Science.gov

Sample records for sealed air filled

  1. Dye filled security seal

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Dennis C. W.

    1982-04-27

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member.

  2. Impact of Blow/Fill/Seal process variables in determining rate of vial contamination by air dispersed microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Leo, Frank; Poisson, Patrick; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Controlled challenges of air dispersed spores of Bacillus subtilis NCIMB 8649 have been generated in a custom-built challenge room housing a Blow/Fill/Seal machine filling filter-sterilized trypticase soy broth into 5.5 cm3 low density polyethylene vials. The effects on the rate of vial contamination of systematic changes in the process variables, rate of provision of ballooning air, delay in the application of mould vacuum and duration of transfer of the open vial, have been examined. Overall, the findings show that the conditions of vial formation can affect appreciably the rate of vial contamination from airborne spores. The indications are that heat lethality, associated with the elevated temperature required for polymer extrusion and vial formation, has a role in determining such contamination. PMID:16316067

  3. Air Sampling System for use in monitoring viable and non-viable particulate air quality under dynamic operating conditions of blow/fill/seal processing.

    PubMed

    Probert, Steve; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2002-01-01

    An Air Sampling Link (ASL), employed in conjunction with an Air Sampling Device (ASD) or a laser particle counter, has been developed for sampling flowing air for viable and non-viable particulate analyses. Typically, the ASL could be used to sample filtered air supplied to an air shower of a Blow/Fill/Seal machine operating in the dynamic state. The ASL allows sample volumes of air to be taken from flowing air without significant loss from the sample flow of airborne particles possessing aerodynamic sizes relevant to those found in practice. The link has no moving parts, is steam sterilizable in-situ, and allows for the taking of continuous samples of air without the need for intervention into the 'critical zone' of the filling machine. This article describes (i) the design criteria for the ASL and the ASD, (ii) the rationale underlying the concept of the ASL design, (iii) the collection performance of the ASL against that of a conventional sampling arrangement, and (iv) a functionality assessment of the ASL-based sampling system installed on a Rommelag style 305 B/F/S machine over a seven week period. PMID:12404722

  4. Air Force Seal Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1996-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to control leakage at the required conditions. This presentation briefly describes current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engines.

  5. Direct seal papers for horizontal form-fill-seal machine.

    PubMed

    Merritt, John

    2002-01-01

    Direct-seal papers are designed for minimal fibre lift, where the sealing layer is incorporated into the bottom web. There are applications where they are the most appropriate economical alternative to traditional coated papers for horizontal form-fill-seal packaging. This article explores their benefits and limitations. PMID:11921779

  6. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  7. Airborne contamination during blow-fill-seal pharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Whyte, W; Matheis, W; Dean-Netcher, M; Edwards, A

    1998-01-01

    The routes of airborne contamination, during Blow-Fill-Seal (BFS) production, were studied using tracer gas, particles and bacteria. The prevention of airborne contamination, by the air shower at the point of fill, was effective (> 99.2% efficient). However, microbe-carrying particles could gain access, by deposition or air exchange, when the containers were cut open and before they shuttled under the protection of the air shower. The use of SF6 tracer gas demonstrated that when the air shower was not on, 50% of the air within the containers came from the area round the machine. When the air shower was switched on, only about 5% of the air came from the surroundings. Airborne microbial contamination of containers is in proportion to: the number of airborne microbes around the machine, the time the container is open, the neck area and the amount of air left within the container. The likely microbial contamination rate can be calculated from a model incorporating these variables. Microbial contamination of containers during BFS manufacturing is normally very low, but by increasing the naturally occurring bacteria in the air of the production rooms by about 100-fold, it was possible to verify the accuracy of this model. The contamination model agrees well with the observation that microbial contamination levels of between 1 in 10(5) and in 10(7) will be found when small containers (< 10 ml) are filled in conventionally ventilated rooms. To achieve similar contamination rates when filling of larger bottles, it is likely that unidirectional flow, or barrier technology will be required. PMID:9691671

  8. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  9. Aerodynamical sealing by air curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Daria; Linden, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Air curtains are artificial high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in a doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The performance of an air curtain is assessed in terms of the sealing effectiveness E, the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. The main controlling parameter for air curtain dynamics is the deflection modulus Dm representing the ratio of the momentum flux of the air curtain and the transverse forces acting on it due to the stack effect. In this talk, we examine the influence of two factors on the performance of an air curtain: the presence of an additional ventilation pathway in the room, such as a small top opening, and the effects of an opposing buoyancy force which for example arises if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. Small-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the E (Dm) -curve of an air curtain in both situations. We present both experimental results and theoretical explanations for our observations. We also briefly illustrate how simplified models developed for air curtains can be used for more complex phenomena such as the effects of wind blowing around a model building on the ventilation rates through the openings.

  10. Filled glass composites for sealing of solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Rajan; Widgeon, Scarlett Joyce; Garino, Terry J.; Brochu, Mathieu; Gauntt, Bryan D.; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.

    2009-04-01

    Glasses filled with ceramic or metallic powders have been developed for use as seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program. The composites of glass (alkaline earth-alumina-borate) and powders ({approx}20 vol% of yttria-stabilized zirconia or silver) were shown to form seals with SOFC materials at or below 900 C. The type and amount of powder were adjusted to optimize thermal expansion to match the SOFC materials and viscosity. Wetting studies indicated good wetting was achieved on the micro-scale and reaction studies indicated that the degree of reaction between the filled glasses and SOFC materials, including spinel-coated 441 stainless steel, at 750 C is acceptable. A test rig was developed for measuring strengths of seals cycled between room temperature and typical SOFC operating temperatures. Our measurements showed that many of the 410 SS to 410 SS seals, made using silver-filled glass composites, were hermetic at 0.2 MPa (2 atm.) of pressure and that seals that leaked could be resealed by briefly heating them to 900 C. Seal strength measurements at elevated temperature (up to 950 C), measured using a second apparatus that we developed, indicated that seals maintained 0.02 MPa (0.2 atm.) overpressures for 30 min at 750 C with no leakage. Finally, the volatility of the borate component of sealing glasses under SOFC operational conditions was studied using weight loss measurements and found by extrapolation to be less than 5% for the projected SOFC lifetime.

  11. Sealed and lubricated rock bit with air protected seal ring

    SciTech Connect

    Galle, E.M.

    1983-03-01

    An earth boring rock bit having a sealed bearing and pressure lubrication system for drilling the earth with air or gas as the circulating medium. An annular groove is formed in the vicinity of the seal and connected to the interior of the bit for cooling the ring and cleaning debris from the area of the ring. The air pressure inside the bit is utilized to bias a movable element in the system to urge lubricant to the bearing.

  12. Locating and sealing air leaks in multiroomed buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Industrial, nontoxic smoke bombs are used in multiroomed buildings to locate and fill discovered leak areas with polyurethane foam. All obvious air escape routes are sealed and the room is then pressurized to a minimum of 0.1 inch water above the pressure of adjoining rooms.

  13. Air riding seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Mills, Jacob A; Brown, Wesley D; Sexton, Thomas D; Jones, Russell B

    2016-07-19

    An air riding seal between a rotor and a stator in a turbine of a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is movable in an axial direction within a housing that extends from the stator, and a bellows is secured to the annular piston to form a flexible air passageway from a compressed air inlet through the annular piston and into a cushion cavity that forms an air riding seal between the annular piston and the rotor sealing surface. In another embodiment, a flexible seal secured to and extending from the annular piston forms a sealing surface between the annular piston chamber and the annular piston to provide a seal and allow for axial movement.

  14. Finger Seal: A Novel Approach to Air to Air Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul; Steinetz, Bruce; Proctor, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    The gas turbine industry used a variety of sealing mechanisms to contain and direct secondary flows into and around components for cooling, and to limit leakage into and from bearing and disk cavities. The function of these seals is very important to the component efficiencies and attendant engine performance. Most of these seals are labyrinth seals, which are high-leakage seals that are costly to manufacture. In recent years, brush seals have been introduced which have demonstrated significantly reduced leakage, although they are still expensive and have exhibited wear and hysteresis difficulties. A new innovative concept called finger seal, patented by AlliedSignal, has demonstrated leakage similar to brush seals and is cheaper. The finger seal is comprised of a stack of precision photo-etched sheet metal elements, which allows intricate features to be made at very low cost and with the potential to resist wear and provide the compliance necessary to accomodate rotor excursions. Initial testing in the high-speed/high-temperature seal test facility, at the NASA Lewis Research Center, has corroborated the finger seal performance. The testing also revealed hysteresis problems with the current design. A NASA funded research project is in progress to correct the functional deficiencies of the finger seal and to refine its features to provide sufficient seal life for commercial transport engines and other long-life applications. This research will benefit the aeronautical gas turbine industry as a whole in terms of fuel consumption, operational characteristics, and cost. The first phase of this research to reduce finger seal hysteresis has been in progress for the last one year. This paper presents the results of this research to date. In future the research program will address seal performance, manufacturing, cost and life issues. The research program is expected to be completed by December 1998.

  15. Improved Gas Filling and Sealing of an HC-PCF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel; Spiers, Gary

    2008-01-01

    An improved packaging approach has been devised for filling a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber (HC-PCF) with a gas, sealing the HC-PCF to retain the gas, and providing for optical connections and, optionally, a plumbing fitting for changing or augmenting the gas filling. Gas-filled HC-PCFs can be many meters long and have been found to be attractive as relatively compact, lightweight, rugged alternatives to conventional gas-filled glass cells for use as molecular-resonance frequency references for stabilization of lasers in some optical-metrology, lidar, optical-communication, and other advanced applications. Prior approaches to gas filling and sealing of HC-PCFs have involved, variously, omission of any attempt to connectorize the PCF, connectorization inside a vacuum chamber (an awkward and expensive process), or temporary exposure of one end of an HC-PCF to the atmosphere, potentially resulting in contamination of the gas filling. Prior approaches have also involved, variously, fusion splicing of HC-PCFs with other optical fibers or other termination techniques that give rise to Fresnel reflections of about 4 percent, which results in output intensity noise.

