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Sample records for sea-surface polarized microwave

  1. Sea surface signature of tropical cyclones using microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Bumjun; Burrage, Derek; Wesson, Joel; Howden, Stephan

    2013-06-01

    Measuring the sea surface during tropical cyclones (TC) is challenging due to severe weather conditions that prevent shipboard measurements and clouds which mask the sea surface for visible satellite sensors. However, sea surface emission in the microwave L-band can penetrate rain and clouds and be measured from space. The European Space Agency (ESA) MIRAS L-band radiometer on the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite enables a view of the sea surface from which the effects of tropical cyclones on sea surface emissivity can be measured. The emissivity at these frequencies is a function of sea surface salinity (SSS), sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface roughness, polarization, and angle of emission. If the latter four variables can be estimated, then models of the sea surface emissivity can be used to invert SSS from measured brightness temperature (TB). Actual measured TB from space also has affects due to the ionosphere and troposphere, which have to be compensated for, and components due to the galactic and cosmic background radiation those have to be removed. In this research, we study the relationships between retrieved SSS from MIRAS, and SST and precipitation collected by the NASA TMI sensor from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite during Hurricane Isaac, in August 2012. During the slower movement of the storm, just before landfall on the vicinity of the Louisiana Shelf, higher precipitation amounts were associated with lower SSS and slightly increased SST. This increased trend of SST and lower SSS under regions of high precipitation are indicative of inhibited vertical mixing. The SMOS Level 2 SSS were filtered by a stepwise process with removal of high uncertainty in TB under conditions of strong surface roughness which are known to create noise. The signature of increased SST associated with increasing precipitation was associated with decreased SSS during the storm. Although further research is required, this study

  2. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  3. Detecting nonlinearities in microwave return from the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heia, Karsten; Eltoft, Torbjorn

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the properties of two different methods for extracting information of non-linear mechanisms influencing the backscatter of microwaves from the ocean surface. In the first of these methods, denoted the Multi Frequency Technique (MFT), several frequencies, distributed in a narrow band around a carrier frequency, are simultaneously transmitted, and the non-linearities are detected as secondary peaks in their mutual cross-product spectrum. This technique has been extensively discussed in earlier papers as a proper method for extracting sea surface information (Alpers, W., and K. Hasselmann, 1978). The second method uses only the transmitted frequency and the non-linear effects are detected as secondary (or over-harmonic) frequency peaks in the bispectrum of the backscattered signal. This method has been successfully applied to studies of non-linear wave-wave iterations in experimental plasma physics, but has to the authors' knowledge not been used in studies of microwave scattering from the sea surface. We refer to this method as the Bispectral Analysis Technique (BAT). In order to correctly interpret the different signatures observed in microwave remote sensing of the ocean surface, it is important to fully understand how various physical phenomena influence the backscattered signal. The data used in this work, are generated by a numerical simulator. Based on the Holliday scattering model and a theoretical description of the power spectrum of the surface elevation, we are able to study in detail how various physical and geometrical conditions influence the backscattered signal. Specifically, we address the problem of detecting non-linear hydrodynamical phenomena induced by non-linear hydrodynamical phenomena (Stokes-type gravity waves) or non-linear modulation mechanisms (tilt and hydrodynamic modulation), using the MFT and BAT. We show in this paper that both methods are capable of detecting non-linear features, but that the performance is

  4. Skylab S-193 Radscat microwave measurements of sea surface winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.; Young, J. D.; Claassen, J. P.; Chan, H. L.; Afarani, M.; Pierson, W. J.; Cardone, V. J.; Hayes, J.; Spring, W.; Greenwood, C.

    1975-01-01

    The S-193 Radscat made extensive measurements of many sea conditions. Measurements were taken in a tropical hurricane (Ava), a tropical storm (Christine), and in portions of extratropical cyclones. Approximately 200 scans of ocean data at 105 kilometer spacings were taken during the first two Skylab missions and another 200 during the final mission when the characteristics of the measurements changed due to damage of the antenna. Backscatter with four transmit/receive polarization combinations and emissions with horizontal and vertical receive polarizations were measured. Other surface parameters investigated for correlation with the measurements included sea temperature, air/sea temperature difference, and gravity-wave spectrum. Methods were developed to correct the microwave measurements for atmospheric effects. The radiometric data were corrected accurately for clear sky and light cloud conditions only. The radiometer measurements were used to recover the surface scattering characteristics for all atmospheric conditions excluding rain. The radiometer measurements also detected the presence of rain which signaled when the scattering measurement should not be used for surface wind estimation. Regression analysis was used to determine empirically the relation between surface parameters and the microwave measurements, after correction for atmospheric effects. Results indicate a relationship approaching square-law at 50 deg between differential scattering coefficient and wind speed with horizontally polarized scattering data showing slightly more sensitivity to wind speed than vertically polarized data.

  5. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  6. Variation of the microwave brightness temperature of sea surfaces covered with mineral and monomolecular oil films

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, H.J.; Alpers, W.; Huehnerfuss, H.

    1983-07-01

    Airborne microwave radiometer measurements over mineral and monomolecular oil films and adjacent clean sea surfaces are reported. An artificial crude-oil spill experiment in the New York Bight area showed a brightness temperature increase of the sea surface at 1.43 GHz as expected from a multilayered system with different dielectric constants. However, a monomolecular surface-film experiment with oleyl alcohol conducted in the North Sea during MARSEN in 1979 showed a strong brightness temperature depression at 1.43 GHz and no change in brightness temperature at 2.65 GHz. It is postulated that the monomolecular layer, because of its physical and chemical properties, polarized the underlying water molecules so strongly that the emissivity decreased from 0.31 to 0.016. It is estimated that the effective dielectric constant changed from 90 to 5.2 x 10/sup 4/. Because these phenomena occurred at 1.43 GHz it may be concluded that this frequency is very close to the center of a new anomalous dispersion region resulting from a restructuring of the water layer below the surface film.

  7. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  8. Ultra Stable Microwave Radiometers for Future Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius will measure global sea surface salinity with 100-km spatial resolution every 8 days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than 0.1 K over 8 days. This three-year research program on ultra stable radiometers has addressed the radiometer requirements and configuration necessary to achieve this objective for Aquarius and future ocean salinity missions. The system configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer testbeds at both JPL and GSFC. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature, a procedure for the measurement and correction for radiometer system non-linearity, noise diode calibration versus temperature, low noise amplifier performance over voltage, and temperature control requirements to achieve the required stability. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability. This report also presents the results of the radiometer test program, a detailed radiometer noise model, and details of the operational switching sequence optimization that can be used to achieve the low noise and stability requirements. Many of the results of this research have been incorporated into the Aquarius radiometer design and will allow this instrument to achieve its goals.

  9. Simulation of a polarized laser beam reflected at the sea surface: modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    A 3-D simulation of the polarization-dependent reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation considers polarized or unpolarized laser sources and calculates the polarization states upon reflection at the sea surface. It is suitable for the radiance calculation of the scene in different spectral wavebands (e.g. near-infrared, SWIR, etc.) not including the camera degradations. The simulation also considers a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver as well as different atmospheric conditions. In the SWIR, the detected total power of reflected laser light is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation combines the 3-D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) with the simulation of polarized or unpolarized laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the input of a camera equipped with a linear polarizer, the polarized sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. The s- and p-polarization states are calculated for the emitted sea surface radiance and the specularly reflected sky radiance to determine the total polarized sea surface radiance of each component. The states of polarization and the radiance of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are calculated by considering the s- and p- components of the electric field of laser light with respect to the specular plane of incidence. This is done by using the formalism of their coherence matrices according to E. Wolf [1]. Additionally, an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is considered for the reflection of laser light radiances. Validation of the simulation results is required to ensure model credibility and applicability to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes, field measurement data (images and

  10. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  11. Rainfall on microwave return from the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L. F.; Giovanangeli, J.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The long range goal remains unchanged; to conduct experiments and develop/test theoretical models to permit useful algorithms to be constructed for microwave systems that observe oceanic processes. This topic is relevant to altimeters, scatterometers, and rain rate measurements. The current focus is attention to scatterometer wind velocity measurement. One component of the laboratory efforts is an experiment conducted, in the wind wave tank at the GSFC/WFF, to quantify the effect of rain-generated surface wave brightening of radar cross section. Laboratory conditions can be characterized as light wind, functional rain rates, a single drop size, and a 36 GHz radar system at 30 degrees inclination.

  12. Microwave radiometer and scatterometer design for the aquarius sea surface Salinity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon H.; Pellerano, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of sea surface salinity with L-band microwave radiometers is a very challenging task. Since the L-band brightness temperature variations associated with salinity changes are small, it is necessary to have a very sensitive and stable radiometer. In addition, the corrections for the ocean surface roughness require real time scatterometer measurements. The designs of the Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer are described in this paper.

  13. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  14. The Effect of Sea-Surface Sun Glitter on Microwave Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple model for the microwave brightness temperature of sea surface Sun glitter is presented. The model is an accurate closeform approximation for the fourfold Sun glitter integral. The model computations indicate that Sun glitter contamination of on orbit radiometer measurements is appreciable over a large swath area. For winds near 20 m/s, Sun glitter affects the retrieval of environmental parameters for Sun angles as large as 20 to 25 deg. The model predicted biases in retrieved wind speed and sea surface temperature due to neglecting Sun glitter are consistent with those experimentally observed in SEASAT SMMR retrievals. A least squares retrieval algorithm that uses a combined sea and Sun model function shows the potential of retrieving accurate environmental parameters in the presence of Sun glitter so long as the Sun angles and wind speed are above 5 deg and 2 m/s, respectively.

  15. Polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional Gaussian sea surfaces with surface reflections.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe

    2011-08-10

    Surface reflection is an important phenomenon that must be taken into account when studying sea surface infrared emissivity, especially at large observation angles. This paper models analytically the polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional sea surfaces with shadowing effect and one surface reflection, by assuming a Gaussian surface slope distribution. A Monte Carlo ray-tracing method is employed as a reference. It is shown that the present model agrees well with the reference method. The emissivity calculated by the present model is then compared with measurements. The comparisons show that agreements are greatly improved by taking one surface reflection into account. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of sea surface infrared emissivity with two and three reflections are also determined. Their contributions are shown to be negligible. PMID:21833139

  16. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field. PMID:27137234

  17. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  18. Ship motion estimation from polarized Doppler spectra from ship wakes on two-dimensional sea surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wang-Qiang; Zhang, Min; Nie, Ding; Sun, Rong-Qing

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the Doppler spectra from ship wakes on two-dimensional sea surfaces and further estimate the ship motion characteristics. The analysis of the ship wakes is helpful to detect the existence of ships on sea surface. And it will be an alternative method when the radar cross-section values are not competent to identify the ship target. In the study, Doppler spectra for different polarizations are compared with and without ship's wakes based on the second-order small slope approximation method. As expected, there appears the second spectral peak when ship's wake is considered. Moreover, the ship velocities, wind speed, and direction are also analyzed. As the results shown, there is a good linearity relation between the position of the second Doppler spectral peak and the ship velocity. Therefore, it is feasible to detect ship according the Doppler spectra.

  19. Sea surface temperatures from the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on Nimbus 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, A. S.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1985-01-01

    Because of problems with the design and calibration of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on Nimbus 7, sea surface temperature (SST) algorithms had to be developed that corrected for instrument effects. Several stages of this development are reported here. The quality of the SST products from the final version is assessed. Thirty-four months of data have been analyzed; the average SST error is about 1.12 C over the whole globe. The error is smaller in the equatorial region and larger in the northern oceans. The main source of error is due to heating of the SMMR instrument. Specific problems in the design of the instrument are discussed. The details of the ST algorithms are given in an appendix.

  20. Infrared and Passive Microwave Radiometric Sea Surface Temperatures and Their Relationships to Atmospheric Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.

    2004-01-01

    The current generation of infrared (IR) and passive microwave (MW) satellite sensors provides highly complementary information for monitoring sea surface temperature (SST). On the one hand, infrared sensors provide high resolution and high accuracy but are obscured by clouds. Microwave sensors on the other hand, provide coverage through non-precipitating clouds but have coarser resolution and generally poorer accuracy. Assuming that the satellite SST measurements do not have spatially variable biases, they can be blended combining the merits of both SST products. These factors have motivated recent work in blending the MW and IR data in an attempt to produce high-accuracy SST products with improved coverage in regions with persistent clouds. The primary sources of retrieval uncertainty are, however, different for the two sensors. The main uncertainty in the MW retrievals lies in the effects of wind-induced surface roughness and foam on emissivity, whereas the IR retrievals are more sensitive to the atmospheric water vapor and aerosol content. Average nighttime differences between the products for the month periods of January 1999 and June 2000 are shown. These maps show complex spatial and temporal differences as indicated by the strong spatially coherent features in the product differences and the changes between seasons. Clearly such differences need to be understood and accounted for if the products are to be combined. The overall goals of this project are threefold: (1) To understand the sources of uncertainty in the IR and MW SST retrievals and to characterize the errors affecting the two types of retrieval as a fiction of atmospheric forcing; (2) To demonstrate how representative the temperature difference between the two satellite products is of Delta T; (3) To apply bias adjustments and to device a comprehensive treatment of the behavior of the temperature difference across the oceanic skin layer to determine the best method for blending thermal infrared

  1. Polarization Imaging over Sea Surface - A Method for Measurements of Stokes Components Angular Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, W.; Piskozub, J.; Toczek, H.

    2015-12-01

    This article describes a method for determining the angular distribution of light polarization over a roughened surface of the sea. Our method relies on measurements of the Stokes vector elements using a polarization imaging camera that operates using the Division of Focal Plane (DoFP) method. It uses special monochrome CCD array in which the neighbouring cells, instead of recording different colours (red green and blue), are equipped with micropolarizers of four directions (0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees). We combined the camera with a fish-eye lens of Field of View (FoV) > 180 deg. Such a large FoV allowed us to crop out the fragment of the frame along the circular horizon, showing a view covering all directions of the hemisphere. Because of complicated optical design of the fish-eye lens (light refraction on surfaces of parts of the lens) connected to the sensor we checked the accuracy of the measurement system. A method to determine the accuracy of measured polarization is based on comparison of the experimentally obtained rotation matrix with its theoretical form. Such a comparison showed that the maximum error of Stokes vector elements depended on zenith angle and reached as much as 24% for light coming from just above the horizon, but decreased rapidly with decreasing zenith angle to the value of 12% for the angles 10° off the edge of FoV. Moreover we present the preliminary results prepared over rough sea surface. These results include total intensity of light, Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) and their standard deviations. The results have been averaged over one thousand frames of a movie. These results indicate that the maximum polarization is observed near the reflection of the sun, and the signal coming from below the surface may be observed at zenith angles far from the vertical direction.

  2. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  3. Assessment of the Aquarius Space-borne Sea Surface Salinity Retrievals in Polar Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinnat, E.; Brucker, L.; Caraballo Álvarez, I. O.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean salinity and temperature drive the thermohaline circulation and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. With the availability of passive L-band (1.4 GHz) space-borne observations, Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) can be monitored globally at weekly time scales. SSS in the polar regions may be used to better constrain deep water formation, and to monitor changes due to freshening by the melting cryosphere. However, SSS remote sensing in the polar oceans is challenging because L-band radiometric observations are less sensitive to salinity in cold waters, SSS retrieval is less accurate for very rough seas and the presence of sea ice, icebergs and land in the radiometer field of view adds complexity to the retrieval process. Aquarius is a NASA space-borne instrument operating three L-band radiometers. While Aquarius SSS retrievals are performed with a good accuracy in tropical and mid-latitude oceans, a thorough assessment has not been performed in the colder waters of the polar oceans. To assess Aquarius data at high latitudes, we compare them to in-situ measurements from ship cruises. In the northern hemisphere, cruises between Denmark and Greenland are used. In the south, we use cruises in the Austral Ocean between Tasmania and Antarctica. These quality-controlled shipborne measurements (more extensive than the Argo profiling floats which are rare at high latitudes) allow us to assess Aquarius SSS over long transects, repeated weekly or monthly, over the three year period during which Aquarius has been operating. Our results show that significant contamination of SSS retrievals by ice and land are observed, despite the correction for land contamination applied in the Aquarius retrieval algorithm. Such long track comparisons with ship data will help refine the future versions of Aquarius space-borne products. Nonetheless, excluding the data contaminated by land or ice, the agreement with ship data is good. Specifically, the standard deviation is ~0.3 - 0

  4. AQUARIUS: A Passive/Active Microwave Sensor to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity Globally from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Colomb, F. Raul; Chao, Yi

    2004-01-01

    Salinity is important for understanding ocean dynamics, energy exchange with the atmosphere and the global water cycle. Existing data is limited and much of the ocean has never even been sampled. Sea surface salinity can be measured remotely by satellite and a three year mission for this purpose called AquariudSAC-D has recently been selected by NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program. The objective is to map the salinity field globally with a spatial resolution of 100 km and a monthly average accuracy of 0.2 psu. The mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, is a partnership of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Argentine Comision National de Actividades Epaciales (CONAE).

  5. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  6. Microwave emission from polar firn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave emission from a half-space medium, characterized by coordinate dependent scattering and absorbing centers, was calculated by numerically solving the radiative transfer equation by the method of invariant imbedding. Rayleigh scattering phase functions and scattering induced polarization of the radiation were included in the calculation. Using the scattering and extinction data of polar firn the brightness temperature was calculated for the 1.55 cm wavelength. This study was the first quantitative comparison of the results of numerical calculation using the actual measured information of crystal size with the observed data.

  7. Passive microwave airborne measurements of the sea surface response at 89 and 157 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, C.; English, S. J.; Prigent, C.; Jones, D. C.

    1996-02-01

    Microwave measurements of the ocean-roughened surface have been collected during several recent international experiments using an airborne radiometer observing at 89 and 157 GHz. The purpose of this project is to test and validate the sea emissivity model required for the future humidity sounder, advanced microwave sounder unit B, over a wide range of atmospheric and surface conditions. In this paper, the measurements are statistically analyzed and compared with a geometric optics model with special emphasis on the sensitivity to the input parameters. This model is shown to provide good overall agreement with the data when coupled to the wave slope description of Cox and Munk (1954), the liquid water dielectric permittivity of Liebe et al. (1991), and the foam coverage of Monahan and Lu (1990), after increasing the theoretical predictions by a bias of about 2.5 K at 89 GHz and 1.7 K at 157 GHz. In addition, an empirical emissivity algorithm derived from low-frequency observations (Hollinger, 1971; Stogryn, 1972) and widely used for satellite retrieval purposes is shown to be inappropriate for use at millimeter frequencies.

  8. Polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present an extension of the ROMA map-making code for data analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background polarization, with particular attention given to the inflationary polarization B-modes. The new algorithm takes into account a possible cross- correlated noise component among the different detectors of a CMB experiment. We tested the code on the observational data of the BOOMERanG (2003) experiment and we show that we are provided with a better estimate of the power spectra, in particular the error bars of the BB spectrum are smaller up to 20% for low multipoles. We point out the general validity of the new method. A possible future application is the LSPE balloon experiment, devoted to the observation of polarization at large angular scales.

  9. Sea-surface temperature fronts in the Yellow and East China Seas from TRMM microwave imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Daji; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Feng

    2010-06-01

    Swath data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission microwave imager of sea-surface temperatures (SST) from 1998 to 2005 have been used to analyze the climatology and seasonal variability of the SST fronts in the Yellow and East China Seas (YES). Seven fronts have been identified and placed into three categories, namely, (1) the shelf-break front (Kuroshio Front), (2) the coastal fronts (Zhe-Min, Jiangsu, Shangdong Peninsula, Western Korean, and Western Chejudo Fronts), and (3) the shelf front (Western Yellow Sea Shelf Front). The Kuroshio Front exists from December through May, with the maximum SST gradient and highest frontal probability in April. The five coastal fronts exist year-round, all with their maximum SST gradient and highest frontal probability in February. The shelf front in the western Yellow Sea exists only from January to March. Frontogenesis in winter is due to effects of both air-sea heat exchange and advection by currents. The coastal fronts in the stratified months are expressed as tidal fronts. The coastal frontal zones coincide with the major spawning grounds of fish in the YES. The overwintering fishery ground in the Yellow Sea overlaps with the narrow band of favorable water temperature in the frontal zone. The overwintering grounds in the East China Sea are broad and bounded by fronts.

  10. Estimating Longwave Net Radiation at Sea Surface from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanhua; Simmer, Clemens; Ruprecht, Eberhard

    1997-07-01

    A neural network is used to calculate the longwave net radiation (Lnet) at the sea surface from measurements of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). The neural network applied in this study is able to account largely for the nonlinearity between Lnet and the satellite-measured brightness temperatures (TB). The algorithm can be applied for instantaneous measurements over oceanic regions with the area extent of satellite passive microwave observations (30-60 km in diameter). Comparing with a linear regression method the neural network reduces the standard error for Lnet from 17 to 5 W m2 when applied to model results. For clear-sky cases, a good agreement with an error of less than 5 W m2 for Lnet between calculations from SSM/I observations and pyrgeometer measurements on the German research vessel Poseidon during the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE) 1989 is obtained. For cloudy cases, the comparison is problematic due to the inhomogenities of clouds and the low and different spatial resolutions of the SSM/I data. Global monthly mean values of Lnet for October 1989 are computed and compared to other sources. Differences are observed among the climatological values from previous studies by H.-J. Isemer and L. Hasse, the climatological values from R. Lindau and L. Hasse, the values of W. L. Darnell et al., and results from this study. Some structures of Lnet are similar for results from W. L. Darnell et al. and the present authors. The differences between both results are generally less than 15 W m2. Over the North Atlantic Ocean the authors found a poleward increase for Lnet, which is contrary to the results of H.-J. Isemer and L. Hasse.

  11. Polar low climatology over the Nordic and Barents seas based on satellite passive microwave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Julia E.; Golubkin, Pavel A.; Bobylev, Leonid P.; Zabolotskikh, Elizaveta V.; Chapron, Bertrand

    2015-07-01

    A new climatology of polar lows over the Nordic and Barents seas for 14 seasons (1995/1996-2008/2009) is presented. For the first time in climatological studies of polar lows an approach based on satellite passive microwave data was adopted for polar low identification. A total of 637 polar lows were found in 14 extended winter seasons by combining total atmospheric water vapor content and sea surface wind speed fields retrieved from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data. As derived, the polar low activity in the Norwegian and Barents Seas is found to be almost equal, and the main polar low genesis area is located northeastward of the North Cape. For the Barents Sea, a significant correlation is found between the number of polar lows and mean sea ice extent. Individual indicative polar low characteristics (i.e., diameter, lifetime, distance traveled, translation speed, and maximum wind speed) are also presented.

  12. Comparison of sea surface winds derived from active and passive microwaves instruments on the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasio, Francesco; Zecchetto, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    In order to characterize the energy and momentum fluxes at the air-sea interface, the surface wind vector must be known with adequate spatial and temporal coverages. Satellite-borne active and passive microwaves instruments perform such measurements. In the Mediterranean Sea, and in general in enclosed or semi-enclosed basins, an adequate coverage is yet more difficult to achieve than in open sea, because of the presence of vast coastal areas and elevated orography near the coastline. This study aims to compare the performance of three of such instruments (two actives and one passive) over several years of activity over the Mediterranean Sea, in order to delve into the possibility of using the three data-sets as a common reference for marine meteorology investigations, dramatically improving the availability of surface wind data in the Mediterranean Sea. They are the METOP-A ASCAT scatterometer, the QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer and the Coriolis WindSat radiometer. ASCAT and QuikSCAT data are freely available for download, at spatial resolution of 25 km by 25 km and 12.5 km by 12.5 km, from the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center PO.DAAC (http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov). ASCAT near real time data have 2 hours latency. The time span covered by these data is March 2007-present for ASCAT, July 1999-November 2009 for QuikSCAT. In the Mediterranean Sea the nominal temporal coverage is less then 2 hit per point per day for both. WindSat data have spatial resolution of 25 km by 25 km, cover the period February 2003-present, and are freely available for download from Remote Sensing Systems (http://www.ssmi.com). They are available as delayed datasets covering one day at a time. The two collocated datasets cover the period February 2003 - November 2009 (WindSat - QuikSCAT) and March 2009 - November 2010 (WindSat - ASCAT), and offer the means to perform: - a comparison of the performances of active and passive microwaves instruments; - a very long

  13. Comparison of sea surface wind speed fields by SEASAT radar altimeter, scatterometer and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer with an emphasis on the Southern Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mognard, N. M.; Campbell, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The SEASAT altimeter (ALT), scatterometer (SASS), and scanning microwave multichannel radiometer (SMMR) measured sea surface wind speed. During the satellite lifetime from June to October 1978, the Austral winter, the highest wind speeds were recorded in the Southern Ocean. Three-month, monthly, and three-day surface wind speed fields deduced from the three Seasat wind speed sensors are compared. The monthly and three-day fields show a pronounced mesoscale (1000 km) variability in wind speed. At all space and time scales analyzed, differences of 40% are found in the magnitude of the wind speed features, with the ALT consistently yielding the lowest wind speed and the SMMR the highest.

