were ranked and prioritized using receptor interaction fingerprint based scoring and quantitative structure activity relationship model developed using already known actives. The virtual screening hits prioritized belong to several classes of molecular scaffolds with several available substitution positions that could allow chemical modification to enhance binding affinity. Finally, identified hits may be useful to a medicinal chemist or combinatorial chemist to pick up the new molecular starting points for medicinal chemistry optimization for the design of novel type II dehydroquinase inhibitors. PMID:19816720

  5. A Genome-Wide Screen to Identify Transcription Factors Expressed in Pelvic Ganglia of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Carrie B.; Ireland, Sara; Fleming, Nicole L.; Yu, Jing; Valerius, M. Todd; Georgas, Kylie; Chiu, Han Sheng; Brennan, Jane; Armstrong, Jane; Little, Melissa H.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Relative positions of neurons within mature murine pelvic ganglia based on expression of neurotransmitters have been described. However the spatial organization of developing innervation in the murine urogenital tract (UGT) and the gene networks that regulate specification and maturation of neurons within the pelvic ganglia of the lower urinary tract (LUT) are unknown. We used whole-mount immunohistochemistry and histochemical stains to localize neural elements in 15.5 days post coitus (dpc) fetal mice. To identify potential regulatory factors expressed in pelvic ganglia, we surveyed expression patterns for known or probable transcription factors (TF) annotated in the mouse genome by screening a whole-mount in situ hybridization library of fetal UGTs. Of the 155 genes detected in pelvic ganglia, 88 encode TFs based on the presence of predicted DNA-binding domains. Neural crest (NC)-derived progenitors within the LUT were labeled by Sox10, a well-known regulator of NC development. Genes identified were categorized based on patterns of restricted expression in pelvic ganglia, pelvic ganglia and urethral epithelium, or pelvic ganglia and urethral mesenchyme. Gene expression patterns and the distribution of Sox10+, Phox2b+, Hu+, and PGP9.5+ cells within developing ganglia suggest previously unrecognized regional segregation of Sox10+ progenitors and differentiating neurons in early development of pelvic ganglia. Reverse transcription-PCR of pelvic ganglia RNA from fetal and post-natal stages demonstrated that multiple TFs maintain post-natal expression, although Pax3 is extinguished before weaning. Our analysis identifies multiple potential regulatory genes including TFs that may participate in segregation of discrete lineages within pelvic ganglia. The genes identified here are attractive candidate disease genes that may now be further investigated for their roles in malformation syndromes or in LUT dysfunction. PMID:22988430

  6. A genome wide screen identifies PAPP-AA mediated IGFR signaling as a novel regulator of habituation learning

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, Marc A.; Jain, Roshan A.; Marsden, Kurt C.; Bell, Hannah; Skinner, Julianne; Hayer, Katharina E.; Hogenesch, John B.; Granato, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Habituation represents a fundamental form of learning, yet the underlying molecular genetic mechanisms are not well defined. Here we report on a genome-wide genetic screen, coupled with whole genome sequencing, that identified 14 zebrafish startle habituation mutants including mutants of the vertebrate specific gene pregnancy associated plasma protein-aa (pappaa). PAPP-AA encodes an extracellular metalloprotease known to increase IGF bioavailability thereby enhancing IGF receptor signaling. We find that pappaa is expressed by startle circuit neurons, and expression of wildtype, but not a metalloprotease-inactive version of pappaa restores habituation in pappaa mutants. Furthermore, acutely inhibiting IGF1R function in wild-type reduces habituation, while activation of IGF1R downstream effectors in pappaa mutants restores habituation, demonstrating that pappaa promotes learning by acutely and locally increasing IGF bioavailability. In sum, our results define the first functional gene set for habituation learning in a vertebrate, and identify PAPPAA-regulated IGF signaling as a novel mechanism regulating habituation learning. PMID:25754827

  7. piggyBac-Based Mosaic Screen Identifies a Postmitotic Function for Cohesin in Regulating Developmental Axon Pruning

    PubMed Central

    Schuldiner, Oren; Berdnik, Daniela; Levy, Jonathan Ma; Wu, Joy Sing-Yi; Luginbuhl, David; Gontang, Allison Camille; Luo, Liqun

    2008-01-01

    Summary Developmental axon pruning is widely used to refine neural circuits. We performed a mosaic screen to identify mutations affecting axon pruning of Drosophila mushroom body γ neurons. We constructed a modified piggyBac vector with improved mutagenicity and generated insertions in >2000 genes. We identified two cohesin subunits (SMC1 and SA) as essential for axon pruning. The cohesin complex maintains sister chromatid cohesion during cell division in eukaryotes. However, we show that the pruning phenotype in SMC1-/- clones is rescued by expressing SMC1 in neurons, revealing a new postmitotic function. SMC1-/- clones exhibit reduced levels of the ecdysone receptor EcR-B1, a key regulator of axon pruning. The pruning phenotype is significantly suppressed by overexpressing EcR-B1 and enhanced by reduced dosage of EcR, supporting a causal relationship. We also demonstrate a postmitotic role for SMC1 in dendrite targeting of olfactory projection neurons. We suggest that cohesin regulates diverse aspects of neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:18267091

  8. piggyBac-based mosaic screen identifies a postmitotic function for cohesin in regulating developmental axon pruning.

    PubMed

    Schuldiner, Oren; Berdnik, Daniela; Levy, Jonathan Ma; Wu, Joy S; Luginbuhl, David; Gontang, Allison Camille; Luo, Liqun

    2008-02-01

    Developmental axon pruning is widely used to refine neural circuits. We performed a mosaic screen to identify mutations affecting axon pruning of Drosophila mushroom body gamma neurons. We constructed a modified piggyBac vector with improved mutagenicity and generated insertions in >2000 genes. We identified two cohesin subunits (SMC1 and SA) as being essential for axon pruning. The cohesin complex maintains sister-chromatid cohesion during cell division in eukaryotes. However, we show that the pruning phenotype in SMC1(-/-) clones is rescued by expressing SMC1 in neurons, revealing a postmitotic function. SMC1(-/-) clones exhibit reduced levels of the ecdysone receptor EcR-B1, a key regulator of axon pruning. The pruning phenotype is significantly suppressed by overexpressing EcR-B1 and is enhanced by a reduced dose of EcR, supporting a causal relationship. We also demonstrate a postmitotic role for SMC1 in dendrite targeting of olfactory projection neurons. We suggest that cohesin regulates diverse aspects of neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:18267091

  9. Complementary genetic screens identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLC, as a modifier of PARP inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Brough, Rachel; Hodny, Zdenek; Ashworth, Alan; Bartek, Jiri; Lord, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a series of basic, preclinical and clinical studies, the Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor, olaparib, has recently been approved for use in ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. By identifying novel predictive biomarkers of tumour cell sensitivity to olaparib, it is possible that the utility of PARP inhibitors could be extended beyond this patient subgroup. Many of the known genetic determinants of PARP inhibitor response have key roles in DNA damage response (DDR) pathways. Although protein ubiquitylation is known to play an important role in regulating the DDR, the exact mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully understood. Using two parallel RNA interference-based screening approaches, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase, CBLC, as a candidate biomarker of response to olaparib. We validated this observation by demonstrating that silencing of CBLC causes increased sensitivity to olaparib in breast cancer cell line models and that defective homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair is the likely cause. This data provides an example of how defects in the ubiquitin machinery have the potential to influence the response of tumour cells to PARP inhibitors. PMID:25883215

  10. A Synthetic Interaction Screen Identifies Factors Selectively Required for Proliferation and TERT Transcription in p53-Deficient Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Mi; Zhu, Lihua J.; Debily, Marie-anne; Kittler, Ellen L. W.; Zapp, Maria L.; Lapointe, David; Gobeil, Stephane; Virbasius, Ching-Man; Green, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi)–based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53−) human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+) human cancer cell lines, diverse p53− human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53− cells, RNAi–mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53− but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53− cancer cells. PMID:23284306

