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Sample records for screw joint stability

  1. Effect of Vertical Misfit on Screw Joint Stability of Implant-Supported Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Gomes, Érica Alves

    2011-08-01

    The passive fit between prosthesis and implant is a relevant factor for screw joint stability and treatment success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface on preload maintenance of retention screw of implant-supported crowns. The crowns were fabricated with different abutments and veneering materials and divided into 5 groups ( n = 12): Gold UCLA abutments cast in gold alloy veneered with ceramic (Group I) and resin (Group II), UCLA abutments cast in titanium veneered with ceramic (Group III) and resin (Group IV), and zirconia abutments with ceramic veneering (Group V). The crowns were attached to implants by gold retention screws with 35-N cm insertion torque. Specimens were submitted to mechanical cycling up to 106 cycles. Measurements of detorque and vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface were performed before and after mechanical cycling. ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference ( P < 0.05) among groups for vertical misfit measured before and after mechanical cycling. The abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values. Pearson correlation test did not demonstrate significant correlation ( P > 0.05) between vertical misfit and detorque value. It was concluded that vertical misfit did not influence torque maintenance and the abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values.

  2. Torsional stability of interference screws derived from bovine bone - a biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the present biomechanical study, the torsional stability of different interference screws, made of bovine bone, was tested. Interference screws derived from bovine bone are a possible biological alternative to conventional metallic or bioabsorbable polymer interference screws. Methods In the first part of the study we compared the torsional stability of self-made 8 mm Interference screws (BC) and a commercial 8 mm interference screw (Tutofix®). Furthermore, we compared the torsional strength of BC screws with different diameters. For screwing in, a hexagon head and an octagon head were tested. Maximum breaking torques in polymethyl methacrylate resin were recorded by means of an electronic torque screw driver. In the second part of the study the tibial part of a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was fixed in porcine test specimens using an 8 mm BC screw and the maximum insertion torques were recorded. Each interference screw type was tested 5 times. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the different 8 mm interference screws (p = 0.121). Pairwise comparisons did not reveal statistically significant differences, either. It was demonstrated for the BC screws, that a larger screw diameter significantly leads to higher torsional stability (p = 9.779 × 10-5). Pairwise comparisons showed a significantly lower torsional stability for the 7 mm BC screw than for the 8 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079) and the 9 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079). Statistically significant differences between the 8 mm and the 9 mm BC screw could not be found (p = 0.15). During screwing into the tibial graft channel of the porcine specimens, insertion torques between 0.5 Nm and 3.2 Nm were recorded. In one case the hexagon head of a BC screw broke off during the last turn. Conclusions The BC screws show comparable torsional stability to Tutofix® interference screws. As expected the torsional strength of the screws increases significantly with the diameter. The safety and in vivo performance of products derived from xenogeneic bone should be the focus of further investigations. PMID:20433761

  3. Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic-Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Trumm, Christoph Gregor; Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    2011-02-15

    We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography-fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

  4. The effect of polyethylene creep on tibial insert locking screw loosening and back-out in prosthetic knee joints.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-10-01

    A prosthetic knee joint typically comprises a cobalt-chromium femoral component that articulates with a polyethylene tibial insert. A locking screw may be used to prevent micromotion and dislodgement of the tibial insert from the tibial tray. Screw loosening and back-out have been reported, but the mechanism that causes screw loosening is currently not well understood. In this paper, we experimentally evaluate the effect of polyethylene creep on the preload of the locking screw. We find that the preload decreases significantly as a result of polyethylene creep, which reduces the torque required to loosen the locking screw. The torque applied to the tibial insert due to internal/external rotation within the knee joint during gait could thus drive locking screw loosening and back-out. The results are very similar for different types of polyethylene. PMID:24997426

  5. Influence of implant/abutment joint designs on abutment screw loosening in a dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Odaki, Misako; Nemoto, Kimiya; Aida, Masahiro

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of implant/abutment joint designs on abutment screw loosening in a dental implant system, using nonlinear dynamic analysis of the finite element method (FEM). This finite element simulation study used two dental implant systems: the Ankylos implant system (Degusa Dental, Hanau, German) with a taper joint (taper joint-type model), and the Bränemark implant system (Nobel Biocare, Gothenburg, Sweden) with an external hex joint (external hex joint-type model). The nonlinear dynamic analysis was performed using three-dimensional finite element analysis. In comparing the movement of the taper type-joint model and external hex type-joint model, it was found that the external hex type-joint model had greater movement than the taper type-joint model. The external hex joint-type model showed rotation movement, whereas the movement of the taper joint-type model showed no rotation. It was concluded that the nonlinear dynamic analysis used in this study clearly demonstrated the differences in rotation of components in dental implant systems with taper or external hex joints. PMID:16041789

  6. Stability of two-fold screw axis structures for cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffraction crystallography indicates that most forms of crystalline cellulose have two-fold screw axis symmetry. Even if exact symmetry is absent, the degree of pseudo symmetry is very high. On the other hand, this symmetry leads to short contacts between H4 and H1' across the glycosidic linkage....

  7. Comparison of in-vitro motion and stability between techniques for index metacarpophalangeal joint radial collateral ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Christopher J.; Tucker, Scott M.; Carlson, Michelle Gerwin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a technique using interference screws to reconstruct the radial collateral ligament (RCL) of the index finger metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint. We hypothesized that this technique would provide equivalent stability and flexion as a 4-tunnel reconstruction. Methods The RCL was isolated in 17 cadaveric index fingers. A cyclic load was applied to the intact RCL across the MP joint to assess flexion, ulnar deviation at neutral (UD@0), and ulnar deviation at 90° of MP joint flexion (UD@90). The RCL was excised from its bony origin and insertion. Each reconstruction (4-tunnel and interference screw) was performed sequentially on each specimen in randomized order. Testing was repeated after each reconstruction. Differences from the intact state were compared between the techniques using paired t-tests for all joint positions (flexion/UD@0/UD@90). Results There was no statistically significant difference in UD@0 or UD@90 between the intact state and after interference screw reconstruction. Compared to the intact state, there was significantly less UD@0 and significantly more UD@90 after 4-tunnel reconstruction. There was no statistically significant difference between techniques when comparing change in -UD@0 or change in UD@90. Change in flexion was statistically significantly different, indicating that the interference screw technique better replicated intact MP joint flexion compared to the 4-tunnel technique. Discussion Interference screw reconstruction of the index RCL provided stability comparable to 4-tunnel reconstruction but is less technically challenging. These results substantiate our clinical experience that interference screw technique provides an optimal combination of stability and flexion at the index MP joint. Clinical Relevance Using an interference screw to reconstruct the index RCL is less challenging and provides stability and range of motion that closely resembles the native MP joint. PMID:23747165

  8. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  9. Strain induced in the condyle by self-tapping screws in the Biomet alloplastic temporomandibular joint: a preliminary experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Duarte, R J; Mesnard, M

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyze how screws affect the strain concentration induced on the mandibular condyle during implantation, screwing, and drilling, as well as after condylar loading. A clean cadaveric mandible was analyzed experimentally in the intact state and was then implanted with a Biomet/Lorenz Microfixation temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implant with seven bicortical self-tapping screws. The external surface of the mandible was instrumented with three strain gauges. A load of 500N on the TMJ was applied to the condyle before and after implantation. The results showed a strain concentration of -1500?? near the screws due to their implantation on the external surface of the mandible. The drilling process induced up to 80?? near the hole. The strain concentration did not change when there were more than six screws. Loading on the TMJ before and after implantation presented only a 10% difference in maximum principal strain. This study demonstrates the importance of the strain concentration induced by the screws. The process of implanting screws shows the importance of lateral surface preparation for a good fit in the condyle. Strain distribution after implantation and loading of the Biomet implant was found to be similar to that in the intact condyle. PMID:26194773

  10. Stabilization of the sacroiliac joint.

    PubMed

    Shaffrey, Christopher I; Smith, Justin S

    2013-07-01

    Lower back pain and pain involving the area of the posterior iliac spine are extremely common. Degeneration of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is one potential cause for lower back pain and pain radiating into the groin or buttocks. Degenerative changes to the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joints are common. A recent study evaluating SIJ abnormalities in a primary low back pain population demonstrated 31.7% of patients demonstrated SI joint abnormalities. (4) As is the case for the evaluation and management of isolated lower back pain, the evaluation, management, and role for surgical intervention in SIJ pain is very controversial. Many patients have degenerative changes of the disc, facet joints, and SIJs. A recent systematic review performed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of tests available to clinicians to identify the disc, facet joint, or SIJ as the source of low back pain concluded that tests do exist that change the probability of the disc or SIJ (but not the facet joint) as the source of low back pain. (3) It was also concluded that the usefulness of these tests in clinical practice, particularly for guiding treatment selection, remains unclear. (3) Although there is general agreement that SIJ pathological changes are a potential cause of pain, there is far less agreement about the optimal management of these conditions. A variety of conditions can cause SIJ dysfunction including degenerative and inflammatory arthritis, trauma, prior lumbosacral fusion, hip arthritis, limb length inequality, infections, and neoplasia. (8) There is increasing evidence that image intensifier-guided single periarticular injection can correctly localize pain to the SIJ but the optimal management strategy remains controversial. Recent publications have compared surgical versus injection treatments and fusion versus denervation procedures. (1 , 8) A systematic review found improvement regardless of the treatment, with most studies reporting over 40% improvement in pain as measured by VAS or NRS scores. (8) It cautioned that one of the studies reported 17.6% of patients experiencing mild/no pain compared with 82.4% experiencing marked/severe pain at 39 months after SIJ fusion procedures. (6 , 8) This systematic review also noted that despite improvements in reported pain, less than half of patients who had work status reported as returning to work. (8) Because of the functional and socioeconomic consequences of chronic lower back pain, numerous surgical treatments to improve this condition have been attempted by spinal surgeons through the years. Arthrodesis of the SIJ is a surgical procedure with a long history dating to the beginnings of spinal surgery. (7) Poor results, high complication rates and the need for additional surgical procedures have generally diminished the enthusiasm for this procedure until recently. (6) A variety of "minimally invasive" procedures have been recently introduced that have rekindled enthusiasm for the surgical management of SIJ pathology. The technique demonstrated in the "Stabilization of the SIJ with SI-Bone" is one of these new techniques. There has been a recent publication detailing the very short term clinical outcomes with this technique that reported encouraging results. (5) In this series of 50 patients, quality of life questionnaires were available for 49 patients preoperatively, 41 patients at 3 months, 40 at 6 months and only 27 at 12 months, complicating the ability to accurately assess true outcomes. Although the focus of this video by Geisler is on the surgical technique, there should have been more information provided on the expected surgical outcomes and potential complications of SIJ fusion. (2) The video only gives minimal information on how to appropriately select patients with potential SIJ pathology for surgical intervention. There are insufficient recommendations on the clinical and radiographic follow-up needed for this procedure. A concern with this implant is whether the porous plasma spray coating on the implant actually results in bone growth across the SIJ

  11. Cortical and Standard Trajectory Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques in Stabilizing Multisegment Lumbar Spine with Low Grade Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    ?nceo?lu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cortical screw (CS) fixation has been recently proposed as an alternative to the standard pedicle screw (PS) fixation technique. Biomechanical studies involving individual screw pullout and single level motion segment stabilization showed comparable performance of both techniques. However, whether this new fixation technique can be applied to the stabilization of multilevel lumbar segments with significant destabilization has been unclear. Purpose To compare stability of CS fixation to the traditional PS fixation in an unstable 3 level spondylolisthesis model. Study Design This is a biomechanical study comparing cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation to traditional trajectory pedicle screw fixation in an unstable cadaveric model using nondestructive flexibility test. Methods Eight fresh frozen cadaveric lumbar spines (T12- S1) were obtained. After intact baseline testing, a 3-level lowgrade spondylolisthesis was simulated at the L1-4. Each specimen was instrumented with the PS and CS fixation systems. Standard nondestructive flexibility test was performed. Range of motion at each level was compared between the constructs during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Results The destabilization model significantly increased the ROM in all planes (P<0.05). Both fixation techniques provided significant reduction in the ROM (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in ROM between the PS and CS groups in any of planes (P>0.05). Conclusions Cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation provided stabilization to multilevel lumbar segment with low-grade spondylolisthesis comparable to the standard trajectory pedicle screw construct. PMID:26484009

  12. Percutaneous Facet Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Recurrent Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst: A New Technique.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Gallo, Giacomo; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie; Bard, Robert L; Kelekis, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of percutaneous treatment of symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst resistant to all medical treatments including facet joint steroid injection. Percutaneous transfacet fixation was then performed at L4-L5 level with a cannulated screw using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 9.5, preoperatively, to 0 after the procedure. At 6-month follow-up, an asymptomatic cystic recurrence was observed, which further reduced at the 1-year follow-up. Pain remained stable (VAS at 0) during all follow-ups. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cyst rupture associated with facet screw fixation could be an alternative to surgery in patients suffering from a symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst. PMID:25944146

  13. Pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilizers for degenerative spine: in vitro biomechanical testing and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chamoli, Uphar; Diwan, Ashish D; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic stabilization in a degenerate symptomatic spine may be advantageous compared with conventional fusion procedures, as it helps preserve motion and minimizes redistribution of loads at instrumented and adjacent segments. This article presents a systematic review of biomechanical and clinical evidence available on some of the pedicle screw based posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) devices. Using Medline, Embase, and Scopus online databases, we identified four pedicle-screw-PDS devices for which both, biomechanical testing and clinical follow-up data are available: Graf artificial ligaments, Isobar TTL, Polyetheretherketone rods, and Dynesys. The current state-of-the-art of pedicle-screw-PDS devices is far from achieving its desired biomechanical efficacy, which has resulted in a weak support for the posited clinical benefits. Although pedicle-screw-PDS devices are useful in salvaging a moderately degenerate functionally suboptimal disc, for severe disc degeneration cases fusion is still the preferred choice. We conclude that a pedicle-screw-PDS device should aim at restoring load sharing amongst spinal elements while preserving the qualitative and quantitative nature of spinal motion, especially minimize posterior shift of the helical axis of motion. More precise and objective assessment techniques need to be standardized for in vivo evaluation of intervertebral motion and load sharing amongst spinal elements across different pedicle-screw-PDS devices. PMID:24123975

  14. Pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilizers for degenerative spine: in vitro biomechanical testing and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chamoli, Uphar; Diwan, Ashish D; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic stabilization in a degenerate symptomatic spine may be advantageous compared with conventional fusion procedures, as it helps preserve motion and minimizes redistribution of loads at instrumented and adjacent segments. This article presents a systematic review of biomechanical and clinical evidence available on some of the pedicle screw based posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) devices. Using Medline, Embase, and Scopus online databases, we identified four pedicle-screw-PDS devices for which both, biomechanical testing and clinical follow-up data are available: Graf artificial ligaments, Isobar TTL, Polyetheretherketone rods, and Dynesys. The current state-of-the-art of pedicle-screw-PDS devices is far from achieving its desired biomechanical efficacy, which has resulted in a weak support for the posited clinical benefits. Although pedicle-screw-PDS devices are useful in salvaging a moderately degenerate functionally suboptimal disc, for severe disc degeneration cases fusion is still the preferred choice. We conclude that a pedicle-screw-PDS device should aim at restoring load sharing amongst spinal elements while preserving the qualitative and quantitative nature of spinal motion, especially minimize posterior shift of the helical axis of motion. More precise and objective assessment techniques need to be standardized for in vivo evaluation of intervertebral motion and load sharing amongst spinal elements across different pedicle-screw-PDS devices. PMID:24382799

  15. Percutaneous Screw Fixation of Crescent Fracture-Dislocation of the Sacroiliac Joint.

    PubMed

    Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Mao, Chuanwan; Feng, Yongzeng; Chen, Linwei; Kong, Jianzhong; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Gang

    2015-11-01

    Crescent fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac joint (CFDSIJ) is a type of lateral compression pelvic injury associated with instability. Open reduction and internal fixation is a traditional treatment of CFDSIJ. However, a minimally invasive method has never been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of closed reduction and percutaneous fixation for different types of CFDSIJ and present their clinical outcome. The authors reviewed 117 patients diagnosed with CFDSIJ between July 2003 and July 2013. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation was performed in 73 patients. Treatment selection was based on Day's fracture classification. For type I fractures, fixation perpendicular to the fracture line were performed. For type II fractures, crossed fixation was performed. For type III fractures, fixation was performed with iliosacral screws. Forty-four patients were treated by open reduction and plate fixation. Demographics, fracture pattern distribution, blood loss, incision lengths, revision surgeries, radiological results, and functional scores were compared. All 117 patients were followed for more than 6 months (mean, 14 months [range, 6-24 months]). Blood loss, extensive exposure, duration of posterior ring surgery, duration of hospital stay, and infection rates were lower in the closed group (P<.01). Patients in the closed group achieved better functional performance (P<.01). There were no significant differences in reduction quality (P=.32), revision surgery rates (P=.27), and iatrogenic neurologic injuries (P=.2) between the 2 groups. The authors' results indicate that closed reduction and percutaneous fixation is a safe and effective surgical method for CFDSIJ. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(11):e976-e982.]. PMID:26558677

  16. Stability of Uncemented Cups - Long-Term Effect of Screws, Pegs and HA Coating: A 14-Year RSA Follow-Up of Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Otten, Volker T C; Crnalic, Sead; Röhrl, Stephan M; Nivbrant, Bo; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2016-01-01

    Screws, pegs and hydroxyapatite-coating are used to enhance the primary stability of uncemented cups. We present a 14-year follow-up of 48 hips randomized to four groups: press-fit only, press-fit plus screws, press-fit plus pegs and hydroxyapatite-coated cups. Radiostereometric migration measurements showed equally good stability regardless cup augmentation. The mean wear rate was high, 0.21mm/year, with no differences between the groups. Seven hips had radiographical osteolysis but only in hips with augmented cups. Cups without screw-holes compared with cups with screw-holes resulted in better clinical outcome at the 14-year follow-up. Thus, augmentation of uncemented cups with screws, pegs, or hydroxyapatite did not appear to improve the long-term stability compared with press-fit only. PMID:26260783

  17. Hybrid Stabilization of Thoracic Spine Fractures with Sublaminar Bands and Transpedicular Screws: Description of a Surgical Alternative and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Marie-Therese; Kandziora, Frank; Schnake, Klaus J.

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of unstable thoracic fractures with transpedicular screws is widely accepted. However, placement of transpedicular screws can cause complications, particularly in the thoracic spine with physiologically small pedicles. Hybrid stabilization, a combination of sublaminar bands and pedicle screws, might reduce the rate of misplaced screws and can be helpful in special anatomic circumstances, such as preexisting scoliosis and osteoporosis. We report about two patients suffering from unstable thoracic fractures, of T5 in one case and T3, T4, and T5 in the other case, with preexisting scoliosis and extremely small pedicles. Additionally, one patient had osteoporosis. Patients received hybrid stabilization with pedicle screws adjacent to the fractured vertebral bodies and sublaminar bands at the level above and below the pedicle screws. No complications occurred. Follow-up was 12 months with clinically uneventful postoperative courses. No signs of implant failure or loss of reduction could be detected. In patients with very small thoracic pedicles, scoliosis, and/or osteoporosis, hybrid stabilization with sublaminar bands and pedicle screws can be a viable alternative to long pedicle screw constructs. PMID:26649214

  18. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) An inert gas back-up on the first weld pass. (b) A slip-on welded joint with sleeves and attachment... lengths without flanges must be joined by one of the following: (a) A butt welded joint with complete penetration at the weld root except that for design temperatures colder than ?10 °C (14 °F) the butt weld...

  19. Diffusion joint of YBCO coated conductors using stabilizing silver layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, J. Y.; Sakai, N.; Tajima, S.; Miyata, S.; Konishi, M.; Yamada, Y.; Chikumoto, N.; Nakao, K.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2006-10-01

    We developed a very simple and new joint technique for coated conductors that could achieve a very low resistance less than 0.02 ?? across the joint with an area of 2 × 20 mm2 without any degradation of Ic. It is a diffusion joint using the Ag stabilizing layer of YBCO coated conductors. Two tapes were stuck with Ag stabilizing layer in contact in a face to face manner and were pressed uniaxially during a heat treatment from 500 °C to room temperature in a pure oxygen atmosphere. The relationship between the joint pressure, the joint structure and Ic were studied.

  20. Assessment of screw displacement axis accuracy and repeatability for joint kinematic description using an electromagnetic tracking device.

    PubMed

    Duck, Teresa R; Ferreira, Louis M; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2004-01-01

    Screw displacement axes (SDAs) have been employed to describe joint kinematics in biomechanical studies. Previous reports have investigated the accuracy of SDAs combining various motion analysis techniques and smoothing procedures. To our knowledge, no study has assessed SDA accuracy describing the relative movement between adjacent bodies with an electromagnetic tracking system. This is important, since in relative motion, neither body is fixed and consequently sensitivity to potential measurement errors from both bodies may be significant. Therefore, this study assessed the accuracy of SDAs for describing relative motion between two moving bodies. We analyzed numerical simulated data, and physical experimental data recorded using a precision jig and electromagnetic tracking device. The numerical simulations demonstrated SDA position accuracy (p=0.04) was superior for single compared to relative body motion, whereas orientation accuracy (p=0.2) was similar. Experimental data showed data-filtering (Butterworth filter) improved SDA position and orientation accuracies for rotation magnitudes smaller or equal to 5.0 degrees, with no effect at larger rotation magnitudes (p<0.05). This suggests that in absence of a filter, SDAs should only be calculated at rotations of greater than 5.0 degrees. For rotation magnitudes of 0.5 degrees (5.0 degrees ) about the SDA, SDA position and orientation error measurements determined from filtered experimental data were 3.75+/-0.30 mm (3.31+/-0.21 mm), and 1.10+/-0.04 degrees (1.04+/-0.03 degrees ), respectively. Experimental accuracy values describing the translation along and rotation about the SDA, were 0.06+/-0.00 mm and 0.09+/-0.01 degrees, respectively. These small errors establish the capability of SDAs to detect small translations, and rotations. In conclusion, application of SDAs should be a useful tool for describing relative motion in joint kinematic studies. PMID:14672581

  1. Lumbosacral fixation using sacroiliac buttress screws: a modification to the Jackson technique with intrasacral rods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of intrasacral rods has been previously reported for posterior lumbosacral fixation. However, problems associated with this technique include poor stability of the rod in the sacrum, difficulty in contouring the rod to fit the lateral sacral mass, and the complicated assembly procedure for the rod and pedicle screws in the thoracolumbar segments after insertion of the rod into the sacrum. Methods We used a screw with a polyaxial head instead of an intrasacral rod, which was inserted into the lateral sacral mass and assembled to the rod connected cephalad to pedicle screws. The dorsal side of the screw was stabilized by the sacral subchondral bone at the sacroiliac joint with iliac buttress coverage, and the tip of the screw was anchored by the sacral cortex. Results Three different cases were used to illustrate lumbosacral fixation using intrasacral screws as an anchor for the spinal instrumentation. Effective resistance of flexural bending moment and fusion were achieved in these patients at the lumbosacral level. Conclusions An intrasacral screw can be stabilized by subchondral bone with iliac buttress coverage at the dorsal and ventral sacral cortex. Posterior spinal fusion with this screw technique enables easier assembly of the instrumentation and presents better stabilization than that provided by the previously reported intrasacral rod technique for correction and fusion of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. PMID:25050132

  2. Removal of broken pedicle screws. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Shimizu, K; Kouda, K; Hosoe, H

    2001-07-01

    The authors describe a simple, new method for removing broken pedicle screws. Under microscopic visualization a straight, narrow slot is etched in the broken surface of the pedicle screw by using a power drill with a 2-mm diamond burr. A minus screwdriver is then inserted into the slot, and the broken screw is rotated and removed. There is no need to enlarge the screw hole around the broken screw or to use any special devices. The authors succeeded in removing broken screws in two cases, and there were no complications. This method allows preservation of both the pedicle and the screw hole. Consequently, it is possible to insert new pedicle screws into the same hole without losing the strength and stability of pedicle screw fixation. The authors recommend this simple and new method for removal of broken pedicle screws. PMID:11453420

  3. Screw Press 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    that sorghum meal extruded at low feed moisture and high screw speeds developed high expansion and resulted in sorghum extrudates with low bulk densities. They concluded that sorghum could be used in blends with other cereals and/or legumes to produce snacks... variables such as mass flow, water injection, barrel temperature, screw configuration, screw speed, feed rate, and feed material affect physical properties of extrudates (Ryu and Ng 2001). In addition, physical features of raw materials...

  4. Muscle force and its role in joint dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    An, Kai-Nan

    2002-10-01

    The study of loading in the muscle is essential to better understanding the adaptation and plasticity of the muscle under pathologic or surgically-altered conditions. Muscle recruitment and muscle force are determined by the muscle's mechanical function as a joint mover and a joint stabilizer. The coordination of muscle contraction affects joint stability. However, the conditions of the joint passive constraints influence the muscle recruitment. Furthermore, muscle force is regulated based on muscle size, such as the physiologic cross-sectional area, and its physiology, namely, the length-tension and the tension-velocity relationship. Alterations of these physiologic relationships also will influence the overall mechanical function of the muscle. PMID:12394451

  5. Benefit and accuracy of intraoperative 3D-imaging after pedicle screw placement: a prospective study in stabilizing thoracolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gierer, Philip; Harms, Christoph; Gradl, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Internal fixation is the established dorsal standard procedure for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures. The main problem of the procedure is the false positioning of the pedicle screws. The exact determination of pedicle screws has up to now only been possible through postoperative computed tomography. This study was intended to clarify the diagnostic value of intraoperative 3D scans after pedicle screw implantation in thoracolumbar spine surgery. The direct intraoperative consequences of the 3D scans are reported and the results of the 3D scans are compared with the postoperative computed tomography images. Intraoperative 3D scans were prospectively carried out from June 2006 to October 2008 on 95 patients with fractures of the thoracolumbar spine that have been treated with internal fixation. Screws positions were categorised intraoperatively, screws in relevant malposition were repositioned immediately. A computed tomography of the involved spinal section was carried out postoperatively for all patients. The positions of the pedicle screws were determined and compared in the axial reconstructions of both procedures. Four hundred and fourteen pedicles with enclosed screws were evaluated by the 3D scans. The time needed for carrying out the 3D scan amounts to an average of 8.2 min. Eleven screws (2.7%) in ten patients were primarily intraoperatively repositioned on the basis of the 3D scan evaluation. Two of 95 patients had to have false positions of the screws revised secondarily following evaluation of the computed tomographies. The secondary postoperative revision rate of the patients amounts to 2.1%. In relation to the number of screws, this is a revision rate of 0.5%. The postoperative computed tomographies showed 323 pedicles without cortical penetration by the screws (78.0%). Ninety-one screws penetrated the pedicle wall (22%). It was possible to postoperatively compare the position classifications of 406 pedicle screws. The CT showed 378 correct screw positions, while 28 screws were positioned falsely. On the basis of the 3D scans, 376 of 378 correct positions were correctly assessed. Twenty-one of 28 false positions could be correctly classified. The sensitivity of all 3D scans reached 91.3% and the specificity 98.2%. The position of 97.8% of the pedicle screws was correctly recognised by the intraoperative 3D scan. Nine screws were classified falsely (2.2%). The comparison of the classification results showed significantly higher error findings by the 3D scan in the spinal section T1–10 (P = 0.014). The image quality of the 3D scan correlates significantly with the width of the scanned pedicle, with the body mass index, the scanned spinal section and the extent of the fixation assembly. 3D scans showed a high accuracy in predicting pedicle screw position. Primary false placement of screws and primary neurovascular damage cannot be avoided. But intraoperative evaluation of the 3D scans resulted in a primary revision rate of 2.7% of the pedicle screws and we could lower the secondary revision rate to 0.5%. PMID:19513764

  6. Benefit and accuracy of intraoperative 3D-imaging after pedicle screw placement: a prospective study in stabilizing thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Beck, Markus; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gierer, Philip; Harms, Christoph; Gradl, Georg

    2009-10-01

    Internal fixation is the established dorsal standard procedure for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures. The main problem of the procedure is the false positioning of the pedicle screws. The exact determination of pedicle screws has up to now only been possible through postoperative computed tomography. This study was intended to clarify the diagnostic value of intraoperative 3D scans after pedicle screw implantation in thoracolumbar spine surgery. The direct intraoperative consequences of the 3D scans are reported and the results of the 3D scans are compared with the postoperative computed tomography images. Intraoperative 3D scans were prospectively carried out from June 2006 to October 2008 on 95 patients with fractures of the thoracolumbar spine that have been treated with internal fixation. Screws positions were categorised intraoperatively, screws in relevant malposition were repositioned immediately. A computed tomography of the involved spinal section was carried out postoperatively for all patients. The positions of the pedicle screws were determined and compared in the axial reconstructions of both procedures. Four hundred and fourteen pedicles with enclosed screws were evaluated by the 3D scans. The time needed for carrying out the 3D scan amounts to an average of 8.2 min. Eleven screws (2.7%) in ten patients were primarily intraoperatively repositioned on the basis of the 3D scan evaluation. Two of 95 patients had to have false positions of the screws revised secondarily following evaluation of the computed tomographies. The secondary postoperative revision rate of the patients amounts to 2.1%. In relation to the number of screws, this is a revision rate of 0.5%. The postoperative computed tomographies showed 323 pedicles without cortical penetration by the screws (78.0%). Ninety-one screws penetrated the pedicle wall (22%). It was possible to postoperatively compare the position classifications of 406 pedicle screws. The CT showed 378 correct screw positions, while 28 screws were positioned falsely. On the basis of the 3D scans, 376 of 378 correct positions were correctly assessed. Twenty-one of 28 false positions could be correctly classified. The sensitivity of all 3D scans reached 91.3% and the specificity 98.2%. The position of 97.8% of the pedicle screws was correctly recognised by the intraoperative 3D scan. Nine screws were classified falsely (2.2%). The comparison of the classification results showed significantly higher error findings by the 3D scan in the spinal section T1-10 (P = 0.014). The image quality of the 3D scan correlates significantly with the width of the scanned pedicle, with the body mass index, the scanned spinal section and the extent of the fixation assembly. 3D scans showed a high accuracy in predicting pedicle screw position. Primary false placement of screws and primary neurovascular damage cannot be avoided. But intraoperative evaluation of the 3D scans resulted in a primary revision rate of 2.7% of the pedicle screws and we could lower the secondary revision rate to 0.5%. PMID:19513764

  7. Experiment on the stability of zero net current, line tied screw pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambler, Sam; Bergerson, W.; Fiksel, G.; Forest, C. B.; Grierson, B.; Hannum, D.; Hegna, C.; Kendrick, R.; Oliva, S.; Sarff, J.

    2004-11-01

    Coronal loops emerging from the solar surface without current are expected to be twisted by convective motion of the footpoints. The resulting equilibrium has zero net current, with current of one sign in the center of the loop and of the opposite sign in the periphery of the loop [Lionello 98]. While the stability of line tied pinch plasmas with net current have been studied, both experimentally and theoretically, relatively little has been done to study the zero net current case. This geometry is investigated in a 1 m long plasma column produced by an array of plasma guns in the Rotating Wall Machine. For this experiment a circle of six cathode guns inject current from one end, while a seventh gun injects current of the opposite sign from the opposite end in the center of the plasma column, forming a coaxial current distribution with no net current. MHD stability is monitored by a two dimensional array of flux loops, mounted outside the first wall. Internal magnetic probes are used to measure the axial, poloidal and radial fields for the study of the internal kink structure.

  8. Screw locking elements: a means to modify the flexibility of osteoporotic fracture fixation with DCPs without compromising system strength or stability.

    PubMed

    Yánez, A; Cuadrado, A; Carta, J A; Garcés, G

    2012-07-01

    This paper analyses whether it is possible to use dynamic compression plates (DCPs) and screw locking elements (SLEs) to vary the flexibility of osteoporotic fracture fixation without compromising the strength and stability of the construct. Compression, torsion and four-point bending static strength tests were conducted. Cyclic load tests of up to 10,000 load cycles were also carried out to determine stiffness performance. Four fixation systems were mounted onto polyurethane bone models. Group 1 consists of the DCP and six cortical screws. Group 2, idem, but with the addition of two SLEs. Group 3, idem, but with the addition of six SLEs. Group 4 used the locking compression plate (LCP) and locking screws. The results indicated no significant difference (p>0.05) in the strength of groups 2-4. It was also observed that the torsional stiffness of group 3 (0.30 Nm/°) was higher than that of group 2 (0.23 Nm/°) and similar to that of group 4 (0.28 Nm/°). Compression stiffness of group 4 (124 N/mm) was higher than that of group 2 (102 N/mm), but lower than that of group 3 (150 N/mm). No notable differences were observed for structural bending stiffness. It is concluded that by using the DCP with SLEs it is possible to modify the stiffness of the fixation construct for the repair of osteoporotic fractures and, in this way, facilitate the conditions suitable on secondary bone healing. PMID:21982962

  9. Four quadrant parallel peripheral screw fixation for displaced femoral neck fractures in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Satish, Bhava RJ; Ranganadham, Atmakuri V; Ramalingam, Karruppasamy; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: The treatment options for displaced femoral neck fracture in elderly are screw fixation, hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty based primarily on age of the patient. The issues in screw fixation are ideal patient selection, optimal number of screws, optimal screw configuration and positioning inside the head and neck of femur. The problems of screw fixation may be loss of fixation, joint penetration, avascular necrosis of femoral head, nonunion, prolonged rehabilitation period and the need for second surgery in failed cases. We hereby present results of a modified screw fixation technique in femoral neck fractures in patients ?50 years of age. Materials and Methods: Patients ?50 years of age (range 50-73 years) who sustained displaced femoral neck fracture and fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled in this prospective study. They were treated with closed reduction under image intensifier control and cannulated cancellous screw fixation. Accurate anatomical reduction was not aimed and a cross sectional contact area of >75% without varus was accepted as good reduction. Four screws were positioned in four quadrants of femoral head and neck, as parallel and as peripheral as possible. Radiological and functional results were evaluated periodically. Sixty four patients who could complete a minimum followup of two years were analyzed. Results: Radiologically, all fractures healed after mean duration of 10 weeks (range 8-12 weeks). There was no avascular necrosis. Nonanatomical healing was observed in 45 cases (70%). All patients except one had excellent functional outcome and could do cross-legged sitting and squatting. Chondrolysis with progressive head resorption was seen in one case, which was converted to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion: Closed reduction and cannulated cancellous screw fixation gives satisfactory functional results in large group of elderly patients. The four quadrant parallel peripheral (FQPP) screw fixation technique gives good stability, allows controlled collapse, avoids fixation failure and achieves predictable bone healing in displaced femoral neck fracture in patients ?50 years of age. PMID:23682180

  10. Influence of screw length and diameter on tibial strain energy density distribution after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jie; Kuang, Guan-Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative tunnel enlargement has been frequently reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Interference screw, as a surgical implant in ACL reconstruction, may influence natural loading transmission and contribute to tunnel enlargement. The aims of this study are (1) to quantify the alteration of strain energy den sity (SED) distribution after the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction; and (2) to characterize the influence of screw length and diameter on the degree of the SED alteration. A validated finite element model of human knee joint was used. The screw length ranging from 20 to 30mm with screw diameter ranging from 7 to 9 mm were investigated. In the post-operative knee, the SED increased steeply at the extra-articular tunnel aperture under compressive and complex loadings, whereas the SED decreased beneath the screw shaft and nearby the intra-articular tunnel aperture. Increasing the screw length could lower the SED deprivation in the proximal part of the bone tunnel; whereas increasing either screw length or diameter could aggravate the SED deprivation in the distal part of the bone tunnel. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the screw could lower the bone SED deprivation around the screw. In consideration of both graft stability and SED alteration, a biodegradable interference screw with a long length is recommended, which could provide a beneficial mechanical environment at the distal part of the tunnel, and meanwhile decrease the bone-graft motion and synovial fluid propagation at the proximal part of the tunnel. These findings together with the clinical and histological factors could help to improve surgical outcome, and serve as a preliminary knowledge for the following study of biodegradable interference screw. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Characterization of the torque limits and clamping force relationships for small stainless steel screws in tensile loaded joints of various metals

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, John D; Flores, Eugene M

    2009-01-01

    This study originated during the design of ChemCam, a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and imaging instrument being developed for NASA's Mars Science Lab Rover. The mission needs for miniaturization, reduced weight, high reliability, minimal use of thread locking compounds, and the ability to handle harsh environmental conditions dictated the use of small, high strength screws to be threaded into a variety of metal alloys including Be-S200f, Al-6061-T6, Mg-ZK60A-T5, and Ti-6Al-4V The lack of a credible fastener torque database for small (No.0 through No.8) high strength stainless steel screws in various parent materials, led to the development of an experimental program to characterize the following: (A) The screw torque value versus angular rotation (which indicates yielding in the screw or parent material) as a function of screw diameter, screw head configuration, depth of thread engagement, type of parent material, type of surface treatment on parent material, presence of thread locking compound, repeatable threaded hole use, and degree of screw pedigree. (B) The relationship between fastener torque and clamping force for a subset of the above mentioned variables. The database generated from this study will serve as a design reference for utilizing small stainless steel fasteners and provide trending information for other researchers who may be interested in broadening its range of parameters. This paper reviews the related fastener torque and clamping force information from the literature, describes the experimental screw torque and clamping force monitoring equipment, presents the test matrix and experimental procedures, and discusses the empirical results.

  12. Axial loading cross screw fixation for the Austin bunionectomy.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Ryan B; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2011-01-01

    The Austin procedure has become a common method of osteotomy for the correction of hallux abductovalgus when indicated. The V-type configuration is intrinsically stable but not without complications. One complication encountered is rotation and/or displacement of the capital fragment. We present the use of an axial loading screw in conjunction with a dorsally placed compression screw. The benefit to this technique lies in the orientation of the axial loading screw, because it is directed to resist the ground reactive forces while also providing a second point of fixation in a crossing screw design. In a head-to-head biomechanical comparison, we tested single dorsal screw fixation versus double screw fixation, including both the dorsal and the axial loading screws in 10 metatarsal Sawbones(®) (Pacific Research Laboratories Inc, Vashon, WA). Five metatarsals received single dorsal screw fixation and five received the dorsal screw and the additional axial loading screw. The metatarsals were analyzed on an Instron compression device for comparison; 100% of the single screw fixation osteotomies failed with compression at an average peak load of 205 N. Four of five axial loading double screw fixation osteotomies did not fail. This finding suggests that the addition of an axial loading screw providing cross screw orientation significantly increases the stability of the Austin osteotomy, ultimately decreasing the likelihood of displacement encountered in the surgical repair of hallux abductovalgus. PMID:21621434

  13. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating

    PubMed Central

    Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 106 cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). RESULTS The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). CONCLUSION The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws. PMID:26576253

  14. Ultra Long Construct Minimally Invasive Spinal Stabilization Using Percutaneous Pedicle Screws in the Treatment of Symptomatic Multicentric Spinal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chris Yin Wei; Kwan, Mun Keong

    2015-01-01

    Managing multiple level spinal metastases is challenging. We report the case of a 58-year-old female with advanced lung cancer who presented with multiple pathological fractures of the thoracic spine (T5, T6, T7, and T8 vertebrae). She was treated with palliative radiotherapy. Her resting pain improved, but the instability pain persisted. One month later, she had a trivial fall leading to a pathological fracture of the L2 vertebra with cauda equine syndrome. The patient was treated surgically with minimally invasive decompression of the L2 and with percutaneous instrumented stabilization using an ultra-long construct from T3 to L5 (15 spinal levels), spanning the previously radiated zone and the decompression site. Postoperatively, she had significant improvements in pain and neurology. There were no surgical complications. Ultra long construct minimally invasive spinal stabilization is the ideal approach for symptomatic multicentric spinal metastasis with poor prognostic scores. Using this technique, the goals of spinal stabilization and direct neural decompression can be achieved with minimal morbidity. PMID:26713131

  15. Surgical screw segmentation for mobile C-arm CT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Joseph; Brehler, Michael; Franke, Jochen; Wolf, Ivo; Vetter, Sven Y.; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nabers, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Calcaneal fractures are commonly treated by open reduction and internal fixation. An anatomical reconstruction of involved joints is mandatory to prevent cartilage damage and premature arthritis. In order to avoid intraarticular screw placements, the use of mobile C-arm CT devices is required. However, for analyzing the screw placement in detail, a time-consuming human-computer interaction is necessary to navigate through 3D images and therefore to view a single screw in detail. Established interaction procedures of repeatedly positioning and rotating sectional planes are inconvenient and impede the intraoperative assessment of the screw positioning. To simplify the interaction with 3D images, we propose an automatic screw segmentation that allows for an immediate selection of relevant sectional planes. Our algorithm consists of three major steps. At first, cylindrical characteristics are determined from local gradient structures with the help of RANSAC. In a second step, a DBScan clustering algorithm is applied to group similar cylinder characteristics. Each detected cluster represents a screw, whose determined location is then refined by a cylinder-to-image registration in a third step. Our evaluation with 309 screws in 50 images shows robust and precise results. The algorithm detected 98% (303) of the screws correctly. Thirteen clusters led to falsely identified screws. The mean distance error for the screw tip was 0.8 +/- 0.8 mm and for the screw head 1.2 +/- 1 mm. The mean orientation error was 1.4 +/- 1.2 degrees.

  16. COMPOSITES AND MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS SCREW-HOLDING CAPACITY OF

    E-print Network

    , and ness, bending stiffness and strength), wood species (pine vs. sweetgum) had an millworkmarkets/32 between its components. For maximum joints or constructions at complete water- inch (18 ram). The product nificantly alter the screw-holding capac- els were cut for bending modulus of elas- (screw or nail

  17. Stability enhancement by joint phase measurements in a single cold atomic fountain

    E-print Network

    Meunier, M; Geiger, R; Guerlin, C; Alzar, C L Garrido; Landragin, A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of joint interrogation in a single atom interferometer which overcomes the dead time between consecutive measurements in standard cold atomic fountains. The joint operation enables for a faster averaging of the Dick effect associated with the local oscillator noise in clocks and with vibration noise in cold atom inertial sensors. Such an operation allows achieving the lowest stability limit due to atom shot noise. We demonstrate a multiple joint operation in which up to five clouds of atoms are interrogated simultaneously in a single setup. The essential feature of multiple joint operation, demonstrated here for a micro-wave Ramsey interrogation, can be generalized to go beyond the current stability limit associated with dead times in present-day cold atom interferometer inertial sensors.

  18. A biological screw in a beetle's leg.

    PubMed

    van de Kamp, Thomas; Vagovi?, Patrik; Baumbach, Tilo; Riedel, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    The coxa-trochanteral joints on the legs of the weevil Trigonopterus oblongus (Pascoe) work as a biological screw-and-nut system. The apical portions of the coxae closely resemble nuts with well-defined inner threads covering 345°. The corresponding trochanters have perfectly compatible external spiral threads of 410°. PMID:21719669

  19. Current trends in pedicle screw stimulation techniques: lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical levels.

    PubMed

    Isley, Michael R; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Leppanen, Ronald E

    2012-06-01

    Unequivocally, pedicle screw instrumentation has evolved as a primary construct for the treatment of both common and complex spinal disorders. However an inevitable and potentially major complication associated with this type of surgery is misplacement of a pedicle screw(s) which may result in neural and vascular complications, as well as impair the biomechanical stability of the spinal instrumentation resulting in loss of fixation. In light of these potential surgical complications, critical reviews of outcome data for treatment of chronic, low-back pain using pedicle screw instrumentation concluded that "pedicle screw fixation improves radiographically demonstrated fusion rates;" however the expense and complication rates for such constructs are considerable in light of the clinical benefit (Resnick et al. 2005a). Currently, neuromonitoring using free-run and evoked (triggered) electromyography (EMG) is widely used and advocated for safer and more accurate placement of pedicle screws during open instrumentation procedures, and more recently, guiding percutaneous placement (minimally invasive) where the pedicle cannot be easily inspected visually. The latter technique, evoked or triggered EMG when applied to pedicle screw instrumentation surgeries, has been referred to as the pedicle screw stimulation technique. As concluded in the Position Statement by the American Society of Neurophysiological Monitoring (ASNM), multimodality neuromonitoring using free-run EMG and the pedicle screw stimulation technique was considered a practice option and not yet a standard of care (Leppanen 2005). Subsequently, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS) Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves published their "Guidelines for the Performance of Fusion Procedures for Degenerative Disease of the Lumbar Spine" (Heary 2005, Resnick et al. 2005a, Resnick et al. 2005b). It was concluded that the "primary justification" of intraoperative neuromonitoring"... is the perception that the safety and efficacy of pedicle screw fixation are enhanced..." (Resnick et al. 2005b). However in summarizing a massive (over 1000 papers taken from the National Library of Medicine), contemporary, literature review spanning nearly a decade (1996 to 2003), this invited panel (Resnick et al. 2005b) recognized that the evidence-based documents contributing to the parts related to pedicle screw fixation and neuromonitoring were "... full of potential sources of error ..." and lacked appropriate, randomized, prospective studies for formulating rigid standards and guidelines. Nevertheless, current trends support the routine use and clinical utility of these neuromonitoring techniques. In particular free-run and triggered EMG have been well recognized in numerous publications for improving both the accuracy and safety of pedicle screw implantation. Currently, treatment with pedicle screw instrumentation routinely involves all levels of the spine - lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical. Significant historical events, various neuromonitoring modalities, intraoperative alarm criteria, clinical efficacy, current trends, and caveats related to pedicle screw stimulation along the entire vertebral column will be reviewed. PMID:22808751

  20. Reduced knee joint moment in ACL deficient patients at a cost of dynamic stability during landing.

    PubMed

    Oberländer, Kai Daniel; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Höher, Jürgen; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2012-05-11

    The current study aimed to examine the effect of anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLd) on joint kinetics and dynamic stability control after a single leg hop test (SLHT). Twelve unilateral ACLd patients and a control subject group (n=13) performed a SLHT over a given distance with both legs. The calculation of joint kinetics was done by means of a soft-tissue artifact optimized rigid full-body model. Margin of stability (MoS) was quantified by the difference between the base of support and the extrapolated center of mass. During landing, the ACLd leg showed lower external knee flexion moments but demonstrated higher moments at the ankle and hip compared to controls (p<0.05). The main reason for the joint moment redistribution in the ACLd leg was a more anterior position of the ground reaction force (GRF) vector, which affected the moment arms of the GRF acting about the joints (p<0.05). For the ACLd leg, trunk angle was more flexed over the entire landing phase compared to controls (p<0.05) and we found a significant correlation between moment arms at the knee joint and trunk angle (r² = 0.48;p<0.01). The consequence of this altered landing strategy in ACLd legs was a more anterior position of the center of mass reducing the MoS (p<0.05). The results illustrate the interaction between trunk angle, joint kinetics and dynamic stability during landing maneuvers and provide evidence of a feedforward adaptive adjustment in ACLd patients (i.e. more flexed trunk angle) aimed at reducing knee joint moments at the cost of dynamic stability control. PMID:22440611

  1. The Efficacy of Hydroxyapatite for Screw Augmentation in Osteoporotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang Hoon; Lee, June Ho; Cho, Ji Young; Lee, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The stability of screw constructs is of considerable importance in determining the outcome, especially in spinal osteoporosis. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been proven as an effective material for increasing the pullout strength of pedicle screws inserted into the osteoporotic bones. However, PMMA has several disadvantages, such as its exothermic properties, the risk of neural injury in the event of extravasation, and difficulties in performing revision surgery. In the current study, we used hydroxyapatite (HA) cement for screw augmentation in spinal osteoporosis. We conclude that HA cement is a useful tool for screw augmentation and recommend it as a promising option for spinal instrumentation in osteoporotic patients. PMID:24201099

  2. The synergistic action of the anterior cruciate ligament and thigh muscles in maintaining joint stability.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, M; Baratta, R; Zhou, B H; Shoji, H; Bose, W; Beck, C; D'Ambrosia, R

    1987-01-01

    The synergistic action of the ACL and the thigh muscles in maintaining joint stability was studied experimentally. The EMG from the quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups was recorded and analyzed in three separate experimental procedures in which the knee was stressed. The test revealed that direct stress of the ACL has a moderate inhibitory effect on the quadriceps, but simultaneously it directly excites the hamstrings. Similar responses were also obtained in patients with ACL damage during loaded knee extension with tibia subluxation, indicating that an alternative reflex arc unrelated to ACL receptors was available to maintain joint integrity. The antagonist muscles (hamstrings) were clearly demonstrated to assume the role of joint stabilizers in the patient who has a deficient ACL. The importance of an appropriate muscle-conditioning rehabilitation program in such a patient is substantiated. PMID:3618871

  3. Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics and Pelvic Ring Stability Using Different Fixation Methods to Treat Pubic Symphysis Diastasis: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Feng; He, Yu; Qian, Hebu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Qinghu

    2015-12-01

    The intention of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics using 5 internal fixation methods used clinically to stabilize a pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD, Tile type B1).A 3-dimensional finite element model of PSD was simulated using 5 implants, including single superior plate (Single-Plate), superior and anterior plate (Dual-Plate), single cannulated screw (Single-Screw), crossed dual cannulated screws (Cross-Screw), and parallel dual cannulated screws (Para-Screw). Three loads were distributed in all models, including dual-leg standing, single-leg stance, and rotation. To evaluate the biomechanical properties, the construct stiffness, the stress distribution, and the von Misses stress were recorded and analyzed. To evaluate pelvic ring stability, the micromotion of the pubic symphysis and iliosacral joint was analyzed.Disruption of pubic symphysis dramatically decreased the pelvic ring stability. Cross-screw and Para-Screw showed higher stiffness than other methods. All implants endured the maximum von Misses stress under single-leg stance. For Plate-Screw system, the maximum stress occurred at a place where it strides over pubic symphysis and adjacent Plate-Screw interface. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. Para-Screw showed the best fixation effect under dual-leg conditions. Cross-screw showed superior antishearing force capacity under single-leg stance. Dual-Plate provided maximum antihorizontal rotation. Para-Screw provided the maximum stabilization for the posterior pelvic ring.This study showed the biomechanical advantages of dual-implant for PSD only from the finite element view. The Para-Screw provided high construct stiffness under 3 load conditions. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. The better anterior and posterior pelvic stabilization were obtained by the dual-implant fixation than other methods. Therefore, the Cross-Screw and Dual-Plate fixation methods should be preferred in the treatment of pubic symphysis from the finite element view. PMID:26656353

  4. Role of the compression screw in the dynamic hip-screw system: A finite-element study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yen-Nien; Li, Chun-Ting; Peng, Yao-Te; Chang, Chih-Han

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic hip-screw (DHS) system is a common implant for fixation of proximal femur fractures. During assembly, it has been recommended to remove the compression screw after initial compression has been obtained; however, related complications had been reported. So far, the role of compression screw in the reconstructed stability of hip fractures as well as the mechanical strength of the DHS system has rarely been mentioned. This study investigated the function of this screw in the DHS system during fracture healing. Based on the FE method, six numerical models of proximal femur were employed to analyze the mechanical response of a DHS implant with various fracture types and different fixation strategies (with or without a compression screw). The displacement of the femur head and peak von Mises stress were selected as indices of the stability of a fractured femur stabilized by a DHS device and of the risk of implant failure, respectively. Our results showed that a retained compression screw increased reconstructed structural stiffness, reducing the displacement of the femur head. This screw also helped to lessen mechanical failure of side plate by reducing the peak von Mises stress around the connection between the barrel and side plate. Both findings were evident in the proximal femur fracture involving the intertrochanteric part, and even more obvious in the setting of bony defects. Thus, we recommend the maintenance of compression screw in the DHS system while treating the intertrochanteric fracture, particularly in cases with bony defects. PMID:26521645