  16. Floating air riding seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A

    2016-08-16

    A floating air riding seal for a gas turbine engine with a rotor and a stator, an annular piston chamber with an axial moveable annular piston assembly within the annular piston chamber formed in the stator, an annular cavity formed on the annular piston assembly that faces a seal surface on the rotor, where the axial moveable annular piston includes an inlet scoop on a side opposite to the annular cavity that scoops up the swirling cooling air and directs the cooling air to the annular cavity to form an air cushion with the seal surface of the rotor.

  17. Sealing ability of five different retrograde filling materials.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, F; Wagner, W

    1996-09-01

    The sealing ability of Amalgam, Harvard-Cement, Diaket, gold-leaf, and Ketac-Endo as retrofilling materials was investigated. Paper cones were fixed with Harvard-Cement in the instrumented roots of 100 extracted human incisors. Apicectomy was performed and a 2-mm-deep retrograde cavity was prepared. Teeth were assigned to five groups (n = 20); each group received a different filling material. Surfaces of the roots were isolated with nail polish. Teeth, were stored in 1% methylene blue dye for 72 h. Roots were sectioned, and the depth of dye penetration was evaluated through a stereomicroscope. Retrofills with Ketac-Endo showed significantly less leakage compared with amalgam. There was no significant difference between the amalgam and Diaket groups. The sealing ability of Harvard-Cement and gold foil was lower than amalgam. It was concluded that retrograde fillings with Ketac-Endo or Diaket can be considered as alternatives for amalgam. PMID:9198426

  18. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  19. High efficiency, down flow air filter sealing and support system

    SciTech Connect

    Mattison, A.H.

    1986-07-15

    An assembly of high efficiency air filter units through which essentially all air entering a clean space below the units must pass to remove particulate matter down to sub-micron size from the air, the assembly comprising: (a) a plurality of air filter units each having a filter core of pleated media sealed in air-tight engagement on four sides to a surrounding, box-like, rigid frame, having side and end members; (b) means for supporting the filter units adjacent the upper surfaces thereof from structure above the space with adjacent units having the side and end members thereof providing adjoining vertical surfaces in closely spaced relation with the lower surfaces of the units in essentially the same horizontal plane to form at least a portion of the top of the space; and (c) a caulking material filling all spaces between the adjoining vertical surfaces of adjacent filter units, effectively sealing the spaces and providing the sole means preventing passage of air around the units.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Sealed Air-Return Plenum Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-08-01

    In this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers greatly improved indoor air quality and HVAC performance by replacing an old, leaky air handler with a new air handler with an air-sealed return plenum with filter; they also sealed the ducts, and added a fresh air intake.

  1. Investigation of pulsed light for terminal sterilization of WFI filled blow/fill/seal polyethylene containers.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J; Burgess, D; Leo, F

    1997-01-01

    A study was performed to assess the ability of pulsed light to sterilize water for injection in blow/fill/seal polyethylene containers. Pulsed light uses intense, short duration flashes of broad spectrum white light to produce high levels of microbial kill. In a first phase of testing, containers of 0.5, 5, 15, and 120 mL nominal volume were inoculated with Bacillus pumilus endospores, Bacillus subtilus variety niger strain globigii endospores, Bacillus stearothermophilus endospores, and Aspergillus niger conidiospores. Approximately 10(6) colony forming units of each test spore were individually inoculated into 22 replicate containers of each sample volume. Two of these containers served as inoculation recovery controls, and 10 were treated using each of two pulsed light exposure methods: single-sided treatment, or treatment within a reflective cavity. Both treatments employed flashes of intense broad spectrum pulsed light delivered at one flash per second. Cavity treatment used 10 flashes to treat each container within a reflective cavity containing a single lamp. Cavity treatment yielded no recoverable survivors for any of the challenge spores from the contents of any of the 160 total samples. Single-sided treatment used 20 approximately 1-J/cm2 flashes from a single lamp-reflector projecting onto one side of the container. Single-sided treatment yielded no recoverable survivors from the contents of the containers for any of the bacterial endospores tested, but Aspergillus niger survival was detected in 4 of the 40 single-side treated samples. A second phase of tests examined the pulsed light inactivation of Bacillus pumilus spores for a range of inoculation levels. High levels of Bacillus pumilus spore kill were obtained using only a few cavity flashes. The results show that pulsed light can provide high levels of microbial lethality and possesses potential for use as a terminal sterilization method for water for injection in filled, sealed polyethylene

  2. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lstiburek, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy, health, safety, and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  3. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Attic Air Sealing Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored Guide to Attic Air Sealing by Building America research partner Building Science Corporation, which provides best practices for attic air sealing. The guide has had 21,000 views and 13,000 downloads since it was posted.

  4. 2003 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The following reports were included in the 2003 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop:Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP); Overview of NASA Glenn Seal Developments; NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Project Overview; Development of Higher Temperature Abradable Seals for Industrial Gas Turbines; High Misalignment Carbon Seals for the Fan Drive Gear System Technologies; Compliant Foil Seal Investigations; Test Rig for Evaluating Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts; Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control; Non-Contacting Finger Seal Developments and Design Considerations; Effect of Flow-Induced Radial Load on Brush Seal/Rotor Contact Mechanics; Seal Developments at Flowserve Corporation; Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators With Seal-Like Features; Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators; Feltmetal Seal Material Through-Flow; "Bimodal" Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) Propulsion for Future Human Mars Exploration Missions; High Temperature Propulsion System Structural Seals for Future Space Launch Vehicles; Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles; High Temperature Metallic Seal Development for Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications; and BrazeFoil Honeycomb.

  5. Measuring the fill height of sealed cans with a compound pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, P.M.

    1995-06-01

    A compound pendulum has been designed, fabricated, tested, and used to determine the fill height of material in sealed cans. The specific cans that stimulated this work are partially filled with uranium and plutonium oxide. Fill height affects nondestructive assays using fission neutrons, but corrections for various fill heights can be made once the height is known. Heights vary with use as the powder compacts or loosens, so it is necessary to determine the height at the time of the neutron measurement. The pendulum is small and readily portable so it can be taken to the location of the neutron measurement. Tests with open cans filled with sand to various known heights had accuracies generally within 3%. Factors that can affect the accuracy are examined and discussed. Experience in using the pendulum on sealed cans is related.

  6. Split ring floating air riding seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Mills, Jacob A

    2015-11-03

    A floating air riding seal for a gas turbine engine with a rotor and a stator, an annular piston chamber with an axial moveable annular piston assembly within the annular piston chamber, an annular cavity formed on the annular piston assembly that faces a seal surface on the rotor, and a central passage connecting the annular cavity to the annular piston chamber to supply compressed air to the seal face, where the annular piston assembly is a split piston assembly to maintain a tight seal as coning of the rotor disk occurs.

  7. Self-sealing ability of OCP-mediated cement as a deciduous root canal filling materia.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuki; Tanaka, Yumi; Nagai, Akiko; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Takagi, Yuzo

    2010-10-01

    The densification process and canal sealing ability of octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-mediated cement were investigated for developing biocompatible and biodegradable root canal filling material for deciduous root. The results of the characterization revealed that the starting paste, which consisted of monocalcium phosphate monohydrate, calcium carbonate, and α-tricalcium phosphate, gradually transformed into carbonate apatite for 6 weeks of immersion in medium with 30% fetal bovine serum (MEM30). The canal sealing ability was estimated by dye penetration test. Three kinds of conditions were chosen for the test: one was the cement just after filling the single-rooted extracted human roots; the others were the cement aged in MEM30 for 1 and 6 weeks after filling, respectively. All roots were then immersed in India ink for 3 days. The penetration depth of OCP-mediated cement decreased significantly with time. This demonstrates that OCP-mediated cement has self-sealing ability. PMID:20733262

  8. 2006 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop; Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce, M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor); Delgado, Irebert (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA s new fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakages as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed seal technologies employed by the Apollo command module that serve as an excellent basis for seals for NASA s new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV).

  9. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, C.; Maxwell, S.

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  10. Measure Guideline. Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, Casey; Maxwell, Sean

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  11. 2000 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The 2000 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered four main areas: (1) overviews of NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) and Access to Space Programs, with emphasis on program goals and seal needs; (2) review of turbine engine seal issues from the perspective of end users such as United Airlines; (3) reviews of sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (4) reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrates for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future engine system efficiency and emission goals. GE, Pratt & Whitney, and Honeywell presented advanced seal development work being performed within their organizations. The NASA-funded GE/Stein Seal team has successfully demonstrated a large (3-ft. diam) aspirating seal that can withstand all anticipated pressures, speeds, and rotor runouts anticipated for a GE90 L.P. turbine balance piston location. GE/Stein Seal are fabricating a full-scale seal to be tested in a GE-90 ground test engine in early 2002. Pratt & Whitney and Stein Seal are investigating carbon seals to accommodate large radial movements anticipated in future geared-fan gearbox locations. Honeywell presented a finger seal design being considered for a high-temperature static combustor location incorporating ceramic finger elements. Successful demonstration of the braided carbon rope thermal barriers to extreme temperatures (5500 F) for short durations provide a new form of very high temperature thermal barrier for future Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle joints. The X-37, X-38, and future highly reusable launch vehicles pose challenging control surface seal demands that require new seal concepts made from emerging high temperature ceramics and other materials.

  12. Development of mainshaft seals for advanced air breathing propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobek, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    A gas-film face seal design incorporating shrouded Rayleigh step lift pads at the primary sealing face was analyzed for performance over a wide range of gas turbine engine conditions. Acceptable leakage rates and operation without rubbing contact was predicted for engine conditions that included sealed pressures to 500 psi, sliding speeds to 600 ft/sec, and sealed gas temperatures to 1200 F. In the experimental evaluation, measured gas leakage rates were, in general, close to that predicted and sometimes lower. Satisfactory performance of the gas-film seal was demonstrated at the maximum seal seat axial runout expected in present positive contact face seal applications. Stable operation was shown when testing was performed with air-entrained dirt.