  14. Experimental measurement and theoretical modeling of microwave scattering and the structure of the sea surface influencing radar observations from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, David; Kong, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) bias 'epsilon' is an error present in radar altimetry of the ocean due to the nonuniform reflection from wave troughs and crests. The EM bias is defined as the difference between the mean reflecting surface and the mean sea surface. A knowledge of the EM bias is necessary to permit error reduction in mean sea level measurements by satellite radar altimeters. Direct measurements of the EM bias were made from a Shell Offshore oil production platform in the Gulf of Mexico for a six month period during 1989 and 1990. Measurements of the EM bias were made at 5 and 14 Ghz. During the EM bias experiments by Melville et al., a wire wave gauge was used to obtain the modulation of the high frequency waves by the low frequency waves. It became apparent that the EM bias was primarily caused by the modulation of the short waves. This was reported by Arnold et al. The EM bias is explained using physical optics scattering and an empirical model for the short wave modulation. Measurements of the short wave modulation using a wire wave gauge demonstrated a linear dependence of the normalized bias on the short wave modulation strength, M. The theory accurately predicts this dependence by the relation epsilon = -alphaMH sub 1/3. The wind speed dependence of the normalized bias is explained by the dependence of the short wave modulation strength on the wind speed. While other effects such as long wave tilt and curvature will have an effect on the bias, the primary cause of the bias is shown to be due to the short wave modulation. This report will present a theory using physical optics scattering and an empirical model of the short wave modulation to estimate the EM bias. The estimated EM bias will be compared to measurements at C and Ku bands.

  15. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) offer a means to explore the universe at a very early epoch. Specifically, if the universe went through a brief period of exponential expansion called inflation as current data suggest, gravitational waves from this period would polarize the CMB in a specific pattern. At GSFC, we are currently working towards two experiments that work in concert to measure this polarization pattern in search of evidence for inflation. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization at frequencies between 40 and 150 GHz from the Atacama Desert in Chile. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne experiment that will make similar measurements at frequencies between 200 and 600 GHz.

  16. The POLARBEAR Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, D.; Ade, P.; Anthony, A.; Arnold, K.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Edwards, J.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Flanigan, D.; Fuller, G.; Ghribi, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Jaehnig, G.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Lee, A. T.; Le Jeune, M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Sholl, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tomaru, T.; Tucker, C.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2014-09-01

    The polarbear cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment has been observing since early 2012 from its 5,200 m site in the Atacama Desert in Northern Chile. polarbear's measurements will characterize the expected CMB polarization due to gravitational lensing by large scale structure, and search for the possible B-mode polarization signature of inflationary gravitational waves. polarbear's 250 mK focal plane detector array consists of 1,274 polarization-sensitive antenna-coupled bolometers, each with an associated lithographed band-defining filter and contacting dielectric lenslet, an architecture unique in current CMB experiments. The status of the polarbear instrument, its focal plane, and the analysis of its measurements are presented.

  17. Cosmological spatial curvature probed by microwave polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, R.A.; Tolman, B.W.

    1982-11-15

    If there is a large-scale anisotropy in the expansion of the universe, the microwave background radiation is expected to be linearly polarized. This communication shows that spatial curvature is capable of rotating the polarization of the microwaves relative to its direction at last scattering, which is directly correlated with the expansion anisotropy (and so also the observed intensity anisotropy). In Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models of the universe with additional small expansion anisotropy, the observed rotation relative to the intensity anisotropy would be appreciable and constant over the celestial sphere in the closed (type IX) model, but in the flat and open models, it must either vanish (types I and V) or vary ina complicated way over the celestial sphere (type VII/sub h/). These facts suggest a clear observational test of the closure of the universe. Also, an ambiguity inherent in the homogeneity of the universe does not allow prediction of the direction of rotation; thus homogeneous universes possess a property which might be called ''handedness.''

  18. Characterization of sun and sky glint from wind ruffled sea surfaces for improved estimation of polarized remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Robert; Ibrahim, Amir; Gilerson, Alex; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Carrizo, Carlos; Ahmed, Sam

    2015-09-01

    During two cruises in 2014, the polarized radiance of the ocean and the sky were continuously acquired using a HyperSAS-POL system. The system consists of seven hyperspectral radiometric sensors, three of which (one unpolarized and two polarized) look at the water and similarly three at the sky. The system autonomously tracks the Sun position and the heading of the research vessel to which it is attached in order to maintain a fixed relative azimuth angle with respect to the Sun (i.e. 90°) and therefore avoid the specular reflection of the sunlight. For the duration of both cruises, (NASA Ship Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR), and NOAA VIIRS Validation/Calibration), in situ inherent optical properties (IOPs) were continuously acquired using a set of instrument packages modified for underway measurement, and hyperspectral radiometric measurements were taken manually at all stations. During SABOR, an underwater polarimeter was deployed when conditions permitted. All measurements were combined in an effort to first develop a glint (sky + Sun) correction scheme for the upwelling polarized signal from a wind driven ocean surface and compare with one assuming that the ocean surface is flat.

  19. Optically Transparent Microwave Polarizer Based On Quasi-Metallic Graphene.

    PubMed

    Grande, Marco; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; de Ceglia, Domenico; Capezzuto, Pio; Scalora, Michael; D'Orazio, Antonella; Bruno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the engineering and the realization of optically transparent graphene-based microwave devices using Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) graphene whose sheet resistance may be tailored down to values below 30 Ω/sq. In particular, we show that the process was successfully used to realize and characterize a simple, optically transparent graphene-based wire-grid polarizer at microwave frequencies (X band). The availability of graphene operating in a quasi-metallic region may allow the integration of graphene layers in several microwave components, thus leading to the realization of fully transparent (and flexible) microwave devices. PMID:26603112

  20. Optically Transparent Microwave Polarizer Based On Quasi-Metallic Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Marco; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Vincenti, Maria Antonietta; de Ceglia, Domenico; Capezzuto, Pio; Scalora, Michael; D’Orazio, Antonella; Bruno, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the engineering and the realization of optically transparent graphene-based microwave devices using Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) graphene whose sheet resistance may be tailored down to values below 30 Ω/sq. In particular, we show that the process was successfully used to realize and characterize a simple, optically transparent graphene-based wire-grid polarizer at microwave frequencies (X band). The availability of graphene operating in a quasi-metallic region may allow the integration of graphene layers in several microwave components, thus leading to the realization of fully transparent (and flexible) microwave devices. PMID:26603112

  1. Microwave frequency modulation for improving polarization transfer in DNP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Mallory; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a driven process that transfers the inherently high electron polarization to surrounding nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency. In a typical DNP experiment, the amplitude and frequency of the applied microwaves are constant. However, by adding time dependence in the form of frequency modulation, the electron excitation bandwidth is increased, thereby increasing the number of electron spins active in the polarization transfer process and improving overall efficiency. Both triangular and sinusoidal modulation show a 3 fold improvement over monochromatic irradiation. In the present study, we compare the nuclear spin polarization after DNP experiments with no modulation of the applied microwaves, triangular and sinusoidal modulation, and modulation schemes derived from the sample's ESR spectrum. We characterize the polarization as a function of the modulation amplitude and frequency and compare the optimal results from each modulation scheme. Working at a field of 3.34 T and at a temperature of 4 K, we show that by using a modulation scheme tailored to the electronic environment of the sample, polarization transfer is improved over other modulation schemes. Small-scale simulations of the spin system are developed to gain further insight into the dynamics of this driven open system. This understanding could enable the design of modulation schemes to achieve even higher polarization transfer efficiencies. With support from NSF (CHE-1410504) and by NIH (U19-A1091173).

  2. Cross-polarized microwave surface-state anti-resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2014-08-01

    We propose a polarization-sensitive measurement of microwave electromagnetic resonances in a static magnetic field to detect the metallic surface state of a bulk insulator. A quantitative model is used to demonstrate that a unique, unambiguous signature of the dissipative but conducting surface can be seen in the orthogonally polarized transmission spectra. These results are relevant to the ongoing search for candidate topological insulator materials.

  3. Sea surface wind field by TerraSAR-X and Tandem-X data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoming; Lehner, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    A new Geophysical Model Function (GMF), denoted XMOD2, is developed to retrieve the sea surface wind field from X-band TerraSAR-X/Tandem-X (TS-X/TD-X) data. In contrary to the previous XMOD1, XMOD2 is based on a nonlinear GMF, and moreover it also depicts the difference between upwind and downwind of the sea surface backscatter. By exploiting 371 collocations, the retrieved TS-X/TD-X sea surface wind speed U10 by XMOD2 agrees well with in situ buoy measurements with a bias of 0.39 m/s, an RMSE of 1.52 m/s and a scatter index (SI) of 16.1%. To apply XMOD2 to TS-X/TD-X data acquired at HH polarization, we verify the X-band SAR Polarization Ratio (PR) models by comparing the retrieved sea surface wind speed to in situ buoy measurements as well. Based on 62 collocated pairs, it is found that by using the Elfouhaily type PR model and XMOD2 yields better U10 retrieval with a bias of -0.27 m/s, an RMSE of 2.06 m/s and a SI of 22.7% than using the X-PR model which yields a bias of -0.98 m, and RMSE of 2.30 m and a SI of 23.4%. Several TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X ScanSAR images are acquired in October, 2012 to track the Hurricane Sandy. Three of the images are acquired in the open sea, which are presented in this chapter to demonstrate observations of sea surface wind and wave extracted from X-band ScanSAR image with high spatial resolution of 17 m in the hurricane. In the case of the TerraSAR-X image acquired on October 26, 2012, we analyze the peak wave direction and length of swell generated by Hurricane Sandy, as well as interaction of swell with the Abaco Island, Bahamas. In the other two cases, sea surface wind field derived from the TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X acquired on October 27 and 28 are presented. The sea surface wind speed retrieved by the X-band Geophysical Model Function (GMF) XMOD2 using wind direction derived from SAR images and the NOAA Hurricane Research Division (HRD) wind analyses are both presented for comparisons. We also compare the retrieved sea surface

  4. Polarized cosmic microwave background map recovery with sparse component separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-11-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting this information from microwave surveys requires distinguishing between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which means solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, but very rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to distinguish between the various components. More recent methods, which instead emphasize the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimates of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, we here introduce a new component separation technique dubbed the polarized generalized morphological component analysis (PolGMCA), which refines previous work to specifically work on the estimation of the polarized CMB maps: i) it benefits from a recently introduced sparsity-based mechanism to cope with partially correlated components; ii) it builds upon estimator aggregation techniques to further yield a better noise contamination/non-Gaussian foreground residual trade-off. The PolGMCA algorithm is evaluated on simulations of full-sky polarized microwave sky simulations using the Planck Sky Model (PSM). The simulations show that the proposed method achieves a precise recovery of the CMB map in polarization with low-noise and foreground contamination residuals. It provides improvements over standard methods, especially on the Galactic center, where estimating the CMB is challenging.

  5. Combined study of microwave-power-dependence and linear-polarization-dependence of the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Mani, Ramesh; Wegscheider, Werner; Georgia State University Collaboration; ETH Zurich Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations (MRIMOs) represent an interesting electrical property of the high mobility two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at low temperatures in a perpendicular magnetic field and under microwave excitation. Some questions under discussion in this topic include: (a) whether MRIMOs' amplitudes grow linearly with the microwave power and (b) how the MRIMO amplitudes change with the rotation of the microwave polarization with respect to the sample. In this study, we utilize swept microwave power and continuously changed linear polarized microwave polarization angle as two variables in four-terminal low-frequency lock-in magnetoresistance measurements of the 2DEG samples. The results show that amplitude of MRIMOs varies non-linearly with the microwave power. Also, the microwave polarization dependence measurements show that MRIMOs depend sensitively on the polarization angle of the linearly polarized microwaves, while the oscillatory magnetoresistance follows a cosine square function of the polarization angle. We provide a simple model that conveys our understanding of our observations. Basic research at Georgia State University is supported by the DOE-BES, MSE Division under DE-SC0001762. Microwave work is supported by the ARO under W911NF-07-01-0158.

  6. Recovering Microwave Cross-Polarization Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, B. L.; Stelzried, C. T.; Ohlson, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Reception improved by adding normally discarded portion of signal. For signal enhancement, major and minor signals combined in slaved closedloop receiver channels. Both receiver channels served by common local oscillator controlled by phase-locked loop in main channel. 10-MHz intermediate-frequency (IF) signals of channels coherently summed. For polarization tracking, phasemeter added to measure phase difference between points A and B. With new circuit, low-level signal used at receiver to augment main signal.

  7. Dipole modulation of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shamik; Kothari, Rahul; Jain, Pankaj; Rath, Pranati K.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dipole modulation model for the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) polarization field. We show that the model leads to correlations between l and l+1 multipoles, exactly as in the case of temperature. We obtain results for the case of TE, EE and BB correlations. An anisotropic or inhomogeneous model of primordial power spectrum which leads to such correlations in temperature field also predicts similar correlations in CMBR polarization. We analyze the CMBR temperature and polarization data in order to extract the signal of these correlation between l and l+1 multipoles. Our results for the case of temperature using the latest PLANCK data agree with those obtained by an earlier analysis. A detailed study of the correlation in the polarization data is not possible at present. Hence we restrict ourselves to a preliminary investigation in this case.

  8. Cosmic microwave background polarization signals from tangled magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, T R; Subramanian, K

    2001-09-01

    Tangled, primordial cosmic magnetic fields create small rotational velocity perturbations on the last scattering surface of the cosmic microwave background radiation. For fields which redshift to a present value of B0 = 3 x 10(-9) G, these vector modes are shown to generate polarization anisotropies of order 0.1-4 microK on small angular scales (500polarization, which could help in their detection. PMID:11531471

  9. Airborne antenna polarization study for the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilreath, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the microwave landing system (MLS) airborne antenna pattern coverage requirements are investigated for a large commercial aircraft using a single omnidirectional antenna. Omnidirectional antennas having vertical and horizontal polarizations were evaluated at several different station locations on a one-eleventh scale model Boeing 737 aircraft. The results obtained during this experimental program are presented which include principal plane antenna patterns and complete volumetric coverage plots.

  10. Automated Microwave Frequency Control in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Ethan; Johnson, Ian; Keller, Dustin; Solid Polarized Target Group Team

    2016-03-01

    To achieve highest polarization levels in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments, target materials must be subjected to microwave irradiation at a particular frequency determined by the difference in the nuclear Larmor and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) frequencies. However, this resonant frequency is variable; it drifts as a result of radiation damage. Manually adjusting the frequency to accommodate for this fluctuation can be difficult, and improper adjustments negatively impact the polarization. In response to this problem, a controller has been developed which automates the process of seeking and maintaining optimal frequency. The creation of such a controller has necessitated research into the correlation between microwave frequency and corresponding polarization growth or decay rates in DNP experiments. Knowledge gained from the research of this unique relationship has additionally lead to the development of a Monte-Carlo simulation which accurately models polarization as a function of frequency and a number of other parameters. The simulation and controller continue to be refined, however, recent DNP experimentation has confirmed the controller's effectiveness.

  11. Effects of polarization-charge shielding in microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M. S.; Lin, S. M.; Chiang, W. Y.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2015-08-15

    Heating of dielectric objects by radio frequency (RF) and microwaves has long been a method widely employed in scientific research and industrial applications. However, RF and microwave heating are often susceptible to an excessive temperature spread due to uneven energy deposition. The current study elucidates an important physical reason for this difficulty and proposes an effective remedy. Non-spherical samples are placed in an anechoic chamber, where it is irradiated by a traveling microwave wave with 99% intensity uniformity. Polarization charges induced on the samples tend to partially cancel the incident electric field and hence reduce the heating rate. The polarization-charge shielded heating rate is shown to be highly dependent on the sample's shape and its orientation relative to the wave electric field. For samples with a relatively high permittivity, the resultant uneven heating can become a major cause for the excessive temperature spread. It is also demonstrated that a circularly polarized wave, with its rapidly rotating electric field, can effectively even out the heating rate and hence the temperature spread.

  12. Enhancement of nuclear polarization with frequency modulated microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Dulya, C.

    1995-04-01

    The authors report their discovery of a gain by a factor of two in the growth rate and of a gain by {approx} 1.7 in the maximum dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of deuteron in the large polarized targets of the Spin Muon Collaboration. These large gains resulted from a frequency modulation (FM) of the {approx} 69 GHz microwave field used for DNP; this FM had a 30 MHz amplitude and {approx} 1 KHz frequency. The target material is glassy deuterated 1-butanol doped with a paramagnetic Cr(V) complex. Measurements of the 430 MHz broad electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption spectrum in the 2.5 T field were performed by a novel differential bolometric technique. They show that FM gives rise to an additional microwave absorption which depends on the amplitude and frequency of FM and which is more pronounced in the edges of the EPR spectrum. For deuterons, polarizations of 0.46 and {minus}0.53 have been obtained. Similar although less dramatic effects were observed for protons where FM increased the polarization by less than 10% and the growth rate by {approx} 20%.

  13. Testing cosmic microwave background polarization data using position angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Michael; Battye, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    We consider a novel null test for contamination which can be applied to cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data that involves analysis of the statistics of the polarization position angles. Specifically, we will concentrate on using histograms of the measured position angles to illustrate the idea. Such a test has been used to identify systematics in the NRAO-VLA Sky Survey point source catalogue with an amplitude well below the noise level. We explore the statistical properties of polarization angles in CMB maps. If the polarization angle is not correlated between pixels, then the errors follow a simple √{N_{pix}} law. However, this is typically not the case for CMB maps since these have correlations which result in an increase in the variance as the effective number of independent pixels is reduced. Then, we illustrate how certain classes of systematic errors can result in very obvious patterns in these histograms, and thus that these errors could possibly be identified using this method. We discuss how this idea might be applied in a realistic context, and make a preliminary analysis of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 data, finding evidence of a systematic error in the Q- and W- band data, consistent with a constant offset in Q and U.

  14. Forward Monte Carlo Computations of Polarized Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battaglia, A.; Kummerow, C.

    2000-01-01

    Microwave radiative transfer computations continue to acquire greater importance as the emphasis in remote sensing shifts towards the understanding of microphysical properties of clouds and with these to better understand the non linear relation between rainfall rates and satellite-observed radiance. A first step toward realistic radiative simulations has been the introduction of techniques capable of treating 3-dimensional geometry being generated by ever more sophisticated cloud resolving models. To date, a series of numerical codes have been developed to treat spherical and randomly oriented axisymmetric particles. Backward and backward-forward Monte Carlo methods are, indeed, efficient in this field. These methods, however, cannot deal properly with oriented particles, which seem to play an important role in polarization signatures over stratiform precipitation. Moreover, beyond the polarization channel, the next generation of fully polarimetric radiometers challenges us to better understand the behavior of the last two Stokes parameters as well. In order to solve the vector radiative transfer equation, one-dimensional numerical models have been developed, These codes, unfortunately, consider the atmosphere as horizontally homogeneous with horizontally infinite plane parallel layers. The next development step for microwave radiative transfer codes must be fully polarized 3-D methods. Recently a 3-D polarized radiative transfer model based on the discrete ordinate method was presented. A forward MC code was developed that treats oriented nonspherical hydrometeors, but only for plane-parallel situations.

  15. Reconfigurable microwave photonic filter based on polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Enming; Pan, Shilong; Li, Peili

    2016-03-01

    A reconfigurable microwave photonic filter based on a polarization modulator (PolM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The PolM together with a polarization controller (PC) and a polarization beam splitter (PBS) implements two complementary intensity modulations in two separated branches. Then, optical components are inserted in the two branches to realize a bandpass filter and an allpass filter, respectively. When the two branches are combined by a second PBS, a filter with a frequency response that equals the subtraction of the frequency responses of the allpass filter and bandpass filter is achieved. By adjusting the PCs placed before the second PBS, a notch filter with a tunable notch depth or a bandpass filter can be achieved.

  16. Microwave-mediated magneto-optical trap for polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizhou, Xie; Wenhao, Bu; Bo, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Realizing a molecular magneto-optical trap has been a dream for cold molecular physicists for a long time. However, due to the complex energy levels and the small effective Lande g-factor of the excited states, the traditional magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme does not work very well for polar molecules. One way to overcome this problem is the switching MOT, which requires very fast switching of both the magnetic field and the laser polarizations. Switching laser polarizations is relatively easy, but fast switching of the magnetic field is experimentally challenging. Here we propose an alternative approach, the microwave-mediated MOT, which requires a slight change of the current experimental setup to solve the problem. We calculate the MOT force and compare it with the traditional MOT and the switching MOT scheme. The results show that we can operate a good MOT with this simple setup. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China.

  17. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and its Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its faint polarization have provided a unique means to constrain the physical state of the early Universe. Continued advances in instrumentation, observation, and analysis have revealed polarized radiation signatures associated with gravitational lensing and have heightened the prospects for using precision polarimetry to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm. Characterization of this relic radiation field has the power to constrain or reveal the detailed properties of astroparticle species and long wave gravitational radiation. On going and planned CMB polarization efforts from the ground, balloon, and space borne platforms will be briefly surveyed. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be summarized. NASA PCOS mini-symposium (invited IPSIG talk).

  18. Estimation of sea-surface winds using backscatter cross-section measurements from airborne research weather radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, P.H. . Remote Sensing Facility)

    1994-01-01

    A technique is presented for estimation of sea-surface winds using backscatter cross-section measurements from an airborne research weather radar. The technique is based on an empirical relation developed for use with satellite-borne microwave scatterometers which derives sea-surface winds from radar backscatter cross-section measurements. Unlike a scatterometer, the airborne research weather radar is a Doppler radar designed to measure atmospheric storm structure and kinematics. Designed to scan the atmosphere, the radar also scans the ocean surface over a wide range of azimuths, with the incidence angle and polarization angle changing continuously during each scan. The new sea-surface wind estimation technique accounts for these variations in incidence angle and polarization and derives the atmospheric surface winds. The technique works well over the range of wind conditions over which the wind speed-backscatter cross-section relation holds, about 2--20 m/s. The problems likely to be encountered with this new technique are evaluated and it is concluded that most problems are those which are endemic to any microwave scatterometer wind estimation technique. The new technique will enable using the research weather radar to provide measurements which would otherwise require use of a dedicated scatterometer.

  19. Searching for Faraday rotation in cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 9th-year foreground reduced data at 33, 41 and 61 GHz to derive a Faraday rotation at map and at angular power spectrum levels taking into account their observational errors. A processing mask provided by WMAP is used to avoid contamination from the disc of our Galaxy and local spurs. We have found a Faraday rotation component at both, map and power spectrum levels. The lack of correlation of the Faraday rotation with Galactic Faraday rotation, synchrotron and dust polarization from our Galaxy or with cosmic microwave background anisotropies or lensing suggests that it could be originated at reionization (ℓ ≲ 12). Even if the detected Faraday rotation signal is weak, the present study could contribute to establish magnetic fields strengths of B0 ˜ 10-8 G at reionization.

  20. Measuring the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with SPT-POL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, Abigail; SPT-POL Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    A new polarization-sensitive camera, SPT-POL, designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), was deployed on the 10 meter South Pole Telescope in January 2012. The goal of the project is to exploit the high resolution of the telescope (1 arcminute beam) and the high sensitivity afforded by the 1536 detector camera to characterize the B-mode polarization induced by the gravitational lensing of the primordial E-mode CMB polarization, as well as to detect or set an upper limit on the level of the B-mode polarization from inflationary gravitational waves. The lensing B-modes will be used to constrain the sum of the neutrino masses by measuring large scale structure, while the inflationary B-modes are sensitive to the energy scale of inflation. I will discuss the development of the SPT-POL camera including the cryogenic design and the transition edge sensor (TES) detectors as well as the science goals and status of the ongoing of the SPT-POL program.

  1. Analysis and Modelling of Sea-Surface Doppler Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, F.; Hoogeboom, P.; Le Chevalier, F.; Stoffelen, A.

    2012-12-01

    The modelling of the Doppler spectrum of a time-varying ocean surface has gained considerable attention in the last decades. Knowledge of how the evolution of the ocean surface wave spectrum affects the scattered electromagnetic field is essential for a quantitative understanding of the properties of the measured microwave Doppler spectra. Complicated hydrodynamics, influencing the motion of the ocean surface waves, make this understanding significantly difficult. Non linear hydrodynamics couple the motion of the large and small waves and, consequently, change statistical characteristics and shapes of the surface-wave components. These hydrodynamic surface interactions are not included in the simplest linear sea-surface model, which assumes that each surface harmonic propagates according to the dispersion relation typical of water waves. In the past decades, Bass [1968] and Barrick [1972] used a surface perturbation theory to predict the Doppler spectra; Valenzuela and Laing [1970], instead, obtained similar results by using a composite surface model. Later, Doppler spectra were studied by Thompson [1989], who computed the spectra using a time-dependent composite model. Zavorotny and Voronovich [1998] made use of an approximate "two-scale" surface model based on a directional wave spectrum. However, currently available analytical scattering models are unreliable at high incidence angles and do not provide a full-polarimetric information. Exact numerical simulations of microwave scattering from time-varying ocean-like surfaces are highly recommended to eliminate concerns on the applicability of approximate models and to provide a validation tool for approximate scattering theories. A more realistic model, that accounts for hydrodynamic surface interactions, is the non-linear model for surface waves by Creamer et ali [1989]. Rino et ali [ 1991] were the first to use the Creamer model to simulate the Doppler spectra from dynamically evolving surface realizations

  2. Polar sea ice observations by means of microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Chang, T. C.; Wilheit, T. T.; Campbell, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Principles pertinent to the utilization of 1.55 cm wavelength radiation emanating from the surface of the earth for studying the changing characteristics of polar sea ice are briefly reviewed. Recent data obtained at that wavelength with an imaging radiometer on-board the Nimbus 5 satellite are used to illustrate how the seasonal changes in extent of sea ice in both polar regions may be monitored free of atmospheric interference. Within a season, changes in the compactness of the sea ice are also observed from the satellite. Some substantial areas of the Arctic sea ice canopy identified as first-year ice in the past winter were observed not to melt this summer, a graphic illustration of the eventual formation of multiyear ice in the Arctic. Finally, the microwave emissivity of some of the multiyear ice areas near the North Pole was found to increase significantly in the summer, probably due to liquid water content in the firm layer.