  5. All arthroscopic stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fiberwire and endobutton system

    PubMed Central

    Spoliti, Marco; De Cupis, Mauro; Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction: acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is common in athletes and in contact sports and about 9% of shoulder injuries involves this joint. The majority of these AC lesions can be successfully treated conservatively but high grade dislocation and some cases of type III dislocation need a surgical treatment. Many different operative techniques have been described over the years. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic stabilization of AC joint dislocation with TightRope® system. Materials and methods: nineteen patients with acute AC dislocation were treated by arthroscopic fixation with TightRope® system. Any associated lesions were repaired. All patients were assessed before surgery (T0), at 3 months (T1), at 6 months (T2) and at 1 year after the surgery (T3) using a visual analogic scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley Score (CMS). All patients were evaluated with X-ray. Results: six AC-joint dislocations involved the right shoulder and thirteen the left shoulder. Ten were type III dislocation, three were type IV and six were type V dislocation. We found a statistically significant reduction of pain (p< 0.01) at T1 compared to the pretreatment scores. The CMS measures showed an improvement between T1, T2 and T3, but the difference was statistically significant only between T1 and T3 (p= 0.017). The postoperative X-Ray of the shoulder showed a good reduction of the AC joint dislocation. We had 1 case of recurrence and 2 cases of loss of intraoperative reduction. Conclusion: arthroscopic technique for acute AC joint dislocations with the use of the TightRope® device is minimally invasive and it allows an anatomic restoration of the joint. It is a safe and effective procedure ensuring stable AC joint reconstruction and good cosmetic results. PMID:25767774

  6. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  7. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Miquela S.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Vangoethem, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  8. Bone properties of the humeral head and resistance to screw cutout

    PubMed Central

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Jensen, Niels Christian

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment of fractures involving the proximal humeral head is hampered by complications. Screw cutout is the major pitfall seen in connection with rigid plating. We have exploited a bony explanation for this phenomenon. Materials and Methods: We examined the convex surface of the humeral head looking at the density and the topographical strength of the subchondral bone using mechanical testing of bone cylinders harvested from the humeral head. We also studied the osseous architecture of the subchondral bone and thickness of the boneplate of the humeral head using a 3-dimensional serial sectioning technique. Results: The bone strength and bone density correlated well and revealed large regional variations across the humeral head. Bone strength and stiffness of the trabecular bone came to a maximum in the most medial anterior and central parts of the humeral head, where strong textural anisotropy was also found. We found in particular a lower bone strength and density in the posterior and inferior regions of the humeral head. A rapid decline in bone strength within a few mm below a relatively thin subchondral plate was also reported. Clinical Relevance: We have in this paper explored some of the most important factors connected with screw stability at the cancellous bone level. We discovered large variations in bone density and bone strength across the joint surface rendering certain areas of the humeral head less suitable for screw placement. The use of rigid plate constructs with divergent screw directions will predictably place screws in areas of the humeral head comprising low density and low strength cancellous bone. New concepts of plates and plating techniques for the surgical treatment of complex fractures of the proximal humerus should take bone distribution, strength, and architecture into account. PMID:24926160

  9. Analysis of the Stress and Displacement Distribution of Inferior Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injuries Repaired with Screw Fixation: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinghua; Zhang, Kun; Zhuang, Yan; Li, Zhong; Yu, Bin; Pei, Guoxian

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of syndesmosis injuries have concentrated on cadaver models. However, they are unable to obtain exact data regarding the stress and displacement distribution of various tissues, and it is difficult to compare models. We investigated the biomechanical effects of inferior tibiofibular syndesmosis injuries (ITSIs) and screw fixation on the ankle using the finite element (FE) method. Methodology/Principal Findings A three-dimensional model of a healthy ankle complex was developed using computed tomography (CT) images. We established models of an ITSI and of screw fixation at the plane 2.5 cm above and parallel to the tibiotalar joint surface of the injured syndesmosis. Simulated loads were applied under three conditions: neutral position with single-foot standing and internal and external rotation of the ankle. ITSI reduced contact forces between the talus and fibula, helped periarticular ankle ligaments withstand more load-resisting movement, and increased the magnitude of displacement at the lower extreme of the tibia and fibula. ITSI fixation with a syndesmotic screw reduced contact forces in all joints, decreased the magnitude of displacement at the lower extreme of the tibia and fibula, and increased crural interosseous membrane stress. Conclusions/significance Severe syndesmosis injuries cause stress and displacement distribution of the ankle to change multidirectional ankle instability and should be treated by internal fixation. Though the transverse syndesmotic screw effectively stabilizes syndesmotic diastasis, it also changes stress distribution around the ankle and decreases the joint's range of motion (ROM). Therefore, fixation should not be performed for a long period of time because it is not physiologically suitable for the ankle joint. PMID:24312464

  10. Muscle Co-Contraction Modulates Damping and Joint Stability in a Three-Link Biomechanical Limb

    PubMed Central

    Heitmann, Stewart; Ferns, Norm; Breakspear, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Computational models of neuromotor control require forward models of limb movement that can replicate the natural relationships between muscle activation and joint dynamics without the burdens of excessive anatomical detail. We present a model of a three-link biomechanical limb that emphasizes the dynamics of limb movement within a simplified two-dimensional framework. Muscle co-contraction effects were incorporated into the model by flanking each joint with a pair of antagonist muscles that may be activated independently. Muscle co-contraction is known to alter the damping and stiffness of limb joints without altering net joint torque. Idealized muscle actuators were implemented using the Voigt muscle model which incorporates the parallel elasticity of muscle and tendon but omits series elasticity. The natural force-length-velocity relationships of contractile muscle tissue were incorporated into the actuators using ideal mathematical forms. Numerical stability analysis confirmed that co-contraction of these simplified actuators increased damping in the biomechanical limb consistent with observations of human motor control. Dynamic changes in joint stiffness were excluded by the omission of series elasticity. The analysis also revealed the unexpected finding that distinct stable (bistable) equilibrium positions can co-exist under identical levels of muscle co-contraction. We map the conditions under which bistability arises and prove analytically that monostability (equifinality) is guaranteed when the antagonist muscles are identical. Lastly we verify these analytic findings in the full biomechanical limb model. PMID:22275897

  11. Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screw and Polymethylmethacrylate-Augmented Pedicle Screw in Osteoporotic Sheep Lumbar Vertebrae: Biomechanical and Interfacial Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Xie, Qing-yun; Wang, Cai-ru; Liu, Jin-biao; Liao, Dong-fa; Jiang, Kai; Lei, Wei; Pan, Xian-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background It was reported that expansive pedicle screw (EPS) and polymethylmethacrylate-augmented pedicle screw (PMMA-PS) could be used to increase screw stability in osteoporosis. However, there are no studies comparing the two kinds of screws in vivo. Thus, we aimed to compare biomechanical and interfacial performances of EPS and PMMA-PS in osteoporotic sheep spine. Methodology/Principal Findings After successful induction of osteoporotic sheep, lumbar vertebrae in each sheep were randomly divided into three groups. The conventional pedicle screw (CPS) was inserted directly into vertebrae in CPS group; PMMA was injected prior to insertion of CPS in PMMA-PS group; and the EPS was inserted in EPS group. Sheep were killed and biomechanical tests, micro-CT analysis and histological observation were performed at both 6 and 12 weeks post-operation. At 6-week and 12-week, screw stabilities in EPS and PMMA-PS groups were significantly higher than that in CPS group, but there were no significant differences between EPS and PMMA-PS groups at two study periods. The screw stability in EPS group at 12-week was significantly higher than that at 6-week. The bone trabeculae around the expanding anterior part of EPS were more and denser than that in CPS group at 6-week and 12-week. PMMA was found without any degradation and absorption forming non-biological “screw-PMMA-bone” interface in PMMA-PS group, however, more and more bone trabeculae surrounded anterior part of EPS improving local bone quality and formed biological “screw-bone” interface. Conclusions/Significance EPS can markedly enhance screw stability with a similar effect to the traditional method of screw augmentation with PMMA in initial surgery in osteoporosis. EPS can form better biological interface between screw and bone than PMMA-PS. In addition, EPS have no risk of thermal injury, leakage and compression caused by PMMA. We propose EPS has a great application potential in augmentation of screw stability in osteoporosis in clinic. PMID:24086381

  12. Effect of cement washout on loosening of abutment screws and vice versa in screw- and cement- retained implant-supported dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Gyu; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the abutment screw stability of screw- and cement-retained implant-supported dental prosthesis (SCP) after simulated cement washout as well as the stability of SCP cements after complete loosening of abutment screws. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six titanium CAD/CAM-made implant prostheses were fabricated on two implants placed in the resin models. Each prosthesis is a two-unit SCP: one screw-retained and the other cemented. After evaluating the passive fit of each prosthesis, all implant prostheses were randomly divided into 3 groups: screwed and cemented SCP (Control), screwed and noncemented SCP (Group 1), unscrewed and cemented SCP (Group 2). Each prosthesis in Control and Group 1 was screwed and/or cemented, and the preloading reverse torque value (RTV) was evaluated. SCP in Group 2 was screwed and cemented, and then unscrewed (RTV=0) after the cement was set. After cyclic loading was applied, the postloading RTV was measured. RTV loss and decementation ratios were calculated for statistical analysis. RESULTS There was no significant difference in RTV loss ratio between Control and Group 1 (P=.16). No decemented prosthesis was found among Control and Group 2. CONCLUSION Within the limits of this in vitro study, the stabilities of SCP abutment screws and cement were not significantly changed after simulated cement washout or screw loosening. PMID:26140172

  13. Rotordynamics of Twin-Screw Pumps 

    E-print Network

    Aboel Hassan Muhammed, Ameen

    2013-02-26

    Twin-screw pumps are positive displacement machines. Two meshing screws connected by timing gears convey the fluid trapped in the screw chambers axially from suction to discharge and force it out against the back pressure. Because of the screw...

  14. JOINT UNITED STATES/IAEA PROPOSED APPROACH FOR SAFEGUARDS DURING PLUTONIUM STABILIZATION, PACKAGING, AND SHIPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    L. KWEI; B. SMITH; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    For safety reasons, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing to stabilize and package plutonium oxide currently subject to International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) beginning in the year 2001. The Hanford Site will also stabilize and package plutonium materials under IAEA safeguards. The U.S. and the IAEA began consultations in late 1996 to develop an approach to the application of safeguards during stabilization and packaging. With the plans to ship RFETS plutonium to Savannah River for interim storage prior to final disposition, this work has been extended to include safeguards during shipment. This paper will discuss the elements of a joint U.S./IAEA proposal for this task.

  15. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  16. [Stabilization of the distal radioulnar joint by Hui-Lindscheid ligamentoplasty. Report of 10 cases].

    PubMed

    Sénéchaud, C; Savioz, D; Della Santa, D

    1996-01-01

    The surgical treatment of chronic sprain of the distal radio-ulnar joint remains a difficult problem. Some authors have proposed a radio-ulnar stabilization procedure which involves some loss of mobility of the forearm. Other, more radical authors, have suggested partial or complete resection of the ulnar head. In this case, they restore mobility in prono-supination, but often with a loss of stability and discomfort or pain. Hui and Lindscheid modified a technique of tenodesis which had been previously proposed by Bunnell. They perfected a tenodesis based on the use of the flexor carpi ulnaris tendon. We feel that this procedure should ensure stability of the distal radio-ulnar joint, while preserving its mobility. We used this technique in 9 patients who were reviewed with a follow-up of 2.7 years. The authors obtained 2/3 of good and very good results. This procedure will be compared with other techniques currently used and differences of the results will be discussed. Unfortunately, few articles have been published on this subject. PMID:8816090

  17. Joint cavity injection combined with manual reduction and stabilization splint treatment of anterior disc displacement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjie; Mu, Hong; Wang, Zhifeng; Lan, Jing; Zhang, Shizhou; Long, Xing; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of upper and lower joint cavity treatment (UJCT vs. LJCT) in patients with anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDw/oR) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Material and methods: A total of 56 patients with unilateral ADDw/oR were randomly divided into two groups: UJCT group and LJCT group. Manual reduction was done in all the patients after joint cavity rejection of sodium hyaluronate. Then, they were treated with stabilization splint for one or two months. At last, Friction index was calculated to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy at 6 to 12 months follow-up. Results: The maximal mouth-opening degrees in the both groups increased significantly when compared with pre-treatment group (P < 0.01), and the Friction index decreased significantly when compared with pre-treatment group (P < 0.01); In LJCT group, the degrees of maximal mouth-opening increased significantly as compared to UJCT group (P < 0.05), and Friction index were also markedly lower than that in UJCT group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In the patients with ADDw/oR of TMJ, the clinical efficacy of LJCT is superior to that of UJCT, especially in the TMJ pain relief, mouth-opening degree and mandibular movement improvement. PMID:26131189

  18. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-30

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying material requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  19. Strength comparison of allogenic bone screws, bioabsorbable screws, and stainless steel screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Rano, James A; Savoy-Moore, Ruth T; Fallat, Lawrence M

    2002-01-01

    Allogenic bone screws are new to the fixation market and have yet to be tested against current fixation materials. An in vitro comparison of the same sizes of stainless steel, bioabsorbable, and allogenic bone screws was undertaken to assess screw resistance to the forces of bending, pullout, and shear. Using aluminum plates to support the screws, forces up to 1000 Newtons were applied to six to eight samples of each type of screw. During each test, stainless steel screws withstood the maximum force that could be exerted by the testing apparatus without failing (bending, 113.9 +/- 11.8 N mean +/- SE; pullout 999.1 +/- 33.7 N; and shear, 997.5 +/- 108.8 N). In each test, compared to bioabsorbable screws, allogenic bone screws failed faster (pullout, allogenic: 12.4 +/- 1.1 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 120.6 +/- 13.8 seconds; p = .001; bending, allogenic: 53.4 +/- 4.8 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 201.9 +/- 11.1 seconds; p = .001; shear, allogenic 13.5 +/- 1.4 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 43.8 +/- 0.9 seconds; p = .001) under equivalent (pullout: bioabsorbable, 385.0 +/- 18.4 N vs. allogenic, 401.0 +/- 35.9 N; p = .001) or lower (bending, allogenic: 4.7 +/- 0.2 N vs. bioabsorbable, 11.0 +/- 0.9 N; p = .675; shear, allogenic: 312.1 +/- 15.5 N vs. bioabsorbable 680.9 +/- 8.5 N; p = .001) loads, and in a highly variable fashion. Overall, the bioabsorbable screws withstood the forces of bending, pullout, and shear better than the allogenic screws, and stainless steel screws outperformed both bioabsorbable and allogenic screws. Despite these results, allogenic screws could still be useful in compliant patients who would benefit from their osteoconductive properties. PMID:11858609

  20. Low noise lead screw positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very precise and low noise lead screw positioner, for positioning a retroreflector in an interferometer is described. A gas source supplies inert pressurized gas, that flows through narrow holes into the clearance space between a nut and the lead screw. The pressurized gas keeps the nut out of contact with the screw. The gas flows axially along the clearance space, into the environment. The small amount of inert gas flowing into the environment minimizes pollution. By allowing such flow into the environment, no seals are required between the end of the nut and the screw.

  1. Low noise lead screw positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Gerald S.

    1986-05-01

    A very precise and low noise lead screw positioner, for positioning a retroreflector in an interferometer is described. A gas source supplies inert pressurized gas, that flows through narrow holes into the clearance space between a nut and the lead screw. The pressurized gas keeps the nut out of contact with the screw. The gas flows axially along the clearance space, into the environment. The small amount of inert gas flowing into the environment minimizes pollution. By allowing such flow into the environment, no seals are required between the end of the nut and the screw.

  2. Simple facet joint repair with dynamic pedicular system: Technical note and case series

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Ali Fahir; Suzer, Tuncer; Sasani, Mehdi; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Cezayirli, Phillip; Marandi, Hosein Jafari; Erbulut, Deniz Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Facet joints are important anatomical structures for the stability of spine. Surgical or degenerative damage to a facet joint may lead to spinal instability and causes clinical problems. This article explains the importance of facet joints, reviews facet replacement systems, and describes a simple and effective method for facet replacement after surgical removal of facet joints. Materials and Methods: Ten patients were operated with the diagnosis of unilateral nerve root compression secondary to facet degeneration. The hypertrophic facet joints were removed with microsurgical techniques and the roots were decompressed. Then, a unilateral artificial facet joint was created using two hinged screws and a dynamic rod. Results: The clinical outcome of all the patients was determined good or excellent at second and last follow-up (mean 13.3 months) controls using visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. Radiological evaluations also demonstrated no implant-related complications. Conclusions: The authors suggest that, if removal of a facet joint is necessary to decompress the nerve roots, the joint can be replaced by a construct composed of two hinged screws connected by a dynamic rod. This simple system mimics the function of a normal facet joint and is an effective technique for unilateral facet joint replacement. PMID:25972711

  3. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying materia1 requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  4. Effect of filler metal composition on the strength of yttria stabilized zirconia joints brazed with Pd-Ag-CuOx

    SciTech Connect

    Darsell, Jens T.; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-09-08

    The Ag-CuOx system is of interest to be used to be used as an air braze filler metal for joining high temperature electrochemical devices. Previous work has shown that the melting temperatures can be increased by adding palladium to Ag-CuOx and it is expected that this may aid high temperature stability. This work compares the room temperature bend strength of joints made between yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) air brazed using Ag-CuOx without palladium and with 5 and 15mol% palladium additions. It has been found that in general palladium decreases joint strength, especially in low copper oxide compositions filler metals. At high copper oxide contents, brittle fracture through both copper oxide rich phases and the YSZ limits joint strength.

  5. Screw/stud removal tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, K.; Herrick, D. E.; Rothermel, L.

    1980-01-01

    Tool removes stubborn panheaded screws or studs where conventional tools would be either too weak or inconvenient to use. Screws with damaged heads or slots can also be removed this way. Tool can be worked with one hand and easily fits limited-access and blind areas. It can be made in various sizes to fit different screwheads.

  6. Modified brachioradialis wrap for stabilizing the distal radioulnar joint: case report.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Patrick G; Peers, Sebastian; Bafus, Blaine T; Evans, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) stability requires competent static and dynamic soft tissues. Multiple DRUJ techniques have been described in the literature. Our method is a novel modification of the Gupta method of DRUJ stabilization used in a revision reconstruction on a patient with a total wrist arthroplasty. A brachioradialis graft is harvested and tunneled through Parona's space volar to the pronator quadratus and through the muscle body. The tendon is then brought dorsal between the radius and ulna to the dorsal side of the distal ulna and sutured to the floor of the 5th extensor compartment, as well as to the surrounding extensor reticulum ulnar to the 6th compartment with nonabsorbable sutures. Our modification of the method described by Gupta prevents ulnar subluxaton of the extensor carpal ulnaris (ECU), allows the tendon graft construct to more adequately resist volar translation of the radius, and thus acts like a leash to pull the radius dorsally to the stationary ulna. This modification gives the graft a better force vector to resist the volar translation of the distal radius. We are able to present successful 30-month follow-up of this procedure. PMID:26568744

  7. Comparison of the pull-out forces of bioabsorbable polylactide/glycolide screws (Biosorb and Lactosorb) and tacks: a study on the stability of fixation in human cadaver parietal bones.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Johanna; Leinonen, Sanna; Ilomäki, Jouko; Suokas, Esa; Törmälä, Pertti; Waris, Timo; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pull-out forces of bioabsorbable polylactide/glycolide (PLGA) tacks and screws in human cadaver parietal bones. Parietal bone pieces (c. 6 cm x 20 cm) were collected from five human male cadavers (age range: 47-75 years). Forty-nine BioSorbPDX (self-reinforced [SR] PLGA 80/20) tacks (1.5-mm diameter, 4.0-mm length), 47 BioSorbPDX (SR-PLGA 80/20) screws (1.5-mm diameter, 4.0-mm length), and 46 LactoSorb (PLGA 82/18) screws (1.5-mm diameter, 4.0-mm length) were applied. The tacks were applied to drill holes using a special applicator gun (no tapping or tightening). The screws were applied to drill holes in the traditional way using tapping and tightening with a screwdriver. A tensile testing machine was used. All the implants were tested thus: the head of the implant was held by an aluminum jig, and the jig was pulled with wire until implant failure. The testing pull speed was 10 mm/min. Means and SDs were calculated, and the data were analyzed using ANOVA. The pull-out force of the tacks was 115.9 +/- 8.3 N, that of Lactosorb screws was 112.9 +/- 12.1 N, and that of Biosorb screws was 110.4 +/- 8.9 N (statistically insignificant difference between the three groups). The most common reason for failure in the case of tacks was barb breakage (55.1%); it was thread breakage in the case of BioSorb screws (66%) and stem split in the case of Lactosorb screws (56%). Tacks seem to have a similar, perhaps even a little better, holding power to cranial bone as screws and can hence be recommended for clinical application, as the procedure saves time and, consequently, costs. PMID:12140419

  8. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout. PMID:26451947

  9. Biomechanical analysis of a temporomandibular joint condylar prosthesis during various clenching tasks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Heng-Li; Su, Kuo-Chih; Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Chen, Michael Y C; Wu, Jay; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of clenching tasks on the stress and stability of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar prosthesis, as well as on the stress and strain in the whole mandible and bone surrounding three screws. Three-dimensional finite element models of the mandible and a TMJ condylar prosthesis using three screws were established. Six static clenching tasks were simulated in this study: incisal clench (INC), intercuspal position (ICP), right unilateral molar clench (RMOL), left unilateral molar clench (LMOL), right group function (RGF), and left group function (LGF). Based on the simulation of the six clenching tasks, none of the inserted screws or the TMJ condylar prosthesis were broken. In addition, the stability of the TMJ condylar prosthesis was sufficiently high for bone ongrowth. For the whole mandibular bone, the maximum von Mises stress and von Mises strain observed in the cortical bone and cancellous bone were yielded by the ICP and RMOL, respectively. For the bone surrounding the inserted screws, the maximum von Mises stress and von Mises strain in both the cortical bone and cancellous bone were yielded by the LMOL. Clenching tasks had significant effects on the stress distribution of the TMJ condylar prosthesis, as well as on the stress and strain distribution of the whole mandible and the bone surrounding the inserted screws. PMID:26027864

  10. An Innovative Universal Screw Removal Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Elmada?, Mehmet; Uzer, Gökçer; Acar, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the clinical benefits of an instrument designed to facilitate removal of polyaxial screws during revision surgery. Methods All polyaxial screws can be removed without additional materials or a large amount of debridement using our newly designed instrument. Forty-two screws were removed from five patients without any complications using this instrument. Results We removed the cap screws and rods from the 42 polyaxial screws in five patients and made them monoaxial using the new screw removal apparatus. The screws and rods were removed quickly in a minimally invasive way with no complications. No damage to the pedicle or surrounding soft tissue occurred during screw removal. No neurogenic changes developed during revision surgery after changing the screws. Conclusion This newly designed screw removal instrument was used safely and effectively to remove all polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25883660

  11. The screw propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1980-07-01

    Marine and air screw propellers are considered in terms of theoretical hydrodynamics as developed by Joukowsky, Prandtl, and Betz. Attention is given to the flow around wings of finite span where spanwise flow exists and where lift and the bound vorticity must all go smoothly to zero at the wing tips. The concept of a trailing vortex sheet made up of infinitesimal line vortexes roughly aligned with the direction of flight is discussed in this regard. Also considered is induced velocity, which tends to convect the sheet downward at every stage in the roll-up process, the vortex theory of propellers and the Betz-Prandtl circulation distribution. The performance of the Gossamer Albatross and of a pedal-driven biplane called the Chrysalis are also discussed.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  13. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  14. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  15. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  16. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  17. Fractional vortex dipoles of edge-screw type in self-focusing Kerr nonlinear media

    E-print Network

    Dreischuh, Alexander

    the evolution of dark beams of finite length carrying edge-screw phase dislocations in self- focusing Kerr charges. Moderate saturation of the medium third-order nonlinearity enabled to stabilize the snake

  18. Axial compression generated by cortical and cancellous lag screws in the equine distal phalanx.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Smith, F W

    2003-09-01

    Lag screw fixation using single 4.5 mm cortical bone screws is a recommended technique for repair of mid-sagittal plane fractures of the distal phalanx in adult horses. However, implant infection and technical difficulties in obtaining adequate interfragmentary compression have made this surgical procedure somewhat controversial. We hypothesized that use of larger diameter screws would result in increased axial compression and improved stability of this fracture. Paired distal phalanges from the forelimbs of 10 adult horses were collected at necropsy and divided in half in the midsagittal plane. Using a randomized block study design, four types of bone screws (4.5 mm cortical, 5.5 mm cortical, 6.5 mm cancellous pre-tapped, and 6.5 mm cancellous non-tapped) were inserted to a depth of 15 mm. During screw insertion, the axial force generated under the screw head was measured with a load washer containing a piezoelectric force transducer, while torque of insertion was recorded with a torsional testing machine. The 6.5mm screw inserted after pre-tapping generated significantly greater axial force (2781 N) than the 4.5 mm (1522 N), 5.5 mm (2073 N) or 6.5 mm non-tapped (2295 N) screws. The relationship between maximal applied torque and axial force generated was linear for each screw type. Each unit of torque applied during insertion of cortical screws resulted in a greater increase in axial compression, as compared to cancellous screws. These data suggest that use of larger diameter screws would result in improved interfragmentary compression of distal phalangeal fractures. PMID:12902180

  19. Treatment of fractures of the condylar head with resorbable pins or titanium screws: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Matthias; Loukota, Richard; Kuchta, Anne; Stadlinger, Bernd; Jung, Roland; Speckl, Katrin; Schmiedekampf, Robert; Eckelt, Uwe

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to compare in vivo the stability of fixation of condylar fractures in sheep using sonic bone welding and standard titanium screws. We assessed stability of the osteosynthesis and maintenance of the height of the mandibular ramus. Height decreased slightly in both groups compared with the opposite side. The volume of the condyle increased considerably in both groups mainly because callus had formed. The results showed no significant disadvantages for pin fixation compared with osteosynthesis using titanium screws. PMID:22901526

  20. Generating and stabilizing the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state in circuit QED: Joint measurement, Zeno effect, and feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Wei; Wang Peiyue; Ding Xinmei; Xu Luting; Li Xinqi

    2011-04-15

    In a solid-state circuit QED system, we extend the previous study of generating and stabilizing a two-qubit Bell state [Phys. Rev. A 82, 032335 (2010)] to a three-qubit GHZ state. In a dispersive regime, we employ the homodyne joint readout for multiple qubits to infer the state for further processing, and in particular we use it to stabilize the state directly by means of an alternate-flip-interrupted Zeno (AFIZ) scheme. Moreover, the state-of-the-art feedback action based on the filtered current enables not only a deterministic generation of the pre-GHZ state in the initial stage, but also a fast recovery from occasional error in the later stabilization process. We show that the proposed scheme can maintain the state with high fidelity if the efficient quantum measurement and rapid single-qubit rotations are available.

  1. An Articulating Tool for Endoscopic Screw Delivery

    E-print Network

    Petrzelka, Joseph Edward

    This paper describes the development of an articulating endoscopic screw driver that can be used to place screws in osteosynthetic plates during thoracoscopic surgery. The device is small enough to be used with a 12 mm ...

  2. The contribution of the acetabular labrum to hip joint stability: a quantitative analysis using a dynamic three-dimensional robot model.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Tara F; Colbrunn, Robb W; Bottros, John J; Mutnal, Amar B; Greeson, Clay B; Klika, Alison K; van den Bogert, Antonie J; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-06-01

    The acetabular labrum provides mechanical stability to the hip joint in extreme positions where the femoral head is disposed to subluxation. We aimed to quantify the isolated labrum's stabilizing value. Five human cadaveric hips were mounted to a robotic manipulator, and subluxation potential tests were run with and without labrum. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematic data were quantified using the stability index (Colbrunn et al., 2013, "Impingement and Stability of Total Hip Arthroplasty Versus Femoral Head Resurfacing Using a Cadaveric Robotics Model," J. Orthop. Res., 31(7), pp. 1108-1115). Global and regional stability indices were significantly greater with labrum intact than after total labrectomy for both anterior and posterior provocative positions. In extreme positions, the labrum imparts significant overall mechanical resistance to hip subluxation. Regional stability contributions vary with joint orientation. PMID:25759977

  3. Air-Lubricated Lead Screw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    Air lubricated lead screw and nut carefully machined to have closely matched closely fitting threads. Compressed air injected into two plenums encircle nut and flow through orifices to lubricate mating threads. Originally developed to position precisely interferometer retroreflector for airborne measurement of solar infrared radiation, device now has positioning accuracy of 0.25 micron.

  4. Biomechanical evaluation of bending strength of spinal pedicle screws, including cylindrical, conical, dual core and double dual core designs using numerical simulations and mechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Amaritsakul, Yongyut; Chao, Ching-Kong; Lin, Jinn

    2014-09-01

    Pedicle screws are used for treating several types of spinal injuries. Although several commercial versions are presently available, they are mostly either fully cylindrical or fully conical. In this study, the bending strengths of seven types of commercial pedicle screws and a newly designed double dual core screw were evaluated by finite element analyses and biomechanical tests. All the screws had an outer diameter of 7 mm, and the biomechanical test consisted of a cantilever bending test in which a vertical point load was applied using a level arm of 45 mm. The boundary and loading conditions of the biomechanical tests were applied to the model used for the finite element analyses. The results showed that only the conical screws with fixed outer diameter and the new double dual core screw could withstand 1,000,000 cycles of a 50-500 N cyclic load. The new screw, however, exhibited lower stiffness than the conical screw, indicating that it could afford patients more flexible movements. Moreover, the new screw produced a level of stability comparable to that of the conical screw, and it was also significantly stronger than the other screws. The finite element analysis further revealed that the point of maximum tensile stress in the screw model was comparable to the point at which fracture occurred during the fatigue test. PMID:25060212

  5. Metallurgical examination of gun barrel screws

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Clift, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    The examination was conducted to determine the extent of degradation that had occurred after a series of firings; these screws prevent live rounds of ammunition from being loaded into the firing chamber. One concern is that if the screw tip fails and a live round is accidentally loaded into the chamber, a live round could be fired. Another concern is that if the blunt end of the screw begins to degrade by cracking, pieces could become small projectiles during firing. All screws used in firing 100 rounds or more exhibited some degree degradation, which progressively worsened as the number of rounds fired increased. (SEM, metallography, x-ray analysis, and microhardness were used.) Presence of cracks in these screws after 100 fired rounds is a serious concern that warrants the discontinued use of these screws. The screw could be improved by selecting an alloy more resistant to thermal and chemical degradation.

  6. Examining executive function in the second year of life: coherence, stability, and relations to joint attention and language.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephanie E; Marcovitch, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Several theories of executive function (EF) propose that EF development corresponds to children's ability to form representations and reflect on represented stimuli in the environment. However, research on early EF is primarily conducted with preschoolers, despite the fact that important developments in representation (e.g., language, gesture, shared joint attention) occur within the 1st years of life. In the present study, EF performance and the relationship between EF and early representation (i.e., joint attention, language) were longitudinally examined in 47 children at 14 and 18 months of age. Results suggest that the 2nd year of life is a distinct period of EF development in which children exhibit very little coherence or stability across a battery of EF tasks. However, by 18 months, a subset of child participants consistently passed the majority of EF tasks, and superior EF performance was predicted by 14-month representational abilities (i.e., language comprehension and some episodes of initiating joint attention). This research suggests that the transition from foundational behavioral control in infancy to the more complex EF observed in preschool is supported by representational abilities in the 2nd year of life. PMID:25546598

  7. Primary stability of a PGLA/Polydioxanone membrane for potential autologous chondrocyte implantation in the hip joint. A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Andrea; Bistolfi, Alessandro; Crova, Maurizio; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to evaluate the primary stability of a membrane ?(resorbable polyglactin-910/poly-p-dioxanone) for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) inserted by press-fit into defects in the femoral head and acetabulum. The stability of the membrane was evaluated after implantation in a cartilage defect on both sides of the joint in 12 hips in six cadavers. The hip was manually put through a full range of motion for 50 cycles after each lesion had been created and filled, starting with the acetabulum.?The implanted membranes showed stability in 83.3% of the acetabular defects and in 33.3% of the femoral defects after the 50 cycles. After an additional 50 cycles the acetabular membrane showed stability in a total of eight (67%) out of 12 acetabular lesions.?The results indicate that this membrane tissue is potentially stable in cartilage defects of the acetabulum, which may have clinical applications in autologous chondrocyte implantation. PMID:23760749

  8. Precision Stabilization Simulation of a Ball Joint Gimbaled Mirror Using Advanced MATLAB

    E-print Network

    Hernandez, Orlando

    to provide precise line of sight stabilization for the seeker (mirror). The mirror is attached to four Kevlar or unwind to change the length of each Kevlar line to position the mirror appropriately. The ball is mounted to a support structure, made up of a fixed body. To maintain stability and position of the seeker, the Kevlar

  9. A study of the effects of water concentration on the stability of interfaces in adhesive joints

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.S.; Kinloch, A.J.; Gardhan, L.M.; Bowditch, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of water concentration on steel-epoxide joints was assessed. The 90{degrees} peel test method has been used to obtain fracture energy, G{sub c} values for adhered joints which have been previously conditioned in a range of relative humidities. Firstly, a loss of peel strength has been seen with increased water content of the adhesive. Further, a critical water concentration marking the transition from slight to pronounced loss of joint strength has been observed. Secondly, a theory for G{sub c} has been used to account for elastic and plastic deformation in the peel arm. However, the theory has not been able to fully account for changes in peel arm thickness but has for changes in the peel angle. Thirdly, apparent interfacial failure has been observed under visual inspection. Auger and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be employed to (i) identify the locus of joint failure and (ii) the site and mechanisms of environmental attack by water.

  10. Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Stabilization in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Breahna, Anca Nicoleta; Meads, Bryce Maurice

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of an 18-years-old patient with thumb carpometacarpal ligament laxity due to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who was treated with trapezial opening wedge osteotomy combined with volar ligaments reconstruction. Two years postoperatively she is pain free and the thumb carpometacarpal joint is stable. PMID:26388011

  11. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  12. Screw-fed pump system

    DOEpatents

    Sprouse, Kenneth M

    2014-11-25

    A pump system includes a pump that includes a first belt and a second belt that are spaced apart from each other to provide generally straight sides of a passage there between. There is an inlet at one end of the passage and an outlet at an opposite end of the passage, with a passage length that extends between the inlet and the outlet. The passage defines a gap distance in a width direction between the straight sides at the passage inlet. A hopper includes an interior space that terminates at a mouth at the passage inlet. At least one screw is located within the interior space of the hopper and includes a screw diameter in the width direction that is less than or equal to the gap distance.

  13. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of four different posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the treatment of the odontoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Liu, Wen-Fei; Jiang, Hong-Kun; Li, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Problems that screw cannot be inserted may occur in screw-rod fixation techniques such as Harms technique. We compared the biomechanical stability imparted to the C-2 vertebrae by four designed posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the management of odontoid fractures. A three-dimensional finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established by subtracting several unit structures from the normal model from a healthy male volunteer. 4 different fixation techniques, shown as follows: ? C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pedicle screw fixation (Harms technique); ? C-1 lateral mass and unilateral C-2 pedicle screw fixation combined with ipsilateral laminar screw fixation; ? Unilateral C-1lateral mass combined with ipsilateral C-1 posterior arch, and C-2 pedicle screw fixation; and ? Unilateral C1 lateral mass screw connected with bilateral C2 pedicle screw fixation was performed on the odontoid fracture model. The model was validated for axial rotation, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and tension for 1.5 Nm. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. The finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established in this paper. All of the four screw-rod techniques significantly decreased motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, as compared with the destabilized odontoid fracture complex (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in stability among the four screw techniques. We concluded that the first three fixation techniques are recommended to be used as surgical intervention for odontoid fracture, while the last can be used as supplementary for the former three methods. PMID:26309508

  15. [Bilateral arthrodesis of the medial foot joints in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Popelka, S; Hromádka, R; Barták, V; Sosna, A

    2012-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often have foot problems. The subtalar and particularly talonavicular joints are affected most frequently. The posterior tibial tendon has an important role in mid-foot stability. In RA patients, chronic inflammation of this tendon or talonavicular joint arthritis can results in posterior tibial tendon rupture. This leads to a collapsed talonavicular joint and forefoot instability, first with talonavicular and later Chopart's joint involvement. This shows as a planovalgus foot, with the forefoot in pronation and the heel in valgus deviation. In a 61-year-old RA patient, ruptures of the posterior tibial tendon due to rheumatoid inflammation occurred bilaterally, with subsequent deviation and instability of the forefoot. Arthrodesis with a medial column screw-Midfoot Fusion Bolt was carried out on the left foot and 4 months later on the right foot. At 7 months after the left and 4 months after the right foot surgery, the patient was free from pain, both feet were stable under loading and the forefoot was firm. The planovalgus deformity was corrected, as well as a valgus deviation of the great toe. Radiography showed a good position of the screws and complete healing of the medial foot joints. PMID:22405554

  16. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  17. Pure Varus Injury to the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Lee, Jung Ha; Chang, Chong Bum

    2015-06-01

    A 30-year-old male was involved in a car accident. Radiographs revealed a depressed marginal fracture of the medial tibial plateau and an avulsion fracture of the fibular head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle, injury to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), posterior horn of the medial meniscus, and the attachments of the lateral collateral ligament and the biceps femoris tendon. The depressed fracture of the medial tibial plateau was elevated and stabilized using a cannulated screw and washer. The injured lateral and posterolateral corner (PLC) structures were repaired and augmented by PLC reconstruction. However, the avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle was not fixed because it was minimally displaced and the torn PCL was also not repaired or reconstructed. We present a unique case of pure varus injury to the knee joint. This case contributes to our understanding of the mechanism of knee injury and provides insight regarding appropriate treatment plans for this type of injury. PMID:26217477

  18. Predicting cancellous bone failure during screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Karen J; Cleek, Tammy M; Mohtar, Aaron A; Hearn, Trevor C

    2013-04-01

    Internal fixation of fractures often requires the tightening of bone screws to stabilise fragments. Inadequate application of torque can leave the fracture unstable, while over-tightening results in the stripping of the thread and loss of fixation. The optimal amount of screw torque is specific to each application and in practice is difficult to attain due to the wide variability in bone properties including bone density. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to investigate the relationships between motor torque and screw compression during powered screw insertion, and to evaluate whether the torque during insertion can be used to predict the ultimate failure torque of the bone. A custom test rig was designed and built for bone screw experiments. By inserting cancellous bone screws into synthetic, ovine and human bone specimens, it was established that variations related to bone density could be automatically detected through the effects of the bone on the rotational characteristics of the screw. The torque measured during screw insertion was found to be directly related to bone density and can be used, on its own, as a good predictor of ultimate failure torque of the bone. PMID:23466167

  19. Balancing rigidity and safety of pedicle screw fixation via a novel expansion mechanism in a severely osteoporotic model.

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas M; Doulgeris, James J; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A; Lee, William E; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2015-01-01

    Many successful attempts to increase pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic bone have been accompanied with an increased risk of catastrophic damage to the patient. To avoid this, a single-armed expansive pedicle screw was designed to increase fixation strength while controlling postfailure damage away from the nerves surrounding the pedicle. The screw was then subsequently tested in two severely osteoporotic models: one representing trabecular bone (with and without the presence of polymethylmethacrylate) and the other representing a combination of trabecular and cortical bone. Maximum pullout strength, stiffness, energy to failure, energy to removal, and size of the resulting block damage were statistically compared among conditions. While expandable pedicle screws produced maximum pullout forces less than or comparable to standard screws, they required a higher amount of energy to be fully removed from both models. Furthermore, damage to the cortical layer in the composite test blocks was smaller in all measured directions for tests involving expandable pedicle screws than those involving standard pedicle screws. This indicates that while initial fixation may not differ in the presence of cortical bone, the expandable pedicle screw offers an increased level of postfailure stability and safety to patients awaiting revision surgery. PMID:25705655

  20. Balancing Rigidity and Safety of Pedicle Screw Fixation via a Novel Expansion Mechanism in a Severely Osteoporotic Model

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas M.; Doulgeris, James J.; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Many successful attempts to increase pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic bone have been accompanied with an increased risk of catastrophic damage to the patient. To avoid this, a single-armed expansive pedicle screw was designed to increase fixation strength while controlling postfailure damage away from the nerves surrounding the pedicle. The screw was then subsequently tested in two severely osteoporotic models: one representing trabecular bone (with and without the presence of polymethylmethacrylate) and the other representing a combination of trabecular and cortical bone. Maximum pullout strength, stiffness, energy to failure, energy to removal, and size of the resulting block damage were statistically compared among conditions. While expandable pedicle screws produced maximum pullout forces less than or comparable to standard screws, they required a higher amount of energy to be fully removed from both models. Furthermore, damage to the cortical layer in the composite test blocks was smaller in all measured directions for tests involving expandable pedicle screws than those involving standard pedicle screws. This indicates that while initial fixation may not differ in the presence of cortical bone, the expandable pedicle screw offers an increased level of postfailure stability and safety to patients awaiting revision surgery. PMID:25705655

  1. Algorithms for joint optimization of stability and diversity in planning combinatorial libraries of chimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Friedman, Alan M; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2009-08-01

    In engineering protein variants by constructing and screening combinatorial libraries of chimeric proteins, two complementary and competing goals are desired: the new proteins must be similar enough to the evolutionarily-selected wild-type proteins to be stably folded, and they must be different enough to display functional variation. We present here the first method, Staversity, to simultaneously optimize stability and diversity in selecting sets of breakpoint locations for site-directed recombination. Our goal is to uncover all "undominated" breakpoint sets, for which no other breakpoint set is better in both factors. Our first algorithm finds the undominated sets serving as the vertices of the lower envelope of the two-dimensional (stability and diversity) convex hull containing all possible breakpoint sets. Our second algorithm identifies additional breakpoint sets in the concavities that are either undominated or dominated only by undiscovered breakpoint sets within a distance bound computed by the algorithm. Both algorithms are efficient, requiring only time polynomial in the numbers of residues and breakpoints, while characterizing a space defined by an exponential number of possible breakpoint sets. We applied Staversity to identify 2-10 breakpoint plans for different sets of parent proteins taken from the purE family, as well as for parent proteins TEM-1 and PSE-4 from the beta-lactamase family. The average normalized distance between our plans and the lower bound for optimal plans is around 2%. Our plans dominate most (60-90% on average for each parent set) of the plans found by other possible approaches, random sampling or explicit optimization for stability with implicit optimization for diversity. The identified breakpoint sets provide a compact representation of good plans, enabling a protein engineer to understand and account for the trade-offs between two key considerations in combinatorial chimeragenesis. PMID:19645597

  2. When Planning Screw Fracture Fixation Why the 5.5?mm Screw is the Goldilocks Screw. An Observational Computer Tomographic Study of Fifth Metatarsal Bone Anatomy in a Sample of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iselin, Lukas D.; Ramawat, Sunil; Hanratty, Brian; Klammer, Georg; Stavrou, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We wanted to verify our clinical experience that the 5.5?mm screw was ideal in the majority of fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The size of a screw is important for the successful surgical treatment of these fractures in order to obtain the maximal stability while reducing the risk for iatrogenic fracture. A sample of patients undergoing computer tomographic imaging of the foot for investigation other than fifth metatarsal pathology were recruited. The parameters of the fifth metatarsal bone anatomy were measured. These parameters of the 5.5?mm screw were correlated with this data. The upper parameter (the diameter of the threads) was 5.5 and the lower parameter (the diameter of the shank) was 4.0?mm. Twenty seven patients were recruited. The proximal third internal diameter ranged from 3.6 to 7.0?mm with a mean of 5.0?mm. 93% of the metatarsals could easily accommodate the 5.5?mm screw. Two of the metatarsals had an internal diameter of < 4?mm (7%). It is our belief that the 5.5?mm screw may be used safely in the majority of patients with fifth metatarsal fractures. PMID:25950685

  3. When Planning Screw Fracture Fixation Why the 5.5?mm Screw is the Goldilocks Screw. An Observational Computer Tomographic Study of Fifth Metatarsal Bone Anatomy in a Sample of Patients.

    PubMed

    Iselin, Lukas D; Ramawat, Sunil; Hanratty, Brian; Klammer, Georg; Stavrou, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We wanted to verify our clinical experience that the 5.5?mm screw was ideal in the majority of fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The size of a screw is important for the successful surgical treatment of these fractures in order to obtain the maximal stability while reducing the risk for iatrogenic fracture.A sample of patients undergoing computer tomographic imaging of the foot for investigation other than fifth metatarsal pathology were recruited. The parameters of the fifth metatarsal bone anatomy were measured.These parameters of the 5.5?mm screw were correlated with this data. The upper parameter (the diameter of the threads) was 5.5 and the lower parameter (the diameter of the shank) was 4.0?mm.Twenty seven patients were recruited.The proximal third internal diameter ranged from 3.6 to 7.0?mm with a mean of 5.0?mm. 93% of the metatarsals could easily accommodate the 5.5?mm screw. Two of the metatarsals had an internal diameter of < 4?mm (7%).It is our belief that the 5.5?mm screw may be used safely in the majority of patients with fifth metatarsal fractures. PMID:25950685

  4. Intra-operative screw trimming in direct screw fixation of the odontoid process fracture--technical note.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Yamano, K; Hamada, Y; Miyamori, T

    1992-01-01

    For a satisfactory direct screw fixation of fractures of the odontoid process it is necessary to use a screw of the proper total length and thread length, but such an optimal ready-made screw is not always available. The authors describe a technique of intra-operative screw trimming using a high-speed diamond drill. This adjustment is easily and quickly performed. It enables the screw to act as a compression screw, which facilitates fusion of the fractured surfaces. PMID:1595397

  5. Are allogenic or xenogenic screws and plates a reasonable alternative to alloplastic material for osteosynthesis--a histomorphological analysis in a dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, C; Obwegeser, J A

    2010-12-01

    Despite invention of titanium and resorbable screws and plates, still, one of the main challenges in bone fixation is the search for an ideal osteosynthetic material. Biomechanical properties, biocompatibility, and also cost effectiveness and clinical practicability are factors for the selection of a particular material. A promising alternative seems to be screws and plates made of bone. Recently, xenogenic bone pins and screws have been invented for use in joint surgery. In this study, screws made of allogenic sheep and xenogenic human bone were analyzed in a vital and dynamic sheep-model and compared to conventional titanium screws over a standard period of bone healing of 56 days with a constant applied extrusion force. Biomechanical analysis and histomorphological evaluation were performed. After 56 days of insertion xenogenic screws made of human bone showed significantly larger distance of extrusion of on average 173.8 ?m compared to allogenic screws made of sheep bone of on average 27.8 and 29.95 ?m of the titanium control group. Severe resorption processes with connective tissue interposition were found in the histomorphological analysis of the xenogenic screws in contrast to new bone formation and centripetal vascularization of the allogenic bone screw, as well as in processes of incorporation of the titanium control group. The study showed allogenic cortical bone screws as a substantial alternative to titanium screws with good biomechanical properties. In contrast to other reports a different result was shown for the xenogenic bone screws. They showed insufficient holding strength with confirmative histomorphological signs of degradation and insufficient osseointegration. Before common clinical use of xenogenic osteosynthetic material, further evaluation should be performed. PMID:20813368

  6. Screw-released roller brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  7. Multipoint joint time and frequency dissemination in delay-stabilized fiber optic links.

    PubMed

    ?liwczy?ski, ?; Krehlik, P

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the system for dissemination of both the RF frequency (e.g., 5, 10, or 100 MHz) and time (pulse per second) signals using an actively tapped fiber-optic link with electronic stabilization of the propagation delay. In principle several nodes for accessing the time/frequency signals may be added without the degradation of the dissemination in the main link. We are discussing the algorithm of determining the propagation delay from the local end of the link to the access node that is required for calibration of the time dissemination. Performed analysis shows that the uncertainty of the time calibration at the access node may in practice be dominated by the dependence of the propagation delay of the receivers on impinging optical powers and is only weakly affected by the distance between the local and access modules. The uncertainty is, however, still low, being only about two times higher compared with the calibration uncertainty of the main link. Experimental results performed on several spooled fibers show that the accuracy of described calibration procedures, expressed as a difference from the results of direct measurement, is not worse than 35 ps. PMID:25768810

  8. The Mast Cell Stabilizer Ketotifen Fumarate Lessens Contracture Severity and Myofibroblast Hyperplasia: A Study of a Rabbit Model of Posttraumatic Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Monument, Michael J.; Hart, David A.; Befus, A. Dean; Salo, Paul T.; Zhang, Mei; Hildebrand, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The propensity of the elbow to become stiff after trauma is widely appreciated and in this setting, the joint capsule is commonly recognized as the major motion-limiting anatomical structure. Affected joint capsules become fibrotic, characterized by myofibroblast hyperplasia and excessive collagen deposition. Mast cell hyperplasia is common within fibrotic tissue and mast cells are known to synthesize many profibrotic mediators. We have hypothesized that mast cell inhibition after skeletal injury will lessen the degree of contracture severity and will reduce myofibroblast hyperplasia within the joint capsule. Methods Posttraumatic contractures of the knee were created using a combination of intra-articular injury coupled to internal immobilization in skeletally mature, New Zealand white rabbits. Four groups of animals were studied: a non-operative control group (CON), an operative contracture group (ORC) and two-operative groups treated with a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen fumarate at doses of 0.5mg/kg (KF0.5) and 1.0mg/kg (KF1.0) twice daily, respectively. After 8 weeks of immobilization, flexion contractures were measured biomechanically and the posterior joint capsule was harvested for quantification of myofibroblast and mast cell numbers. Results Flexion contractures developed in the ORC group (58 ± 14°) and the severity of contracture was significantly reduced in both groups treated with Ketotifen (KF0.5: 42 ± 17° and KF1.0: 45 ± 10°, p<0.02). Joint capsule myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly increased within the operative contracture group (p<0.001). In both surgical groups treated with Ketotifen, myofibroblast and mast cell numbers were significantly reduced (p<0.001). Conclusions The use of a mast cell stabilizer, Ketotifen was effective in reducing the biomechanical and cellular manifestations of joint capsule fibrosis in a rabbit model of posttraumatic joint contracture. This is suggestive that an inflammatory pathway, mediated by mast cell activation is involved in the induction of joint capsule fibrosis after traumatic injury. Clinical Relevance These results suggest mast cell activation is an important event in the genesis of posttraumatic joint contractures. Further work is needed to determine if mast cell inhibition has a role in the prevention of posttraumatic joint contractures in humans. PMID:20516323

  9. [Troublesome radiologic changes after reconstructive fixation of the anterior cruciate ligament with resorbable interference screws].