  13. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Modera, Mark

    2012-05-01

    This report presents a process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  14. 2008 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor); Delgado, Irebert R. (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Orion project aimed at developing a new spacecraft that will fare astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA s fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakage as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Turbine seal development topics covered include a method for fast-acting HPT blade tip clearance control, noncontacting low-leakage seals, intershaft seals, and a review of engine seal performance requirements for current and future Army engine platforms.

  15. 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Delgado, Irebert

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA's new Orion project aimed at developing a new spacecraft that will fare astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA's fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA's turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakage as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Turbine seal development topics covered include a method for fast-acting HPT blade tip clearance control, noncontacting low-leakage seals, intershaft seals, and a review of engine seal performance requirements for current and future Army engine platforms.

  16. 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Propulsion 21 Project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed tests completed for the shuttle main landing gear door seals.

  17. 1999 NASA Seal/secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn hosted the Seals/Secondary Air System Workshop on October 28-29, 1999. Each year NASA and our industry and university partners share their respective seal technology development. We use these workshops as a technical forum to exchange recent advancements and "lessons-leamed" in advancing seal technology and solving problems of common interest. As in the past we are publishing two volumes. Volume 1 will be publicly available and volume 2 will be restricted under International Traffic and Arms Regulations (I.T.A.R.). The 1999 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop was divided into four areas; (i) overviews of the government-sponsored gas turbine programs (NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology program and DOE Advanced Turbine System program) and the general aviation program (GAP) with emphasis on program goals and seal needs; (ii) turbine engine seal issues from the perspective of an airline customer (i.e., United Airlines), (iii) sealing concepts, methods and results including experimental facilities and numerical predictions; and (iv) reviews of seal requirements for next generation aerospace vehicles (Trailblazer, Bantam and X-38).

  18. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.; Modera, M.

    2012-05-01

    Space conditioning energy use can be significantly reduced by addressing uncontrolled infiltration and exfiltration through the envelope of a building. A process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology is presented. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  19. Solubility and bacterial sealing ability of MTA and root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Espir, Camila Galletti; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; Berbert, Fabio Luiz Camargo Villela; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Objective To evaluate solubility and sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and root-end filling materials. Material and Methods The materials evaluated were: MTA, Calcium Silicate Cement with zirconium oxide (CSC/ZrO2), and zinc oxide/eugenol (ZOE). Solubility test was performed according to ANSI/ADA. The difference between initial and final mass of the materials was analyzed after immersion in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. Retrograde cavities in human teeth with single straight root canal were performed by using ultrasonic tip CVD 9.5107-8. The cavities were filled with the evaluated materials to evaluate sealing ability using the bacterial leakage test with Enterococcus faecalis. Bacterial leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for six weeks observing the turbidity of Brain Heart infusion (BHI) medium in contact with root apex. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey tests (solubility), and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (sealing ability) at a 5% significance level. Results For the 7-day period, ZOE presented highest solubility when compared with the other groups (p<0.05). For the 30-day period, no difference was observed among the materials. Lower bacterial leakage was observed for MTA and CSC/ZrO2, and both presented better results than ZOE (p<0.05). Conclusion MTA and CSC/ZrO2 presented better bacterial sealing capacity, which may be related to lower initial solubility observed for these materials in relation to ZOE. PMID:27119759

  20. Solubility and bacterial sealing ability of MTA and root-end filling materials

    PubMed Central

    ESPIR, Camila Galletti; GUERREIRO-TANOMARU, Juliane Maria; SPIN-NETO, Rubens; CHÁVEZ-ANDRADE, Gisselle Moraima; BERBERT, Fabio Luiz Camargo Villela; TANOMARU-FILHO, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate solubility and sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and root-end filling materials. Material and Methods The materials evaluated were: MTA, Calcium Silicate Cement with zirconium oxide (CSC/ZrO2), and zinc oxide/eugenol (ZOE). Solubility test was performed according to ANSI/ADA. The difference between initial and final mass of the materials was analyzed after immersion in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. Retrograde cavities in human teeth with single straight root canal were performed by using ultrasonic tip CVD 9.5107-8. The cavities were filled with the evaluated materials to evaluate sealing ability using the bacterial leakage test with Enterococcus faecalis. Bacterial leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for six weeks observing the turbidity of Brain Heart infusion (BHI) medium in contact with root apex. Data were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey tests (solubility), and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (sealing ability) at a 5% significance level. Results For the 7-day period, ZOE presented highest solubility when compared with the other groups (p<0.05). For the 30-day period, no difference was observed among the materials. Lower bacterial leakage was observed for MTA and CSC/ZrO2, and both presented better results than ZOE (p<0.05). Conclusion MTA and CSC/ZrO2 presented better bacterial sealing capacity, which may be related to lower initial solubility observed for these materials in relation to ZOE. PMID:27119759

  1. Root apex sealing with different filling materials photopolymerized with argon ion laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupato Conrado, Luis Augusto; Frois, Iris M.; Amaro Zangaro, Renato; Munin, Egberto

    2003-06-01

    The present study evaluates the seal quality in apex delta of single root human teeth filled with light-curing materials (Ultrablend Calcium-hydroxide, Vitremer glass ionomer and Flow-Fill Magic composite). 45 roots prepared by the endo PTC/Dakin technique were used. All prepared samples received photopolymerization with the blue 488 nm argon ion laser light. A 200 μm optical fiber introduced into the root canal delivered 100 mW of light power to the light-curing material. The fiber tip was positioned 5 mm away from the apex. Light was applied for 20 seconds. After curing, the samples received impermeabilization with ethyl-cyanoacrylate, leaving only the apex exposed, and then immersed in a methylene-blue dye solution for 24 hours. The samples were cut longitudinally and analyzed under a stereoscopic microscope for dye infiltration. It was found that those samples sealed with Ultrablend Calcium-hydroxide or the glass ionomer presented the best results, as compared to those samples sealed with the Flow-Fill Magic composite. No statistically significant difference was observed between the group treated with Ultrablend Calcium-hydroxide and the group treated with the glass ionomer, for a significance level of 0.05.

  2. 2002 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s perspective of aeronautics and space technology for the 21st century; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET), Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle (TBCC), and Revolutionary Turbine Accelator (RTA) programs; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn's seal program aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA's turbomachinery, space propulsion, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET and TBCC/RTA program overviews illustrated for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. For example, the NASA UEET program goals include an 8- to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to investigate advanced reusable space vehicle technologies (X-38) and advanced space ram/scramjet propulsion systems. Seal challenges posed by these advanced systems include high-temperature operation, resiliency at the operating temperature to accommodate sidewall flexing, and durability to last many missions.

  3. Effect of intracanal medicament on the sealing ability of root canals filled with Resilon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching S; Debelian, Gilberto J; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of the use of calcium hydroxide as an intracanal dressing on the sealing ability of a thermoplastic synthetic polymer-based root filling (Resilon). Forty-seven single rooted teeth were decoronated and instrumented to ISO sizes 40. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups of 15 roots each. Group 1 was immediately filled. Group 2 and group 3 had calcium hydroxide paste placed with lentulo-spiral filler. After 7 days, calcium hydroxide was removed from the canals with two different techniques: #15 K-file agitated irrigation with 17% Ethylenediaminetetracitic acid (EDTA) (group 2) or ultrasonically agitated irrigation with 17% EDTA (group 3) for 2 min. All teeth were filled with Resilon points and the resin sealer (Ephiphany root canal sealant) using lateral condensation technique. Two teeth were immediately filled with Resilon master point size 40/.04 without sealer to act as a positive control. A split chamber microbial leakage model using Streptococcus mutans was used and the leakage was evaluated daily for a period of 30 days. Overall, 6 of 44 (14%) of samples filled with Resilon points and the resin sealer had microbial leakage. Three samples in group 1 (21%), two samples in group 2 (13%), and one specimen in group 3 (7%) had bacterial leakage. Using the Fisher's Exact test, there was no statistically significant difference in leakage between the groups with calcium hydroxide dressing and the group without calcium hydroxide (p > 0.05). Under the condition of this study, calcium hydroxide did not adversely affect the seal of the root-canal system filled with Resilon. PMID:16728244

  4. Air quality in tightly sealed and passive homes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.A.

    1981-09-01

    Indoor air quality has attracted increasing attention during the past few yars. Pollutants generated from combustion, building materials, and human activities may reach significant levels in the indoor environment to produce adverse health effects. This report deals with the classes of pollutants and their sources, and the significance of reported levels, possible health effects, and control strategies in relation to tightly sealed and passive solar construction techniques. In tightly sealed homes, residential air-to-air heat exchangers, whose design and performance are discussed, offer one method of improving air quality at reasonable cost. It is recommended that further research be implemented to identify hazardous concentrations of pollutants and set standards to minimize health impacts in the search for new energy innovations.

  5. Effect of thermoplastic filling techniques on the push-out strength of root sealing materials.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Zigomar Hideo Fecchio Nasser; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Raucci Neto, Walter; Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Silva, Silvio Rocha Corrêa da; Alfredo, Edson

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of two thermoplastic obturation systems (MicroSeal and Obtura II) on bond strength of different sealers to intraradicular dentin. Sixty root canals of human canines were prepared using ProTaper rotary files (crown-down technique) and irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA. The root canals were filled by MicroSeal, Obtura II, or lateral compaction techniques using AH Plus and Epiphany SE. 1.5 mm thick root slices were subjected to the push-out test. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the bond strength values (MPa) observed in the groups obturated with MicroSeal (2.96 ± 2.72) and Obtura II (2.68 ± 2.18) did not significantly differ from each other (p > 0.05) but were significantly higher than that observed in the group obturated with lateral condensation (2.01 ± 1.48; p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in strength (p > 0.05) among the root canal thirds (cervical: 2.44 ± 2.03; middle: 2.50 ± 2.27; and apical: 2.70 ± 2.34). Adhesive failures were predominant (60%) in all groups. In conclusion, MicroSeal and Obtura II techniques, using AH plus sealer, increased the resistance to displacement of the filling material, when compared with lateral compaction. Moreover, when used with Epiphany SE, these obturation systems did not affect the bond strength of the material to root dentin. PMID:26676199

  6. 2004 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (1) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (2) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program; (3) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal program aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (4) Reviews of NASA prime contractor and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (5) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrated for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. For example, the NASA UEET program goals include an 8- to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle, as part of NASA s new Exploration Initiative. Plans to develop the necessary mechanism and androgynous seal technologies were reviewed. Seal challenges posed by reusable re-entry space vehicles include high-temperature operation, resiliency at temperature to accommodate gap changes during operation, and durability to meet mission requirements.