  11. In silico and in vitro screening to identify structurally diverse non-azole CYP51 inhibitors as potent antifungal agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aarti; Paliwal, Sarvesh Kumar; Sharma, Mukta; Mittal, Anupama; Sharma, Swapnil; Sharma, Jai Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The problem of resistance to azole class of antifungals is a serious cause of concern to the medical fraternity and thus there is an urgent need to identify non-azole scaffolds with high affinity for lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51). In view of this we have attempted to identify novel non-azole CYP51 inhibitors through the application of pharmacophore based virtual screening and in vitro evaluation. A rigorously validated pharmacophore model comprising of 2 hydrogen bond acceptor and 2 hydrophobic features has been developed and used to mine NCI database. Out of 265 retrieved hits, NSC 1215 and 1520 have been chosen on the basis of Lipinski's rule of five, fit and estimated values. Both the hits were docked into the active site of CYP51. In view of high fit value and CDocker score, NSC 1215 and 1520 have been subjected to in vitro microbiological assay. The result reveals that NSC 1215 and 1520 are active against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Aspergillus niger. In addition to this the absorption characteristics of both the hits have also been determined using the rat sac technique and permeation in order of NSC 1520>NSC 1215 has been observed. PMID:26579619

  12. Quantitative Proteomics with siRNA Screening Identifies Novel Mechanisms of Trastuzumab Resistance in HER2 Amplified Breast Cancers*

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Alaina P.; Collier, Timothy S.; Vidavsky, Ilan; Bose, Ron

    2013-01-01

    HER2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is overexpressed in 20% to 30% of human breast cancers and which affects patient prognosis and survival. Treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) has improved patient survival, but the development of trastuzumab resistance is a major medical problem. Many of the known mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance cause changes in protein phosphorylation patterns, and therefore quantitative proteomics was used to examine phosphotyrosine signaling networks in trastuzumab-resistant cells. The model system used in this study was two pairs of trastuzumab-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cell lines. Using stable isotope labeling, phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitations, and online TiO2 chromatography utilizing a dual trap configuration, ∼1700 proteins were quantified. Comparing quantified proteins between the two cell line pairs showed only a small number of common protein ratio changes, demonstrating heterogeneity in phosphotyrosine signaling networks across different trastuzumab-resistant cancers. Proteins showing significant increases in resistant versus sensitive cells were subjected to a focused siRNA screen to evaluate their functional relevance to trastuzumab resistance. The screen revealed proteins related to the Src kinase pathway, such as CDCP1/Trask, embryonal Fyn substrate, and Paxillin. We also identify several novel proteins that increased trastuzumab sensitivity in resistant cells when targeted by siRNAs, including FAM83A and MAPK1. These proteins may present targets for the development of clinical diagnostics or therapeutic strategies to guide the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer patients who develop trastuzumab resistance. PMID:23105007

  13. An RNA interference lethality screen of the human druggable genome to identify molecular vulnerabilities in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Geetika; Pathak, Harsh B; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Yan; Einarson, Margret B; Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Birrer, Michael J; Godwin, Andrew K

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapies have been used to combat many tumor types; however, few have effectively improved the overall survival in women with epithelial ovarian cancer, begging for a better understanding of this deadly disease and identification of essential drivers of tumorigenesis that can be targeted effectively. Therefore, we used a loss-of-function screening approach to help identify molecular vulnerabilities that may represent key points of therapeutic intervention. We employed an unbiased high-throughput lethality screen using a 24,088 siRNA library targeting over 6,000 druggable genes and studied their effects on growth and/or survival of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell lines. The top 300 "hits" affecting the viability of A1847 cells were rescreened across additional EOC cell lines and non-tumorigenic, human immortalized ovarian epithelial cell lines. Fifty-three gene candidates were found to exhibit effects in all tumorigenic cell lines tested. Extensive validation of these hits refined the list to four high quality candidates (HSPA5, NDC80, NUF2, and PTN). Mechanistic studies show that silencing of three genes leads to increased apoptosis, while HSPA5 silencing appears to alter cell growth through G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, two independent gene expression studies show that NDC80, NUF2 and PTN were significantly aberrantly overexpressed in serous adenocarcinomas. Overall, our functional genomics results integrated with the genomics data provide an important unbiased avenue towards the identification of prospective therapeutic targets for drug discovery, which is an urgent and unmet clinical need for ovarian cancer. PMID:23056589

  14. Tandem virtual screening targeting the SRA domain of UHRF1 identifies a novel chemical tool modulating DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Cartron, Pierre Francois; Liutkevičiūtė, Zita; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Matulis, Daumantas; Bronner, Christian; Martinet, Nadine; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2016-05-23

    Ubiquitin-like protein UHRF1 that contains PHD and RING finger domain 1 is a key epigenetic protein enabling maintenance of the DNA methylation status through replication. A tandem virtual screening approach was implemented for identifying small molecules able to bind the 5-methylcytosine pocket of UHRF1 and inhibit its functionality. The NCI/DTP small molecules Repository was screened in silico by a combined protocol implementing structure-based and ligand-based methodologies. Consensus ranking was utilized to select a set of 27 top-ranked compounds that were subsequently evaluated experimentally in a stepwise manner for their ability to demethylate DNA in cellulo using PCR-MS and HPLC-MS/MS. The most active molecules were further assessed in a cell-based setting by the Proximity Ligation In Situ Assay and the ApoTome technology. Both evaluations confirmed that the DNMT1/UHRF1 interactions were significantly reduced after 4 h of incubation of U251 glioma cells with the most potent compound NSC232003, showing a 50% interaction inhibition at 15 μM as well as induction of global DNA cytosine demethylation as measured by ELISA. This is the first report of a chemical tool that targets UHRF1 and modulates DNA methylation in a cell context by potentially disrupting DNMT1/UHRF1 interactions. Compound NSC232003, a uracil derivative freely available by the NCI/DTP Repository, provides a versatile lead for developing highly potent and cell-permeable UHRF1 inhibitors that will enable dissection of DNA methylation inheritance. PMID:27049577

  15. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  16. Novel high-throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine [AZT (azidothymidine)] is associated with selection of the mutations M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in RT (reverse transcriptase). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT's ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-MP (AZT-monophosphate) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme's polymerase active site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleoside/nucleotide analogues, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. In the present study, we have developed a FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer)-based high-throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z' factor of 0.69. We screened three chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified APEX57219 {3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxybenzoic acid]} as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate. PMID:24969820

  17. Novel high throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine (AZT) is associated with selection of M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in reverse transcriptase (RT). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT’s ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-monophosphate (AZT-MP) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme’s polymerase activ e site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleosid(t)e analogs, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. Here, we developed a Förster resonance energy transfer based high throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal to noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z’ factor of 0.69. We screened 3 chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified 3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-lidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxy-benzoic acid] (APEX57219) as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate. PMID:24969820

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Screening for and Managing Identified Hypertension for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Phuong-Lan; Wright, E. Pamela; Nguyen, Thanh-Trung; Schuiling-Veninga, C. C. M.; Bijlsma, M. J.; Nguyen, Thi-Bach-Yen; Postma, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To inform development of guidelines for hypertension management in Vietnam, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different strategies on screening for hypertension in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A decision tree was combined with a Markov model to measure incremental cost-effectiveness of different approaches to hypertension screening. Values used as input parameters for the model were taken from different sources. Various screening intervals (one-off, annually, biannually) and starting ages to screen (35, 45 or 55 years) and coverage of treatment were analysed. We ran both a ten-year and a lifetime horizon. Input parameters for the models were extracted from local and regional data. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate parameter uncertainty. A threshold of three times GDP per capita was applied. Results Cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained varied in different screening scenarios. In a ten-year horizon, the cost-effectiveness of screening for hypertension ranged from cost saving to Int$ 758,695 per QALY gained. For screening of men starting at 55 years, all screening scenarios gave a high probability of being cost-effective. For screening of females starting at 55 years, the probability of favourable cost-effectiveness was 90% with one-off screening. In a lifetime horizon, cost per QALY gained was lower than the threshold of Int$ 15,883 in all screening scenarios among males. Similar results were found in females when starting screening at 55 years. Starting screening in females at 45 years had a high probability of being cost-effective if screening biannually was combined with increasing coverage of treatment by 20% or even if sole biannual screening was considered. Conclusion From a health economic perspective, integrating screening for hypertension into routine medical examination and related coverage by health insurance could be recommended. Screening for hypertension has a high probability of