    PubMed

    Loubignac, F; Lecuire, F; Rubini, J; Basso, M

    1998-03-01

    The authors report worrisome radiological changes which were noted after implantation of absorbable interference screws in ligamentoplasty at the knee joint. Seventeen screws were implanted between September 1995 and July 1996, in eleven patients (average age 27) who were operated upon for chronic anterior knee instability. They underwent a modified Kenneth Jones procedure using autografts with absorbable interference screws (Acufex in 2 cases and Bio-interférix in 9 cases). Significant enlargement of bone tunnels and bony sclerosis of their edges were noted in every patient, but without any modification in the positioning of the graft. No clinical instability was observed in any of the patients, with one to two years follow-up. Publications on this topic are scarce except for one author who reported enlargement of bone tunnels after using bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts. Resorption of absorbable screws probably induces a marked inflammatory reaction, with radiological changes reminiscent of those sometimes observed after tendon allografts. Although the radiological changes reported here may not affect the graft fixation, the authors have reverted to using metallic interference screws. PMID:9586250

  10. Assessment of ankle and hindfoot stability and joint pressures using a human cadaveric model of a large lateral talar process excision: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E; Richards, R Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-03-01

    Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability.A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment.In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P?=?.04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm excision in comparison with the pre-excison state.An excision of up to 10 cm of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection. PMID:25789950

  11. Assessment of Ankle and Hindfoot Stability and Joint Pressures Using a Human Cadaveric Model of a Large Lateral Talar Process Excision

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E.; Richards, R. Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability. A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5?cm3 and 10?cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment. In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10?cm3 lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm3 fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P?=?.04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm3 excision in comparison with the pre-excison state. An excision of up to 10?cm3 of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection. PMID:25789950

  12. Fixed-angle screws vs standard screws in acetabular prosthesis fixation: a cadaveric biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hugate, Ronald R; Dickey, Ian D; Chen, Qingshan; Wood, Christina M; Sim, Franklin H; Rock, Michael G

    2009-08-01

    Secure fixation of acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty can be challenging. The purpose of this study was to perform biomechanical analysis of cup fixation strength using fixed-angle vs standard screw fixation. Multihole, porous-backed acetabular prostheses were implanted in both acetabuli of 8 cadaveric pelves using standard press-fit techniques. Fixed-angle screws were used on the left side, and standard cancellous screws were used in the right. The use of fixed-angle screws enhanced acetabular fixation substantially under subfailure cyclic loading conditions and load-to-failure. The triradiate screw configuration increases the bending moment required to fail the specimens as well. Fixed-angle screws may be useful for achieving rigid fixation of acetabular prostheses in challenging clinical scenarios. PMID:18639433

  13. Semi-Empirical Screw Compressor Chiller Model 

    E-print Network

    Nelson, I. C.; Culp, C.; Graves, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    A screw chiller model which is based on a first principles, semi-empirical analysis that describes the system performance based on observations of the thermodynamic processes is developed. This model is a modified method to empirically derive...

  14. Navigation of Pedicle Screws in the Thoracic Spine with a New Electromagnetic Navigation System: A Human Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Patrick; Oezdemir, Semih; Komp, Martin; Giannakopoulos, Athanasios; Kasch, Richard; Merk, Harry; Liermann, Dieter; Godolias, Georgios; Ruetten, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Posterior stabilization of the spine is a standard procedure in spinal surgery. In addition to the standard techniques, several new techniques have been developed. The objective of this cadaveric study was to examine the accuracy of a new electromagnetic navigation system for instrumentation of pedicle screws in the spine. Material and Method. Forty-eight pedicle screws were inserted in the thoracic spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation and instruments developed especially for electromagnetic navigation. The screw position was assessed postoperatively by a CT scan. Results. The screws were classified into 3 groups: grade 1 = ideal position; grade 2 = cortical penetration <2?mm; grade 3 = cortical penetration ?2?mm. The initial evaluation of the system showed satisfied positioning for the thoracic spine; 37 of 48 screws (77.1%, 95% confidence interval [62.7%, 88%]) were classified as group 1 or 2. Discussion. The screw placement was satisfactory. The initial results show that there is room for improvement with some changes needed. The ease of use and short setup times should be pointed out. Instrumentation is achieved without restricting the operator's mobility during navigation. Conclusion. The results indicate a good placement technique for pedicle screws. Big advantages are the easy handling of the system. PMID:25759814

  15. The Use of MMF Screws: Surgical Technique, Indications, Contraindications, and Common Problems in Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Ehrenfeld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mandibulo-maxillary fixation (MMF) screws are inserted into the bony base of both jaws in the process of fracture realignment and immobilisation. The screw heads act as anchor points to fasten wire loops or rubber bands connecting the mandible to the maxilla. Traditional interdental chain-linked wiring or arch bar techniques provide the anchorage by attached cleats, hooks, or eyelets. In comparison to these tooth-borne appliances MMF screws facilitate and shorten the way to achieve intermaxillary fixation considerably. In addition, MMF screws help to reduce the hazards of glove perforation and wire stick injuries. On the downside, MMF screws are attributed with the risk of tooth root damage and a lack of versatility beyond the pure maintenance of occlusion such as stabilizing loose teeth or splinting fragments of the alveolar process. The surgical technique of MMF screws as well as the pros and cons of the clinical application are reviewed. The adequate screw placement to prevent serious tooth root injuries is still an issue to rethink and modify conceptual guidelines. PMID:22110819

  16. Extraction strength of cannulated cancellous bone screws.

    PubMed

    Hearn, T C; Schatzker, J; Wolfson, N

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the alterations in the relative dimensions of thread and core diameter that accompany cannulation of cancellous bone screws affect their holding strength. The screws were inserted in bovine femoral cancellous bone and mounted in the load train of a materials testing system. They were then extracted under servo-hydraulic displacement control. The tests were repeated in synthetic cancellous material. From the corresponding load-displacement histories, the maximum force values attained were determined as the screws' holding strengths. The results of tests from 17 matched pairs of bovine femora, and of 15 tests of each screw in synthetic material, were recorded. No significant differences in extraction strength between 7.0-mm cannulated and 6.5-mm standard cancellous bone screws were found. Based on tests in the bovine femur and synthetic cancellous material, this study showed that the extraction strength of cancellous bone screws is not altered by the changes in thread-to-core ratio accommodating cannulation. PMID:8459298

  17. Planning screw insertion trajectory in lumbar spinal fusion using pre-operative CT images.

    PubMed

    Daemi, N; Ahmadian, A; Mirbagheri, A; Ahmadian, A H; Saberi, H; Amidi, F; Alirezaie, J

    2015-08-01

    Spinal fusion permanently connects two or more vertebrae in spine to improve stability, correct a deformity or reduce pain by immobilizing the vertebrae through pedicle screw fixation. Pedicle screws should be inserted very carefully to prevent possible irrecoverable damages to the spinal cord. Surgeons use CT/fluoroscopic images to find how to insert the screws safely. However, there is still human error, as determining precise trajectory in 3D space is difficult because of asymmetric structure of pedicle. In this study we attempt to propose a shape based method to help the surgeons to find the more accurate and safe path for screw insertion that minimizes the risk or invasiveness of the surgery using pre-operative CT images. We extracted two features for insertion paths from CT images, named "safety margin" and "pedicular screw fixation strength". By using weighted k-means different paths were clustered and compared with each other. Results of comparison between those paths obtained from surgeon's pre-operative planning, intra operative and the proposed method proves a great improvement on the rate of success in reaching a suitable insertion trajectory by using our method. It is observed that the risk of damage in intra operative stage can be potentially high and it can be reduced considerably by using the proposed planning approach. PMID:26737081

  18. Management of fracture-dislocation of the lower cervical spine with the cervical pedicle screw system

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Zou, Jun; Gan, Minfeng; Zhu, Ruofu; Yang, Huilin

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Usually, cervical pedicle screw fixation has been considered too risky for neurovascular structures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the method and efficacy of the cervical pedicle screw system for fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine because of its rigid fixation. PATIENTS AND METHODS A prospective study was conducted involving 48 patients with cervical spine fracture-dislocation who underwent cervical pedicle screw fixation surgery between January 2003 and January 2007. All patients had various degrees of cord injury, and they were classified according to the American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale: 18 cases were grade A, 15 grade B, 10 grade C, and 5 grade D. RESULTS Six months after the operation, all patients had achieved solid bony fusion and stable fixation of the related segments. Thirty patients with incomplete spinal cord injury improved their ASIA Impairment Scale classification by 1 to 2 grades after the operation. Eighteen patients with complete spinal cord injury had no improvement in neural function. However, nerve root symptoms such as pain and numbness were alleviated to some extent. CONCLUSIONS The cervical pedicle screw system is an effective and reliable method for the restoration of cervical stability. Sufficient pre-operative imaging studies of the pedicles and strict screw insertion technique should be emphasised. PMID:20487593

  19. Plan to procedure: combining 3D templating with rapid prototyping to enhance pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Stans, Anthony A.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Matsumoto, Jane M.; Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2010-02-01

    Spinal fusion procedures involving the implantation of pedicle screws have steadily increased over the past decade because of demonstrated improvement in biomechanical stability of the spine. However, current methods of spinal fusion carries a risk of serious vascular, visceral, and neurological injury caused by inaccurate placement or inappropriately sized instrumentation, which may lead to patient paralysis or even fatality. 3D spine templating software developed by the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic allows the surgeon to virtually place pedicle screws using pre-operative 3D CT image data. With the template plan incorporated, a patient-specific 3D anatomic model is produced using a commercial rapid prototyping system. The pre-surgical plan and the patient-specific model then are used in the procedure room to provide real-time visualization and quantitative guidance for accurate placement of each pedicle screw, significantly reducing risk of injury. A pilot study was conducted at Mayo Clinic by the Department of Radiology, the Department of Orthopedics, and the BIR, involving seven complicated pediatric spine cases. In each case, pre-operative 3D templating was carried out and patient specific models were generated. The plans and the models were used intra-operatively, providing precise pedicle screw starting points and trajectories. Postoperative assessment by the surgeon confirmed all seven operations were successful. Results from the study suggest that patient-specific, 3D anatomic models successfully acquired from 3D templating tools are valuable for planning and conducting pedicle screw insertion procedures.

  20. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  1. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  2. Temperature calculation for extruder screws with internal heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakemeyer, C.; Schöppner, V.

    2014-05-01

    One possibility of directly influencing the temperature profile in an extruder is by tempering the screw. This method is currently used in double-screw extrusion and in certain specialized applications in the field of single-screw extrusion. Significant possibilities of influencing the temperature have been shown, for example, while processing PVC on counterrotating double-screw extruders [1]. However, until now, it has not been possible to theoretically model this effect. This paper will thus introduce a mathematical model which describes the effect of internal screw tempering on the temperature gradient of the material in the extruder, allowing processes using tempered screws to be better designed and dimensioned.

  3. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. PMID:25869451

  4. Use of a Percutaneous Pointed Reduction Clamp Before Screw Fixation to Prevent Gapping of a Fifth Metatarsal Base Fracture: A Technique Tip.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eric W; Cata, Ezequiel; Schon, Lew C

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary screw fixation has become widely accepted as the standard of care for operative treatment of Jones fractures, allowing not only accelerated rehabilitation but also reduction of the risk of repeat fracture. The unique anatomy of the fifth metatarsal-mainly its inherent lateral curvature-makes fixation technically challenging. In general, surgical fixation should be performed with the largest screw possible, in both diameter and length, which will provide the strongest possible construct. However, an increased screw length and width have been associated with complications, including lateral gapping and distraction of the fracture site and malreduction of the fracture. The use of a pointed reduction clamp is a simple, yet effective, method of preventing iatrogenic displacement and gapping at the fracture site during placement of an intramedullary screw. Percutaneous reduction and stabilization of the fracture using this technique could help limit the complications associated with large screw fixation of Jones fractures. PMID:26188626

  5. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  6. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J. (Sandia Park, NM); Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-12

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  7. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an ?-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. PMID:25562758

  8. Abstract--The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) functions as a mechanical stabilizer in the tibiofemoral joint. Over

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    experiment, bovine joints were excised, cast in an agar gel matrix and externally compressed. In a second ultrasound or MRI images acquired before and after a Manuscript received May 2, 2005. This work was supported

  9. Biomechanical study of expandable pedicle screw fixation in severe osteoporotic bone comparing with conventional and cement-augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Long; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chou, Chi-Wei; Chen, Jou-Wen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Lai, Yu-Shu; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Shih-Tien

    2014-11-01

    Pedicle screws are widely utilized to treat the unstable thoracolumbar spine. The superior biomechanical strength of pedicle screws could increase fusion rates and provide accurate corrections of complex deformities. However, osteoporosis and revision cases of pedicle screw substantially reduce screw holding strength and cause loosening. Pedicle screw fixation becomes a challenge for spine surgeons in those scenarios. The purpose of this study was to determine if an expandable pedicle screw design could be used to improve biomechanical fixation in osteoporotic bone. Axial mechanical pull-out test was performed on the expandable, conventional and augmented pedicle screws placed in a commercial synthetic bone block which mimicked a human bone with severe osteoporosis. Results revealed that the pull-out strength and failure energy of expandable pedicle screws were similar with conventional pedicle screws augmented with bone cement by 2 ml. The pull-out strength was 5-fold greater than conventional pedicle screws and the failure energy was about 2-fold greater. Besides, the pull-out strength of expandable screw was reinforced by the expandable mechanism without cement augmentation, indicated that the risks of cement leakage from vertebral body would potentially be avoided. Comparing with the biomechanical performances of conventional screw with or without cement augmentation, the expandable screws are recommended to be applied for the osteoporotic vertebrae. PMID:24907127

  10. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  11. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  12. [Fracture of implant abutment screws and removal of a remaining screw piece].

    PubMed

    van den Broeke, S M; de Baat, C

    2008-07-01

    Fracture of the implant abutment screws is a complication which can render an implant useless. The prevalence of abutment screw fracture does not exceed 2.5% after 10 years. Causes are loosening of implant abutment screw, too few, too short or too narrow implants, implants not inserted perpendicular to the occlusal plane, improper suprastructure, too long free-ending parts of the suprastructure, improper occlusion concept, premature occlusal contacts, parafunctions, inadequate skills of the dentist, and fabrication failures. Methods of removing a fractured implant abutment screw piece are, among others, the use of a self-made screwdriver and the use of a service set available for the specific implant system. PMID:18686561

  13. Pedicle screw placement in the lumbar spine: effect of trajectory and screw design on acute biomechanical purchase.

    PubMed

    Wray, Steven; Mimran, Ronnie; Vadapalli, Sasidhar; Shetye, Snehal S; McGilvray, Kirk C; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Low bone mineral density in patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery with screws is an especially difficult challenge because poor bone quality can severely compromise the maximum achievable purchase of the screws. A relatively new technique, the cortical bone screw trajectory, utilizes a medialized trajectory in the caudocephalad direction to engage a greater amount of cortical bone within the pars interarticularis and pedicle. The objectives of this cadaveric biomechanical study were to 1) evaluate a cortical screw system and compare its mechanical performance to the traditional pedicle screw system; 2) determine differences in bone quality associated with the cortical screw trajectory versus the normal pedicle screw insertion technique; 3) determine the cortical wall breach rate with both the cortical and traditional screw trajectories; and 4) determine the performance of the traditional screw in the cortical screw trajectory. METHODS Fourteen fresh frozen human lumbar spine sections (L1-5) were used in this study (mean age 57 ± 19 years). The experimental plan involved drilling and tapping screw holes for 2 trajectories under navigation (a traditional pedicle screw and a cortical screw) in both high-and low-quality vertebrae, measuring the bone quality associated with these trajectories, placing screws in the trajectories, and evaluating the competence of the screw purchase via 2 mechanical tests (pullout and toggle). The 3 experimental variants were 1) traditional pedicle screws placed in the traditional pedicle screw trajectory, 2) traditional pedicle screws placed in the cortical screw trajectory, and 3) cortical screws placed in the cortical screw trajectory. RESULTS A statistically significant increase in bone quality was observed for the cortical trajectories with a cortical screw (42%; p < 0.001) and traditional pedicle screw (48%; p < 0.001) when compared to the traditional trajectory with a traditional pedicle screw within the high-quality bone group. These significant differences were also found in the lowquality bone cohort. All mechanical parameter comparisons (screw type and trajectory) between high-quality and lowquality samples were significant (p < 0.01), and these data were all linearly correlated (r ? 0.65) to bone mineral density. Not all mechanical parameters determined from pullout and toggle testing were statistically significant between the 3 screw/trajectory combinations. The incidence of cortical wall breach with the cortical or traditional pedicle screw trajectories was not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS The data demonstrated that the cortical trajectory provides denser bone that allows for utilization of smaller screws to obtain mechanical purchase that is equivalent to long pedicle screws placed in traditional pedicle screw trajectories for both normal- and low-quality bone. Overall, this biomechanical study in cadavers provides evidence that the cortical screw trajectory represents a good option to obtain fixation for the lumbar spine with low-quality bone. PMID:25679236

  14. Computation of Flow in Screw Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalitzin, Georgi; Cai, Xiaodan; Reba, Ramons; Medic, Gorazd

    2015-08-01

    A CFD model enabling accurate and computationally affordable simulation of unsteady flow in screw compressors has been developed. This paper focuses on computational aspects, including real-gas CFD using hybrid structured/unstructured moving grids, and specifics of grid generation for moving rotors and their communication with the discharge plenum.

  15. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  16. Improvements to the single screw extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiemenz, C.; Ziegmann, G.; Franzkoch, B.; Hoffmanns, W.; Michaeli, W.

    1977-01-01

    The extrusion on a single screw extruder is examined. The process is divided into several steps: the dosage of the materials to be conveyed; the modification of the shape of the feeding opening which influences the feeding process and consequently the throughput of the extruder; optimizing the shape of the feeding zone to meet the specific material requirements; and plasticizing and homogenizing.

  17. Computer simulation of screw dislocation in aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The atomic structure in a 110 screw dislocation core for aluminum is obtained by computer simulation. The lattice statics technique is employed since it entails no artificially imposed elastic boundary around the defect. The interatomic potential has no adjustable parameters and was derived from pseudopotential theory. The resulting atomic displacements were allowed to relax in all three dimensions.

  18. The role of hyaluronic acid in joint stability--a hypothesis for hip dysplasia and allied disorders.

    PubMed

    Cullis-Hill, D; Ghosh, P

    1987-06-01

    The concentration of hyaluronic acid (HA) and proteins in synovial fluids of hip and shoulder joints of a variety of canine breeds has been investigated. In the Australian Kelpie, a working dog with a low incidence of hip dysplasia, shoulder synovial fluid viscosity and HA concentration were higher than in similar joints of Alsatians in which hip dysplasia is relatively common. Moreover, the HA levels and viscosity in shoulder fluids of animals with clinically defined hip dysplasia were substantially lower than in all other breeds studied. On the basis of these findings, we propose that hip dysplasia and other joint abnormalities may arise as a consequence of a deficiency in the levels of HA in synovial fluids. PMID:3614011

  19. The screw-helical voltage gating of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Keynes, R D; Elinder, F

    1999-04-22

    In the voltage-gated ion channels of every animal, whether they are selective for K+, Na+ or Ca2+, the voltage sensors are the S4 transmembrane segments carrying four to eight positive charges always separated by two uncharged residues. It is proposed that they move across the membrane in a screw-helical fashion in a series of three or more steps that each transfer a single electronic charge. The unit steps are stabilized by ion pairing between the mobile positive charges and fixed negative charges, of which there are invariably two located near the inner ends of segments S2 and S3 and a third near the outer end of either S2 or S3. Opening of the channel involves three such steps in each domain. PMID:10343407

  20. The screw-helical voltage gating of ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, R D; Elinder, F

    1999-01-01

    In the voltage-gated ion channels of every animal, whether they are selective for K+, Na+ or Ca2+, the voltage sensors are the S4 transmembrane segments carrying four to eight positive charges always separated by two uncharged residues. It is proposed that they move across the membrane in a screw-helical fashion in a series of three or more steps that each transfer a single electronic charge. The unit steps are stabilized by ion pairing between the mobile positive charges and fixed negative charges, of which there are invariably two located near the inner ends of segments S2 and S3 and a third near the outer end of either S2 or S3. Opening of the channel involves three such steps in each domain. PMID:10343407

  1. [Tensile strength studies of self-cutting titanium osteosynthesis screws].

    PubMed

    Honke, W; Neumayer, B; Russ, A

    1992-12-01

    The tapping screws of the Medicon Osteosynthese System applied in the jaw and facial area were checked for their mechanical sturdiness. Screwing tests with bones and aluminium were carried out. The minimum fracture moment, the moment transferrable by the screw slot and the required moment for a tight seat of the Osteosynthese plate on the bone surface were calculated. The screws and plates are of titanium alloy TiA16V4 (US standard) for implantats. In a sample taken at random of test screws the fracture moments were measured and examined. All the screws support considerable loads and the fracture moments are almost 20% higher that the minimum fracture moment for TiA16V4 screws specified in DIN 267, part 18. PMID:1286145

  2. Chitosan-coated Stainless Steel Screws for Fixation in Contaminated Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Alex H.; Bumgardner, Joel D.; Yang, Yunzhi; Moseley, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Stainless steel screws and other internal fixation devices are used routinely to stabilize bacteria-contaminated bone fractures from multiple injury mechanisms. In this preliminary study, we hypothesize that a chitosan coating either unloaded or loaded with an antibiotic, gentamicin, could lessen or prevent these devices from becoming an initial nidus for infection. The questions investigated for this hypothesis were: (1) how much of the sterilized coating remains on the screw with simulated functional use; (2) is the unloaded or loaded chitosan coating bacteriostatic and biocompatible; and (3) what amount and rate does an antibiotic elute from the coating? In this study, the gentamicin eluted from the coating at a detectable level during 72 to 96 hours. The coating was retained at the 90% level in simulated bone screw fixation and the unloaded and loaded chitosan coatings had encouraging in vitro biocompatibility with fibroblasts and stem cells and were bacteriostatic against at least one strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The use of an antibiotic-loaded chitosan coating on stainless steel bone screws and internal fixation devices in contaminated bone fracture fixation may be considered after optimization of antibiotic loading and elution and more expanded in vitro and in vivo investigations with other organisms and antibiotics. PMID:18443893

  3. Screw Versus Plate Fixation for Chevron Osteotomy: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Boyd J; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2016-01-01

    The chevron osteotomy is a popular procedure used for the correction of moderate hallux abducto valgus deformity. Fixation is typically accomplished with Kirschner wires or bone screws; however, in cystic or osteoporotic bone, these could be inadequate, resulting in displacement of the capital fragment. We propose using a locking plate and interfragmental screw for fixation of the chevron osteotomy that could reduce the healing time and decrease the incidence of displacement. We performed a retrospective cohort study for chevron osteotomies on 75 feet (73 patients). The control groups underwent fixation with 1 screw in 30 feet (40%) and 2 screws in 30 feet (40%). A total of 15 feet (20%) were included in the locking plate and interfragmental screw group. The patients were followed up until bone healing was achieved at a median of 7 (range 6 to 14) weeks. Our hypothesis was that those treated with the locking plate and interfragmental screw would have a faster healing time and fewer incidents of capital fragment displacement compared with the 1- or 2-screw groups. The corresponding mean intervals to healing for the 1-screw group was 7.71 ± 1.28 (range 6 to 10) weeks, for the 2-screw group was 7.27 ± 1.57 (range 6 to 14) weeks, and for the locking plate and interfragmental screw group was 7.01 ± 1.00 (range 6 to 9) weeks. One case of capital fragment displacement occurred in the single screw group and one in the 2-screw group. No displacement occurred in the locking plate and interfragmental screw group. Neither finding was statistically significant. However, we believe the locking plate and interfragmental screw could be a viable option in patients with osteoporotic and cystic bone changes for correction of hallux abducto valgus. PMID:26277241

  4. Effect of a defect structure on the static and long-term strength of submicrocrystalline VT1-0 titanium fabricated by plastic deformation during screw and lengthwise rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betekhtin, V. I.; Kolobov, Yu. R.; Sklenicka, V.; Kadomtsev, A. G.; Narykova, M. V.; Dvorak, J.; Golosov, E. V.; Kardashev, B. K.; Kuz'menko, I. N.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of nanoporosity and the highly dispersed carbide particles that form during screw and lengthwise rolling of VT1-0 titanium on its mechanical and, partly, thermal stability characteristics is revealed and analyzed.

  5. Analysis of Rotor Contact for Screw Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameya, Hirotaka; Aoki, Masakazu; Nozawa, Shigekazu

    A reliability evaluation of meshing rotor surfaces needs contact theory on a micro size area. We propose a method to evaluate whether a screw compressor rotor has enough contact fatigue strength. The method is based on analyses of three dimensional curvatures and the Hertz contact pressure. At a contact point one of the principal curvatures directs the rotor's sealing line and this is calculated as the gap distribution. Another perpendicular curvature is calculated with an approximate arc to the rotor profile. As the contact point is an inflection point, the contact condition is first calculated on each side and then composed. Using our method we found the rotors of a typical screw compressor have enough strength. This is because the rotor contact pressure is calculated to be 0.57 times of a contact fatigue strength of their material.

  6. Joint swelling

    MedlinePLUS

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  7. Dual load path ball screw with rod end swivel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wngett, Paul (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A dual drive ball has a ball screw shaft coupled at one end to a gear train and coupled at the other end to a ball screw nut. The ball screw shaft and ball screw nut are connected through complementary helical grooves filled with ball bearing balls. The outer surface of the ball screw nut is plined and can be driven by a second gear train. An output tube is coupled at one end to the ball screw nut and at its opposite end has a connector portion with a groove on its inner surface. A rod end has a coupling member for coupling to a surface to be actuated and a shaft portion with a groobe on its outer surface. This shaft portion is received with in the outputtube portion and the corresponding grooves are coupled through the use of a plurality of ball bearing balls.

  8. Screws, Propellers and Fans Based on a Mobius Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Backley, Floyd D.; Gilinsky, Mikhail

    1998-01-01

    A Mobius strip concept is intended for improving the working efficiency of propellers and screws. Applications involve cooling, boat propellers, mixing in appliance, blenders, and helicopters. Several Mobius shaped screws for the average size kitchen mixers have been made and tested. The tests have shown that the mixer with the Mobius shaped screw pair is most efficient, and saves more than 30% of the electric power by comparison with the standard. The created video film about these tests illustrates efficiency of Mobius shaped screws.

  9. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    PubMed Central

    Kogias, Evangelos; Sircar, Ronen; Krüger, Marie T.; Volz, Florian; Scheiwe, Christian; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%). None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6%) after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726. PMID:26075297

  10. Friction-induced noise of gear system with lead screw and nut: Mode-coupling instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jaeyoung

    2015-11-01

    The mode-coupling instability in the gear system with a lead screw and nut is investigated. The actual gear geometry and the contact kinematics are developed in analytical the model. The complete set of vibration modes including axial, torsion and transverse displacements is applied to seek the solution of the linearized gear system. From the linear stability analysis, the bending mode pair as well as the torsion and axial mode pair have the strong tendency towards the mode-coupling instability. It points out that squeak noise in the lead screw system can occur even for a constant friction coefficient without the negative-friction velocity slope. The closed-form solution and numerical calculation also show that the rotating direction can drastically change the onset of mode-coupling instability.

  11. Mechanical and thermomechanical stability issues of 96.5SN-3.5AG solder joints in microelectronic packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong

    Flip chip technology is the ultimate solution for high performance and high density chip level interconnection. This thesis describes the investigation of using eutectic 96.5Sn-3.5Ag solder for flip chip applications. The principal components of the research include mechanical characterization, bumping process development, and finite element simulation for solder joint reliability. A novel solder bumping process was developed for wafer level fabrication of 96.5Sn-3.5Ag solder bumps. As a baseline process, an electroplating method was applied to fabricate the micro-scale solder bumps with 125-mum diameter, 250-mum pitch and approximately 80-mum height. Pre-deposition of solder bumps was carried out by electroplating over a fine-pattern photoresist mask. Rapid dissolution of Ag into Sn was accomplished during reflow and chip joining process. Nickel was selected as the diffusion barrier and wetting layer in the under-the-bump metallurgy (UBM). Microstructural and compositional analyses were performed using SEM and EDS. Three different mechanical testing techniques including tensile creep, lap shear creep, and automated ball indentation tests were used to characterize the mechanical deformation behavior of 96.5Sn-3.5Ag solder and solder joints. Constant-load creep tests on bulk specimens revealed a dislocation climb mechanism with a relatively large stress exponent of n = 10 for creep strain rates ranging from 10sp{-9} to 10sp{-3} and at temperatures ranging from 298K to 453K. The apparent activation energy for creep was found to be 0.57 ev. Lap shear creep tests on 96.5Sn-7.5Ag solder bumps also revealed a dislocation climb mechanism with a stress exponent of n = 10 for creep strain rates ranging from 10sp{-7} to 10sp{-4} at room temperature. In general, the solder joints are more creep resistant than the bulk specimen due to the inclusion of solder/base metal intermetallics. The intermetallic compounds may form precipitates or dispersoids in the solder matrix and thus hamper the creep deformation rate. The aspect ratio may also influence the creep deformation rate. A constitutive model is established which describes the mechanical deformation behavior of 96.5Sn-3.5Ag as a function of stress, time, and temperature. The constitutive equation was implemented in a two dimensional finite element model to study the solder joint reliability under a typical thermal cycling condition. The strain range values can be used in the Coffin-Manson equation for estimating the accelerating factors and thus to predict the life of a flip chip package. The methodology used in this investigation can be applied in the areas of solder mechanics, solder processing, and electronic packaging technologies.

  12. Single screw interrupted thread positive displacement mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boblitt, Wayne W.

    1992-07-01

    A single screw positive displacement compressor mechanism employing shallow gate rotor tooth penetration of the main rotor for purposes of reducing internal leakage and consequent compressor inefficiencies is presented. The invention is provided with an interrupted main rotor thread for purposes of insuring multiple gate rotor teeth meshing with the drive portion of the main rotor thread, thereby reducing gate rotor tooth flank loads in the compressor section of the device. Provision is also made for main rotor thread baffling between the main rotor chamber section and the mechanism inlet.

  13. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  14. Straight, semi-anatomic and anatomic TMJ implants: the influence of condylar geometry and bone fixation screws.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Completo, A; Relvas, C; Mesnard, M; Simões, J A

    2011-07-01

    A 3D finite element model of in vitro intact and implanted mandibles with different temporomandibular joints (TMJ) was analyzed. Three TMJ implant geometries were assessed. The displacements, stress and strain fields on the condyle were obtained for both simulated cases. Strains were also assessed near the screws that fixate the implant to the mandible. The geometry of the mandible was obtained through 3D digitalization of a synthetic model. The TMJ implants studied were modelled considering a commercial implant which was also used to create semi-anatomic and anatomic implants that were analyzed and to assess the influence of the geometry. Numerical finite element models were built and the implants were positioned by an experienced orofacial surgeon. All implants were fixed by four screws which were placed in the same position on the mandible. The boundary conditions were simulated considering the support on the incisive tooth, the loads of the five most important muscular forces and a 5mm mouth aperture. This study indicates that the deformation on the intact mandible was similar when an anatomic implant was considered in the implanted mandible. However, the anatomic geometry presented some problems concerning the implant integrity due to geometric variations. The geometry of TMJ implant also played a role relatively to the screws structural integration and bone fixation. The geometry of TMJ implant defines the necessary number of screws and position in the mandible fixation. PMID:20801667

  15. Periodic Stresses in Gyroscopic Bodies, with Applications to Air Screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1918-01-01

    Report discusses periodic stresses in gyroscopic bodies with applications to air screws caused by particle mass. Report concludes that all modern air screws obey the laws found for plane groups of particles. In particular the two-bladers exert on the shaft a rhythmic gyroscopic torque; the multibladers a steady one; both easily calculable for any given conditions of motion and mass distribution.

  16. Introduction High-shear wet granulation by twin screw extrusion

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    1 Introduction High-shear wet granulation by twin screw extrusion machinery is an emerging and compaction16,17 . Wet granulation in a twin screw extruder is particularly useful with many screwdesign1,11,12 ,machinetype2 ,auxiliaryequipmentcon- figuration11 , and feeding strategies of all

  17. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique. PMID:25402966

  18. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hypermobile joints have an increased risk for joint dislocation and other problems. Extra care may be needed ... the joint? Is there any history of joint dislocation, difficulty walking, or difficulty using the arms? Further ...

  19. On interlayer stability and high-cycle simulator performance of diamond-like carbon layers for articulating joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Thorwarth, Kerstin; Thorwarth, Götz; Figi, Renato; Weisse, Bernhard; Stiefel, Michael; Hauert, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings have been proven to be an excellent choice for wear reduction in many technical applications. However, for successful adaption to the orthopaedic field, layer performance, stability and adhesion in physiologically relevant setups are crucial and not consistently investigated. In vitro wear testing as well as adequate corrosion tests of interfaces and interlayers are of great importance to verify the long term stability of DLC coated load bearing implants in the human body. DLC coatings were deposited on articulating lumbar spinal disks made of CoCr28Mo6 biomedical implant alloy using a plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) process. As an adhesion promoting interlayer, tantalum films were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Wear tests of coated and uncoated implants were performed in physiological solution up to a maximum of 101 million articulation cycles with an amplitude of ±2° and -3/+6° in successive intervals at a preload of 1200 N. The implants were characterized by gravimetry, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and cross section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. It is shown that DLC coated surfaces with uncontaminated tantalum interlayers perform very well and no corrosive or mechanical failure could be observed. This also holds true in tests featuring overload and third-body wear by cortical bone chips present in the bearing pairs. Regarding the interlayer tolerance towards interlayer contamination (oxygen), limits for initiation of potential failure modes were established. It was found that mechanical failure is the most critical aspect and this mode is hypothetically linked to the ?-? tantalum phase switch induced by increasing oxygen levels as observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is concluded that DLC coatings are a feasible candidate for near zero wear articulations on implants, potentially even surpassing the performance of ceramic vs. ceramic. PMID:24921709

  20. On Interlayer Stability and High-Cycle Simulator Performance of Diamond-Like Carbon Layers for Articulating Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Thorwarth, Kerstin; Thorwarth, Götz; Figi, Renato; Weisse, Bernhard; Stiefel, Michael; Hauert, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings have been proven to be an excellent choice for wear reduction in many technical applications. However, for successful adaption to the orthopaedic field, layer performance, stability and adhesion in physiologically relevant setups are crucial and not consistently investigated. In vitro wear testing as well as adequate corrosion tests of interfaces and interlayers are of great importance to verify the long term stability of DLC coated load bearing implants in the human body. DLC coatings were deposited on articulating lumbar spinal disks made of CoCr28Mo6 biomedical implant alloy using a plasma-activated chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) process. As an adhesion promoting interlayer, tantalum films were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Wear tests of coated and uncoated implants were performed in physiological solution up to a maximum of 101 million articulation cycles with an amplitude of ±2° and ?3/+6° in successive intervals at a preload of 1200 N. The implants were characterized by gravimetry, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and cross section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. It is shown that DLC coated surfaces with uncontaminated tantalum interlayers perform very well and no corrosive or mechanical failure could be observed. This also holds true in tests featuring overload and third-body wear by cortical bone chips present in the bearing pairs. Regarding the interlayer tolerance towards interlayer contamination (oxygen), limits for initiation of potential failure modes were established. It was found that mechanical failure is the most critical aspect and this mode is hypothetically linked to the ?-? tantalum phase switch induced by increasing oxygen levels as observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is concluded that DLC coatings are a feasible candidate for near zero wear articulations on implants, potentially even surpassing the performance of ceramic vs. ceramic. PMID:24921709

  1. Feasibility of C2 Vertebra Screws Placement in Patient With Occipitalization of Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Li, Xueshi; Chen, Jianting; Wu, Zenghui; Zhu, Qingan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Occipitalization of atlas (OA) is a congenital disease with the possibility of anomalous bony anatomies and the C2 pedicle screw insertion is technically challenging. However, there are no existing literatures clarified the dimensions and angulations of the C2 pedicles, lamina and lateral masses for screw insertion in patients with OA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the morphometric features of C2 for screw placement in OA to guide the use of surgical screws. Measurements of the OA patients on the computer tomography (CT) images including lamina angle, length and thickness, pedicle angle, length and thickness, and lateral mass thickness and length of the axis vertebra. The OA patients data were compared with age and gender matched cohort of randomly selected patients in a control group without OA. The picture archiving and communication system was used for all patients who had received cervical CT scanning between January 2001 and January 2015. Measurements were performed independently by 2 experienced observers who reviewed the CT scans and recorded the patients with OA. Statistical analysis was performed at a level of significance P?stabilization as the C2 bony architectures are significantly smaller than normal. Anatomically, translaminar screw is a more viable option in comparison with pedicle screw for C2 fixation in OA. Nevertheless, the suitability should be fully assessed prior to surgery. PMID:26376390

  2. Lateral Movement of Screw Dislocations During Homoepitaxial Growth and Devices Yielded Therefrom Free of the Detrimental Effects of Screw Dislocations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention is related to a method that enables and improves wide bandgap homoepitaxial layers to be grown on axis single crystal substrates, particularly SiC. The lateral positions of the screw dislocations in epitaxial layers are predetermined instead of random, which allows devices to be reproducibly patterned to avoid performance degrading crystal defects normally created by screw dislocations.

  3. Effect of DDGS, Moisture Content, and Screw Speed on the Physical Properties of Extrudates in Single Screw Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three isocaloric (3.5 kcal/g) ingredient blends containing 20, 30, and 40% (wb) DDGS along with soy flour, corn flour, fish meal, mineral and vitamin mix, with the net protein adjusted to 28% (wb) for all blends, were extruded in a single screw laboratory-scale extruder at screw speeds of 100, 130, ...

  4. Finite Element Analysis of a New Pedicle Screw-Plate System for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is increasingly popular for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar disc diseases. The constructs intended for segmental stability are varied in MI-TLIF. We adopted finite element (FE) analysis to compare the stability after different construct fixations using interbody cage with posterior pedicle screw-rod or pedicle screw-plate instrumentation system. Methods A L3–S1 FE model was modified to simulate decompression and fusion at L4–L5 segment. Fixation modes included unilateral plate (UP), unilateral rod (UR), bilateral plate (BP), bilateral rod (BR) and UP+UR fixation. The inferior surface of the S1 vertebra remained immobilized throughout the load simulation, and a bending moment of 7.5 Nm with 400N pre-load was applied on the L3 vertebra to recreate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Range of motion (ROM) and Von Mises stress were evaluated for intact and instrumentation models in all loading planes. Results All reconstructive conditions displayed decreased motion at L4–L5. The pedicle screw-plate system offered equal ROM to pedicle screw-rod system in unilateral or bilateral fixation modes respectively. Pedicle screw stresses for plate system were 2.2 times greater than those for rod system in left lateral bending under unilateral fixation. Stresses for plate were 3.1 times greater than those for rod in right axial rotation under bilateral fixation. Stresses on intervertebral graft for plate system were similar to rod system in unilateral and bilateral fixation modes respectively. Increased ROM and posterior instrumentation stresses were observed in all loading modes with unilateral fixation compared with bilateral fixation in both systems. Conclusions Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion augmentation with pedicle screw-plate system fixation increases fusion construct stability equally to the pedicle screw-rod system. Increased posterior instrumentation stresses are observed in all loading modes with plate fixation, and bilateral fixation could reduce stress concentration. PMID:26649749

  5. Basic study for ultrasound-based navigation for pedicle screw insertion using transmission and backscattered methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziqiang; Wu, Bing; Zhai, Xiao; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Luo, Beier; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Xu, Kailiang; Liu, Chengcheng; Wang, Chuanfeng; Zhao, Yingchuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Chen, Kai; Yang, Wu; Ta, Dean; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the acoustic properties of human vertebral cancellous bone and to study the feasibility of ultrasound-based navigation for posterior pedicle screw fixation in spinal fusion surgery. Fourteen human vertebral specimens were disarticulated from seven un-embalmed cadavers (four males, three females, 73.14 ± 9.87 years, two specimens from each cadaver). Seven specimens were used to measure the transmission, including tests of attenuation and phase velocity, while the other seven specimens were used for backscattered measurements to inspect the depth of penetration and A-Mode signals. Five pairs of unfocused broadband ultrasonic transducers were used for the detection, with center frequencies of 0.5 MHz, 1 MHz, 1.5 MHz, 2.25 MHz, and 3.5 MHz. As a result, good and stable results were documented. With increased frequency, the attenuation increased (P<0.05), stability of the speed of sound improved (P<0.05), and penetration distance decreased (P>0.05). At about 0.6 cm away from the cortical bone, warning signals were easily observed from the backscattered measurements. In conclusion, the ultrasonic system proved to be an effective, moveable, and real-time imaging navigation system. However, how ultrasonic navigation will benefit pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery needs to be determined. Therefore, ultrasound-guided pedicle screw implantation is theoretically effective and promising. PMID:25861053

  6. CT-based morphometric analysis of C1 laminar dimensions: C1 translaminar screw fixation is a feasible technique for salvage of atlantoaxial fusions

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Andrew; Lu, Derek; Lu, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Translaminar screw fixation has become an alternative in the fixation of the axial and subaxial cervical spine. We report utilization of this approach in the atlas as a salvage technique for atlantoaxial stabilization when C1 lateral mass screws are precluded. To assess the feasibility of translaminar fixation at the atlas, we have characterized the dimensions of the C1 lamina in the general adult population using computed tomography (CT)-based morphometry. Methods: A 46-year-old male with symptomatic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum underwent bilateral C1 and C2 translaminar screw/rod fixation as C1 lateral mass fixation was precluded by an anomalous vertebral artery. The follow-up evaluation 2½ years postoperatively revealed an asymptomatic patient without recurrent neck/shoulder pain or clinical signs of instability. To better assess the feasibility of utilizing this approach in the general population, we retrospectively analyzed 502 consecutive cervical CT scans performed over a 3-month period in patients aged over 18 years at a single institution. Measurements of C1 bicortical diameter, bilateral laminar length, height, and angulation were performed. Laminar and screw dimensions were compared to assess instrumentation feasibility. Results: Review of CT imaging found that 75.9% of C1 lamina had a sufficient bicortical diameter, and 63.7% of C1 lamina had sufficient height to accept bilateral translaminar screw placement. Conclusions: CT-based measurement of atlas morphology in the general population revealed that a majority of C1 lamina had sufficient dimensions to accept translaminar screw placement. Although these screws appear to be a feasible alternative when lateral mass screws are precluded, further research is required to determine if they provide comparable fixation strength versus traditional instrumentation methods. PMID:26005585

  7. Experimental trial on surgical treatment for transverse fractures of the proximal phalanx: technique using intramedullary conical compression screw versus lateral compression plate?

    PubMed Central

    Ibanez, Daniel Schneider; Rodrigues, Fabio Lucas; Salviani, Rafael Salmeron; Roberto, Fernando Augusto Reginatto; Pengo Junior, Jose Roberto; Aita, Marcio Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the mechanical parameters between two methods for stabilization through compression: 1.5 mm axial compression plate versus conical compression screw used as an intramedullary tutor. Methods Polyurethane models (Sawbone®) that simulated transverse fractures of the proximal phalanx were used. The models were divided into three groups: lateral plate, conical screw and no implant. Results Greater force was needed to result in fatigue in the synthesis using an intramedullary plate. Thus, this model was proven to be mechanically superior to the model with the lateral plate. Conclusion Stabilization using the Acutrak® screw for treating fractures in the model used in this trial presents mechanical results that are statistically significantly superior to those from the axial compression technique using the lateral plate (Aptus Hand®). PMID:26535195

  8. SCREW COMPRESSOR CHARACTERISTICS FOR HELIUM REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter; Creel, Jonathan; Arenius, Dana; Casagrande, Fabio; Howell, Matt

    2008-03-01

    The oil injected screw compressors have practically replaced all other types of compressors in modern helium refrigeration systems due to their large displacement capacity, minimal vibration, reliability and capability of handling helium's high heat of compression.At the present state of compressor system designs for helium systems, typically two-thirds of the lost input power is due to the compression system. Therefore it is important to understand the isothermal and volumetric efficiencies of these machines to help properly design these compression systems to match the refrigeration process. This presentation summarizes separate tests that have been conducted on Sullair compressors at the Superconducting Super-Collider Laboratory (SSCL) in 1993, Howden compressors at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in 2006 and Howden compressors at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in 2006. This work is part of an ongoing study at JLab to understand the theoretical basis for these efficiencies and their loss

  9. Dynamic-locking-screw (DLS)–leads to less secondary screw perforations in proximal humerus fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of reduction and screw perforation causes high failure rates in the treatment of proximal humerus fractures. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the early postoperative complications using modern Dynamic Locking Screws (DLS 3.7) for plating of proximal humerus fractures. Methods Between 03/2009 and 12/2010, 64 patients with acute proximal humerus fractures were treated by angular stable plate fixation using DLSs in a limited multi-centre study. Follow-up examinations were performed three, six, twelve and twenty-four weeks postoperatively and any complications were carefully collected. Results 56 of 64 patients were examined at the six-month follow-up. Complications were observed in 12 patients (22%). In five cases (9%), a perforation of the DLS 3.7 occurred. Conclusions Despite the use of modern DLS 3.7, the early complications after plating of proximal humerus fractures remain high. The potential advantage of the DLS 3.7 regarding secondary screw perforation has to be confirmed by future randomized controlled trials. PMID:24894637

  10. Parametric Analysis of Orthopedic Screws in Relation to Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Salaorno, Massimiliano; Grasso, Giovanni; Audenino, Alberto L

    2009-01-01

    A global study of geometry and material properties of orthopedic screws was performed, considering not only the effect of each single factor (screw pitch, number of threads, fillet angle, etc.) but also their interactions with respect to bone density. The stress patterns resulting from different screw geometries and bone densities were analyzed using finite element techniques, taking into account different levels of osseointegration between the screw and the bone. These numerical models where validated through experimental pull-out tests, where a pull out force of 120 N produced localized failure of the last thread (stresses above 0.42 MPa). The results of the numerical simulations were then summarised using a multi-factorial parametric analysis. This demonstrated the great relevance of the interaction between bone density and screw pitch, showing that the optimal screw pitch can vary by more than 25% for different densities (0.35 g/cm3 and 0.47 g/cm3, respectively). The parameters calculated by means of the multi-factorial analysis allow the pull out force to be estimated for different osseointegration levels, different screw geometries and material properties, and for different bone densities. The final objective is to determine the best choice of implant for each individual patient. PMID:19587807

  11. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kova?evi?, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  12. Midline Lumbar Fusion with Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Masaki; KURAISHI, Keita; UMEDA, Yasuyuki; SANO, Takanori; TSUJI, Masanori; SUZUKI, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    A novel cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique provides an alternative fixation technique for lumbar spine. Trajectory of CBT screw creates a caudo-cephalad path in sagittal plane and a medio-lateral path in axial plane, and engages cortical bone in the pedicle. The theoretical advantage is that it provides enhanced screw grip and interface strength. Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) is composed of posterior mid-line approach, microsurgical laminectomy, and CBT screw fixation. We adopted the MIDLF technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Advantages of this technique include that decompression and fusion are available in the same field, and it minimizes approach-related damages. To determine whether MIDLF with CBT screw is as effective as traditional approach and it is minimum invasive technique, we studied the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIDLF. Our results indicate that MIDLF is effective and minimum invasive technique. Evidence of effectiveness of MIDLF is that patients had good recovery score, and that CBT screw technique was safety in clinical and stable in radiological. MIDLF with CBT screw provides the surgeon with additional options for fixation. This technique is most likely to be useful for treating lumbar spondylolisthesis in combination with midline decompression and insertion of an interbody graft, such as the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar interbody fusion techniques. PMID:25169139

  13. Metal artifacts from titanium and steel screws in CT, 1.5T and 3T MR images of the tibial Pilon: a quantitative assessment in 3D.

    PubMed

    Radzi, Shairah; Cowin, Gary; Robinson, Mark; Pratap, Jit; Volp, Andrew; Schuetz, Michael A; Schmutz, Beat

    2014-06-01

    Radiographs are commonly used to assess articular reduction of the distal tibia (pilon) fractures postoperatively, but may reveal malreductions inaccurately. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) are potential three-dimensional (3D) alternatives they generate metal-related artifacts. This study aims to quantify the artifact size from orthopaedic screws using CT, 1.5T and 3T MRI data. Three screws were inserted into one intact human cadaver ankle specimen proximal to and along the distal articular surface, then CT, 1.5T and 3T MRI scanned. Four types of screws were investigated: titanium alloy (TA), stainless steel (SS) (Ø =3.5 mm), cannulated TA (CTA) and cannulated SS (CSS) (Ø =4.0 mm, Ø empty core =2.6 mm). 3D artifact models were reconstructed using adaptive thresholding. The artifact size was measured by calculating the perpendicular distance from the central screw axis to the boundary of the artifact in four anatomical directions with respect to the distal tibia. The artifact sizes (in the order of TA, SS, CTA and CSS) from CT were 2.0, 2.6, 1.6 and 2.0 mm; from 1.5T MRI they were 3.7, 10.9, 2.9, and 9 mm; and 3T MRI they were 4.4, 15.3, 3.8, and 11.6 mm respectively. Therefore, CT can be used as long as the screws are at a safe distance of about 2 mm from the articular surface. MRI can be used if the screws are at least 3 mm away from the articular surface except for SS and CSS. Artifacts from steel screws were too large thus obstructed the pilon from being visualised in MRI. Significant differences (P<0.05) were found in the size of artifacts between all imaging modalities, screw types and material types, except 1.5T versus 3T MRI for the SS screws (P=0.063). CTA screws near the joint surface can improve postoperative assessment in CT and MRI. MRI presents a favourable non-ionising alternative when using titanium hardware. Since these factors may influence the quality of postoperative assessment, potential improvements in operative techniques should be considered. PMID:24914417

  14. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Posterior C1-C2 Transarticular Screw Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Jose C. Gonzalez-Llanos, Francisco

    2005-01-15

    We present a case of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after a posterior C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation procedure that was effectively treated with endovascular coil occlusion. Vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm complicating posterior C1-C2 transarticular fixation is extremely rare, with only one previous case having been reported previously. Endovascular occlusion is better achieved in the subacute phase of the pseudoaneurysm, when the wall of the pseudoaneurysm has matured and stabilized. Further follow-up angiographies are mandatory in order to confirm that there is no recurrence of the lesion.

  15. Intersection of screw dislocations in fcc crystals during torsional deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myshlyaev, M. M.

    2012-03-01

    Dislocation reactions, including dislocation intersections during various processes in crystals, play an important and often crucial role. This is most pronounced during plastic deformation of crystalline solids, which attracts particular interest from researchers. Intersection of screw dislocations in fcc crystals during their deformation by uniaxial tension and compression was studied by A. Cottrell [1]. It was shown that the intersection of similar screw dislocations moving toward each other results in the formation of interstitial thresholds on them; in the case of intersection of opposite screw dislocations, vacancy thresholds are formed on them.

  16. Vibration analysis of three-screw pumps under pressure loads and rotor contact forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wanyou; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Chuan; Lu, Xiqun; Shuai, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Two main vibration sources in three-screw pumps, the fluid exciting force and the screw contact force, are studied to provide the basis for vibration control in this paper. A fluid exciting force model and a screw contact model are proposed to calculate these forces. An experimental test is carried out to obtain the vibration response of a three-screw pump. A calibrated finite element model of the three-screw pump is used to verify the vibration response under the fluid exciting force and the screw contact force obtained from the proposed models. The results show that the screw contact force is more dominant than the fluid exciting force.