  7. 1999 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn hosted the Seals/Secondary Air System Workshop on October 2829, 1999. Each year NASA and our industry and university partners share their respective seal technology development. We use these workshops as a technical forum to exchange recent advancements and "lessons-learned" in advancing seal technology and solving problems of common interest. As in the past we are publishing two volumes. Volume 1 will be publicly available and will be made available on-line through the web page address listed at the end of this chapter. Volume 2 will be restricted under International Traffic and Arms Regulations (I.T.A.R.) In this conference participants gained an appreciation of NASA's new Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program and how this program will be partnering with ongoing DOE -industrial power production and DOD- military aircraft engine programs. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding into sealing advancements and challenges that lie ahead, participants gained new working and personal relationships with the attendees. When the seals and secondary fluid management program was initiated, the emphasis was on rocket engines with spinoffs to gas turbines. Today, the opposite is true and we are, again building our involvement in the rocket engine and space vehicle demonstration programs.

  8. Microscopic assessment of the sealing ability of three endodontic filling techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cueva-Goig, Roger; Llena-Puy, Mª Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background Several techniques have been proposed for root canal filling. New rotary files, with non-standardized taper, are appearing, so, points adapted to the taper of the last instrument used to prepare the canal can help in the obturation process. The aim of this study is to assess the sealing ability of different root canal filling techniques. Material and Methods Root canals from 30 teeth were shaped with Mtwo and divided in three groups; A, standard lateral condensation with size 35 and 20 gutta-percha points; B, standard lateral condensation and injected gutta-percha; C, single gutta-percha point (standardized 35 Mtwo), continuous wave technique and injected gutta-percha. Root surfaces were covered with nail varnish, except for the apical 2 mm, and submerged in a NO3Ag2 solution; apical stain penetration was measured in mm. Data were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test with a 90% confidence interval. Results A and B groups showed stain leakage in the 90% of the cases, whereas it was of 80% for group C. Stain leakage intervals were 1-5 mm for groups A and B and 1-3 mm for group C. There were no statistically significant differences between the three studied groups (p>.05). Conclusions All the analyzed root canal filling techniques showed some apical stain leakage, without significant differences among them. Key words:Gutta-percha filling, microleakage, single cone, injected gutta-percha, warm gutta-percha. PMID:26855702

  9. Windage heating of air passing through labyrinth seals

    SciTech Connect

    Millward, J.A.; Edwards, M.F.

    1996-04-01

    The viscous drag on rotating components in gas turbine engines represents both a direct loss of power from the cycle and an input of heat into the secondary (cooling) air system. Hotter cooling air in turn means increased flow requirements. The effects of windage on performance are therefore compounded. To facilitate accurate temperature predictions of highly stressed components, information is needed on windage characteristics of all elements in the secondary cooling system. Much information is available in the literature for disks, cones, cylinders, bolts, etc., but little has been published on windage heating in high-speed seals. Results are presented for experiments carried out (at representative nondimensional conditions) on different designs of labyrinth seals. The results are compared with values calculated from the simple momentum balance theory suggested by McGreeham and Ko and with several values determined from CFD analysis.

  10. Measure Guideline. Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-on-Grade Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Bruce

    2012-02-01

    This measure guideline describes two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

  11. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Mechanical Closets in Slab-On-Grade Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, B.

    2012-02-01

    This measure guideline describes covers two fundamental retrofit strategies for air sealing around air handling systems that are located within the living space in an enclosed closet: one in which all of the equipment is removed and being replaced, and a closet where the equipment is to remain and existing conditions are sealed. It includes the design and installation details necessary to effectively seal the air handler closet and central return system to maximize the efficiency and safety of the space conditioning system.

  12. Controlled-force end seal arrangement for an air press of a papermaking machine

    DOEpatents

    Beck, David A.

    2003-07-08

    An air press for pressing a fiber web includes a plurality of rolls and a pair of end seal arrangements. Of the plurality of rolls, each pair of adjacent rolls forms a nip therebetween. Further, each roll has a pair of roll ends, the plurality of rolls together forming two sets of roll ends. Each end seal arrangement coacts with one set of roll ends, the plurality of rolls and the pair of end seal arrangements together defining an air press chamber having an air chamber pressure. Each end seal arrangement is composed of at least one roll seal, including a first roll seal, and an adjustable bias mechanism. Each roll seal forms a seal with at least one roll end, and one side of the first roll seal being exposed to the air chamber pressure. The adjustable bias mechanism is configured for controlling a position of each roll seal relative to a respective at least one roll end and for adjusting a seal force between the roll seal and the respective at least one roll end.

  13. Sealing ability of MTA, Super EBA, Vitremer and amalgam as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cecília Luiz; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the root-end sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Angelus), reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Super EBA), resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) and zinc-free amalgam (GS-80) (control). The root canals of eighty human lower molars were accessed, cleansed, shaped and obturated. Apexes were resected and cavities were prepared. Teeth were divided into 4 groups of 40 cavities, root-end filled with the materials, and immersed in methylene blue for 72 h at 37 degrees C. Roots were then sectioned transversally at each millimeter and evaluated under magnification, observing the dye penetration in each section. Data were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis test at a 5% level of significance, showing the differences among all materials (p < 0.001). The crescent order of microleakage was MTA < Vitremer < Super EBA < amalgam. Higher leakage levels were observed in the first millimeter sections of amalgam, Vitremer and MTA, when compared with the third millimeter section (p < 0.05). PMID:16089263

  14. Sealing capacity in vitro of thermoplasticized gutta-percha with a solid core endodontic filling technique.

    PubMed

    Valli, K S; Rafeek, R N; Walker, R T

    1998-04-01

    This study assessed the sealing capacity of two endodontic gutta-percha filling techniques. Thirty-four single-rooted fully developed teeth were endodontically accessed, instrumented and randomly divided into two experimental groups (n = 12) and two control groups (n = 5). In Group A, root canals were obturated using a solid core thermoplastic technique (Densfil), in Group B and Group C (negative control) canals were obturated with laterally condensed gutta-percha, and in Group D (positive control) canals were left unobturated. AH-26 was used as the sealer. Two days later, the teeth were conventionally prepared for testing apical and coronal leakage, immersed in india ink for 5 days and subsequently cleared. The linear coronal and apical extent of dye penetration was measured under a light dissecting microscope. The mean apical leakage for Group A was 1.39 mm, and for Group B 2.76 mm, whereas the mean coronal leakage for Group A was 2.87 mm, and for Group B 4.03 mm. The differences between the groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). PMID:9558517

  15. In vitro comparative study of sealing ability of Diadent BioAggregate and other root-end filling materials

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, MA; Saeed, MH

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This in vitro study evaluated and compared sealing ability of Diadent BioAggregate (DBA) as a new root-end filling material (REFM) versus amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM) and white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA). Materials and Methods: Crowns of sixty extracted human maxillary incisors were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). All the roots were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha and resin sealer. Obturated roots were divided randomly into 2 control groups and 4 experimental groups of 10 samples each. In the negative control group (group I), roots were kept without any further preparation. In the positive and experimental groups roots, were apically resected and root-end cavities were prepared and filled with: (a) gutta-percha (group 2-positive control group); (b) amalgam (group 3); (c) IRM (group 4); (d) WMTA (group 5); (e) DBA (group 6). Apical leakage was assessed using dye penetration technique. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test. Results: Significant difference of sealing ability was found among 4 tested groups. DBA followed by MTA showed the highest sealing ability. Conclusions: DBA with its high sealing ability can be considered a possible alternative to MTA. PMID:22876012

  16. Air/Oil Seals R and D at AlliedSignal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullah, M. Rifat

    2006-01-01

    AlliedSignal aerospace company is committed to significantly improving the reliabilities of air/oil seals in their gas turbine engines. One motivation for this is that aircraft cabin air quality can be affected by the performance of mainshaft air/oil seals. In the recent past, coking related failure modes have been the focus of air/oil seal R&D at AlliedSignal. Many significant advances have been made to combat coke related failures, with some more work continuing in this area. This years R&D begins to address other commin failure modes. Among them, carbon seal "blistering" has been a chronic problem facing the sealing industry for many decades. AlliedSignal has launched an aggressive effort this year to solve this problem for our aerospace rated carbon seals in a short (one to two year) timeframe. Work also continues in developing more user-friendly tools and data for seal analysis & design. Innovations in seal cooling continue. Nominally non-contacting hydropad sealing concept is being developed for aerospace applications. Finally, proprietary work is in planning stages for development of a seal with the aggressive aim of zero oil leakage.

  17. Estimation of water-filled and air-filled porosity in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1993-01-01

    The responses of density and dielectric logs are formulated in terms if the matrix properties, air-filled porosity and water-filled porosity. Porosity values obtained from logs from borehole USW G-2 are in reasonable agreement with estimates from core determinations.

  18. Sealing ability of MTA used as a root end filling material: effect of the sonic and ultrasonic condensation.

    PubMed

    Bernabé, Pedro Felício Estrada; Gomes-Filho, João Eduardo; Bernabé, Daniel Galera; Nery, Mauro Juvenal; Otoboni-Filho, José Arlindo; Dezan-Jr, Eloi; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Despite the excellent properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), the condensation technique may have some influence in its sealing ability. The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of sonic and ultrasonic setting of MTA. Thirty-four extracted human teeth had their canals prepared and filled with Sealapex sealer and gutta-percha using the active lateral condensation technique. The teeth were rendered waterproof and apicoectomy performed at 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities (3.0 mm deep and 1.4 mm diameter) were prepared with diamond ultrasonic tips. The root-end cavities were filled with Pro-Root MTA® with ultrasonic vibration, sonic vibration or no vibration. The positive control group did not receive any material while the negative control group was totally rendered waterproof. After material set, the specimens were immersed in Rodhamine B for 24 h, under vacuum in the first 15 min, then washed, dried and split longitudinally for evaluating the infiltration at the dentin/material interface. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests at 5% significance level. Sonic vibration promoted the lowest infiltration values (p<0.05). It was concluded that sonic vibration could be considered an efficient aid to improve the sealing ability of MTA when used as root-end filling material. PMID:23780366

  19. Strength characteristics and air-leakage determinations for alternative mine seal designs. Report of Investigations/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, E.S.; Greninger, N.B.; Stephan, C.R.; Lipscomb, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    During the normal course of underground coal mining, it sometimes becomes necessary to seal off abandoned areas to eliminate the need to ventilate them. Seals also are used to isolate fire zones or areas susceptible to spontaneous combustion. The objective of the research is to determine whether seals constructed from various materials and designs can withstand a 20-psig methane-air explosion without losing their structural integrity.