  3. Microwave maps of the polar ice of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, T. C.; Nordberg, W.; Campbell, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Synoptic views of the entire polar regions of earth have been obtained free of the usual persistent cloud cover using a scanning microwave radiometer operating at a wavelength of 1.55 cm on board the Nimbus-5 satellite. Three different views at each pole are presented utilizing data obtained at approximately one-month intervals from December 1972 to February 1973. Large discrepancies exist between the long-term ice cover depicted in various atlases and the actual extent of the canopies. The distribution of multiyear ice in the north polar region is markedly different from that predicted by existing ice dynamics models. Irregularities in the edge of the Antarctic sea ice pack occur that have neither been observed previously nor anticipated. The brightness temperatures of the Greenland and Antarctic glaciers show interesting contours probably related to the ice and snow morphologic structure.

  4. Three modes of interdecadal trends in sea surface temperature and sea surface height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.

    2013-12-01

    It might be thought that sea surface height and sea surface temperature would be tightly related. We show that this is not necessarily the case on a global scale. We analysed this relationship in a suite of coupled climate models run under 1860 forcing conditions. The models are low-resolution variants of the GFDL Earth System Model, reported in Galbraith et al. (J. Clim. 2011). 1. Correlated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode corresponds to opening and closing of convective chimneys in the Southern Ocean. As the Southern Ocean destratifies, sea ice formation is suppressed during the winter and more heat is taken up during the summer. This mode of variability is highly correlated with changes in the top of the atmosphere radiative budget and weakly correlated with changes in the deep ocean circulation. 2. Uncorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode of variability is associated with interdecadal variabliity in tropical winds. Changes in the advective flux of heat to the surface ocean play a critical role in driving these changes, which also result in significant local changes in sea level. Changes sea ice over the Southern Ocean still result in changes in solar absorption, but these are now largely cancelled by changes in outgoing longwave radiation. 3. Anticorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperatures. By varying the lateral diffusion coefficient in the ocean model, we are able to enhance and suppress convection in the Southern and Northern Pacific Oceans. Increasing the lateral diffusion coefficients shifts the balance sources of deep water away from the warm salty deep water of the North Atlantic and towards cold fresh deep water from the other two regions. As a result, even though the planet as a whole warms, the deep ocean cools and sea level falls, with changes of order 30 cm over 500 years. The increase in solar absorption

  5. Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Kunkee, D. B.; Piepmeier, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop satellite-based observational techniques for measuring both oceanic and atmospheric variables using passive polarimetric radiometry. Polarimetric radiometry offers a potential alternative to radar scatterometry in observing global ocean surface wind direction from satellites. Polarimetric radiometry might also provide a means of detecting cell-top ice in convective storms by virtue of the polarizing properties of oriented ice particles, and thus facilitate estimation of the phase of the storm. The project focuses on the development of polarimetric microwave radiometers using digital cross-correlators for obtaining precise measurements of all four Stokes' parameters. As part of the project a unique four-band polarimetric imaging radiometer, the Polar Scanning Radiometer (PSR), is being designed for use on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. In addition to providing an aircraft-based demonstration of digital correlation technology the PSR will significantly enhance the microwave imaging capability of the existing suite of DC-8 instruments. During the first grant year excellent progress has been made in the following areas: (1) demonstrating digital correlation radiometry, (2) fabricating aircraft-qualified correlators for use in the PSR, and (3) modeling observed SSM/I brightness signatures of ocean wind direction.

  6. Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector with Selective Polarization Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward; U-yen, Kongpop; Stevenson, Thomas; Brown, Ari; Moseley, Samuel; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2013-01-01

    A conventional low-noise detector requires a technique to both absorb incident power and convert it to an electrical signal at cryogenic temperatures. This innovation combines low-noise detector and readout functionality into one device while maintaining high absorption, controlled polarization sensitivity, and broadband detection capability. The resulting far-infrared detectors can be read out with a simple approach, which is compact and minimizes thermal loading. The proposed microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) consists of three basic elements. The first is the absorptive section in which the incident power is coupled to a superconducting resonator at far-infrared frequency above its superconducting critical frequency (where superconductor becomes normal conductor). This absorber's shape effectively absorbs signals in the desired polarization state and is resonant at the radio frequency (RF) used for readout of the device. Control over the metal film used in the absorber allows realization of structures with either a 50% broadband or 100% resonance absorptance over a 30% fractional bandwidth. The second element is a microwave resonator - which is realized from the thin metal films used to make the absorber as transmission lines - whose resonance frequency changes due to a variation in its kinetic inductance. The resonator's kinetic inductance is a function of the power absorbed by the device. A low-loss dielectric (mono-crystalline silicon) is used in a parallel-plate transmission line structure to realize the desired superconducting resonators. There is negligible coupling among the adjacent elements used to define the polarization sensitivity of each detector. The final component of the device is a microwave transmission line, which is coupled to the resonator, and allows detection of changes in resonance frequency for each detector in the focal plane array. The spiral shape of the detector's absorber allows incident power with two polarizations to

  7. A novel microwave cancellation circuit for measuring nonlinear dielectric changes of polar solution under microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao-Ran; Huang, Ka-Ma

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an experimental set-up based on a novel microstrip cancellation circuit is presented for investigating the effects of external microwave fields on the dielectric properties of polar solution. The circuit consists of a 3 dB Wilkinson power combiner, a conventional 20 dB backward coupler, and a specially designed 20 dB single-sectioned forward coupler. Besides, in order to realize a uniform electric field in the tested solution, a nicked microstrip ring is designed in the circuit. An improvement of measurement sensitivity in the proposed circuit was obtained when compared to the conventional transmission lines method. We exploit interference cancellation processes to suppress the probing signal at the output port under the principle that two identical amplitude signals with 180° phase difference will completely cancel each other. The measurements are carried out at the frequency of 2.45 GHz, and the temperature effects caused by microwave heating are excluded by the flowing fluid. Experimental results show that the dielectric properties of DMSO-methanol/ethanol mixtures change at the electric field intensity of 105 V m  -  1 and present a distinctly nonlinear dielectric change with the electric fields. The study of the microwave-material interaction has expanded our insights into the high-power microwave’s industry application.

  8. SELF-CALIBRATION OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Brian G.; Yadav, Amit P. S.; Shimon, Meir

    2013-01-10

    Precision measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, especially experiments seeking to detect the odd-parity 'B-modes', have far-reaching implications for cosmology. To detect the B-modes generated during inflation, the flux response and polarization angle of these experiments must be calibrated to exquisite precision. While suitable flux calibration sources abound, polarization angle calibrators are deficient in many respects. Man-made polarized sources are often not located in the antenna's far-field, have spectral properties that are radically different from the CMB's, are cumbersome to implement, and may be inherently unstable over the (long) duration these searches require to detect the faint signature of the inflationary epoch. Astrophysical sources suffer from time, frequency, and spatial variability, are not visible from all CMB observatories, and none are understood with sufficient accuracy to calibrate future CMB polarimeters seeking to probe inflationary energy scales of 10{sup 15} GeV. Both man-made and astrophysical sources require dedicated observations which detract from the amount of integration time usable for detection of the inflationary B-modes. CMB TB and EB modes, expected to identically vanish in the standard cosmological model, can be used to calibrate CMB polarimeters. By enforcing the observed EB and TB power spectra to be consistent with zero, CMB polarimeters can be calibrated to levels not possible with man-made or astrophysical sources. All of this can be accomplished for any polarimeter without any loss of observing time using a calibration source which is spectrally identical to the CMB B-modes.

  9. Sea Surface Height 1993 - 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts year-to-year variability in sea surface height, and chronicles two decades of El Niño and La Niña events. It was created using NASA ocean altimetry data from 1993 to 2011, ...

  10. The Evolution of Spaceborne Microwave Sounders for the U.S. Polar-Orbiting Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James C.; Krimschansky, Sergey; Patel, Probodh; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is the next generation space-borne microwave sounder. It is the latest and most advanced version of a series of satellite-based microwave sounders, currently under development by NASA for the future U.S. operational polar-orbiting weather satellite system, called the NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environment Satellite System), slated to begin orbiting around the end of this decade. This paper will present a brief history of the evolution of the space-borne microwave sounders, from its early-day scientific experiments, through the operational sounder aboard today's polar orbiting weather satellites, and ending in the ATMS development. It will also describe the evolution of microwave radiometer technology that enabled the space-borne microwave radiometry, from its early versions with simple, nadir-viewing, fixed-horn antennas to the present-day scanning reflector antennas with broad-band MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers, plus on-board calibrations.

  11. Spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien; Fidler, Christian; Pitrou, Cyril; Pettinari, Guido W. E-mail: christian.fidler@port.ac.uk E-mail: g.pettinari@sussex.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We compute the spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization induced by non-linear effects in the Compton interactions between CMB photons and the flow of intergalactic electrons. This signal is of the y-type and is dominated by contributions arising from the reionized era. We stress that it is not shadowed by the thermal SZ effect which has no equivalent for polarization. We decompose its angular dependence into E- and B-modes, and we calculate the corresponding power spectra, both exactly and using a suitable Limber approximation that allows a simpler numerical evaluation. We find that B-modes are of the same order of magnitude as E-modes. Both spectra are relatively flat, peaking around ℓ = 280, and their overall amplitude is directly related to the optical depth to reionization. Moreover, we find this effect to be one order of magnitude larger than the non-linear kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters. Finally, we discuss how to improve the detectability of our signal by cross-correlating it with other quantities sourced by the flow of intergalactic electrons.

  12. Microwave remote sensing and radar polarization signatures of natural fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models developed for simulation of microwave remote sensing of the Earth surface from airborne/spaceborne sensors are described. Theoretical model calculations were performed and the results were compared with data of field measurements. Data studied included polarimetric images at the frequencies of P band, L band, and C band, acquired with airborne polarimeters over a agricultural field test site. Radar polarization signatures from bare soil surfaces and from tree covered fields were obtained from the data. The models developed in this report include: (1) Small perturbation model of wave scatterings from randomly rough surfaces, (2) Physical optics model, (3) Geometrical optics model, and (4) Electromagnetic wave scattering from dielectric cylinders of finite lengths, which replace the trees and branches in the modeling of tree covered field. Additionally, a three-layer emissivity model for passive sensing of a vegetation covered soil surface is also developed. The effects of surface roughness, soil moisture contents, and tree parameters on the polarization signatures were investigated.

  13. A wideband photonic microwave phase shifter using polarization-dependent intensity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyu; Sun, Wenhui; Wang, Wenting; Tong, Youwan; Zheng, Jianyu; Yuan, Haiqing; Wang, Xin; Bai, Jinhua; Yu, Lijuan; Liu, Jianguo; Zhu, Ninghua

    2015-12-01

    We present a tunable and wideband microwave photonic phase shifter based on polarization-dependence of the LiNbO3 Mach-Zehender modulator (MZM). In the proposed device, an orthogonal single sideband modulation is implemented by using a MZM and an optical band-pass filter. With the polarizer to synthesize the polarization orthogonal optical carrier and sideband, the phase of the optical microwave signal output from the polarizer can be tuned from 0 to 360° by simply adjusting the polarization direction of the lights whereas the amplitude keeps constant. A full range tunable phase shifting in the frequency range of 10-35 GHz is achieved.

  14. Cosmic Microwave Background B-Mode Polarization Experiment POLARBEAR-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Tomotake; Ade, Peter; Akiba, Yoshiki; Aleman, Christopher; Arnold, Kam; Atlas, Matt; Barron, Darcy; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Dobbs, Matt; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Fabbian, Giulio; Feng, Guangyuan; Gilbert, Adam; Grainger, William; Halverson, Nils; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hattori, Kaori; Hazumi, Masashi; Holzapfel, William; Hori, Yasuto; Inoue, Yuki; Jaehnig, Greg; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Kermish, Zigmund; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Ted; Lee, Adrian; Matsuda, Frederick; Morii, Hideki; Moyerman, Stephanie; Myers, Michael; Navaroli, Marty; Nishino, Haruki; Okamura, Takahiro; Reichart, Christian; Richards, Paul; Ross, Colin; Rotermund, Kaja; Sholl, Michael; Siritanasak, Praween; Smecher, Graeme; Stebor, Nathan; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Aritoki; Takada, Suguru; Takakura, Satoru; Tomaru, Takayuki; Wilson, Brandon; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Zahn, Oliver

    POLARBEAR-2 (PB-2) is a ground-based experiment to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) located at the Atacama desert (5200 m in altitude) in Chile. The science goals of the POLARBEAR-2 are i) to detect or set an upper limit of the inflationary gravitational wave B-mode with the sensitivity of r = 0.01 with 95% C.L. and ii) to measure the weak gravitational lensing B-mode signal and extract the information, such as the sum of neutrino masses with the limit of 90 meV by PB-2 alone and 65 meV by combining PB-2 and Planck at 68% CL. PB-2 observes at the 95 and 150 GHz bands simultaneously using the dichroic dual-polarization antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers together with SQUIDs and the frequency domain multiplexing readout system. The total number of the detectors with the two bands are 7855 that are 6 times more than that of POLARBEAR-1, and the expected focal plane combined statistical sensitivity is 5.7 µK√s with the beam size of 5.2 and3.5 arcmin for the 95 and 150 GHz bands, respectively. The polarization signal is modulated by the sky rotation and the continuously rotating half-wave plate. PB-2 is scheduled to deploy in 2014. The PB-2 receiver will be mounted on the new telescope, which has the same design as the Huan Tran telescope (HTT). We present the overview of PB-2 and discuss the project status.

  15. Microwave Manipulation of Electrically Injected Spin-Polarized Electrons in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C.; Li, J.; Appelbaum, I.; Morton, J. J. L.

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate microwave manipulation of the spin states of electrically injected spin-polarized electrons in silicon. Although the silicon channel is bounded by ferromagnetic metal films, we show that moderate microwave power can be applied to the devices without altering the device operation significantly. Resonant microwave irradiation is used to induce spin rotation of spin-polarized electrons as they travel across a silicon channel, and the resultant spin polarization is subsequently detected by a ferromagnetic Schottky barrier spin detector. These results demonstrate the potential for combining advanced electron spin resonance techniques to complement the study of semiconductor spintronic devices beyond standard magnetotransport measurements.

  16. Circularly Polarized Microwave Antenna Element with Very Low Off-Axis Cross-Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greem. David; DuToit, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to improve off-axis cross-polarization performance and ease of assembly of a circularly polarized microwave antenna element. To ease assembly, the initial design requirement of Hexweb support for the internal circuit part, as well as the radiating disks, was eliminated. There is a need for different plating techniques to improve soldering. It was also desirable to change the design to eliminate soldering as well as the need to use the Hexweb support. Thus, a technique was developed to build the feed without using solder, solving the lathing and soldering issue. Internal parts were strengthened by adding curvature to eliminate Hexweb support, and in the process, the new geometries of the internal parts opened the way for improving the off-axis cross-polarization performance as well. The radiating disks curvatures were increased for increased strength, but it was found that this also improved crosspolarization. Optimization of the curvatures leads to very low off-axis cross-polarization. The feed circuit was curved into a cylinder for improved strength, eliminating Hexweb support. An aperture coupling feed mechanism eliminated the need for feed pins to the disks, which would have required soldering. The aperture coupling technique also improves cross-polarization performance by effectively exciting the radiating disks very close to the antenna s central axis of symmetry. Because of the shape of the parts, it allowed for an all-aluminum design bolted together and assembled with no solder needed. The advantage of a solderless design is that the reliability is higher, with no single-point failure (solder), and no need for special plating techniques in order to solder the unit together. The shapes (curved or round) make for a more robust build without extra support materials, as well as improved offaxis cross-polarization.

  17. New Constraints on Cosmic Polarization Rotation from B-Mode Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Ni, Wei-Tou; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2014-09-01

    SPTpol, POLARBEAR, and BICEP2 have recently measured the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization in various sky regions of several tens of square degrees and obtained BB power spectra in the multipole range 20-3000, detecting the components due to gravitational lensing and to inflationary gravitational waves. We analyze jointly the results of these three experiments and propose modifications to their analyses of the spectra to include in the model, in addition to the gravitational lensing and the inflationary gravitational wave components, and also the effects induced by the cosmic polarization rotation (CPR), if it exists within current upper limits. Although in principle our analysis would also lead to new constraints on CPR, in practice these can only be given on its fluctuations langδα2rang, since constraints on its mean angle are inhibited by the derotation which is applied by current CMB polarization experiments, in order to cope with the insufficient calibration of the polarization angle. The combined data fits from all three experiments (with 29% CPR-SPTpol correlation, depending on the theoretical model) gives the constraint langδα2rang1/2 < 27.3 mrad (1.°56), with r = 0.194 ± 0.033. These results show that the present data are consistent with no CPR detection and the constraint on CPR fluctuation is about 1.°5. This method of constraining the CPR is new, is complementary to previous tests, which use the radio and optical/UV polarization of radio galaxies and the CMB E-mode polarization, and adds a new constraint for the sky areas observed by SPTpol, POLARBEAR, and BICEP2.

  18. New constraints on cosmic polarization rotation from B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Alighieri, Sperello di Serego; Ni, Wei-Tou; Pan, Wei-Ping E-mail: weitou@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    SPTpol, POLARBEAR, and BICEP2 have recently measured the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization in various sky regions of several tens of square degrees and obtained BB power spectra in the multipole range 20-3000, detecting the components due to gravitational lensing and to inflationary gravitational waves. We analyze jointly the results of these three experiments and propose modifications to their analyses of the spectra to include in the model, in addition to the gravitational lensing and the inflationary gravitational wave components, and also the effects induced by the cosmic polarization rotation (CPR), if it exists within current upper limits. Although in principle our analysis would also lead to new constraints on CPR, in practice these can only be given on its fluctuations (δα{sup 2}), since constraints on its mean angle are inhibited by the derotation which is applied by current CMB polarization experiments, in order to cope with the insufficient calibration of the polarization angle. The combined data fits from all three experiments (with 29% CPR-SPTpol correlation, depending on the theoretical model) gives the constraint (δα{sup 2}){sup 1/2} < 27.3 mrad (1.°56), with r = 0.194 ± 0.033. These results show that the present data are consistent with no CPR detection and the constraint on CPR fluctuation is about 1.°5. This method of constraining the CPR is new, is complementary to previous tests, which use the radio and optical/UV polarization of radio galaxies and the CMB E-mode polarization, and adds a new constraint for the sky areas observed by SPTpol, POLARBEAR, and BICEP2.

  19. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) First Year Observations: TE Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Spergel, D. N.; Barnes, C.; Bennett, C. L.; Halpern, M.; Hinshaw, G.; Jarosik, N.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Page, L.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters at frequencies 23, 33, 41, 61, and 94 GHz. We detect correlations between the temperature and polarization maps significant at more than 10 standard deviations. The correlations are inconsistent with instrument noise and are significantly larger than the upper limits established for potential systematic errors. The correlations are present in all WAMP frequency bands with similar amplitude from 23 to 94 GHz, and are consistent with a superposition of a CMB signal with a weak foreground. The fitted CMB component is robust against different data combinations and fitting techniques. On small angular scales (theta less than 5 deg), the WMAP data show the temperature-polarization correlation expected from adiabatic perturbations in the temperature power spectrum. The data for l greater than 20 agree well with the signal predicted solely from the temperature power spectra, with no additional free parameters. We detect excess power on large angular scales (theta greater than 10 deg) compared to predictions based on the temperature power spectra alone. The excess power is well described by reionization at redshift 11 is less than z(sub r) is less than 30 at 95% confidence, depending on the ionization history. A model-independent fit to reionization optical depth yields results consistent with the best-fit ACDM model, with best fit value t = 0.17 +/- 0.04 at 68% confidence, including systematic and foreground uncertainties. This value is larger than expected given the detection of a Gunn-Peterson trough in the absorption spectra of distant quasars, and implies that the universe has a complex ionization history: WMAP has detected the signal from an early epoch of reionization.

  20. FETAL AND MATERNAL EFFECTS OF CONTINUAL EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 970-MHZ CIRCULARLY-POLARIZED MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtually continual exposure to 970-MHz microwaves in circularly-polarized waveguides was used to elicit fetal responses in Sprague-Dawley rats during gestation. wo hundred fifty rats were exposed to microwave radiation at whole-body averaged specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0....

  1. Sea surface wind measurement over offshore wind farm using TerraSAR-X data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Lehner, Susanne; Brusch, Stephan; Ren, Yong-Zheng

    2011-11-01

    A TerraSAR-X Stripmap image over the North Sea shows significant spatial variations of sea surface wind field over the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus. In the present study, we demonstrate the tempting potential of using high resolution SAR to investigate spatial variations of sea surface wind field over the offshore wind farms. A newly developed X-band Geophysical Model Function (GMF) XMOD2 is applied on the TS-X data to retrieve sea surface wind speed. By comparing the TS-X retrieved sea surface wind field to results of the DWD wind field, in situ observations on the FiNO platform, as well as the satellite measurement derived from the polarimetric microwave radiometer WindSat, it is found that the SAR estimated wind field not only agrees well with other measurements, but also presents the fine-scale features of sea surface wind field over the offshore wind farm.

  2. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  3. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  4. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W; Mani, Ramesh G

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  5. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  6. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  7. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Global accuracies and error characteristics of presently orbiting satellite sensors are examined. The workshops are intended to lead to a better understanding of present capabilities for sea surface temperature measurement and to improve measurement concepts for the future. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVHRR and Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer is emphasized. Some data from the High Resolution Infrared Sounder HIRS and AVHRR are also examined. Comparisons of satellite data with ship and eXpendable BathyThermograph XBT measurement show standard deviations in the range 0.5 to 1.3 C with biases of less than 0.4 C, depending on the sensor, ocean region, and spatial/temporal averaging. The Sea Surface Temperature SST anomaly maps show good agreement in some cases, but a number of sensor related problems are identified.

  8. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are now possible using a variety of sensors. The present accuracies of these methods are in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 C. This makes them potentially useful for synoptic studies of ocean currents and for global monitoring of climatological anomalies. To improve confidence in the satellite data, objective evaluations of sensor accuracies are necessary, and the conditions under which these accuracies degrade need to be understood. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on the Nimbus-7 satellite was studied. Sea surface temperatures, derived from November 1979 SMMR data, were compared globally against ship measurements and climatology, using facilities of the JPL Pilot Ocean Data System. Methods for improved data analysis and plans for additional workshops to incorporate data from other sensors were discussed.

  9. Bistatic electromagnetic scattering and detection of pollutant on a sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Helmi; Khenchaf, Ali; Comblet, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    We present the study and analysis of the variations of the bistatic electromagnetic (EM) signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we start with the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we evaluate the EM scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surfaces observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical forward-backward method. The obtained numerical results of the EM scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X, and Ku), and radar polarization.

  10. Bistatic scattering from a contaminated sea surface observed in C, X, and Ku bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, H.; Khenchaf, A.; Comblet, F.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper focuses on the study and analysis of variations of the bistatic electromagnetic signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we will start the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we will evaluate the electromagnetic (EM) scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surface observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical Forward-Backward Method (FBM). The obtained numerical results of the electromagnetic scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion, and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X and Ku) and radar polarization.

  11. Generation of phase-coded microwave signals using a polarization-modulator-based photonic microwave phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    A scheme for the generation of phase-coded microwave signals using an electrically tunable photonic microwave phase shifter is proposed and demonstrated. The photonic phase shifter is based on a single-sideband polarization modulator (PolM), and the tuning of the phase shifter is implemented by a second PolM. By introducing an RF signal to the first PolM and an electrical coding signal to the second PolM, a phase-coded microwave signal with binary phase codes or polyphase codes is achieved. An experiment is performed. The simple and flexible operation, high coding rate, large frequency range, excellent transmission performance, and high stability of the system is confirmed. PMID:23455292

  12. Broadband and wide-angle reflective polarization converter based on metasurface at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linbo; Zhou, Peiheng; Chen, Haiyan; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang

    2015-09-01

    We propose to realize a broadband and wide-angle reflective polarization converter in microwave regions. The proposed converter can convert a linearly polarized (LP) wave to its cross-polarized wave at three resonant frequencies. It can also convert the LP wave to a circularly polarized wave at other two resonant frequencies. Furthermore, the proposed converter can achieve broad bandwidth with incident angle up to 45°. The simulated and measured results are in agreement in the entire frequency regions, and the bandwidth of polarization conversion over 75 % can be obtained from 7.6 to 15.5 GHz under normal incidence and from 7.8 to 13.0 GHz under incident angle of 45°. The surface current distributions of the proposed converter are discussed to analyze the physical mechanism. The converter tolerance to wide angle of incidence and the broad bandwidth could be useful in the range of applications in the microwave regions.