  17. Disorders of the sacroiliac joint.

    PubMed

    Sizer, Phillip S; Phelps, Valerie; Thompsen, Kirk

    2002-03-01

    Controversies have surrounded the sacroiliac joint. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a considerably complex and strong joint with limited mobility, mechanically serving as a force transducer and a shock absorber. Anatomical changes are seen in the SIJ throughout an individual's lifetime. The ligamentous system associated with the SIJ serves to enhance stability and offer proprioceptive feedback in context with the rich plexus of articular receptors. Stability in the SIJ is related to form and force closure. Movement in the SIJ is 3-D about an axis outside of the joint. The functional examination of the SIJ is related to a clinical triad. PMID:17134467

  18. 21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER TORQUE WRENCH FOR ASSEMBLY AND REPAIR OF BOTH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3070 Pedicle screw spinal system. ...22Cr-13Ni-5Mn stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and unalloyed titanium, that allow the surgeon to build an implant...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3070 Pedicle screw spinal system. ...22Cr-13Ni-5Mn stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and unalloyed titanium, that allow the surgeon to build an implant...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3070 Pedicle screw spinal system. ...22Cr-13Ni-5Mn stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and unalloyed titanium, that allow the surgeon to build an implant...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3070 Pedicle screw spinal system. ...22Cr-13Ni-5Mn stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and unalloyed titanium, that allow the surgeon to build an implant...

  3. Screw pumps cost effective for heavy crude operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.R. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports that in petroleum production, screw pumps fulfill the requirements for pumping crude oil with an API gravity of 20[degrees] or less (0.93 sp gr or greater). In many cases, these pumps provide more efficiency than centrifugal and reciprocating pumps. Heavy crude oils typically have viscosities at pumping temperatures in excess of 500 SSU (100 cSt). While screw pumps can handle viscosities ranging from fractional centistokes to millions of centistokes, the normal range for crude oil, from cost and efficiency viewpoints, is above 100 SSU (20 cSt). Bitumens can also be handled by screw pumps. Invented in 1922, rotary, positive-displacement multiple-screw pumps have been used for pumping fuel for burning, lubricating oil, fluid power, process feed, food, chemicals, synthetic-fiber slurries, general transfer, and many other applications.

  4. Screw Instability and Blandford-Znajek Mechanism

    E-print Network

    Li-Xin Li

    2000-01-25

    When magnetic field lines thread a rotating black hole's horizon and connect with remote astrophysical loads, the rotational energy of the black hole can be extracted through the Blandford-Znajek mechanism. Due to the rotation of the black hole, the magnetic field lines are twisted and toroidal components are generated. So poloidal electric currents are induced and the black hole's rotational energy is transported to the astrophysical loads through Poynting flux. The Blandford-Znajek mechanism has been considered to be a possible process for powering extragalactic jets. In this paper we show that due to the screw instability of magnetic field, the toroidal components of the magnetic field, and thus the poloidal currents, cannot exceed the limits given by the Kruskal-Shafranov criterion. This significantly lowers the power of the Blandford-Znajek mechanism when the loads are far from the black hole. So the Blandford-Znajek mechanism can only work efficiently within the neighborhood of the black hole. The implications of the results for the scenario of extragalactic jets powered by the Blandford-Znajek mechanism are discussed.

  5. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  6. Solid and hollow pedicle screws affect the electrical resistance: A potential source of error with stimulus-evoked electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Liao, Xinhua; Ma, Xianguang; Li, Changqing; Han, Jianda; Zhou, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although stimulus evoked electromyography (EMG) is commonly used to confirm the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. There are no studies to differentiate between solid screws and hollow screws to the electrical resistance of pedicle screws. We speculate that the electrical resistance of the solid and hollow pedicle screws may be different and then a potential source of error with stimulus-evoked EMG may happen. Materials and Methods: Resistance measurements were obtained from 12 pedicle screw varieties (6 screws of each manufacturer) across the screw shank based on known constant current and measured voltage. The voltage was measured 5 times at each site. Results: Resistance of all solid screws ranged from 0.084 ? to 0.151 ? (mean =0.118 ± 0.024 ?) and hollow screws ranged from 0.148 ? to 0.402 ? (mean = 0.285 ± 0.081 ?). There was a significant difference of resistance between the solid screws and hollow screws (P < 0.05). The screw with the largest diameter no matter solid screws or hollow screws had lower resistance than screws with other diameters. No matter in solid screws group or hollow screws group, there were significant differences (P < 0.05) between the 5.0 mm screws and 6.0 mm screws, 6.0 mm screws and 7.0 mm screws, 5.0 mm screws and 7.0 mm screws, 4.5 mm screws and 5.5 mm screws, 5.5 mm screws and 6.5 mm screws, 4.5 mm screws and 6.5 mm screws. The resistance of hollow screws was much larger than the solid screws in the same diameter group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Hollow pedicle screws have the potential for high electrical resistance compared to the solid pedicle screws and therefore may affect the EMG response during stimulus-evoked EMG testing in pedicle screw fixation especially in minimally invasive percutaneous pedical screw fixation surgery. PMID:23960278

  7. Role of Dynesys as Pedicle-Based Nonfusion Stabilization for Degenerative Disc Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Neel; Baron, Eli M.

    2012-01-01

    Posterior nonfusion pedicle-screw-based stabilization remains a controversial area of spine surgery. To date, the Dynesys system remains the most widely implanted posterior nonfusion pedicle screw system. We review the history of Dynesys and discuss clinical outcome studies and biomechanical evaluations regarding the Dynesys system. Indications for surgery and controversies are discussed. Recommendations are made regarding technical implantation. PMID:23326673

  8. Investigation of an 11mm diameter twin screw granulator: Screw element performance and in-line monitoring via image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Ridade; Martinez-Marcos, Laura; Osorio, Juan G; Cruise, Paul; Jones, Ian; Halbert, Gavin W; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Litster, James D

    2015-12-30

    As twin screw granulation (TSG) provides one with many screw element options, characterization of each screw element is crucial in optimizing the screw configuration in order to obtain desired granule attributes. In this study, the performance of two different screw elements - distributive feed screws and kneading elements - was studied in an 11mm TSG at different liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios. The kneading element configuration was found to break large granules more efficiently, leading to narrower granule size distributions. While pharmaceutical industry shifts toward continuous manufacturing, inline monitoring and process control are gaining importance. Granules from an 11mm TSG were analysed using the Eyecon™, a real-time high speed direct imaging system, which has been used to capture accurate particle size distribution and particle count. The size parameters and particle count were then assessed in terms of their ability to be a suitable control measure using the Shewhart control charts. d10 and particle count were found to be good indicators of the change in L/S ratio. However, d50 and d90 did not reflect the change, due to their inherent variability even when the process is at steady state. PMID:26385406

  9. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Jy-Jiunn; Wu, Ting-Lin; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA) to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide. PMID:26466309

  10. Pullout performance comparison of pedicle screws based on cement application and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Tolunay, Tolga; Ba?gül, Cemile; Demir, Teyfik; Yaman, Mesut E; Arslan, Arslan K

    2015-11-01

    Pedicle screws are the main fixation devices for certain surgeries. Pedicle screw loosening is a common problem especially for osteoporotic incidents. Cannulated screws with cement augmentation are widely used for that kind of cases. Dual lead dual cored pedicle screw has already given promising pullout values without augmentation. This study concentrates on the usage of dual lead dual core with cement augmentation as an alternative to cannulated and standard pedicle screws with cement augmentation. Five groups (dual lead dual core, normal pedicle screw and cannulated pedicle screw with augmentation, normal pedicle screw, dual lead dual cored pedicle screw) were designed for this study. Healthy bovine vertebrae and synthetic polyurethane foams (grade 20) were used as embedding test medium. Test samples were prepared in accordance with surgical guidelines and ASTM F543 standard testing protocols. Pullout tests were conducted with Instron 3300 testing frame. Load versus displacement values were recorded and maximum pullout loads were stated. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation exhibited the highest pullout values, while dual lead dual cored pedicle screw demonstrated similar pullout strength as cannulated pedicle screw and normal pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation can be used for osteoporotic and/or severe osteoporotic patients according to its promising results on animal cadaver and synthetic foams. PMID:26503840

  11. Placement of C1 Pedicle Screws Using Minimal Exposure: Radiographic, Clinical, and Literature Validation

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Christopher M.; Nixon, Menarvia K.C.; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil; Sin, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional C1-2 fixation involves placement of C1 lateral mass screws. Evolving techniques have led to the placement of C1 pedicle screws to avoid exposure of the C1-C2 joint capsule. Our minimal dissection technique utilizes anatomical landmarks with isolated exposure of C2 and the inferior posterior arch of C1. We evaluate this procedure clinically and radiographically through a technical report. Methods Consecutive cases of cranial-vertebral junction surgery were reviewed for one fellowship trained spinal surgeon from 2008-2014. Information regarding sex, age, indication for surgery, private or public hospital, intra-operative complications, post-operative neurological deterioration, death, and failure of fusion was extracted. Measurement of pre-operative axial and sagittal CT scans were performed for C1 pedicle width and C1 posterior arch height respectively. Results 64 patients underwent posterior cranio-vertebral junction fixation surgery. 40 of these patients underwent occipital-cervical fusion procedures. 7/9 (77.8%) C1 instrumentation cases were from trauma with the remaining two (22.2%) from oncologic lesions. The average blood loss among isolated C1-C2 fixation was 160cc. 1/9 patients (11.1%) suffered pedicle breech requiring sub-laminar wiring at the C1 level. On radiographic measurement, the average height of the C1 posterior arch was noted at 4.3mm (range 3.8mm to 5.7mm). The average width of the C1 pedicle measured at 5.3mm (range 2.8 to 8.7mm). The patient with C1 pedicle screw failure had a pedicle width of 2.78mm on pre-operative axial CT imaging. Conclusion Our study directly adds to the literature with level four evidence supporting a minimal dissection of C1 arch in the placement of C1 pedicle screws with both radiographic and clinical validation. Clinical Relevance Justification of this technique avoids C2 nerve root manipulation or sacrifice, reduces bleeding associated with the venous plexus, and leaves the third segment of the vertebral artery unexplored. Pre-operative review of imaging is critical in the placement of C1-C2 instrumentation. PMID:26484006

  12. Proximal interphalangeal arthrodesis in the horse. A retrospective study and a modified screw technique.

    PubMed

    Caron, J P; Fretz, P B; Bailey, J V; Barber, S M

    1990-01-01

    Arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint was used to treat lameness resulting from osteoarthrosis and for closed subluxation in 35 horses. Six horses had bilateral arthrodeses. Several conventional internal fixation techniques and a three converging screw method were used. Criteria for success included the horse performing its previous or intended athletic activity and the owner being satisfied with the outcome. Using these criteria, a successful outcome was obtained in 65% of the 26 animals in which adequate follow-up was available. A successful outcome was observed in four of six horses with bilateral arthrodeses. The internal fixation technique used did not influence the success rate, and the duration of postoperative casting was similar in successful and unsuccessful cases. The success rate of proximal interphalangeal arthrodeses was 46% in the fore limbs and 83% in the hind limbs. Complications included infection, cast ulcers, bone or implant failure, implant loosening, and laminitis. PMID:2349775

  13. Adaptive backstepping sliding mode control of flexible ball screw drives with time-varying parametric uncertainties and disturbances.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Tang, Wen Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method to model and design servo controllers for flexible ball screw drives with dynamic variations. A mathematical model describing the structural flexibility of the ball screw drive containing time-varying uncertainties and disturbances with unknown bounds is proposed. A mode-compensating adaptive backstepping sliding mode controller is designed to suppress the vibration. The time-varying uncertainties and disturbances represented in finite-term Fourier series can be estimated by updating the Fourier coefficients through function approximation technique. Adaptive laws are obtained from Lyapunov approach to guarantee the convergence and stability of the closed loop system. The simulation results indicate that the tracking accuracy is improved considerably with the proposed scheme when the time-varying parametric uncertainties and disturbances exist. PMID:24053935

  14. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  15. Comparison of Pedicle Screw Loosening Mechanisms and the Effect on Fixation Strength.

    PubMed

    Mehmanparast, Hedayeh; Petit, Yvan; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Screw loosening is a common complication in spinal fixation using pedicle screws which may lead to loss of correction and revision surgery. The mechanisms of pedicle screw loosening are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the pedicle screw pullout force and stiffness subsequent or not to multidirectional cyclic bending load (toggling). Pedicle screws inserted into porcine lumbar vertebrae underwent toggling in craniocaudal (CC), mediolateral (ML) directions, and no toggling (NT) before pullout. This study suggests that toggling and in particular CC toggling should be included in biomechanical evaluation of pedicle screw fixation strength. PMID:26502116

  16. Numerical simulation of a twin screw expander for performance prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing use of twin screw expanders in waste heat recovery applications, the performance prediction of these machines plays an important role. This paper presents a mathematical model for calculating the performance of a twin screw expander. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State in the instantaneous control volumes. Different flow processes that occur inside the screw expander such as filling (accompanied by a substantial pressure loss) and leakage flows through the clearances are accounted for in the model. The mathematical model employs all geometrical parameters such as chamber volume, suction and leakage areas. With R245fa as working fluid, the Aungier Redlich-Kwong Equation of State has been used in order to include real gas effects. To calculate the mass flow rates through the leakage paths formed inside the screw expander, flow coefficients are considered as constant and they are derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic calculations at given working conditions and applied to all other working conditions. The outcome of the mathematical model is the P-V indicator diagram which is compared to CFD results of the same twin screw expander. Since CFD calculations require significant computational time, developed mathematical model can be used for the faster performance prediction.

  17. Effect of angular stability and other locking parameters on the mechanical performance of intramedullary nails.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Stefanie; Gerber, Claus; von Oldenburg, Geert; Kessler, Manuel; Stephan, Daniel; Augat, Peter

    2015-04-01

    To extend the indications of intramedullary nails for distal or proximal fractures, nails with angle stable locking options have been developed. Studies on the mechanical efficacy of these systems have been inconsistent likely due to confounding variables such as number, geometry, or orientation of the screws, as well as differences in the loading mode. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the effect of angular stability on the mechanical performance of intramedullary nails. The results could then be compared with the effects of various locking screw parameters and loading modes. A generic model was developed consisting of artificial bone material and titanium intramedullary nail that provided the option to systematically modify the locking screw configuration. Using a base configuration, the following parameters were varied: number of screws, distance and orientation between screws, blocking of screws, and simulation of freehand locking. Tension/compression, torsional, and bending loads were applied. Stiffness and clearance around the zero loading point were determined. Angular stability had no effect on stiffness but completely blocked axial clearance (p=0.003). Simulation of freehand locking reduced clearance for all loading modes by at least 70% (p<0.003). The greatest increases in torsional and bending stiffness were obtained by increasing the number of locking screws (up to 80%, p<0.001) and by increasing the distance between them (up to 70%, p<0.001). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the mechanical performance of IM nailing can be affected by various locking parameters of which angular stability is only one. While angular stability clearly reduces clearance of the screw within the nail, mechanical stiffness depends more on the number of screws and their relative distance. Thus, optimal mechanical performance in IM nailing could potentially be obtained by combining angular stability with optimal arrangement of locking screws. PMID:25581739

  18. Intraoperative Computed Tomography Navigation for Transpedicular Screw Fixation to Treat Unstable Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures. From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C. In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2–3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8?mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7?mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws. The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  19. Odontoid balloon kyphoplasty associated with screw fixation for Type II fracture in 2 elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Terreaux, Luc; Loubersac, Thomas; Hamel, Olivier; Bord, Eric; Robert, Roger; Buffenoir, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Anterior screw fixation is a well-recognized technique that is used to stabilize Type IIB fractures of the odontoid process in the elderly. However, advanced age and osteoporosis are 2 risk factors for pseudarthrosis. Kyphoplasty has been described in the treatment of lytic lesions in C-2. The authors decided to combine these 2 techniques in the treatment of unstable fractures of the odontoid. Two approximately 90-year-old patients were treated for this type of fracture. Instability was demonstrated on dynamic radiography in one patient, and the fracture was seen on static radiography in the other. Clinical parameters, pain, range of motion, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) score (for the first patient), and radiological examinations (CT scans and dynamic radiographs) were studied both before and after surgery. After inflating the balloon both above and below the fracture line, the authors applied a high-viscosity polymethylmethacrylate cement. Some minor leakage of cement was noted in both cases but proved to be harmless. The screws were correctly positioned. The clinical result was excellent, both in terms of pain relief and in the fact that there was no reduction in the SF-36 score. The range of motion remained the same. A follow-up CT scan obtained 1 year later in one of the patients showed no evidence of change in the materials used, and the dynamic radiographs showed no instability. This combination of kyphoplasty and anterior screw fixation of the odontoid seems to be an interesting technique in osteoporotic Type IIB fractures of the odontoid process in the elderly, with good results both clinically and radiologically. PMID:25555053

  20. Pedicle screw piercer with warning device - A technique to increase accuracy of pedicle screw placement

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Lin; Yong, He; Yang, Xu; Bi, Zhang; Mo, Sha; Zhi-Min, Guo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pedicle screw fixation has achieved significant popularity amongst spinal surgeons for both single and multilevel spinal fusion. Suboptimal placements of pedicle screws may lead to neurological and vascular complications. There have been many advances in techniques available for navigating through the pedicle; however, these techniques are not without drawbacks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and feasibility of the pedicle piercer with warning device. Materials and Methods: Eight normal adult thoracolumbar specimens from cadavers consisting of 80 vertebras (T8–L5) were selected and randomly allocated into four groups. Each group contained 20 vertebra. Group 1 was tested for maximum pressure of the piercer within the vertebrae (F1). Group 2 was tested for maximum pressure of the warning piercer penetrating front cortex of the vertebral body (F2). Group 3 was tested for the maximum pressure of piercer penetrating vertebral body endplate (F3) and pedicle notch (F41, F42). Group 4 was tested for maximum pressure of the piercer penetrating the vertebral lateral cortex (F6), the medial and lateral cortex of pedicle (F51, F52). In the second experiment of this study, 4 normal adult specimens consisting of 40 vertebra and 80 pedicles were used for testing the alarm effects of pedicle piercer. The following indicators were adopted for the tests including true positive/negative, false positive/negative, sensitivity, specificity, availability, Youden index, and diagnostic efficiency. SPSS 16.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: There were statistically significant differences between F1, and F2, F3, F41, F42, F51, F52 respectively (P < 0.05). F1 = 8.970 ± 0.2698, F3 = 13.055 ± 0.6718. We found that the threshold value of piercer warning was from 9.6 to 12.3 Kgf. Sensitivity was 92.31%, specificity was 95.12%, usability was 87.45%, Youden index was 87.43% and diagnostic efficiency was 92.5% respectively. Conclusion: Warning piercer is a safe, simple, sensitive device for detecting pedicle breach during regular pedicle screw placement surgery. PMID:25404764

  1. SEM and fractography analysis of screw thread loosening in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Scarano, A; Quaranta, M; Traini, T; Piattelli, M; Piattelli, A

    2007-01-01

    Biological and technical failures of implants have already been reported. Mechanical factors are certainly of importance in implant failures, even if their exact nature has not yet been established. The abutment screw fracture or loosening represents a rare, but quite unpleasant failure. The aim of the present research is an analysis and structural examination of screw thread or abutment loosening compared with screw threads or abutment without loosening. The loosening of screw threads was compared to screw thread without loosening of three different implant systems; Branemark (Nobel Biocare, Gothenburg, Sweden), T.B.R. implant systems (Benax, Ancona, Italy) and Restore (Lifecore Biomedical, Chaska, Minnesota, USA). In this study broken screws were excluded. A total of 16 screw thread loosenings were observed (Group I) (4 Branemark, 4 T.B.R and 5 Restore), 10 screw threads without loosening were removed (Group II), and 6 screw threads as received by the manufacturer (unused) (Group III) were used as control (2 Branemark, 2 T.B.R and 2 Restore). The loosened abutment screws were retrieved and analyzed under SEM. Many alterations and deformations were present in concavities and convexities of screw threads in group I. No macroscopic alterations or deformations were observed in groups II and III. A statistical difference of the presence of microcracks were observed between screw threads with an abutment loosening and screw threads without an abutment loosening. PMID:17897496

  2. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G.

    1989-04-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to build as efficient a compressor as possible. Over the last several years improvements to the design of screw compressors has made them efficiently competitive with other types of compressors, especially at large loads. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate four different methods of cooling a 250 horsepower compressor and determine their effects on the efficiency of the compressor. Two conventional methods, liquid injection and thermosyphon cooling, and two new methods, V-PLUS and Fresco oil injection, are investigated. The screw compressor used in the tests was a VRS-500 screw compressor made by the Vilter Manufacturing Corporation. 6 figs.

  3. Mild coal gasification screw pyrolyzer development and design

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, D.W.

    1990-08-01

    Our objective is to produce information and design recommendations needed for the development of an efficient continuous process for the mild gasification of caking bituminous coals. We have focused on the development of an externally heated pyrolyzer in which the sticky, reacting coal is conveyed by one or more screws. We have taken a multifaceted approach to forwarding the development of the externally-heated screw pyrolyzer. Small scale process experiments on a 38-mm single screw pyrolyzer have been a major part of our effort. Engineering analyses aimed at producing design and scaleup equations have also been important. Process design recommendations follow from these. We critically review our experimental data and experience, and information from the literature and equipment manufactures for the purpose of making qualitative recommendations for improving practical pyrolyzer design and operation. Benchscale experiments are used to supply needed data and test some preliminary concepts. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305 Section 1926.305...Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. ...otherwise secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing...

  5. Performance Evaluation and CFD Simulation of Multiphase Twin-Screw Pumps 

    E-print Network

    Patil, Abhay

    2013-05-16

    work focuses on the experimental and numerical analysis of twin-screw pumps for different operating conditions. Experimental evaluation aims to understand steady state and transient behavior of twin-screw pumps. Detailed steady state evaluation helped...

  6. Joint Commission

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Updates America’s Hospitals: Improving Quality and Safety: The Joint Commission’s Annual Report 2015 Tuesday November 17, 2015 ... Center of Sarasota Read Full Testimonial | Read All Joint Commission Vision All people always experience the safest, ...

  7. Biodegradation of Inion fast-absorbing biodegradable plates and screws.

    PubMed

    Losken, H Wolfgang; van Aalst, John A; Mooney, Mark P; Godfrey, Virginia L; Burt, Tripti; Teotia, Sumeet; Dean, Shay B; Moss, Jonathan R; Rahbar, Reza

    2008-05-01

    Biodegradable plates and screws are recommended for use in surgery of the craniofacial skeleton of children. To be effective and not interfere with growth of the child's skull, the plates must biodegrade sufficiently to release the holding power of the plate and screw within 1 year. It is also essential that excessive foreign body reaction and cyst formation does not occur when the plates and screws biodegrade. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the rate of biodegradation of Inion CPS Baby biodegradable plates and screws under different clinical circumstances in the rabbit craniofacial skeleton and evaluate their efficacy for use in pediatric craniofacial surgery. Foreign body reaction would be evaluated. Inion baby plates and screws were tested in a rabbit model. Plates were applied to the frontal bone, over a bony defect of the parietal bone, to a nasal bone fracture, and inserted in the subcutaneous space over the occipital bone in thirty 6-week-old rabbits. Six rabbits were euthanized at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months' postoperative time point and examined for residual plates and screws. Bone from each surgical site was excised, fixed by immersion in 10% neutral-buffered formalin, decalcified in Immunocal solution, and examined by 7-microm paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. At 9 months, the plates and screws had effectively biodegraded and no longer had holding power on the bones. Fragmentation of the implant material was noted. Residual implant material was still present on gross and histologic examination in rabbits at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months. Residue of a screw was still palpable in 1 rabbit at 18 months. There was no evidence of cyst formation in any of the examined specimens. Macrophages and giant cells were present in most of the specimens at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months. Findings from the current study revealed a relative short resorption time (9 mo) and normal inflammatory sequelae in an adult rabbit model. These findings suggest that these plates may be used safely in fixing the pediatric craniofacial skeleton. PMID:18520394

  8. Optical conductivity of semiconductor crystals with a screw dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Hisao; Shima, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We study ac electronic transport in semiconductor crystals with a screw dislocation. The screw dislocation in the crystal results in an effective potential field that has a pronounced effect on the quantum mechanical electronic transport of the system. Alternating current conductivity at a frequency around 100 GHz has been calculated, showing upward shift in the peak position with increasing the Fermi energy. The result is in contrast to the persistency in the peak position observed in a dislocation-free crystal penetrated by magnetic flux, despite the apparent similarity between the two crystalline systems.

  9. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  10. MECHANICS OF THE TAPER INTEGRATED SCREWED-IN (TIS) ABUTMENTS USED IN DENTAL IMPLANTS

    E-print Network

    Müftü, Sinan

    1 MECHANICS OF THE TAPER INTEGRATED SCREWED-IN (TIS) ABUTMENTS USED IN DENTAL IMPLANTS by Dinçer. Keywords: Dental implants; Taper lock; Morse taper; Conical interference fit; Tapered screw; Screw mechanics; Loosening torque, Tightening torque #12;3 INTRODUCTION A dental implant system serves

  11. Posterior talar fracture with dislocation of both talo-navicular and subtalar joints: a variant type II of the Sneppens classification

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old man fell from a ladder, thus causing an axial compression injury to the right ankle. Severe deformity was evident and the ankle could not be reduced by simple manipulation. The skin was tented and appearing critically contused. Radiographs revealed an oblique fracture of the posterior aspect of the talar body with dislocation of both the talo-navicular and subtalar joints, an injury previously not described in the literature. The fracture–dislocation was anatomically reduced within 3?h of presentation and stability achieved with two headless buried compression screws. CT scan confirmed anatomical reduction and the patient remained non-weight bearing in a cast for 6?weeks. One year postoperatively, the patient remains pain-free with no radiological signs of avascular necrosis of the talus. This injury is unique and despite its severity and soft tissue compromise good quality reduction and internal fixation resulted in an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:22847568

  12. Virtual Passive Controller for Robot Systems Using Joint Torque Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a control method based on virtual passive dynamic control that will stabilize a robot manipulator using joint torque sensors and a simple joint model. The method does not require joint position or velocity feedback for stabilization. The proposed control method is stable in the sense of Lyaponov. The control method was implemented on several joints of a laboratory robot. The controller showed good stability robustness to system parameter error and to the exclusion of nonlinear dynamic effects on the joints. The controller enhanced position tracking performance and, in the absence of position control, dissipated joint energy.

  13. Cellulose and the twofold screw axis: Modeling and experimental arguments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystallography indicates that molecules in crystalline cellulose either have 2-fold screw-axis (21) symmetry or closely approximate it, leading to short distances between H4 and H1' across the glycosidic linkage. Therefore, modeling studies of cellobiose often show elevated energies for 21 structur...

  14. INTERIOR VIEW OF JAMES HARRIS CUTTING SCREW THREADS INTO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF JAMES HARRIS CUTTING SCREW THREADS INTO THE INTERIOR OF FITTINGS ON ONE IN A BANK OF TAPPING MACHINES, EACH OPERATED BY THE SAME WORKER SIMULTANEOUSLY BUT TIMED TO REQUIRE WORKER ACTION AT INTERVALS THAT DO NOT INTERFERE WITH THE OTHER MACHINES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Tapping Room, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements. PMID:25124058

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing of Distillers Dried

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL PAPER Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing of Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS)-Based Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) Feeds Ferouz Y. Ayadi & Kurt A. Rosentrater & Kasiviswanathan with limited availabilities of fish meal for fish feed, has created the need for alternative protein sources

  17. Screw dislocation in zirconium: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouet, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    Plasticity in zirconium is controlled by 1/3<12¯10> screw dislocations gliding in the prism planes of the hexagonal close-packed structure. This prismatic and not basal glide is observed for a given set of transition metals like zirconium and is known to be related to the number of valence electrons in the d band. We use ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory to study the core structure of screw dislocations in zirconium. Dislocations are found to dissociate in the prism plane in two partial dislocations, each with a pure screw character. Ab initio calculations also show that the dissociation in the basal plane is unstable. We calculate then the Peierls barrier for a screw dislocation gliding in the prism plane and obtain a small barrier. The Peierls stress deduced from this barrier is lower than 21 MPa, which is in agreement with experimental data. The ability of an empirical potential relying on the embedded atom method (EAM) to model dislocations in zirconium is also tested against these ab initio calculations.

  18. Screw fixation of medial malleolar fractures: a cadaveric biomechanical study challenging the current AO philosophy.

    PubMed

    Parker, L; Garlick, N; McCarthy, I; Grechenig, S; Grechenig, W; Smitham, P

    2013-12-01

    The AO Foundation advocates the use of partially threaded lag screws in the fixation of fractures of the medial malleolus. However, their threads often bypass the radiodense physeal scar of the distal tibia, possibly failing to obtain more secure purchase and better compression of the fracture. We therefore hypothesised that the partially threaded screws commonly used to fix a medial malleolar fracture often provide suboptimal compression as a result of bypassing the physeal scar, and proposed that better compression of the fracture may be achieved with shorter partially threaded screws or fully threaded screws whose threads engage the physeal scar. We analysed compression at the fracture site in human cadaver medial malleoli treated with either 30 mm or 45 mm long partially threaded screws or 45 mm fully threaded screws. The median compression at the fracture site achieved with 30 mm partially threaded screws (0.95 kg/cm(2) (interquartile range (IQR) 0.8 to 1.2) and 45 mm fully threaded screws (1.0 kg/cm(2) (IQR 0.7 to 2.8)) was significantly higher than that achieved with 45 mm partially threaded screws (0.6 kg/cm(2) (IQR 0.2 to 0.9)) (p = 0.04 and p < 0.001, respectively). The fully threaded screws and the 30mm partially threaded screws were seen to engage the physeal scar under an image intensifier in each case. The results support the use of 30 mm partially threaded or 45 mm fully threaded screws that engage the physeal scar rather than longer partially threaded screws that do not. A 45 mm fully threaded screw may in practice offer additional benefit over 30 mm partially threaded screws in increasing the thread count in the denser paraphyseal region. PMID:24293597

  19. Neurocentral synchondrosis fracture in immature spines associated with pedicle screw type fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Sairyo, K; Scifert, J; Goel, V K; Grosland, N; Grobler, L J

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the weak point in immature lumbar vertebrae associated with pedicle screw instrumentation. Ten immature thoracic and lumbar vertebrae were collected from calf spines. After installation of 6- and 7-mm-diameter pedicle screws into the pedicles of each specimen, pullout force was applied to the screw using the uniaxial MTS system until failure. Tightening torque during installation was measured. From the load-displacement curve, failure load was calculated and failure site was confirmed by radiographs. Inner pedicle diameters were measured after the pullout test, and percent fills of the pedicle screw were calculated. Mean tightening torque was 1.4 or 2.1 (Nm), mean failure load was 852.5 or 1,015.0 (N), and mean percent fill was 81.4 or 93.5% for 6- or 7-mm screws, respectively. Tightening torque and percent fill in 7-mm screws were significantly (p < 0.01) greater than that in 6-mm screws; however, failure load showed no significant difference (p = 0.10) between the two screw groups. Failure by screw pullout occurred at the screw-bone interface or through the neurocentral synchondrosis (NS). NS fractures were observed in 20% of 6-mm screws, 60% of 7-mm screws, and 40% overall, whereas interface failures occurred in 80% of 6-mm screws, 40% of 7-mm screws, and 60% overall. In NS fracture group, tightening torque (p < 0.05) and percent fill (p < 0.01) were significantly greater than in the interface failure group. The results led us to conclude that the mechanism of the NS fracture is unclear. However, NS fracture could be one of the conceivable complications associated with pedicle screw fixation in the immature spine. PMID:9588471

  20. Interpolating gain-scheduled H? loop shaping design for high speed ball screw feed drives.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Tang, WenCheng; Bao, DaFei

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method to design servo controllers for flexible ball screw drives with time-varying dynamics, which are mainly due to the time-varying table position and the workpiece mass. A gain-scheduled H? loop shaping controller is designed to achieve high tracking performance against the dynamic variations. H? loop shaping design procedure incorporates open loop shaping by a set of compensators to obtain performance/robust stability tradeoffs. The interpolating gain-scheduled controller is obtained by interpolating the state space model of the linear time-invariant (LTI) controllers estimated for fixed values of the scheduling parameters and a linear least squares problem can be solved. The proposed controller has been compared with P/PI with velocity and acceleration feedforward and adaptive backstepping sliding mode control experimentally. The experimental results indicate that the tracking performance has been improved and the robustness for time-varying dynamics has been achieved with the proposed scheme. PMID:25592980

  1. Single allograft medial collateral ligament and posterior oblique ligament reconstruction: a technique to improve valgus and rotational stability.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiangtao; Ji, Gang; Zhang, Yingze; Gao, Shijun; Wang, Fei; Chen, Baicheng

    2014-08-01

    We present a novel and simple method for single hamstring allograft MCL and PMC reconstruction, which can improve both joint valgus and external rotational stability and maximize utilization of allograft. All patients received arthroscopic evaluation through inferomedial and inferolateral knee incisions to ascertain whether there were intra-articular injuries. An 8-cm-length longitudinal incision was made from 1 cm above adductor tubercle to 5-cm proximal medial tibia joint line. The anterior tibia insertion was defined as 15 mm lateral from the medial tibia edge and 45 mm below the medial tibia joint line. The posterior tibia insertion was defined as 15 mm lateral from the medial tibia edge and 20 mm below the medial tibia joint line. A 5- or 6-mm reamer was used to drill the tibia tunnel along with guide pin, and a 6 or 7 mm drill was used to drill the femur tunnel to a depth of 25 or 30 mm until the proximal adductor tubercle. The allograft was harvested from tibia and placed into the tunnel and fixed with absorbable interference screw. All patients performed active rehabilitation exercises after the operation periodically. PMID:23807396

  2. Covering the Screw-Access Holes of Implant Restorations in the Esthetic Zone: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Saboury, Abolfazl; Gooya, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention as well as retrievability, and obviate the risk of excessive sub-gingival cement commonly associated with cement retained implant restorations. Screw-retained restorations generally have screw access holes, which can compromise esthetics and weaken the porcelain around the holes. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of a separate overcasting crown design to cover the screw access hole of implant screw-retained prosthesis for improved esthetics. PMID:25628703

  3. The cause of 2S Diapason screw breakage after internal lumbar fixation: studies of the mechanical and material properties of the implant.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, P; Grabarczyk, J; Depczyk, T

    2002-08-30

    In the years 1994-99, unstable fractures of the lumbar spine were surgically treated with interbody fixation in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Nicholas Copernicus Voivodeship Specialized Hospital in ?ód?, using stabilizers manufactured by various companies. Complications in the form of stabilizer breakage were observed in 1 case out of 22. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the reason why the Stryker 2S Diapason screws broke. Tests performed to measure the material and mechanical properties of the implant did not show any signs of material fatigue, nor were any material defects discovered. However, a scanning microscope investigation confirmed the hypothesis that the material had crumbled due to overload. This discovery led to the decision that screws would be mounted in the bodies of the vertebrae in a manner decreasing implant load. PMID:17679886

  4. The general theory of blade screws including propellers, fans, helicopter screws, helicoidal pumps, turbo-motors, and different kinds of helicoidal blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Bothezat, George

    1920-01-01

    Report presents a theory which gives a complete picture and an exact quantitative analysis of the whole phenomenon of the working of blade screws, but also unites in a continuous whole the entire scale of states of work conceivable for a blade screw. Chapter 1 is devoted to the establishment of the system of fundamental equations relating to the blade screw. Chapter 2 contains the general discussion of the 16 states of work which may establish themselves for a blade screw. The existence of the vortex ring state and the whirling phenomenon are established. All the fundamental functions which enter the blade-screw theory are submitted to a general analytical discussion. The general outline of the curve of the specific function is examined. Two limited cases of the work of the screw, the screw with a zero constructive pitch and the screw with an infinite constructive pitch, are pointed out. Chapter 3 is devoted to the study of the propulsive screw or propeller. (author)

  5. Finite element analysis of Stryker Xia pedicle screw in artificial bone samples with and without supplemental cement augmentation.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Choma, Theodore J; Kueny, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    A validated, using in vitro biomechanical testing, finite element model was used to evaluate the affects of (1) cement augmentation and (2) an intact posterior cortex in osteoporotic bone. The presence of augmentation and/or a posterior cortical cortex increased the stabilization of the pedicle screw 2-5 fold. Placement of cement influenced failure load and toggle; with distal placement having the largest increase in failure load and decrease in cephalad-caudad toggle. The presence of posterior cortex caused a decrease in the amount of toggle, a proximal shift of the center of rotation and an increase in the maximum failure force. PMID:24980259

  6. Superior fixation of pegged trabecular metal over screw-fixed pegged porous titanium fiber mesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Lasting stability of cementless implants depends on osseointegration into the implant surface, and long-term implant fixation can be predicted using radiostereometric analysis (RSA) with short-term follow-up. We hypothesized that there would be improved fixation of high-porosity trabecular metal (TM) tibial components compared to low-porosity titanium pegged porous fiber-metal (Ti) polyethylene metal backings. Methods In a prospective, parallel-group, randomized unblinded clinical trial, we compared cementless tibial components in patients aged 70 years and younger with osteoarthritis. The pre-study sample size calculation was 22 patients per group. 25 TM tibial components were fixed press-fit by 2 hexagonal pegs (TM group) and 25 Ti tibial components were fixed press-fit and by 4 supplemental screws (Ti group). Stereo radiographs for evaluation of absolute component migration (primary effect size) and single-direction absolute component migration (secondary effect size) were obtained within the first postoperative week and at 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. American Knee Society score was used for clinical assessment preoperatively, and at 1 and 2 years. Results There were no intraoperative complications, and no postoperative infections or revisions. All patients had improved function and regained full extension. All tibial components migrated initially. Most migration of the TM components (n = 24) occurred within the first 3 months after surgery whereas migration of the Ti components (n = 22) appeared to stabilize first after 1 year. The TM components migrated less than the Ti components at 1 year (p = 0.01) and 2 years (p = 0.004). Interpretation We conclude that the mechanical fixation of TM tibial components is superior to that of screw-fixed Ti tibial components. We expect long-term implant survival to be better with the TM tibial component. PMID:21434781

  7. System for Image-Processing-Based Inspection of a Screw Hole on a Molded Plastic Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hironobu; Takeda, Fumiaki

    A screw hole is incorrectly molded if the pin on the mold is broken when the plastic is molded by injection molding. Sampling inspection is carried out manually to identify the incorrectly molded screw hole. In the sampling inspection, the incorrectly molded screw hole on the molded plastic frame is rarely overlooked. Therefore, the development of a system for the high-precision identification of the incorrectly molded screw hole is required. The purpose of this study is to develop a screw-hole inspection system that distinguishes between a correctly molded screw hole and an incorrectly molded one. In this paper, a screw-hole inspection system is proposed. There is a need to capture clearly the screw hole on an uneven plastic frame and therefore, a multi-camera system is used. The proposed system consists of several Web cameras with the individual adjustable focus. Moreover, the inspection of the screw holes is performed using an inspection algorithm that is developed for a multi-camera system. When 2548 correctly molded screw holes and 2940 incorrectly molded screw holes were inspected by the proposed system, the inspection success rate was 100.0%. Finally, we have verified its effectiveness by performing an experiment.

  8. Endosseous Fixation Device for Lapidus Arthrodesis: Technique, Early Experience, and Comparison With Crossed Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Zelent, Marek E; Neese, David J; Peterson, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    First metatarsal cuneiform joint arthrodesis has been commonly used since the early 1900s for definitive treatment of a variety of conditions involving the medial column of the foot. Early applications of this procedure resulted in a relatively high rate of complications, including malunion and nonunion. We retrospectively examined a novel method of fixation involving an endosseous implant with a nonporous, rough exterior surface and compared it with the traditional crossed screw fixation, considered the standard of care for the procedure. Twenty-one feet in 19 patients served as the control group with crossed screws, and 18 feet in 17 patients served as the trial group using the study device. Null hypothesis testing was used to compare the outcomes parameters between the comparative groups. Postoperatively, the patients were allowed to walk in a prefabricated, removable, below-the-knee cast boot at a mean of 48.3 ± 8.2 days in the control group and 24.4 ± 9.7 days in the trial group. These differences were highly significant (p < .0001). Postoperatively, the patients were allowed to walk in a stiff-soled shoe at a mean of 65.2 ± 8.4 days in the control group and 49.7 ± 19.2 days in the trial group. These differences were also statistically significant (p = .0020). The patients in the control group required revision surgery in 7 of 21 procedures (33%), with 2 patients developing nonunion (9.5%). Only 1 patient in the trial group required revision surgery (5.8%), and no patient developed nonunion. From these results, we believe that the endosseous trial implant is a reliable option for fixation of the first metatarsal cuneiform arthrodesis procedure and might allow for earlier weightbearing with fewer postoperative complications. PMID:26364702

  9. A custom-made sealing screw cap for a closed, hollow obturator.

    PubMed

    Nishigawa, Goro; Maruo, Yukinori; Jin, Keiji; Oki, Kazuhiro; Minagi, Shogo

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a closed, hollow obturator with a nondetachable screw cap to seal the access hole that also allows cleaning of the inside of the bulb. A small screw cap was fabricated from a cobalt-chromium alloy. This screw was screwed to the access hole prepared at the top of the hollow obturator and when removed allows the inside of the obturator to be cleaned through the access hole. At the end of the screw, a preformed cobalt-chromium wire was attached that works as the safety retention mechanism of the screw. This ensures the screw in not aspirated or swallowed if it becomes unscrewed and falls from the prosthesis during wear in the patient's mouth. This device enables the patient to clean the inside of the closed obturator at home. PMID:17912099

  10. Pullout strength of anterior spinal instrumentation: a product comparison of seven screws in calf vertebral bodies

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Dieter; Wild, Alexander; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Schneider, Erich; Linke, Berend

    2007-01-01

    A lot of new implant devices for spine surgery are coming onto the market, in which vertebral screws play a fundamental role. The new screws developed for surgery of spine deformities have to be compared to established systems. A biomechanical in vitro study was designed to assess the bone–screw interface fixation strength of seven different screws used for correction of scoliosis in spine surgery. The objectives of the current study were twofold: (1) to evaluate the initial strength at the bone–screw interface of newly developed vertebral screws (Universal Spine System II) compared to established systems (product comparison) and (2) to evaluate the influence of screw design, screw diameter, screw length and bone mineral density on pullout strength. Fifty-six calf vertebral bodies were instrumented with seven different screws (USS II anterior 8.0 mm, USS II posterior 6.2 mm, KASS 6.25 mm, USS II anterior 6.2 mm, USS II posterior 5.2 mm, USS 6.0 mm, USS 5.0 mm). Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined by quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Failure in axial pullout was tested using a displacement-controlled universal test machine. USS II anterior 8.0 mm showed higher pullout strength than all other screws. The difference constituted a tendency (P = 0.108) when compared to USS II posterior 6.2 mm (+19%) and was significant in comparison to the other screws (+30 to +55%, P < 0.002). USS II posterior 6.2 mm showed significantly higher pullout strength than USS 5.0 mm (+30%, P = 0.014). The other screws did not differ significantly in pullout strength. Pullout strength correlated significantly with BMD (P = 0.0015) and vertebral body width/screw length (P < 0.001). The newly developed screws for spine surgery (USS II) show higher pullout strength when compared to established systems. Screw design had no significant influence on pullout force in vertebral body screws, but outer diameter of the screw, screw length and BMD are good predictors of pullout resistance. PMID:17273838

  11. Finger joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Prucz, Roni B; Friedrich, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Finger joint dislocations and collateral ligament tears are common athletic hand injuries. Treatment of the athlete requires a focus on safe return to play and maximizing function. Certain dislocations, such as proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal volar dislocations, may be associated with tendon injuries and must be treated accordingly. Treatment of other dislocations is ultimately determined by postreduction stability, with many dislocations amenable to nonoperative treatment (ie, immobilization followed by rehabilitation). Protective splinting does not necessarily preclude athletic participation. Minor bone involvement typically does not affect the treatment plan, but significant articular surface involvement may necessitate surgical repair or stabilization. Percutaneous and internal fixation are the mainstays of surgical treatment. Treatment options that do not minimize recovery or allow the patient to return to protected play, such as external fixation, are generally avoided during the season of play. Undertreated joint injuries and unrecognized ligament injuries can result in long term disability. PMID:25455398

  12. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  13. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J. (Worcester, MA); Patten, Jr., Donald O. (Sterling, MA)

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  14. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kouvidis, George K; Sommers, Mark B; Giannoudis, Peter V; Katonis, Pavlos G; Bottlang, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe) and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes) were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS) of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with the HIPS model. In this model, the double screw construct provided significantly greater resistance against varus collapse and neck rotation in comparison to a standard DHS lag screw implant. PMID:19450283

  15. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G. . Ray W. Herrick Labs.); Fresco, A. )

    1990-01-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to design and build as efficient a compressor as possible. In a screw compressor it appears that the way the compressor is cooled can have an effect on the compressor's efficiency. This paper presents experimental data on three different screw compressor cooling methods: Liquid Refrigerant Injection Cooling System; Thermosyphon Cooling System; and Oil Injection System. All tests were conducted on a hot gas bypass system using refrigerant R-22. The data taken shows that the Oil Injection System is slightly better than the other two. These tests should be repeated with a higher oil flow rate and ammonia as the working fluid. 10 figs.

  16. Structure of screw dislocation core in Ta at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaofeng Jiang, Na; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Ying

    2014-03-07

    The core structure and Peierls stress of the 1/2 ?111?(110) screw dislocation in Ta have been investigated theoretically using the modified Peierls–Nabarro theory that takes into account the discreteness effect of crystal. The lattice constants, the elastic properties, and the generalized-stacking-fault energy(?-surface) under the different pressures have been calculated from the electron density functional theory. The core structure of dislocation is determined by the modified Peierls equation, and the Peierls stress is evaluated from the dislocation energy that varies periodically as dislocation moves. The results show the core width and Peierls stress in Ta are weakly dependent of the pressure up to 100?GPa when the length and stress are measured separately by the Burgers vector b and shear modulus ?. This indicates that core structure is approximately scaling invariant for the screw dislocation in Ta. The scaled plasticity of Ta changes little in high pressure environment.

  17. Detecting thrust bearing failure within a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Pallaver, C.

    1994-05-01

    A 3 1/2 mile ring of over 1000 superconducting magnets are needed to focus and drive the world`s highest energy particle smasher. 24 Refrigerators supply liquid helium to the magnets; 34 high pressure oil flooded screw compressors supply 285 psig helium gas to the refrigerators. The 400 h.p. screws are reliable machines that use 45 gallons of oil per minute to seal and lubricate the rotors, lubricate the bearings, and remove the heat of compression. These machines are spaced out in seven buildings over four miles. A minimum of 28 machines must be operating at all times. A contingent of operators start, stop, and monitor any machine from a distant control room. The 34 compressors have an average of 32,000 hours; 9 machines have over 40,000 hours; the highest is 55,000 hours.

  18. Structure of screw dislocation core in Ta at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaofeng; Jiang, Na; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Ying

    2014-03-01

    The core structure and Peierls stress of the 1/2?111?{110} screw dislocation in Ta have been investigated theoretically using the modified Peierls-Nabarro theory that takes into account the discreteness effect of crystal. The lattice constants, the elastic properties, and the generalized-stacking-fault energy(?-surface) under the different pressures have been calculated from the electron density functional theory. The core structure of dislocation is determined by the modified Peierls equation, and the Peierls stress is evaluated from the dislocation energy that varies periodically as dislocation moves. The results show the core width and Peierls stress in Ta are weakly dependent of the pressure up to 100 GPa when the length and stress are measured separately by the Burgers vector b and shear modulus ?. This indicates that core structure is approximately scaling invariant for the screw dislocation in Ta. The scaled plasticity of Ta changes little in high pressure environment.

  19. Effect of different radial hole designs on pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Jou-Wen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yi-Long; Wang, Shih-Tien; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2015-08-01

    Cannulated pedicle screws are designed for bone cement injection to enhance fixation strength in severely osteoporotic spines. However, the screws commonly fracture during insertion. This study aims to evaluate how different positions/designs of radial holes may affect the pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws using finite element analysis. Three different screw hole designs were evaluated under torsion and bending conditions. The pullout strength for each screw was determined by axial pullout failure testing. The results showed that when the Von Mises stress reached the yield stress of titanium alloy the screw with four radial holes required a greater torque or bending moment than the nine and twelve hole screws. In the pullout test, the strength and stiffness of each screw with cement augmentation showed no significant differences, but the screw with four radial holes had a greater average pullout strength, which probably resulted from the significantly greater mean maximum lengths of cement augmentation. Superior biomechanical responses, with lower stress around the radial holes and greater pullout strength, represented by cannulated pedicle screw with four radial holes may worth recommending for clinical application. PMID:26054806

  20. The effects of screw number and length on two methods of tension band plating.

    PubMed

    Haug, R H

    1993-02-01

    Bovine ribs were used to evaluate the effects that screw length and number have on two types of tension bands. Five trials each were done with one, two, three, or four screws per segment, using screws 4, 8, 12, or 16 mm in length and 2-mm adaptation plates or 2-mm mini-dynamic compression plates. The fractured ribs were subjected to increasing weights until failure. With the 2-mm adaptation plate, screw length played no role in the amount of weight resisted. Increasing the number of screws per segment increased the weight resisted to up to three screws per segment, after which no additional benefit was realized (P < .001). For the 2-mm mini-dynamic compression plate, increasing screw length increased the weight resisted up to three screws per segment, after which length had no effect (P < .001). Increasing the number of screws per segment increased the weight resisted up to three screws per segment, after which no additional benefit was realized (P < .001). PMID:8426255

  1. Wet-gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pumps 

    E-print Network

    Chan, Evan

    2009-05-15

    IN TWIN-SCREW MULTIPHASE PUMPS A Thesis by EVAN CHAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Stuart L. Scott Committee Members, Daulat Mamora Charles Glover Head of Department, Stephen Holditch December 2006 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering iii ABSTRACT...

  2. Supersonic self-similar screw-pinch plasma implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for supersonic compression of a plasma containing an axial current and an entrained axial magnetic field (screw-pinch). The solutions presented here represent a screw-pinch plasma with diffuse current profile. Four separate plasma implosion modes are identified. The solutions representing the implosion modes differ qualitatively from Z-pinch and [Theta]-pinch schemes. They comprise of plasma annulus implosion, converging transverse MHD shock, propagation of fast magnetosonic waves towards the axis (weak discontinuities) and collapse of a hollow plasma liner. These modes are chosen on the basis of their ability to achieve magnetic field cumulation during the course of implosion. Analytic expressions describing asymptotic behavior of the hydromagnetic profiles are obtained for each of the four implosion modes. Numerical examples for selected boundary conditions, representing realistic plasma parameters for the purpose of ultra-high magnetic field generation, are presented for each of the four implosion modes. A special case representing the exponential implosion of a screw-pinch plasma has also been analyzed. It has been found that specifying an exponential dependence to the temporal contribution of the hydromagnetic variables, results in a more constrained solution space. This comparison is made with the case described above which has a power law type temporal contribution. Owing to the immense possible applications associated with plasma pinches, the time independent profiles of the hydromagnetic variables have been utilized in order to arrive at an estimate for the practical utility of the theoretical model. More specifically, the time dependent profiles of the hydromagnetic variables, and a piston condition for an external laser driven have been obtained. Numerical examples have also been provided for two cases representing screw-pinch plasma implosions occurring for realistic experimental parameters.