  20. Wave intensity analysis in air-filled flexible vessels.

    PubMed

    Clavica, Francesco; Parker, Kim H; Khir, Ashraf W

    2015-02-26

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) is an analytical technique generally used to investigate the propagation of waves in the cardiovascular system. Despite its increasing usage in the cardiovascular system, to our knowledge WIA has never been applied to the respiratory system. Given the analogies between arteries and airways (i.e. fluid flow in flexible vessels), the aim of this work is to test the applicability of WIA with gas flow instead of liquid flow. The models employed in this study are similar to earlier studies used for arterial investigations. Simultaneous pressure (P) and velocity (U) measurements were initially made in a single tube and then in several flexible tubes connected in series. Wave speed was calculated using the foot-to-foot method (cf), which was used to separate analytically the measured P and U waveforms into their forward and backward components. Further, the data were used to calculate wave intensity, which was also separated into its forward and backward components. Although the measured wave speed was relatively high, the results showed that the onsets and the nature of reflections (compression/expansion) derived with WIA, corresponded well to those anticipated using the theory of waves in liquid-filled elastic tubes. On average the difference between the experimental and theoretical arrival time of reflection was 6.1% and 3.6% for the single vessel and multivessel experiment, respectively. The results suggest that WIA can provide relatively accurate information on reflections in air-filled flexible tubes, warranting further studies to explore the full potential of this technique in the respiratory system. PMID:25595424

  1. JT9D ceramic outer air seal system refinement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1982-01-01

    The abradability and durability characteristics of the plasma sprayed system were improved by refinement and optimization of the plasma spray process and the metal substrate design. The acceptability of the final seal system for engine testing was demonstrated by an extensive rig test program which included thermal shock tolerance, thermal gradient, thermal cycle, erosion, and abradability tests. An interim seal system design was also subjected to 2500 endurance test cycles in a JT9D-7 engine.

  2. The Effect of Thickness on the Sealing Ability of CEM Cement as a Root-end Filling Material

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Saeed; Asgary, Saeed; Samiei, Mohammad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Vahid Pakdel, Seyyed Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Different materials have been used for root-end filling during surgical endodontic treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the dye penetration in different thicknesses of calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement as root-end filling material. Materials and methods. Following root canal filling in 70 extracted human single-rooted premolar teeth, the apical 3 mm of their root-ends was resected; the root-end cavities with depths of 1, 2 and 3 mm were prepared by ultrasonic retrotips and filled with CEM cement. After setting of cement, the roots were immersed in 2% Rhodamine B and the dye leakage was measured under stereomicroscope (×16) using Image J software. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests at 5% significance level. Results. The means and standard deviations of dye penetration in the 1, 2, and 3 mm groups were 3395.5±1893.4, 3410.4±1440.5, and 2581.6±1852.9 μm, respectively. The one-way ANOVA analysis indicated significant differences (P < 0.001); however, the Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that only the positive control group differed significantly from the experimental groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The findings demonstrated CEM cement to have an adequate root-end sealing ability in 3-mm thickness. PMID:25973147

  3. Validation of a high voltage leak detector for use with pharmaceutical blow-fill-seal containers--a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Möll, F; Doyle, D L; Haerer, M; Morton Guazzo, D

    1998-01-01

    Proposed requirements for pharmaceutical package integrity testing outlined in the EU Guide for Sterile Medicinal Products may make it necessary to evaluate and validate alternate ways to perform 100% leak inspection. One such method is high voltage leak detection (HVLD). Even though HVLD has been used for glass ampoules and vials for years, qualification and validation strategies are not well established. In this article, we describe and discuss our practical approach to validation and the protocols used to qualify and validate a high voltage leak detector for use with blow-fill-seal containers. For this work, we used laser drilled pinholes as a model for pinholes produced during manufacturing and defined a "window diagram." This diagram allowed us to plot the parameters of influence and the settings of the HVLD in an easy to visualize pictorial display. In the validation step, we initially determined the most sensitive standard integrity test for our product and container design from the available choices, the vacuum chamber, dye bath and microbial challenge visual inspection tests. In the next phase of our work, the HVLD was crossed-validated against the most sensitive of these tests, the dye bath visual inspection test. This was accomplished with a large number of containers mixed with deliberately defective ampoules. Our conclusion from this work is that the HVLD is an appropriate and feasible integrity test for 100% inspection of blow-fill-seal containers. PMID:9846069

  4. Design of a two dimensional planer pressurized air labyrinth seal test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konicki, Joseph S.

    1993-12-01

    A two-dimensional planer labyrinth seal test rig was designed to operate with air supplied at 45 psig and temperatures up to 150 F. The rig operates with a manually specified test section pressure up to 30 psig yielding Mach numbers to 0.9 and gap Reynolds numbers to 100,000. The air flow rate through the seal will be controlled by setting inlet pressure and adjusting an outlet control valve. The test section measurements are 18 inches wide by 1.5 inches depth by 6 inches in length and provides for 10:1 large scale geometry seals to be used to facilitate measurements. Design maximum seal gap size is 0.15 inches. The test section has a glass viewing port to allow flow field measurement by non-intrusive means such as Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) with seals containing up to 5 sealing knives. Measurements of pressure, temperature and flow fields can also be simultaneously measured by probes inserted in the seal itself, or mounted on the removable/replaceable top plate. Inlet flow is conditioned through the use of a dump diffuser incorporating screens, honeycombs, expansion and contraction portions. The inlet flow to the test section can be modified from uniform to various non-uniform conditions by employing profile generators such as screens and winglets. A detailed mechanical design has been conducted including stress analysis and seal flow rate predictions.

  5. Sealing Ability of Resilon and MTA as Root-end Filling Materials: A Bacterial and Dye Leakage Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Hengameh; Faramarzi, Farhad; Paymanpour, Payam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endodontic surgery is a valuable option for maintaining patient's natural dentition when previous orthograde endodontic treatments fail to succeed. Proper root-end preparation and placement of a retro-filling material are recommended for successful endodontic surgery. The objective of this experimental study was to compare sealing ability of Resilon/Epiphany system, as a potential root-end filling material, with ProRoot MTA using both dye and bacterial leakage models. Materials and Methods Ninety two single-rooted extracted human teeth were decoronated and prepared endodontically. Specimens were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n = 20) and four control groups (n = 3). After removal of apical 3 mm and root-end cavity preparation, MTA, or Resilon were used to fill root end cavities. For bacterial leakage, specimens (20 for each experimental group, 3 negative, and 3 positive controls) were subjected to E. faecalis over a 70-day period. Methylene blue was used for dye leakage (the same in number as before). Using stereomicroscope (40× mag.) complete dye leakage was assessed after 72 h. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed for bacterial leakage. The data was analyzed using t-test and Chi-square analysis (α = 0.05). Results All of the positive controls and none of negative controls revealed leakage. Result of log rank test showed no significant difference between MTA and Resilon in time of bacterial leakage at the end of the 70 days (P > 0.05) There was also no statistical difference in complete dye leakage for both groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion Leakage occurred in both MTA and Resilon as root-end filling material but the difference was not statistically significant. Resilon might be noticed as a potential root-end filling material if good isolation is attainable. PMID:24171025

  6. JT8D revised high-pressure turbine cooling and other outer air seal program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1979-01-01

    The JT8D high pressure turbine was revised to reduce leakage between the blade tip shrouds and the outer air seal, and engine testing was performed to determine the effect on performance. The addition of a second knife-edge on the blade tip shroud, the extension of the honeycomb seal land to cover the added knife-edge and an existing spoiler on the shroud, and a material substitution in the seal support ring to improve thermal growth characteristics are included. A relocation of the blade cooling air discharge to insure adequate cooling flow is required. Significant specific fuel consumption and exhaust gas temperature improvements were demonstrated with the revised turbine in sea level and simulated altitude engine tests. Inspection of the revised seal hardware after these tests showed no unusual wear or degradation.

  7. Measure Guideline: Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-09-01

    This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks. The purpose of this document is to provide the outline of the overview and process of insulating and air sealing walls so that home retrofit professionals can identify approaches to air sealing and insulation measures.