  13. Frequency swept microwaves for hyperfine decoupling and time domain dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Daniel E M; Albert, Brice J; Saliba, Edward P; Scott, Faith J; Choi, Eric J; Mardini, Michael; Barnes, Alexander B

    2015-11-01

    Hyperfine decoupling and pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are promising techniques to improve high field DNP NMR. We explore experimental and theoretical considerations to implement them with magic angle spinning (MAS). Microwave field simulations using the high frequency structural simulator (HFSS) software suite are performed to characterize the inhomogeneous phase independent microwave field throughout a 198GHz MAS DNP probe. Our calculations show that a microwave power input of 17W is required to generate an average EPR nutation frequency of 0.84MHz. We also present a detailed calculation of microwave heating from the HFSS parameters and find that 7.1% of the incident microwave power contributes to dielectric sample heating. Voltage tunable gyrotron oscillators are proposed as a class of frequency agile microwave sources to generate microwave frequency sweeps required for the frequency modulated cross effect, electron spin inversions, and hyperfine decoupling. Electron spin inversions of stable organic radicals are simulated with SPINEVOLUTION using the inhomogeneous microwave fields calculated by HFSS. We calculate an electron spin inversion efficiency of 56% at a spinning frequency of 5kHz. Finally, we demonstrate gyrotron acceleration potentials required to generate swept microwave frequency profiles for the frequency modulated cross effect and electron spin inversions. PMID:26482131

  14. Multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation based on polarization modulation and balanced detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Xu, Weiyuan; Wei, Zhengwu; Pan, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Photonic multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation is proposed and demonstrated based on polarization modulation and balanced detection. Consisting of only a polarization modulator (PolM) driven by an electrical coding data, a polarization beam splitter (PBS) and a balanced photodetector (BPD), the proposed microwave phase coder has no requirement on the wavelength, intensity modulation format, or modulation index of the input optical microwave signal, and allows phase coding of arbitrary-format RF signals, which enables multi-frequency phase coding with compact structure, simple operation, and high flexibility. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed, achieving simultaneous phase coding of 15 and 30 GHz, or 10 and 20 GHz RF signals with a coding rate of 5  Gb/s. PMID:26696170

  15. Resonance overlap criterion for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    1997-01-01

    The threshold for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields is discussed within the classical mechanics framework for high microwave frequencies. The Chirikov resonance overlap criterion predictions are compared with estimates obtained adopting the renormalization method. It is shown that the ionization threshold is highly sensitive to the helicity of microwaves. Among all possible initial electronic orbits, those of medium eccentricity are the first to ionize. The results obtained indicate that collisions with the nucleus play a negligible role for the onset of ionization. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. A microwave trap for sympathetic cooling of polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunseith, Devin; Truppe, Stefan; Hendricks, Richard; Sauer, Ben; Hinds, Edward; Tarbutt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We have been developing techniques to cool molecules into the microkelvin regime. One method is to use sympathetic cooling, using ultracold atoms as a refrigerant to cool molecules. Previous work has suggested that atoms and molecules can be trapped in the antinode of a Fabry­-Pérot microwave cavity. We couple microwave power into this cavity from a rectangular waveguide via a small hole in one mirror. We have developed an analytical model that helps us understand this coupling, and gives us an idea of how the size of the hole affects the cavity's coupling and finesse. We carried out finite-­difference time­-domain simulations and performed experiments on a prototype cavity to verify this model. We have now designed and built this trap for operation under ultra­high vacuum, with the ability to cool the mirrors to 77 K and couple in up to 2 kW of microwave power. This will allow us to trap molecules with a moderate dipole moment at temperatures of hundreds of millikelvin, as well as atoms at a few millikelvin. We will present our work in creating and understanding the microwave trap, as well as our first results demonstrating trapping of lithium atoms in the microwave trap. The authors would like to thank EPSRC for supporting this work.

  17. New satellite record of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-02-01

    Sea surface temperature is one of the key variables scientists track in studying climate changes; it is also important to meteorology and oceanography. Merchant et al. describe a new 20-year record of sea surface temperature. The record was created using infrared imagery from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) as part of the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) project.

  18. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  19. H-atom ionization by elliptically polarized microwave fields: The overlap criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    1997-07-01

    The threshold for H-atom ionization by elliptically polarized microwave fields is discussed within the classical-mechanics framework using the Chirikov overlap criterion. It is shown that the trends observed in the recent experiment [M. R. W. Bellermann {ital et al.} Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 76}, 892 (1996)] are qualitatively reproduced by the theory; the origin of the remaining discrepancy is discussed. Increased stability of some orbits with respect to the perturbation due to the elliptically polarized microwaves has been related to vanishing widths of the corresponding resonance islands. Analytic Chirikov overlap prediction is compared with results of numerical simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Boltzmann hierarchy for the cosmic microwave background at second order including photon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Beneke, M.; Fidler, C.

    2010-09-15

    Non-Gaussianity and B-mode polarization are particularly interesting features of the cosmic microwave background, as--at least in the standard model of cosmology--their only sources to first order in cosmological perturbation theory are primordial, possibly generated during inflation. If the primordial sources are small, the question arises how large is the non-Gaussianity and B-mode background induced in second order from the initially Gaussian and scalar perturbations. In this paper we derive the Boltzmann hierarchy for the microwave background photon phase-space distributions at second order in cosmological perturbation theory including the complete polarization information, providing the basis for further numerical studies. As an aside we note that the second-order collision term contains new sources of B-mode polarization and that no polarization persists in the tight-coupling limit.

  1. Stratospheric Impact of Varying Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Waugh, Darryn; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM) has been run in 50 year simulations with the: 1) 1949-1999 Hadley Centre sea surface temperatures (SST), and 2) a fixed annual cycle of SSTs. In this presentation we first show that the 1949-1999 FVGCM simulation produces a very credible stratosphere in comparison to an NCEP/NCAR reanalysis climatology. In particular, the northern hemisphere has numerous major and minor stratospheric warming, while the southern hemisphere has only a few over the 50-year simulation. During the northern hemisphere winter, temperatures are both warmer in the lower stratosphere and the polar vortex is weaker than is found in the mid-winter southern hemisphere. Mean temperature differences in the lower stratosphere are shown to be small (less than 2 K), and planetary wave forcing is found to be very consistent with the climatology. We then will show the differences between our varying SST simulation and the fixed SST simulation in both the dynamics and in two parameterized trace gases (ozone and methane). In general, differences are found to be small, with subtle changes in planetary wave forcing that lead to reduced temperatures in the SH and increased temperatures in the NH.

  2. Fast polarization changes in mm microwave emission of weak multistructured solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Strauss, F. M.; Costa, J. E. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Circular polarization of weak multistructured solar bursts was measured at mm microwaves with unprecedented sensitivity (0.03 sfu rms) and high time resolution (1ms). It was shown that sudden changes occur in the degree of polarization with time scales of 0.04 to 0.3 s. In most cases the degree of polarization attained maximum values before the maximum flux in both mm microwaves and hard X-rays with time scales of 0.04 to 1.0 s. The timing accuracy in determining the degree of polarization was 40 ms. Physical phenomena are discussed invoking one or a combination of various possible causes for the observed effects. The bursts at mm microwaves were weak compared to the contribution of the preexisting active regions, and therefore the changes in magnetoionic propagation conditions for emerging radiation plays an important role in the observed effects. Composite effects due to more than one polarizing mechanism or more than one polarized spots within the antenna beam are discussed.

  3. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  4. Constraints on CPT violation from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three year polarization data: A wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cabella, Paolo; Silk, Joseph; Natoli, Paolo

    2007-12-15

    We perform a wavelet analysis of the temperature and polarization maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) delivered by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment in search for a parity-violating signal. Such a signal could be seeded by new physics beyond the standard model, for which the Lorentz and CPT symmetries may not hold. Under these circumstances, the linear polarization direction of a CMB photon may get rotated during its cosmological journey, a phenomenon also called cosmological birefringence. Recently, Feng et al. have analyzed a subset of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and BOOMERanG 2003 angular power spectra of the CMB, deriving a constraint that mildly favors a nonzero rotation. By using wavelet transforms we set a tighter limit on the CMB photon rotation angle {delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}3.0 ({delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}6.0) at the one (two) {sigma} level, consistent with a null detection.

  5. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, W Y; Wu, M H; Wu, K L; Lin, M H; Teng, H H; Tsai, Y F; Ko, C C; Yang, E C; Jiang, J A; Barnett, L R; Chu, K R

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system. PMID:25173291

  6. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.

    2014-08-15

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  7. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  8. Problems in determining sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, J. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Anticipated problems for determining ocean dynamics signals from sea surface topography are discussed. The needs for repeated tracks are listed if oceanic tides or ocean turbulence are to be determined.

  9. Aquarius Observations of Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows changes in global sea surface salinity, as measured by NASA’s Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft, from December 2011 through December 2012. Red repr...

  10. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  11. SMOS Sea Surface Salinity Validation in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In November 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched the first soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) satellite, which represented the first use of spaceborne remote sensing tools to probe global sea surface salinity (SSS). The SMOS satellite carries a microwave imaging radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) for detection in the microwave L-band as the only payload. The MIRAS instrument is expected to provide a global SSS distribution with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 km and an accuracy of 0.1-0.2 practical salinity units (psu). The South China Sea is semi-enclosed, and the sea conditions are relatively complex. The suitability of ESA SMOS salinity products for the South China Sea has not been validated. Therefore, using SSS data measured during an expedition in the South China Sea, which was sponsored by China Natural Science Foundation and conducted in the fall of 2011, this paper validated the SSS products released by ESA, which were retrieved using three sea surface roughness models. To analyze the effect of the spatial resolution on the weekly average SMOS SSS distribution, the weekly average salinity data were averaged to reduce the spatial resolution to 0.25 ° x 0.25°. These average data were then compared to the measured data, followed by an analysis of the error variation. In addition, the effects of the orbital track (ascending or descending) on the SSS retrieval were analyzed.

  12. Dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter based on metasurfaces at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yajun; Xia, Song; Shi, Hongyu; Zhang, Anxue; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-06-01

    We present a dual-band and high-efficiency polarization converter in microwave regime. The proposed converter can convert a linearly polarized wave to its cross-polarized wave for two distinct bands: Ku (11.5-20.0 GHz) and Ka (28.8-34.0 GHz). It can also convert the linearly polarized wave to a circularly polarized wave at four other frequencies. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results for both frequency bands. The polarization conversion ratio is above 0.94 for the Ku-band and 0.90 for the Ka-band. Furthermore, the converter can achieve dual-band and high-efficiency polarization conversion over angles of incidence up to 45°. The converter is also polarization-selective in that only the x- and y-polarized waves can be converted. The physical mechanism of the dual-band polarization conversion effect is interpreted via decomposed electric field components that couple with different plasmon resonance modes of the structure.

  13. Simulation of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Fields for AMiBA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Park, Changbom

    2002-06-01

    We have made a topological study of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps by simulating the AMiBA experiment results. A ΛCDM CMB sky is adopted to make mock interferometric observations designed for the AMiBA experiment. CMB polarization fields are reconstructed from the AMiBA mock visibility data using the maximum entropy method. We have also considered effects of Galactic foregrounds on the CMB polarization fields. The genus statistic is calculated from the simulated Q and U polarization maps, where Q and U are Stokes parameters. Our study shows that the Galactic foreground emission, even at low Galactic latitude, is expected to have small effects on the CMB polarization field. Increasing survey area and integration time is essential to detect non-Gaussian signals of cosmological origin through genus measurement.

  14. Fast cosmic microwave background power spectrum estimation of temperature and polarization with Gabor transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Frode K.; Górski, Krzysztof M.

    2003-08-01

    We extend the analysis of Gabor transforms on a cosmic microwave background temperature map to polarization. We study the temperature and polarization power spectra on the cut sky, the so-called pseudo-power spectra. The transformation kernels relating the full-sky polarization power spectra and the polarization pseudo-power spectra are found to be similar to the kernel for the temperature power spectrum. This fact is used to construct a fast power spectrum estimation algorithm using the pseudo-power spectrum of temperature and polarization as data vectors in a maximum-likelihood approach. Using the pseudo-power spectra as input to the likelihood analysis solves the problem of having to invert huge matrices, which makes the standard likelihood approach infeasible.

  15. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. PMID:17280339

  16. Analytical Derivation of the Vegetation Optical Depth from the Microwave Polarization Difference Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meesters, Antoon G. C. A.; DeJeu, Richard A. M.; Owe, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    A numerical solution for the canopy optical depth in an existing microwave-based land surface parameter retrieval model is presented. The optical depth is derived from the microwave polarization difference index and the dielectric constant of the soil. The original procedure used an approximation in the form of a logarithmic decay function to define this relationship, and was derived through a series of lengthy polynomials. These polynomials had to be recalculated when the scattering albedo or antenna incidence angle changes. The new procedure is computationally more efficient and accurate.

  17. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  18. The Application of Aperture Synthesis to the Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Sea surface salinity is measured optimally at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum in order to maximize radiometric sensitivity to changes in salinity. Long wavelengths (e.g. L-band) mean large antennas in space, and because of the technological challenge associated with putting large scanning antennas in orbit, no system currently exists to measure salinity. Aperture synthesis is an interferometric technique to make deployment of large antenna apertures in space feasible. It uses pairs of small antennas and signal processing to achieve the resolution of a single large aperture. Aperture synthesis has been demonstrated successfully for remote sensing by the aircraft prototype radiometer, ESTAR. ESTAR is an L-band instrument which employs aperture synthesis in the cross track dimension. Recent measurements with ESTAR of the fresh water outflow from the Delaware River are in good agreement (about 1 psu) with shipboard thermosalinograph measurements. Synthetic aperture radiometers are currently being developed for remote sensing from space. HYDROSTAR is an instrument for remote sensing from space based on the design of ESTAR. It employs aperture synthesis in one dimension and is being proposed as a pathfinder instrument to make global maps of soil moisture and sea surface salinity and to demonstrate the feasibility of aperture synthesis for remote sensing from space. Instruments which use remote sensing in two dimensions are currently being developed by the European Space Agency. These instruments include additional channels (frequencies and polarizations) and may be able to achieve radiometric sensitivity and spatial resolution to meet the diverse needs of the coastal zone and open ocean oceanographic communities.

  19. An application of new microwave absorption tube in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction of organophosphorus pesticides from fresh vegetable samples.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Xu, Xu; Su, Rui; Zhang, Hanqi; Wang, Ziming

    2012-03-16

    A new self-designed microwave absorption tube was used in microwave-assisted extraction of seven organophosphorus pesticides from four kinds of vegetable samples. The non-polar solvent was used as extraction solvent, and a new portable microwave extraction apparatus was used. By sealing graphite powder in glass tube, microwave absorption tube was made and used to heat samples directly. The extracts were directly analyzed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The effects of some experimental parameters on extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. 3.0 g of sample, 25 mL of hexane and three microwave absorption tubes were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 425 W irradiation power at 70 °C for 8 min. The recoveries were in the range of 76.5-109.4% and the relative standard deviations were lower than 13.1%. PMID:22321952

  20. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response ismore » hardly sensitive to θ.« less

  1. Simultaneous measurements of skin sea surface temperature and sea surface emissivity from a single thermal imagery.

    PubMed

    Yoshimori, Kyu; Tamba, Sumio; Yokoyama, Ryuzo

    2002-08-20

    A novel method, to our knowledge, to measure simultaneously the thermal emissivity and skin temperature of a sea surface has been developed. The proposed method uses an infrared image that includes a sea surface and a reference object located near the surface. By combining this image with sky radiation temperature, we retrieve both skin sea surface temperature and sea surface emissivity from the single infrared image. Because the method requires no knowledge of thermal radiative properties of actual sea surfaces, it can be used even for a contaminated sea surface whose emissivity is hard to determine theoretically, e.g., oil slicks or slicks produced by biological wastes. Experimental results demonstrate that the estimated emissivity agrees with the theoretical prediction and, also, the recovered temperature distribution of skin sea surface has no appreciable high-temperature area that is due to reflection of the reference object. The method allows the acquisition of match-up data of radiometric sea surface temperatures that precisely correspond to the satellite observable data. PMID:12206200

  2. Addressing spin transitions on 209Bi donors in silicon using circularly polarized microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasukawa, T.; Sigillito, A. J.; Rose, B. C.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, donor spin qubits in isotopically enriched 28Si have been intensely studied due to their exceptionally long coherence times. More recently, bismuth donor electron spins have become popular because Bi has a large nuclear spin which gives rise to clock transitions (first-order insensitive to magnetic field noise). At every clock transition there are two nearly degenerate transitions between four distinct states which can be used as a pair of qubits. Here it is experimentally demonstrated that these transitions are excited by microwaves of opposite helicity such that they can be selectively driven by varying microwave polarization. This work uses a combination of a superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) microresonator and a dielectric resonator to flexibly generate arbitrary elliptical polarizations while retaining the high sensitivity of the CPW.

  3. Production of global sea surface temperature fields for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory workshop comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J. E.; Njoku, E. G.; Chelton, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is measured from space by the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), high resolution infrared sounder (HIRS) and VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS). Typical accuracies have been reported from 0.5 C regionally to 2.0 C on a global basis. To evaluate the accuracy of the satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, a series of three workshops was organized to provide uniform data reduction and analysis. The analytical techniques used to intercompare satellite and in situ measurements are described in detail. Selected results showed the overall average rms errors were in the range 0.5-1.0 C.

  4. Neutral Hydrogen Structures Trace Dust Polarization Angle: Implications for Cosmic Microwave Background Foregrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. E.; Hill, J. Colin; Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, M. E.; Babler, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Using high-resolution data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-Hi) survey, we show that linear structure in Galactic neutral hydrogen (Hi) correlates with the magnetic field orientation implied by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission. The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. At high Galactic latitudes, where the Planck data are noise dominated, the Hi data provide an independent constraint on the Galactic magnetic field orientation, and hence the local dust polarization angle. We detect strong cross-correlations between template maps constructed from estimates of dust intensity combined with either Hi-derived angles, starlight polarization angles, or Planck 353 GHz angles. The Hi data thus provide a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B -mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination.

  5. Neutral Hydrogen Structures Trace Dust Polarization Angle: Implications for Cosmic Microwave Background Foregrounds.

    PubMed

    Clark, S E; Hill, J Colin; Peek, J E G; Putman, M E; Babler, B L

    2015-12-11

    Using high-resolution data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-Hi) survey, we show that linear structure in Galactic neutral hydrogen (Hi) correlates with the magnetic field orientation implied by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission. The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. At high Galactic latitudes, where the Planck data are noise dominated, the Hi data provide an independent constraint on the Galactic magnetic field orientation, and hence the local dust polarization angle. We detect strong cross-correlations between template maps constructed from estimates of dust intensity combined with either Hi-derived angles, starlight polarization angles, or Planck 353 GHz angles. The Hi data thus provide a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. PMID:26705622

  6. Phase-space structures and ionization dynamics of the hydrogen atom in elliptically polarized microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchekinova, E.; Chandre, C.; Uzer, T.

    2006-10-01

    The multiphoton ionization of hydrogen atoms in a strong elliptically polarized microwave field exhibits complex features that are not observed for ionization in circular and linear polarized fields. Experimental data reveal high sensitivity of ionization dynamics to the small changes of the field polarization. The multidimensional nature of the problem makes widely used diagnostics of dynamics, such as Poincaré surfaces of section, impractical. We analyze the phase-space dynamics using the finite time stability analysis rendered by the fast Lyapunov indicators technique. The concept of zero-velocity surface is used to initialize the calculations and visualize the dynamics. Our analysis provides stability maps calculated for the initial energy at the maximum and below the saddle of the zero-velocity surface. We estimate qualitatively the dependence of ionization thresholds on the parameters of the applied field, such as polarization and scaled amplitude.

  7. Polarization conversion from a thin cavity array in the microwave regime

    PubMed Central

    Tremain, B.; Rance, H. J.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Linearly polarized microwave radiation is shown to have its plane of polarization converted to the orthogonal state upon reflection from an ultrathin (λ/25) cavity array. The structure benefits from an uncomplicated design consisting of a metallic grating closely separated from a ground plane by a dielectric spacer. A single set of periodically spaced slits (monograting) exhibits polarization conversion when the normally incident electric field is aligned at 45° to the slits. Two orthogonal sets of slits (bigrating) allows this narrow-band effect to be broadened when the two orthogonal resonances are separated in frequency. We optimise the design and experimentally demonstrate near loss-less polarization conversion (95% of the incident intensity) across a 3.1 GHz frequency band. Finally, we study the dependence of the structure's performance on incident angle and slit width. PMID:25797210

  8. Microwave Polarized Signatures Generated within Cloud Systems: SSM/I Observations Interpreted with Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Pardo, Juan R.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rossow, Willaim B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) observations in cloud systems are studied over the tropics. Over optically thick cloud systems, presence of polarized signatures at 37 and 85 GHz is evidenced and analyzed with the help of cloud top temperature and optical thickness extracted from visible and IR satellite observations. Scattering signatures at 85 GHz (TbV(85) less than or = 250 K) are associated with polarization differences greater than or = 6 K, approx. 50%, of the time over ocean and approx. 40% over land. In addition. over thick clouds the polarization difference at 37 GHz is rarely negligible. The polarization differences at 37 and 85 GHz do not stem from the surface but are generated in regions of relatively homogeneous clouds having high liquid water content. To interpret the observations, a radiative transfer model that includes the scattering by non-spherical particles is developed. based on the T-matrix approach and using the doubling and adding method. In addition to handling randomly and perfectly oriented particles, this model can also simulate the effect of partial orientation of the hydrometeors. Microwave brightness temperatures are simulated at SSM/I frequencies and are compared with the observations. Polarization differences of approx. 2 K can be simulated at 37 GHz over a rain layer, even using spherical drops. The polarization difference is larger for oriented non-spherical particles. The 85 GHz simulations are very sensitive to the ice phase of the cloud. Simulations with spherical particles or with randomly oriented non-spherical ice particles cannot replicate the observed polarization differences. However, with partially oriented non-spherical particles, the observed polarized signatures at 85 GHz are explained, and the sensitivity of the scattering characteristics to the particle size, asphericity, and orientation is analyzed. Implications on rain and ice retrievals are discussed.

  9. Characteristics of 13.9 GHz radar scattering from oil films on the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Croswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft microwave scatterometer measurements are presented, which were made in 1979 as part of a project to study the response of a number of active and passive microwave and optical remote sensors to an oil-covered sea surface conducted by NASA Langley Research Center. A 13.9-GHz Doppler scatterometer with a fan beam antenna and coherent detection was used to measure radar backscatter as a function of incidence angle. The radar scattering signature of the clear surface and signatures of the surface covered with various crude oil films are compared. Reductions in Ku band microwave backscatter up to 14 dB are observed for both treated and untreated LaRosa and Murban crude oil films deposited on the sea surface. Maximum Ku band sensitivity to the effects of the oil in terms of differential scatter is observed in the 25-35 deg incidence angle region.

  10. A microwave satellite water vapour column retrieval for polar winter conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perro, Christopher; Lesins, Glen; Duck, Thomas J.; Cadeddu, Maria

    2016-05-01

    A new microwave satellite water vapour retrieval for the polar winter atmosphere is presented. The retrieval builds on the work of Miao et al. (2001) and Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), employing auxiliary information for atmospheric conditions and numerical optimization. It was tested using simulated and actual measurements from the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) satellite instruments. Ground truth was provided by the G-band vapour radiometer (GVR) at Barrow, Alaska. For water vapour columns less than 6 kg m-2, comparisons between the retrieval and GVR result in a root mean square (RMS) deviation of 0.39 kg m-2 and a systematic bias of 0.08 kg m-2. These results are compared with RMS deviations and biases at Barrow for the retrieval of Melsheimer and Heygster (2008), the AIRS and MIRS satellite data products, and the ERA-Interim, NCEP, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses. When applied to MHS measurements, the new retrieval produces a smaller RMS deviation and bias than for the earlier retrieval and satellite data products. The RMS deviations for the new retrieval were comparable to those for the ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and ASR reanalyses; however, the MHS retrievals have much finer horizontal resolution (15 km at nadir) and reveal more structure. The new retrieval can be used to obtain pan-Arctic maps of water vapour columns of unprecedented quality. It may also be applied to measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave/Temperature 2 (SSM/T2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit B (AMSU-B), Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS), Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and Chinese MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) instruments.

  11. Dielectric properties measurement method in the microwave frequencies range for non-polar/polar liquid mixtures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Ienciu, M.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Fourel, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a method based on dielectric properties measurements over a large spectrum of frequencies, in the microwave (MW) domain, in order to characterize a liquid mixture. The liquid mixtures consist of non-polar fluids (silicone oil, diesel fuel) and polar additives, in order to increase the specific MW absorption of the mixture for further MW power processing. We have measured the MW specific absorptions for mixtures of silicone oil with 20% and 30% (w/w) isopropanol. In both cases, the mixtures are sufficiently stable over time to allow further studies of thermal convection dynamics initiated by MW heating. For a mixture of diesel fuel with 10% (w/w) alkyl polyglycoside, the main observation was that its MW specific absorption varies over time after the mechanical mixing process.