  3. Hydroxylapatite-coated Diapason screws: first clinical report.

    PubMed

    Lapresle, P; Missenard, G

    1995-01-01

    We report our preliminary experience with 27 patients who underwent surgery for posterior spinal arthrodesis using the hydroxylapatite-coated Diapason screws. Each of the patients was considered to have a condition that was mechanically risky from the surgical standpoint. The results were good for patients with lytic spondylolisthesis and were excellent for patients with osteoporosis, but were generally less successful for patients requiring "long lever arm" fixations and those with degenerative scoliosis. PMID:7787345

  4. Comparison and prediction of pullout strength of conical and cylindrical pedicle screws within synthetic bone

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Chi; Chen, Po-Quang; Lu, Tung-Wu; Wu, Shing-Sheng; Shih, Kao-Shang; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was designed to derive the theoretical formulae to predict the pullout strength of pedicle screws with an inconstant outer and/or inner diameter distribution (conical screws). For the transpedicular fixation, one of the failure modes is the screw loosening from the vertebral bone. Hence, various kinds of pedicle screws have been evaluated to measure the pullout strength using synthetic and cadaveric bone as specimens. In the literature, the Chapman's formula has been widely proposed to predict the pullout strength of screws with constant outer and inner diameters (cylindrical screws). Methods This study formulated the pullout strength of the conical and cylindrical screws as the functions of material, screw, and surgery factors. The predicted pullout strength of each screw was compared to the experimentally measured data. Synthetic bones were used to standardize the material properties of the specimen and provide observation of the loosening mechanism of the bone/screw construct. Results The predicted data from the new formulae were better correlated with the mean pullout strength of both the cylindrical and conical screws within an average error of 5.0% and R2 = 0.93. On the other hand, the average error and R2 value of the literature formula were as high as -32.3% and -0.26, respectively. Conclusion The pullout strength of the pedicle screws was the functions of bone strength, screw design, and pilot hole. The close correlation between the measured and predicted pullout strength validated the value of the new formulae, so as avoid repeating experimental tests. PMID:19402917

  5. Continuous expression of slurry in a screw press

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, M.; Hayashi, N.; Iwata, M.; Murase, T.; Ogawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    An approximate method is described for predicting the steadystate performance of a screw press for the continuous expression of a slurry, with the worm channel being modified as the path between two flat plates. Screw expression of a slurry involves two mechanisms of dewatering which, for a batch operation, can be analyzed by the variable-pressure, variable-rate theory of filtration and by consolidation theory. By assuming that the expression consists of a succession of batch processes, basic equations are derived for the relationship between the dehydration rate, the feed rate, and the expression pressure distribution in a constant-pitch, straighttaper screw press. The thickness of the filter cake in the worm channel and the flow distribution in the consolidated cake are calculated for a given pressure distribution and feed rate, and the solids concentration and rate of discharge of the cake are estimated. The critical speed of rotation of the worm, at which the slurry becomes highly deliquored, is strongly influenced by the external diameter and helical angle of the worm. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental data for clay slurries with a concentration of 0.31-0.46 in the feed.

  6. Screw fixation of dermal regeneration template for scalp reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Orseck, Michael J; Trujillo, Manny G; Ritter, Edmond F

    2012-05-01

    Despite many advances in reconstructive techniques, the full-thickness scalp defect remains a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Patient and disease-specific factors occasionally make reconstruction with a dermal regeneration template (DRT) an attractive option when other methods are less advised. Although the applicability of dermal regeneration templates has been well elucidated, the method of DRT immobilization has not been standardized. Given the difficulty of adherence and subsequent infiltration of host cells into the DRT from the underlying bone due to seroma, hematoma, or shearing forces, we propose a screw and bolster system for DRT immobilization. We present a series of 13 patients with full-thickness scalp loss who underwent reconstruction with DRT and a subsequent split-thickness skin graft. All 13 patients were treated with the screw-bolster method of DRT fixation before a vacuum-assisted closure dressing. The average surface area of the defect was 96 cm. The mean time interval between the application of DRT and skin graft was 28 days. At a mean of 9-month follow-up, all patients achieved a well-vascularized neodermis, and progressed to complete, stable wound healing following application of a split-thickness skin graft. We propose that a screw-bolster system of fixation is a safe and effective method of immobilizing DRT in full-thickness scalp defects. PMID:22531400

  7. Modelling of the Heating Process in a Thermal Screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Veje, Christian T.; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-11-01

    The procedure of separating efficiently dry-stuff (proteins), fat, and water is an important process in the handling of waste products from industrial and commercial meat manufactures. One of the sub-processes in a separation facility is a thermal screw where the raw material (after proper mincing) is heated in order to melt fat, coagulate protein, and free water. This process is very energy consuming and the efficiency of the product is highly dependent on accurate temperature control of the process. A key quality parameter is the time that the product is maintained at temperatures within a certain threshold. A detailed mathematical model for the heating process in the thermal screw is developed and analysed. The model is formulated as a set of partial differential equations including the latent heat for the melting process of the fat and the boiling of water, respectively. The product is modelled by three components; water, fat and dry-stuff (bones and proteins). The melting of the fat component is captured as a plateau in the product temperature. The model effectively captures the product outlet temperature and the energy consumed. Depending on raw material composition, "soft" or "dry", the model outlines the heat injection and screw speeds necessary to obtain optimal output quality.

  8. Arthritis at the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Sankaye, Prashant; Ostlere, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The shoulder is a complex joint with numerous structures contributing to mobility and stability. Shoulder pain is a common clinical complaint that may be due to a wide spectrum of disorders including rotator cuff disease, instability, and arthropathy. Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint is uncommon because it is a non-weight-bearing joint. Significant osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint is unusual in the absence of trauma, and the detection of advanced degenerative changes in patients without a known history of trauma should alert the clinician to search for other disorders. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and key imaging findings of the common categories of the arthritis affecting the glenohumeral joint. PMID:26021591

  9. Use of a continuous twin screw granulation and drying system during formulation development and process optimization.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Peeters, E; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-01-01

    Since small scale is key for successful introduction of continuous techniques in the pharmaceutical industry to allow its use during formulation development and process optimization, it is essential to determine whether the product quality is similar when small quantities of materials are processed compared to the continuous processing of larger quantities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether material processed in a single cell of the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a continuous twin screw granulation and drying system introduced by GEA Pharma Systems, Collette™, Wommelgem, Belgium) is predictive of granule and tablet quality during full-scale manufacturing when all drying cells are filled. Furthermore, the performance of the ConsiGma™-1 system (a mobile laboratory unit) was evaluated and compared to the ConsiGma™-25 system. A premix of two active ingredients, powdered cellulose, maize starch, pregelatinized starch and sodium starch glycolate was granulated with distilled water. After drying and milling (1000 ?m, 800 rpm), granules were blended with magnesium stearate and compressed using a Modul™ P tablet press (tablet weight: 430 mg, main compression force: 12 kN). Single cell experiments using the ConsiGma™-25 system and ConsiGma™-1 system were performed in triplicate. Additionally, a 1h continuous run using the ConsiGma™-25 system was executed. Process outcomes (torque, barrel wall temperature, product temperature during drying) and granule (residual moisture content, particle size distribution, bulk and tapped density, hausner ratio, friability) as well as tablet (hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution) quality attributes were evaluated. By performing a 1h continuous run, it was detected that a stabilization period was needed for torque and barrel wall temperature due to initial layering of the screws and the screw chamber walls with material. Consequently, slightly deviating granule and tablet quality attributes were obtained during the start-up phase of the 1h run. For the single cell runs, granule and tablet properties were comparable with results obtained during the second part of the 1h run (after start-up). Although deviating granule quality (particle size distribution and Hausner ratio) was observed due to the divergent design of the ConsiGma™-1 unit and the ConsiGma™-25 system (horizontal set-up) used in this study, tablet quality produced from granules processed with the ConsiGma™-1 system was predictive for tablet quality obtained during continuous production using the ConsiGma™-25 system. PMID:25528462

  10. Posterior occipito-axial fixation applied C2 laminar screws for pediatric atlantoaxial instability caused by Down syndrome: Report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Kuroki, Hiroshi; Kubo, Shinichiro; Hamanaka, Hideaki; Chosa, Etsuo

    2012-01-01

    Background Upper cervical spine instability is one of the most critical orthopedic problems in patients with Down syndrome. However, arthrodesis of the upper cervical spine in these patients can be very difficult to achieve and has a high complication rate because of mental retardation and accompanying various medical conditions of the vital organs. Even now, surgeries in such patients, especially pediatric cases, are challenging and the optimal operative procedure remains unsettled. The purpose of this study was to report 2 cases of pediatric atlantoaxial instability due to Down syndrome in which posterior occipito-axial fixation with C2 laminar screws was performed. Methods Case 1 was a girl aged 6 years 10 months who had atlantoaxial rotatory fixation with os odontoideum. Atlantoaxial rotatory fixation was incompletely reduced by halo traction, and it was not maintained without halo-ring and -vest fixation. Posterior occipito-axial fixation with bilateral C2 laminar screws was then performed. Case 2 was a boy aged 10 years 7 months who had atlantoaxial subluxation with os odontoideum. He also had incomplete quadriplegia, so he could neither walk nor have a meal by himself. Posterior occipito-axial fixation with right C2 pedicle and left C2 laminar screws was then carried out. Results In case 1 bone union was obtained at 3 months after surgery and the patient's symptoms were resolved. In case 2 bone union was obtained at 3 months after surgery and the paralysis was improved. Conclusions/level of evidence In cases of atlantoaxial instability due to Down syndrome, symptomatic patients often present between ages 5 and 15 years and mental retardation interferes with postoperative cervical immobilization. C2 laminar screws can be safely applied for the pediatric axis and biomechanically accomplished rigid fixation. The C2 laminar screw is one of the most useful options to achieve stability of the pediatric atlantoaxial complex without the risk of vertebral artery injuries (level IV case series). PMID:25694894

  11. Field simulation of axisymmetric plasma screw pinches by alternating-direction-implicit methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    An axisymmetric plasma screw pinch is an axisymmetric column of ionized gaseous plasma radially confined by forces from axial and azimuthal currents driven in the plasma and its surroundings. This dissertation is a contribution to detailed, high resolution computer simulation of dynamic plasma screw pinches in 2-d {ital rz}-coordinates. The simulation algorithm combines electron fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) ion models to represent the plasma in a hybrid fashion. The plasma is assumed to be quasineutral; along with the Darwin approximation to the Maxwell equations, this implies application of Ampere`s law without displacement current. Electron inertia is assumed negligible so that advective terms in the electron momentum equation are ignored. Electrons and ions have separate scalar temperatures, and a scalar plasma electrical resistivity is assumed. Altemating-direction-implicit (ADI) methods are used to advance the electron fluid drift velocity and the magnetic fields in the simulation. The ADI methods allow time steps larger than allowed by explicit methods. Spatial regions where vacuum field equations have validity are determined by a cutoff density that invokes the quasineutral vacuum Maxwell equations (Darwin approximation). In this dissertation, the algorithm was first checked against ideal MM stability theory, and agreement was nicely demonstrated. However, such agreement is not a new contribution to the research field. Contributions to the research field include new treatments of the fields in vacuum regions of the pinch simulation. The new treatments predict a level of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence near the bulk plasma surface that is higher than predicted by other methods.

  12. Cortical Bone Trajectory for Lumbar Pedicle Screw Placement: A Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Hogan, Jarred; Maharaj, Monish; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-08-01

    There have been a number of developments in screw design and implantation techniques over recent years, including proposal of an alternative trajectory for screw fixation aimed at increasing purchase of pedicle screws in higher density bone. Cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw insertion follows a lateral path in the transverse plane and caudocephalad path in the sagittal plane. This technique has been advocated because it is reportedly less invasive, improves screw-bone purchase and reduces neurovascular injury; however, these claims have not been supported by robust clinical evidence. The available evidence was therefore reviewed to assess the relative merits of CBT and highlight areas for further research. To this end, a search of relevant published studies reporting biomechanical, morphometric or clinical outcomes after use of CBT screws in patients with spinal pathologies was performed via six electronic databases. PMID:26311095

  13. Fabrication of a screw-retained restoration avoiding the facial access hole: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gazaui, Sabrina; Razzoog, Michael; Sierraalta, Marianella; Saglik, Berna

    2015-11-01

    Dental implant restorations may be either screw-retained or cemented onto an abutment. While each method has its advantages and disadvantages, cemented restorations are commonly used in the maxillary arch, usually because of esthetic concerns. Available bone in the anterior maxilla dictates the placement of the implant, which may result in a facially positioned screw-access opening. Still, a growing volume of literature states that periimplant soft tissues respond more favorably to screw-retained crowns than cement-retained crowns. This clinical report outlines a treatment with a new method of fabricating a custom abutment-crown combination for a screw-retained restoration. The technique allows the channel for the screw to be placed at an angle other than parallel to the implant body. In this case, the practitioner may choose either a screw-retained or cement-retained implant restoration, where previously only a cemented restoration was possible. PMID:26344192

  14. Imaging screw dislocations at atomic resolution by aberration-corrected electron optical sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.; Lozano, J. G.; Pennycook, T. J.; Jones, L.; Hirsch, P. B.; Nellist, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    Screw dislocations play an important role in materials' mechanical, electrical and optical properties. However, imaging the atomic displacements in screw dislocations remains challenging. Although advanced electron microscopy techniques have allowed atomic-scale characterization of edge dislocations from the conventional end-on view, for screw dislocations, the atoms are predominantly displaced parallel to the dislocation line, and therefore the screw displacements are parallel to the electron beam and become invisible when viewed end-on. Here we show that screw displacements can be imaged directly with the dislocation lying in a plane transverse to the electron beam by optical sectioning using annular dark field imaging in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Applying this technique to a mixed [a+c] dislocation in GaN allows direct imaging of a screw dissociation with a 1.65-nm dissociation distance, thereby demonstrating a new method for characterizing dislocation core structures. PMID:26041257

  15. Research on energy conversion mechanism of a screw centrifugal pump under the water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, H.; Li, R. N.; Su, Q. M.; Han, W.; Cheng, X. R.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to research screw centrifugal pump impeller power capability and energy conversion mechanism, we used Navier-Stokes equation and standard k-? equation turbulence model on the basis of the Euler equations to carry out screw centrifugal pump internal flow numerical simulation. This was explored by simulating specific design conditions; the medium is water, variation of speed and pressure of flow filed under the action of the impeller, and the screw centrifugal impeller shroud line and wheel line segment take monitoring sites. The monitoring points are between dynamic head and static head change to analyze the energy conversion capability along the impeller corners of screw centrifugal pump. The results show that the energy of fluid of the screw centrifugal pump is provided by spiral segment, the spiral segment in front of the impeller has played a multi-level role, it has significant reference value to research the energy conversion mechanism of screw centrifugal pump under solid-liquid two phase.

  16. Surgical Strategies to Improve Fixation in the Osteoporotic Spine: The Effects of Tapping, Cement Augmentation, and Screw Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Craig A.; Reiter, Michael; Pfeiffer, Ferris; Choma, Theodore J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design?Biomechanical study of pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone. Objective?To investigate whether it is better to tap or not tap osteoporotic bone prior to placing a cement-augmented pedicle screw. Methods?Initially, we evaluated load to failure of screws placed in cancellous bone blocks with or without prior tapping as well as after varying the depths of tapping prior to screw insertion. Then we evaluated load to failure of screws placed in bone block models with a straight-ahead screw trajectory as well as with screws having a 23-degree cephalad trajectory (toward the end plate). These techniques were tested with nonaugmented (NA) screws as well as with bioactive cement (BioC) augmentation prior to screw insertion. Results?In the NA group, pretapping decreased fixation strength in a dose-dependent fashion. In the BioC group, the tapped screws had significantly greater loads to failure (p?screw orientation, the screws oriented at 23 degrees cephalad had a significantly higher failure force than their respective counterparts at 0 degrees (p?screw fixation is often inadequate in the osteoporotic spine, but this study suggests tapping prior to cement augmentation will substantially improve fixation when compared with not tapping. Angulating screws more cephalad also seems to enhance aging spine fixation. PMID:24494181

  17. Surgical strategies to improve fixation in the osteoporotic spine: the effects of tapping, cement augmentation, and screw trajectory.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Craig A; Reiter, Michael; Pfeiffer, Ferris; Choma, Theodore J

    2014-02-01

    Study Design?Biomechanical study of pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone. Objective?To investigate whether it is better to tap or not tap osteoporotic bone prior to placing a cement-augmented pedicle screw. Methods?Initially, we evaluated load to failure of screws placed in cancellous bone blocks with or without prior tapping as well as after varying the depths of tapping prior to screw insertion. Then we evaluated load to failure of screws placed in bone block models with a straight-ahead screw trajectory as well as with screws having a 23-degree cephalad trajectory (toward the end plate). These techniques were tested with nonaugmented (NA) screws as well as with bioactive cement (BioC) augmentation prior to screw insertion. Results?In the NA group, pretapping decreased fixation strength in a dose-dependent fashion. In the BioC group, the tapped screws had significantly greater loads to failure (p?screw orientation, the screws oriented at 23 degrees cephalad had a significantly higher failure force than their respective counterparts at 0 degrees (p?screw fixation is often inadequate in the osteoporotic spine, but this study suggests tapping prior to cement augmentation will substantially improve fixation when compared with not tapping. Angulating screws more cephalad also seems to enhance aging spine fixation. PMID:24494181

  18. Boundary layer stability and transition to turbulence; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME and JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference, 1st, Portland, OR, June 23-27, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, D. C.; Reed, H. L.; Kobayashi, R.

    The papers presented at the conference provide an overview of current research related to the mechanisms of the laminar-turbulent transition. The principal topics discussed include receptivity, bypass mechanisms, curvature, three-dimensionality, nonlinearities, breakdown, and control. Papers are included on linear and nonlinear receptivity to vortical free-stream disturbances; initiation of boundary-layer disturbances by nonlinear mode interactions; stability and transition to turbulence of thin liquid film flow along a rotating disk; and turbulent intermittency measurements for turbomachinery flows.

  19. Joint pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... both rest and exercise are important. Warm baths, massage, and stretching exercises should be used as often ... Does keeping the joint elevated help? Do medicines, massage, or applying heat reduce the pain? What other ...

  20. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (inventor); Kerley, James J. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  1. Joint Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  2. All-Arthroscopic Suprapectoral Long Head of Biceps Tendon Tenodesis With Interference Screw–Like Tendon Fixation After Modified Lasso-Loop Stitch Tendon Securing

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Thilo; Kircher, Jörn; Krauspe, Ruediger

    2012-01-01

    Arthroscopic suprapectoral techniques for tenodesis of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB) are appropriate for the treatment of proximal biceps lesions. Several types of techniques and fixation devices have been described and evaluated in biomechanical studies regarding primary stability. In this technical note, we describe an all-arthroscopic suprapectoral technique using the 6.25-mm Bio-SwiveLock device (Arthrex, Naples, FL) for an interference screw–like bony fixation after having armed the tendon with a lasso-loop stitch. Both the interference screw fixation and securing of the lasso-loop tendon have been well described and approved in biomechanical tests concerning the primary stability. One advantage of this technique performed from the glenohumeral space, in addition to the strong and secure fixation with ingrowth of the tendon in a bony canal, is the avoidance of touching the soft tissue above the bicipital groove, which results in a smooth fitting of the tendon into its natural canal and therefore avoids mechanical irritation of the stump at the rotator interval. In conclusion, the all-arthroscopic suprapectoral LHB tenodesis performed from the glenohumeral space with the modified lasso-loop stitch for securing of the tendon and the 6.25-mm Bio-SwiveLock suture anchor for interference screw–like bony tendon fixation is an appropriate technique for the treatment of LHB-associated lesions. PMID:23766976

  3. Double-sided fiber laser beam welding process of T-joints for aluminum aircraft fuselage panels: Filler wire melting behavior, process stability, and their effects on porosity defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wang; Yang, Zhibin; Chen, Yanbin; Li, Liqun; Jiang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Yunlong

    2013-11-01

    Aluminum alloy T-joints for aircraft fuselage panels were fabricated by double-sided fiber laser beam welding with filler wire, and the influence of the wire feeding posture on the welding process stability was investigated. A CMOS high speed video system was used to observe the wire melting behavior and the weld pool dynamics in real time during the welding process by using a bandpass red laser with an emission wavelength of 808 nm as backlight source to illuminate the welding zone. The weld porosity defects were analyzed by X-ray radiography. The effects of wire feeding posture on the wire melting behavior, process stability, and porosity defects were investigated. The experimental results indicated that three distinct filler material transfer modes were identified under different wire feeding positions: liquid bridge transfer mode, droplet transfer mode, and spreading transfer mode. The liquid bridge transfer mode could guarantee a stable welding process, and result in the lowest porosity. Compared with wire feeding in the leading direction, the process was not stable and porosity increased when wire feeding in the trailing direction. Increased in the wire feeding angle was disadvantage for pores to escape from the weld molten pool, meanwhile, it made the welding process window smaller due to increasing the centering precision requirement for adjusting the filler wire.

  4. Comparison of Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Arthrodesis Fixation Techniques: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Jakob C; Jolley, Tyler; Shibuya, Naohiro; Lew, Eric; Britt, Matthew; Butterfield, Ted; Boike, Alan; Hardy, Mark; Brancheau, Steven P; Motley, Travis; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the complications that occur after hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. The present study evaluated complications in 152 patients aged 18 to 80 years from 2005 to 2012 from 4 different academic institutions after hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. Overall, 65.8% of the patients had ?1 complication. Infections occurred in 16.5%, dehiscence in 12.5%, and reoperations in 27.0%. The clinical nonunion rate was ?17.8%, and the radiographic nonunion rate was ?13.8%. After logistic regression analysis, only the study site and peripheral neuropathy were associated with having ?1 complication (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively). Single screw fixation compared with other fixation did not have a statistically significant influence on the postoperative complications. However, when fixation was expanded to 4 categories, single screw fixation had lower infection and reoperation rates than either crossed Kirschner wires or other fixation category but not compared with crossed screws on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Although additional studies are warranted, the findings from the present study might aid in both the prognosis of complications and the support of the use of a single screw over crossed Kirchner wire fixation in hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. PMID:25960055

  5. Access to Abutment Screw in Cement Retained Restorations: A Clinical Tip

    PubMed Central

    Harianawala, Husain; Kantharia, Nidhi; Sethi, Tania; Jambhekar, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    Abutment screw loosening has been reported to be the most common prosthetic complications occurring in screw retained as well as cement retained implant restorations. Different methods to treat this issue have been reported in the literature so far; however these have their own short-comings. Retrievability of an implant restoration intact becomes a clinical challenge when the restoration is cement retained especially with an angulated abutment. This technique is aimed at accurately determining the position of the abutment screw in 3 dimensional relationships using a vacuum formed clear stent. This technique can be used as a viable protocol for management of screw loosening in cement retained implant restorations. PMID:25859535

  6. Handbook on dynamics of jointed structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Nicoli M.; Lauffer, James P.; Jew, Michael D.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Gregory, Danny Lynn; Starr, Michael James; Resor, Brian Ray

    2009-07-01

    The problem of understanding and modeling the complicated physics underlying the action and response of the interfaces in typical structures under dynamic loading conditions has occupied researchers for many decades. This handbook presents an integrated approach to the goal of dynamic modeling of typical jointed structures, beginning with a mathematical assessment of experimental or simulation data, development of constitutive models to account for load histories to deformation, establishment of kinematic models coupling to the continuum models, and application of finite element analysis leading to dynamic structural simulation. In addition, formulations are discussed to mitigate the very short simulation time steps that appear to be required in numerical simulation for problems such as this. This handbook satisfies the commitment to DOE that Sandia will develop the technical content and write a Joints Handbook. The content will include: (1) Methods for characterizing the nonlinear stiffness and energy dissipation for typical joints used in mechanical systems and components. (2) The methodology will include practical guidance on experiments, and reduced order models that can be used to characterize joint behavior. (3) Examples for typical bolted and screw joints will be provided.

  7. 2DEG on a cylindrical shell with a screw dislocation

    E-print Network

    Cleverson Filgueiras; Edilberto O. Silva

    2015-04-12

    A two dimensional electron gas on a cylindrical surface with a screw dislocation is considered. More precisely, we investigate how both the geometry and the deformed potential due to a lattice distortion affect the Landau levels of such system. The case showing the deformed potential can be thought in the context of 3D common semiconductors where the electrons are confined on a cylindrical shell. We will show that important quantitative differences exist due to this lattice distortion. For instance, the effective cyclotron frequency is diminished by the deformed potential, which in turn enhances the Hall conductivity.

  8. Flexible intramedullary nail removal using a broken screw removal set.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Scott T; Dahners, Laurence E

    2006-05-01

    The use of flexible titanium intramedullary nails for management of pediatric long bone fractures and some adult fractures has become common. Nail removal after union can be challenging and often requires a larger exposure than nail placement to allow the insertion of grasping devices, such as pliers. A percutaneous technique for the removal of flexible intramedullary nails using extraction bolts from a broken screw removal set is presented. The technique is especially useful when the end of the nail is not prominent and where a hollow reamer from the same set can expose the nail end for the extraction bolt to be used. PMID:16766939

  9. Supersonic Self-Similar Screw-Pinch Plasma Implosions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, Ravi Chandrasekar

    1992-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for the supersonic compression of a plasma containing an axial current and an entrained axial magnetic field (screw-pinch). These solutions represent a complete generalization of previous works done on the Z-pinch and Theta -pinch schemes. The solutions presented herein represent a screw-pinch plasma with a diffuse current profile. Four separate plasma implosion modes are identified. Apart from constituting a mathematical tour-de-force, the solutions representing the implosion modes differ qualitatively from the Z-pinch and Theta-pinch schemes. They comprise of the plasma annulus implosion, a converging transverse MHD shock, the propagation of fast magnetosonic waves towards the axis (weak discontinuities), and, finally, the collapse of a hollow plasma liner. These modes are chosen on the basis of their ability to achieve magnetic field cumulation during the course of the implosion. Analytic expressions describing the asymptotic behavior of the hydromagnetic profiles are obtained for each of the four implosion modes. Numerical examples for selected boundary conditions, representing realistic plasma parameters for the purpose of ultra-high magnetic field generation, are presented for each of the four implosion modes. A special case representing the exponential implosion of a screw-pinch plasma has also been analyzed. It has been found that specifying an exponential dependence to the temporal contribution of the hydromagnetic variables, results in a more constrained solution space. This comparison is made with the case described above which has a power law type temporal contribution. It has been found that the special case admitted only the plasma annulus implosion mode. A few numerical examples for this mode have been provided. Owing to the immense possible applications associated with plasma pinches, the time independent profiles of the hydromagnetic variables have been utilized in order to arrive at an estimate for the practical utility of the theoretical model. More specifically, the time dependent profiles of the hydromagnetic variables, and a piston condition for an external laser driver have been obtained. Numerical examples have also been provided for two cases representing screw-pinch plasma implosions occurring for realistic experimental parameters.

  10. 2DEG on a cylindrical shell with a screw dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueiras, Cleverson; Silva, Edilberto O.

    2015-09-01

    A two dimensional electron gas on a cylindrical surface with a screw dislocation is considered. More precisely, we investigate how both the geometry and the deformed potential due to a lattice distortion affect the Landau levels of such system. The case showing the deformed potential can be thought in the context of 3D common semiconductors where the electrons are confined on a cylindrical shell. We will show that important quantitative differences exist due to this lattice distortion. For instance, the effective cyclotron frequency is diminished by the deformed potential, which in turn enhances the Hall conductivity.

  11. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8?N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264?N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890?N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective. PMID:25991716

  12. Host-feeding sources and habitats jointly affect wing developmental stability depending on sex in the major Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Nattero, Julieta; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre; Del Pilar Fernández, María; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2015-12-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), a slight and random departure from bilateral symmetry that is normally distributed around a 0 mean, has been widely used to infer developmental instability. We investigated whether habitats (ecotopes) and host-feeding sources influenced wing FA of the hematophagous bug Triatoma infestans. Because bug populations occupying distinct habitats differed substantially and consistently in various aspects such as feeding rates, engorgement status and the proportion of gravid females, we predicted that bugs from more open peridomestic habitats (i.e., goat corrals) were more likely to exhibit higher FA than bugs from domiciles. We examined patterns of asymmetry and the amount of wing size and shape FA in 196 adult T. infestans collected across a gradient of habitat suitability and stability that decreased from domiciles, storerooms, kitchens, chicken coops, pig corrals, to goat corrals in a well-defined area of Figueroa, northwestern Argentina. The bugs had unmixed blood meals on human, chicken, pig and goat depending on the bug collection ecotope. We documented the occurrence of FA in wing shape for bugs fed on all host-feeding sources and in all ecotopes except for females from domiciles or fed on humans. FA indices for wing shape differed significantly among host-feeding sources, ecotopes and sexes. The patterns of wing asymmetry in females from domiciles and from goat corrals were significantly different; differences in male FA were congruent with evidence showing that they had higher mobility than females across habitats. The host-feeding sources and habitats of T. infestans affected wing developmental stability depending on sex. PMID:26318543

  13. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner...6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing...

  14. A new technique of bone cement augmentation via the disc space for percutaneous pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Kyu; Park, Choon Keun; Lee, Dong Chan; Lee, Dong Geun

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT In elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, instrumented lumbar interbody fusion may result in fixation failure or nonunion because of decreased pedicle screw pullout strength or increased interbody graft subsidence risk. Thus, given its many advantages, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with cement augmentation can be an effective method to use in elderly patients. The authors report on an easy, safe, and economical technique for bone cement augmentation using a bone biopsy needle inserted into the disc space in 2 osteoporotic patients who were treated with posterior interbody fusion and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. METHODS Two elderly patients who complained of back pain and intermittent neurological claudication underwent posterior interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. After routinely assembling rods on the screws, a bone biopsy needle was inserted into the disc space via the operative field; the needle was then placed around the tips of the screws using fluoroscopic radiography for guidance. Bone cement was injected through the bone biopsy needle, also under fluoroscopic radiography guidance. RESULTS Both patients' symptoms improved after the operation, and there was no evidence of cage subsidence or screw loosening at the 4-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The indirect technique of bone cement augmentation via the disc space for percutaneous screw fixation could be an easy, safe, and economical method. PMID:26360145

  15. Non-invasive ultrasound based temperature measurements at reciprocating screw plastication units: Methodology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Klaus; Praher, Bernhard; Steinbichler, Georg

    2015-05-01

    Previous attempts to accurately measure the real polymer melt temperature in the screw chamber as well as in the screw channels have failed on account of the challenging metrological boundary conditions (high pressure, high temperature, rotational and axial screw movement). We developed a novel ultrasound system - based on reflection measurements - for the online determination of these important process parameters. Using available pressure-volume-temperature (pvT) data from a polymer it is possible to estimate the density and adiabatic compressibility of the material and therefore the pressure and temperature depending longitudinal ultrasound velocity. From the measured ultrasonic reflection time from the screw root and barrel wall and the pressure it is possible to calculate the mean temperature in the screw channel or in the chamber in front of the screw (in opposition to flush mounted infrared or thermocouple probes). By means of the above described system we are able to measure axial profiles of the mean temperature in the screw chamber. The data gathered by the measurement system can be used to develop control strategies for the plastication process to reduce temperature gradients within the screw chamber or as input data for injection moulding simulation.

  16. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  1. A Newly Designed Screw- and Cement-Retained Prosthesis and Its Abutments.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young-Ku; Lim, Young-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The degree of misfit between a prosthesis and its supporting implants is a major concern in screw-retained prostheses because it can lead to screw loosening or mechanical failure of implant components. On the other hand, the difficulty of removing subgingival excess cement and the irretrievability of the superstructure are major drawbacks to cement-retained prostheses. A newly designed screw- and cement-retained prosthesis (SCRP) may solve these problems with its passivity, retrievability, and ease in the complete removal of excess cement, giving it the advantages of both screw-retained and cement-retained prostheses. This prosthetic system is mainly composed of a cement-retained framework with screw holes on the occlusal surface and specially designed cementable abutments for multiunit prostheses. The principle and structure of the SCRP system is described in this article. PMID:26523721

  2. Standing placement of transphyseal screw in the distal radius in 8 Thoroughbred yearlings

    PubMed Central

    Modesto, Rolf B.; Rodgerson, Dwayne H.; Masciarelli, Amanda E.; Spirito, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study describes placement of distal radial transphyseal screws in Thoroughbred yearlings with carpal varus deformities while standing, and identifes short- and long-term complications following the procedure. Data gathered from 2009 to 2013 identified 8 yearlings that met the inclusion criteria. Horses were sedated intravenously and a single 4.5-mm cortical screw was placed in the distal lateral radial physis following application of local anesthetic and surgical preparation of a pre-placed hole. All horses were evaluated weekly after surgery and screw removal was performed standing and under sedation when correction of the angular limb deformity was achieved. The mean time for screw removal was 46 days. No short- or long-term complications were identified. Findings indicate that placing a single transphyseal screw in the lateral aspect of the distal radial physis with the horse standing is a viable option to treat varus angular limb deformity of the carpus in horses. PMID:26028683

  3. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  4. Computer-assisted screw insertion for cervical disorders in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shono, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Isao; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Kamimura, Mikio; Ebara, Sohei; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    To reconstruct highly destructed unstable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cervical lesions, the authors have been using C1/2 transarticular and cervical pedicle screw fixations. Pedicle screw fixation and C1/2 transarticular screw fixation are biomechanically superior to other fixation techniques for RA patients. However, due to severe spinal deformity and small anatomical size of the vertebra, including the lateral mass and pedicle, in the most RA cervical lesions, these screw fixation procedures are technically demanding and pose the potential risk of neurovascular injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and safety of cervical pedicle screw insertion to the deformed, fragile, and small RA spine lesions using computer-assisted image-guidance systems. A frameless, stereotactic image-guidance system that is CT-based, and optoelectronic was used for correct screw placement. A total of 21 patients (16 females, 5 males) with cervical disorders due to RA were surgically treated using the image-guidance system. Postoperative computerized tomography and plane X-ray was used to determine the accuracy of the screw placement. Neural and vascular complications associated with screw insertion and postoperative neural recovery were evaluated. Postoperative radiological evaluations revealed that only 1 (2.1%; C4) of 48 screws inserted into the cervical pedicle had perforated the vertebral artery canal more than 25% (critical breach). However, no neurovascular complications were observed. According to Ranawat’s classification, 9 patients remained the same, and 12 patients showed improvement. Instrumentation failure, loss of reduction, or nonunion was not observed at the final follow-up (average 49.5 months; range 24–96 months). In this study, the authors demonstrated that image-guidance systems could be applied safely to the cervical lesions caused by RA. Image-guidance systems are useful tools in preoperative planning and in transarticular or transpedicular screw placement in the cervical spine of RA patients. PMID:17024400

  5. The Structural Engineer 88 (1) 5 January 2010 25 This paper presents a model for the strength of inclined screws

    E-print Network

    Symons, Digby

    . The model is an upper bound plastic collapse model that assumes that the timber and screws behave perfectly plastically and that the concrete remains undamaged. Six failure modes are considered: yield of the screw allow screw withdrawal, lateral crushing of the timber and the development of plastic hinges

  6. Shoulder joint (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is the most freely moving joint of the body. The shoulder joint can move in multiple directions therefore it is less stable than other joints and is more susceptible to injury. Dislocation of the shoulder joint is common and occurs ...

  7. Arthritis: Metacarpophalangeal (MP) Joint

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is completely destroyed, then joint replacement or joint fusion are effective surgical options. The joints can be ... useful, especially for older or less active individuals. Fusion—or making the joint solid—is an effective ...

  8. Screw Back-Out Following "Open-Door" Cervical Laminoplasty: A Review of 165 Plates

    PubMed Central

    Buchowski, Jacob M.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To investigate safety profile of open door laminoplasty plates. Overview of Literature Few reports have documented potential complications related to the use of cervical laminoplasty plates. Methods Records and radiographs of consecutive plated laminoplasty patients of one academic surgeon were analyzed. Group 1 had screw back-out, defined as change in screw position, and group 2 did not. Results Forty-two patients (mean age, 56.9) underwent "open-door" cervical laminoplasty using 165 plates. Mean follow-up was 24 months (range, 12-49 months). Mean Nurick grade improved from 2.1 to 0.9 postoperatively. Cervical lordosis (C2-7) was 12.1° preoperatively and 10.0° postoperatively. Range-of-motion was 27.0° preoperatively and 23.4° postoperatively. Partial screw back-out was noted in 27 of 165 plates (16.4%) and in 34 of 660 screws (5.2%). Of the 34 screws, 27 (79.4%) were at either the most cranial (12/27, 44.4%) or the most caudal (15/27, 55.5%) level. Cranially, 11/12 screws (91.7%) had back-out. Caudally, 9/15 lateral mass screws (60.0%) backed-out versus 6 laminar screws (40.0%). Of the 22 patients with screw back-out, 15 (68.2%) occurred <3 months postoperative and 6 (27.3%) occurred 4-12 months postoperative. No statistical differences were found between group 1 and 2 for age, gender, preoperative and postoperative lordosis, focal sagittal alignment, range-of-motion, or Nurick grade. Despite screw backout in 22 patients, there were no plate dislodgements, laminoplasty closure, or neurological deterioration. Conclusions Although screw back-out may occur with the use of cervical laminoplasty plates, the use of these plates without a bone block appears to be safe and reliable. As screw back-out is most common at the cranial and caudal ends of the laminoplasty, we recommend using the maximum number of screws (typically 2 for the lateral mass and 2 for the spinous process) at these levels to secure the plate to the bone. PMID:26713115

  9. Self-Assembly of Left and Right-Handed Molecular Screws

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Khan, I. John; McGuinness, Kenneth; Parmar, Avanish S.; Silva, Teresita; Murthy, Sanjeeva; Nanda, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Stereoselectivity is a hallmark of biomolecular processes from catalysis to self-assembly, which predominantly occur between homochiral species. However, both homochiral and heterochiral complexes of synthetic polypeptides have been observed where stereoselectivity hinges on details of intermolecular interactions. This raises the question whether general rules governing stereoselectivity exist. A geometric ridges-in-grooves model of interacting helices indicates that heterochiral associations should generally be favored in this class of structures. We tested this principle using a simplified molecular screw – a collagen peptide triple- helix composed of either L- or D-proline with a cyclic aliphatic side chain. Calculated stabilities of like- and opposite- handed triple-helical pairings indicated a preference for heterospecific associations. Mixing left and right-handed helices drastically lowered solubility, resulting in micron-scale sheet-like assemblies that are one peptide-length thick as characterized with atomic force microscopy. X-ray scattering measurements of inter-helical spacing in these sheets support a tight ridges-in-grooves packing of left and right-handed triple helices. PMID:24283407

  10. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  11. Management of acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Ma, Richard; Bedi, Asheesh; Dines, David M; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2014-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are among the most common shoulder girdle injuries in athletes and most commonly result from a direct force to the acromion with the arm in an adducted position. Acromioclavicular joint injuries often present with associated injuries to the glenohumeral joint, including an increased incidence of superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) tears that may warrant further evaluation and treatment. Anteroposterior stability of the acromioclavicular joint is conferred by the capsule and acromioclavicular ligaments, of which the posterior and superior ligaments are the strongest. Superior-inferior stability is maintained by the coracoclavicular (conoid and trapezoid) ligaments. Type-I or type-II acromioclavicular joint injuries have been treated with sling immobilization, early shoulder motion, and physical therapy, with favorable outcomes. Return to activity can occur when normal shoulder motion and strength are obtained and the shoulder is asymptomatic as compared with the contralateral normal extremity. The management of type-III injuries remains controversial and is individualized. While a return to the previous level of functional activity with nonsurgical treatment has been documented in a number of case series, surgical reduction and coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction has been associated with a favorable outcome and can be considered in patients who place high functional demands on their shoulders or in athletes who participate in overhead sports. Surgical management is indicated for high-grade (?type IV) acromioclavicular joint injuries to achieve anatomic reduction of the acromioclavicular joint, reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and repair of the deltotrapezial fascia. Outcomes after surgical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments have been satisfactory with regard to achieving pain relief and return to functional activities, but further improvements in the biomechanical strength of these constructs are necessary to avoid loss of reduction and creep with cyclic loading. PMID:24382728

  12. Wall-locking of kink modes in a line-tied screw pinch with a rotating wall

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-05-15

    The effect of rotating conducting walls on mode-locking is studied in a line-tied, linear screw pinch experiment and then compared to a torque balance model which has been extended to include differential wall rotation. Wall rotation is predicted to asymmetrically affect the mode-unlocking threshold, with fast rotation eliminating the locking bifurcation. Static error fields are observed to lock the resistive wall mode (RWM) variant of the current driven kink instability by modifying the electromagnetic torque. Using locked modes, the stabilizing effect of wall rotation on the RWM is experimentally demonstrated by illustrating a reduction of the RWM growth rate and an extension of the RWM-stable operation window.

  13. The helical screw expander evaluation project. [for geothermal wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A positive-displacement helical-screw expander of the Lysholm type has been adapted for geothermal service and successfully demonstrated in a 50 kW prototype power system. Evaluation of the expander by tests of a new model in a 1 MW power system under wellhead conditions in selected liquid-dominated geothermal fields is proposed. The objectives are to determine the performance characteristics of the expander and power system over a broad range of operating conditions and also to examine the concept of wellhead power plants. Throttling and fractionation of the fluids from the test wells is planned to simulate a wide range of wellhead pressures and steam fractions. Variation in the expander exhaust pressure is also planned. The investigation will include expander efficiency, corrosion, erosion, scale formation and control, and endurance testing. Interaction studies with the wells and an electric grid are also proposed.

  14. Parallel operation of NH3 screw compressors - the optimum way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pijnenburg, B.; Ritmann, J.

    2015-08-01

    The use of more smaller industrial NH3 screw compressors operating in parallel seems to offer the optimum way when it comes to fulfilling maximum part load efficiency, increased redundancy and other highly requested features in the industrial refrigeration industry today. Parallel operation in an optimum way can be selected to secure continuous operation and can in most applications be configured to ensure lower overall operating economy. New compressors are developed to meet requirements for flexibility in operation and are controlled in an intelligent way. The intelligent control system keeps focus on all external demands, but yet striving to offer always the lowest possible absorbed power, including in future scenarios with connection to smart grid.

  15. Structural and torsional vibration analysis of a dry screw compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willie, J.; Sachs, R.

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates torsional vibration and pulsating noise in a dry screw compressor. The compressor is designed at Gardner Denver (GD) and is oil free and use for mounting on highway trucks. They are driven using a Power Take-Off (PTO) transmission and gear box on a truck. Torque peak fluctuation and noise measurements are done and their sources are investigated and reported in this work. To accurately predict the torsional response (frequency and relative angular deflection and torque amplitude), the Holzer method is used. It is shown that the first torsional frequency is manifested as sidebands in the gear train meshing frequencies and this can lead to noise that is the result of amplitude modulation. Sensitivity analysis of the drive train identifies the weakest link in the drive train that limits the first torsional frequency to a low value. Finally, the significance of higher mode shapes on inter-lobe clearance distribution of the rotors is investigated.

  16. Rigid-drift magnetohydrodynamic equilibria for cylindrical screw pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The rigid-drift equations of MHD equilibria in cylindrical geometry are solved analytically in terms of an infinite series of hypergeometric functions for the case where the pressure is proportional to the square of number density and the current density is arbitrarily pitched. Solutions are obtained for a pure Z pinch, a pure theta pinch, and a general screw pinch. It is found that the shapes of the pressure and magnetic-field profiles are completely determined by the model once two parameters are specified: the local plasma beta on the axis and a quantity related to the pitch of the current density. A set of profiles that resemble those observed experimentally in reversed-field pinches is presented. The results also indicate that hollow pressure profiles and reversed Bz profiles can occur either simultaneously or independently and that the pressure always falls to zero at a finite value of the radius.

  17. The numerical analysis of labyrinth screw pump and seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Luo, Jin; Han, Guojun

    1991-08-01

    The main part of a labyrinth screw pump and seal is composed of both threads on the axle and the sleeve, which intersect at an oblique angle. A unit element surrounded by the two sets of threads has been taken as an isolated calculating area. Based on the N-S equation and the continuity equation, the centrifugal force and curvature effect have been neglected. Due to the periodical property along z-direction, it is reasonable to neglect the terms (d/dz) in the equations on the entrance and the middle cross section of the unit element. Thus, the set of equations could be reduced in a simpler form, and the coupling of x-y plane flow with z-direction could be eliminated. Therefore a quasi-state three-dimensional velocity field in the unit element space can be calculated by numerical solutions. Thus the corresponding characteristics of the labyrinth pump and seal may be obtained.

  18. Divertor Stabilization in Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V.P.

    2005-01-15

    Divertor stabilization is considered as an alternative MHD stability concept for mirror-based plasma confinement systems. The discussed concept is based on thermodynamics and self-organization of magnetized plasmas, contrary to the conventional MHD stabilization, based on the presence of averaged 'magnetic well'. We show that self-organized plasma maintenance near a relaxed marginally-stable state with decreasing pressure profile can be realized in essentially non-paraxial longitudinally linked mirror cells restricted by a joint divertorlike magnetic separatrix with one or several magnetic field nulls at the plasma edge. Brief history, basic principles, and main advantages of the divertor stabilization concept are discussed.

  19. Alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreatment for fermentable sugar production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inevitable depletion of fossil fuels has resulted in an increasing worldwide interest in exploring alternative and sustainable energy sources. Lignocellulose, which is the most abundant biomass on earth, is widely regarded as a promising raw material to produce fuel ethanol. Pretreatment is an essential step to disrupt the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic matrix for enzymatic saccharification and bioethanol production. This paper established an ATSE (alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreatment) process using a specially designed twin-screw extruder in the presence of alkaline solution to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of corn stover for the production of fermentable sugars. Results The ATSE pretreatment was conducted with a biomass/liquid ratio of 1/2 (w/w) at a temperature of 99°C without heating equipment. The results indicated that ATSE pretreatment is effective in improving the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Sodium hydroxide loading is more influential factor affecting both sugar yield and lignin degradation than heat preservation time. After ATSE pretreatment under the proper conditions (NaOH loading of 0.06 g/g biomass during ATSE and 1 hour heat preservation after extrusion), 71% lignin removal was achieved and the conversions of glucan and xylan in the pretreated biomass can reach to 83% and 89% respectively via subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis (cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g-biomass and substrate consistency of 2%). About 78% of the original polysaccharides were converted into fermentable sugars. Conclusions With the physicochemical functions in extrusion, the ATSE method can effectively overcome the recalcitrance of lignocellulose for the production of fermentable sugars from corn stover. This process can be considered as a promising pretreatment method due to its relatively low temperature (99°C), high biomass/liquid ratio (1/2) and satisfied total sugar yield (78%), despite further study is needed for process optimization and cost reduction. PMID:23834726

  20. Biomechanical effects of plate area and locking screw on medial open tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chu-An; Lin, Shang-Chih; Hwa, Su-Yang; Chen, Chun-Ming; Tseng, Ching-Shiow

    2015-01-01

    Medial open high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been used to treat osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee. However, weaker plate strength, unstable plate/screw junction and improper surgery technique are highly related to the HTO outcomes. Two ?-shape plates were designed and eight variations (two supporting area × four locking stiffness) were compared by finite-element method. The computed tomography-based tibia was reconstructed and both wedge micromotion and implant stresses were chosen as the comparison indices. The construct was subjected to surgical and physiological loads. The medial-posterior region is the most loaded region and the load through the posterior leg is about four times that through the anterior leg. This indicates that the two-leg design can form a force-couple mechanism to effectively reduce the implant stresses. The use of locking screws significantly decrease the screw and hole stresses. However, the extending plate reduces the stresses of screws and holes above the wedge but makes the distal screws and holes much stressed. Wedge micromotion is affected by extending plate rather than locking screw. Three factors contribute to effective stabilisation of unstable HTO wedge: (1) intimate tibia-plate contact at medial-posterior regions, (2) sufficient rigidity at plate-screw junctions and (3) effective moment-balancing design at distal tibia-plate interfaces. PMID:24617553

  1. Experimental results of single screw mechanical tests: a follow-up to SAND2005-6036.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sandwook; Lee, Kenneth L.; Korellis, John S.; McFadden, Sam X.

    2006-08-01

    The work reported here was conducted to address issues raised regarding mechanical testing of attachment screws described in SAND2005-6036, as well as to increase the understanding of screw behavior through additional testing. Efforts were made to evaluate fixture modifications and address issues of interest, including: fabrication of 45{sup o} test fixtures, measurement of the frictional load from the angled fixture guide, employment of electromechanical displacement transducers, development of a single-shear test, and study the affect of thread start orientation on single-shear behavior. A286 and 302HQ, No.10-32 socket-head cap screws were tested having orientations with respect to the primary loading axis of 0{sup 0}, 45{sup o}, 60{sup o}, 75{sup o} and 90{sup o} at stroke speeds 0,001 and 10 in/sec. The frictional load resulting from the angled screw fixture guide was insignificant. Load-displacement curves of A286 screws did not show a minimum value in displacement to failure (DTF) for 60{sup o} shear tests. Tests of 302HQ screws did not produce a consistent trend in DTF with load angle. The effect of displacement rate on DTF became larger as shear angle increased for both A286 and 302HQ screws.