  8. Apical sealing of root canal fillings performed with five different endodontic sealers: analysis by fluid filtration

    PubMed Central

    de VASCONCELOS, Bruno Carvalho; BERNARDES, Ricardo Affonso; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Húngaro; BRAMANTE, Clóvis Monteiro; de MORAES, Ivaldo Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of five root canal sealers, including two experimental cements (MBP and MTA-Obtura) using the fluid filtration method. Material and Methods Teeth were divided into 5 study groups: G1-AH Plus; G2-Acroseal; G3-Sealapex; G4-MBP; G5-MTA-Obtura; and two controls. Chemical-mechanical preparation was performed with ProFile rotary nickel-titanium instruments 1 mm short of the apical foramen. The sealing ability was evaluated by fluid filtration at 15, 30, and 60 days. Results The statistical analysis showed significant difference between the materials at different periods (p<0.05). AH Plus and MBP had similar leakage values at 15 and 60 days, alternating with significant reduction at 30 days, while the other materials showed progressive increase in leakage values. Acroseal and Sealapex presented the best results at 15 days and the worst at 60 days. Conclusions All sealers evaluated presented fluid leakage, with AH Plus and MBP showing the best results at the end of the experimental period. Acroseal, Sealapex, and MTA-Obtura presented increase in leakage values at longer observation periods. PMID:21655776

  9. In-air vocal repertoires of spotted seals, Phoca largha.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peijun; Lu, Jiaojiao; Li, Songhai; Han, Jiabo; Wang, Qinguo; Yang, Liangliang

    2016-08-01

    Spotted seals (Phoca largha) are thought to be less vocal than other phocids. However, acoustic communication behaviors of spotted seals have been reported several times. In this study, the vocal repertoires of spotted seals housed in Dalian Sun Aquarium, China were recorded and analyzed. The frequencies of the sounds made by the seals ranged from 139.3 to 2323.1 Hz, and the time durations lasted from 92.8 to 1208 ms, depending on age and gender (P < 0.01). The peak-to-peak sound source levels were 109-124 dB re 20μPa. In total, seven vocal types were identified: pup call, yearling call, bark, growl, grunt, moo, and throat guttural. The pups emitted sounds with high frequencies (F1: 972.4 ± 374.4 Hz, mean ± standard deviation) and medial time durations (564 ± 178 ms); when the pups grew older, the sounds became yearling calls, which had high frequencies with median (interquartile range) of 1198.0 (821.7-1385.5) Hz; and long time durations [902 (745-1080) ms]. The male adults emitted sounds with low frequencies [430.2 (388.2-486.7) Hz] and short time durations [334 (233-599) ms], while the female adults emitted sounds with medial frequencies [814.5 (592.6-1024.3) Hz] and medial time durations [531 (336-688) ms]. PMID:27586740

  10. Hot air balloons fill gap in atmospheric and sensing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Steven M.; Price, Russ

    Eric Edgerton was having a problem he could not solve: how to noninvasively collect in situ incinerator plume data. So he called in the Air Force and learned about its Atmospheric and Sensor Test Platform program; its platform is a manned hot air balloon. Many investigators are discovering the advantages of hot air balloons as stable, inexpensive platforms for performing in situ atmospheric measurements. Some are also using remote sensing capabilities on the balloon platforms.

  11. JT90 Ceramic Outer Air Seal System Refinement Program, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1982-01-01

    The sprayed ceramic gas turbine outer air seal system was tested in two JT9D engines to substantiate the abradability and durability of the seals. Of particular significance was that one of the tests, a 150 hour 1000 cycle endurance program at nominal JT9D operating conditions, was completed with minimal effect on the seals and received Federal Aviation Administration cognizance with respect to potential field service use by the airlines. The other engine test completed 1825 endurance cycles at severe operating conditions and no burn through or other serious defects in the structural integrity of a seal segment was observed. These test results combined with other Pratt and Whitney Aircraft engine tests substantiate the potential of the ceramic outer air seal system to attain the durability goal of 50000 hour engine operating capability. Both engine tests subjected the seals to intentional blade rubs and demonstrated good abradability with volume wear ratios greater than 100, far exceeding the design goal of 10. The improved volume wear ratio will allow the turbine tip clearance to be reduced, thereby resulting in an estimated thrust specific fuel consumption improvement of 0.3 percent.

  12. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Paulo Leal; Bernardineli, Norberti; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Torres, Sérgio Aparecido; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Marciano, Marina Angélica

    2016-04-01

    Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc) using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (p<0.05). Results All cements showed bacterial leakage after 24 hours, except for the negative control group. The MBPc showed significantly less bacterial leakage compared with the MTA group (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between the CPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM. PMID:27119763

  13. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study

    PubMed Central

    MEDEIROS, Paulo Leal; BERNARDINELI, Norberti; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; TORRES, Sérgio Aparecido; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; MARCIANO, Marina Angélica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc) using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (p<0.05). Results All cements showed bacterial leakage after 24 hours, except for the negative control group. The MBPc showed significantly less bacterial leakage compared with the MTA group (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between the CPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM. PMID:27119763

  14. Capillary flow porometry to assess the seal provided by root-end filling materials in a standardized and reproducible way.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Mieke A A; De Bruyne, Roger J E; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2006-03-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the root-end sealing ability of gutta-percha + AH26 (GP), Ketac-Fil, Fuji IX (FIX), tooth-colored MTA (MTA), IRM, Ketac-Fil + conditioner (Ketac-FilC), and Fuji IX + conditioner (FIXC). A total of 140 standardized bovine root sections were divided into seven groups, filled with the mentioned root-end filling materials, and, at 48 h, submitted to capillary flow porometry to assess minimum, mean flow and maximum pore diameters. Results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Level of significance was set at 0.05. Using the Kruskal-Wallis tests we found that there was no significant difference between the minimum pore diameters of the different materials, but significant differences between the mean flow (p < 0.001) and maximum (p < 0.001) pore diameters could be demonstrated. For the mean flow pore diameters, there was a significant difference between FIX and all other materials, between Ketac-Fil and IRM and between Ketac-FilC and IRM. Concerning maximum pore diameters, there was a significant difference between FIX and all other materials, between Ketac-Fil and MTA, GP and IRM, FIXC and IRM, and Ketac-FilC and IRM. The data showed that each sample had leaked. Glass ionomer cements leaked more than other materials, although dentin conditioning diminished the maximum through pore diameters. This maximum pore diameter, which corresponds to the largest leak in the sample, together with the size of bacteria and their metabolites, will be indicative of the eventual leakage along the root-end filling materials. PMID:16500227

  15. Source levels of northern elephant seal vocalizations in-air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insley, Stephen J.; Southall, Brandon L.

    2005-09-01

    Accurate measurements of vocalization sound-pressure levels are necessary to determine the acoustical active space of animals in natural and human-altered ambient noise conditions. Despite this basic need, such data are limited or nonexistent for most species. Our study characterized aerial ambient noise and vocalization source levels for northern elephant seals during the breeding season. Subjects were adult males, lactating females, and dependent offspring (pups) at An~o Nuevo State Reserve. Source level measurements were made using a Type 1 sound level meter and calibrated microphones on-axis: (1) at 1 m; (2) at several known distances (laser measured); and (3) simultaneously at 1 m and a second known distance. Concurrent ambient noise conditions were measured in situ (non-weighted 5 min Leq integrated averages) and recorded for later spectral analysis. Measurements were made at two sites, one relatively noisy and the other relatively quiet, to determine whether animals compensate for higher noise conditions by increasing source levels (Lombard effect). Results indicate a wide range in signal strength, particularly for adult males whose vocalization source levels appear to be correlated with dominance rank and related to ambient noise conditions. The Lombard effect was not observed for adult females or elephant seal pups.

  16. The sealing ability of a new silicone-based root canal filling material (GuttaFlow): an in vitro study using the percentage of gutta-percha-filled area.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daming; Tang, Zhijuan; Zhang, Guangdong; Liu, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    Percentage of gutta-percha-filled area (PGFA) was used to investigate the sealing ability of GuttaFlow. A total of 80 mandibular first premolars with single canal were randomly divided into 4 Groups (n=20) according to root canal filling technique and/or material - Group1: cold lateral condensation technique; Group 2: continuous wave condensation technique; Group 3: GuttaFlow; Group 4: GuttaFlow and accessory gutta-percha cones without lateral condensation. The PGFA values of Groups 3 and 4 were significantly higher than those of Groups 1 and 2 (p<0.05), but there were no significant differences between Group 3 and Group 4 (p>0.05). It was concluded that GuttaFlow provided superior sealing ability, such that accessory gutta-percha cones became unnecessary when filling root canals with GuttaFlow. PMID:21946476

  17. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Han, Baolu; Xue, Nandong; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g., in plastic and glass sheds), which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)). Air was sampled at 5, 15, and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cylinders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges. Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs. These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air. The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed. PMID:25597683

  18. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: an ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Maya; Tokunaga, Hisako; Kaneko, Kenji; Arai, Tsunenori

    2007-02-01

    In order to seal air leak from lung dissection plane in thoracotomy, we studied diode laser irradiation (wavelength: 810nm) with surface stain of indocyanine green (ICG, peak absorption wavelength: 805nm) ex vivo. In general, this air leak is sealed by suturing with weak tension and large margin of parenchyma. This suturing requires surgeon's skill and takes long time. Moreover, lung ventilatory performance is significantly impaired. Since laser tissue welding is novel method to adhere living tissue with thin thermally denatured attachment layer, we propose to seal the lung dissection plane with laser irradiation. Our aim of this study is to investigate the sealing mechanism as well as optimum condition to develop reliable laser sealing method for dissected lung plane in surgery, using practical laser-dye combination. Compartment of extracted porcine lung was prepared as a lung model, which volume was approximately 60cm^3. ICG solution (2.5mg/ml) was applied to the dissection plane of this lung model with 1minute. The diode laser (power density: 8-40W/cm^2) irradiated to the plane, moving the laser spot with constant speed (v=1mm/s). The heat degeneration depth and smoothness of the laser irradiated surface were observed by a microscope. When power density was over 24W/cm^2, heat degeneration depth was over 1.5E-4 m. There were no pin holes on the surface and the air leak seemed to be sealed completely. We also evaluated the air leak by endotracheal pressure. In the case of above condition, the heat degeneration depth was the same that of previous reported result with CO2 laser.

  19. Mathematical model of an air-filled alpha stirling refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Patrick; Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2013-10-01

    This work develops a mathematical model for an alpha Stirling refrigerator with air as the working fluid and will be useful in optimizing the mechanical design of these machines. Two pistons cyclically compress and expand air while moving sinusoidally in separate chambers connected by a regenerator, thus creating a temperature difference across the system. A complete non-linear mathematical model of the machine, including air thermodynamics, and heat transfer from the walls, as well as heat transfer and fluid resistance in the regenerator, is developed. Non-dimensional groups are derived, and the mathematical model is numerically solved. The heat transfer and work are found for both chambers, and the coefficient of performance of each chamber is calculated. Important design parameters are varied and their effect on refrigerator performance determined. This sensitivity analysis, which shows what the significant parameters are, is a useful tool for the design of practical Stirling refrigeration systems.