  12. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B(1S)) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B(1S) field is 13μT/W(1/2), where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5W the corresponding value is γ(S)B(1S)=0.84MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement (ϵ) vs. ω(1S)/(2π) for a sample of (13)C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment. PMID:21382733

  13. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B 1 S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B 1 S field is 13 μT/W 1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γSB 1 S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement ( ɛ) vs. ω1 S/(2 π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  14. Microwave Field Distribution in a Magic Angle Spinning Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Probe

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B1S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B1S field is 13µT/W1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γ SB1S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement (ε) vs. ω1S/(2π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment. PMID:21382733

  15. Sea surface and remotely sensed temperatures off Cape Mendocino, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Arvesen, J. C.; Frydenlund, D.; Myers, J. S.; Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    During September 3 to 5, 1979, a multisensor oceanographic experiment was conducted off Cape Mendocino, California. The purpose of this experiment was to validate the use of remote sensing techniques over an area along the U.S. west coast where coasted upwelling is known to be intense. Remotely sensed mutlispectral data, including thermal infrared imagery, were collected above an upwelling feature off Cape Mendocino. Data were acquired from the TIRNOS-N and NOAA-6 polar orbiting satellites, the NASA Ames Research Center's high altitude U-2 aircraft, and a U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft. Supporting surface truth data over the same feature were collected aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, OCEANOGRAPHER. Atmospheric soundings were also taken aboard the ship. The results indicate that shipboard measurements of sea surface temperatures can be reproduction within 1 C or better through remote observation of absolute infrared radiance values (whether measured aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellite, the U-2 aircraft, or the Coast Guard aircraft) by using appropriate atmospheric corrections. Also, the patterns of sea surface temperature which were derived independently from the various remote platforms provide a consistent interpretation of the surface temperature field.

  16. Systematic Effects in Polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometers for Cosmic Microwave Background Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Peter C.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan; Tucker, Gregory S.

    2015-11-01

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  17. Optically controlled microwave phase shifter based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Sun, Wen Hui; Wang, Wen Ting; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-06-01

    This Letter reports an optically controlled microwave phase shifter with an ultra-wideband working bandwidth and a full 360° phase shifting range based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). A continuous wave probe light is modulated by a polarization modulator (PolM) that is driven by a microwave signal to be phase shifted. The optical carrier and the first-order sidebands of the probe light experience different phase shifts due to the NPR induced by the control light in the HNLF. An optical bandpass filter is used to realize single-sideband modulation of the probe light by removing one of the first-order sidebands, as well as to reject the control light. After detecting by a photodetector, the phase of the recovered microwave signal is continuously tunable by adjusting the power of the control light. The proposed approach is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. A full 360° tunable phase shift is realized over an ultra-wideband frequency range from 8 to 38 GHz when the power of the control light is tuned from 0 to 570 mW. PMID:24876035

  18. Implementation of a widely tunable microwave signal generator based on dual-polarization fiber grating laser.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiang; Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the implementation of a widely tunable microwave signal generator based on a dual-polarization fiber grating laser. The laser contains two strong, wavelength-matched Bragg gratings photoinscribed in an Er-doped fiber and emits two polarization modes when pumped with a 980 nm laser diode. By beating the two modes, a microwave signal with a signal-to-noise ratio over 60 dB can be obtained. For a free running laser the fluctuations in intensity and frequency of the microwave signal are ±1  dB and ±5  kHz, respectively, and the noise level is about -40  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz. The frequency can be continuously tuned from 1.8 to 15.1 GHz, by transversely loading the laser cavity and changing the intracavity birefringence by use of a piezoelectric transducer-based mechanical device. The measured response time rate of tuning is about 90 MHz/μs and the intensity fluctuation at different frequencies is less than ±1.5  dB. The frequency fluctuation under loading is controlled within 1 MHz by introducing an electrical feedback. PMID:25967802

  19. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1989-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T(sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  20. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  1. Circularly polarized microwaves for magnetic resonance study in the GHz range: Application to nitrogen-vacancy in diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mrózek, M. Rudnicki, D. S.; Gawlik, W.; Mlynarczyk, J.

    2015-07-06

    The ability to create time-dependent magnetic fields of controlled polarization is essential for many experiments with magnetic resonance. We describe a microstrip circuit that allows us to generate strong magnetic field at microwave frequencies with arbitrary adjusted polarization. The circuit performance is demonstrated by applying it to an optically detected magnetic resonance and Rabi nutation experiments in nitrogen-vacancy color centers in diamond. Thanks to high efficiency of the proposed microstrip circuit and degree of circular polarization of 85%; it is possible to address the specific spin states of a diamond sample using a low power microwave generator. The circuit may be applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance experiments with a well-controlled polarization of microwaves.

  2. Satellite Altimetric Mappings of Arctic Sea Surface Topography: An Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, D. C.; Farrell, S. L.; Laxon, S. W.; Zwally, H. J.; Yi, D.; Coakley, B.; Cochran, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Increasingly precise mappings of sea surface topography (SST) in the Arctic Ocean are being derived from near-polar satellite altimeters such as the laser system - Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) - onboard NASA's ICESat and the radar systems onboard ESA's ERS-2 and Envisat. These mappings of sea surface topography (SST) have important oceanographic and geodetic applications. For example, because the geoid does conform closely to sea surface topography we can use altimetric SST measurements to estimate gravity (e.g., see the ARCtic Satellite-only (ARCS) field, McAdoo et al. 2008) particularly in regions lacking "true" surface gravity observations. Also, by differencing mappings of mean SST with a gravimetric geoid - particularly a geoid underpinned by a GRACE mean field model - we can estimate the dynamic ocean topography (DOT) and circulation of the Arctic Ocean. However, accurate estimates of DOT (e.g. accuracies better than a decimeter) require that we have very precise knowledge of the geoid and mean SST. Comparing a mean SST derived from ICESat/GLAS data spanning several years with a corresponding mean SST derived from ERS-2 data reveals short- wavelength differences or discrepancies of order 40 - 60 cm in certain areas of the Arctic Ocean such as the Chukchi Borderland. In order to attribute a portion of these discrepancies to laser or radar altimeter measurement error, we convert these mean SST fields to equivalent gravity fields and compare with gravity observations from several of the unclassified SCICEX/U.S. Navy submarine cruises (Edwards and Coakley, 2003; http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/SCICEX/ ). This comparison enables us to quantify short-wavelength errors in both laser and radar altimetric mean SST models.

  3. The meteorological effects on microwave apparent temperatures looking downward over a smooth sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of clouds and rain on microwave apparent temperatures for a flat sea surface are examined. The presence of clouds and rain can be expressed as a change of absorption coefficient and the total absorption is computed as the sum of individual effects. Various cloud and rain models proposed by meteorologists are employed to compute the microwave apparent temperature when viewing downward through these model atmospheres. It is shown that stratus, cumulus, overcast, and rain all contribute significantly to the observed temperature. Larger sensitivities to clouds and rain are observed for horizontally polarized apparent temperature at large nadir angles than for vertically polarized apparent temperature.

  4. Multiresolution internal template cleaning: an application to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-yr polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Cobos, R.; Vielva, P.; Barreiro, R. B.; Martínez-González, E.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation data obtained by different experiments contain, besides the desired signal, a superposition of microwave sky contributions. Using a wavelet decomposition on the sphere, we present a fast and robust method to recover the CMB signal from microwave maps. We present an application to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) polarization data, which shows its good performance, particularly in very polluted regions of the sky. The applied wavelet has the advantages that it requires little computational time in its calculations, it is adapted to the HEALPIX pixelization scheme and it offers the possibility of multiresolution analysis. The decomposition is implemented as part of a fully internal template fitting method, minimizing the variance of the resulting map at each scale. Using a χ2 characterization of the noise, we find that the residuals of the cleaned maps are compatible with those expected from the instrumental noise. The maps are also comparable to those obtained from the WMAP team, but in our case we do not make use of external data sets. In addition, at low resolution, our cleaned maps present a lower level of noise. The E-mode power spectrum ? is computed at high and low resolutions, and a cross-power spectrum ? is also calculated from the foreground reduced maps of temperature given by WMAP and our cleaned maps of polarization at high resolution. These spectra are consistent with the power spectra supplied by the WMAP team. We detect the E-mode acoustic peak at ℓ˜ 400, as predicted by the standard ΛCDM model. The B-mode power spectrum ? is compatible with zero.

  5. Low-Temperature Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 9.4 Tesla With a 30 Milliwatt Microwave Source

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can provide large signal enhancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by transfer of polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins. We discuss several aspects of DNP experiments at 9.4 Tesla (400 MHz resonant frequency for 1H, 264 GHz for electron spins in organic radicals) in the 7–80 K temperature range, using a 30 mW, frequency-tunable microwave source and a quasi-optical microwave bridge for polarization control and low-loss microwave transmission. In experiments on frozen glycerol/water doped with nitroxide radicals, DNP signal enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed (relative to 1H NMR signals with thermal equilibrium spin polarization). The largest sensitivity enhancements are observed with a new triradical dopant, DOTOPA-TEMPO. Field modulation with a 10 G root-mean-squared amplitude during DNP increases the nuclear spin polarizations by up to 135%. Dependencies of 1H NMR signal amplitudes, nuclear spin relaxation times, and DNP build-up times on the dopant and its concentration, temperature, microwave power, and modulation frequency are reported and discussed. The benefits of low-temperature DNP can be dramatic: the 1H spin polarization is increased approximately 1000-fold at 7 K with DNP, relative to thermal polarization at 80 K. PMID:20392658

  6. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization at 9.4 T with a 30 mW microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can provide large signal enhancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by transfer of polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins. We discuss several aspects of DNP experiments at 9.4 T (400 MHz resonant frequency for 1H, 264 GHz for electron spins in organic radicals) in the 7-80 K temperature range, using a 30 mW, frequency-tunable microwave source and a quasi-optical microwave bridge for polarization control and low-loss microwave transmission. In experiments on frozen glycerol/water doped with nitroxide radicals, DNP signal enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed (relative to 1H NMR signals with thermal equilibrium spin polarization). The largest sensitivity enhancements are observed with a new triradical dopant, DOTOPA-TEMPO. Field modulation with a 10 G root-mean-squared amplitude during DNP increases the nuclear spin polarizations by up to 135%. Dependencies of 1H NMR signal amplitudes, nuclear spin relaxation times, and DNP build-up times on the dopant and its concentration, temperature, microwave power, and modulation frequency are reported and discussed. The benefits of low-temperature DNP can be dramatic: the 1H spin polarization is increased approximately 1000-fold at 7 K with DNP, relative to thermal polarization at 80 K.

  7. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation over Oil-Covered Sea Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Jin, Wei; Guo, Li-Xin

    2012-07-01

    An exhaustive analysis of electromagnetic wave propagation over an oil-covered sea surface in an evaporation duct environment is studied in comparison with those of the oil-free sea surface. Instead of using the traditional rms height formula, which only considers the oil-free sea surface, we reduce the rms height of a one-dimensional oil-covered sea surface based on the Pierson-Moskowitz sea spectrum. Then, the electromagnetic wave propagation over the oil-covered sea surface in an evaporation duct environment with different wind speeds and frequencies is discussed by the parabolic equation for a fully oil-covered sea surface. In addition, the influence of the fractional filling factor on the electromagnetic wave propagation over non-fully oil-covered sea surface is also investigated. The results show that the oil film can reduce the sea surface roughness and strengthen the trapping effect in an evaporation duct environment.

  8. Degree-scale Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Measurements from Three Years of BICEP1 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkats, D.; Aikin, R.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kovac, J. M.; Su, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Bierman, E. M.; Bock, J. J.; Chiang, H. C.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Nguyen, H. T.; Ponthieu, N.; Pryke, C.; Richter, S.; Rocha, G.; Sheehy, C.; Kernasovskiy, S. S.; Takahashi, Y. D.; Tolan, J. E.; Yoon, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    BICEP1 is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed specifically to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at degree angular scales. We present results from an analysis of the data acquired during three seasons of observations at the South Pole (2006-2008). This work extends the two-year result published in Chiang et al., with additional data from the third season and relaxed detector-selection criteria. This analysis also introduces a more comprehensive estimation of band power window functions, improved likelihood estimation methods, and a new technique for deprojecting monopole temperature-to-polarization leakage that reduces this class of systematic uncertainty to a negligible level. We present maps of temperature, E- and B-mode polarization, and their associated angular power spectra. The improvement in the map noise level and polarization spectra error bars are consistent with the 52% increase in integration time relative to Chiang et al. We confirm both self-consistency of the polarization data and consistency with the two-year results. We measure the angular power spectra at 21 <= l <= 335 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with Lambda cold dark matter cosmology, with the first acoustic peak of the EE spectrum now detected at 15σ. The BB spectrum remains consistent with zero. From B-modes only, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 0.03^{+0.27}_{-0.23}, or r < 0.70 at 95% confidence level.

  9. MEASUREMENT OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA FROM TWO YEARS OF BICEP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H. C.; Barkats, D.; Bock, J. J.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Bierman, E. M.; Keating, B. G.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.

    2010-03-10

    Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) is a bolometric polarimeter designed to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. During three seasons of observing at the South Pole (2006 through 2008), BICEP mapped {approx}2% of the sky chosen to be uniquely clean of polarized foreground emission. Here, we present initial results derived from a subset of the data acquired during the first two years. We present maps of temperature, Stokes Q and U, E and B modes, and associated angular power spectra. We demonstrate that the polarization data are self-consistent by performing a series of jackknife tests. We study potential systematic errors in detail and show that they are sub-dominant to the statistical errors. We measure the E-mode angular power spectrum with high precision at 21 <= l <= 335, detecting for the first time the peak expected at l {approx} 140. The measured E-mode spectrum is consistent with expectations from a LAMBDACDM model, and the B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero. The tensor-to-scalar ratio derived from the B-mode spectrum is r = 0.02{sup +0.31}{sub -0.26}, or r < 0.72 at 95% confidence, the first meaningful constraint on the inflationary gravitational wave background to come directly from CMB B-mode polarization.

  10. Cosmic 21 cm delensing of microwave background polarization and the minimum detectable energy scale of inflation.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Kris; Cooray, Asantha

    2005-11-18

    We propose a new method for removing gravitational lensing from maps of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization anisotropies. Using observations of anisotropies or structures in the cosmic 21 cm radiation, emitted or absorbed by neutral hydrogen atoms at redshifts 10 to 200, the CMB can be delensed. We find this method could allow CMB experiments to have increased sensitivity to a background of inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs) compared to methods relying on the CMB alone and may constrain models of inflation which were heretofore considered to have undetectable IGW amplitudes. PMID:16384131

  11. Efficient decomposition of cosmic microwave background polarization maps into pure E, pure B, and ambiguous components

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Emory F.

    2011-04-15

    Separation of the B component of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization map from the much larger E component is an essential step in CMB polarimetry. For a map with incomplete sky coverage, this separation is necessarily hampered by the presence of ambiguous modes which could be either E or B modes. I present an efficient pixel-space algorithm for removing the ambiguous modes and separating the map into pure E and B components. The method, which works for arbitrary geometries, does not involve generating a complete basis of such modes and scales the cube of the number of pixels on the boundary of the map.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9T using a novel 250 Gyrotron microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-12-01

    In the 1990's we initiated development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources with the goal of performing dynamic nuclear polarization at magnetic fields (˜5-23 T) used in contemporary NMR experiments. This article describes the motivation for these efforts and the developments that led to the operation of a gyrotron source for DNP operating at 250 GHz. We also mention results obtained with this instrument that would have been otherwise impossible absent the increased sensitivity. Finally, we describe recent efforts that have extended DNP to 460 GHz and 700 MHz 1H frequencies.

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9T using a novel 250 gyrotron microwave source.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Robert G

    2011-12-01

    In the 1990's we initiated development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources with the goal of performing dynamic nuclear polarization at magnetic fields (∼5-23 T) used in contemporary NMR experiments. This article describes the motivation for these efforts and the developments that led to the operation of a gyrotron source for DNP operating at 250 GHz. We also mention results obtained with this instrument that would have been otherwise impossible absent the increased sensitivity. Finally, we describe recent efforts that have extended DNP to 460 GHz and 700 MHz (1)H frequencies. PMID:22152359

  14. Twentieth-Century Sea Surface Temperature Trends

    PubMed

    Cane; Clement; Kaplan; Kushnir; Pozdnyakov; Seager; Zebiak; Murtugudde

    1997-02-14

    An analysis of historical sea surface temperatures provides evidence for global warming since 1900, in line with land-based analyses of global temperature trends, and also shows that over the same period, the eastern equatorial Pacific cooled and the zonal sea surface temperature gradient strengthened. Recent theoretical studies have predicted such a pattern as a response of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system to an exogenous heating of the tropical atmosphere. This pattern, however, is not reproduced by the complex ocean-atmosphere circulation models currently used to simulate the climatic response to increased greenhouse gases. Its presence is likely to lessen the mean 20th-century global temperature change in model simulations. PMID:9020074

  15. Ocean backscatter across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, S.V.; Li, F.K.

    1997-06-01

    Ocean backscatter was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the airborne NUSCAT K{sub u}-band scatterometer, across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991. Backscatter across the front between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration experimental coastal buoy A (44024) on the cold side and Discus C buoy (44023) on the warm side shows a difference of more than 5 dB for vertical polarization in many cases. This large frontal backscatter change is observed in all upwind, downwind, and crosswind directions. The sea surface temperature difference measured by the buoys was about 9{degrees}C. The corresponding difference in wind speed cannot account for the large backscatter change in view of geophysical model functions depending only on neutral wind velocity such as SASS. The measured backscatter also has larger upwind-downwind and upwind-crosswind ratios compared to the model results. Furthermore, NUSCAT data reveal that upwind backscatter on the cold side was smaller than or close to crosswind backscatter on the warm side for incidence angles between 30{degrees} to 50{degrees}. This suggests that the temperature front can be detected by the scatterometer at these incidence angles for different wind directions in the cold and warm sides.

  16. Global mean sea surface based upon SEASAT altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A global mean sea surface based upon the SEASAT altimeter data was derived. A combination of crossing arc techniques, accurate SEASAT reference orbits, and a previously computed GOES-3/SEASAT mean sea surface were used in the computation process. This mean sea surface provides a basis for the determination of global ocean circulation patterns and for detailed analysis of the Earth's internal structure. A contour map of the global mean sea surface is presented.

  17. Precise orbit computation and sea surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakker, Karel F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Rummel, R.; Vermaat, E.; Deruijter, W. P. M.; Vandermade, J. W.; Zimmerman, J. T. F.

    1991-01-01

    The research project described below is part of a long-term program at Delft University of Technology aiming at the application of European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1) and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements for geophysical purposes. This program started in 1980 with the processing of Seasat laser range and altimeter height measurements and concentrates today on the analysis of Geosat altimeter data. The objectives of the TOPEX/POSEIDON research project are the tracking of the satellite by the Dutch mobile laser tracking system MTLRS-2, the computation of precise TOPEX/POSEIDON orbits, the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of the orbit errors, the improvement of ERS-1 orbits through the information obtained from the altimeter crossover difference residuals for crossing ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON tracks, the combination of ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data into a single high-precision data set, and the application of this data set to model the sea surface. The latter application will focus on the determination of detailed regional mean sea surfaces, sea surface variability, ocean topography, and ocean currents in the North Atlantic, the North Sea, the seas around Indonesia, the West Pacific, and the oceans around South Africa.

  18. Evaluation of the potential of one to three SEASAT-SMMR channels in retrieving sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, P. C.; Kniffen, S.

    1982-01-01

    The scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) aboard the SEASAT satellite measured emitted radiation in both horizontal and vertical polarizations at microwave frequencies of 6.6, 10.69, 18.0, 21.0 and 37.0 GHz. Retrieval algorithms, for sea surface temperature (SST) determination, from subsets of one to three SMMR channels are obtained by a two step statistical technique. The technique first selects the best subsets of a given size defined by an R2 criterion (coefficient of determination), of a given size by the application of an efficient 'leaps and bounds' technique on a statistical data base. It then performs a regression analysis on the selected subsets. The statistical data base employed a large (600) set of seasonally and geographically diverse atmospheric and surface parameters for radiative transfer calculations. The results of the study of one to three channel subset retrieval algorithms indicate the possibility of using 6.6V, 6.6H and 18V channels for SST determination from SEASAT-SMMR data.

  19. On the influence of resonant scattering on cosmic microwave background polarization anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2007-10-01

    We implement the theory of resonant scattering in the context of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization anisotropies. We compute the changes in the E-mode polarization (EE) and temperature E-mode (TE) CMB power spectra introduced by the scattering on a resonant transition with a given optical depth τX and polarization coefficient E1. The latter parameter, accounting for how anisotropic the scattering is, depends on the exchange of angular momentum in the transition, enabling observational discrimination between different resonances. We use this formalism in two different scenarios: cosmological recombination and cosmological re-ionization. In the context of cosmological recombination, we compute predictions in frequency and multipole space for the change in the TE and EE power spectra introduced by scattering on the Hα and Pα lines of hydrogen. This constitutes a fundamental test of the standard model of recombination, and the sensitivity it requires is comparable to that needed in measuring the primordial CMB B-mode polarization component. In the context of re-ionization, we study the scattering off metals and ions produced by the first stars, and find that polarization anisotropies, apart from providing a consistency test for intensity measurements, give some insight on how re-ionization evolved. Since polarization anisotropies have memory of how anisotropic the line scattering is, they should be able to discern the OI 63.2-μm transition from other possible transitions associated to OIII, NII, NIII, etc. The amplitude of these signals are, however, between 10 and 100 times below the (already challenging) level of CMB B-mode polarization anisotropies.

  20. W-band dual-polarization receiver for array of microwave background anisotropy (AMiBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Chen, Ming-Tang; Jiang, Homing; Chu, Tah-Hsiung; Hsieh, Sun-Nieng; Han, Chi-Chian; Patt, Ferdinand; Ho, West; Huang, Yau-Der; Wilson, Warwick

    2004-10-01

    This is to report on our development for a dual-polarization receiver to detect the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in 85 to 105 GHz band. The receiver is based on a MMIC, HEMT-based LNA developed in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A W-band, orthomode transducer (OMT) is used for polarization separation. Most of the RF front-end is located in cryogenics environment at 20K. We have developed a MMIC sub-harmonically pumped diode mixer, operating at 42 GHz, for signal down-conversion. The entire base-band, 2 to 18 GHz, is correlated in a lag-correlator system. The receiver design details and the lab test results will be described in this report.

  1. Microwave maps of the polar ice of the earth. [from Nimbus-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, T. C.; Nordberg, W.; Campbell, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Synoptic views of the entire polar regions of earth were obtained free of the usual persistent cloud cover using a scanning microwave radiometer operating at a wavelength of 1.55 cm on board the Nimbus-5 satellite. Three different views at each pole are presented utilizing data obtained at approximately one-month intervals during the winter of 1972-1973. The major discoveries resulting from an analysis of these data are as follows: (1) Large discrepancies exist between the climatic norm ice cover depicted in various atlases and the actual extent of the canopies. (2) The distribution of multiyear ice in the north polar region is markedly different from that predicted by existing ice dynamics models. (3) Irregularities in the edge of the Antarctic sea ice pack occur that have neither been observed previously nor anticipated. (4) The brightness temperatures of the Greenland and Antarctica glaciers show interesting contours probably related to the ice and snow morphologic structure.

  2. BAYESIAN INFERENCE OF POLARIZED COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRA FROM INTERFEROMETRIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S.; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Le; Timbie, Peter; Bunn, Emory F.

    2013-01-15

    Detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is one of the frontiers of observational cosmology. Because they are an order of magnitude fainter than E-modes, it is quite a challenge to detect B-modes. Having more manageable systematics, interferometers prove to have a substantial advantage over imagers in detecting such faint signals. Here, we present a method for Bayesian inference of power spectra and signal reconstruction from interferometric data of the CMB polarization signal by using the technique of Gibbs sampling. We demonstrate the validity of the method in the flat-sky approximation for a simulation of an interferometric observation on a finite patch with incomplete uv-plane coverage, a finite beam size, and a realistic noise model. With a computational complexity of O(n {sup 3/2}), n being the data size, Gibbs sampling provides an efficient method for analyzing upcoming cosmology observations.

  3. Cosmic birefringence fluctuations and cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seokcheon; Liu, Guo-Chin; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2015-06-01

    Recently, BICEP2 measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization has indicated the presence of primordial gravitational waves at degree angular scales, inferring the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.2 and a running scalar spectral index, provided that dust contamination is low. In this Letter, we show that the existence of the fluctuations of cosmological birefringence can give rise to CMB B-mode polarization that fits BICEP2 data with r < 0.11 and no running of the scalar spectral index. When dust contribution is taken into account, we derive an upper limit on the cosmological birefringence, Aβ2 < 0.0075, where A is the amplitude of birefringence fluctuations that couple to electromagnetism with a coupling strength β.

  4. Synthesis of passive microwave and radar altimeter data for estimating accumulation rates of polar snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we compare dry-snow extinction coefficients derived from radar altimeter data with brightness temperature data from passive microwave measurements over a portion of the East Antarctic plateau. The comparison between the extinction coefficients and the brightness temperatures shows a strong negative correlation, where the correlation coefficients ranged from -0.87 to -0.95. The extinction coefficient of the dry polar snow decreases with increasing surface elevation, while the average brightness temperature increases with surface elevation. Our analysis shows that the observed trends are related to geographic variations in scattering coefficient of snow, which in turn are controlled by variations in surface temperature and snow accumulation rate. By combining information present in the extinction coefficient and brightness temperature data sets, we develop a model that can be used to obtain quantitative estimates of the accumulation rate of dry polar snow.

  5. Evolution of the linear-polarization-angle-dependence of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations with microwave power

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-11-10

    We examine the role of the microwave power in the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system. The diagonal resistance R{sub xx} was measured at the fixed magnetic fields of the photo-excited oscillatory extrema of R{sub xx} as a function of both the microwave power, P, and the linear polarization angle, θ. Color contour plots of such measurements demonstrate the evolution of the lineshape of R{sub xx} versus θ with increasing microwave power. We report that the non-linear power dependence of the amplitude of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations distorts the cosine-square relation between R{sub xx} and θ at high power.