  19. An Antibody Screen of a Plasmodium vivax Antigen Library Identifies Novel Merozoite Proteins Associated with Clinical Protection

    PubMed Central

    França, Camila T.; Hostetler, Jessica B.; Sharma, Sumana; White, Michael T.; Lin, Enmoore; Kiniboro, Benson; Waltmann, Andreea; Darcy, Andrew W.; Li Wai Suen, Connie S. N.; Siba, Peter; King, Christopher L.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Background Elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria would be greatly facilitated by the development of an effective vaccine. A comprehensive and systematic characterization of antibodies to P. vivax antigens in exposed populations is useful in guiding rational vaccine design. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated antibodies to a large library of P. vivax entire ectodomain merozoite proteins in 2 Asia-Pacific populations, analysing the relationship of antibody levels with markers of current and cumulative malaria exposure, and socioeconomic and clinical indicators. 29 antigenic targets of natural immunity were identified. Of these, 12 highly-immunogenic proteins were strongly associated with age and thus cumulative lifetime exposure in Solomon Islanders (P<0.001–0.027). A subset of 6 proteins, selected on the basis of immunogenicity and expression levels, were used to examine antibody levels in plasma samples from a population of young Papua New Guinean children with well-characterized individual differences in exposure. This analysis identified a strong association between reduced risk of clinical disease and antibody levels to P12, P41, and a novel hypothetical protein that has not previously been studied, PVX_081550 (IRR 0.46–0.74; P<0.001–0.041). Conclusion/Significance These data emphasize the benefits of an unbiased screening approach in identifying novel vaccine candidate antigens. Functional studies are now required to establish whether PVX_081550 is a key component of the naturally-acquired protective immune response, a biomarker of immune status, or both. PMID:27182597

  20. Screening of the Pan-African Natural Product Library Identifies Ixoratannin A-2 and Boldine as Novel HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A.; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva’a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M.; Rice, Charles M.; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world. PMID:25830320

  1. A Screen for Genes Expressed in the Olfactory Organs of Drosophila melanogaster Identifies Genes Involved in Olfactory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Narelle E.; Herr, Anabel; de Bruyne, Marien; Warr, Coral G.

    2012-01-01

    Background For insects the sense of smell and associated olfactory-driven behaviours are essential for survival. Insects detect odorants with families of olfactory receptor proteins that are very different to those of mammals, and there are likely to be other unique genes and genetic pathways involved in the function and development of the insect olfactory system. Methodology/Principal Findings We have performed a genetic screen of a set of 505 Drosophila melanogaster gene trap insertion lines to identify novel genes expressed in the adult olfactory organs. We identified 16 lines with expression in the olfactory organs, many of which exhibited expression of the trapped genes in olfactory receptor neurons. Phenotypic analysis showed that six of the lines have decreased olfactory responses in a behavioural assay, and for one of these we showed that precise excision of the P element reverts the phenotype to wild type, confirming a role for the trapped gene in olfaction. To confirm the identity of the genes trapped in the lines we performed molecular analysis of some of the insertion sites. While for many lines the reported insertion sites were correct, we also demonstrated that for a number of lines the reported location of the element was incorrect, and in three lines there were in fact two pGT element insertions. Conclusions/Significance We identified 16 new genes expressed in the Drosophila olfactory organs, the majority in neurons, and for several of the gene trap lines demonstrated a defect in olfactory-driven behaviour. Further characterisation of these genes and their roles in olfactory system function and development will increase our understanding of how the insect olfactory system has evolved to perform the same essential function to that of mammals, but using very different molecular genetic mechanisms. PMID:22530061

  2. Yeast-based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Plasmodium falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 Inhibitors That Kill Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Frame, I. J.; Deniskin, Roman; Rinderspacher, Alison; Katz, Francine; Deng, Shi-Xian; Moir, Robyn D.; Adjalley, Sophie H.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Fidock, David A.; Willis, Ian M.; Landry, Donald W.; Akabas, Myles H.

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative transporters are potential drug targets, however most functional assays involve radioactive substrate uptake that is unsuitable for high-throughput screens (HTS). We developed a robust yeast-based growth assay that is potentially applicable to many equilibrative transporters. As proof of principle, we applied our approach to Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfENT1). PfENT1 inhibitors might serve as novel antimalarial drugs since PfENT1-mediated purine import is essential for parasite proliferation. To identify PfENT1 inhibitors, we screened 64,560 compounds and identified 171 by their ability to rescue the growth of PfENT1-expressing fui1Δ yeast in the presence of a cytotoxic PfENT1 substrate, 5-fluorouridine (5-FUrd). In secondary assays, nine of the highest activity compounds inhibited PfENT1-dependent growth of a purine auxotrophic yeast strain with adenosine as the sole purine source (IC50 0.2–2 µM). These nine compounds completely blocked [3H]adenosine uptake into PfENT1-expressing yeast and erythrocyte-free trophozoite-stage parasites (IC50 5–50 nM), and inhibited chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasite proliferation (IC50 5–50 µM). Wild-type (WT) parasite IC50 values were up to four-fold lower compared to PfENT1-knockout (pfent1Δ) parasites. pfent1Δ parasite killing showed a delayed-death phenotype not observed with WT. We infer that in parasites, the compounds inhibit both PfENT1 and a secondary target with similar efficacy. The secondary target identity is unknown, but its existence may reduce the likelihood of parasites developing resistance to PfENT1 inhibitors. Our data support the hypothesis that blocking purine transport through PfENT1 may be a novel and compelling approach for antimalarial drug development. PMID:25602169

  3. A Genetic Screen Using the PiggyBac Transposon in Haploid Cells Identifies Parp1 as a Mediator of Olaparib Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, Stephen J.; Rehman, Farah L.; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Brough, Rachel; Wallberg, Fredrik; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Chen, Lina; Campbell, James; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic perturbation screens have the potential to dissect a wide range of cellular phenotypes. Such screens have historically been difficult in diploid mammalian cells. The recent derivation of haploid embryonic stem cells provides an opportunity to cause loss of function mutants with a random mutagen in a mammalian cell with a normal genetic background. We describe an approach to genetic screens that exploits the highly active piggyBac transposon in haploid mammalian cells. As an example of haploid transposon (HTP) screening, we apply this approach to identifying determinants of cancer drug toxicity and resistance. In a screen for 6-thioguanine resistance we recovered components of the DNA mismatch repair pathway, a known requirement for toxicity. In a further screen for resistance to the clinical poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib we recovered multiple Parp1 mutants. Our results show that olaparib toxicity to normal cells is mediated predominantly via Parp1, and suggest that the clinical side effects of olaparib may be on target. The transposon mutant libraries are stable and can be readily reused to screen other drugs. The screening protocol described has several advantages over other methods such as RNA interference: it is rapid and low cost, and mutations can be easily reverted to establish causality. PMID:23634208

  4. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors Within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries.