  2. Early Results from Posterior Cervical Fusion with a Screw-Rod System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyun; Shin, Dong Ah; Yi, Seung; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose We performed 65 cases of posterior fusion surgery for cervical and/or high thoracic lesions using a polyaxial screw-rod system. Patients and Methods A total of 486 screws were implanted in 65 patients. Results Fixation of the screws was carried out over an average of 2.9 spinal segments. Upon evaluation by postoperative CT scans, twelve (2.5%) screws had suboptimal trajectories but two of these revealed radiculopathy in one patient and required screw repositioning. No vascular sequelae resulted. There has been no segmental motion in any of the cases to date. As for other complications, there was one case of dural tearing and two cases of lateral mass fractures. There were no infections or other wound healing problems or hardware failures. No patients had neurological deterioration after surgery. There were statistically significant improvements in the mean Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores in the preoperative and late postoperative follow-up evaluations. Although further studies are required to establish the long-term results of fusion rates and clinical outcomes. Conclusion We cautiously suggest that the posterior polyaxial screw-rod system can be safely used as a primary or additional fusion method in this risky region. The successful and safe use of this method is dependent on a precise preoperative surgical plan and tactics for ensuring safe screw fixation. PMID:17594152

  3. In-vitro development of a temporal abutment screw to protect osseointegration in immediate loaded implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, a temporal abutment fixation screw, designed to fracture in a controlled way upon application of an occlusal force sufficient to produce critical micromotion was developed. The purpose of the screw was to protect the osseointegration of immediate loaded single implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven different screw prototypes were examined by fixing titanium abutments to 112 Mozo-Grau external hexagon implants (MG Osseous®; Mozo-Grau, S.A., Valladolid, Spain). Fracture strength was tested at 30° in two subgroups per screw: one under dynamic loading and the other without prior dynamic loading. Dynamic loading was performed in a single-axis chewing simulator using 150,000 load cycles at 50 N. After normal distribution of obtained data was verified by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, fracture resistance between samples submitted and not submitted to dynamic loading was compared by the use of Student's t-test. Comparison of fracture resistance among different screw designs was performed by the use of one-way analysis of variance. Confidence interval was set at 95%. RESULTS Fractures occurred in all screws, allowing easy retrieval. Screw Prototypes 2, 5 and 6 failed during dynamic loading and exhibited statistically significant differences from the other prototypes. CONCLUSION Prototypes 2, 5 and 6 may offer a useful protective mechanism during occlusal overload in immediate loaded implants. PMID:25932315

  4. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. Material/Methods We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. Results All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. Conclusions Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  5. Navigated pedicle screw placement using computed tomographic data in dorsolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Saurabh; Sharma, Rajbahadur; Garg, Sudhir; Jindal, Rohit; Gupta, Ravi; Goe, Anshul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Computed tomographic (CT) based navigation is a technique to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. It is believed to enhance accuracy of pedicle screw placement, potentially avoiding complications arising due to pedicle wall breach. This study aims to assess the results of dorsolumbar fractures operated by this technique. Materials and Methods: Thirty consecutive skeletally mature patients of fractures of dorsolumbar spine (T9–L5) were subjected to an optoelectronic navigation system. All patients were thoroughly examined for neurological deficit. The criterion for instability were either a tricolumnar injury or presence of neurological deficit or both. Patients with multilevel fractures and distorted spine were excluded from study. Time taken for insertion of each pedicle screw was recorded and placement assessed with a postoperative CT scan using Laine's grading system. Results: Only one screw out of a total of 118 screws was misplaced with a Laine's Grade 5 placement, showing a misplacement rate of 0.847%. Average time for matching was 7.8 min (range 5-12 min). Average time taken for insertion of a single screw was 4.19 min (range 2-8 min) and total time for all screws after exposure was 34.23 min (range 24-45 min) for a four screw construct. No neurovascular complications were seen in any of the patients postoperatively and in subsequent followup of 1-year duration. Conclusion: CT-based navigation is effective in improving accuracy of pedicle screw placement in traumatic injuries of dorsolumbar spine (T9-L5), however additional cost of procuring CT scan to the patient and cost of equipment is of significant concern in developing countries. Reduced radiation exposure and lowered ergonomic constraints around the operation table are its additional benefits. PMID:25404766

  6. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. RESULTS All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  7. Fully Threaded Versus Partially Threaded Screws: Determining Shear in Cancellous Bone Fixation.

    PubMed

    Downey, Michael W; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Carpenter, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers have studied and compared various forms of intraosseous fixation. No studies have examined the effects of shear through stiffness and failure strength of a fully threaded versus a partially threaded screw. Our hypothesis was that the fully threaded lag screw technique would provide greater shear strength and resistance. Thirty-six synthetic sawbone blocks were used to test screw fixation. In group 1 (n = 9), 2 blocks were fixed together using a fully threaded 4.0-mm stainless steel cancellous bone screw and the lag technique. In group 2 (n = 8), 2 blocks were fixed together using the standard manufacturer-recommended method for inserting 4.0-mm partially threaded stainless steel cancellous bone screws. The constructs were then mechanically tested. Shear was applied by compressing each construct at an axial displacement rate of 0.5 mm/s until failure. The fully threaded screw had a significantly greater (p = .026) initial stiffness (106.4 ± 15.8 N/mm) than the partially threaded screw (80.1 ± 27.5 N/mm). The yield load and displacement for the fully threaded group (429.4 ± 11.7 N and 7.2 ± 0.35 mm) were 64% and 67% greater than those for the partially threaded screw group (261.4 ± 26.1 N and 4.3 ± 1.03 mm), respectively. The results of the present study have demonstrated the importance of a full-thread construct to prevent shear and to decrease strain at the fracture. The confirmation of our hypothesis questions the future need and use of partially threaded screws for cancellous bone fixation. PMID:26210079

  8. Use of screws and cement in revision TKA with primary or revision specific prosthesis with up to 17 years followup.

    PubMed

    Berend, Michael E; Ritter, Merrill A; Keating, E Michael; Jackson, Michael D; Davis, Kenneth E; Malinzak, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use for screws and cement, and primary and revision specific prosthesis for revision TKA. Between July 1989 and February 2010, 839 consecutive revision TKAs were performed, with 609 knees meeting inclusion criteria. At 17 years followup, Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 0.9859 for revision specific prosthesis with screws and cement, 0.9848 for revision prosthesis with no screws, 0.9118 for primary prosthesis with screws, and 0.9424 for primary prosthesis with no screws. Revision TKAs using screws had greater defects (P<.0001). Use of revision prosthesis along with screws and cement to correct largely defective revision TKAs is highly recommended. PMID:25151092

  9. Investigation of a Multiphase Twin-screw Pump Operating at High Gas Volume Fractions 

    E-print Network

    Kroupa, Ryan Daniel

    2012-07-16

    and knowledge. I would also like to offer a special thank you for Dr. Stuart Scott and Dr. Jun Xu at Shell for making this research possible. vi NOMENCLATURE A = cross-sectional area of volume created by screw B = outer screw diameter BPD... the red line represents the production. In the above figure the red line represents the production of oil from a MPP field test. This study performed in 1998 shows a constant production of nearly 11,000 BPD until the installation of a twin-screw MPP...

  10. A comparison of two headless compression screws for operative treatment of scaphoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the interfragmentary compression force across a simulated scaphoid fracture by two commonly used compression screw systems; the Acutrak 2 Standard and the 3.0 mm Synthes headless compression screw. Methods Sixteen (8 pairs; 6 female, 2 male) cadaver scaphoids were randomly assigned to receive either the Acutrak 2 or Synthes screw with the contralateral scaphoid designated to receive the opposite. Guide wires were inserted under fluoroscopic control. Following transverse osteotomy, the distal and proximal fragments were placed on either side of a custom load cell, to measure interfragmentary compression. Screws were placed under fluoroscopic control using the manufacturer's recommended surgical technique. Compressive forces were measured during screw insertion. Recording continued for an additional 60s in order to measure any loss of compression after installation was complete. The peak and final interfragmentary compression were recorded and paired t-tests performed. Results The mean peak compression generated by the Acutrak 2 Standard was greater than that produced by the Synthes compression screw (103.9 ± 33.2 N vs. 88.7 ± 38.6 N respectively, p = 0.13). The mean final interfragmentary compression generated by the Acutrak 2 screw (68.6 ± 36.4 N) was significantly greater (p = 0.04) than the Synthes screw (37.2 ± 26.8 N). Specimens typically reached a steady state of compression by 120-150s after final tightening. Conclusion Peak interfragmentary compression observed during screw installation was similar for both screw systems. However, the mean interfragmentary compression generated by the Acutrak 2 Standard was significantly greater. Our study demonstrates that the Synthes headless compression screw experienced a greater loss of interfragmentary compressive force from the time of installation to the final steady state compression level. The higher post-installation compression of the Acutrak 2 Standard may be attributable to the greater number of threads throughout the entire length of the screw. The clinical significance of these results, are, at this point uncertain. We do demonstrate that a fully threaded design offers a more reliable compression that may translate to more predictable bony union. PMID:21645410

  11. Plastification of polymers in twin-screw-extruders: New visualization technic using high-speed imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Knieper, A. E-mail: Christian.Beinert@lbf.fraunhofer.de; Beinert, C. E-mail: Christian.Beinert@lbf.fraunhofer.de

    2014-05-15

    The initial melting of the first granules through plastic energy dissipation (PED) at the beginning of the melting zone, in the co-rotating twin-screw extruder is visualized in this work. The visualization was created through the use of a high speed camera in the cross section of the melting zone. The parameters screw speed, granule-temperature, temperature-profile, type of polymer and back pressure were examined. It was shown that the screw speed and the temperature-profile have significant influence on the rate of initial melting.

  12. Deformations of the spin currents by topological screw dislocation and cosmic dispiration

    E-print Network

    Jian-hua Wang; Kai Ma; Kang Li; Hua-wei Fan

    2015-10-27

    We study the spin currents induced by topological screw dislocation and cosmic dispiration. By using the extended Drude model, we find that the spin dependent forces are modified by the nontrivial geometry. For the topological screw dislocation, only the direction of spin current is bended by deforming the spin polarization vector. In contrast, the force induced by cosmic dispiration could affect both the direction and magnitude of the spin current. As a consequence, the spin-Hall conductivity doesn't receive corrections from screw dislocation.

  13. Deformations of the spin currents by topological screw dislocation and cosmic dispiration

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jian-hua; Li, Kang; Fan, Hua-wei

    2015-01-01

    We study the spin currents induced by topological screw dislocation and cosmic dispiration. By using the extended Drude model, we find that the spin dependent forces are modified by the nontrivial geometry. For the topological screw dislocation, only the direction of spin current is bended by deforming the spin polarization vector. In contrast, the force induced by cosmic dispiration could affect both the direction and magnitude of the spin current. As a consequence, the spin-Hall conductivity doesn't receive corrections from screw dislocation.

  14. Deformations of the spin currents by topological screw dislocation and cosmic dispiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Ma, Kai; Li, Kang; Fan, Huawei

    2015-11-01

    We study the spin currents induced by topological screw dislocation and cosmic dispiration. By using the extended Drude model, we find that the spin dependent forces are modified by the nontrivial geometry. For the topological screw dislocation, only the direction of spin current is bent by deforming the spin polarization vector. In contrast, the force induced by cosmic dispiration could affect both the direction and magnitude of the spin current. As a consequence, the spin-Hall conductivity does not receive corrections from screw dislocation.

  15. Plastification of polymers in twin-screw-extruders: New visualization technic using high-speed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knieper, A.; Beinert, C.

    2014-05-01

    The initial melting of the first granules through plastic energy dissipation (PED) at the beginning of the melting zone, in the co-rotating twin-screw extruder is visualized in this work. The visualization was created through the use of a high speed camera in the cross section of the melting zone. The parameters screw speed, granule-temperature, temperature-profile, type of polymer and back pressure were examined. It was shown that the screw speed and the temperature-profile have significant influence on the rate of initial melting.

  16. Screw-rotation twinning through helical movement of triple-partials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pan; Du, Kui; Zhang, Jianxin; Wang, Lihua; Yue, Yonghai; Ma, Evan; Zhang, Yuefei; Zhang, Ze; Chen, Mingwei; Han, Xiaodong

    2012-09-01

    By in situ uniaxial-tensile tests with dynamic and atomic scale observation, we report the quantitative investigation of strain-induced deformation-twinning process through incoherent twin boundary propagation in nanocrystalline Au. The consecutive and quantitative strain maps revealed that a strong compressive strain, up to 5.8%, was formed. A screw-rotation twinning mechanism by consecutive and collective screw-rotations of triple-partials along a [111] screw-axis is proposed. This twin generates a macro-strain of 0.707, same as the conventional shear twins, but in a helical manner.

  17. Fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw accuracy with a mini-open approach: a tomographic evaluation of 470 screws in 125 patients

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Sánchez, José Antonio; Gutiérrez-Partida, Carlos Francisco; Ramírez-Barrios, Luis Rodolfo; Ortíz-Leyva, Ramses Uriel; Rodríguez-García, Manuel; Sánchez-Escandón, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Background Transpedicular screws are currently placed with open free hand and minimally invasive techniques assisted with either fluoroscopy or navigation. Screw placement accuracy had been investigated with several methods reaching accuracy rates from 71.9% to 98.8%. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and safety for 2-D fluoroscopy-guided screw placement assisted with electrophysiological monitoring and the inter-observer agreement for the breach classification. Methods A retrospective review was performed on 125 consecutive patients who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and transpedicular screws placement between the levels of T-12 and S-1. Screw accuracy was evaluated using a postoperative computed tomography by three independent observers. Pedicle breach was documented when there was a violation in any direction of the pedicle. Inter-observer agreement was assessed with the Kappa coefficient. Results A total of 470 transpedicular screws were evaluated between the levels of T-12 and S-1. In 57 patients the instrumentation was bilateral and in 68 unilateral. A substantial degree of agreement was found between the observers AB (?=0.769) and A-C (?=0.784) and almost perfect agreement between observers B-C (?=0.928). There were a total of 427.33 (90.92%) screws without breach, 39.33 (8.37%) minor breach pedicles and 3.33 (0.71%) major breach pedicles. The pedicle breach rate was 9.08% Trajectory pedicle breach percentages were as follows: minor medial pedicle breach 4.68%, minor lateral pedicle breach 3.47%, minor inferior pedicle breach 0.22%, and major medial breach 0.70%. No intraoperative instrumentation-related or postoperative clinical complications were encountered and no surgical revision was needed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated a high accuracy (90.2%) for 2-D fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw using electromonitoring. Only 0.71% of the 470 screws had a major breach. Knowing the radiological spine pedicle anatomy and the correct interpretation of EMG are the key factors for this technique. PMID:26609509

  18. Management of difficult intra-articular fractures or fracture dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Liodaki, E; Xing, S G; Mailaender, P; Stang, F

    2015-01-01

    Intra-articular fractures or fracture dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint are difficult clinically because the bone and soft tissue structures are small and intricate. Suboptimal treatment of intra-articular fractures typically leads to functional impairment of the hand. This article reviews the current methods of treatment, together with the senior author's experience in treating difficult proximal interphalangeal joint fractures and dislocations. Besides conservative treatments, surgical treatments include open or closed reduction with traditional Osteosynthesis, such as K-wires, screws or plates. Among recent developments are the percutaneous application of thin cannulated compression screws and novel dynamic external fixators. After a preferred minimally invasive treatment with stable reconstruction of the articular surface, sufficient aftercare is necessary to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:25427554

  19. Is Polymethyl Methacrylate a Viable Option for Salvaging Lateral Mass Screw Failure in the Subaxial Cervical Spine?

    PubMed Central

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Kuhns, Craig A.; Jenkins, Tyler J.; Pfeiffer, Ferris M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design?Biomechanical analysis of lateral mass screw pullout strength. Objective?We compare the pullout strength of our bone cement–revised lateral mass screw with the standard lateral mass screw. Methods?In cadaveric cervical spines, we simulated lateral mass screw “cutouts” unilaterally from C3 to C7. We salvaged fixation in the cutout side with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or Cortoss cement (Orthovita, Malvern, Pennsylvania, United States), allowed the cement to harden, and then drilled and placed lateral mass screws back into the cement-augmented lateral masses. On the contralateral side, we placed standard lateral mass screws into the native, or normal lateral, masses and then compared pullout strength of the cement-augmented side to the standard lateral mass screw. For pullout testing, each augmentation group was fixed to a servohydraulic load frame and a specially designed pullout fixture was attached to each lateral mass screw head. Results?Quick-mix PMMA-salvaged lateral mass screws required greater force to fail when compared with native lateral mass screws. Cortoss cement and PMMA standard-mix cement-augmented screws demonstrated less strength of fixation when compared with control-side lateral mass screws. Attempts at a second round of cement salvage of the same lateral masses led to more variations in load to failure, but quick-mix PMMA again demonstrated greater load to failure when compared with the nonaugmented control lateral mass screws. Conclusion?Quick-mix PMMA cement revision equips the spinal surgeon with a much needed salvage option for a failed lateral mass screw in the subaxial cervical spine. PMID:25649421

  20. Is polymethyl methacrylate a viable option for salvaging lateral mass screw failure in the subaxial cervical spine?

    PubMed

    Gallizzi, Michael A; Kuhns, Craig A; Jenkins, Tyler J; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2015-02-01

    Study Design?Biomechanical analysis of lateral mass screw pullout strength. Objective?We compare the pullout strength of our bone cement-revised lateral mass screw with the standard lateral mass screw. Methods?In cadaveric cervical spines, we simulated lateral mass screw "cutouts" unilaterally from C3 to C7. We salvaged fixation in the cutout side with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or Cortoss cement (Orthovita, Malvern, Pennsylvania, United States), allowed the cement to harden, and then drilled and placed lateral mass screws back into the cement-augmented lateral masses. On the contralateral side, we placed standard lateral mass screws into the native, or normal lateral, masses and then compared pullout strength of the cement-augmented side to the standard lateral mass screw. For pullout testing, each augmentation group was fixed to a servohydraulic load frame and a specially designed pullout fixture was attached to each lateral mass screw head. Results?Quick-mix PMMA-salvaged lateral mass screws required greater force to fail when compared with native lateral mass screws. Cortoss cement and PMMA standard-mix cement-augmented screws demonstrated less strength of fixation when compared with control-side lateral mass screws. Attempts at a second round of cement salvage of the same lateral masses led to more variations in load to failure, but quick-mix PMMA again demonstrated greater load to failure when compared with the nonaugmented control lateral mass screws. Conclusion?Quick-mix PMMA cement revision equips the spinal surgeon with a much needed salvage option for a failed lateral mass screw in the subaxial cervical spine. PMID:25649421

  1. Medial column stabilization.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, A R

    1991-07-01

    This article presented a brief review of medial column stabilizing procedures. The various types of procedures that have been advocated for different deformities have been discussed. It is important to keep in mind that fusion of any of the medial column joints should not be performed as an isolated procedure in flexible flatfoot deformity. Medial column stabilization is only a component procedure when surgically managing a flexible flatfoot. When choosing procedures to correct a flexible flatfoot, thorough preoperative evaluation is important. It is also important to realize that conservative measures should be exhausted before attempting any type of stabilization of the medial column for flexible flatfoot deformity. Specific criteria for flexible flatfoot surgery should include severe uncontrollable deformity, an inability to wear standard foot gear, and persistent pain and disability despite exhaustive conservative therapy. A medial column stabilization is also an excellent procedure for those patients who have end-stage degenerative joint disease of the medial longitudinal arch. PMID:1893342

  2. Stable, Thermally Conductive Fillers for Bolted Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVesque, Raymond J., II; Jones, Cherie A.; Babel, Henry W.

    2003-01-01

    A commercial structural epoxy [Super Koropon (or equivalent)] has been found to be a suitable filler material for bolted joints that are required to have large thermal conductances. The contact area of such a joint can be less than 1 percent of the apparent joint area, the exact value depending on the roughnesses of the mating surfaces. By occupying the valleys between contact peaks, the filler widens the effective cross section for thermal conduction. In comparison with prior thermal joint-filler materials, the present epoxy offers advantages of stability, ease of application, and -- as a byproduct of its stability -- lasting protection against corrosion. Moreover, unlike silicone greases that have been used previously, this epoxy does not migrate to contaminate adjacent surfaces. Because this epoxy in its uncured state wets metal joint surfaces and has low viscosity, it readily flows to fill the gaps between the mating surfaces: these characteristics affect the overall thermal conductance of the joint more than does the bulk thermal conductivity of the epoxy, which is not exceptional. The thermal conductances of metal-to-metal joints containing this epoxy were found to range between 5 and 8 times those of unfilled joints.

  3. Analysis of stress induced by screws in the vertebral fixation system

    PubMed Central

    Fakhouri, Sarah Fakher; Shimano, Marcos Massao; de Araújo, Cleudmar Amaral; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido; Shimano, Antônio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare, using photoelasticity, internal stress produced by USS II type screw with 5.2 and 6.2 mm external diameters, when submitted to three different pullout strengths. Methods: Two photoelastic models were especially made. The simulation was performed using loads of 1.8, 2.4 e 3.3 kgf.The fringe orders were evaluated around the screws. In all the models analyzed the shear stress were calculated. Results: Independently of the applied load, the smaller screw showed higher values of shear stress. Conclusion: According to the analysis performed, we observed that the place of highest stress was in the first thread of the lead, close to the head of the screws. Experimental study. PMID:24644414

  4. Design and Construction of a High Pressure System for Evaluating Multiphase Twin-Screw Pumps 

    E-print Network

    Hatch, Theodore Isaac

    2013-08-26

    Twin-screw pumps are currently sold by manufacturers without adequate data predicting the pump behavior when pumping multiphase mixtures. In light of the fact that pump behavior is known to change significantly under these conditions, a new closed...

  5. Hourglass Worm Gearing with Worm Teeth Generated by High-Speed Screw Cutting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Akiyo; Maki, Minoru

    Authors reported theory of hourglass worm gearing whose worm is generated by high speed screw generating method, on previous report. CNC high speed hourglass worm generating machine has been developed according to the theory. And worm cutting test and performance test of worm gearing was made. The test results are as follows: (1) Newly developed machine has high speed cutting ability same as mach type screw generating apparatus. (2) Surface roughness of worm tooth surface generated by the CNC high speed hourglass worm generating machine has same order of roughness of screw surface cut by mach type screw generating apparatus. (3) Hourglass worm gearing generated by the newly developed machine showed high efficiency and ran 1000 hours without trouble.

  6. Analyzing melt homogeneity in a single screw plasticizing unit of an injection molding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, K.; Praher, B.; Steinbichler, G.

    2013-10-01

    In injection molding investigations on mixing efficiency and thermal homogeneity of the melt in the screw chamber are of great interest as the directly effect the quality of the molded parts. For most injection molding applications mixing is performed in the single screw plasticizing unit of the injection molding machine. In this work, a CFD approach with two coupled fluid domains is used in order to describe the plasticizing process in an injection molding machine. One domain rotates and translates in axial direction (screw), the other one increases its length (chamber). On basis of the calculated pressure, velocity and temperature field of the polymer melt the thermal melt homogeneity is investigated. To analyze the optical-mechanical homogeneity of the melt a Euler-Lagrangian method is used to calculate the distribution of tracer particles within the screw chamber.

  7. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    Knee joint replacement is surgery to replace a knee joint with a man-made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis . ... cartilage and bone are removed from the knee joint. Man-made pieces are then placed in the ...

  8. Joint Durability Where Next?

    E-print Network

    Joint Durability Where Next? Peter Taylor #12;The problem? · Some joints are deteriorating faster joints · Batch variability · Drainage · Salt treatment · Hand placed #12;Ames, IA · Non-distressed joint Spacing factor: 0.007in w/cm: 0.40 to 0.45 · Distressed joint Spacing factor: 0.005in w/cm: 0.42 - 0

  9. Transpedicular fixation of the lumbar and lumbosacral spine with screws. Application of the Diapason system.

    PubMed

    Yanase, M; Sakou, T; Taketomi, E; Yone, K

    1995-04-01

    Forty-six patients with the Diapason transpedicular screw system for lumbar and lumbosacral fusions were analysed clinically. No implant breakage was observed, but one rod migrated. Additional sacral screws different in the length of the threaded portion are necessary in this system. Metallosis was noted in a few cases, but posed no significant clinical problems. This system, which is simple in structure, easy to use, and applicable to magnetic resonance scanning after surgery, is considered to be a useful instrumentation. PMID:7609979

  10. Horizontal ridge expansion and implant placement using screws: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Implants are typically placed after performing ridge expansion by inserting screws of gradually increasing thickness and good clinical outcomes are often obtained. We placed 11 implants in 6 patients, and one implant failed during osseointegration but it was replaced immediately after removal and successful prosthetic treatments were completed. During these surgeries, buccal cortical plate complete fractures do not occur. Inserting screws for ridge expansion is a successful and predictable technique for implant placement in narrow alveolar bone. PMID:25368836

  11. Late-Onset Screw Migration into Iliac Vessels 21 years after Hip Arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Taishi; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Takakagawa, Shu; Yukizawa, Yohei; Ike, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries to the vascular system are a rare but serious complication of hip surgery. We report a case of an 83-year-old man who presented with intrapelvic migration of a screw into the space between the external iliac artery and vein 21 years after hip arthrodesis. The patient was treated with laparotomy, and the damaged artery was excised and sutured. This is the first case of a late vascular complication secondary to screw migration after hip arthrodesis. PMID:25336996

  12. Chondrocyte response to in vitro mechanical injury and co-culture with joint capsule tissue

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jennifer H. (Jennifer Henrica)

    2005-01-01

    Acute traumatic joint injury in young adults leads to an increased risk for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) later in life irrespective of surgical intervention to stabilize the injured joint. Although the mechanism ...

  13. Development of a high speed extrusion concept using a floating screw sleeve for solid-melt-separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrenberg, Gregor; Wortberg, Johannes

    2015-05-01

    The High-Speed-S-Truder with floating screw sleeve is an alternative extrusion concept with solid-melt-separation. A fairly conventional 35 mm screw with a length of 21 D, which is accelerated by a 75 kW gearless, water cooled synchronous drive, conveys the resin into a 60 mm screw sleeve with a length of 10 D. Inside the sleeve the material is plasticizied and discharged into the outer screw channel of the sleeve through radial bores. Only the solid bed remains inside. The development of a melt pool - and thus a decrease of the plasticizing capacity - is avoided. The sleeve is rotated by drag forces only (approximately 10 - 15 % of the screw speed). Due to the low speed of the screw sleeve molten material is conveyed to a 4 D Dynamic Mixing Ring in a gentle manner. The DMRs floating ring and the screw sleeve are directly coupled. The granules in the screw channel are stopped by a barrier on the screw in front of the mixing device. So nearly no unmelted material can pass the system. For temperature management in the plastification and mixing zone a 3-zone heating/air-cooling system is used. Various kinds of experiments with the High-Speed S-Truder were conducted. Reachable throughputs with different types of material (LDPE, LLDPE, PP, PS) have been tested. Also three screw geometries, which are mainly varying in the channel depth, were compared. Experimental results and theoretical background will be described in this paper.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Pressure Losses at Suction of a Twin Screw Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjeneh, M.; Kovacevic, A.; Rane, S.; Manolis, M.; Stosic, N.

    2015-08-01

    Rotary twin screw machines are used in the wide range of industrial applications and are capable of handling single and multiphase fluids as compressors, expanders and pumps. Concentration of liquid in the inlet flow can influence the performance of the machine significantly. Characteristics of the multiphase flow at the suction of a screw compressor depend on the local flow velocities and concentration. Local flow velocity measurements inside the screw compressors are difficult to obtain. However other flow properties such as local pressures are easier to attain. It is therefore useful to carry out experiments with local pressure variations in the suction which can be used to validate the 3D numerical Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models that could help in studying the single and multiphase flow behaviour in screw compressors. This paper presents experimental efforts to measure the local pressure losses inside the suction plenum of the screw compressor. Pressure variations are measured at 23 locations in the suction port at various operating conditions and compared with 3D CFD model. The grid generator SCORGTM was used for generating numerical mesh of rotors. The flow calculations were carried out using commercial 3D solver ANSYS CFX. It was found that the local pressure changes predicted by the CFD model are in the good agreement with measured pressures. This validated the use of CFD for modelling of the single phase flows in suction of screw machines.

  15. The Biocompatibility of Degradable Magnesium Interference Screws: An Experimental Study with Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Thormann, Ulrich; Alt, Volker; Heimann, Lydia; Gasquere, Cyrille; Heiss, Christian; Szalay, Gabor; Franke, Jörg; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Screws for ligament reconstruction are nowadays mostly made of poly-L-lactide (PLLA). However, magnesium-based biomaterials are gathering increased interest in this research field because of their good mechanical property and osteoanabolic influence on bone metabolism. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of an interference screw for ligament reconstruction made of magnesium alloy W4 by diecasting and milling and using different PEO-coatings with calcium phosphates. PLLA and titanium screws were used as control samples. The screws were implanted in the femur condyle of the hind leg of a merino sheep. The observation period was six and twelve weeks and one year. Histomorphometric, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and molecular biological evaluation were conducted. Further TEM analysis was done. In all magnesium screws a clinically relevant gas formation in the vicinity of the biomaterial was observed. Except for the PLLA and titanium control samples, no screw was fully integrated in the surrounding bone tissue. Regarding the fabrication process, milling seems to produce less gas liberation and has a better influence on bone metabolism than diecasting. Coating by PEO with calcium phosphates could not reduce the initial gas liberation but rather reduced the bone metabolism in the vicinity of the biomaterial. PMID:25717474

  16. Polypyrrole coating on poly-(lactide/glycolide)-?-tricalcium phosphate screws enhances new bone formation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Dong; Björninen, Miina; Cao, Lu; Wang, Hui-Ren; Pelto, Jani; Li, Xiang-Qian; Hyttinen, Jari; Jiang, Yun-Qi; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Sándor, George K; Seppänen, Riitta; Haimi, Suvi; Dong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) has gained interest as an implant material due to its multifunctional properties and its high compatibility with several cell and tissue types. For the first time, the biocompatibility and osteointegration of PPy coating, incorporated with chondroitin sulfate (CS), were studied in vivo by implanting PPy-coated bioabsorbable bone fixation composite screws of poly-(lactide/glycolide) copolymer (PLGA) and ?-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) into New Zealand white rabbits. Uncoated bioabsorbable polymer composite screws and commercially available stainless steel cortical screws were used as reference implants. The rabbits were euthanized 12 and 26 weeks after the implantation. The systemic effects were evaluated from food and water consumption, body weight, body temperature, clinical signs, blood samples, internal organ weights, and histological examination. Local effects were studied from bone tissue and surrounding soft tissue histology. New bone formation was evaluated by micro-computed tomography, tetracycline labeling and torsion tests. Torsion tests were performed in order to capture the peak value of the torsion force during the course of the screw's loosening. The coated screws induced significantly more bone formation than the uncoated screws. In addition, none of the implants induced any systemic or local toxicity. The results suggest that PPy is biocompatible with bone tissue and is a potential coating for enhancing osteointegration in orthopedic implants. PMID:26610717

  17. Conceptual framework for model-based analysis of residence time distribution in twin-screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; Panouillot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Juuti, Mikko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2015-04-25

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batchwise wet granulation processes. The twin-screw granulator (TSG) screws consist of transport and kneading element modules. Therefore, the granulation to a large extent is governed by the residence time distribution within each module where different granulation rate processes dominate over others. Currently, experimental data is used to determine the residence time distributions. In this study, a conceptual model based on classical chemical engineering methods is proposed to better understand and simulate the residence time distribution in a TSG. The experimental data were compared with the proposed most suitable conceptual model to estimate the parameters of the model and to analyse and predict the effects of changes in number of kneading discs and their stagger angle, screw speed and powder feed rate on residence time. The study established that the kneading block in the screw configuration acts as a plug-flow zone inside the granulator. Furthermore, it was found that a balance between the throughput force and conveying rate is required to obtain a good axial mixing inside the twin-screw granulator. Although the granulation behaviour is different for other excipients, the experimental data collection and modelling methods applied in this study are generic and can be adapted to other excipients. PMID:25698071

  18. Optical and Exciton Dynamical Properties of a Screw-Dislocation-Driven ZnO:Sn Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun; Lu, Junfeng; Wang, Fang; Guo, Jiyuan; Gu, Ning; Xu, Chunxiang

    2015-06-17

    Screw dislocation plays a critical role in crystal growth and significantly affects the carrier dynamics process of luminescent semiconductor materials. In this paper, we report a novel screw-dislocation-induced ZnO:Sn hillock microstructure. The detailed growth process and possible formation mechanism of screw dislocation are demonstrated. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence reveals the free exciton recombination emission mechanism of the ZnO:Sn hillock microstructure. By comparing time-resolved photoluminescence spectra with those of two other samples without screw dislocations, it is found that the screw dislocation in the ZnO:Sn microstructures effectively decreases the carrier lifetime. In addition, UV Fabry-Perot lasing action is observed from the ZnO:Sn hillock microstructure, and the numerical simulation of the standing wave pattern and light intensity distribution further confirm the Fabry-Perot lasing mechanism. Therefore, ZnO:Sn can be utilized as a UV laser gain medium, and its optical properties can be modulated by screw dislocation. PMID:26011860

  19. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  20. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    .org Shoulder Joint Replacement Page ( 1 ) Although shoulder joint replacement is less common than knee or hip replacement, it is just as successful in relieving joint pain. Shoulder replacement surgery was ?rst performed in ...

  1. Joint Replacement Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Arthritis July 2014 Joint Replacement Surgery: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family What Is Joint Replacement Surgery? Joint replacement surgery is removing a ...

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Article Chapters Temporomandibular Joint Disorder What is ... Updated: November 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than ...

  3. Electro-Thermal Simulation Studies of SiC Junction Diodes Containing Screw Dislocations Under High Reverse-Bias Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, R. P.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work was to conduct a modeling study of SiC P-N junction diodes operating under high reverse biased conditions. Analytical models and numerical simulation capabilities were to be developed for self-consistent electro-thermal analysis of the diode current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Data from GRC indicate that screw dislocations are unavoidable in large area SiC devices, and lead to changes in the SiC diode electrical response characteristics under high field conditions. For example, device instability and failures linked to internal current filamentation have been observed. The physical origin of these processes is not well understood, and quantitative projections of the electrical behavior under high field and temperature conditions are lacking. Thermal calculations for SiC devices have not been reported in the literature either. So estimates or projections of peak device temperatures and power limitations do not exist. This numerical study and simulation analysis was aimed at resolving some of the above issues. The following tasks were successfully accomplished: (1) Development of physically based models using one- and two-dimensional drift-diffusion theory for the transport behavior and I-V characteristics; (2) One- and two-dimensional heat flow to account for internal device heating. This led to calculations of the internal temperature profiles, which in turn, were used to update the electrical transport parameters for a self-consistent analysis. The temperature profiles and the peak values were thus obtainable for a given device operating condition; (3) Inclusion of traps assumed to model the presence of internal screw dislocations running along the longitudinal direction; (4) Predictions of the operating characteristics with and without heating as a function of applied bias with and without traps. Both one and two-dimensional cases were implemented; (5) Assessment of device stability based on the operating characteristics. The presence of internal non-uniformities, particularly filamentary structures, was probed and demonstrated; (6) Cause and physical origins of filamentary behavior and unstable I-V characteristics were made transparent; (7) It was demonstrated that diodes containing defects would be more prone to thermal breakdown associated with the temperature dependent decrease in the thermal conductivity; and (8) Finally, negative differential resistance (S-shaped NDR) which can potential lead to device instability and filamentary behavior was shown to occur for diodes containing a line of defects such as could be associated with a screw dislocation line.

  4. Encapsulation of liquids using a counter rotating twin screw extruder.

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Krauss, Ralph; Marmann, Andreas; Thommes, Markus; Schuchmann, Heike P; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Until now extrusion is not applied for pharmaceutical encapsulation processes, whereas extrusion is widely used for encapsulation of flavours within food applications. Based on previous mixing studies, a hot melt counter-rotating extrusion process for encapsulation of liquid active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was investigated. The mixing ratio of maltodextrin to sucrose as matrix material was adapted in first extrusion trials. Then the number of die holes was investigated to decrease expansion and agglutination of extrudates to a minimum. At a screw speed of 180 min(-1) the product temperature was decreased below 142 °C, resulting in extrudates of cylindrical shape with a crystalline content of 9-16%. Volatile orange terpenes and the nonvolatile ?-tocopherol were chosen as model APIs. Design of experiments were performed to investigate the influences of barrel temperature, powder feed rate, and API content on the API retentions. A maximum of 9.2% ?-tocopherol was encapsulated, while the orange terpene encapsulation rate decreased to 6.0% due to evaporation after leaving the die. During 12 weeks of storage re-crystallization of sucrose occurred; however, the encapsulated orange terpene amount remained unchanged. PMID:25460584

  5. Screw dislocation-driven growth of one-dimensional nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fei

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology are impacting our lives in many ways, from electronic and photonic devices to biosensors. They also hold the promise of tackling the renewable energy challenges facing us. However, one limiting scientific challenge is the effective and efficient bottom-up synthesis of nanomaterials. In this thesis, we discuss the fundamental theories of screw dislocation-driven growth of various nanostructures including one-dimensional nanowires and nanotubes, two-dimensional nanoplates, and three-dimensional hierarchical tree-like nanostructures. We then introduce the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to structurally characterize the dislocation-driven nanomaterials for future searching and identifying purposes. We summarize the guidelines for rationally designing the dislocation-driven growth and discuss specific examples to illustrate how to implement the guidelines. We also show that dislocation growth is a general and versatile mechanism that can be used to grow a variety of nanomaterials via distinct reaction chemistry and synthetic methods. The fundamental investigation and development of dislocation-driven growth of nanomaterials will create a new dimension to the rational design and synthesis of increasingly complex nanomaterials.

  6. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Joint Replacement Email to a friend * required fields From * ... name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION In a joint replacement, the abnormal bone and lining structures of ...

  7. MODELING UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE VULNERABILITY IN JOINTED ROCK

    SciTech Connect

    R. SWIFT; D. STEEDMAN

    2001-02-01

    The vulnerability of underground structures and openings in deep jointed rock to ground shock attack is of chief concern to military planning and security. Damage and/or loss of stability to a structure in jointed rock, often manifested as brittle failure and accompanied with block movement, can depend significantly on jointed properties, such as spacing, orientation, strength, and block character. We apply a hybrid Discrete Element Method combined with the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach to simulate the MIGHTY NORTH event, a definitive high-explosive test performed on an aluminum lined cylindrical opening in jointed Salem limestone. Representing limestone with discrete elements having elastic-equivalence and explicit brittle tensile behavior and the liner as an elastic-plastic continuum provides good agreement with the experiment and damage obtained with finite-element simulations. Extending the approach to parameter variations shows damage is substantially altered by differences in joint geometry and liner properties.

  8. What would be the annual cost savings if fewer screws were used in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treatment in the US?

    PubMed

    Larson, A Noelle; Polly, David W; Ackerman, Stacey J; Ledonio, Charles G T; Lonner, Baron S; Shah, Suken A; Emans, John B; Richards, B Stephens

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT There is substantial heterogeneity in the number of screws used per level fused in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. Assuming equivalent clinical outcomes, the potential cost savings of using fewer pedicle screws were estimated using a medical decision model with sensitivity analysis. METHODS Descriptive analyses explored the annual costs for 5710 AIS inpatient stays using discharge data from the 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database (Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), which is a national all-payer inpatient database. Patients between 10 and 17 years of age were identified using the ICD-9-CM code for idiopathic scoliosis (737.30). All inpatient stays were assumed to represent 10-level fusions with pedicle screws for AIS. High screw density was defined at 1.8 screws per level fused, and the standard screw density was defined as 1.48 screws per level fused. The surgical return for screw malposition was set at $23,762. A sensitivity analysis was performed by varying the cost per screw ($600-$1000) and the rate of surgical revisions for screw malposition (0.117%-0.483% of screws; 0.8%-4.3% of patients). The reported outcomes include estimated prevented malpositioned screws (set at 5.1%), averted revision surgeries, and annual cost savings in 2009 US dollars, assuming similar clinical outcomes (rates of complications, revision) using a standard- versus high-density pattern. RESULTS The total annual costs for 5710 AIS hospital stays was $278 million ($48,900 per patient). Substituting a high for a standard screw density yields 3.2 fewer screws implanted per patient, with 932 malpositioned screws prevented and 21 to 88 revision surgeries for implant malposition averted, and a potential annual cost savings of $11 million to $20 million (4%-7% reduction in the total cost of AIS hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS Reducing the number of screws used in scoliosis surgery could potentially decrease national AIS hospitalization costs by up to 7%, which may improve the safety and efficiency of care. However, such a screw construct must first be proven safe and effective. PMID:26384134

  9. Theoretical assessment of an intramedullary condylar component versus screw fixation for the condylar component of a hemiarthroplasty alloplastic TMJ replacement system.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Mesnard, M; Relvas, C; Completo, A; Simões, J A

    2014-03-01

    Virtual design gives flexibility to explore constructive solutions or structures. It enables analysis that would often be impossible even if expensive real prototypes were available. Simulations using finite element models allow access to the stress and strain tensor or to the deformation tensor within an implant or a tissue which is impossible experimentally, even in vitro. This study is based on two numerical models of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implants, comparing two bone-implant connections: an external connection performed with surgical screws (commercial model) and an internal connection carried out by penetration into the intramedullary space. The finite element models were constructed based on a cadaveric mandible and considering the five principal muscles in action. Strain distributions into the surrounding bone tissue are analysed and in both models they show significant differences at the external surface of the mandible in displacements. However, while the intramedullary fixation increases strains in the cancellous tissue, the study shows that strain distribution is mainly influenced by the number and distribution of screws in commercial solution. PMID:23684530

  10. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis . ... thromboembolic disease in patients undergoing elective hip and knee arthopolasty: Evidence-based guideline and evidence report. American ...

  11. Spacesuit mobility joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  12. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  13. Optimization of the diffusion joint process for the Ag layers of YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, J.; Sakai, N.; Miyata, S.; Konishi, M.; Yamada, Y.; Chikumoto, N.; Nakao, K.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2007-10-01

    Diffusion joint processes using Ag stabilizing layer for YBCO tape were performed in varied parameter such as temperature, time duration, cooling procedure and conditions of surface for Ag stabilizing layer to optimize for joint condition. We succeeded in developing a brief process with which low resistance below 5 × 10-13 ? m2 at the joint without any degradation of Ic was achieved by polishing surface of Ag stabilizing layer and quenching procedure. The polishing is effective in reducing joint time and temperature. The mechanism was discussed for the decrease in Ic after joint held at 873 K.

  14. A Novel Surgical Technique for Removing Buried Cannulated Screws Using a Guidewire and Countersink: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongsheng; Giri, Krishna Prasad; Pearce, Christopher Jon

    2015-01-01

    Removal of metal implants is a common procedure that is performed for a variety of indications. However, problems such as a buried screw head may occasionally arise and render hardware removal difficult or even impossible. The problem is further compounded when the initial screw was inserted percutaneously or via a minimally-invasive (MIS) technique. In the present paper, we introduce a novel, minimally invasive technique to remove buried cannulated screws which obviates the need for excessive extension of the skin incision, surgical exploration, soft tissue dissection or excess bone removal, which surgeons may otherwise have to undertake to uncover the buried screw head. This technique is especially useful in removing cannulated screws which have been inserted using small stab incisions and MIS techniques initially. This technique can be applied to the removal of buried cannulated screws which are placed into any bone in the body. PMID:26161159

  15. Biomechanical comparison of unilateral semi-rigid and dynamic stabilization on ovine vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Karakoyun, Dursun O; Özkaya, Mustafa; Okutan, Volkan C; Dalg?ç, Ali; Belen, Deniz; Demir, Teyfik

    2015-11-01

    Using the unilateral pedicle screw fixation was thought to decrease the stiffness of the fixed segments. Various prospective, randomized studies were performed to determine whether unilateral pedicle screw fixation provides the necessities of bilateral fixation in one- or two-segment lumbar spinal fusion. In this study, four different unilateral pedicle screw fixation systems were evaluated to determine which one best approximated an intact spine with respect to biomechanics and kinematics. The four groups included an intact group, a unilateral facetectomy group with no fixation, a unilateral semi-rigid pedicle screw fixation group with a poly-ether-ether-ketone rod, and a unilateral dynamic pedicle screw fixation group. The bone mineral densities of all specimens were measured and specimens were matched with groups randomly. Flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation tests were performed to compare the groups. For the flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation tests, the best biomechanical outcomes were in the control group. The unilateral facetectomy group had the poorest performance and was not stable enough, compared with the control group. The dynamic and semi-rigid groups showed performance closer to that of the control group. The biomechanical responses of these two groups were also in good agreement, showing no significant statistical differences. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the unilateral dynamic and semi-rigid pedicle screw fixations can be used to provide stability to the vertebrae. PMID:26503839

  16. Feasibility of Translaminar Screw Placement in Korean Population: Morphometric Analysis of Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Sang Hyuk; Kurniawan, Ferry; Lee, Junho; Jeon, Jae Kyun; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the feasibility of unilateral and bilateral translaminar screw placement in Koran population, and compare the acceptance rate using previously reported data in American population. Materials and Methods The translaminar lengths, thickness, heights, and sagittal-diagonal measurements were performed. The feasibility analysis was performed using unilateral and bilateral 3.5 mm cervical screw placement on the CT scans within 0.5 mm of safety margin. We also performed radiographic analysis of the morphometric dimensions and the feasibility of unilateral and bilateral translaminar screw placement at C3-C7. Results Korean population had similar or significantly shorter translaminar lengths and thickness (lengths and thickness in C7 among males; lengths in C6-C7 and thickness in C4 among females) than American population, but had similar or significantly longer translaminar heights and sagittal-diagonal measurements (heights in C3-C7 and sagittal-diagonal measurements in C3-C6 among males; heights in C7 and sagittal-diagonal measurements in C3-C7 among females). Unilaterally, translaminar screw acceptance rates in C3-C7 were similar between Korean and American male population, but the rates in C4-C6 were significantly smaller between Korean and American female population. Bilaterally, translaminar screw acceptance rates in C3 and C5-C6 were significantly larger between Korean and American male population, but the rates in C3-C7 were similar between Korean and American female population. Conclusion The feasibility of unilateral and bilateral translaminar screw placement is different depending on different ethnics. Subaxial cervical unilateral translaminar screw placement among Korean male population and bilateral placement at C4-C7 among Korean female population are more acceptable than American population. PMID:25510760

  17. First Metatarsalphalangeal Joint Arthrodesis: A Retrospective Comparison of Two Methods of Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, M.A; Parnell, M; Khan, W.S; Khan, A

    2015-01-01

    First metatarsalphalangeal joint arthrodesis is a well established and successful treatment; however there still remains controversy over the best choice of construct. We performed a retrospective study of patients undergoing first metatarsalphalangeal fusion over eighteen months (n=52) using either dorsal non-locking plate with additional compression lag screw fixation or dorsal non-locking plate alone. We found when assessing clinical criteria, patients with dorsal non-locking plates and additional compression lag screw fixation had a significantly higher rate of fusion (100% vs 77.8%), significantly higher rate of fusion within the first two months (55.6% vs 83.3%), significantly earlier time to fusion (52.2 days vs 75.6 days), and significantly lower rate of non-union (0% vs 22.2%). When blindly assessing radiographic criteria, the patients treated with the plate and compression screw had a significantly higher rate of fusion and lower rate of non-union (0% vs 33%). There was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of complications in the groups. We believe that the interfragmentary compression is a crucial factor in achieving good union rates and recommend the use of non-locking pre-contoured plating with additional interfragmentary compression screw as the fixation method of choice for these procedures. PMID:26587065

  18. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene tape for the management of screw access channels in implant-supported prostheses.

    PubMed

    Moráguez, Osvaldo D; Belser, Urs C

    2010-03-01

    This article describes a procedure in which polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape is used to seal the screw access channel to protect the screw head of the abutment and crown screw in implant-supported restorations. The material can be sterilized, is easy to manipulate, radiopaque, and less associated with malodor when retrieved. Malodor is primarily associated with the implant-abutment interface configuration and the suprastructure component design of a given implant system. This technique enables fast removal of the filling material in a single piece, preventing unpredictable and time-consuming manipulations when removal of the screw-retained crown or abutment is required. PMID:20188242

  19. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint 5 Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, R. C.; Stratton, T. C.; LaMont, D. T.

    2003-01-01

    Torque tension testing of a newly designed Reusable Solid Rocket Motor nozzle bolted assembly was successfully completed. Test results showed that the 3-sigma preload variation was as expected at the required input torque level and the preload relaxation were within the engineering limits. A shim installation technique was demonstrated as a simple process to fill a shear lip gap between nozzle housings in the joint region. A new automated torque system was successfully demonstrated in this test. This torque control tool was found to be very precise and accurate. The bolted assembly performance was further evaluated using the Nozzle Structural Test Bed. Both current socket head cap screw and proposed multiphase alloy bolt configurations were tested. Results indicated that joint skip and bolt bending were significantly reduced with the new multiphase alloy bolt design. This paper summarizes all the test results completed to date.

  20. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs.

  1. Empirical modeling of a Lysholm helical screw expander

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Testing of a Lysholm helical screw expander having a rotor diameter of 5.12 inches and an expansion ratio of 5.3 was performed with simulated geothermal fluid at an inlet pressure of 120 psia. The inlet quality, engine speed and pressure ratio were independently varied to produce a three-dimensional data matrix of 104 data points. Statistical curve fitting methods were adapted to produce equations for mass flow rate and power output in terms of the three variables associated with the data matrix. These explicit equations were combined with a steam table subroutine to produce a computer model for prediction of mass flow rate, power, efficiency and exhaust quality at a given set of operating conditions. The predictive ability observed during validation of the model is adequate for use in modeling of hybrid geothermal energy conversion systems. Mass flow rates werre predicted to within 2.7% of the measured values. For most conditions, predictions of power were within 3.3% of the measured values. Predictions of efficiency reflected the combined errors in prediction of power and mass flow rate. Efficiency predictions were in error by as much as 5% of the measured values. The predictions for exhaust quality were within 0.4% of the measured values. Isentropic engine efficiencies of over 43% were measured during the tests. An observed peak in efficiency represented an optimum pressure ratio and a trade-off between lower leakage fractions at high speeds and low inlet qualities, increasing frictional losses at high speeds, and increasing fluid and power densities at low qualities.

  2. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...1) Class II (special controls), when intended to provide immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the treatment of the following acute and chronic instabilities or deformities of...

  3. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePLUS

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  4. Stability: from biomechanical concept to chiropractic practice

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Stuart M

    1999-01-01

    This paper formalizes stability in a clinician-friendly way and then discusses ways for chiropractors to ensure stability of spinal joints that may have their stability compromized from manipulation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7

  5. Bilateral femoral neck fractures secondary to chronic carbamazepine use treated by bilateral dynamic hip screw: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sariyilmaz, Kerim; Gulenc, Baris; Ozkunt, Okan; Dikici, Fatih; Yazicioglu, Onder

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral femoral neck fractures without major trauma are rare and related to several conditions. Insufficiency fractures due to the use of anti-epileptic drug are one of the rare causes. This case study is about bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fractures resulting from chronic use of anti-epileptic drug. Presentation of case A 26-year-old woman was referred to our emergency department with a complaint of bilateral groin pain and a 12-year history of irregular carbamazepine use. The diagnosis was bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fractures due to irregular long-term carbamazepine use. One-stage bilateral dynamic hip screw osteosynthesis was performed. After 2 years of follow up, good result was obtained. Discussion There are several risk factors for insufficiency fracture, and antiepileptic drug related osteoporosis is one of the reason. These drugs have negative effect on bone methabolism and bone mineral density. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of bilateral femoral neck insufficiency fracture due to chronic carbamazepine use. Joint and bone pain with a history of long-term use of anti-epileptic drug should be investigated carefully, and insufficiency fractures should be kept in mind. PMID:25528039

  6. Designs and Techniques That Improve the Pullout Strength of Pedicle Screws in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas M.; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Doulgeris, James J.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein. PMID:24724097

  7. A video guided solution for screw insertion in orthopedic plate fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaraggia, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Angelopoulou, E.; Hornegger, J.

    2013-03-01

    In orthopedic and trauma surgery, metallic plates are used for reduction and fixation of bone fractures. In clinical practice, the intra-operative planning for screw fixation is usually based on fluoroscopic images. Screw fixation is then performed on a free-hand basis. As such, multiple attempts may be required in order to achieve an optimal positioning of the fixing screws. To help the physician insert the screws in accordance to the planned position, we propose a method for screw insertion guidance. Our approach uses a small video camera, rigidly placed on the drill, and a set of small markers that are rigidly fixed on a variable angle drill sleeve. In order to investigate the achievable accuracy of our setup, we simulate the estimation of the drill bit position under two different marker arrangements, planar and 3D, and different noise levels. Furthermore, we motivate our choices for marker design and position given the limited space available for marker positioning, the requirement for accurate position estimation of the drill bit and the illumination changes that could affect the surgical site. We also describe our proposed marker detection and tracking pipeline. Our simulation results let us conclude that we can achieve an accuracy of 1° and 1mm in the estimation of angular orientation and tip position of the drill bit respectively, provided that we have accurate marker detection.