  6. Investigation on the GPS single scattering from a 2-D largescale sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiwen; Guo, Lixin

    2014-05-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) signals reflected from the ocean surface can be used for various remote sensing purposes. In this paper, we develop a facet model to simulate the received GPS single from a 2-D largescale sea surface. In this model, the sea surface is envisaged as a two-scale profile on which the long waves are locally approximated by planar facets. The microscopic profile within a facet is assumed to be represented by a set of sinusoidal ripple patches. The complex reflective function of each modified facet is evaluated by a modified formula of the original Bass and Fuks' two-scale model, in which the phase factor of each facet is with the capillary wave modification. The scattering field and the bistatic scattering coefficient of facet model is derived in detail. With received GPS single, we give a detail analysis of the polarization property, the scattering property of GPS scattering signal over the sea surface.

  7. Extraction of Water from Polar Lunar Permafrost with Microwaves - Dielectric Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing indicates the presence of hydrogen rich regions associated with the lunar poles. The logical hypothesis is that there is cryogenically trapped water ice located in craters at the lunar poles. Some of the craters have been in permanent darkness for a billion years. The presence of water at the poles as well as other scientific advantages of a polar base, have influenced NASA plans for the lunar outpost. The lunar outpost has water and oxygen requirements on the order of 1 ton per year scaling up to as much as 10 tons per year. Microwave heating of the frozen permafrost has unique advantages for water extraction. Proof of principle experiments have successfully demonstrated that microwaves will couple to the cryogenic soil in a vacuum and the sublimed water vapor can be successfully captured on a cold trap. The dielectric properties of lunar soil will determine the hardware requirements for extraction processes. Microwave frequency dielectric property measurements of lunar soil simulant have been measured.

  8. Monte Carlo Calculations of Polarized Microwave Radiation Emerging from Cloud Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Roberti, Laura

    1998-01-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous growth in cloud dynamical and microphysical models that are able to simulate storms and storm systems with very high spatial resolution, typically of the order of a few kilometers. The fairly realistic distributions of cloud and hydrometeor properties that these models generate has in turn led to a renewed interest in the three-dimensional microwave radiative transfer modeling needed to understand the effect of cloud and rainfall inhomogeneities upon microwave observations. Monte Carlo methods, and particularly backwards Monte Carlo methods have shown themselves to be very desirable due to the quick convergence of the solutions. Unfortunately, backwards Monte Carlo methods are not well suited to treat polarized radiation. This study reviews the existing Monte Carlo methods and presents a new polarized Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The code is based on a forward scheme but uses aliasing techniques to keep the computational requirements equivalent to the backwards solution. Radiative transfer computations have been performed using a microphysical-dynamical cloud model and the results are presented together with the algorithm description.

  9. A Polarized Delta-Four-Stream Approximation for Infrared and Microwave Radiative Transfer: Part I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K. N.; Ou, S. C.; Takano, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2005-07-01

    The delta-four-stream polarized (vector) thermal radiative transfer has been formulated and numerically tested specifically for application to satellite data assimilation in cloudy atmospheres. It is shown that for thermal emission in the earth's atmosphere, the [I, Q] component of the Stokes vector can be decoupled from the [U, V] component and that the solution of the vector equation set involving the four-stream approximation can be expressed in an analytic form similar to the scalar case. Thus, the computer time requirement can be optimized for the simulation of forward radiances and their derivatives. Computations have been carried out to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of this method by comparing radiance and polarization results to those computed from the exact doubling method for radiative transfer for a number of thermal infrared and microwave frequencies. Excellent agreement within 1% is shown for the radiance results for all satellite viewing angles and cloud optical depths. For polarization, differences between the two are less than 5% if brightness temperature is used in the analysis. On balance of the computational speed and accuracy, the four-stream approximation for radiative transfer appears to be an attractive means for the simulation of cloudy radiances and polarization for research and data assimilation purposes.

  10. A high-power microwave circular polarizer and its application on phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hao; Hu, Yongmei; Chang, Chao; Guo, Letian

    2016-04-01

    A high-power waveguide dual circular polarizer was theoretically designed and proof-of-principle was experimentally tested. It consists of two incident rectangular waveguides with a perpendicular H-plane junction, one circular waveguide with a pair of trapezoidal grooves coupled in E-plane at the top, a spherical crown located at the bottom, and an iris at the perpendicular junction of two rectangular waveguides. When wave incidents at one of the two separated rectangular waveguides, it, respectively, generates a left-hand circular polarized wave or a right-hand circular polarized wave in the circular waveguide. By adding a dumbbell-like metal plug driven with a high speed servomotor, a movable short circuit is formed along the circular waveguide to adjust the output RF phase of the rectangular port, realizing a high-speed high-power phase shifter. The C-band high power microwave (HPM) experiments were carried out, and the power capacity of the HPM polarizer and phase shifter was demonstrated to reach gigawatt level.

  11. Detection of polarization in the cosmic microwave background using DASI. Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J M; Leitch, E M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L

    The past several years have seen the emergence of a standard cosmological model, in which small temperature differences in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales of the order of a degree are understood to arise from acoustic oscillations in the hot plasma of the early Universe, arising from primordial density fluctuations. Within the context of this model, recent measurements of the temperature fluctuations have led to profound conclusions about the origin, evolution and composition of the Universe. Using the measured temperature fluctuations, the theoretical framework predicts the level of polarization of the CMB with essentially no free parameters. Therefore, a measurement of the polarization is a critical test of the theory and thus of the validity of the cosmological parameters derived from the CMB measurements. Here we report the detection of polarization of the CMB with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI). The polarization is deteced with high confidence, and its level and spatial distribution are in excellent agreement with the predictions of the standard theory. PMID:12490941

  12. Cosmic ray contributions to the WMAP polarization data on the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibig, Tadeusz; Wolfendale, Arnold W.

    2016-01-01

    We have updated our analysis of the 9-year WMAP data using the collection of polarization maps looking for the presence of additional evidence for a finite ‘cosmic ray (CR) foreground’ for the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We have given special attention to high Galactic latitudes, where the recent BICEP2 findings were reported although very recent Planck data claims that dust is prevalent, thus nullifying the BICEP2 results. The method of examining the correlation with the observed gamma ray flux proposed in our earlier papers and applied to the polarization data shows that the foreground related to CRs is still observed even at high Galactic latitudes and conclusions about gravitational waves are not yet secure. Theory has it that there is important information about inflationary gravitational waves in the fine structure of the CMB polarization properties (polarization vector and angle) and it is necessary to examine further the conclusions that can be gained from studies of the CMB maps, in view of the disturbing foreground effects.

  13. Optical Demonstration of THz, Dual-Polarization Sensitive Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dober, B.; Austermann, J. A.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Che, G.; Cho, H. M.; Devlin, M.; Duff, S. M.; Galitzki, N.; Gao, J.; Groppi, C.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; McKenney, C. M.; Li, D.; Lourie, N.; Mauskopf, P.; Vissers, M. R.; Wang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Polarization sensitive, microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are under development for the next generation BLAST instrument (BLAST-TNG). BLAST-TNG is a balloon-borne submillimeter polarimeter designed to study magnetic fields in diffuse dust regions and molecular clouds. We present the design and performance of feedhorn-coupled, dual-polarization sensitive MKIDs fabricated from TiN/Ti multilayer films, which have been optimized for the 250 μm band. Measurements show effective selection of linear polarization and good electrical isolation between the orthogonally crossed X and Y detectors within a single spatial pixel. The detector cross-polar coupling is <3 %. Passband measurements are presented, which demonstrate that the desired band-edges (1.0-1.4 THz) have been achieved. We find a near linear response to the optical load from a blackbody source, which has been observed in previous devices fabricated from TiN. Blackbody-coupled noise measurements demonstrate that the sensitivity of the detectors is limited by photon noise when the optical load is greater than 1 pW.

  14. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves. PMID:25062161

  15. Rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization from weak gravitational lensing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang

    2014-01-31

    When a cosmic microwave background (CMB) photon travels from the surface of last scatter through spacetime metric perturbations, the polarization vector may rotate about its direction of propagation. This gravitational rotation is distinct from, and occurs in addition to, the lensing deflection of the photon trajectory. This rotation can be sourced by linear vector or tensor metric perturbations and is fully coherent with the curl deflection field. Therefore, lensing corrections to the CMB polarization power spectra as well as the temperature-polarization cross correlations due to nonscalar perturbations are modified. The rotation does not affect lensing by linear scalar perturbations, but needs to be included when calculations go to higher orders. We present complete results for weak lensing of the full-sky CMB power spectra by general linear metric perturbations, taking into account both deflection of the photon trajectory and rotation of the polarization. For the case of lensing by gravitational waves, we show that the B modes induced by the rotation largely cancel those induced by the curl component of deflection. PMID:24580435

  16. Optical Demonstration of THz, Dual-Polarization Sensitive Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dober, B.; Austermann, J. A.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Che, G.; Cho, H. M.; Devlin, M.; Duff, S. M.; Galitzki, N.; Gao, J.; Groppi, C.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; McKenney, C. M.; Li, D.; Lourie, N.; Mauskopf, P.; Vissers, M. R.; Wang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Polarization sensitive, microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are under development for the next generation BLAST instrument (BLAST-TNG). BLAST-TNG is a balloon-borne submillimeter polarimeter designed to study magnetic fields in diffuse dust regions and molecular clouds. We present the design and performance of feedhorn-coupled, dual-polarization sensitive MKIDs fabricated from TiN/Ti multilayer films, which have been optimized for the 250 \\upmu m band. Measurements show effective selection of linear polarization and good electrical isolation between the orthogonally crossed X and Y detectors within a single spatial pixel. The detector cross-polar coupling is <3 %. Passband measurements are presented, which demonstrate that the desired band-edges (1.0-1.4 THz) have been achieved. We find a near linear response to the optical load from a blackbody source, which has been observed in previous devices fabricated from TiN. Blackbody-coupled noise measurements demonstrate that the sensitivity of the detectors is limited by photon noise when the optical load is greater than 1 pW.

  17. Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum with the POLARBEAR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Leitch, E. M.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ˜30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat +sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  18. A measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization with the south pole telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, Abigail Tinney

    We present maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization at 90 and 150 GHz measured with SPTpol and the first EE and TE CMB power spectrum measurements from SPTpol. We also describe the SPTpol instrument in detail. We discuss the development of the SPTpol camera including the cryogenic design and the transition edge sensor (TES) detectors developed at NIST and Argonne National Laboratory. The goals of the SPTpol project are to exploit the high resolution of the telescope (1 arcminute beam) and the high sensitivity afforded by the 1536 detector camera to measure the E-mode power spectrum of the CMB, characterize the B-mode polarization induced by the gravitational lensing of the primordial E-mode CMB polarization, and to detector set an upper limit on the level of the B-mode polarization from inflationary gravitational waves. This thesis is a first step toward accomplishing these goals. Measuring the E-mode power spectrum will allow us to improve constraints on parameters of the current cosmological models that are sensitive to the damping tail of the CMB.

  19. Optical Demonstration of THz, Dual-Polarization Sensitive Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dober, B.; Austermann, J. A.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Che, G.; Cho, H. M.; Devlin, M.; Duff, S. M.; Galitzki, N.; Gao, J.; Groppi, C.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; McKenney, C. M.; Li, D.; Lourie, N.; Mauskopf, P.; Vissers, M. R.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Polarization sensitive, microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are under development for the next generation BLAST instrument (BLAST-TNG). BLAST-TNG is a balloon-borne submillimeter polarimeter designed to study magnetic fields in diffuse dust regions and molecular clouds. We present the design and performance of feedhorn-coupled, dual-polarization sensitive MKIDs fabricated from TiN/Ti multilayer films, which have been optimized for the 250 \\upmu m band. Measurements show effective selection of linear polarization and good electrical isolation between the orthogonally crossed X and Y detectors within a single spatial pixel. The detector cross-polar coupling is < 3 %. Passband measurements are presented, which demonstrate that the desired band-edges (1.0-1.4 THz) have been achieved. We find a near linear response to the optical load from a blackbody source, which has been observed in previous devices fabricated from TiN. Blackbody-coupled noise measurements demonstrate that the sensitivity of the detectors is limited by photon noise when the optical load is greater than 1 pW.

  20. Design and Deployment of the Polarbear Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Kam Stahly

    2010-12-01

    POLARBEAR is a Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiment that will measure the CMB polarization angular power spectrum with unprecedented precision, searching for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves and the gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization by large scale structure. This dissertation presents an overview of the design of the instrument, focusing on the design and fabrication of the focal plane, and presents the results of some tests of instrument performance, both in the laboratory and from the initial engineering deployment. The structure of this thesis is as follows: Chapter 1 introduces the theoretical constructs used to describe the CMB polarization anisotropies, and the state of measurements in the field. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the choices made in the instrument design. Chapter 3 discusses the fundamental limits to the sensitivity of bolometric detectors, and chapter 4 explains the design choices involved in populating the focal plane with detectors. Chapter 5 describes the details of the detector architecture and fabrication, and chapter 6 the details of selecting the spectral band of the detectors. Finally, chapter 7 goes through some results obtained before and during the POLARBEAR engineering run in 2010, and comments on the work to be done before the Chilean deployment.

  1. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values.

  2. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, D.J.; Trenberth, K.E.; Reynolds, R.W. NOAA, Climate Analysis Center, Washington, DC )

    1992-09-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S. 22 refs.

  3. SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S.; Zhang Le; Timbie, Peter; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Bunn, Emory F.

    2013-07-15

    The detection of the primordial B-mode spectrum of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal may provide a probe of inflation. However, observation of such a faint signal requires excellent control of systematic errors. Interferometry proves to be a promising approach for overcoming such a challenge. In this paper we present a complete simulation pipeline of interferometric observations of CMB polarization, including systematic errors. We employ two different methods for obtaining the power spectra from mock data produced by simulated observations: the maximum likelihood method and the method of Gibbs sampling. We show that the results from both methods are consistent with each other as well as, within a factor of six, with analytical estimates. Several categories of systematic errors are considered: instrumental errors, consisting of antenna gain and antenna coupling errors; and beam errors, consisting of antenna pointing errors, beam cross-polarization, and beam shape (and size) errors. In order to recover the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, within a 10% tolerance level, which ensures the experiment is sensitive enough to detect the B-signal at r = 0.01 in the multipole range 28 < l < 384, we find that, for a QUBIC-like experiment, Gaussian-distributed systematic errors must be controlled with precisions of |g{sub rms}| = 0.1 for antenna gain, |{epsilon}{sub rms}| = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} for antenna coupling, {delta}{sub rms} Almost-Equal-To 0. Degree-Sign 7 for pointing, {zeta}{sub rms} Almost-Equal-To 0. Degree-Sign 7 for beam shape, and {mu}{sub rms} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} for beam cross-polarization. Although the combined systematic effects produce a tolerance level on r twice as large for an experiment with linear polarizers, the resulting bias in r for a circular experiment is 15% which is still on the level of desirable sensitivity.

  4. Degree-scale cosmic microwave background polarization measurements from three years of BICEP1 data

    SciTech Connect

    Barkats, D.; Aikin, R.; Bock, J. J.; Filippini, J.; Hristov, V. V.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Kovac, J. M.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Bierman, E. M.; Su, M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Chiang, H. C.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Jones, W. C.; and others

    2014-03-10

    BICEP1 is a millimeter-wavelength telescope designed specifically to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background at degree angular scales. We present results from an analysis of the data acquired during three seasons of observations at the South Pole (2006-2008). This work extends the two-year result published in Chiang et al., with additional data from the third season and relaxed detector-selection criteria. This analysis also introduces a more comprehensive estimation of band power window functions, improved likelihood estimation methods, and a new technique for deprojecting monopole temperature-to-polarization leakage that reduces this class of systematic uncertainty to a negligible level. We present maps of temperature, E- and B-mode polarization, and their associated angular power spectra. The improvement in the map noise level and polarization spectra error bars are consistent with the 52% increase in integration time relative to Chiang et al. We confirm both self-consistency of the polarization data and consistency with the two-year results. We measure the angular power spectra at 21 ≤ ℓ ≤ 335 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with Lambda cold dark matter cosmology, with the first acoustic peak of the EE spectrum now detected at 15σ. The BB spectrum remains consistent with zero. From B-modes only, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r=0.03{sub −0.23}{sup +0.27}, or r < 0.70 at 95% confidence level.

  5. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND INDUCED POLARIZATION FROM SINGLE SCATTERING BY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Elsa P. R. G.; Da Silva, Antonio J. C.; Liu, Guo-Chin

    2012-09-20

    We present light-cone-integrated simulations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization signal induced by a single scattering in the direction of clusters of galaxies and filaments. We characterize the statistical properties of the induced polarization signals from the presence of the CMB quadrupole component (pqiCMB) and as the result of the transverse motion of ionized gas clouds with respect to the CMB rest frame (p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ). From adiabatic N-body/hydrodynamic simulations, we generated 28 random sky patches integrated along the light cone, each with about 0.86 deg{sup 2} and angular resolution of 6''. Our simulation method involves a box-stacking scheme that allows to reconstruct the CMB quadrupole component and the gas physical properties along the line of sight. We find that the linear polarization degree in the logarithmic scale of both effects follows approximately a Gaussian distribution and the mean total signal is about 10{sup -8} and 10{sup -10} for the pqiCMB and p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ effects, respectively. The polarization angle is consistent with a flat distribution in both cases. From the mean distributions of the polarization degree with redshift, the highest peak is found at z {approx_equal} 1 for the induced CMB quadrupole and at z {approx_equal} 0.5 for the kinematic component. Our results suggest that most of the contribution for the total polarization signal arises from z {approx}< 4 for the pqiCMB and z {approx}< 3 for p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ. The spectral dependency of both integrated signals is strong, increasing with the frequency, especially in the case of the p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ signal, which increases by a factor of 100 from 30 GHz to 675 GHz. The maxima values found at the highest frequency are about 3 {mu}K and 13 {mu}K for the pqiCMB and p{beta}{sup 2}{sub t}SZ, respectively. The angular power spectra of these effects peak at large multipoles l > 10{sup 4}, being of the order of 10{sup -5} {mu}K{sup 2

  6. What can be learned from the lensed cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization power spectrum?

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sarah; Challinor, Anthony; Rocha, Graca

    2006-01-15

    The effect of weak gravitational lensing on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies and polarization will provide access to cosmological information that cannot be obtained from the primary anisotropies alone. We compare the information content of the lensed B-mode polarization power spectrum, properly accounting for the non-Gaussian correlations between the power on different scales, with that of the unlensed CMB fields and the lensing potential. The latter represent the products of an (idealized) optimal analysis that exploits the lens-induced non-Gaussianity to reconstruct the fields. Compressing the non-Gaussian lensed CMB into power spectra is wasteful and leaves a tight degeneracy between the equation of state of dark energy and neutrino mass that is much stronger than in the more optimal analysis. Despite this, a power-spectrum analysis will be a useful first step in analyzing future B-mode polarization data. For this reason, we also consider how to extract accurate parameter constraints from the lensed B-mode power spectrum. We show with simulations that for cosmic-variance-limited measurements of the lensed B-mode power, including the non-Gaussian correlations in existing likelihood approximations gives biased parameter results. We develop a more refined likelihood approximation that performs significantly better. This new approximation should also be of more general interest in the wider context of parameter estimation from Gaussian CMB data.

  7. Modern average global sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    The data contained in this data set are derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature data (AVHRR MCSST), which are obtainable from the Distributed Active Archive Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. The JPL tapes contain weekly images of SST from October 1981 through December 1990 in nine regions of the world ocean: North Atlantic, Eastern North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Agulhas, Indian, Southeast Pacific, Southwest Pacific, Northeast Pacific, and Northwest Pacific. This data set represents the results of calculations carried out on the NOAA data and also contains the source code of the programs that made the calculations. The objective was to derive the average sea-surface temperature of each month and week throughout the whole 10-year series, meaning, for example, that data from January of each year would be averaged together. The result is 12 monthly and 52 weekly images for each of the oceanic regions. Averaging the images in this way tends to reduce the number of grid cells that lack valid data and to suppress interannual variability.

  8. L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; va der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (T(sub B))'s measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These T(sub B)'s measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly T(sub B)'s could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly T(sub B). Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, h(sub r), on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on T(sub B) simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent h(sub r) parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of T(sub B) simulations in the early growth cycle.

  9. Deciphering inflation with gravitational waves: Cosmic microwave background polarization vs direct detection with laser interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tristan L.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-06-15

    A detection of the primordial gravitational wave background is considered to be the 'smoking-gun' evidence for inflation. While superhorizon waves are probed with cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, the relic background will be studied with laser interferometers. The long lever arm spanned by the two techniques improves constraints on the inflationary potential and validation of consistency relations expected under inflation. If gravitational waves with a tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio greater than 0.01 are detected by the CMB, then a direct-detection experiment with a sensitivity consistent with current concept studies should be pursued vigorously. If no primordial tensors are detected by the CMB, a direct-detection experiment to understand the simplest form of inflation must have a sensitivity improved by two to 3 orders of magnitude over current plans.

  10. Leveraging microwave polarization information for the calibration of a land data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Thomas R. H.; Crow, Wade T.; De Jeu, Richard A. M.

    2014-12-01

    This letter contributes a new approach to calibrating a tau-omega radiative transfer model coupled to land surface model output with low-frequency (<10 GHz) microwave brightness temperature (TB) observations. The problem of calibrating this system is generally poorly posed because various parameter combinations may yield indistinguishable (least squares error) results. This is theoretically important for a land data assimilation system since alternative parameter combinations have different impacts on the sensitivity of TB to soil moisture and misattribution of systematic error may therefore disrupt data assimilation system performance. Via synthetic experiments we demonstrate that using TB polarization difference to parameterize vegetation opacity can improve the stability of calibrated soil moisture/TB sensitivities relative to the more typical approach of utilizing ancillary information to estimate vegetation opacity. The proposed approach fully follows from the radiative transfer model, implemented according to commonly adopted assumptions, and reduces by one the number of calibration parameters.

  11. Synthesis of polymer-derived ceramic Si(B)CN-carbon nanotube composite by microwave-induced interfacial polarization.

    PubMed

    Bhandavat, R; Kuhn, W; Mansfield, E; Lehman, J; Singh, G

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate synthesis of a polymer-derived ceramic (PDC)-multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite using microwave irradiation at 2.45 GHz. The process takes about 10 min of microwave irradiation for the polymer-to-ceramic conversion. The successful conversion of polymer coated carbon nanotubes to ceramic composite is chemically ascertained by Fourier transform-infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and physically by thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy characterization. Frequency dependent dielectric measurements in the S-Band (300 MHz to 3 GHz) were studied to quantify the extent of microwave-CNT interaction and the degree of selective heating available at the MWCNT-polymer interface. Experimentally obtained return loss of the incident microwaves in the specimen explains the reason for heat generation. The temperature-dependent permittivity of polar molecules further strengthens the argument of internal heat generation. PMID:22141448

  12. The Aquarius Mission: Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, Chester; Chao, Y.; deCharon, A.; Edelstein, W.; Hildebrand, P.; Lagerloef, G.; LeVine, D.; Pellerano, F.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Ruf, C.

    2001-01-01

    Aquarius is a new satellite mission concept to study the impact of the global water cycle on the ocean, including the response of the ocean to buoyancy forcing and the subsequent feedback of the ocean on the climate. The measurement objective of Aquarius is sea surface salinity, which reflects the concentration of freshwater at the ocean surface. Salinity affects the dielectric constant of sea water and, consequently, the radiometric emission of the sea surface to space. Rudimentary space observations with an L-band radiometer were first made from Skylab in the mid-70s and numerous aircraft missions of increasing quality and improved technology have been conducted since then. Technology is now available to carry out a global mission, which includes both an accurate L band (1.413 Ghz) radiometer and radar system in space and a global array of in situ observations for calibration and validation, in order to address key NASA Earth Science Enterprise questions about the global cycling of water and the response of the ocean circulation to climate change. The key scientific objectives of Aquarius examine the cycling of water at the ocean's surface, the response of the ocean circulation to buoyancy forcing, and the impact of buoyancy forcing on the ocean's thermal feedback to the climate. Global surface salinity will also improve our ability to model the surface solubility chemistry needed to estimate the air-sea exchange of CO2. In order to meet these science objectives, the NASA Salinity Sea Ice Working Group over the past three years has concluded that the mission measurement goals should be better than 0.2 practical salinity units (psu) accuracy, 100 km resolution, and weekly to revisits. The Aquarius mission proposes to meet these measurement requirements through a real aperture dual-polarized L band radiometer and radar system. This system can achieve the less than 0.1 K radiometric temperature measurement accuracy that is required. A 3 m antenna at approx. 600km

  13. Artificial neural network based microwave precipitation estimation using scattering index and polarization corrected temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, C.; Prakash, Satya; Sathiyamoorthy, V.; Gairola, R. M.

    2011-11-01

    An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based technique is proposed for estimating precipitation over Indian land and oceanic regions [30° S - 40° N and 30° E - 120° E] using Scattering Index (SI) and Polarization Corrected Temperature (PCT) derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) measurements. This rainfall retrieval algorithm is designed to estimate rainfall using a combination of SSM/I and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) measurements. For training the ANN, SI and PCT (which signify rain signatures in a better way) calculated from SSM/I brightness temperature are considered as inputs and Precipitation Radar (PR) rain rate as output. SI is computed using 19.35 GHz, 22.235 GHz and 85.5 GHz Vertical channels and PCT is computed using 85.5 GHz Vertical and Horizontal channels. Once the training is completed, the independent data sets (which were not included in the training) were used to test the performance of the network. Instantaneous precipitation estimates with independent test data sets are validated with PR surface rain rate measurements. The results are compared with precipitation estimated using power law based (i) global algorithm and (ii) regional algorithm. Overall results show that ANN based present algorithm shows better agreement with PR rain rate. This study is aimed at developing a more accurate operational rainfall retrieval algorithm for Indo-French Megha-Tropiques Microwave Analysis and Detection of Rain and Atmospheric Structures (MADRAS) radiometer.