    PubMed

    Paul Friedman, Katie; Watt, Eric D; Hornung, Michael W; Hedge, Joan M; Judson, Richard S; Crofton, Kevin M; Houck, Keith A; Simmons, Steven O

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limited in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ToxCast screening assay portfolio. To fill 1 critical screening gap, the Amplex UltraRed-thyroperoxidase (AUR-TPO) assay was developed to identify chemicals that inhibit TPO, as decreased TPO activity reduces TH synthesis. The ToxCast phase I and II chemical libraries, comprised of 1074 unique chemicals, were initially screened using a single, high concentration to identify potential TPO inhibitors. Chemicals positive in the single-concentration screen were retested in concentration-response. Due to high false-positive rates typically observed with loss-of-signal assays such as AUR-TPO, we also employed 2 additional assays in parallel to identify possible sources of nonspecific assay signal loss, enabling stratification of roughly 300 putative TPO inhibitors based upon selective AUR-TPO activity. A cell-free luciferase inhibition assay was used to identify nonspecific enzyme inhibition among the putative TPO inhibitors, and a cytotoxicity assay using a human cell line was used to estimate the cellular tolerance limit. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using guaiacol as a substrate to confirm the activity profiles of putative TPO inhibitors. This effort represents the most extensive TPO inhibition screening campaign to date and illustrates a tiered screening approach that focuses resources, maximizes assay throughput, and reduces animal use. PMID:26884060

  5. Integrated compound profiling screens identify the mitochondrial electron transport chain as the molecular target of the natural products manassantin, sesquicillin, and arctigenin.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kevin; Selinger, Douglas W; Solomon, Jonathan M; Wu, Hua; Schmitt, Esther; Serluca, Fabrizio C; Curtis, Daniel; Benson, John D

    2013-01-18

    Phenotypic compound screens can be used to identify novel targets in signaling pathways and disease processes, but the usefulness of these screens depends on the ability to quickly determine the target and mechanism of action of the molecules identified as hits. One fast route to discovering the mechanism of action of a compound is to profile its properties and to match this profile with those of compounds of known mechanism of action. In this work, the Novartis collection of over 12,000 pure natural products was screened for effects on early zebrafish development. The largest phenotypic class of hits, which caused developmental arrest without necrosis, contained known electron transport chain inhibitors and many compounds of unknown mechanism of action. High-throughput transcriptional profiling revealed that these compounds are mechanistically related to one another. Metabolic and biochemical assays confirmed that all of the molecules that induced developmental arrest without necrosis inhibited the electron transport chain. These experiments demonstrate that the electron transport chain is the target of the natural products manassantin, sesquicillin, and arctigenin. The overlap between the zebrafish and transcriptional profiling screens was not perfect, indicating that multiple profiling screens are necessary to fully characterize molecules of unknown function. Together, zebrafish screening and transcriptional profiling represent sensitive and scalable approaches for identifying bioactive compounds and elucidating their mechanism of action. PMID:23138533

  6. High-throughput screen identifies disulfiram as a potential therapeutic for triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Tyler JW; Pai, Melody; Liu, Jeff C; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Sun, Thomas; Egan, Sean E; Datti, Alessandro; Huang, Jing; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents an aggressive subtype, for which radiation and chemotherapy are the only options. Here we describe the identification of disulfiram, an FDA-approved drug used to treat alcoholism, as well as the related compound thiram, as the most potent growth inhibitors following high-throughput screens of 3185 compounds against multiple TNBC cell lines. The average IC50 for disulfiram was ~300 nM. Drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS) analysis identified IQ motif-containing factors IQGAP1 and MYH9 as direct binding targets of disulfiram. Indeed, knockdown of these factors reduced, though did not completely abolish, cell growth. Combination treatment with 4 different drugs commonly used to treat TNBC revealed that disulfiram synergizes most effectively with doxorubicin to inhibit cell growth of TNBC cells. Disulfiram and doxorubicin cooperated to induce cell death as well as cellular senescence, and targeted the ESA+/CD24-/low/CD44+ cancer stem cell population. Our results suggest that disulfiram may be repurposed to treat TNBC in combination with doxorubicin. PMID:23974104

  7. A Genetic Screen for Mutations Affecting Cell Division in the Arabidopsis thaliana Embryo Identifies Seven Loci Required for Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.; Sieber, Patrick; Somerville, Chris; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in plants involves the formation of unique cellular structures such as the phragmoplast and the cell plate, both of which are required to divide the cell after nuclear division. In order to isolate genes that are involved in de novo cell wall formation, we performed a large-scale, microscope-based screen for Arabidopsis mutants that severely impair cytokinesis in the embryo. We recovered 35 mutations that form abnormally enlarged cells with multiple, often polyploid nuclei and incomplete cell walls. These mutants represent seven genes, four of which have previously been implicated in phragmoplast or cell plate function. Mutations in two loci show strongly reduced transmission through the haploid gametophytic generation. Molecular cloning of both corresponding genes reveals that one is represented by hypomorphic alleles of the kinesin-5 gene RADIALLY SWOLLEN 7 (homologous to tobacco kinesin-related protein TKRP125), and that the other gene corresponds to the Arabidopsis FUSED ortholog TWO-IN-ONE (originally identified based on its function in pollen development). No mutations that completely abolish the formation of cross walls in diploid cells were found. Our results support the idea that cytokinesis in the diploid and haploid generations involve similar mechanisms. PMID:26745275

  8. A Visual Screen of Protein Localization during Sporulation Identifies New Components of Prospore Membrane-Associated Complexes in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chien; Santore, Ethan; Lavoie, Elizabeth; Needleman, Leor; Fiacco, Nicholas; Kim, Carey

    2014-01-01

    During ascospore formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the secretory pathway is reorganized to create new intracellular compartments, termed prospore membranes. Prospore membranes engulf the nuclei produced by the meiotic divisions, giving rise to individual spores. The shape and growth of prospore membranes are constrained by cytoskeletal structures, such as septin proteins, that associate with the membranes. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to various proteins that associate with septins at the bud neck during vegetative growth as well as to proteins encoded by genes that are transcriptionally induced during sporulation were examined for their cellular localization during prospore membrane growth. We report localizations for over 100 different GFP fusions, including over 30 proteins localized to the prospore membrane compartment. In particular, the screen identified IRC10 as a new component of the leading-edge protein complex (LEP), a ring structure localized to the lip of the prospore membrane. Localization of Irc10 to the leading edge is dependent on SSP1, but not ADY3. Loss of IRC10 caused no obvious phenotype, but an ady3 irc10 mutant was completely defective in sporulation and displayed prospore membrane morphologies similar to those of an ssp1 strain. These results reveal the architecture of the LEP and provide insight into the evolution of this membrane-organizing complex. PMID:24390141

  9. A Multistep High-Content Screening Approach to Identify Novel Functionally Relevant Target Genes in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Malte; Honstein, Tatjana; Kirchhoff, Sandra; Kreider, Ramona; Schmidt, Harald; Sipos, Bence; Gress, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to foster the systematic identification of novel genes with important functional roles in pancreatic cancer, we have devised a multi-stage screening strategy to provide a rational basis for the selection of highly relevant novel candidate genes based on the results of functional high-content analyses. The workflow comprised three consecutive stages: 1) serial gene expression profiling analyses of primary human pancreatic tissues as well as a number of in vivo and in vitro models of tumor-relevant characteristics in order to identify genes with conspicuous expression patterns; 2) use of ‘reverse transfection array’ technology for large-scale parallelized functional analyses of potential candidate genes in cell-based assays; and 3) selection of individual candidate genes for further in-depth examination of their cellular roles. A total of 14 genes, among them 8 from “druggable” gene families, were classified as high priority candidates for individual functional characterization. As an example to demonstrate the validity of the approach, comprehensive functional data on candidate gene ADRBK1/GRK2, which has previously not been implicated in pancreatic cancer, is presented. PMID:25849100

  10. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  11. An RNAi-based chemical genetic screen identifies three small-molecule inhibitors of the Wnt/wingless signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Foster C.; Klein, Keren; Carson, Brittany B.; Katz, Shauna; Ekas, Laura A.; Evans, Steve; Nagourney, Robert; Cardozo, Timothy; Brown, Anthony M. C.; DasGupta, Ramanuj