  8. Designs and techniques that improve the pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae: current status.

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas M; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A; Doulgeris, James J; Lee, William E; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein. PMID:24724097

  9. Continuous twin screw granulation: influence of process variables on granule and tablet quality.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Córdoba Díaz, D; Peeters, E; Fonteyne, M; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to screen theophylline (125 mg) tablets manufactured via twin screw granulation in order to improve process understanding and knowledge of process variables that determine granule and tablet quality. A premix of theophylline anhydrate, ?-lactose monohydrate and PVP (ratio: 30/67.5/2.5,w/w) was granulated with demineralized water. Experiments were done using the high-shear wet granulation module (based on twin screw granulation) of the ConsiGma™-25 unit (a continuous tablet manufacturing system) for particle size enlargement. After drying, granules were compressed using a MODUL™ P tablet press (compression force: 10 kN, tablet diameter: 12 mm). Using a D-optimal experimental design, the effect of several process variables (throughput (10-25 kg/h), screw speed (600-950 rpm), screw configuration (number (2, 4, 6 and 12) and angle (30°, 60° and 90°) of kneading elements), barrel temperature (25-40°C) and method of binder addition (dry versus wet)) on the granulation process (torque and temperature increase in barrel wall), granule (particle size distribution, friability and flowability) and tablet (tensile strength, porosity, friability, disintegration time and dissolution) quality was evaluated. The results showed that the quality of granules and tablets can be optimized by adjusting specific process variables (number of kneading elements, barrel temperature and binder addition method) during a granulation process using a continuous twin screw granulator. PMID:22687571

  10. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy who received limited unilateral decompression and bilateral pedicle screw fixation were included and evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores preoperatively and at follow-up visits. Ligamentum flavum thickness of the involved segments was measured on axial magnetic resonance images. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The mean preoperative VAS score was 6.6±1.6 and 4.6±3.1 for leg and back pain, respectively. Ligamentum flavum thickness was comparable between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side (p=0.554). The mean follow-up duration was 29.2 months. The pain in the symptomatic side lower extremity (VAS score, 1.32±1.2) and the back (VAS score, 1.75±1.73) significantly improved (p=0.000 vs. baseline for both). The ODI improved significantly postoperatively (6.60±6.5; p=0.000 vs. baseline). Significant improvement in VAS pain and ODI scores were observed in patients receiving single or multi-segment decompression fusion with fixation (p<0.01). Conclusion Limited laminectomy and unilateral spinal decompression followed by bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion achieves satisfactory outcomes in patients with spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. This procedure is less damaging to structures that are important for maintaining posterior stability of the spine. PMID:26279816

  11. Visualization and understanding of the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Fonteyne, Margot; Helkimo, Niko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Juuti, Mikko; Delaet, Urbain; Van Assche, Ivo; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in the application of twin screw granulation as a continuous wet granulation technique for pharmaceutical drug formulations. However, the mixing of granulation liquid and powder material during the short residence time inside the screw chamber and the atypical particle size distribution (PSD) of granules produced by twin screw granulation is not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study aims at visualizing the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging. In first instance, the residence time of material inside the barrel was investigated as function of screw speed and moisture content followed by the visualization of the granulation liquid distribution as function of different formulation and process parameters (liquid feed rate, liquid addition method, screw configuration, moisture content and barrel filling degree). The link between moisture uniformity and granule size distributions was also studied. For residence time analysis, increased screw speed and lower moisture content resulted to a shorter mean residence time and narrower residence time distribution. Besides, the distribution of granulation liquid was more homogenous at higher moisture content and with more kneading zones on the granulator screws. After optimization of the screw configuration, a two-level full factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the influence of moisture content, screw speed and powder feed rate on the mixing efficiency of the powder and liquid phase. From these results, it was concluded that only increasing the moisture content significantly improved the granulation liquid distribution. This study demonstrates that NIR chemical imaging is a fast and adequate measurement tool for allowing process visualization and hence for providing better process understanding of a continuous twin screw granulation system. PMID:24211658

  12. A piezoelectric screw dislocation near an elliptical inhomogeneity containing a confocal rigid line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C. Z.; Zhao, Y. X.; Liu, Y. W.

    2012-09-01

    The interaction between a piezoelectric screw dislocation and an elliptical inhomogeneity in piezoelectric composite material which contains an electrically conductive confocal rigid line is studied, especially analyzing the shielding effect of a piezoelectric screw dislocation near an elliptical inhomogeneity. By applying the complex variable method, the analytical solution to the elastic field and the electric field, the field intensity factors at the tip of the rigid line are derived. The image force acting on the piezoelectric screw dislocation is calculated by using the generalized Peach-Koehler formula. Accordingly, the location and the orientation of the dislocation, the material properties upon the shielding or anti-shielding effect on the stress intensity factors, as well as the effects of the rigid line and the electroelastic properties of the piezoelectric materials on the image force are discussed.

  13. Void-induced cross slip of screw dislocations in fcc copper

    E-print Network

    Takahiro Hatano; Tetsuya Kaneko; Yousuke Abe; Hideki Matsui

    2007-12-19

    Pinning interaction between a screw dislocation and a void in fcc copper is investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulation. A screw dislocation bows out to undergo depinning on the original glide plane at low temperatures, where the behavior of the depinning stress is consistent with that obtained by a continuum model. If the temperature is higher than 300 K, the motion of a screw dislocation is no longer restricted to a single glide plane due to cross slip on the void surface. Several depinning mechanisms that involve multiple glide planes are found. In particular, a depinning mechanism that produces an intrinsic prismatic loop is found. We show that these complex depinning mechanisms significantly increase the depinning stress.

  14. Examining drug hydrophobicity in continuous wet granulation within a twin screw extruder.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Thompson, M R; O'Donnell, K P

    2015-12-30

    The influence of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) hydrophobicity on continuous wet granulation was studied in twin screw granulation utilizing foamed binder delivery. The APIs examined were caffeine, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and griseofulvin and the drug load was maintained constant at 15 wt%. In order to understand the impact of these APIs on the granulation process, API and binder distribution, particle size, porosity, and fracture strength were analyzed on samples collected along the screw length. It was found that the API and binder distributions were uniform along the screws regardless of the hydrophobicity of the formulation, in contrast to literature results with liquid injection. The absence of de-mixing of the hydrophobic ingredient was hypothesized to be a result of the high spread-to-soak ratio of a foamed binder that 'cages' those particles within the mass of local hydrophilic solids. PMID:26232701

  15. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yogesh V.; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M.; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  16. Improved Screw Placement for Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) using Robotically-Assisted Drill Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Koutenaei, Bamshad Azizi; Guler, Ozgur; Wilson, Emmanuel; Thoranaghatte, Ramesh U.; Oetgen, Matthew; Navab, Nassir; Cleary, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip displacement condition in adolescents. In the standard treatment, the surgeon uses intra-operative fluoroscopic imaging to plan the screw placement and the drill trajectory. The accuracy, duration, and efficacy of this procedure are highly dependent on surgeon skill. Longer procedure times result in higher radiation dose, to both patient and surgeon. A robotic system to guide the drill trajectory might help to reduce screw placement errors and procedure time by reducing the number of passes and confirmatory fluoroscopic images needed to verify accurate positioning of the drill guide along a planned trajectory. Therefore, with the long-term goals of improving screw placement accuracy, reducing procedure time and intra-operative radiation dose, our group is developing an image-guided robotic surgical system to assist a surgeon with pre-operative path planning and intra-operative drill guide placement. PMID:25333154

  17. Impingement contributes to backside wear and screw-metallic shell fretting in modular acetabular cups.

    PubMed

    Kligman, Mordechai; Furman, Bridgitte D; Padgett, Douglas E; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-02-01

    Eighty-six polyethylene liners and 56 metallic shells of acetabular components were evaluated by visual and stereomicroscopic examination for impingement, backside polyethylene wear, creep, and fretting at the screw-metallic shell interface using a subjective scoring system. Medical records and radiological data were available in 65 and 46 patients, respectively. Impingement was found in 62 components (75%). Backside polyethylene wear and screw-metallic shell corrosion and fretting were significantly correlated (P < .001) with impingement. Polyethylene creep was significantly correlated to backside wear and tended to be higher for the cups that had impingement (P = .06). No correlation was found between backside polyethylene wear and implant design or cup position. Our results suggest that impingement in a modular acetabular component correlated with increased backside wear and screw-metallic shell corrosion and fretting. PMID:17275644

  18. Peierls potential of screw dislocations in bcc transition metals: Predictions from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Christopher R.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that screw dislocation motion dominates the plastic deformation in body-centered-cubic metals at low temperatures. The nature of the nonplanar structure of screw dislocations gives rise to high lattice friction, which results in strong temperature and strain rate dependence of plastic flow. Thus the nature of the Peierls potential, which is responsible for the high lattice resistance, is an important physical property of the material. However, current empirical potentials give a complicated picture of the Peierls potential. Here, we investigate the nature of the Peierls potential using density functional theory in the bcc transition metals. The results show that the shape of the Peierls potential is sinusoidal for every material investigated. Furthermore, we show that the magnitude of the potential scales strongly with the energy per unit length of the screw dislocation in the material.

  19. Carbon nanotube composites prepared by ultrasonically assisted twin screw extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Todd

    Two ultrasonic twin screw extrusion systems were designed and manufactured for the ultrasonic dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in viscous polymer matrices at residence times of the order of seconds in the ultrasonic treatment zones. The first design consisted of an ultrasonic slit die attachment in which nanocomposites were treated. A second design incorporated an ultrasonic treatment section into the barrel of the extruder to utilize the shearing of the polymer during extrusion while simultaneously applying treatment. High performance, high temperature thermoset phenylethynyl terminate imide oligomer (PETI-330) and two different polyetherether ketones (PEEK) were evaluated at CNT loadings up to 10 wt%. The effects of CNT loading and ultrasonic amplitude on the processing characteristics and rheological, mechanical, electrical, thermal and morphological properties of nanocomposites were investigated. PETI and PEEK nanocomposites showed a decrease in resistivity, an increase in modulus and strength and a decrease in strain at break and toughness with increased CNT loading. Ultrasonically treated samples showed a decrease in die pressure and extruder torque with increasing ultrasonic treatment and an increase in complex viscosity and storage modulus at certain ultrasonic treatment levels. Optical microscopy showed enhanced dispersion of the CNT bundles in ultrasonically treated samples. However, no significant improvement of mechanical properties was observed with ultrasonic treatment due to lack of adhesion between the CNT and matrix in the solid state. A curing model for PETI-330 was proposed that includes the induction and curing stages to predict the degree of cure of PETI-330 under non-isothermal conditions. Induction time parameters, rate constant and reaction order of the model were obtained based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data. The model correctly predicted experimentally measured degrees of cure of compression molded plaques cured to various degrees. An apparatus for high temperature resin transfer molding (HT-RTM) was designed and built to produce PETI-8 and PETI-330/carbon fabric composite panels. Performance of the panels was tested at various temperatures. The produced panels exhibited low void content in wetted areas and had higher short beam shear properties in comparison with vacuum assisted resin transfer moldings. To investigate the environmental aspects of nanomaterials, a testing apparatus was designed and manufactured to study the effectiveness of particulate respirators at filtering CNTs. Three different grades of respirators were evaluated for their effectiveness to prevent the inhalation of CNTs. Dust masks, commonly used in a processing environment, were found to be highly ineffective at preventing the inhalation of CNTs. However, respirators with a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) rating of P95 or greater were shown to prevent the inhalation of CNTs under normal breathing conditions.

  20. Degradation behaviour of LAE442-based plate-screw-systems in an in vitro bone model.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Leonie; Besdo, Silke; Angrisani, Nina; Wriggers, Peter; Hering, Britta; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Reifenrath, Janin

    2015-04-01

    The use of absorbable implant materials for fixation after bone fracture helps to avoid a second surgery for implant removal and the risks and costs involved. Magnesium (Mg) is well known as a potential metallic material for degradable implants. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate if degradable LAE442-based magnesium plate-screw-systems are suitable candidates for osteosynthesis implants in load-bearing bones. The corrosion behaviour was tested concerning the influence of different surface treatments, coatings and screw torques. Steel plates and screws of the same size served as control. Plates without special treatment screwed on up to a specified torque of 15cNm or 7cNm, NaOH treated plates (15cNm), magnesium fluoride coated plates (15cNm) and steel plates as control (15cNm) were examined in pH-buffered, temperature-controlled SBF solution for two weeks. The experimental results indicate that the LAE442 plates and screws coated with magnesium fluoride revealed a lower hydrogen evolution in SBF solution as well as a lower weight loss and volume decrease in ?-computed tomography (?CT). The nanoindentation and SEM/EDX measurements at several plate areas showed no significant differences. Summarized, the different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour differently. Also the NaOH treatment seemed to have no essential influence on the degradation kinetics. The plates coated with magnesium fluoride showed a decreased corrosion rate. Hence, it is recommended to consider this coating for the next in vivo study. PMID:25686954

  1. The effect of multiple processing and re-use on orthodontic mini-screw torque values

    PubMed Central

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Rafiei, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reusing orthodontic mini-screws would reduce treatment cost and lead to more use of mini-screws and improvement of orthodontic treatments. This study has assessed the effects of reprocessing and reusing the titanium mini-screws on their maximum insertion, removal and fracture torque (FT). Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 20 titanium mini-screws (1.6-mm × 8-mm) were randomly divided into two equal groups. In the test group, the screws were first sterilized by autoclave and then their FT was assessed. In the control group, FT was assessed after 5 times of insertion, cleaning, processing (37% phosphoric acid for 10 min, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min) and sterilizing with autoclave. The maximum insertion and removal torque values were compared using the repeated measure ANOVA and the FT data were analyzed by the t-test. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software (version 13.0) and the significance was set on 0.05. Results: The paired t-test for maximum insertion torque (MIT) showed that MIT1 was significantly lower than other MIT values (P = 0.02) and also MIT2 was significantly higher than MIT5 (P = 0.01), but other MIT values had no significant differences. The paired t-test for maximum removal torque (MRT) showed that only MRT2 was significantly higher than other MRT values (except MRT1) (P = 0.046). Regarding FT, the t-test showed that there was no significant difference between FT0 and FT5 (P = 0.485). Conclusion: Within limitations of this study, five time insertion, cleaning, processing and steam sterilization had no significant negative effect on insertion, removal and FT of the mini-screws. PMID:26005464

  2. A novel dual-screw coal feeder for production of low sulfur fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Khang, S.J.; Keener, T.C.

    1993-06-15

    In this project, the following tasks have been performed: (1) Setting up the Dual-Screw feeder reactor. (2) Determination of the pyrolysis product and the sulfur distribution in char, tar and gas based on experimental data. (3) Study of the devolatilization and the desulfurization kinetics and obtaining the basic kinetic parameters. (4) Study of the sulfur removal efficiency of lime pellets fed into the outer tube of the dual-screw feeder reactor. (5) Study of the effect of the coal particle size on pyrolysis and desulfurization. (6) Study of the coal pyrolysis using a TGA (Thermal Gravimetric Analyzer). (7) Study of the coal desulfurization using a tube oven. (8) Setting up a combustor. (9) Study of the combustion characteristics of the pyrolysis products from the dual-screw feeder reactor. (10) Process simulation of the dual-screw feeder reactor. The experimental results of devolatilization and desulfurization of an Ohio {number_sign}8 coal demonstrate that an increasing the temperature in mild coal pyrolysis leads to the increase of both the devolatilization yield and the desulfurization yield. Under the experimental conditions, mainly the organic sulfur releases in the form of H{sub 2}S. Both the devolatilization and the desulfurization processes can be described by using the first-order-reaction model which gives the activation energy values for pyrolysis and desulfurization of 170,021 kJ/mol and 78,783 kJ/mol, indicating the sulfur is easier to release than volatiles. The outer screw region of CaO pellets also demonstrated almost a complete removal of hydrogen sulfide from volatiles. At a temperature of 475{degree}C and a residence time of 6 minutes, 73.1% of the organic sulfur was removed in the screw feeder reactor. The investigation of the combustion characteristics of the pyrolysis products showed a negligible reduction of the total heating value of the char and volatile products.

  3. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  4. Basic mechanisms of helium heat transfer and related influence on stability of superconducting magnets; Proceedings of the 2nd Joint Seminar (U.S.-Japan), University of Los Angeles, CA, Aug. 26-30, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papers are presented on low-Tc and high-Tc superconductors, with contributions in the areas of heat transfer in boiling and 'take-off' stability limits, transport phenomena in superfluid He II and related He II stability questions of fluid management. Other topics addressed include the stability of superconducting magnets, supercritical forced flow modes, solid-state phenomena, quench propagation, and contact problems, e.g. solid-liquid and solid-solid, including metal-insulator systems.

  5. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height...6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing Burner...

  6. To Determine the Percentage of Copper in a Brass Screw Using a Computer Interface with a Colorimeter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Joan; Hedge, Robyn

    1997-01-01

    Year 11 students investigated the real-world problem of whether screws are really brass. It allowed them to use the colorimeter and computer interface in a way that was easily understood and models normal practice in testing laboratories. Screws were dissolved in nitric acid and their absorbance of red light was compared with a standard curve.…

  7. Submitted to Composites A: Applied Science and Manufacturing Graded Polymer Composites Using Twin Screw Extrusion: A Combinatorial

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Twin Screw Extrusion: A Combinatorial Approach to Developing New Energetic Materials Frederick M. Recently, a manufacturing technology known as Twin Screw Extrusion (TSE), has been demonstrated to increase suited to manufacturing graded polymer composites through transient operating and/or feed conditions

  8. Percutaneous Cement-Augmented Screws Fixation in the Fractures of the Aging Spine: Is It the Solution?

    PubMed Central

    Pesenti, Sébastien; Peltier, Emilie; Adetchessi, Tarek; Dufour, Henry; Fuentes, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Management of elderly patients with thoracolumbar fractures is still challenging due to frequent osteoporosis and risk of screws pull-out. The aim of this study was to evaluate results of a percutaneous-only procedure to treat these fragile patients using cement-augmented screws. Methods. 12 patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture associated with an important loss of bone stock were included in this prospective study. Surgical procedure included systematically a percutaneous osteosynthesis using cemented fenestrated screws. When necessary, additional anterior support was performed using a kyphoplasty procedure. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed using CT scan. Results. On the whole series, 15 fractures were diagnosed and 96 cemented screws were inserted. The difference between the pre- and postoperative vertebral kyphosis was statistically significant (12.9° versus 4.4°, P = 0.0006). No extrapedicular screw was reported and one patient was diagnosed with a cement-related pulmonary embolism. During follow-up period, no infectious complications, implant failures, or pull-out screws were noticed. Discussion. Aging spine is becoming an increasing public health issue. Management of these patients requires specific attention due to the augmented risk of complications. Using percutaneous-only screws fixation with cemented screw provides satisfactory results. A rigorous technique is mandatory in order to achieve best outcomes. PMID:24696858

  9. Changes in the computed tomography (pixel) value of mandibular ramus bone and fixation screws after sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Ueki, K; Moroi, A; Iguchi, R; Kosaka, A; Ikawa, H; Yoshizawa, K

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the changes in computed tomography (CT) values of ramus bone and screws after sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) setback surgery. The subjects were 64 patients (128 sides) who underwent bilateral SSRO setback surgery. They were divided into six groups according to the fixation plate type used and the use or not of self-setting ?-tricalcium phosphate (Biopex): group 1: titanium plate and screws; group 2: titanium plate and screws with Biopex; group 3: poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) plate and screws; group 4: PLLA plate and screws with Biopex; group 5: uncalcined and unsintered hydroxyapatite particles and poly-l-lactic acid (uHA/PLLA) plate and screws; group 6: PLLA/uHA plate and screws with Biopex. CT values (pixel values) of the lateral cortex, medial cortex, osteotomy site, and screws were measured preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 1 year postoperatively using horizontal CT images at the mandibular foramen taken parallel to the Frankfort horizontal plane. There were significant differences in the time-course change of pixel values for the lateral cortex (P<0.0001) and the osteotomy site (P<0.0001) among the six groups. This study suggests that the fixation plate type and use of bone alternative material may affect bone quality during the process of bone healing after SSRO. PMID:26139563

  10. ScrewFit: combining localization and description of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Calligari, Paolo A; Kneller, Gerald R

    2012-12-01

    A new application of the ScrewFit algorithm [Kneller & Calligari (2006), Acta Cryst. D62, 302-311] is presented which adds the detection of protein secondary-structure elements to their detailed geometrical description in terms of a curve with intrinsic torsion. The extension is based on confidence and persistence criteria for the ScrewFit parameters which are established by analyzing the structural fluctuations of standard motifs in the SCOP fold classes. The agreement with the widely used DSSP method is comparable with the general consensus among other methods in the literature. This combination of secondary-structure detection and analysis is illustrated for the enzyme adenylate kinase. PMID:23151634

  11. Vertebral body compression fracture after percutaneous pedicle screw removal in a young man.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, M; De Iure, F; Amendola, L; Martucci, A

    2015-12-01

    Hazards and potential complications associated with pedicle screw insertions have been reported. In contrast, complications due to implant removal are rarely described. An unreported case of acute vertebral body compression fracture following pedicle screw removal in a young man occurred during an episode of forceful coughing. Spinal implants need to be removed in cases of complications, pain or tissue irritation, and removal is mandatory when fixation involves L2 or the lower segments. Complications associated with spinal implant removal are rare but possible, and patients must be informed of this potential risk. PMID:25417175

  12. A complete absorption mechanism of stacking fault tetrahedron by screw dislocation in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haidong; Wang, Qingyuan

    2013-10-01

    It was frequently observed in experiments that stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT) can be completely absorbed by dislocation and generate defect-free channels in irradiated materials, but the mechanism is still open. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) was used to explore the dislocation mechanism of reaction between SFT and screw dislocation in copper. Our computational results reveal that, at high temperature, the SFT is completely absorbed by screw dislocation with the help of Lomer-Cottrell (LC) lock transforming into Lomer dislocation. This complete absorption mechanism is very helpful to understand the defect-free channels in irradiated materials.

  13. Posterior Spinal Reconstruction with Pedicle Screws, Multiple Iliac Screws and Wisconsin Spinal Wires in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Scoliosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Beom; Park, Young-Seop; Park, Jong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with progressing truncal shift owing to spinal deformity. On plain radiograph, the Cobb angle was 54 degree in coronal plane. Radiological examinations showed severe dystrophic change with dysplastic pedicles, bony scalloping, neural foraminal widening from dural ectasia. The patient underwent deformity correction and reconstruction surgery from the T9 to the pelvis using multiple iliac screws and Wisconsin interspinous segmental instrumentation by wiring due to maximize fixation points. The postoperative course was uneventful. One-year follow-up radiographs showed a successful curve correction with solid fusion. We report a case of pedicle dysplasia and dystrophic change treated by posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion with help of multiple iliac screws and modified Wisconsin interspinous segmental wiring. PMID:26512279

  14. Pressure suit joint analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B. W. (inventors)

    1982-01-01

    A measurement system for simultaneously measuring torque and angular flexure in a pressure suit joint is described. One end of a joint under test is held rigid. A torque transducer is pivotably supported on the other movable end of a joint. A potentiometer is attached to the transducer by an arm. The wiper shaft of the potentiometer is gripped by a reference arm that rotates the wiper shaft the same angle as the flexure of joint. A signal is generated by the potentiometer which is representative of the joint flexure. A compensation circuit converts the output of the transducer to a signal representative of joint torque.

  15. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining. PMID:24485809

  16. Intraoperative Vertebral Artery Angiography to Guide C1-2 Transarticular Screw Fixation in a Patient with Athetoid Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jong Chul; Park, Ki Seok; Ha, Ho Gyun

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of an athetoid cerebral palsy with quadriparesis caused by kyphotic deformity of the cervical spine, severe spinal stenosis at the cervicomedullary junction, and atlantoaxial instability. The patient improved after the first surgery, which included a C1 total laminectomy and C-arm guided righ side unilateral C1-2 transarticular screw fixation. C1-2 fixation was not performed on the other side because of an aberrant and dominant vertebral artery (VA). Eight months after the first operation, the patient required revision surgery for persistent neck pain and screw malposition. We used intraoperative VA angiography with simultaneous fluoroscopy for precise image guidance during bilateral C1-2 transarticular screw fixation. Intraoperative VA angiography allowed the accurate insertion of screws, and can therefore be used to avoid VA injury during C1-2 transarticular screw fixation in comorbid patients with atlantoaxial deformities. PMID:22639719

  17. Elbow joint luxation in a 1-month-old foal.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Martínez, L M; Vázquez, F J; Romero, A; Ormazábal, J R

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on luxation of the elbow joint without concomitant fracture in a 1-month-old foal. Conservative treatment, with closed reduction and full-limb bandaging, including caudal and lateral splints, seemed successful initially, however, failed to provide enough stability and luxation recurred, and open reduction and surgical placement of prosthetic collateral ligaments was required. Luxation of the elbow joint should be considered when acute non-weight bearing forelimb lameness occurs associated with pain and swelling in the area of the elbow in young foals. Closed reduction failed to provide sufficient joint stability. PMID:18271829

  18. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  19. Behavior of jointed pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, A.C.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental data on the axial, bending and torsional behavior of ductile cast iron pipes with rubber gasket joints is presented. Analytical expressions are provided which predict the resistance mechanisms and behavior of the joints. The bending mechanism is found to be quite different from the axial and torsional mechanism. By repeating the tests in a specially designed soil box, the effects of burial depths are determined. A joint stiffness matrix including axial, bending and torsional effects is provided. The slip behavior of the joint changes the stiffness values, however this occurence may be dealt with by using an appropriate flag system placed within a computer program. To minimize axial compressional stresses and interlocking bending stresses at the joint, a minor geometrical change in the joint needs to be made. Joints with larger lip lengths provide more flexibility when subjected to axial compression or joint bending rotations.

  20. Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medical Tests & Exams > Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) Print A A A Text Size ...

  1. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  3. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePLUS

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  4. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ... often caused by: Bursitis Arthritis Injury to the hip joint or surrounding area Overuse or strain from running ...

  5. Interaction of a screw dislocation with Frank loops in Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, D.; Bakaev, A.

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of 2 and 5 nm Frank loops with a moving screw dislocation is studied in Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy (a model of austenitic 304 and 316 steels) employing the newly developed Fe-Ni-Cr interatomic potential in molecular dynamics simulations. The applied potential ensures full stability of FCC phase and smooth evolution of stacking fault energy (SFE) as a function of chemical composition, fitted to be in a close agreement with the CALPHAD database. A model of Fe-10Ni-20Cr random alloy closely reproduces elastic properties and SFE of 316-type austenitic steels. The results reveal a number of interaction mechanisms depending on loop orientation and ambient temperature. Half of the observed reactions lead to loop unfaulting despite a low SFE of the alloy. The unfaulting reactions are enhanced with temperature and the critical stress for the unfaulting is regularly higher in comparison with the loop shear interaction. By comparing present results with a recent study done in a low SFE Fe-50Ni alloy, we reveal that a magnitude of local variation of SFE is an important factor controlling the formation of dislocation constrictions. In the Fe-50Ni alloy, characterized by strong variations of local SFE, the constrictions are almost never observed so that the loop shear interaction prevails, while absorption is rare. In the Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy, characterized by small variations of local SFE, the constrictions are regularly formed resulting in frequent loop unfaulting. Approximately half of the inspected configurations for dislocation-loop interaction lead to loop unfaulting, despite of rather low stacking fault energy of the alloy. The obstacle strength in reactions causing loop unfault is 0.5-0.65 ?b/L, while it is ˜0.2 ?b/L in case of simple loop shear. A new type of the interaction mechanism leading to the partial unfaulting and reconstruction of the Frank loops (but in a different {1 1 1} plane) was observed. Such reaction occurred only in the case of 2 nm loops. The strength of such interaction mechanism is of the order of 0.25 ?b/L. The primary feature controlling absorption in the alloy is the formation of short constrictions allowing for the local cross-slip dislocation movement. Strong local variation of SFE (such as in Fe-50Ni [13]) makes practically impossible the formation of constrictions on relatively large loops, preventing from loop unfault. Thus, magnitude of local variation of SFE is another factor to be accounted for in the consideration of dislocation-Frank loop interaction.

  6. Postoperative Therapy for Chronic Thumb Carpometacarpal (CMC) Joint Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Wollstein, Ronit; Michael, Dafna; Harel, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Surgical arthroplasty of thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis is commonly performed. Postoperative therapeutic protocols aim to improve range of motion and function of the revised thumb. We describe a case in which the thumb CMC joint had been chronically dislocated before surgery, with shortening of the soft-tissue dynamic and static stabilizers of the joint. The postoperative protocol addressed the soft tissues using splinting and exercises aimed at lengthening and strengthening these structures, with good results. It may be beneficial to evaluate soft-tissue tension and the pattern of thumb use after surgery for thumb CMC joint osteoarthritis to improve postoperative functional results. PMID:26709434

  7. Evaluation of tantalum 316 stainless steel transition joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular transition joints providing a metallurgically bonded connection between tantalum and 316 stainless steel pipe sections were comparatively evaluated for durability under thermal cycling conditions approximating the operation of a SNAP-8 mercury boiler. Both coextruded and vacuum brazed transition joints of 50mm (2 inch) diameter were tested by thermal cycling 100 times between 730 C and 120 C(1350 F and 250 F) in a high vacuum environment. The twelve evaluated transition joints survived the full test sequence without developing leaks, although liquid penetrant bond line indications eventually developed in all specimens. The brazed transition joints exhibited the best dimensional stability and bond line durability.

  8. Complications of Biodegradable Materials: Anchors and Interference Screws.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    Metal, plastic, and biodegradable implants can all cause problems. The advantage of the biodegradable implant is clarity in postoperative imaging, easier revision, and fewer concerns about associated tissue damage. Although biodegradable implants do degrade over time, this time varies considerably, depends upon the polymer present, and is often measured in years. Before that occurring, the implant is a rigid device. Problems in the operative or immediate postoperative period include implant breakage during insertion, loss of initial fixation, incompletely buried or "proud" implants within a joint that could damage articular cartilage, and possible implant migration. Later occurring problems include the development of inflammatory reactions leading to lytic changes, cyst formation, intra-articular granuloma formation along with swelling, and sterile pretibial abscesses. Despite this list of potential problems on balance biodegradable implants are safe and effective and present no greater concerns (and arguably fewer ones) than metal or plastic implants. PMID:26225575

  9. Joint Enrollment Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Department of Education collects information on joint enrollment in Iowa's 15 community colleges. Jointly enrolled students are high school students enrolled in community college credit coursework. Most jointly enrolled students enroll through Senior Year Plus (SYP) programs such as Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and concurrent…

  10. Numerical Flow Simulation for Bingham Plastics in a Single-Screw Extruder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, G.; Broszeit, J.

    Numerical simulations have been performed concerning the operation of a single-screw extruder, pumping a Bingham plastic under isothermal, developed flow conditions. Under the assumption of sufficiently low Reynolds numbers, inertia effects are neglected. The singular rheological behavior of the Bingham plastic is considered as the limiting case within a class of generalized Newtonian liquids with smooth constitutive equations. The validation of this regularization process is shown for a related flow problem where the Bingham solution is known analytically. A mixed finite-element method is applied to the flow in the screw-extruder to reduce the equations of motion, the continuity equation, and the regularized constitutive equation to a set of nonlinear algebraic equations, which are solved using a Newton method. In particular, the pumping characteristics of a given screw geometry are extracted from the finite-element calculations, i.e., the dependence of the volumetric flow rate and of the power requirement on the axial pressure drop, on the screw speed, and on the rheological parameters. Calculated flow fields clearly show the size and position of regions in the extruder channel where the Bingham plastic behaves like a solid.

  11. Efficiency and Leakage Analysis of a Twin-Screw Multiphase Pump 

    E-print Network

    Turhan, Yusuf

    2014-04-01

    , the leakage flow whose direction is from the pressure side to the suction side of the pump is investigated. The leakage flow and its properties are modeled with respect to Leistritz screw pump geometry and some thermodynamics and fluid mechanics tools...

  12. Influence of liquid in clearances on the operational behaviour of twin screw expanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräßer, Melanie; Brümmer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    A lot of effort has been expended on understanding the influences of an injected auxiliary liquid on a twin screw expander's performance. Sealed clearances improve performance on the one hand, but involve considerable frictional losses on the other hand. This paper contributes to an evaluation of these opposing effects with regard to the efficiency of screw expanders. First, thermodynamic analyses using the multi-chamber model-based simulation tool KaSim, developed at the Chair of Fluidics, are presented for a test screw expander in order to show the maximum potential of clearance sealing. This analysis involves thermodynamic simulations for sealed and unsealed clearances and leads to an order of priorities for different clearance types. Second, hydraulic losses within front and housing clearances are calculated, applying an analytical model of incompressible one-phase clearance flow. Subsequently dry and wet screw expanders are evaluated while both clearance sealing and frictional losses are considered for the simulation of a liquid-injected machine.

  13. Entropy Time Evolution in a Twin Flight Single Screw Extruder and its Relationship to Chaos

    E-print Network

    1 Entropy Time Evolution in a Twin Flight Single Screw Extruder and its Relationship to Chaos use entropic measures to probe disorder or system homogeneity. The time evolution of the Renyi entropy. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy rate, calculated by the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents, is correlated

  14. Twin screw extrusion processing of feed blends containing distillers dried grains with solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion trials were conducted with varying levels of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) along with soy flour, corn flour, fish meal, vitamin mix, mineral mix and net protein content adjusted to 28% using a Wenger TX-52 twin screw extruder. The properties of extrudates obtained with exper...

  15. Extrusion cooking using a twin-screw apparatus reduces toxicity of fumonisin-contaminated corn grits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion cooking using a single screw configuration reduced fumonisin concentrations of corn grits in an earlier study. Adding glucose before cooking enhanced reductions and, in one of three trials, partially reversed in vivo toxicity. To determine the effectiveness of extrusion using the more effi...

  16. Twin screw wet granulation: Effect of process and formulation variables on powder caking during production.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-12-30

    This work focuses on monitoring the behaviour and the mass of the built up/caking of powder during wet granulation using Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). The variables changed during this work are; powder (?-lactose monohydrate and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC)), the screw configuration (conveying and kneading elements) and the weight percentage of hydroxypropyl-methyl cellulose (HPMC) dissolved in the granulation liquid (i.e. changing liquid viscosity). Additionally, the effect of these variables on the size distribution, of the granules produced, was determined. The experiments were conducted using an acrylic transparent barrel. A stainless steel barrel was then used to conduct the two extreme granulation liquid viscosities with two different screw configurations, using lactose only. This was done to compare the findings to those obtained from the transparent barrel for validation purpose. These variables showed to affect the behaviour and the mass of the powder caking as well as the size distribution of granules. Overall, the use of kneading element resulted in uniform behaviour in caking with higher mass. Furthermore, increasing the amount of HPMC resulted in a reduction of the mass of powder caking for lactose, while showing inconsistent trend for MCC. Furthermore, lactose showed to have a greater tendency to cake in comparison to MCC. The results, for lactose, obtained from the stainless steel barrel compared well with their corresponding conditions from the transparent barrel, as the screw configuration and HPMC mass varied. PMID:26536529

  17. The Effect of Noise on the Dirac Phase of Electron in The Presence of Screw Dislocation

    E-print Network

    Reza Torabi

    2011-10-26

    The effect of noise on the Dirac phase of electron in the presence of screw dislocation is studied. An uncorrelated noise, which coincides with the nature of thermal fluctuations, is adopted. Results indicate that the Dirac phase is robust against existing noise in the system.

  18. Anatomy of screw dislocations in nanoporous SAPO-18 as revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel L; Lind, Anna; Akporiaye, Duncan; Attfield, Martin P; Anderson, Michael W

    2015-04-11

    Defects in solids are often the source of functional activity, the trigger for crystal growth and the seat of instability. Screw dislocations are notoriously difficult to study by electron microscopy. Here we decipher the complex anatomy of one such defect in the industrially important nanoporous catalyst SAPO-18 by atomic force microscopy. PMID:25761232

  19. Study of titanium screws as retrograde fillings using bacteria and dye.

    PubMed

    Luomanen, M; Tuompo, H

    1985-12-01

    The tightness of retrograde titanium screw fillings and retrograde amalgam fillings was compared in 17 human, single-rooted teeth using Serratia marcescens bacteria in vitro. The root canals were subjected to instrumentation and irrigation, after which 2 mm was cut off from the apical end. Eight of the teeth were sealed using retrograde titanium screw fillings and nine using retrograde amalgam fillings. The teeth were suspended by means of wires in test tubes, with the crowns upwards and the roots immersed in trypticase soy broth. Suspensions of Serratia marcescens bacteria were placed in the root canals, and samples from the broth were plated daily. The bacteria penetrated the apical titanium screw seals in 2 to 7 days, and the retrograde amalgam fillings readily on the first day. Thus, the titanium screws seemed to provide a tighter seal. Staining with India ink showed that penetration had occurred at the tooth-filling margin and that the instrumentation had not caused any fractures to the roots. PMID:3912957

  20. Comparison of open versus percutaneous pedicle screw insertion in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Ushmaev, A.; Ruecker, A.; Nuechtern, J.; Grossterlinden, L.; Begemann, P. G.; Baeumer, T.; Rueger, J. M.; Briem, D.

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has become more and more important for the treatment of traumatic spine fractures. Besides, some clinical studies, objective data regarding the possible lower damage to the surrounding tissue of the spine is still missing. Here we report a sheep model where we compared a percutaneous versus an open approach for dorsal instrumentation with pedicle screws to the spine. Twelve skeletally mature sheep underwent bilateral pedicle screw fixation at the L4–L6 level. Forty-eight pedicle screws were bilaterally inserted into the pedicles and connected with rods using either an open dorsal standard or a percutaneous approach. Operation time, blood flow, compartment pressure, radiation time, loss of blood, laboratory findings and EMG were evaluated to objectify possible advantages for the percutaneous operation technique. Loss of blood and the distribution of CK-MM as a marker for muscle damage were significantly lower in the percutaneous group. However, radiation time was significantly longer in the percutaneous group. Other parameters like compartment pressure, blood flow and also measurement of the EMG at different time points did not reveal significant differences. Based on the results we found in the present study, percutaneous screw insertion can bring moderate advantages but it should be noted that essential functional deficits to the muscle could not be detected. PMID:18389291

  1. Mechanical comparison of cortical screw fixation versus locking plate fixation in first metatarsal base osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin; Lidtke, Roy H; Oliver, Noah G; Maker, Jared M

    2014-01-01

    The oblique closing base wedge osteotomy has been used for surgical treatment of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformities with an intermetatarsal angle typically greater than 15°. Several postoperative complications have been identified that relate to failure of the fixation construct used to fixate the osteotomy, especially when that construct has been subjected to a vertical load. We performed a mechanical analysis comparing 2 constructs used to fixate oblique osteotomies of the first metatarsal using composite first metatarsals. An oblique base osteotomy was uniformly performed on 40 composite first metatarsals. Of the 40 specimens, 20 were fixated with a locking plate construct and 18 with a cortical screw construct, consisting of an anchor and compression screw (2 specimens from the latter group were excluded because of hinge fracture). Each specimen was loaded in a materials testing machine to measure the maximum load at construct failure when a vertical force was applied to the plantar aspect of the metatarsal head. The mean load to failure for the locking plate construct was significantly greater than the cortical screw construct (190.0 ± 70 N versus 110.3 ± 20.3 N, p < .001). Our study results have demonstrated that the locking plate construct was able to withstand a significantly greater vertical load before failure than was the 2-cortical screw construct in oblique osteotomies performed at the base of composite first metatarsals. PMID:24954919

  2. Kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements based on screw theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuantao; Wang, Sanmin; Mills, James K.; Zhi, Changjian

    2014-07-01

    Because the deployable structures are complex multi-loop structures and methods of derivation which lead to simpler kinematic and dynamic equations of motion are the subject of research effort, the kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements are presented based on screw theory and the principle of virtual work respectively. According to the geometric characteristic of the deployable structure examined, the basic structural unit is the common scissor-like-element(SLE). First, a spatial deployable structure, comprised of three SLEs, is defined, and the constraint topology graph is obtained. The equations of motion are then derived based on screw theory and the geometric nature of scissor elements. Second, to develop the dynamics of the whole deployable structure, the local coordinates of the SLEs and the Jacobian matrices of the center of mass of the deployable structure are derived. Then, the equivalent forces are assembled and added in the equations of motion based on the principle of virtual work. Finally, dynamic behavior and unfolded process of the deployable structure are simulated. Its figures of velocity, acceleration and input torque are obtained based on the simulate results. Screw theory not only provides an efficient solution formulation and theory guidance for complex multi-closed loop deployable structures, but also extends the method to solve dynamics of deployable structures. As an efficient mathematical tool, the simper equations of motion are derived based on screw theory.

  3. Modeling of wet gas compression in twin-screw multiphase pump 

    E-print Network

    Xu, Jian

    2009-05-15

    model is developed based upon a previous Texas A&M twin-screw pump model. In this model, both the gas slip and liquid slip in the pump clearances are simulated. The mechanical model is coupled with a thermodynamic model to predict the pressure...

  4. Is cross-screw fixation superior to plate for radial neck fractures?

    PubMed

    Li, S L; Lu, Y; Wang, M Y

    2015-06-01

    This study compares the outcomes of two methods of fixation of displaced fractures of the radial neck. The 58 patients with a mean age of 38.5 years (18 to 56), were treated in a non randomised study with screws (n = 29) or a plate and screws (n = 29) according to the surgeon's preference. The patients were reviewed at one year. Radiographs and functional evaluations were carried out up to one year post-operatively, using the Broberg and Morrey functional evaluation score, range of movement, and assessment of complications. The mean functional scores did not differ significantly between groups (90 (55 to 100) vs 84; 50 to 100, p = 0.09), but the mean range of forearm rotation in screw group was significantly better than in the plate group (152°; 110° to 170° vs 134°; 80° to 170°, p = 0.001). Although not statistically significant, the screw group had a lower incidence of heterotopic ossification than the plate group (n = 1) than the plated group (n = 3) and the pathology was graded as less severe. PMID:26033065

  5. Using Outside Air for Flooded Oil Screw Compressors at an Industrial Facility 

    E-print Network

    Hunt, D. G.; Terry, S.

    2014-01-01

    . However, energy use will be a function of mass flow, since processes demand a given mass flow, which is a function of inlet density and time loaded. For flooded oil screw compressors, our experimental results show that for a given mass flow (scfm...

  6. [Mechanical principle and clinical application of the combined spinal rod-plate and transpedicular screws fixation system].

    PubMed

    Zhang, G H

    1989-12-01

    Twenty-one patients with unstable burst fractures of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine were treated with a combined spinal rod-plate and transpedicular screws (CSRP-TPS) fixation system. This system is a new device for disorders of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. In treatment of spinal fractures, it provided three-column axial distraction and stabilized the injured vertebra in a lordotic position-this maximized the reduction and indirectly achieved a neurologic decompression by ligamentotaxis. This "indirect" neurologic decompression was more successful in cases treated early after injury as the spinal canal area (measured by pre- and postoperative CT) increased 35% in cases treated within one week after injury; 25% in cases treated 7-14 days after injury; and there was little improvement in cases treated more than two weeks following injury. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. There were no infections, iatrogenic neurologic deficits or instrumentation failures. The CSRP-TPS system gave more improved results over conventional Harrington and segmental spinal instrumentation systems and only required fixation and fusion of three vertebral levels. PMID:2636110

  7. Atomistic study on the cross-slip process of a screw????dislocation in magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, M.; Kaburaki, H.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tsuru, T.

    2015-09-01

    The cross-slip process of a screw????dislocation from the basal to the prismatic plane in magnesium was studied using the density functional theory and the molecular dynamics calculations. An atomistic method for calculating the total Peierls energy map has been devised to track the transition path of a dissociated and/or constricted screw????dislocation in the cross-slip process. The barrier of a screw????dislocation from the basal to the prismatic plane is estimated by the density functional theory for the first time to be 61.4+/- 2.0 meV per Burgers vector length. The activation enthalpy for the cross slip is calculated using a line tension model based on the density functional theory to be 1.4-1.7?eV, which is in reasonable agreement with experiments. On the basis of the results, the effect of temperature on the cross-slip process of the dissociated screw????dislocation on the basal plane is studied in detail using the molecular dynamics method with the embedded-atom-method (EAM) interatomic potential, in which the critical resolved shear stress for the cross slip is evaluated. It is confirmed that the bowed-out dislocation line on the prismatic plane consists of slightly dissociated rectilinear segments with connecting jogs at low temperatures and, as the temperature rises, the curved dislocation line becomes smooth with many segments. The motion of an????dislocation on the prismatic plane is jerky in the low temperature region, while it is retarded by the formation of the largely dissociated plateau segment above the room temperature. A large reduction of the critical shear stress for the cross slip is obtained when the????screw dislocation interacts with a hard-sphere particle placed on the basal plane in the low temperature region.

  8. Mixing and transport during pharmaceutical twin-screw wet granulation: experimental analysis via chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Panouillot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Juuti, Mikko; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2014-07-01

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising continuous alternative for traditional batch high shear wet granulation (HSWG). The extent of HSWG in a twin screw granulator (TSG) is greatly governed by the residence time of the granulation materials in the TSG and degree of mixing. In order to determine the residence time distribution (RTD) and mixing in TSG, mostly visual observation and particle tracking methods are used, which are either inaccurate and difficult for short RTD, or provide an RTD only for a finite number of preferential tracer paths. In this study, near infrared chemical imaging, which is more accurate and provides a complete RTD, was used. The impact of changes in material throughput (10-17 kg/h), screw speed (500-900 rpm), number of kneading discs (2-12) and stagger angle (30-90°) on the RTD and axial mixing of the material was characterised. The experimental RTD curves were used to calculate the mean residence time, mean centred variance and the Péclet number to determine the axial mixing and predominance of convective over dispersive transport. The results showed that screw speed is the most influential parameter in terms of RTD and axial mixing in the TSG and established a significant interaction between screw design parameters (number and stagger angle of kneading discs) and the process parameters (material throughput and number of kneading discs). The results of the study will allow the development and validation of a transport model capable of predicting the RTD and macro-mixing in the TSG. These can later be coupled with a population balance model in order to predict granulation yields in a TSG more accurately. PMID:24768925

  9. Optimisation of two-stage screw expanders for waste heat recovery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, M. G.; Smith, I. K.; Stosic, N.

    2015-08-01

    It has previously been shown that the use of two-phase screw expanders in power generation cycles can achieve an increase in the utilisation of available energy from a low temperature heat source when compared with more conventional single-phase turbines. However, screw expander efficiencies are more sensitive to expansion volume ratio than turbines, and this increases as the expander inlet vapour dryness fraction decreases. For singlestage screw machines with low inlet dryness, this can lead to under expansion of the working fluid and low isentropic efficiency for the expansion process. The performance of the cycle can potentially be improved by using a two-stage expander, consisting of a low pressure machine and a smaller high pressure machine connected in series. By expanding the working fluid over two stages, the built-in volume ratios of the two machines can be selected to provide a better match with the overall expansion process, thereby increasing efficiency for particular inlet and discharge conditions. The mass flow rate though both stages must however be matched, and the compromise between increasing efficiency and maximising power output must also be considered. This research uses a rigorous thermodynamic screw machine model to compare the performance of single and two-stage expanders over a range of operating conditions. The model allows optimisation of the required intermediate pressure in the two- stage expander, along with the rotational speed and built-in volume ratio of both screw machine stages. The results allow the two-stage machine to be fully specified in order to achieve maximum efficiency for a required power output.

  10. Material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastio, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly seventy-five years ago, the single screw extruder was introduced as a means to produce metal products. Shortly after that, the extruder found its way into the plastics industry. Today much of the world's polymer industry utilizes extruders to produce items such as soda bottles, PVC piping, and toy figurines. Given the significant economical advantages of extruders over conventional batch flow systems, extruders have also migrated into the food industry. Food applications include the meat, pet food, and cereal industries to name just a few. Cereal manufacturers utilize extruders to produce various forms of Ready-to-Eat (RTE) cereals. These cereals are made from grains such as rice, oats, wheat, and corn. The food industry has been incorrectly viewed as an extruder application requiring only minimal energy control and performance capability. This misconception has resulted in very little research in the area of material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruders. Breakfast cereal extruder barrels and individual screw elements are subjected to the extreme pressures and temperatures required to shear and cook the cereal ingredients, resulting in excessive material wear and catastrophic failure of these components. Therefore, this project focuses on the material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements, modeled as a Discrete Time Markov Chain (DTMC) process in which historical data is used to predict future failures. Such predictive analysis will yield cost savings opportunities by providing insight into extruder maintenance scheduling and interchangeability of screw elements. In this DTMC wear analysis, four states of wear are defined and a probability transition matrix is determined based upon 24,041 hours of operational data. This probability transition matrix is used to predict when an extruder component will move to the next state of wear and/or failure. This information can be used to determine maintenance schedules and screw element interchangeability.

  11. Determining the Best Treatment for Coronal Angular Deformity of the Knee Joint in Growing Children: A Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki Hyuk; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Yeol; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the best treatment modality for coronal angular deformity of the knee joint in growing children using decision analysis. A decision tree was created to evaluate 3 treatment modalities for coronal angular deformity in growing children: temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using staples, percutaneous screws, or a tension band plate. A decision analysis model was constructed containing the final outcome score, probability of metal failure, and incomplete correction of deformity. The final outcome was defined as health-related quality of life and was used as a utility in the decision tree. The probabilities associated with each case were obtained by literature review, and health-related quality of life was evaluated by a questionnaire completed by 25 pediatric orthopedic experts. Our decision analysis model favored temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate over temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using percutaneous screws or stapling, with utilities of 0.969, 0.957, and 0.962, respectively. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate was better than temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using percutaneous screws, when the overall complication rate of hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate was lower than 15.7%. Two-way sensitivity analysis showed that hemiepiphysiodesis using a tension band plate was more beneficial than temporary hemiepiphysiodesis using percutaneous screws. PMID:25276801

  12. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    PubMed Central

    Haegeman, Bart; Loreau, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability. PMID:26557427

  13. Hydrogen-induced change in core structures of {110}[111] edge and {110}[111] screw dislocations in iron

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2013-01-01

    Employing the empirical embedded-atom method potentials, the evolution of edge and screw dislocation core structure is calculated at different hydrogen concentrations. With hydrogen, the core energy and Peierls potential are reduced for all dislocations. A broaden-core and a quasi-split core structure are observed for edge and screw dislocation respectively. The screw dislocation and hydrogen interaction in body-centred cubic iron is found to be not mainly due to the change of elastic modulus, but the variation of dislocation core structure. PMID:24067268

  14. Torque Limit for Bolted Joint For Composites. Part B; Experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostreva, Kristian M.