  14. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne Telescope for Measuring Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    EBEX is a long-duration balloon-borne (LDB) telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It is designed to measure or place an upper limit on the inflationary B-mode signal, a signal predicted by inflationary theories to be imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves, to detect the effects of gravitational lensing on the polarization of the CMB, and to characterize polarized Galactic foreground emission. The payload consists of a pointed gondola that houses the optics, polarimetry, detectors and detector readout systems, as well as the pointing sensors, control motors, telemetry sytems, and data acquisition and flight control computers. Polarimetry is achieved with a rotating half-wave plate and wire grid polarizer. The detectors are sensitive to frequency bands centered on 150, 250, and 410 GHz. EBEX was flown in 2009 from New Mexico as a full system test, and then flown again in December 2012 / January 2013 over Antarctica in a long-duration flight to collect scientific data. In the instrumentation part of this thesis we discuss the pointing sensors and attitude determination algorithms. We also describe the real-time map making software, "QuickLook", that was custom-designed for EBEX. We devote special attention to the design and construction of the primary pointing sensors, the star cameras, and their custom-designed flight software package, "STARS" (the Star Tracking Attitude Reconstruction Software). In the analysis part of this thesis we describe the current status of the post-flight analysis procedure. We discuss the data structures used in analysis and the pipeline stages related to attitude determination and map making. We also discuss a custom-designed software framework called "LEAP" (the LDB EBEX Analysis Pipeline) that supports most of the analysis pipeline stages.

  15. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  16. Improved Sea Surface Salinity Retrievals using Ancillary data for Aquarius Ocean Roughness Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.; Hejazin, Y.; Rabollii, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D sea surface salinity (SSS) measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is a combined L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which derives SSS from ocean surface brightness temperature (Tb) measurements. This paper deals with a method of improving AQ SSS by making a making an ocean roughness brightness temperature correction (ΔTbr). The ΔTbr is derived using several ancillary data sources of surface wind measurements, namely; NOAA numerical weather model - Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS), WindSat ocean vector wind, and the CONAE Microwave Radiometer (MWR). The basis of the correction is the excess (warming) brightness temperature that is produced when the ocean is roughened by the surface wind. We model the increase in L-band Tb as a function of wind speed and direction relative to the antenna azimuth look direction. Our radiative transfer model by El-Nimri [2010] has been tuned to actual AQ ocean surface Tb's with corresponding surface wind vector. Using this ocean emissivity model and the ancillary wind vector, we derive the roughness correction, ΔTbr, which is applied to the AQ measured ocean surface Tb before retrieving SSS. Finally the effect of ΔTbr is evaluated by computing the difference between the HYCOM ocean salinity model and the AQ retrievals. These differences are cross correlated with the ancillary surface wind vector to assess the effectiveness of the roughness correction. Finally, we compare our ΔTbr with the AQ scatterometer derived ΔTbr. We compare the similarities and differenced versus the ancillary surface wind speed. S. El-Nimri et al., 2010, "An improved C-band ocean surface emissivity model at hurricane force wind speeds over a wide range of earth incidence angles," IEEE Geosci. Rem. Sens. Letters, vol. 7, NO. 4, October.

  17. Sea surface wind stress in stratified atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the wind shear stress on the sea surface as well as the velocity profile in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over wind waves by using similarity theory. For a given geostrophic velocity, Coriolis parameter, spectral peak period and stratification parameter the sea surface shear stress is determined. Further, the direction of the sea surface shear stress and the velocity profile are given. Parameterizations of the results are also presented. Finally, the engineering relevance of the results is discussed.

  18. Passive L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly TB's could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly TB. Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, hr, on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on TB simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent hr parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of TB simulations in the early growth cycle. A.T. Joseph, R. Van der Velde, P.E. O'Neill, R.H. Lang, and T. Gish, "Soil moisture retrieval during a corn growth cycle using L-band (1.6 GHz) radar observations", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 46, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2008.917214, Aug. 2008. M.C. Dobson, F.T. Ulaby, M

  19. The POLARBEAR Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment and Anti-Reflection Coatings for Millimeter Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quealy, Erin Elizabeth

    New technology has rapidly advanced the field of observational cosmology over the last 30 years. This trend will continue with the development of technologies to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization. The B-mode component of the polarization map will place limits on the energy scale of inflation and the sum of the neutrino masses. This thesis describes the pb instrument which will measure the CMB polarization anisotropy to unprecedented sensitivity. POLARBEAR-I is currently observing, and an upgraded version, POLARBEAR-II, is planned for the future. The first version of the experiment, POLARBEAR-I, is fielding several new technologies for the first time. POLARBEAR-I has high sensitivity due to its detector count. It employs a 1274 detector Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer array. The bolometers are coupled to a planar array of polarization sensitive antennas. These antennas are lithographed on the same substrate as the TES detectors, allowing on-chip band defining filters between the antenna and detector. The focal plane is composed of seven hexagonal detector modules. This modular scheme can be extended to create larger focal plane arrays in the future. POLARBEAR-I is observing at a single band near 150 GHz, the peak in the CMB blackbody curve. The lenslet antenna coupled detector technology, fielding for the first time in POLARBEAR-I, is naturally scalable to larger arrays with multi-chroic pixels. This broadband technology will have higher sensitivity and better capability for astronomical foreground contaminant removal. The antenna geometry can be changed to receive a wider frequency bandwidth. This bandwidth can be broken into multiple frequency bands with the on-chip band defining filters. Each band will be read out by one TES detector. A dual band instrument, pbtwo, is in development with bands at 90 and 150 GHz. One challenge for all CMB polarization measurements is minimization of systematic errors. One source of error is

  20. A TSVD Analysis of the Impact of Polarization on Microwave Breast Imaging using an Enclosed Array of Miniaturized Patch Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Mays, R. Owen; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave breast imaging performance is fundamentally dependent on the quality of information contained within the scattering data. We apply a truncated singular-value decomposition (TSVD) method to evaluate the information contained in a simulated scattering scenario wherein a compact, shielded array of miniaturized patch antennas surrounds an anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. In particular, we investigate the impact of different antenna orientations (and thus polarizations), namely two array configurations with uniform antenna orientations and one mixed-orientation array configuration. The latter case is of interest because it may offer greater flexibility in antenna and array design. The results of this analysis indicate that mixed-polarization configurations do not degrade information quality compared to uniform-polarization configurations and in fact may enhance imaging performance, and thus represent viable design options for microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25705136

  1. Sea surface temperature - Observations from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) on the geostationary GOES satellites were used to estimate sea surface temperatures (SST). A procedure was developed to screen VAS visible and infrared data for cloud-free regions for estimation of SST from the clear infrared radiances. A data set of matches between the VAS radiances and high quality buoy estimates of SST was produced. A linear regression analysis of these matches was performed to generate an empirical algorithm relating the VAS window channel brightness temperatures to the estimates of SST recorded by NOAA fixed environment buoys. Daily maps of SST during Hurricanes Alicia (1983) and Debbie (1982) demonstrated the ability of VAS to monitor air-sea interactions at high temporal and spatial scales.

  2. Sea surface temperature variability: patterns and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deser, Clara; Alexander, Michael A; Xie, Shang-Ping; Phillips, Adam S

    2010-01-01

    Patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) variability on interannual and longer timescales result from a combination of atmospheric and oceanic processes. These SST anomaly patterns may be due to intrinsic modes of atmospheric circulation variability that imprint themselves upon the SST field mainly via surface energy fluxes. Examples include SST fluctuations in the Southern Ocean associated with the Southern Annular Mode, a tripolar pattern of SST anomalies in the North Atlantic associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and a pan-Pacific mode known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (with additional contributions from oceanic processes). They may also result from coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions, such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon in the tropical Indo-Pacific, the tropical Atlantic Niño, and the cross-equatorial meridional modes in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic. Finally, patterns of SST variability may arise from intrinsic oceanic modes, notably the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. PMID:21141660

  3. Satellite monitoring of sea surface pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, G.; Telfer, D. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Image processing techniques developed are well adapted to the exploration and isolation of local areas which exhibit small temperature differences between themselves and their surroundings. In the worst case of imagery of small areal extent of sea surface having no coastal boundary in the area, there is yet no method of distinguishing unambiguously an oil spill from fog, cloud, the effect produced by shallow sediments, or the effects of naturally occuring thermal fronts. In the case of uniform slicks of liquid North Sea oil in still air, laboratory simulation experiments show that, for oil thicknesses in excess of 1 or 2 mm, there is, under equilibrium conditions, little dependence of oil surface temperature on the thickness of the oil layer. The surface temperature of oil is consistently higher than that of water, the difference being about 1 K at low values of relative humidity, but tending to increase as the relative humidity increases.

  4. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Sea surface temperatures from VAS MSI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is developed for estimating sea surface temperatures from multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder on the geostationary GOES satellites. Theoretical regression equations for two and three infrared window channels are empirically tuned using clear field of view satellite radiances matched with reports of SST from NOAA fixed environmental buoys. The empirical regression equations are then used to produce daily regional analyses of SST. Monthly mean SST's for the western North Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific during March and July 1982 were produced for use in the SST Intercomparison Workshop Series. Workshop results showed VAS SST's have a scatter of 0.8-1.0 C and a slight warm bias with respect to the other measurements of SST. The VAS SST's show no discernible bias in the region of El Chichon volcanic aerosol cloud.

  6. Determination of the Structure of the Coronal Magnetic Field Using Microwave Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogod, V. M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory motions and wave processes in active regions requires knowledge of the structure of the magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. We study the magnetic field structure of active regions at coronal heights, as they are determined by means of multiwave observations of polarized radio emission of active regions in the microwave range. Two methods, a stereoscopic method and the analysis of the radio spectrum are used. The method of stereoscopy rotation allows estimating the height of radio sources in a stable active region relative to the photosphere, based on its apparent motion in the image plane recorded over several days of observation. At various times one-dimensional scans at multiple frequencies spanning the 5.98 - 15.95 GHz frequency range from the RATAN-600 instrument are used. The gyroresonance emission mechanism, which is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field strength, is applied to convert the radio source estimated heights at various frequencies, h(f), to information as regards magnetic field vs. height, B(h). Diagrams of longitude - height of some polarized radio sources revealed multiple reversals, suggestive of a spiral magnetic structure. In all cases, the magnetic field strength maintains high values (800 - 1000 G) at the highest altitudes analysed, which reflects a relatively weak divergence in the field of magnetic flux tubes (in the height range 8 - 14 Mm) responsible for the main part of the radio emission of active regions.

  7. Probing 'Parent Universe' in Loop Quantum Cosmology with B-mode Polarization in Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucky Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei

    2016-06-01

    We aim to use the observations of B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to probe the ‘parent universe’ under the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC). In particular, we investigate the possibility for the gravitational waves (GW) such as those from the stellar binary systems in the parent universe to survive the big bounce and thus to be still observable today. Our study is based on the background dynamics with the zeroth-order holonomy correction using the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We propose a new framework in which transfer functions are invoked to bring the GWs in the parent universe through the big bounce, inflation, and big bang to reach today. This transparent and intuitive formalism allows us to accurately discuss the influence of the GWs from the parent universe on the B-mode polarization in the CMB today under backgrounds of different LQC parameters. These features can soon be tested by the forth-coming CMB observations and we note that the LQC backgrounds with symmetric bouncing scenarios are ruled out by the latest observational results from Planck and BICEP2/Keck experiments.

  8. The millimeter-wave bolometric interferometer (MBI) for observing the cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaiseung

    This thesis describes the Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) anisotropy at angular scales 0.5°--1° and a center frequency of 90 GHz. The measurement of the CMBP anisotropy on these angular scales will put more stringent constraints on cosmological models and parameters. The prototype instrument employs four corrugated feedhorns and cooled bolometers. Using a Butler beam combiner, beams from four feedhorns are correlated, yielding interferometric measurements of the CMBP. From these interferometric measurements, we can reconstruct the image of polarization by aperture synthesis and estimate the power spectrum of the CMBP by maximum likelihood method. We describe aperture synthesis and maximum likelihood method. We present the result of the image reconstruction and the power spectrum estimation from simulated MBI observations. With the planned sensitivity of the MBI, the MBI will be able to estimate the E mode power spectra of the CMBP in the multipole range (150 <= l <= 300) and put upper bounds on the B mode power spectra in the relevant multipoles. In the end, we describe all-sky imaging method from interferometric measurements developed for the Einstein Probe Interferometer for Cosmology (EPIC), which is the satellite version of the MBI.

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9T using a novel 250GHz gyrotron microwave source.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, V S; Farrar, C T; Hornstein, M K; Mastovsky, I; Vieregg, J; Bryant, J; Eléna, B; Kreischer, K E; Temkin, R J; Griffin, R G

    2003-02-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9T (250 GHz for g=2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170+/-50 have been observed in 1-13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of approximately 17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C-13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U-13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments. PMID:12615147

  10. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 9T using a novel 250GHz gyrotron microwave source

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, V.S.; Farrar, C.T.; Hornstein, M.K.; Mastovsky, I.; Vieregg, J.; Bryant, J.; Eléna, B.; Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    In this communication, we report enhancements of nuclear spin polarization by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in static and spinning solids at a magnetic field strength of 9T (250 GHz for g = 2 electrons, 380 MHz for 1H). In these experiments, 1H enhancements of up to 170 ± 50 have been observed in 1-13C-glycine dispersed in a 60:40 glycerol/water matrix at temperatures of 20 K; in addition, we have observed significant enhancements in 15N spectra of unoriented pf1-bacteriophage. Finally, enhancements of ~17 have been obtained in two-dimensional 13C–13C chemical shift correlation spectra of the amino acid U-13C, 15N-proline during magic angle spinning (MAS), demonstrating the stability of the DNP experiment for sustained acquisition and for quantitative experiments incorporating dipolar recoupling. In all cases, we have exploited the thermal mixing DNP mechanism with the nitroxide radical 4-amino-TEMPO as the paramagnetic dopant. These are the highest frequency DNP experiments performed to date and indicate that significant signal enhancements can be realized using the thermal mixing mechanism even at elevated magnetic fields. In large measure, this is due to the high microwave power output of the 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator used in these experiments. PMID:12615147

  11. POLARBEAR2: A new multichroic receiver for precision measurements of cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Darcy; POLARBEAR Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    POLARBEAR-2 is a new receiver that will be installed in 2014 alongside the currently observing POLARBEAR-1 receiver, on a new telescope as a part of the Simons Array. The science goals of the POLARBEAR project are to do a deep search for B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) created by inflationary gravitational waves, as well as characterize the CMB B-mode signal at smaller angular scales, where it originates from weak gravitational lensing. The Simons Array will include a total of three off-axis Gregorian telescopes with 3.5 m primary mirrors, located in the Chajnantor Astronomical Park in the Atacama Desert in Chile. Phased upgrades to receiver technology will enable us to improve sensitivity and capabilities, while continuing a deep survey of 80% of the sky. The POLARBEAR-2 receiver has a larger area focal plane with new dichroic pixels, with bands at 95 GHz and 150 GHz, and a total of 7,588 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers. The focal plane is cooled to 250 milliKelvin, and the bolometers will be read-out by SQUID amplifiers with 32x frequency domain multiplexing. The focal plane is designed to have a noise equivalent temperature of 5.7 μK√s.

  12. Determination of the Structure of the Coronal Magnetic Field Using Microwave Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogod, V. M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory motions and wave processes in active regions requires knowledge of the structure of the magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. We study the magnetic field structure of active regions at coronal heights, as they are determined by means of multiwave observations of polarized radio emission of active regions in the microwave range. Two methods, a stereoscopic method and the analysis of the radio spectrum are used. The method of stereoscopy rotation allows estimating the height of radio sources in a stable active region relative to the photosphere, based on its apparent motion in the image plane recorded over several days of observation. At various times one-dimensional scans at multiple frequencies spanning the 5.98 - 15.95 GHz frequency range from the RATAN-600 instrument are used. The gyroresonance emission mechanism, which is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field strength, is applied to convert the radio source estimated heights at various frequencies, h(f), to information as regards magnetic field vs. height, B(h). Diagrams of longitude - height of some polarized radio sources revealed multiple reversals, suggestive of a spiral magnetic structure. In all cases, the magnetic field strength maintains high values (800 - 1000 G) at the highest altitudes analysed, which reflects a relatively weak divergence in the field of magnetic flux tubes (in the height range 8 - 14 Mm) responsible for the main part of the radio emission of active regions.

  13. B polarization of the cosmic microwave background as a tracer of strings

    SciTech Connect

    Seljak, Uros; Slosar, Anze

    2006-09-15

    String models can produce successful inflationary scenarios in the context of brane collisions, and in many of these models cosmic strings may also be produced. In scenarios such as Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Maldacena-McAllister-Trivedi (KKLMMT) scenario the string contribution is naturally predicted to be well below the inflationary signal for cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, in agreement with the existing limits. We find that for B type polarization of CMB the situation is reversed and the dominant signal comes from vector modes generated by cosmic strings, which exceeds the gravity wave signal from both inflation and strings. The signal can be detected for a broad range of parameter space; future polarization experiments may be able to detect the string signal down to the string tension G{mu}=10{sup -9}, although foregrounds and lensing are likely to worsen these limits. We argue that the optimal scale to search for the string signature is at l{approx}1000, but in models with high optical depth the signal from reionization peak at large scales is also significant. The shape of the power spectrum allows one to distinguish the string signature from the gravity waves from inflation, but only with a sufficiently high angular resolution experiment.

  14. Antenna-coupled Superconducting Bolometers for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Michael James

    We describe the development of a novel millimeter-wave cryogenic detector. The device integrates a planar antenna, superconducting transmission line, bandpass filter, and bolometer onto a single silicon wafer. The bolometer uses a superconducting Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) thermistor, which provides substantial advantages over conventional semiconductor bolometers. The detector chip is fabricated using standard micro-fabrication techniques. This highly-integrated detector architecture is particularly well-suited for use in the de- velopment of polarization-sensitive cryogenic receivers with thousands of pixels. Such receivers are needed to meet the sensitivity requirements of next-generation cosmic microwave background polarization experiments. The design, fabrication, and testing of prototype array pixels are described. Preliminary considerations for a full array design are also discussed. A set of on-chip millimeter-wave test structures were developed to help understand the performance of our millimeter-wave microstrip circuits. These test structures produce a calibrated transmission measurement for an arbitrary two-port circuit using optical techniques, rather than a network analyzer. Some results of fabricated test structures are presented.

  15. Investigation on global positioning system signal scattering and propagation over the rough sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Guo, Li-Xin; Wu, Zhen-Sen

    2010-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of polarization properties, scattering properties and propagation properties of global positioning system (GPS) scattering signal over the rough sea surface. To investigate the polarization and the scattering properties, the scattering field and the bistatic scattering coefficient of modified Kirchhoff approximation using the tapered incident wave is derived in detail. In modeling the propagation properties of the GPS scattering signal in the evaporation duct, the initial field of parabolic equation traditionally computed by the antenna pattern using fast Fourier transform (FFT) is replaced by the GPS scattering field. And the propagation properties of the GPS scattering signal in the evaporation duct with different evaporation duct heights and elevation angles of GPS are discussed by the improved discrete mixed Fourier transform taking into account the sea surface roughness.

  16. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field From Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    The primary focus of this project was on the estimation of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. This effort is directly related to an attempt to describe the mechanisms which give rise to observed SST and its variability on seasonal and inter-annual timescales, its relation to ocean-atmosphere interaction, and the dynamical coupling between the ocean mixed layer and the deep interior ocean. This is one of the fundamental climate related questions being pursued currently under the CLIVAR Program. Because of the strong turbulent mixing associated with atmospheric fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater through the sea surface, the ocean forms a shallow surface boundary layer, the mixed layer which is largely homogeneous in its constituents. The relation between the temperature of the remotely sensed "skin" and the bulk of the mixed layer is largely understood (Reynolds and Smith 1994; Emery et al., 1995). However, because the surface mixed layer is effectively decoupled from the underlying ocean dynamics, an interpretation of satellite SST observations in isolation and in direct use for dynamical studies is very difficult. As a result, the impact of SST data on the understanding of ocean variability.

  17. Multisensor monitoring of sea surface state of the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Mityagina, Marina; Bocharova, Tatina

    Results of many-year monitoring of the state of coastal zone based on a multisensor approach are presented. The monitoring is aimed at solving the following tasks: operational mapping of parameters characterizing the state and pollution (coastal, ship and biogenic) of water; analysis of meteorological state and its effect on the drift and spread of pollutants; study of coastal circulation patterns and their impact on the drift and spread of pollutants; deriving typical pollution distribution patterns in the coastal zone.Processing and analysis is performed using data in visual, infrared and microwave ranges from ERS-2 SAR, Envisat ASAR/MERIS, Terra and Aqua MODIS and NOAA AVHRR instruments. These are complimented with ground data from meteorological stations on the shore and results of satellite data processing of previous periods. The main regions of interest are the Russian sectors of the Black and Azov Seas, southeastern part of the Baltic Sea, and northern and central regions of the Caspian Sea. Adjacent coasts are extremely populated and have well-developed industry, agriculture and rapidly growing tourist sectors. The necessity of constant monitoring of the sea state there is obvious.The monitoring activities allow us to accumulate extensive material for the study of hydrodynamic processes in the regions, in particular water circulation. Detailing the occurrence, evolution and drift of smalland meso-scale vortex structures is crucial for the knowledge of the mechanisms determining mixing and circulation processes in the coastal zone. These mechanisms play an important role in ecological, hydrodynamic and meteorological status of a coastal zone. Special attention is paid to the sea surface state in the Kerch Strait, where a tanker catastrophe took place on November 11, 2007 causing a spillage of over 1.5 thousand tons of heavy oil. The Kerch Strait is characterized by a complex current system with current directions changing to their opposites depending on

  18. On discrimination between film slicks and "look-alikes" on the sea surface in multifrequency radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergievskaya, Irina; Ermakov, Stanislav A.; Kapustin, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Slicks on the sea surface are characterized by attenuation of short wind waves and appear in radar imagery at moderate incidence angles as areas of reduced intensity. In the proximity of oil platforms, ship routes, fish farms, etc. marine slicks are often identified as oil spills or biogenic films. However, probability of false alarm when detecting film slicks is very high because of the occurrence of structures in radar images looking similar but not related to surface films ("lookalikes"). One of the most frequent "look-alikes" is wind depression areas (WDAs) where the wind excitation of short surface waves is reduced compared to the ambient background. Results of field observations of films slicks and WDA are described and differences in character of wind wave attenuation in different parts of the wind wave spectrum are revealed. Model calculations of wave damping degree (contrast) in film slick and in WDA are carried out and are shown to be in general agreement with experiment. Capabilities of dual-polarization and multi-band microwave radar for discrimination between film slicks and "look-alikes" are analyzed based on experiment and model results.

  19. A multispectral method of determining sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A multispectral method for determining sea surface temperatures is discussed. The specifications of the equipment and the atmospheric conditions required for successful multispectral data acquisition are described. Examples of data obtained in the North Atlantic Ocean are presented. The differences between the actual sea surface temperatures and the equivalent blackbody temperatures as determined by a radiometer are plotted.

  20. Improved dark energy detection through the polarization-assisted cross correlation of the cosmic microwave background with radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ng, Kin-Wang; Pen, Ue-Li

    2011-03-15

    Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect can be estimated by cross-correlating the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky with tracers of the local matter distribution. At late cosmic time, the dark energy-induced decay of gravitation potential generates a cross correlation signal on large angular scales. The dominant noise is the intrinsic CMB anisotropies from the inflationary epoch. In this paper we use CMB polarization to reduce this intrinsic noise. We cross-correlate the microwave sky observed by Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) with the radio source catalog compiled by NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) to study the efficiency of the noise suppression. We find that the error bars are reduced by about 4 to 14% and the statistical power in the signal is improved.

  1. Mapping photosynthetically available radiation at the sea surface using GOCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongkuk; Kim, Jihye; Yang, Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Eon; Frouin, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) controls the composition of marine ecosystem by affecting the growth of phytoplankton, thus estimating PAR at the ocean surface accurately is important to understand the marine ecological environment. Although many studies have been attempted to estimate PAR employing ocean colour satellite data since 2003, previous studies using data from the polar orbit systems had spatial and temporal limitations to estimate accurate daily PAR. Here, we estimate daily PAR from Geostationary Ocean Colour Imager (GOCI) which collects data eight times a day at an hour interval in daytime and compare it with in-situ measurement and MODIS-based daily PAR. The algorithm we developed in this study, employed GOCI visible bands (centred at (412, 443, 490, 555, 660, 680 nm) which belongs to the range of PAR by calculating albedo at the layer of clouds and the sea surface to estimate daily PAR. The resultant value was validated by comparing the in-situ measurements acquired from an ocean research station, Socheongcho between February and May 2015, which showed a similar pattern with somewhat GOCI-base PAR's overestimations. The comparison with the results from MODIS, a polar orbit system showed that a good agreement with each other was illustrated at clear sky conditions, while MODIS showed some over- or underestimations at cloudy conditions with irregular patterns. This study shows that GOCI can estimate effectively the daily PAR with its advantages of acquiring data more frequently than other polar orbit ocean colour satellites by reducing the uncertainties induced by insufficient images to map the daily PAR at ocean surface.