    2011-01-01

    Misregulated β-catenin responsive transcription (CRT) has been implicated in the genesis of various malignancies, including colorectal carcinomas, and it is a key therapeutic target in combating various cancers. Despite significant effort, successful clinical implementation of CRT inhibitory therapeutics remains a challenging goal. This is, in part, because of the challenge of identifying inhibitory compounds that specifically modulate the nuclear transcriptional activity of β-catenin while not affecting its cytoskeletal function in stabilizing adherens junctions at the cell membrane. Here, we report an RNAi-based modifier screening strategy for the identification of CRT inhibitors. Our data provide support for the specificity of these inhibitory compounds in antagonizing the transcriptional function of nuclear β-catenin. We show that these inhibitors efficiently block Wnt/β-catenin–induced target genes and phenotypes in various mammalian and cancer cell lines. Importantly, these Wnt inhibitors are specifically cytotoxic to human colon tumor biopsy cultures as well as colon cancer cell lines that exhibit deregulated Wnt signaling. PMID:21393571

  12. In vitro screening of clinical drugs identifies sensitizers of oncolytic viral therapy in glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Berghauser Pont, L M E; Balvers, R K; Kloezeman, J J; Nowicki, M O; van den Bossche, W; Kremer, A; Wakimoto, H; van den Hoogen, B G; Leenstra, S; Dirven, C M F; Chiocca, E A; Lawler, S E; Lamfers, M L M

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) have broad potential as an adjuvant for the treatment of solid tumors. The present study addresses the feasibility of clinically applicable drugs to enhance the oncolytic potential of the OV Delta24-RGD in glioblastoma. In total, 446 drugs were screened for their viral sensitizing properties in glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) in vitro. Validation was done for 10 drugs to determine synergy based on the Chou Talalay assay. Mechanistic studies were undertaken to assess viability, replication efficacy, viral infection enhancement and cell death pathway induction in a selected panel of drugs. Four viral sensitizers (fluphenazine, indirubin, lofepramine and ranolazine) were demonstrated to reproducibly synergize with Delta24-RGD in multiple assays. After validation, we underscored general applicability by testing candidate drugs in a broader context of a panel of different GSCs, various solid tumor models and multiple OVs. Overall, this study identified four viral sensitizers, which synergize with Delta24-RGD and two other strains of OVs. The viral sensitizers interact with infection, replication and cell death pathways to enhance efficacy of the OV. PMID:26196249

  13. A large-scale functional screen identifies Nova1 and Ncoa3 as regulators of neuronal miRNA function

    PubMed Central

    Störchel, Peter H; Thümmler, Juliane; Siegel, Gabriele; Aksoy-Aksel, Ayla; Zampa, Federico; Sumer, Simon; Schratt, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of neuronal development, network connectivity, and synaptic plasticity. While many neuronal miRNAs were previously shown to modulate neuronal morphogenesis, little is known regarding the regulation of miRNA function. In a large-scale functional screen, we identified two novel regulators of neuronal miRNA function, Nova1 and Ncoa3. Both proteins are expressed in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of developing hippocampal neurons. We found that Nova1 and Ncoa3 stimulate miRNA function by different mechanisms that converge on Argonaute (Ago) proteins, core components of the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC). While Nova1 physically interacts with Ago proteins, Ncoa3 selectively promotes the expression of Ago2 at the transcriptional level. We further show that Ncoa3 regulates dendritic complexity and dendritic spine maturation of hippocampal neurons in a miRNA-dependent fashion. Importantly, both the loss of miRNA activity and increased dendrite complexity upon Ncoa3 knockdown were rescued by Ago2 overexpression. Together, we uncovered two novel factors that control neuronal miRISC function at the level of Ago proteins, with possible implications for the regulation of synapse development and plasticity. PMID:26105073

  14. Suppression of pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis by HMP19 identified through genome-wide shRNA screen.

    PubMed

    Kurahara, Hiroshi; Bohl, Christopher; Natsugoe, Shoji; Nishizono, Yuka; Harihar, Sitaram; Sharma, Rahul; Iwakuma, Tomoo; Welch, Danny R

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic effectiveness against metastatic or even locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is dismal, with 5-year survival less than 5%. Even in patients who undergo potentially curative resection, most patients' tumors recur in the liver. Improving therapies targeting or preventing liver metastases is crucial for improving prognosis. To identify genes suppressing metastasis, a genome-wide shRNA screen was done using the human non-metastatic PDAC cell line, S2-028. After identification of candidates, functional validation was done using intrasplenic and orthotopic injections in athymic mice. HMP19 strongly inhibited metastasis but also partially attenuated tumor growth in the pancreas. Knockdown of HMP19 increased localization of activated ERK1/2 in the nucleus, corresponding to facilitated cell proliferation, decreased p27(Kip1) and increased cyclin E1. Over-expression of HMP19 exerted the opposite effects. Using a tissue microarray of 84 human PDAC, patients with low expression of HMP19 showed significantly higher incidence of liver metastasis (p = 0.0175) and worse prognosis (p = 0.018) after surgery. HMP19, a new metastasis/tumor suppressor in PDAC, appears to alter signaling that leads to cell proliferation and appears to offer prognostic value in human PDAC. PMID:27012470

  15. A large-scale functional screen identifies Nova1 and Ncoa3 as regulators of neuronal miRNA function.

    PubMed

    Störchel, Peter H; Thümmler, Juliane; Siegel, Gabriele; Aksoy-Aksel, Ayla; Zampa, Federico; Sumer, Simon; Schratt, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of neuronal development, network connectivity, and synaptic plasticity. While many neuronal miRNAs were previously shown to modulate neuronal morphogenesis, little is known regarding the regulation of miRNA function. In a large-scale functional screen, we identified two novel regulators of neuronal miRNA function, Nova1 and Ncoa3. Both proteins are expressed in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of developing hippocampal neurons. We found that Nova1 and Ncoa3 stimulate miRNA function by different mechanisms that converge on Argonaute (Ago) proteins, core components of the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC). While Nova1 physically interacts with Ago proteins, Ncoa3 selectively promotes the expression of Ago2 at the transcriptional level. We further show that Ncoa3 regulates dendritic complexity and dendritic spine maturation of hippocampal neurons in a miRNA-dependent fashion. Importantly, both the loss of miRNA activity and increased dendrite complexity upon Ncoa3 knockdown were rescued by Ago2 overexpression. Together, we uncovered two novel factors that control neuronal miRISC function at the level of Ago proteins, with possible implications for the regulation of synapse development and plasticity. PMID:26105073

  16. An optimized InCell Western screening technique identifies hexachlorophene as a novel potent TDP43 targeting drug.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Malathi; Peralta, Diego A; Gibson, Chelsea; Zitnyar, Ashley; Jinwal, Umesh K

    2015-08-10

    TAR DNA binding protein (TDP43) is a DNA- and RNA-binding protein that is implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders termed as "TDP43 proteinopathies" including Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal lobe dementia (FTLD). We have developed an InCell Western (ICW) technique for screening TDP targeting drugs in 96 well plates. We tested 281 compounds and identified a novel compound hexachlorophene (referred to as B10) that showed potent reduction in TDP43 levels. The effect of B10 on TDP protein level was validated in two different cellular models: endogenous TDP43 expressing N9 microglial cells and TDP43-over-expressing HEK293 and HeLa cells. We also analyzed effect of B10 on various pathological forms of TDP such as the C25 cleaved fragment that localizes to the cytosol, insoluble high molecular weight species, and ALS-linked mutants. Our data suggest that B10 effectively reduces all forms of TDP. Overall, our data suggest that B10 could serve as a potential drug molecule for the treatment of AD, ALS and other TDP43 proteinopathies. PMID:25987361

  17. A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen Identifies CDC25A as a Determinant of Sensitivity to ATR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sergio; Mayor-Ruiz, Cristina; Lafarga, Vanesa; Murga, Matilde; Vega-Sendino, Maria; Ortega, Sagrario; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-04-21

    One recurring theme in drug development is to exploit synthetic lethal properties as means to preferentially damage the DNA of cancer cells. We and others have previously developed inhibitors of the ATR kinase, shown to be particularly genotoxic for cells expressing certain oncogenes. In contrast, the mechanisms of resistance to ATR inhibitors remain unexplored. We report here on a genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen that identified CDC25A as a major determinant of sensitivity to ATR inhibition. CDC25A-deficient cells resist high doses of ATR inhibitors, which we show is due to their failure to prematurely enter mitosis in response to the drugs. Forcing mitotic entry with WEE1 inhibitors restores the toxicity of ATR inhibitors in CDC25A-deficient cells. With ATR inhibitors now entering the clinic, our work provides a better understanding of the mechanisms by which these compounds kill cells and reveals genetic interactions that could be used for their rational use. PMID:27067599

  18. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C.