  20. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-04-12

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

  1. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  2. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  3. Effects of Sand-Filled Hydraulic Fractures during Air Sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R. J.; Murdoch, L. C.; Falta, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    The effectiveness of air sparging is limited in fine-grained formations, such as clay-rich saprolite, where low permeability restricts flow rates. The purpose of this work is to investigate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fractures to increase the performance of air sparging in relatively low permeability materials. The approach has been to conduct step-rate, air-injection tests into conventional wells and wells intersecting fractures, and then to evaluate the results of these tests using analytical and numerical models. Fieldwork is being conducted in an area underlain by saprolite weathered from granitoid gneiss. Permeability of the saprolite ranges from 1x10-12 to 5x10 -12 m2 according to slug test data. Five wells have been used for testing: three non-fractured and two fractured wells. Well tests involved injecting air at constant pressure and monitoring transient flow rates until the flow approximately equilibrated over 10 to 60 minutes, then incrementally increasing pressure and repeating the flow monitoring. Field results were expressed in terms of the initial specific sparge capacity (Q/(P-H-E)) where Q is mass flow rate, P is injection pressure, H is hydrostatic pressure, and E is air entry pressure. The specific sparge capacity of conventional wells ranges from 0.3 to 0.6 m3/(Mpa min), whereas it is several times greater for fractured wells (0.8 to 3.5 m3/(Mpa min)) at the field site. Field data have been analyzed using analytical and numerical models. We use the step-rate data and invert an analytical solution adapted from Philip (J. Contam. Hydro., 1998) to estimate the in situ relative permeability function during sparging. This approach indicates that permeability ranges from 0.4x10-12 to 2x10-12 m2, which is remarkably similar to the slug test data. It also indicates that the in situ air entry pressure is approximately 31 kPa, and the exponent constant in the Gardner relative permeability function ranges from 0.12 to 0.25 m-1. Numerical analyses

  4. Substances To Fill Lighter-Than-Air Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1995-01-01

    Various combinations of solid and liquid chemicals proposed as sources of hydrogen and other gases for inflating lighter-than-air balloons. In all cases energy used to propel balloon upward or downward comes from temperature differences in planet's atmosphere itself. Phase changes and/or reversible chemical reactions used to vary quantities of gases in balloons as functions of pressure and temperature and, as functions of altitude: provides means to control altitude of balloon.

  5. Portable optical frequency standard based on sealed gas-filled hollow-core fiber using a novel encapsulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triches, Marco; Brusch, Anders; Hald, Jan

    2015-12-01

    A portable stand-alone optical frequency standard based on a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is developed to stabilize a fiber laser to the ^{13}{C}_2{H}_2 P(16) (ν _1 + ν _3) transition at 1542 nm using saturated absorption. A novel encapsulation technique is developed to permanently seal the hollow-core fiber with easy light coupling, showing negligible pressure increase over two months. The locked laser shows a fractional frequency instability below 8 × 10^{-12} for an averaging time up to 104 s. The lock-point repeatability over one month is 2.6 × 10^{-11}, corresponding to a standard deviation of 5.3 kHz. The system is also assembled in a more compact and easy-to-use configuration ( Plug&Play), showing comparable performance with previously published work. The real portability of this technology is proved by shipping the system to a collaborating laboratory, showing unchanged performance after the return.

  6. 2001 NASA Seal/secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop covered the following topics: (i) overview of NASA's Vision for 21st Century Aircraft; (ii) overview of NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET); (iii) reviews of sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (iv) reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrates for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. The NASA UEET program goals include an 8-to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to investigate advanced reusable space vehicle technologies (X-38) and advanced space ram/scramjet propulsion systems. Seal challenges posed by these advanced systems include high-temperature operation, resiliency at the operating temperature to accommodate sidewall flexing, and durability to last many missions.

  7. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  8. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  9. Comparison of the Root End Sealing Ability of Four Different Retrograde Filling Materials in Teeth with Root Apices Resected at Different Angles – An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K.C.; Yadav, Pankaj; Rao, Yogesh; Relhan, Nikhil; Gupta, Priyanka; Choubey, Ashish; Bhardwaj, Shivanshu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Insufficient apical seal is the significant reason for surgical endodontic disappointment. The root-end filling material utilized should avoid egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the sealing ability of four root-end filling materials MTA, Portland cement, IRM, RMGIC in teeth with root apices resected at 0 and 45 angle using dye penetration method under fluorescent microscope. Materials and Methods Hundred extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were sectioned horizontally at the cement-enamel junction. After cleaning, shaping and obturation with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer, the tooth samples were randomly divided in two groups (the root apices resected at 0° and 45° to the long axis of the root). The root resections were carried out by removing 2 mm and 1 mm in both the groups. Following which 3 mm deep root-end cavities were prepared at the apices and the root were coated with nail varnish except the tip. The teeth in both the group were randomly divided into four subgroups each (Pro root MTA, Portland cement, IRM and Light cure nano GIC Ketac N-100). All the retrofilled samples were stored in acrydine orange for 24 hours after which they were cleaned and vertically sectioned buccolingually. The sectioned root samples were observed under fluorescent microscope. Results The root apex sealing ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was superior to Portland cement, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) and LC GIC. IRM demonstrated the maximum apical leakage value among all the materials. Portland cement and LC GIC showed comparable sealing ability. Conclusion The angulation whether 0° or 45° angle did not affect the sealing ability of all the four materials used, MTA proved to be one of the superior materials for root-end filling. PMID:26894168

  10. Space Station Freedom seal leakage rate analysis and testing summary: Air leaks in ambient versus vacuum exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.; Markovitch, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report is intended to reveal the apparent relationship of air seal leakage rates between 2 atmospheres (atm) to 1 atm and 1 atm to vacuum conditions. Gas dynamics analysis is provided as well as data summarizing the MSFC test report, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study With Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report'.

  11. Controlling a rabbet load and air/oil seal temperatures in a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2002-01-01

    During a standard fired shutdown of a turbine, a loaded rabbet joint between the fourth stage wheel and the aft shaft of the machine can become unloaded causing a gap to occur due to a thermal mismatch at the rabbet joint with the bearing blower turned on. An open or unloaded rabbet could cause the parts to move relative to each other and therefore cause the rotor to lose balance. If the bearing blower is turned off during a shutdown, the forward air/oil seal temperature may exceed maximum design practice criterion due to "soak-back." An air/oil seal temperature above the established maximum design limits could cause a bearing fire to occur, with catastrophic consequences to the machine. By controlling the bearing blower according to an optimized blower profile, the rabbet load can be maintained, and the air/oil seal temperature can be maintained below the established limits. A blower profile is determined according to a thermodynamic model of the system.

  12. Experimental Studies of the Acoustic Properties of a Finite Elastic Pipe Filled with Water/air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.

    1996-02-01

    Vibration of, and sound power radiated from, a water/air-filled steel pipe are measured and analyzed. Two types of pipe terminal are employed in the experiments: embedded in sand boxes or without any absorption treatment. Comparisons are made between experiments and theoretical analysis. The measured wavenumbers agree well with those predicted as do modal responses are sound power of the air-filled pipe. For the water-filled steel pipe used in the test (inner diameter 150 mm), measured modal responses and sound power at high frequencies (higher than 4·5 kHz) are much lower than expected for the lossless model. Influences of pipe terminals on the coupling between the water and pipe are also examined.

  13. Optimum values of air-filling fraction for photonic crystal fibers with different configurations and fixed number of air rings.

    PubMed

    Zendehnam, Akbar; Hosseinpour, Maryam; Mirzaei, Mahmood; Hedayati, Kambiz

    2014-02-20

    In this study, a Gaussian amp function related to the Gaussian family is employed to approximate the output intensity profile of various arrangements of air holes in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with a fixed number of air rings (N=4). It is shown that d/Λ=0.5 can be the best minimum value of air-filling fraction for all of the studied PCFs when λ=1.35  μm, whereas, for λ=1.55 and 1.65 μm, d/Λ=0.6 is suitable for achieving the maximum output intensity with very low confinement loss. PMID:24663304

  14. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Klocke, S.; Faakye, O.; Puttagunta, S.

    2014-10-01

    ​While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  15. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings

    SciTech Connect

    Klocke, S.; Faakye, O.; Puttagunta, S.

    2014-10-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of Consortium for Advanced Residential Building's (CARB’s) multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  16. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: monitoring heat-denature with auto-fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Maya; Arai, Tsunenori

    2008-02-01

    We studied the monitoring of heat-denature by autofluorescence spectrum from lung dissection plane during laser air leak sealing procedure. In order to seal the air leakage from lung in thoracotomy, we proposed novel laser sealing method with the combination of the diode laser (810nm wavelength) irradiation and indocyanine green staining (peak absorption wavelength: 805 nm). This sealing method is expected to preserve the postoperative ventilatory capacity and achieve minimally invasive surgery. We previously reported that this laser sealing only requires thin sealing margin (less than 300 μm in thickness) compared with that of the suturing or stapling. The most serious issue on the laser air leak sealing might be re-air-leakage due to rigid surface layer caused by excessive heat-denature, such as carbonization. We should achieve laser air leak sealing minimizing the degree of heat denature. Dissection planes of isolated porcine lung with /without the diode laser irradiation were prepared as samples. We measured the auto-fluorescence from these samples using a spectrometer. When the diode laser was irradiated with 400J/cm2, the surface of diode laser irradiated lung was fully carbonized. The ration of auto-fluorescence emission of 450nm / 500 nm, with 280 nm excitation wavelength was decreased less tha 50 % of initial value. That of 600 nm / 500 nm was increased over 700 % of initial value. The decreasing of the 450 nm auto-fluorescence intensity might be attributed to the heat-denaturing of the interstitial collagen in lung. However, increasing of the 600 nm didn't specify the origins, we suppose it might be originated from heat-denature substance, like carbonization. We could establish the useful monitoring for lung heat-denaturing with simple methodology. We think the auto-fluorescence measurement can be helpful not only for understanding the sealing mechanism, but also for controlling the degree of heat-denaturing during the procedure.