  2. Calibration of Suomi national polar-orbiting partnership advanced technology microwave sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Fuzhong; Zou, Xiaolei; Sun, Ninghai; Yang, Hu; Tian, Miao; Blackwell, William J.; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Lin; Anderson, Kent

    2013-10-01

    The Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite was launched on 28 October 2011 and carries the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on board. ATMS is a cross-track scanning instrument observing in 22 channels at frequencies ranging from 23 to 183 GHz, permitting the measurements of the atmospheric temperature and moisture under most weather conditions. In this study, the ATMS radiometric calibration algorithm used in the operational system is first evaluated through independent analyses of prelaunch thermal vacuum data. It is found that the ATMS peak nonlinearity for all the channels is less than 0.5 K, which is well within the specification. For the characterization of the ATMS instrument sensitivity or noise equivalent differential temperatures (NEDT), both standard deviation and Allan variance of warm counts are computed and compared. It is shown that NEDT derived from the standard deviation is about three to five times larger than that from the Allan variance. The difference results from a nonstationary component in the standard deviation of warm counts. The Allan variance is better suited than the standard deviation for describing NEDT. In the ATMS sensor brightness temperature data record (SDR) processing algorithm, the antenna gain efficiencies of main beam, cross-polarization beam, and side lobes must be derived accurately from the antenna gain distribution function. However, uncertainties remain in computing the efficiencies at ATMS high frequencies. Thus, ATMS antenna brightness temperature data records (TDR) at channels 1 to 15 are converted to SDR with the actual beam efficiencies whereas those for channels 16 to 22 are only corrected for the near-field sidelobe contributions. The biases of ATMS SDR measurements to the simulations are consistent between GPS RO and NWP data and are generally less than 0.5 K for those temperature-sounding channels where both the forward model and input atmospheric profiles are reliable.

  3. Evidence for gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background polarization from cross-correlation with the cosmic infrared background.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Borys, C; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-04-01

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics. PMID:24745402

  4. Evidence for Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization from Cross-Correlation with the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Borys, C.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.

  5. Effects of irregular sea surface and evaporation duct on radar detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Moshe

    1988-06-01

    The detection performance of microwave search radars operating in close proximity to the sea surface is evaluated. The effects of media characteristics on the propagation of electromagnetic waves have been incorporated. Specular and diffused scattering from a rough surface, and the effects of the curvature of the earth's surface have been included in the study. Additionally, surface ducting effects caused by atmospheric anomalies are presented. Some design and operational considerations which can improve the detection performance of a surface search radar, are also presented.

  6. Variations and climatology of CI0 in the polar lower stratosphere from UARS Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Water, J. W.; Livesey, N. J.

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measured the global distribution of stratospheric ClO over annual cycles for much of the 1990s, albeit with reduced sampling frequency in the latter half of the decade. Here we present an overview of the interannual and interhemispheric variations in the distribution of ClO derived from UARS MLS measurements, with a particular emphasis on enhancements in the winter polar lower stratosphere.

  7. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  8. Litmus Test for Cosmic Hemispherical Asymmetry in the Cosmic Microwave Background B-Mode Polarization.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Recent measurements of the temperature field of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide tantalizing evidence for violation of statistical isotropy (SI) that constitutes a fundamental tenet of contemporary cosmology. CMB space based missions, WMAP, and Planck have observed a 7% departure in the SI temperature field at large angular scales. However, due to higher cosmic variance at low multipoles, the significance of this measurement is not expected to improve from any future CMB temperature measurements. We demonstrate that weak lensing of the CMB due to scalar perturbations produces a corresponding SI violation in B modes of CMB polarization at smaller angular scales. The measurability of this phenomenon depends upon the scales (l range) over which power asymmetry is present. Power asymmetry, which is restricted only to l<64 in the temperature field, cannot lead to any significant observable effect from this new window. However, this effect can put an independent bound on the spatial range of scales of hemispherical asymmetry present in the scalar sector. PMID:27314711

  9. A triple-band, polarization- and incident angle-independent microwave metamaterial absorber with interference theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junfeng; Hu, Zhaoyang; Wang, Shengming; Huang, Xiutao; Liu, Minghai

    2016-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of an ultrathin triple-band metamaterial absorber (MMA) in the microwave frequencies. The unit cell of the MMA consists of three different sizes of electric split ring resonators (eSRRs) and continuous metal film separated by only 1 mm dielectric substrate. The single-band MMA of this structure is firstly investigated. Then, by tuning the scale factor of the unit cells, the proposed triple-band MMA achieves absorption peaks at 9.85 GHz, 13.05 GHz and 14.93 GHz, respectively. Electric field distributions at three resonant frequencies are investigated to qualitatively analyze the loss mechanism. The further simulated and experimental results indicate that the proposed MMA is also polarization- and incident angle-independent. Finally, the interference theory is introduced to quantitatively analyze the MMA, which provides good insight into the physics behind the absorbing structure. To calculate the absorption rates accurately, we employ a simulation strategy make the near-field coupling between two metallic layers get back (compensation method). The measured absorption spectra show an excellent agreement with the theoretical calculation and simulation results. Therefore, the explanation to the physical mechanism of the triple-band MMA is presented and verified.

  10. Born-corrections to weak lensing of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstotz, Steffen; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Merkel, Philipp M.

    2015-11-01

    Many weak-lensing calculations make use of the Born approximation where the light ray is approximated by a straight path. We examine the effect of Born-corrections for lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in an analytical approach by taking perturbative corrections to the geodesic into account. The resulting extra power in the lensing potential spectrum is comparable to the power generated by non-linear structure formation and affects especially the polarization spectra, leading to relative changes of the order of 10-3 for the E-mode spectrum and several per cent on all scales to the B-mode spectrum. In contrast, there is only little change of spectra involving the CMB temperature. Additionally, the corrections excite one more degree of freedom resulting in a deflection component which cannot be described as a gradient of the lensing potential as it is related to image rotation in lens-lens coupling. We estimate the magnitude of this effect on the CMB spectra and find it to be negligible.

  11. Litmus Test for Cosmic Hemispherical Asymmetry in the Cosmic Microwave Background B -Mode Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Recent measurements of the temperature field of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide tantalizing evidence for violation of statistical isotropy (SI) that constitutes a fundamental tenet of contemporary cosmology. CMB space based missions, WMAP, and Planck have observed a 7% departure in the SI temperature field at large angular scales. However, due to higher cosmic variance at low multipoles, the significance of this measurement is not expected to improve from any future CMB temperature measurements. We demonstrate that weak lensing of the CMB due to scalar perturbations produces a corresponding SI violation in B modes of CMB polarization at smaller angular scales. The measurability of this phenomenon depends upon the scales (l range) over which power asymmetry is present. Power asymmetry, which is restricted only to l <64 in the temperature field, cannot lead to any significant observable effect from this new window. However, this effect can put an independent bound on the spatial range of scales of hemispherical asymmetry present in the scalar sector.

  12. High-precision simulations of the weak lensing effect on cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbian, Giulio; Stompor, Radek

    2013-08-01

    We studied the accuracy, robustness, and self-consistency of pixel-domain simulations of the gravitational lensing effect on the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies due to the large-scale structure of the Universe. In particular, we investigated the dependence of the precision of the results precision on some crucial parameters of these techniques and propose a semi-analytic framework to determine their values so that the required precision is a priori assured and the numerical workload simultaneously optimized. Our focus was on the B-mode signal, but we also discuss other CMB observables, such as the total intensity, T, and E-mode polarization, emphasizing differences and similarities between all these cases. Our semi-analytic considerations are backed up by extensive numerical results. Those are obtained using a code, nicknamed lenS2HAT - for lensing using scalable spherical harmonic transforms (S2HAT) - which we have developed in the course of this work. The code implements a version of the previously described pixel-domain approach and permits performing the simulations at very high resolutions and data volumes, thanks to its efficient parallelization provided by the S2HAT library - a parallel library for calculating of the spherical harmonic transforms. The code is made publicly available.

  13. Use of superconducting bearings to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanany, S.; Matsumura, T.; Johnson, B.; Jones, T.; Hull, J. R.; Ma, K. B.

    2002-08-21

    Measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation are expected to significantly increase our understanding of the early universe. We present a design for a CMB polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. The design is optimized for implementation in MAXIPOL, a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter. A prototype bearing, consisting of commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We report on measurements of the coefficient of friction as a function of temperature between 15 and 80 K, of rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, of levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm, and of ambient pressure between 1 and 10{sup -7} torr. The low rotational drag of the HTS bearing allows rotations for long periods of time with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  14. The weighted curvature approximation in scattering from sea surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, Charles-Antoine; Soriano, Gabriel; Chapron, Bertrand

    2010-07-01

    A family of unified models in scattering from rough surfaces is based on local corrections of the tangent plane approximation through higher-order derivatives of the surface. We revisit these methods in a common framework when the correction is limited to the curvature, that is essentially the second-order derivative. The resulting expression is formally identical to the weighted curvature approximation, with several admissible kernels, however. For sea surfaces under the Gaussian assumption, we show that the weighted curvature approximation reduces to a universal and simple expression for the off-specular normalized radar cross-section (NRCS), regardless of the chosen kernel. The formula involves merely the sum of the NRCS in the classical Kirchhoff approximation and the NRCS in the small perturbation method, except that the Bragg kernel in the latter has to be replaced by the difference of a Bragg and a Kirchhoff kernel. This result is consistently compared with the resonant curvature approximation. Some numerical comparisons with the method of moments and other classical approximate methods are performed at various bands and sea states. For the copolarized components, the weighted curvature approximation is found numerically very close to the cut-off invariant two-scale model, while bringing substantial improvement to both the Kirchhoff and small-slope approximation. However, the model is unable to predict cross-polarization in the plane of incidence. The simplicity of the formulation opens new perspectives in sea state inversion from remote sensing data.

  15. The Effect of Ocean Currents on Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Leeuwenburgh, Olwijn

    2000-01-01

    We investigate regional and global-scale correlations between observed anomalies in sea surface temperature and height. A strong agreement between the two fields is found over a broad range of latitudes for different ocean basins. Both time-longitude plots and wavenumber-frequency spectra suggest an advective forcing of SST anomalies by a first-mode baroclinic wave field on spatial scales down to 400 km and time scales as short as 1 month. Even though the magnitude of the mean background temperature gradient is determining for the effectiveness of the forcing, there is no obvious seasonality that can be detected in the amplitudes of SST anomalies. Instead, individual wave signatures in the SST can in some cases be followed over periods of two years. The phase relationship between SST and SSH anomalies is dependent upon frequency and wavenumber and displays a clear decrease of the phase lag toward higher latitudes where the two fields come into phase at low frequencies. Estimates of the damping coefficient are larger than generally obtained for a purely atmospheric feedback. From a global frequency spectrum a damping time scale of 2-3 month was found. Regionally results are very variable and range from 1 month near strong currents to 10 month at low latitudes and in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Strong agreement is found between the first global EOF modes of 10 day averaged and spatially smoothed SST and SSH grids. The accompanying time series display low frequency oscillations in both fields.

  16. Low-frequency microwave radiometer for N-ROSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Lo, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The all weather, global determination of sea surface temperature (SST) has been identified as a requirement needed to support naval operations. The target SST accuracy is + or - 1.0 K with a surface resolution of 10 km. Investigations of the phenomenology and technology of remote passive microwave sensing of the ocean environment over the past decade have demonstrated that this objective is presently attainable. Preliminary specification and trade off studies were conducted to define the frequency, polarization, scan geometry, antenna size, and other esstential parameters of the low frequency microwave radiometer (LFMR). It will be a dual polarized, dual frequency system at 5.2 and 10.4 GHz using a 4.9 meter deployable mesh surface antenna. It is to be flown on the Navy-Remote Ocean Sensing System (N-ROSS) satellite scheduled to be launched in late 1988.

  17. A reevaluation of Stogryn's apparent temperature theory over the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Eom, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The emission theory for the sea surface by Stogryn has been reevaluated. Results agree with Stogryn's paper except for small nadir angles where the apparent temperature versus wind speed behavior is in reverse of what was reported by Stogryn. By plotting the change in contributions by the sea surface emission and sky temperature scattered toward the radiometer as a function of nadir angle at two different wind speeds, it is found that the sky temperature effect is dominating at small nadir angles, while the change in surface emission becomes increasingly more important at larger nadir angles. It is also found that at nadir higher emission is associated with the polarization where E(arrow) field is aligned along the upwind direction than the one along the crosswind direction.

  18. Annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan observed by ASCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Y.; Shimada, S.; Ohsawa, T.; Kozai, K.; Kogaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface wind speeds and these statistics can be applied for many marine industrial activities. For example, the averaged wind speed is crucial information for a site selection of an offshore wind farm. It has widely been recognized that a total amount of the offshore wind generation is strongly depended on the annual average wind speeds. A advanced scatterometer (ASCAT), which is a kind of scatterometer aboard METOP-A and B, has observed sea surface wind speeds at the height of 10 m above the sea surface approximately twice a day using active microwaves. The annual average wind speed can be calculated from the observed wind speed. For an actual use of the annual average wind speed, generalities and representativeness of the wind speed must be clarified. To investigate annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan (120°E to 165°E, 19°N to 49°N), the annual average wind speeds and these standard deviations are calculated from 5 years of ASCAT observations from 2010 through 2014. It is found that there are some sea areas where standard deviations are relatively higher than their surroundings. Annual average wind speed maps indicate that the high standard deviation is caused by strong winds from Eurasia in the winter of 2011 in part of North Pacific Ocean and Sea of Okhotsk. Additionally standard deviations for only winter are also higher than for summer in those sea areas. Therefore the strong wind speed in the winter of a particular year can easily affect to the annual average wind speed. Meanwhile off the coast of Niigata and Hokkaido, there are also higher standard deviation areas than their surroundings. Differences between monthly maximum wind speeds for the winter and minimum wind speeds for the summer in these areas are larger and the large differences seem to be a cause of the high standard deviations.

  19. Correlations between altimetric sea surface height and radiometric sea surface temperature in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew S.; Allen, Myles; Guymer, Trevor; Saunders, Mark

    1998-04-01

    In the last decade, satellite altimetric measurements of sea surface height (SSH) and infrared radiometric measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) have provided a wealth of information about ocean circulation and atmosphere-ocean interactions. SSH is a depth-integrated quantity dependent upon the temperature and salinity structure of the water column and on the depth independent barotropic contribution. SST from infrared radiometers is a surface parameter representing the temperature of the top few microns of the ocean surface. Hence any relationship between SST and SSH provides dynamical information about the coupling between the ocean surface and subsurface. It also offers a promise of new techniques such as interpolating SSH data using SST and of improved calculations of eddy kinetic energy. We use SST data from the along-track scanning radiometer on ERS-I and SSH data from the TOPEX/POSEIDON instrument to examine the relationship between SST and SSH anomalies within the South Atlantic region for 1993 and 1994. We find that positive (≈0.2-0.6) spatial cross correlations between SST and SSH anomalies at zero lag are present throughout the region at large scales (wavelengths >1000 km). Small-scale correlations, however, are high (≈0.7) only in areas associated with fronts and mesoscale variability. These small-scale correlations are seasonal, being strongest in winter and weakest in summer. We discuss the application of these correlations to various techniques requiring the synergistic use of SSH and SST data.

  20. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field from Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project was part of a previous grant at MIT that was moved over to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) together with the principal investigator. The final report provided here is concerned only with the work performed at SIO since January 2000. The primary focus of this project was the study of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. The central goal of the project was to improve our understanding and modeling of the relationship between the SST and its variability to internal ocean dynamics, and the overlying atmosphere, and to explore the relative roles of air-sea fluxes and internal ocean dynamics in establishing anomalies in SST on annual and longer time scales. An understanding of those problems will feed into the general discussion on how SST anomalies vary with time and the extend to which they interact with the atmosphere.

  1. Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QUIET Collaboration; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bronfman, L.; Bustos, R.; Church, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Jones, M. E.; Kangaslahti, P.; Kapner, D. J.; Kubik, D.; Lawrence, C. R.; Limon, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Miller, A. D.; Nagai, M.; Nguyen, H.; Nixon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Piccirillo, L.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.; Samtleben, D.; Seiffert, M.; Shepherd, M. C.; Smith, K. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; Vanderlinde, K.; Williamson, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 μK\\sqrt{s}. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of ~1000 deg2 with an effective angular resolution of 12farcm8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C l (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with ΛCDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1+0.9 - 0.8 (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2+0.9 - 0.8 (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  2. SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Reeves, R.; Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.; Bronfman, L.; Church, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Gaier, T.; Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  3. Upper ocean flow statistics estimated from superresolved sea-surface temperature images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Shane R.; Smith, K. Shafer

    2015-02-01

    Ocean turbulence on scales of 10-50 km plays a key role in biogeochemical processes, frontal dynamics, and tracer transport in the upper ocean, but our understanding of these scales is limited because they are too small to be resolved using extant satellite altimetry products. By contrast, microwave imagery of the sea-surface temperature field does resolve these scales and can be used to estimate the upper ocean flow field due to the strong correlation between the surface density field and the interior potential vorticity. However, because the surface density (or temperature) is a smoothed version of the geostrophic stream function, the resulting velocity field estimates are limited to scales of 100-300 km in the first few hundred meters of the water column. A method is proposed for generating superresolved sea-surface temperature images using direct low-resolution (microwave) temperature observations in combination with an empirical parameterization for the unresolved scales modeled on statistical information from high-resolution (infrared) imagery. Because the method relies only on the statistics of the small-scale field, it is insensitive to data outages due to cloud cover that affect infrared observations. The method enhances the effective resolution of the temperature images by exploiting the effect of spatial aliasing and generates an optimal estimate of the small-scale temperature field using standard Bayesian inference. The technique is tested in quasigeostrophic simulations driven by realistic climatological shear and stratification profiles for three contrasting regions at high, middle, and low latitudes. The resulting superresolved sea-surface temperature images are then used to estimate the three-dimensional velocity field in the upper ocean on scales of 10-50 km.

  4. Observational Strategies of Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature and Polarization Interferometry Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Ng, Kin-Wang; Park, Changbom; Liu, Guo-Chin; Umetsu, Keiichi

    2003-05-01

    We have simulated the interferometric observation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization fluctuations. We have constructed data pipelines from the time-ordered raw visibility samples to the CMB power spectra that utilize the methods of data compression, maximum likelihood analysis, and optimal subspace filtering. They are customized for three observational strategies: the single pointing, the mosaicking, and the drift-scanning. For each strategy, derived are the optimal strategy parameters that yield band power estimates with minimum uncertainty. The results are general and can be applied to any close-packed array on a single platform such as the CBI and the forthcoming AMiBA experiments. We have also studied the effect of rotation of the array platform on the band power correlation by simulating the CBI single-pointing observation. It is found that the band power anticorrelations can be reduced by rotating the platform and thus densely sampling the visibility plane. This enables us to increase the resolution of the power spectrum in the l-space down to the limit of the sampling theorem (Δl=226~π/θ), which is narrower by a factor of about sqrt(2) than the resolution limit (Δl~300) used in the recent CBI single-pointing observation. The validity of this idea is demonstrated for a two-element interferometer that samples visibilities uniformly in the uv-annulus. From the fact that the visibilities are the Fourier modes of the CMB field convolved with the beam, a fast unbiased estimator (FUE) of the CMB power spectra is developed and tested. It is shown that the FUE gives results very close to those from the quadratic estimator method without requiring large computer resources even though uncertainties in the results increase.

  5. The interaction of polarized microwaves with planar arrays of femtosecond laser-produced plasma filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, Anca; El Morsli, Mbark; Vidal, Francois; Payeur, Stephane; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Chateauneuf, Marc; Theberge, Francis; Dubois, Jacques

    2013-02-15

    The interaction of polarized microwaves with subwavelength arrays of parallel plasma filaments, such as those produced by the propagation of high-power femtosecond laser pulses in ambient air, was investigated by calculating the reflection and transmission coefficients as a function of the incidence angles using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The time evolution of these coefficients was calculated and compared with experiments. It is found that the plasma filaments array becomes transparent when the polarization of the microwave radiation is perpendicular to the filaments axis, regardless the incidence angle of the microwave with respect to the filaments, except near grazing incidence. Increasing the filaments electron density or diameter, or decreasing the electron collision frequency or filaments spacing, decreases the transmission and increases the reflection. Transmission decreases when increasing the number of filament layers while reflection remains unchanged as the number of filament layers exceeds a given number ({approx}3 in our case). Transmission slightly increases when disorder is introduced in the filament arrays. The detailed calculation results are compared with those obtained from the simple birefringent slab model, which provides a convenient framework to calculate approximately the properties of filament arrays.

  6. Three-dimensional effects in polarization signatures as observed from precipitating clouds by low frequency ground-based microwave radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, A.; Simmer, C.; Czekala, H.

    2006-09-01

    Consistent negative polarization differences (i.e. differences between the vertical and the horizontal brightness temperature) are observed when looking at precipitating systems by ground-based radiometers at slant angles. These signatures can be partially explained by one-dimensional radiative transfer computations that include oriented non-spherical raindrops. However some cases are characterized by polarization values that exceed differences expected from one-dimensional radiative transfer. A three-dimensional fully polarized Monte Carlo model has been used to evaluate the impact of the horizontal finiteness of rain shafts with different rain rates at 10, 19, and 30 GHz. The results show that because of the reduced slant optical thickness in finite clouds, the polarization signal can strongly differ from its one-dimensional counterpart. At the higher frequencies and when the radiometer is positioned underneath the cloud, significantly higher negative values for the polarization are found which are also consistent with some observations. When the observation point is located outside of the precipitating cloud, typical polarization patterns (with troughs and peaks) as a function of the observation angle are predicted. An approximate 1-D slant path radiative transfer model is considered as well and results are compared with the full 3-D simulations to investigate whether or not three-dimensional effects can be explained by geometry effects alone. The study has strong relevance for low-frequency passive microwave polarimetric studies.

  7. Three-dimensional effects in polarization signatures as observed from precipitating clouds by low frequency ground-based microwave radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, A.; Simmer, C.; Czekala, H.

    2006-06-01

    Consistent negative polarization differences (i.e. differences between the vertical and the horizontal brightness temperature) are observed when looking at precipitating systems by ground-based radiometers at slant angles. These signatures can be partially explained by one-dimensional radiative transfer computations that include oriented non-spherical raindrops. However some cases are characterized by polarization values that exceed differences expected from one-dimensional radiative transfer. A three-dimensional fully polarized Monte Carlo model has been used to evaluate the impact of the horizontal finiteness of rain shafts with different rain rates at 10, 19, and 30 GHz. The results show that because of the reduced slant optical thickness in finite clouds, the polarization signal can strongly differ from its one-dimensional counterpart. At the higher frequencies and when the radiometer is positioned underneath the cloud, significantly higher negative values for the polarization are found which are also consistent with some observations. When the observation point is located outside of the precipitating cloud, typical polarization patterns (with troughs and peaks) as a function of the observation angle are predicted. An approximate 1-D slant path radiative transfer model is considered as well and results are compared with the full 3-D simulations to investigate whether or not three-dimensional effects can be explained by geometry effects alone. The study has strong relevance for low-frequency passive microwave polarimetric studies.

  8. A technique for measuring vertically and horizontally polarized microwave brightness temperatures using electronic polarization-basis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, Albin J.

    1992-01-01

    This technique for electronically rotating the polarization basis of an orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer is based on the measurement of the first three feedhorn Stokes parameters, along with the subsequent transformation of this measured Stokes vector into a rotated coordinate frame. The technique requires an accurate measurement of the cross-correlation between the two orthogonal feedhorn modes, for which an innovative polarized calibration load was developed. The experimental portion of this investigation consisted of a proof of concept demonstration of the technique of electronic polarization basis rotation (EPBR) using a ground based 90-GHz dual orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer. Practical calibration algorithms for ground-, aircraft-, and space-based instruments were identified and tested. The theoretical effort consisted of radiative transfer modeling using the planar-stratified numerical model described in Gasiewski and Staelin (1990).

  9. A Methodology for Surface Soil Moisture and Vegetation Optical Depth Retrieval Using the Microwave Polarization Difference Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, Manfred; deJeu, Richard; Walker, Jeffrey; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A methodology for retrieving surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth from satellite microwave radiometer data is presented. The procedure is tested with historical 6.6 GHz brightness temperature observations from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer over several test sites in Illinois. Results using only nighttime data are presented at this time, due to the greater stability of nighttime surface temperature estimation. The methodology uses a radiative transfer model to solve for surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth simultaneously using a non-linear iterative optimization procedure. It assumes known constant values for the scattering albedo and roughness. Surface temperature is derived by a procedure using high frequency vertically polarized brightness temperatures. The methodology does not require any field observations of soil moisture or canopy biophysical properties for calibration purposes and is totally independent of wavelength. Results compare well with field observations of soil moisture and satellite-derived vegetation index data from optical sensors.

  10. Relative sensitivity of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) for vegetation and desertification monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Francois; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple equation relating the Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is proposed which represents well data obtained from Nimbus 7/SMMR at 37 GHz and NOAA/AVHRR Channels 1 and 2. It is found that there is a limit which is characteristic of a particular type of cover for which both indices are equally sensitive to the variation of vegetation, and below which MPDI is more efficient than NDVI. The results provide insight into the relationship between water content and chlorophyll absorption at pixel size scales.