    PubMed

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-05-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  19. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C

    PubMed Central

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S. Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J.; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  20. A Genome-Scale DNA Repair RNAi Screen Identifies SPG48 as a Novel Gene Associated with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Słabicki, Mikołaj; Theis, Mirko; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Samsonov, Sergey; Mundwiller, Emeline; Junqueira, Magno; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Teyra, Joan; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Poser, Ina; Prieur, Fabienne; Truchetto, Jérémy; Confavreux, Christian; Marelli, Cécilia; Durr, Alexandra; Camdessanche, Jean Philippe; Brice, Alexis; Shevchenko, Andrej; Pisabarro, M. Teresa; Stevanin, Giovanni; Buchholz, Frank

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity, and genes with roles in DNA repair are frequently mutated in a variety of human diseases. Repair via homologous recombination typically restores the original DNA sequence without introducing mutations, and a number of genes that are required for homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) have been identified. However, a systematic analysis of this important DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells has not been reported. Here, we describe a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA (esiRNA) screen for genes involved in DNA double strand break repair. We report 61 genes that influenced the frequency of HR-DSBR and characterize in detail one of the genes that decreased the frequency of HR-DSBR. We show that the gene KIAA0415 encodes a putative helicase that interacts with SPG11 and SPG15, two proteins mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We identify mutations in HSP patients, discovering KIAA0415/SPG48 as a novel HSP-associated gene, and show that a KIAA0415/SPG48 mutant cell line is more sensitive to DNA damaging drugs. We present the first genome-scale survey of HR-DSBR in mammalian cells providing a dataset that should accelerate the discovery of novel genes with roles in DNA repair and associated medical conditions. The discovery that proteins forming a novel protein complex are required for efficient HR-DSBR and are mutated in patients suffering from HSP suggests a link between HSP and DNA repair. PMID:20613862

  1. A functional screen identifies miRNAs that inhibit DNA repair and sensitize prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Koji; Kumar, Binod; Zhang, Yonggang; Coulter, Jonathan B.; Hedayati, Mohammad; Mears, Brian; Ni, Xiaohua; Kudrolli, Tarana A.; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Rodriguez, Ronald; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Lupold, Shawn E.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in DNA repair pathways through transcriptional responses to DNA damaging agents or through predicted miRNA regulation of DNA repair genes. We hypothesized that additional DNA damage regulating miRNAs could be identified by screening a library of 810 miRNA mimetics for the ability to alter cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR). A prostate cancer Metridia luciferase cell model was applied to examine the effects of individual miRNAs on IR sensitivity. A large percentage of miRNA mimetics were found to increase cellular sensitivity to IR, while a smaller percentage were protective. Two of the most potent IR sensitizing miRNAs, miR-890 and miR-744–3p, significantly delayed IR induced DNA damage repair. Both miRNAs inhibited the expression of multiple components of DNA damage response and DNA repair. miR-890 directly targeted MAD2L2, as well as WEE1 and XPC, where miR-744–3p directly targeted RAD23B. Knock-down of individual miR-890 targets by siRNA was not sufficient to ablate miR-890 radiosensitization, signifying that miR-890 functions by regulating multiple DNA repair genes. Intratumoral delivery of miR-890 mimetics prior to IR therapy significantly enhanced IR therapeutic efficacy. These results reveal novel miRNA regulation of DNA repair and identify miR-890 as a potent IR sensitizing agent. PMID:25845598

  2. A genome-scale proteomic screen identifies a role for DnaK in chaperoning of polar autotransporters in Shigella.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Anuradha; Fixen, Kathryn R; Gray, Andrew N; Niki, Hironori; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2009-10-01

    Autotransporters are outer membrane proteins that are widely distributed among gram-negative bacteria. Like other autotransporters, the Shigella autotransporter IcsA, which is required for actin assembly during infection, is secreted at the bacterial pole. In the bacterial cytoplasm, IcsA localizes to poles and potential cell division sites independent of the cell division protein FtsZ. To identify bacterial proteins involved in the targeting of IcsA to the pole in the bacterial cytoplasm, we screened a genome-scale library of Escherichia coli proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for those that displayed a localization pattern similar to that of IcsA-GFP in cells that lack functional FtsZ using a strain carrying a temperature-sensitive ftsZ allele. For each protein that mimicked the localization of IcsA-GFP, we tested whether IcsA localization was dependent on the presence of the protein. Although these approaches did not identify a polar receptor for IcsA, the cytoplasmic chaperone DnaK both mimicked IcsA localization at elevated temperatures as a GFP fusion and was required for the localization of IcsA to the pole in the cytoplasm of E. coli. DnaK was also required for IcsA secretion at the pole in Shigella flexneri. The localization of DnaK-GFP to poles and potential cell division sites was dependent on elevated growth temperature and independent of the presence of IcsA or functional FtsZ; native DnaK was found to be enhanced at midcell and the poles. A second Shigella autotransporter, SepA, also required DnaK for secretion, consistent with a role of DnaK more generally in the chaperoning of autotransporter proteins in the bacterial cytoplasm. PMID:19684128

  3. A genetic screen in zebrafish identifies the mutants vps18, nf2 and foie gras as models of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Kirsten C; Amsterdam, Adam; Soroka, Carol; Boyer, James; Hopkins, Nancy

    2005-08-01

    Hepatomegaly is a sign of many liver disorders. To identify zebrafish mutants to serve as models for hepatic pathologies, we screened for hepatomegaly at day 5 of embryogenesis in 297 zebrafish lines bearing mutations in genes that are essential for embryonic development. Seven mutants were identified, and three have phenotypes resembling different liver diseases. Mutation of the class C vacuolar protein sorting gene vps18 results in hepatomegaly associated with large, vesicle-filled hepatocytes, which we attribute to the failure of endosomal-lysosomal trafficking. Additionally, these mutants develop defects in the bile canaliculi and have marked biliary paucity, suggesting that vps18 also functions to traffic vesicles to the hepatocyte apical membrane and may play a role in the development of the intrahepatic biliary tree. Similar findings have been reported for individuals with arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, which is due to mutation of another class C vps gene. A second mutant, resulting from disruption of the tumor suppressor gene nf2, develops extrahepatic choledochal cysts in the common bile duct, suggesting that this gene regulates division of biliary cells during development and that nf2 may play a role in the hyperplastic tendencies observed in biliary cells in individuals with choledochal cysts. The third mutant is in the novel gene foie gras, which develops large, lipid-filled hepatocytes, resembling those in individuals with fatty liver disease. These mutants illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for studying liver development and disease, and provide valuable tools for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of congenital biliary disorders and fatty liver disease. PMID:16000385