    2003-01-01

    Today, aerospace quality composite parts are generally made from either a unidirectional tape or a fabric prepreg form depending on the application. The matrix material, typically epoxy because of it dimensional stability, is pre-impregnated onto the fibers to ensure uniform distribution. Both of these composite forms are finding themselves used in applications where a joint is required. Two widely used joint methods are the classic mechanically fastened joint, and the contemporary bonded joint; however, the mechanically fastened joint is most commonly used by design engineers. A major portion of the research up-to-date about bolted composite joints has dealt with the inplane static load capacity. This work has helped to spawn standards dealing with filled-hole static joint strength. Other research has clearly shown that the clamp-up load in the mechanical fastener significantly affects the joint strength in a beneficial manner by reducing the bearing strength dependence of the composite laminate. One author reported a maximum increase in joint strength of 28%. This finding has helped to improve the reliability and efficiency of the joint in a composite structure.

  15. Early osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint is not associated with joint instability during typical isometric loading.

    PubMed

    Halilaj, Eni; Moore, Douglas C; Patel, Tarpit K; Ladd, Amy L; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C; Crisco, Joseph J

    2015-11-01

    The saddle-shaped trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint contributes importantly to the function of the human thumb. A balance between mobility and stability is essential in this joint, which experiences high loads and is prone to osteoarthritis (OA). Since instability is considered a risk factor for TMC OA, we assessed TMC joint instability during the execution of three isometric functional tasks (key pinch, jar grasp, and jar twist) in 76 patients with early TMC OA and 44 asymptomatic controls. Computed tomography images were acquired while subjects held their hands relaxed and while they applied 80% of their maximum effort for each task. Six degree-of-freedom rigid body kinematics of the metacarpal with respect to the trapezium from the unloaded to the loaded task positions were computed in terms of a TMC joint coordinate system. Joint instability was expressed as a function of the metacarpal translation and the applied force. We found that the TMC joint was more unstable during a key pinch task than during a jar grasp or a jar twist task. Sex, age, and early OA did not have an effect on TMC joint instability, suggesting that instability during these three tasks is not a predisposing factor in TMC OA. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1639-1645, 2015. PMID:25941135

  16. Mechanics of Suture Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaning; Song, Juha; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary; Ortiz Group/DMSE/MIT Team; Boyce Group/ME/MIT Team

    2011-03-01

    Biological sutures are joints which connect two stiff skeletal or skeletal-like components. These joints possess a wavy geometry with a thin organic layer providing adhesion. Examples of biological sutures include mammalian skulls, the pelvic assembly of the armored fish Gasterosteus aculeatus (the three-spined stickleback), and the suture joints in the shell of the red-eared slider turtle. Biological sutures allow for movement and compliance, control stress concentrations, transmit loads, reduce fatigue stress and absorb energy. In this investigation, the mechanics of the role of suture geometry in providing a naturally optimized joint is explored. In particular, analytical and numerical micromechanical models of the suture joint are constructed. The anisotropic mechanical stiffness and strength are studied as a function of suture wavelength, amplitude and the material properties of the skeletal and organic components, revealing key insights into the optimized nature of these ubiquitous natural joints.

  17. Self-force on a point charge and linear source in the space of a screw dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Sérgio; Moraes, Fernando

    2000-03-01

    Using a description of defect in solids in terms of three-dimensional gravity, we determine the eletrostatic self-force acting on a point teste charge and a linear source in the presence of a screw dislocation.

  18. Atomistic study of temperature dependence of interaction between screw dislocation and nanosized bcc Cu precipitate in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Dong-Ik; Jung, Woo-Sang; Cho, Young Whan; Hong, Kyung Tae; Wirth, Brian D.

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction between a screw dislocation and a 3.5 nm diameter bcc Cu precipitate in bcc Fe have been performed in the twinning and antitwinning direction between 10 and 400 K. The results indicate a significant temperature dependence in the antitwinning direction, whereby the screw dislocation bypasses the Cu precipitate by Orowan looping below 200 K, but shears the precipitate above 300 K. The transition in interaction mechanism is caused by a screw dislocation assisted martensitic transformation of the Cu precipitate, which significantly diminishes above 300 K. The screw dislocation shears the precipitate at all temperatures between 10 and 400 K in the twinning direction. Thus, transformation of the precipitate induces additional precipitate strengthening below 200 K in the antitwinning direction, which drastically decreases with increasing temperature above 300 K.

  19. Numerical and Experimental Evaluation on the Residual Stresses of Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Sun Chul; Park, Wonjo; Yang, Haesug; Jung, Haeyoung; Kim, Chuyoung

    Wings for the defense industry such as fighters, missiles, and rockets should show no deformation or damage on the structure. The structures of existing wings had holes for weight reduction. The plates and frames were fixed with rivets or screws, which limited the weight reduction possible. In this study, an improvement was made in jointing methods through EB welding and laser welding. Welding strength was measured through tension testing. In addition, finite element analysis was performed for the welding process so as to deduce the optimum welding condition.

  20. CAD/CAM-fabricated template for locating implant abutment screws in cement-retained anatomic zirconia restorations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Du-Hyeong

    2015-09-01

    Currently, appropriate access to the abutment screw within cement-retained implant restorations is determined using labor-intensive techniques. The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture technology has facilitated a digitized fabrication process to yield a template that can enhance the accuracy of drilling a screw channel. This article describes the method used to create these guide templates by using advanced dental design programs and machining. PMID:26013067

  1. Wear resistance of thick diamond like carbon coatings against polymeric materials used in single screw plasticizing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitzenbacher, G.; Liu, K.; Forsich, C.; Heim, D.

    2015-05-01

    Wear on the screw and barrel surface accompany polymer single screw plasticizing technology from the beginning. In general, wear on screws can be reduced by using nitrided steel surfaces, fused armour alloys on the screw flights and coatings. However, DLC-coatings (Diamond Like Carbon) comprise a number of interesting properties such as a high hardness, a low coefficient of friction and an excellent corrosion resistance due to their amorphous structure. The wear resistance of about 50 µm thick DLC-coatings against polyamide 6.6, polybutylene terephthalate and polypropylene is investigated in this paper. The tribology in the solids conveying zone of a single screw extruder until the beginning of melting is evaluated using a pin on disc tribometer and a so called screw tribometer. The polymeric pins are pressed against coated metal samples using the pin on disc tribometer and the tests are carried out at a defined normal force and sliding velocity. The screw tribometer is used to perform tribological experiments between polymer pellets and rotating coated metal shafts simulating the extruder screw. Long term experiments were performed to evaluate the wear resistance of the DLC-coating. A reduction of the coefficient of friction can be observed after a frictional distance of about 20 kilometers using glass fibre reinforced polymeric materials. This reduction is independent on the polymer and accompanied by a black layer on the wear surface of the polymeric pins. The DLC-coated metal samples show an up to 16 µm deep wear track after the 100 kilometer test period against the glass fiber filled materials only.

  2. Breakdown Degradation Associated with Elementary Screw Dislocations in 4H-SiC P(+)N Junction Rectifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.; Huang, W.; Dudley, M.

    1998-01-01

    It is well-known that SiC wafer quality deficiencies are delaying the realization of outstandingly superior 4H-SiC power electronics. While efforts to date have centered on eradicating micropipes (i.e., hollow core super-screw dislocations with Burgers vector greater than 2c), 4H-SiC wafers and epilayers also contain elementary screw dislocations (i.e., Burgers vector = lc with no hollow core) in densities on the order of thousands per sq cm, nearly 100-fold micropipe densities. This paper describes an initial study into the impact of elementary screw dislocations on the reverse-bias current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of 4H-SiC p(+)n diodes. First, Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWBXT) was employed to map the exact locations of elementary screw dislocations within small-area 4H-SiC p(+)n mesa diodes. Then the high-field reverse leakage and breakdown properties of these diodes were subsequently characterized on a probing station outfitted with a dark box and video camera. Most devices without screw dislocations exhibited excellent characteristics, with no detectable leakage current prior to breakdown, a sharp breakdown I-V knee, and no visible concentration of breakdown current. In contrast devices that contained at least one elementary screw dislocation exhibited a 5% to 35% reduction in breakdown voltage, a softer breakdown I-V knee, and visible microplasmas in which highly localized breakdown current was concentrated. The locations of observed breakdown microplasmas corresponded exactly to the locations of elementary screw dislocations identified by SWBXT mapping. While not as detrimental to SiC device performance as micropipes, the undesirable breakdown characteristics of elementary screw dislocations could nevertheless adversely affect the performance and reliability of 4H-SiC power devices.

  3. Morphometry of the cervical vertebral pedicles as a guide for transpedicular screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Kayalioglu, Gulgun; Erturk, Mete; Varol, Tuncay; Cezayirli, Enis

    2007-03-01

    Anatomical measurements of the cervical pedicle in a large series of human cervical vertebrae from 48 individuals were obtained to reduce the incidence and severity of complications caused by transpedicular screw placement. The greatest pedicle length was at C-3 and the greatest pedicle width was at C-6. Pedicle width and lateral mass thickness gradually increased from C-3 to C-6. Pedicle height and interpedicular distance increased from C-3 to C-5, and decreased slightly at C-6. The lateral mass-pedicle length was greatest at C-4. The present study found right-left differences for the pedicle-spinous process distance at C-6 (p < 0.05). Pedicle width and height were smaller than those reported in earlier studies, especially at C-3 and C-4, whereas the increasing pedicle widths at C-5 and C-6 were appropriate for pedicle screw fixation. PMID:17384491

  4. Self-similar solutions for the supersonic implosion of a screw-pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, R. C.; Choe, W. H.

    1992-06-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for the supersonic compression of a plasma containing an axial current and an entrained axial magnetic field (screw pinch). These solutions represent a complete generalization of previous works done on the Z-pinch and Theta-pinch schemes. The solutions presented herein represent a screw-pinch plasma with a diffuse current profile. Three separate plasma implosion modes are identified that differ qualitatively from the Z-pinch and Theta-pinch schemes. They are comprised of the plasma annulus implosion, a converging transverse magnetohydrodynamic shock, and the propagation of fast magnetosonic waves toward the axis (weak discontinuity). Analytic expressions describing the asymptotic behavior of the hydromagnetic profiles are obtained for each. Numerical examples for selected boundary conditions, representing realistic plasma parameters for the purpose of ultrahigh magnetic field generation, are presented.

  5. Design of Flexure-based Precision Transmission Mechanisms using Screw Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, J B; Panas, R M

    2011-02-07

    This paper enables the synthesis of flexure-based transmission mechanisms that possess multiple decoupled inputs and outputs of any type (e.g. rotations, translations, and/or screw motions), which are linked by designer-specified transmission ratios. A comprehensive library of geometric shapes is utilized from which every feasible concept that possesses the desired transmission characteristics may be rapidly conceptualized and compared before an optimal concept is selected. These geometric shapes represent the rigorous mathematics of screw theory and uniquely link a body's desired motions to the flexible constraints that enable those motions. This paper's impact is most significant to the design of nano-positioners, microscopy stages, optical mounts, and sensors. A flexure-based microscopy stage was designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate the utility of the theory.

  6. Analysis of the screw compressor rotors’ non-uniform thermal field effect on transmission error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafin, T. N.; Yakupov, R. R.; Burmistrov, A. V.; Khamidullin, M. S.; Khisameev, I. G.

    2015-08-01

    The vibrational state of the screw compressor is largely dependent on the gearing of the rotors and on the possibility of angular backlash in the gears. The presence of the latter leads to a transmission error and is caused by the need for the downward bias of the actual profile in relation to the theoretical. The loss of contact between rotors and, as a consequence, the current value of the quantity, characterizing the transmission error, is affected by a large number of different factors. In particular, a major influence on the amount of possible movement in the gearing will be exerted by thermal deformations of the rotor and the housing parts in the working mode of the machine. The present work is devoted to the analysis of the thermal state in the operation of the screw oil-flooded compressor and its impact on the transmission error and the possibility of losing contact between them during the operating cycle.

  7. Effects of twin-screw extrusion on soluble dietary fibre and physicochemical properties of soybean residue.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yan; Chi, Yu-Jie

    2013-06-01

    Extrusion cooking technology was applied for soluble dietary fibre extraction from soybean residue. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimise the effects of extrusion parameters, namely extrusion temperature (90-130°C), feed moisture (25-35%) and screw speed (160-200 rpm) on the content of soluble dietary fibre. According to the regression coefficients significance of the quadratic polynomial model, the optimum extrusion parameters were as follows: extrusion temperature, 115°C; feed moisture, 31%; and screw speed, 180 rpm. Under these conditions, the soluble dietary fibre content of soybean residue could reach to 12.65% which increased 10.60% compared with the unextruded soybean residue. In addition, the dietary fibre in extrude soybean residue had higher water retention capacity, oil retention capacity and swelling capacity than those of dietary fibre in unextruded soybean residue. PMID:23411192

  8. Update on single-screw expander geometry model integrated into an open-source simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziviani, D.; Bell, I. H.; De Paepe, M.; van den Broek, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a mechanistic steady-state model of a single-screw expander is described with emphasis on the geometric description. Insights into the calculation of the main parameters and the definition of the groove profile are provided. Additionally, the adopted chamber model is discussed. The model has been implemented by means of the open-source software PDSim (Positive Displacement SIMulation), written in the Python language, and the solution algorithm is described. The single-screw expander model is validated with a set of steady-state measurement points collected from a 11 kWe organic Rankine cycle test-rig with SES36 and R245fa as working fluid. The overall performance and behavior of the expander are also further analyzed.

  9. Thermal fatigue experiment of screw cooling tube under one-sided heating condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the results of thermal fatigue experiments of a cooling tube with a helical triangular fin on its inner cooling surface, namely a screw tube. The screw tube is directly machined in a CuCrZr heat sink bar with slits at its heated side. The thermal fatigue experiments are carried out at 20 and 30 MW/m 2. Water leakages from fatigue cracks, found at the slit of the heat sink, occurred at around 4500th and 1400th cycles at 20 and 30 MW/m 2, respectively. These results show good agreement with lifetime predictions using Manson-Coffin's law based on finite element analyses. Fractographic observations show the fatigue cracks starting from the outer heated surface at the slit region of the cooling channel and propagating toward its inner surface.

  10. Atomistic studies of jogged screw dislocations in {gamma}-TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.Y.; Li, M.; Zhou, S.J.

    1999-07-01

    The behavior of jogged screw dislocations in {gamma}-TiAl alloys have been investigated with large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The authors find a new mechanism for formation of pinning points in jogged screw dislocations. They also find that the critical height for the logs in {+-}[{bar 1}10] directions on the (001) plane to move nonconservatively is between 3r{sub 0} and 4r{sub 0}, where r{sub 0} is the nearest neighbor distance of aluminum atoms. Interstitials and vacancies are created during the nonconservative motions of the jogs. In addition, the formations of dislocation dipole and loops around the jogs are also observed.

  11. Validation of discrete element simulations in the field of solids conveying in single-screw extruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessmann, Johann-Sebastian; Schoeppner, Volker

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with possibilities to validate DEM simulations in the solids conveying zone of single-screw extruders. Apart from determining coefficients of friction, the representation of the pellets' shape is crucial. On the basis of DEM simulations of the bulk density within the screw channel, it is shown that most common plastic pellets can be represented adequately by combining two spheres. Additionally, simulations of the feed opening's pellet flow during a solids conveying process are conducted and validated by comparisons with experimental studies. Good conformity is obtained if the pellets are represented by several spheres as described above. Furthermore, the throughput of simulations and experiments is compared, also yielding good conformity. All the mentioned solids conveying simulations have so far been conducted without pressure build-up. To obtain an initial indication of the situation when pressure build-up is taken into account, simulations and experimental compression tests were also conducted.

  12. Interaction of a screw dislocation with an interface and a nanocrack incorporating surface elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu

    2015-09-01

    We study the anti-plane deformations of a linearly elastic bimaterial. One phase of the bimaterial is weakened by a finite crack with surface elasticity perpendicular to the interface and is also subjected to a screw dislocation. The surface elasticity is incorporated by using a version of the continuum-based surface/interface model of Gurtin and Murdoch. By considering a distribution of screw dislocations and line forces on the crack, the interaction problem is reduced to two decoupled first-order Cauchy singular integro-differential equations, which can be numerically solved by means of the Chebyshev polynomials and the collocation method. The associated problem of a mode III Zener-Stroh crack perpendicular to a bimaterial interface is also solved.

  13. Screw dislocation-induced influence of transverse modes on Hall conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, André G.; Poux, Armelle; Assafrão, Denise; Filgueiras, Cleverson

    2013-11-01

    The Hall conductivity of an electron gas on an interface showing a topological defect called screw dislocation is investigated. This kind of defect induces a singular torsion on the medium which in turn induces transverse modes in the quantum Hall effect. It is shown that this topology decreases the plateaus' widths and shifts the steps in the Hall conductivity to lower magnetic fields. The Hall conductivity is neither enhanced nor diminished by the presence of this kind of defect alone. We also consider the presence of two defects on a sample, a screw dislocation together with a disclination. For a specific value of deficit angle, there is a reduction in the Hall conductivity. For an excess of angle, the steps shift to higher magnetic fields and the Hall conductivity is enhanced. Our work could be tested only in common semiconductors but we think it opens a road to the investigation on how topological defects can influence other classes of Hall effect.

  14. Development of a test rig for a helium twin-screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B. M.; Hu, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Li, Q.

    2014-01-29

    A large helium cryogenic system is being developed for use in great science projects, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Large Helical Device (LHD), and the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In this cryogenic system, a twin-screw compressor is a key component. Therefore, it is necessary to obtain the compressor performance. To obtain the performance characteristics, a test rig for the compressor has been built. All the important performance parameters, including adiabatic efficiency, volumetric efficiency, oil injection characteristic, and noise characteristic can be acquired with the rig when sensors are installed in the test system. With the test performance, the helium twin-screw compressor can be evaluated. Using these results, the design of the compressor can be improved.

  15. Deployable robotic woven wire structures and joints for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahinpoor, MO; Smith, Bradford

    1991-01-01

    Deployable robotic structures are basically expandable and contractable structures that may be transported or launched to space in a compact form. These structures may then be intelligently deployed by suitable actuators. The deployment may also be done by means of either airbag or spring-loaded typed mechanisms. The actuators may be pneumatic, hydraulic, ball-screw type, or electromagnetic. The means to trigger actuation may be on-board EPROMS, programmable logic controllers (PLCs) that trigger actuation based on some input caused by the placement of the structure in the space environment. The actuation may also be performed remotely by suitable remote triggering devices. Several deployable woven wire structures are examined. These woven wire structures possess a unique form of joint, the woven wire joint, which is capable of moving and changing its position and orientation with respect to the structure itself. Due to the highly dynamic and articulate nature of these joints the 3-D structures built using them are uniquely and highly expandable, deployable, and dynamic. The 3-D structure naturally gives rise to a new generation of deployable three-dimensional spatial structures.

  16. Anatomical study of anterior column screw tunnels through virtual three-dimensional models of the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Tang, Peifu; Yao, Yimin; She, Fei; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We created 66 male and 74 female virtual three-dimensional models of the pelvis based on computed tomography data from 140 patients. Virtual cylindrical bolts (VCBs) were placed in the anterior column (AC), which was then resliced serially along the bolt's long axis. AC screw tunnel mainly comprises two long, narrow triangular prisms [zone III (acetabular fossa) and zone V (obturator foramen)]--forming the III/V angle--linked by a larger, shorter cylinder [zone IV (acetabular notch)]. VCBs' mean length and maximum diameter were 111.13 ± 7.33 and 7.37 ± 1.90 mm, respectively. The models' anatomical zone lengths were similar between the sexes. Zone V's narrowest diameters and the III/V angles were significantly different. VCBs >6.5 mm were accommodated in 65 of 66 male models and 31 of 74 female models. VCBs >5.0 and <6.5 mm were accommodated in one male and 30 female models. Eleven female models accommodated only VCBs >3.5 and <5.0 mm. However, to 13 female pelvic models with maximum VCB accommodation of <5 mm for the anterior column, the maximum diameter of the VCBs was 8.23 ± 1.22 mm in medial passage and 10.3 ± 1.91 mm in lateral passage, respectively. Percutaneous fixation of the AC with screws is a safe technique, even though in Chinese female patients. The narrowest diameters in zone V and the III/V angles are the key factors for application of AC screws. Female patients with a smaller interosseous space at zone V and a large III/V angle can accommodate segmental passage screws. PMID:24413847

  17. Percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for an unstable thoracic spine fracture after a traumatic degloving injury.

    PubMed

    Celano, Emma Christine; Baum, Griffin R; Gelbard, Rondi B; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2015-01-01

    Unstable spinal fractures require urgent surgical intervention to relieve compression of the spinal cord, correct spinal deformity, stabilise the spine and prevent further neurological injury. We report the case of a young man with a thoracic chance fracture in the setting of a devastating degloving injury, whose fracture was stabilised using minimally invasive, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. We discuss the advantages of using a minimally invasive technique for spinal fixation and its role in the treatment of complicated, multisystem trauma patients. PMID:26646146

  18. Deformation Analysis of the Main Components in a Single Screw Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feilong; Liao, Xueli; Feng, Quanke; Van Den Broek, Martijn; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-08-01

    The single screw compressor is used in many fields such as air compression, chemical industry and refrigeration. During operation, different gas pressures and temperatures applied on the components can cause different degrees of deformation, which leads to a difference between the thermally induced clearance and the designed clearance. However, limited research about clearance design is reported. In this paper, a temperature measurement instrument and a convective heat transfer model were described and used to establish the temperature of a single screw air compressor's casing, screw rotor and star wheel. 3-D models of these three main components were built. The gas force deformation, thermal- structure deformation and thermal-force coupling deformation were carried out by using a finite element simulation method. Results show that the clearance between the bottom of the groove and the top of star wheel is reduced by 0.066 mm, the clearance between the side of groove and the star wheel is reduced by 0.015 mm, and the clearance between the cylinder and the rotor is reduced by 0.01 mm. It is suggested that these deformations should be taken into account during the design of these clearances.

  19. Low-order models of a single-screw expander for organic Rankine cycle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziviani, D.; Desideri, A.; Lemort, V.; De Paepe, M.; van den Broek, M.

    2015-08-01

    Screw-type volumetric expanders have been demonstrated to be a suitable technology for organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems because of higher overall effectiveness and good part-load behaviour over other positive displacement machines. An 11 kWe single-screw expander (SSE) adapted from an air compressor has been tested in an ORC test-rig operating with R245fa as working fluid. A total of 60 steady-steady points have been obtained at four different rotational speeds of the expander in the range between 2000 rpm and 3300 rpm. The maximum electrical power output and overall isentropic effectiveness measured were 7.3 kW and 51.9%, respectively. In this paper, a comparison between two low-order models is proposed in terms of accuracy of the predictions, the robustness of the model and the computational time. The first model is the Pacejka equation-based model and the second is a semi-empirical model derived from a well-known scroll expander model and modified to include the geometric aspects of a single screw expander. The models have been calibrated with the available steady-state measurement points by identifying the proper parameters.

  20. Interaction between a piezoelectric screw dislocation and a finite crack with surface piezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Xu, Yang

    2015-09-01

    We analytically investigate the contribution of surface piezoelectricity to the interaction between a piezoelectric screw dislocation and a finite crack in a hexagonal piezoelectric solid. The piezoelectric screw dislocation suffers jumps in the displacement and in the electric potential across the slip plane, and meanwhile it is subjected to a line force and a line charge at its core. The original boundary value problem is reduced to two sets of coupled first-order Cauchy singular integro-differential equations by considering a distribution of line dislocations, electric-potential-dislocations, line forces and line charges on the crack. By using a diagonalization method, the two sets of equations are decoupled into four independent singular integro-differential equations, each of which can be numerically solved by means of the collocation method. Our analysis reveals that in general the stresses, strains, electric displacements and electric fields exhibit both the weak logarithmic and the strong square root singularities at the two crack tips. The image force acting on the piezoelectric screw dislocation due to its interaction with the finite crack is calculated.

  1. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  2. Mechanistic modeling of modular co-rotating twin-screw extruders.

    PubMed

    Eitzlmayr, Andreas; Koscher, Gerold; Reynolds, Gavin; Huang, Zhenyu; Booth, Jonathan; Shering, Philip; Khinast, Johannes

    2014-10-20

    In this study, we present a one-dimensional (1D) model of the metering zone of a modular, co-rotating twin-screw extruder for pharmaceutical hot melt extrusion (HME). The model accounts for filling ratio, pressure, melt temperature in screw channels and gaps, driving power, torque and the residence time distribution (RTD). It requires two empirical parameters for each screw element to be determined experimentally or numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The required Nusselt correlation for the heat transfer to the barrel was determined from experimental data. We present results for a fluid with a constant viscosity in comparison to literature data obtained from CFD simulations. Moreover, we show how to incorporate the rheology of a typical, non-Newtonian polymer melt, and present results in comparison to measurements. For both cases, we achieved excellent agreement. Furthermore, we present results for the RTD, based on experimental data from the literature, and found good agreement with simulations, in which the entire HME process was approximated with the metering model, assuming a constant viscosity for the polymer melt. PMID:25102114

  3. Minimally Invasive Mini Open Split-Muscular Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation of the Thoracolumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Uluta?, Murat; Seçer, Mehmet; Çelik, Suat Erol

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively assessed the feasibility and safety of a new percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS) fixation technique for instrumentation of the thoracic and lumbar spine in this study. All patients were operated in the prone position under general anesthesia. A 6 to 8 cm midline skin incision was made and wide subcutaneous dissection was performed. The paravertebral muscles were first dissected subperiosteally into the midline incision of the fascia for lumbar microdiscectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage implantation. After the secondary paramedian incisions on the fascia, the PPSs were inserted via cleavage of the multifidus muscles directly into the pedicles under fluoroscopy visualization. A total of 35 patients underwent surgery with this new surgical technique. The control group for operative time, blood loss and analgesic usage consisted of 35 randomly selected cases from our department. The control group underwent surgery via conventional pedicle screw instrumentation with paramedian fusion. All patients in the minimal invasive surgery series were ambulatory with minimal pain on the first postoperative day. The operation time and blood loss and the postoperative analgesic consumption were significantly less with this new technique. In conclusion, the minimal invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation technique is safe and feasible. It can be performed via a short midline skin incision and can also be combined with interbody fusion, causing minimal pain without severe muscle damage. PMID:25874062

  4. Surgical Treatment of Calcaneal Avulsion Fracture in Elderly Patients Using Cannulated Cancellous Screws and Titanium Wire.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Satoshi; Ota, Haruka; Okamoto, Michio; Namba, Jiro; Yamamoto, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the calcaneus are relatively uncommon and are seen most frequently in elderly or osteoporotic patients. A surgical method that avoids displacement of the avulsed fragment after fixation has not been developed. We report the cases of 3 patients (a 73-year-old male, an 85-year-old male, and an 81-year-old female) treated by open reduction and internal fixation using titanium wire and cannulated cancellous screws. The posterior approach was used by way of a vertical midline incision. The fracture was fixed with 2 screws, and then a titanium wire was passed through the holes of the cannulated screws. A small incision on the lateral side of planter was added for the exit and return of the wire. The wire knot was bent inside the proximal Achilles tendon bursa in 2 patients and was directed to the plantar side in 1 to avoid irritation. Bony union was achieved without repeat displacement of the fragment in all 3 patients. Normal ankle function was restored, and the patients recovered the activities of daily living almost to the original level. Although an additional plantar incision is required, this surgical technique provides strong internal fixation. PMID:26440932

  5. CFD simulation of a screw compressor including leakage flows and rotor heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spille-Kohoff, Andreas, Dr.; Hesse, Jan; El Shorbagy, Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have promising potential to become an important part in the development process of positive displacement (PD) machines. CFD delivers deep insights into the flow and thermodynamic behaviour of PD machines. However, the numerical simulation of such machines is more complex compared to dynamic pumps like turbines or fans. The fluid transport in size-changing chambers with very small clearances between the rotors, and between rotors and casing, demands complex meshes that change with each time step. Additionally, the losses due to leakage flows and the heat transfer to the rotors need high-quality meshes so that automatic remeshing is almost impossible. In this paper, setup steps and results for the simulation of a dry screw compressor are shown. The rotating parts are meshed with TwinMesh, a special hexahedral meshing program for gear pumps, gerotors, lobe pumps and screw compressors. In particular, these meshes include axial and radial clearances between housing and rotors, and beside the fluid volume the rotor solids are also meshed. The CFD simulation accounts for gas flow with compressibility and turbulence effects, heat transfer between gas and rotors, and leakage flows through the clearances. We show time- resolved results for torques, forces, interlobe pressure, mass flow, and heat flow between gas and rotors, as well as time- and space-resolved results for pressure, velocity, temperature etc. for different discharge ports and working points of the screw compressor. These results are also used as thermal loads for deformation simulations of the rotors.

  6. Effects of screw speed on the properties of plasticized PLA/POSS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodal, M.; Sirin, H.; Ozkoc, G.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of screw speed on the flow behavior, mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of the melt compounded plasticized poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) composites were investigated. Two types of POSS-aminopropylisobutyl-POSS (A-POSS) as the reactive one and the octaisobutyl-POSS (O-POSS) as the non-reactive one, were used at 1-10 wt% filler loadings. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-8000 g/moles) was utilized as a plasticizer. PEG amount was kept constant at 10 wt% with respect to PLA. To investigate the compounding conditions on the properties of the composites, two different screw speeds (100 and 200 rpm) were used. It was found that incorporation of POSS particles to the PLA decreased the melt viscosity of the composites due to the slip-agent behavior of POSS molecules. The mechanical test results showed that composites compounded at 100 rpm have higher yield strength and modulus values. Moreover, a significant improvement in Izod impact strength of plasticized PLA composites compounded at 100 rpm was obtained (regardless of POSS type). SEM analysis showed that POSS particles dispersed homogeneously in polymer matrix at all loadings regardless of screw speed. It was revealed from DSC that POSS particles acted as a nucleating agent for PLA/PEG independently from mixing conditions. Moreover, the percent crystallinity was found to be higher in the presence of POSS.

  7. Thermodynamics of plastic flow of BCC metals from atomistic studies of isolated screw dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Roman; Vitek, Vaclav

    2015-03-01

    The thermodynamic description of dislocation glide in BCC metals depends crucially on the shape of the Peierls barrier that 1 / 2 < 111 > screw dislocations have to overcome when moving in the lattice. While the height of this barrier can be obtained unequivocally using saddle-point search algorithms such as the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) method, its exact shape depends on the chosen approximation of the transition pathway of the system. We formulate a procedure that allows to identify the position of the dislocation directly from the displacements of atoms in its core. We investigate the performance of this model by calculating curved paths of a 1 / 2 < 111 > screw dislocation in tungsten from a series of images obtained recently using the NEB method at zero applied stress and for positive/negative shear stresses perpendicular to the slip direction. The Peierls barriers plotted along these curved paths are shown to be quite different from those obtained previously by assuming a straight dislocation path. We demonstrate how these results can be utilized to develop a new thermodynamic model of plasticity of BCC metals that is systematically linked to the atomic-level properties of isolated 1 / 2 < 111 > screw dislocations.

  8. Correlation between microleakage and screw loosening at implant-abutment connection

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Simel

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between microleakage and screw loosening at different types of implant-abutment connections and/or geometries measuring the torque values before and after the leakage tests. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different abutment types (Intenal hex titanium, internal hex zirconium, morse tapered titaniu?m) with different geometries were connected to its own implant fixture. All the abutments were tightened with a standard torque value then the composition was connected to the modified fluid filtration system. After the measurements of leakage removal torque values were re-measured. Kruskal-wallis test was performed for non-parametric and one-way ANOVA was performed for parametric data. The correlation was evaluated using Spearman Correlation Test (?=0.05). RESULTS Significantly higher microleakage was found at the connection of implant-internal hex zirconium abutment. Observed mean torque value loss was also significantly higher than other connection geometries. Spearman tests revealed a significant correlation between microleakage and screw loosening. CONCLUSION Microleakage may provoke screw loosening. Removing torque values rationally decrease with the increase of microleakage. PMID:24605204

  9. Radiostrontium clearance and bone formation in response to simulated internal screw fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, W.J.; Simmons, D.J.; Fenster, R.; Shively, R.A.

    1987-06-01

    Changes in radiostrontium clearance (SrC) and bone formation (tetracycline labeling) were observed in the femurs of skeletally mature dogs following the various operative steps involved in bone screw fixation. Drilling, but not periosteal stripping, produced a small but statistically significant increase in SrC and endosteal bone formation in the distal third of the bone. Strontium clearance values equivalent to those produced by drilling alone were recorded after screw fixation at low or high torque (5 versus 20 inch pounds), as well as by the insertion of loosely fitting stainless steel implants. Bone formation (equals the percentage tetracycline-labeled trabecular bone surfaces) was increased by 30% when SrC values exceeded 3.5 ml/100 g bone/min, and the relationship was linear when SrC values ranged between 1.0 and 7.0 ml/100 g bone/min. The changes in SrC and bone formation one-week after bone screw application are primarily those associated with a response to local trauma caused by drilling.

  10. Continuous twin-screw granulation for enhancing the dissolution of poorly water soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Maniruzzaman, Mohammed; Nair, Arun; Renault, Maxcene; Nandi, Uttom; Scoutaris, Nicholaos; Farnish, Richard; Bradley, Michael S A; Snowden, Martin J; Douroumis, Dennis

    2015-12-30

    The article describes the application of a twin-screw granulation process to enhance the dissolution rate of the poorly water soluble drug, ibuprofen (IBU). A quality-by-design (QbD) approach was used to manufacture IBU loaded granules via hot-melt extrusion (HME) processing. For the purpose of the study, a design of experiment (DoE) was implemented to assess the effect of the formulation compositions and the processing parameters. This novel approach allowed the use of, polymer/inorganic excipients such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and magnesium aluminometasilicate (Neusilin(®)-MAS) with polyethylene glycol 2000 (PEG) as the binder without requiring a further drying step. IBU loaded batches were processed using a twin screw extruder to investigate the effect of MAS/polymer ratio, PEG amount (binder) and liquid to solid (L/S) ratios on the dissolution rates, mean particle size and the loss on drying (LoD) of the extruded granules. The DoE analysis showed that the defined independent variables of the twin screw granulation process have a complex effect on the measured outcomes. The solid state analysis showed the existence of partially amorphous IBU state which had a significant effect on the dissolution enhancement in acidic media. Furthermore, the analysis obtained from the surface mapping by Raman proved the homogenous distribution of the IBU in the extruded granulation formulations. PMID:26387621

  11. Intracranial penetrating injury by screw driver: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bodwal, Jatin; Sreenivas, M; Aggrawal, Anil

    2013-11-01

    Penetrating injury to the head, with the exception of missile injuries is rare owing to thick calvarium. Orbital and temporal areas are comparatively vulnerable to penetrating injuries, due to their relative thinness. A case is presented in which a man killed his wife by forcefully thrusting a screw driver into her cranial cavity. The deceased presented to the hospital with the screw driver embedded in her head. She was declared as 'brought dead on arrival' at the emergency of the hospital. Pre-autopsy plain radiography and Computed Tomography (CT) of the head were done to assess the extent of brain damage. The peculiarity of this case lies in the fact that screw driver as a stabbing weapon in the head is very rarely used. In such cases, there is a need to perform radiography and CT with the weapon in-situ for better interpretation on injuries. In this paper role of radiography and CT in intra cranial penetration is discussed with review of literature. PMID:24237802

  12. Bilateral C1–C2 Transarticular Screw and C1 Laminar Hook Fixation and Bone Graft Fusion for Reducible Atlantoaxial Dislocation: A Seven-Year Analysis of Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiang; Ni, Bin; Xie, Ning; Lu, Xuhua; Guo, Qunfeng; Lu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Bilateral C1-2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation was developed on the basis of transarticular screws fixation. The modified technique has showed a better biomechanical stability than established techniques in previous study. However, long-term (minimum follow-up 7 years) outcomes of patients with reducible atlantoaxial dislocation who underwent this modified fixation technique have not still been reported. Methods A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the outcome of 36 patients who underwent this modified technique. Myelopathy was assessed using the Ranawat myelopathy score and Myelopathy Disability Index. Pain scores were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale. Radiological imaging was assessed and the following data were extracted: the atlantodental intervals, the space available for cord, presence of spinal cord signal change on T2 weighted image, C1–C2 angle, C2–C7 angle and fusion rates. Findings All patients achieved a minimum seven-year follow up. 95% patients with neck and suboccipital pain improved after surgery; in their Visual Analogue pain scores, there was a greater than 50% improvement in their VAS scores with a drop of 5 points on the VAS (P<0.05). 92% of patients improved in the Ranawat myelopathy grade; the Myelopathy Disability Index assessment showed a preoperative mean score of 35.62 with postoperative mean 12.75(P<0.05). There was not any significant atlantoaxial instability at each follow-up time. The space available for cord increased in all patients. Postoperative sagittal kyphosis of the subaxial spine was not observed. After six months after surgery, bone grafts of all patients were fused. No complications related to surgery were found in the period of follow-up. Conclusions The long-term outcomes of this case series demonstrate that under the condition of thorough preoperative preparations, bilateral C1–C2 transarticular screw and C1 laminar hook fixation and bone graft fusion is a reliable posterior atlantoaxial fusion technique for reducible atlantoaxial dislocation. PMID:24498163

  13. Compound solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.; Simonson, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Joining technique prevents contamination, may be used to join dissimilar metal tubes, minimizes fluid and gas entrapment, expedites repairs, and can yield joints having leakage rates less than 0.000001 standard cubic cm He/min. Components of joint are solder sleeve, two solder rings, Teflon sleeve, and tubing to be joined.

  14. Joint Newspaper Operating Agreements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Marie

    The number of competing daily newspapers in American cities has dwindled until only about 50 cities boast two papers. Of the newspapers in those cities, 23 now maintain separate editorial operations but have joint printing, advertising, and circulation departments. The concept of joint operation is 50 years old, dating from the Depression years…

  15. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe the place where the sacrum and the iliac bones join. The ... The main purpose of the joint is to connect the spine and the pelvis. As a result, there is very little movement at the SIJ. Major reasons ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Option Using Percutaneous Pedicle Screw for Instability of Metastasis Involving Thoracolumbar and Lumbar Spine : A Case Series in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ho-Young; Park, Se-Jun; Kim, Eun-Sang; Lee, Chong-Suh; Eoh, Whan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report a minimally invasive treatment option using percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with adjuvant treatment for metastatic thoraco-lumbar and lumbar spinal tumors. Methods This is a retrospective study of charts of patients with spinal metastases. All were older than 18 years of age and were considered to have more than 3 months of life expectancy. The patients had single or two level lesions, and compression fracture or impending fracture. Exclusion criterion was metastasis showing severe epidural compression with definite neurological symptoms. Usually spinal segments from one level above to below pathology were stabilized. Visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain assessment and Frankel scale for neurological deficit were used, while pre- and post-operative performance status was evaluated using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG). Results Twelve patients (nine men, three women; median age 54.29 years) underwent surgery. All patients presented with back pain with/without radicular pain. There were no early complications and perioperative mortalities. Following surgery, a significant difference between average pre- and post-operative VAS scores was found (p=0.003). Overall, 91.8% of patients (11/12) experienced improvement in their ECOG score post-operatively. The mean ambulation time was 196.9 days [95% confidence interval (CI), 86.2-307.6 days; median, 97 days]. During follow-up, nine patients died and the mean overall survival time in enrolled twelve patients was 249.9 days (95% CI, 145.3-354.4 days; median, 176 days). Conclusion Minimally invasive treatment using percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with adjuvant treatment is a good alternative treatment option for potential instability of the thoraco-lumbar and lumbar spinal metastasis. PMID:25733990

  17. MISR JOINT_AS Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-21

    Joint Aerosol Product (JOINT_AS) The MISR Level 3 Products are global or regional ... field campaigns at daily and monthly time scales. The Joint Aerosol product provides a monthly global statistical summary of MISR ...

  18. Accuracy of thoracolumbar transpedicular and vertebral body percutaneous screw placement: coupling the Rosa(®) Spine robot with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance-a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, M; Peltier, J

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to eval uate the accuracy of a new robotic device when coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance. Screws (D8-S1) were implanted during two separate cadaver sessions by coupling the Rosa(®) Spine robot with the flat-panel CT device. Of 38 implanted screws, 37 (97.4 %) were fully contained within the pedicle. One screw breached the lateral cortical of one pedicle by <1 mm. The mean ± SD accuracy (relative to pre-operative planning) was 2.05 ± 1.2 mm for the screw head, 1.65 ± 1.11 for the middle of the pedicle and 1.57 ± 1.01 for the screw tip. When coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance, the Rosa(®) Spine robot appears to be accurate in placing pedicle screws within both pedicles and the vertebral body. Large clinical studies are mandatory to confirm this preliminary cadaveric report. PMID:26530846

  19. Biomechanics of the natural, arthritic, and replaced human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The human ankle joint complex plays a fundamental role in gait and other activities of daily living. At the same time, it is a very complicated anatomical system but the large literature of experimental and modelling studies has not fully described the coupled joint motion, position and orientation of the joint axis of rotation, stress and strain in the ligaments and their role in guiding and stabilizing joint motion, conformity and congruence of the articular surfaces, patterns of contact at the articular surfaces, patterns of rolling and sliding at the joint surfaces, and muscle lever arm lengths. The present review article addresses these issues as described in the literature, reporting the most recent relevant findings. PMID:24499639

  20. Screw dislocation-induced growth spirals as emissive exciton localization centers in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funato, Mitsuru; Banal, Ryan G.; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2015-11-01

    Screw dislocations in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells cause growth spirals with an enhanced Ga incorporation, which create potential minima. Although screw dislocations and their surrounding potential minima suggest non-radiative recombination processes within growth spirals, in reality, screw dislocations are not major non-radiative sinks for carriers. Consequently, carriers localized within growth spirals recombine radiatively without being captured by non-radiative recombination centers, resulting in intense emissions from growth spirals.

  1. VOLTAGE DISTRIBUTION AND MECHANICAL STRENGTH IN SPLICE JOINTS MADE FROM AS-MANUFACTURED YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Zhang, Yifei; Gouge, Michael J; Rey, Christopher M; Van der Laan, Danko; Clickner, Cam

    2010-01-01

    With recommendations from wire manufacturers as a starting point, a series of solder joints were fabricated and characterized to determine the best method to produce repeatable, low-resistance and high-mechanical-strength splices in as-manufactured, stabilized YBCO coated conductors. From the 2.54 cm long splice joints that were fabricated, parameters such as solder material, stabilization material, fabrication method, and conductor geometry were varied to determine the impact of each on splice joint properties. Results indicate that the lowest resistance splice joints were influenced primarily by the tape orientation in the joint and the stabilization material. The lowest resistances were between 2 10-8 and 1.0 10-7 in 4-mm wide tapes and were obtained from pure copper stabilized tapes oriented with the YBCO layers in closest proximity. The voltage drop along the splice length indicated that only a fraction of the splice length contributes to the splice joint resistance. Mechanical characterization of splice joints showed that the joint resistance remained unchanged under axial stress up to a stress level at which the critical current of the tapes forming the joint degrades irreversibly.

  2. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  3. In vitro and in vivo studies on the degradation of high-purity Mg (99.99wt.%) screw with femoral intracondylar fractured rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei; Cheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Changli; Ni, Jiahua; Zhang, Yuanzhuang; Zhong, Wanrun; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    High-purity magnesium (HP Mg) takes advantage in no alloying toxic elements and slower degradation rate in lack of second phases and micro-galvanic corrosion. In this study, as rolled HP Mg was fabricated into screws and went through in vitro immersion tests, cytotoxicity test and bioactive analysis. The HP Mg screws performed uniform corrosion behavior in vitro, and its extraction promoted cell viability, bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation related gene, i.e. ALP, osteopontin (OPN) and RUNX2 of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Then HP Mg screws were implanted in vivo as load-bearing implant to fix bone fracture and subsequently gross observation, range of motion (ROM), X-ray scanning, qualitative micro-computed tomography (?CT) analysis, histological analysis, bending-force test and SEM morphology of retrieved screws were performed respectively at 4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. As a result, the retrieved HP Mg screws in fixation of rabbit femoral intracondylar fracture showed uniform degradation morphology and enough bending force. However, part of PLLA screws was broken in bolt, although its screw thread was still intact. Good osseointegration was revealed surrounding HP Mg screws and increased bone volume and bone mineral density were detected at fracture gap, indicating the rigid fixation and enhanced fracture healing process provided by HP Mg screws. Consequently, the HP Mg showed great potential as internal fixation devices in intra-articular fracture operation. PMID:26117658

  4. Compliant Joints For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

  5. Improving the API dissolution rate during pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion I: Effect of the API particle size, and the co-rotating, twin-screw extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Gogos, Costas G; Ioannidis, Nicolas

    2015-01-15

    The dissolution rate of the active pharmaceutical ingredients in pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion is the most critical elementary step during the extrusion of amorphous solid solutions - total dissolution has to be achieved within the short residence time in the extruder. Dissolution and dissolution rates are affected by process, material and equipment variables. In this work, we examine the effect of one of the material variables and one of the equipment variables, namely, the API particle size and extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate, in a co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. By rapidly removing the extruder screws from the barrel after achieving a steady state, we collected samples along the length of the extruder screws that were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the amount of undissolved API. Analyses of samples indicate that reduction of particle size of the API and appropriate selection of screw design can markedly improve the dissolution rate of the API during extrusion. In addition, angle of repose measurements and light microscopy images show that the reduction of particle size of the API can improve the flowability of the physical mixture feed and the adhesiveness between its components, respectively, through dry coating of the polymer particles by the API particles. PMID:25448572

  6. Wear studies on plasma-sprayed Al2O3 and 8mole% of Yttrium-stabilized ZrO2 composite coating on biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy for orthopedic joint application

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Perumal; Manivasagam, Geetha; Rajamanickam, Asokamani; Natarajan, Alagumurthi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the wear characteristics of the composite ceramic coating made with Al2O3-40wt%8YSZ on the biomedical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy (grade 5) used for total joint prosthetic components, with the aim of improving their tribological behavior. The coatings were deposited using a plasma spraying technique, and optimization of plasma parameters was performed using response surface methodology to obtain dense coating. The tribological behaviors of the coated and uncoated substrates were evaluated using a ball-on-plate sliding wear tester at 37°C in simulated body-fluid conditions. The microstructure of both the titanium alloy and coated specimen were examined using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The hardness of the plasma-sprayed alumina–zirconia composite coatings was 2.5 times higher than that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, while the wear rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was 253 times higher than that of the composite-coated Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The superior wear resistance of the alumina–zirconia coated alloy is attributed to its enhanced hardness and intersplat bonding strength. Wear-track examination showed that the predominant wear mechanism of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was abrasive and adhesive wear, whereas, in the case of alumina–zirconia composite coated alloy, the wear was dominated by microchipping and microcracking. PMID:26491323

  7. Just How Joint Is Joint Action in Infancy? Malinda Carpenter

    E-print Network

    Carpenter, M.alinda

    Just How Joint Is Joint Action in Infancy? Malinda Carpenter Department of Developmental 2008; received in revised form 19 December 2008; accepted 20 January 2009 Abstract Joint action is central to countless aspects of human life. Here I examine the roots of joint action in infancy. First, I

  8. Joint Purchasing Consortium forms New Joint Procurement Committee

    E-print Network

    Victoria, University of

    Joint Purchasing Consortium forms New Joint Procurement Committee A new committee comprised of VPs the Consortium for a two year term. The Joint Procurement Committee members include: VP, Finance will be working on roles, responsibilities, and governance and implementation of the Wave 1 joint procurement

  9. Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Tie Bar, & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Medora Bridge, Spanning East Fork of White River at State Route 235, Medora, Jackson County, IN

  10. Knee joint replacement - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ok to start again. People who have a prosthesis, such as an artificial joint, need to carefully ... in your wallet that says you have a prosthesis. You will need to take antibiotics before any ...

  11. A lag-screw technique for bridging of the medial aspect of the distal tibial physis in horses.

    PubMed

    Witte, Stefan; Thorpe, Paul E; Hunt, Robert J; Spirito, Micheal A; Rodgerson, Dwayne H

    2004-11-15

    A lag-screw technique for transphyseal bridging of the medial aspect of the distal tibial physis in foals with tarsal valgus deformities and results of the technique in 11 foals (6 with bilateral tarsal valgus deformities and 5 with unilateral tarsal valgus deformities) are described. Briefly, horses were anesthetized, and a single stab incision was made through the skin to the underlying bone over the most distal aspect of the medial malleolus. A 20-gauge needle was placed in the incision to guide screw placement, and a lag screw was inserted parallel to the medial cortex of the tibia under radiographic guidance. Screws were removed when the tarsal valgus deformity was clinically assessed to have improved by at least 80%. Clinically, all horses had evidence of a tarsal valgus deformity of > 7 degrees prior to surgery. Mean age at the time of lag-screw implanation was 220 days (range, 116 to 364 days). Mean time the implant was in place was 62 days (range, 39 to 89 days). The tarsal valgus deformity resolved in all 11 horses with excellent cosmetic results. PMID:15568393

  12. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  13. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  14. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  15. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  16. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  17. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  18. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA); Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  19. Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys and Rotary Screw Trap, 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelle, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2006 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 37,938 fish from 15 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 15% of fish enumerated followed by rainbow trout (10%) and mountain whitefish (7%). Day surveys were conducted during the summer period 2007 (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2007 (October) surveys. The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) program from August through November of 2007. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 999 wild Oncorhynchus mykiss and 5,107 wild run O. tshawytscha were PIT tagged during the study period. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 22.3% for juvenile O. tshawytscha and 9.0% for juvenile O. mykiss. Rotary screw traps operated 7 days a week and remote capture operations were conducted when flow and temperature regimes permitted. This is third annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

  20. Reciprocating and Screw Compressor semi-empirical models for establishing minimum energy performance standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Hassan; Armstrong, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The efficiency bar for a Minimum Equipment Performance Standard (MEPS) generally aims to minimize energy consumption and life cycle cost of a given chiller type and size category serving a typical load profile. Compressor type has a significant chiller performance impact. Performance of screw and reciprocating compressors is expressed in terms of pressure ratio and speed for a given refrigerant and suction density. Isentropic efficiency for a screw compressor is strongly affected by under- and over-compression (UOC) processes. The theoretical simple physical UOC model involves a compressor-specific (but sometimes unknown) volume index parameter and the real gas properties of the refrigerant used. Isentropic efficiency is estimated by the UOC model and a bi-cubic, used to account for flow, friction and electrical losses. The unknown volume index, a smoothing parameter (to flatten the UOC model peak) and bi-cubic coefficients are identified by curve fitting to minimize an appropriate residual norm. Chiller performance maps are produced for each compressor type by selecting optimized sub-cooling and condenser fan speed options in a generic component-based chiller model. SEER is the sum of hourly load (from a typical building in the climate of interest) and specific power for the same hourly conditions. An empirical UAE cooling load model, scalable to any equipment capacity, is used to establish proposed UAE MEPS. Annual electricity use and cost, determined from SEER and annual cooling load, and chiller component cost data are used to find optimal chiller designs and perform life-cycle cost comparison between screw and reciprocating compressor-based chillers. This process may be applied to any climate/load model in order to establish optimized MEPS for any country and/or region.