  4. A haploid genetic screen identifies the G1/S regulatory machinery as a determinant of Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Blomen, Vincent A.; Bisteau, Xavier; Degener, Fabian; Matsushita, Felipe Yu; Foijer, Floris; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Wee1 cell cycle checkpoint kinase prevents premature mitotic entry by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases. Chemical inhibitors of Wee1 are currently being tested clinically as targeted anticancer drugs. Wee1 inhibition is thought to be preferentially cytotoxic in p53-defective cancer cells. However, TP53 mutant cancers do not respond consistently to Wee1 inhibitor treatment, indicating the existence of genetic determinants of Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity other than TP53 status. To optimally facilitate patient selection for Wee1 inhibition and uncover potential resistance mechanisms, identification of these currently unknown genes is necessary. The aim of this study was therefore to identify gene mutations that determine Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity. We performed a genome-wide unbiased functional genetic screen in TP53 mutant near-haploid KBM-7 cells using gene-trap insertional mutagenesis. Insertion site mapping of cells that survived long-term Wee1 inhibition revealed enrichment of G1/S regulatory genes, including SKP2, CUL1, and CDK2. Stable depletion of SKP2, CUL1, or CDK2 or chemical Cdk2 inhibition rescued the γ-H2AX induction and abrogation of G2 phase as induced by Wee1 inhibition in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines. Remarkably, live cell imaging showed that depletion of SKP2, CUL1, or CDK2 did not rescue the Wee1 inhibition-induced karyokinesis and cytokinesis defects. These data indicate that the activity of the DNA replication machinery, beyond TP53 mutation status, determines Wee1 inhibitor sensitivity, and could serve as a selection criterion for Wee1-inhibitor eligible patients. Conversely, loss of the identified S-phase genes could serve as a mechanism of acquired resistance, which goes along with development of severe genomic instability. PMID:26598692

  5. A screen for enhancers of clearance identifies huntingtin as a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) client protein.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Barbara; Weiss, Andreas; Parker, Christian N; Bibel, Miriam; Paganetti, Paolo; Kaupmann, Klemens

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms to reduce the cellular levels of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) provide promising strategies for treating Huntington disease (HD). To identify compounds enhancing the degradation of mHtt, we performed a high throughput screen using a hippocampal HN10 cell line expressing a 573-amino acid mHtt fragment. Several hit structures were identified as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors. Cell treatment with these compounds reduced levels of mHtt without overt toxic effects as measured by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer assays and Western blots. To characterize the mechanism of mHtt degradation, we used the potent and selective Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. In HdhQ150 embryonic stem (ES) cells and in ES cell-derived neurons, NVP-AUY922 treatment substantially reduced soluble full-length mHtt levels. In HN10 cells, Hsp90 inhibition by NVP-AUY922 enhanced mHtt clearance in the absence of any detectable Hsp70 induction. Furthermore, inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide or overexpression of dominant negative heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) in HdhQ150 ES cells attenuated Hsp70 induction but did not affect NVP-AUY922-mediated mHtt clearance. Together, these data provided evidence that direct inhibition of Hsp90 chaperone function was crucial for mHtt degradation rather than heat shock response induction and Hsp70 up-regulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction of mutant and wild-type Htt with the Hsp90 chaperone. Hsp90 inhibition disrupted the interaction and induced clearance of Htt through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our data suggest that Htt is an Hsp90 client protein and that Hsp90 inhibition may provide a means to reduce mHtt in HD. PMID:22123826

  6. Screening a mouse liver gene expression compendium identifies modulators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), dioxin-like compounds (DLC) as well as some drugs and endogenous tryptophan metabolites. Short-term activation of AhR can lead to hepatocellular steatosis, and chronic activation can lead to liver cancer in mice and rats. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets in a genomic database in which AhR activity was altered. A set of 63 genes was identified (the AhR gene expression biomarker) that was dependent on AhR for regulation after exposure to TCDD or benzo[a]pyrene and includes the known AhR targets Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1. A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher's test; p-value ≤ 10(-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the AhR biomarker and a test set of 37 and 41 biosets positive or negative, respectively for AhR activation. The test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 95%. The rank-based test was used to identify factors that activate or suppress AhR in an annotated mouse liver/mouse primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ∼ 1850 comparisons. In addition to the expected activation of AhR by TCDD and DLC, AhR was activated by AP20189 and phenformin. AhR was suppressed by phenobarbital and 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) in a constitutive activated receptor (CAR)-dependent manner and pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile in a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-dependent manner. Inactivation of individual genes in nullizygous models led to AhR activation (Pxr, Ghrhr, Taf10) or suppression (Ahr, Ilst6st, Hnf1a). This study describes a novel screening strategy for identifying factors in mouse liver that perturb AhR in a gene expression compendium. PMID:26215100

  7. The ToxCast Pathway Database for Identifying Toxicity Signatures and Potential Modes of Action from Chemical Screening Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ToxCast program, is developing predictive toxicity approaches that will use in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS), high-content screening (HCS) and toxicogenomic data to predict in vivo toxicity phenotypes. There are ...

  8. Structured Teacher Ratings to Identify Students in Need of Academic Assistance: Validation of the Brief Academic Competence Evaluation Screening System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Albers, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    The Brief Academic Competence Evaluation Screening System (BACESS) is a multiphase universal screening measure designed to assist educators in the identification of students who are likely to experience learning difficulties in elementary school. This study evaluated the reliability and validity of the measure for this purpose. The BACESS was used…

  9. A High-Throughput Forward Genetic Screen Identifies Genes Required for Virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 on Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Karl J.; Ye, David; Fich, Eric; Jian, Allen; Lo, Timothy; Desveaux, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Successful pathogenesis requires a number of coordinated processes whose genetic bases remain to be fully characterized. We utilized a high-throughput, liquid media-based assay to screen transposon disruptants of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 to identify genes required for virulence on Arabidopsis. Many genes identified through this screen were involved in processes such as type III secretion, periplasmic glucan biosynthesis, flagellar motility, and amino acid biosynthesis. A small set of genes did not fall into any of these functional groups, and their disruption resulted in context-specific effects on in planta bacterial growth. PMID:22870224

  10. Development of the Risk Appraisal Measure (RAM): A Brief Screen to Identify Risk Areas and Guide Interventions for Dementia Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J.; Gitlin, Laura N.; Schulz, Richard; Zhang, Song; Burgio, Louis D.; Stevens, Alan B.; Nichols, Linda O.; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Family caregivers play a significant role in the health care of patients with dementia yet their needs and health status are often overlooked. This study developed and validated a brief screening measure for use in research, health care and community settings to systematically assess well-being and identify needed areas of support for caregivers of patients with dementia. Design This study used data from Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer’s Caregiver Health (REACH II), a multi-site, randomized, clinical trial of a behavioral intervention designed to improve the quality of life of caregivers in multiple domains. PARTICIPANTS: Two-hundred and twelve Hispanic, 211 Black/African American and 219 White family community dwelling dementia caregiver dyads providing in-home care to patients with dementia. Measurement Based on conceptual and psychometric analyses, a 16-item measure was developed that taps six domains linked to caregiver risk and amenable to intervention: depression, burden, self-care and health behaviors, social support, safety, and patient problem behaviors. The reliability and validity of the instrument was evaluated with 642 dementia caregiver dyads from the REACH II program. Results The measure was found to have acceptable internal consistency for a multi-dimensional scale and similar measurement properties for each of the racial/ethnic groups. Concurrent validity was also demonstrated for the measure. Conclusion The REACH Risk Appraisal Measure (RAM) developed in this study shows promise as an assessment tool that can be used in research, clinical and community settings to guide, prioritize, and target needed areas of support for caregivers of patients with dementia. PMID:19453305

  11. Genome-wide Screens for Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation Identify the Fission Yeast Nonhomologous End Joining Factor Xrc4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yu, Yang; Suo, Fang; Sun, Ling-Ling; Zhao, Dan; Du, Li-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is the main means for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Molecular understanding of NHEJ has benefited from analyses in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In human cells, the DNA ligation reaction of the classical NHEJ pathway is carried out by a protein complex composed of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and XRCC4. In S. cerevisiae, this reaction is catalyzed by a homologous complex composed of Dnl4 and Lif1. Intriguingly, no homolog of XRCC4 has been found in S. pombe, raising the possibility that such a factor may not always be required for classical NHEJ. Here, through screening the ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity phenotype of a genome-wide fission yeast deletion collection in both the vegetative growth state and the spore state, we identify Xrc4, a highly divergent homolog of human XRCC4. Like other fission yeast NHEJ factors, Xrc4 is critically important for IR resistance of spores, in which no homologous recombination templates are available. Using both extrachromosomal and chromosomal DSB repair assays, we show that Xrc4 is essential for classical NHEJ. Exogenously expressed Xrc4 colocalizes with the LigIV homolog Lig4 at the chromatin region of the nucleus in a mutually dependent manner. Furthermore, like their human counterparts, Xrc4 and Lig4 interact with each other and this interaction requires the inter-BRCT linker and the second BRCT domain of Lig4. Our discovery of Xrc4 suggests that an XRCC4 family protein is universally required for classical NHEJ in eukaryotes. PMID:24847916

  12. Polymerase chain reaction-based screening method applicable universally to environmental haloarchaea and halobacteria for identifying polyhydroxyalkanoate producers among them.

    PubMed

    Mahansaria, Riddhi; Choudhury, Jayanta Debabrata; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2015-09-01

    The existing techniques for detection of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in halophilic archaea/bacteria are either imprecise or require prior PHA production before screening. The proposed method involves amplification of the approximately 280-300 bp conserved region of Class III PHA synthase (phaC) gene of halophiles using the primers codehopCF and codehopCR (Han et al. Appl Environ Microb 76:7811-7819, 2010). In this study, the best reaction condition was ascertained after repeated trials. This developed method was tested on nine haloarchaeal and halobacterial type strains and 28 environmental halophilic archaea and bacteria isolated from the salt pans of the east and west coasts of India. 29 strains were found to be phaC-positive, while eight were found to be phaC-negative although they appeared PHA positive through conventional Nile Red staining. 16S rRNA-based phylogenetic analysis identified 9 haloarchaeal and 9 halobacterial species as novel PHA producers. Multiple sequence alignment of the phaC gene-derived amino acid sequences showed that only 7 amino acid residues were conserved within all four classes of phaC enzymes, whereas 61 amino acids were identical among the phaC enzyme specific to the haloarchaeal and halobacterial strains presently investigated. All phaC-positive strains produced PHA in standard nutrient deficient medium, whereas the phaC-negative strains did not accumulate any PHA as detected by gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, thus proving the precision of the developed method and elimination of false positives seen with the traditional Nile Red staining procedure. PMID:26240023

  13. A kinome screen identifies checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) as a sensitizer for RRM1-dependent gemcitabine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Chen, Zhengming; Malysa, Agnes; Li, Xin; Oliveira, Paula; Zhang, Yingtao; Bepler, Gerold

    2013-01-01

    Gemcitabine is among the most efficacious and widely used antimetabolite agents. Its molecular targets are ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) and elongating DNA. Acquired and de novo resistance as a result of RRM1 overexpression are major obstacles to therapeutic efficacy. We deployed a synthetic lethality screen to investigate if knockdown of 87 selected protein kinases by siRNA could overcome RRM1-dependent gemcitabine resistance in high and low RRM1-expressing model systems. The models included genetically RRM1-modified lung and breast cancer cell lines, cell lines with gemcitabine-induced RRM1 overexpression, and a series of naturally gemcitabine-resistant cell lines. Lead molecular targets were validated by determination of differential gemcitabine activity using cell lines with and without target knock down, and by assessing synergistic activity between gemcitabine and an inhibitor of the lead target. CHK1 was identified has the kinase with the most significant and robust interaction, and it was validated using AZD7762, a small-molecule ATP-competitive inhibitor of CHK1 activation. Synergism between CHK1 inhibition and RRM1-dependent gemcitabine efficacy was observed in cells with high RRM1 levels, while antagonism was observed in cells with low RRM1 levels. In addition, four cell lines with natural gemcitabine resistance demonstrated improved gemcitabine efficacy after CHK1 inhibition. In tumor specimens from 187 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, total CHK1 and RRM1 in situ protein levels were significantly (p = 0.003) and inversely correlated. We conclude that inhibition of CHK1 may have its greatest clinical utility in malignancies where gemcitabine resistance is a result of elevated RRM1 levels. We also conclude that CHK1 inhibition in tumors with low RRM1 levels may be detrimental to gemcitabine efficacy. PMID:23483975

  14. High Throughput Screen Identifies Natural Product Inhibitor of Phenylalanyl-tRNA Synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O; Munoz, Hector; Bullard, James M

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae are causative agents in a wide range of infections. Genes encoding proteins corresponding to phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS) were cloned from both bacteria. The two forms of PheRS were kinetically evaluated and the K(m)'s for P. aeruginosa PheRS with its three substrates, phenylalanine, ATP and tRNA(Phe) were determined to be 48, 200, and 1.2 µM, respectively, while the K(m)'s for S. pneumoniae PheRS with respect to phenylalanine, ATP and tRNA(Phe) were 21, 225 and 0.94 µM, respectively. P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS were used to screen a natural compound library and a single compound was identified that inhibited the function of both enzymes. The compound inhibited P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS with IC50's of 2.3 and 4.9 µM, respectively. The compound had a K(I) of 0.83 and 0.98 µM against P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the compound was determined against a panel of Gram positive and negative bacteria including efflux pump mutants and hyper-sensitive strains. MICs against wild-type P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae cells in culture were determined to be 16 and 32 µg/ml, respectively. The mechanism of action of the compound was determined to be competitive with the amino acid, phenylalanine, and uncompetitive with ATP. There was no inhibition of cytoplasmic protein synthesis, however, partial inhibition of the human mitochondrial PheRS was observed. PMID:25601215

  15. Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency: An examination of the medical and neurodevelopmental characteristics of 14 cases identified through newborn screening or clinical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Waisbren, S.E.; Levy, H.L.; Noble, M.; Matern, D.; Gregersen, N.; Pasley, K.; Marsden, D.

    2014-01-01

    The medical and neurodevelopmental characteristics of 14 children with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) are described. Eight were detected as neonates by newborn screening. Three children diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms had normal newborn screening results while 3 were born in states that did not screen for SCADD. Treatment included frequent feedings and a low fat diet. All children identified by newborn screening demonstrated medical and neuropsychological development within the normative range on follow-up, although one child had a relative weakness in the motor area and another child exhibited mild speech delay. Of the 3 clinically identified children with newborn screening results below the cut-off value, 2 were healthy and performed within the normal range on cognitive and motor tests at follow-up. Four clinically identified children with SCADD experienced persistent symptoms and/or developmental delay. However, in each of these cases, there were supplementary or alternative explanations for medical and neuropsychological deficits. Results indicated no genotype-phenotype correlations. These findings suggest that SCADD might be benign and the clinical symptoms ascribed to SCADD reflective of ascertainment bias or that early identification and treatment prevented complications that may have occurred due to interaction between genetic susceptibility and other genetic factors or environmental stressors. PMID:18676165

  16. A lin-45 raf enhancer screen identifies eor-1, eor-2 and unusual alleles of Ras pathway genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Rocheleau, Christian E; Howard, Robyn M; Goldman, Alissa P; Volk, Mandy L; Girard, Laura J; Sundaram, Meera V

    2002-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway controls multiple processes including excretory system development, P12 fate specification, and vulval cell fate specification. To identify positive regulators of Ras signaling, we conducted a genetic screen for mutations that enhance the excretory system and egg-laying defects of hypomorphic lin-45 raf mutants. This screen identified unusual alleles of several known Ras pathway genes, including a mutation removing the second SH3 domain of the sem-5/Grb2 adaptor, a temperature-sensitive mutation in the helical hairpin of let-341/Sos, a gain-of-function mutation affecting a potential phosphorylation site of the lin-1 Ets domain transcription factor, a dominant-negative allele of ksr-1, and h