  17. The frequency response of the vibrissae of harp seal, Pagophilus Groenlandicus, to sound in air and water.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Lisa F; De Groot, Theodorus

    2013-01-01

    The motion of isolated seal vibrissae due to low frequency sound in air has been measured using a microscope with a video camera and modeled using an FEM method with good agreement between the measurements and the model; the model has also been used to predict the motion of seal vibrissae in water. The shape of the seal vibrissae is that of a tapered right rectangular prism, unlike that of the previously studied rat vibrissae which are conical in shape. Moreover, unlike rat vibrissae which oscillate in the direction of the sound stimulus, two different modes of vibration of seal vibrissae were observed - one corresponding to the wider side being stimulated and one with the narrow side stimulated. The tuning of the seal vibrissae was much sharper than those of rat vibrissae, with quality factors about three times as large as those of rat vibrissae. As shown by the model, this increased sharpness is caused by the larger cross-sectional areas (by more than a factor of ten) of the seal vibrissae. This increased sharpness may be necessary for seal vibrissae so that they can have tuning in water, where the drag more heavily dampens the tuning than in air. The results suggest that vibrissae tuning may be important in the seal's ability to track the wake of its prey. PMID:23349983

  18. Comparative evaluation of sealing ability of glass ionomer-resin continuum as root-end filling materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Hitesh; Dewan, Harisha; Annapoorna, B. M.; Manjunath, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Root-end filling is a prudent procedure aimed at sealing the root canal to prevent penetration of tissue fluids into the root canals. An ideal root-end filling material should produce a complete apical seal. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the leakage behavior of four different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight maxillary central incisors were obturated with laterally condensed gutta-percha and AH plus sealer. The roots were resected at the level of 3 mm perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth. Root-end cavities were prepared with straight fissure stainless steel bur. The teeth were then divided into four experimental and two control groups, and cavities restored as per the groupings. The teeth were immersed in methylene blue for 48 h, split longitudinally, and dye penetration was measured. Results: A highly significant difference existed in the mean dye penetration of Group I (conventional glass ionomer) and the other groups (resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified composite, and composite resin). There was no statistically significant difference among the three groups. Conclusions: (1) Significant difference was found in the dye penetration values of conventional glass ionomer cement and other groups. (2) No statistically significant difference was found in the dye penetration values of groups II, III, and IV. PMID:26759803

  19. Comparison of the sealing capabilities of Ketac-silver and extra high copper alloy amalgam when used as retrograde root canal filling.

    PubMed

    al-Ajam, A D; McGregor, A J

    1993-07-01

    Apical microleakage following reverse retrograde root filling with extra high copper amalgam alloy was compared with that following a silver-glass ionomer retrofilling. The root canals of 56 extracted, single-rooted anterior human teeth were instrumented and obturated with laterally condensed gutta-percha and zinc oxide-eugenol sealer. Each tooth was apically resected at 45 degrees to its long axis and the root surface isolated with nail varnish. Teeth were divided into three groups. The first group received extra high copper amalgam retrograde fillings, the second group was retrofilled with a silver-glass ionomer, and the control group had no retrograde root filling placed. Following immersion in 1% methylene blue dye at 37 degrees C, the roots were sectioned and dye penetration was measured using an image analyzer. The sealing effectiveness of these materials was determined by their ability to inhibit dye penetration at 24 and 48 h. The results of this study show that a silver glass-ionomer is just as effective as extra high copper amalgam in terms of sealing capability. There was no statistically significant difference between the two materials. PMID:8245758

  20. [The application of air-lift loop column filling with porous carrier in wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Ding, F; Yang, H; Chen, S; Zhang, W; Xing, X

    2001-09-01

    An air lift loop reactor filling with porous carrier particles was utilized as aeration column. Experiments were carried out in wide operating conditions. The experimental results showed that in the range of gas flow rate from 0.117 to 0.156 m3/(min.m3), a higher efficiency of removal of ammonium-N was achieved, and when the gas flow rate was above 0.039 m3/(min.m3), the COD was completely degraded in about 1 h. The filling ratio of the porous carriers in the column was an important factor for the removal of C and N compounds, and a filling ratio of 15% was proved to be most suitable in the operation ranges. The experimental results also indicated that the effect of aeration temperature on the removal efficiency was significant and the highest efficiency was obtained at around 25 degrees C. PMID:11769236

  1. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1 ½-Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team analyzed five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. These homes were chosen for testing as they are common in Minnesota and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled the team to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  2. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates were analyzed for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. The reason for choosing this house type was they are very common in our area and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR Building America industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled us to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  3. An in-vitro comparative study for assessment of apical sealing ability of Epiphany/AH Plus sealer with Resilon/gutta-percha root canal filling materials

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Meraj; Musani, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Iffat M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Endodontic treatment is directed to eliminate microbial challenges from the root canal system and to create a complete seal. The aim of this study was to assess the apical sealing ability of resin-based Epiphany-Resilon root canal filling system and to compare it with the sealing abilities of different combinations of AH Plus, gutta-percha, Epiphany, and Resilon. Materials and Methods: One hundred extracted human maxillary incisor roots were treated endodontically. The samples were divided into groups A, B, C, and D, with each group containing 25 samples. Group A: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer; Group B: Canals obturated with Resilon and Epiphany; Group C: Canals obturated with gutta-percha and Epiphany; Group D: Control group canals obturated with gutta-percha without a sealer. The sealing ability of each of the obturation techniques was tested using the dye penetration method followed by the clearing method using alcohol. Stereo microscope was used to measure the extent of dye penetration. Statistical data analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Tukey tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all the four groups. Apical extent of mean microleakage was maximum for gutta-percha, followed by Gutta-percha + AH-plus and Gutta-percha + Epiphany, and the least with Resilon + Epiphany. Statistically significant difference (P < 0.01) was seen in the apical leakage. Conclusion: All the samples tested showed microleakage. The “Epiphany soft resin endodontic obturation system” showed a superior result compared to other obturation materials. PMID:27583220

  4. Heat loss in air of an Antarctic marine mammal, the Weddell seal.

    PubMed

    Mellish, Jo-Ann; Hindle, Allyson; Skinner, John; Horning, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The conflicting needs of homeostasis in air versus water complicate our understanding of thermoregulation in marine mammals. Large-scale modeling efforts directed at predicting the energetic impact of changing sea ice conditions on polar ecosystems require a better understanding of thermoregulation in air of free-ranging animals. We utilized infrared imaging as an indirect approach to determine surface temperatures of dry, hauled-out Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii, n = 35) of varying age and body condition during the Antarctic summer. The study groups provided a fivefold range in body mass and a threefold range in blubber depth. Surface temperature (T s) did not vary by body region (head, shoulder, axilla, torso, hip, flippers). Average seal T s (mean 13.9 ± 11.2 °C) was best described through a combination of the physical traits of body mass and environmental variables of ambient temperature T air, and wind speed. Additional factors of ice temperature (T ice), relative humidity and cloud cover did not improve the model. Heat transfer model estimates suggested that radiation contributed 56.6 ± 7.7 % of total heat loss. Convection and conduction accounted for the remaining 15.7 ± 12.3 and 27.7 ± 9.3 %, respectively. Heat loss by radiation was primarily influenced by body mass and wind speed, whereas convective heat loss was influenced primarily by blubber depth and wind speed. Conductive heat loss was modeled largely as a function of physical traits of mass and blubber depth rather than any environmental covariates, and therefore was substantially higher in animals in leaner condition. PMID:25378218

  5. In-air evoked potential audiometry of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the North and Baltic Seas.

    PubMed

    Ruser, Andreas; Dähne, Michael; Sundermeyer, Janne; Lucke, Klaus; Houser, Dorian S; Finneran, James J; Driver, Jörg; Pawliczka, Iwona; Rosenberger, Tanja; Siebert, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    In-air anthropogenic sound has the potential to affect grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) behaviour and interfere with acoustic communication. In this study, a new method was used to deliver acoustic signals to grey seals as part of an in-air hearing assessment. Using in-ear headphones with adapted ear inserts allowed for the measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) on sedated grey seals exposed to 5-cycle (2-1-2) tone pips. Thresholds were measured at 10 frequencies between 1-20 kHz. Measurements were made using subcutaneous electrodes on wild seals from the Baltic and North Seas. Thresholds were determined by both visual and statistical approaches (single point F-test) and good agreement was obtained between the results using both methods. The mean auditory thresholds were ≤40 dB re 20 µPa peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) between 4-20 kHz and showed similar patterns to in-air behavioural hearing tests of other phocid seals between 3 and 20 kHz. Below 3 kHz, a steep reduction in hearing sensitivity was observed, which differed from the rate of decline in sensitivity obtained in behavioural studies on other phocids. Differences in the rate of decline may reflect influence of the ear inserts on the ability to reliably transmit lower frequencies or interference from the structure of the distal end of the ear canal. PMID:24632891

  6. In-Air Evoked Potential Audiometry of Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the North and Baltic Seas

    PubMed Central

    Ruser, Andreas; Dähne, Michael; Sundermeyer, Janne; Lucke, Klaus; Houser, Dorian S.; Finneran, James J.; Driver, Jörg; Pawliczka, Iwona; Rosenberger, Tanja; Siebert, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    In-air anthropogenic sound has the potential to affect grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) behaviour and interfere with acoustic communication. In this study, a new method was used to deliver acoustic signals to grey seals as part of an in-air hearing assessment. Using in-ear headphones with adapted ear inserts allowed for the measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) on sedated grey seals exposed to 5-cycle (2-1-2) tone pips. Thresholds were measured at 10 frequencies between 1–20 kHz. Measurements were made using subcutaneous electrodes on wild seals from the Baltic and North Seas. Thresholds were determined by both visual and statistical approaches (single point F-test) and good agreement was obtained between the results using both methods. The mean auditory thresholds were ≤40 dB re 20 µPa peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) between 4–20 kHz and showed similar patterns to in-air behavioural hearing tests of other phocid seals between 3 and 20 kHz. Below 3 kHz, a steep reduction in hearing sensitivity was observed, which differed from the rate of decline in sensitivity obtained in behavioural studies on other phocids. Differences in the rate of decline may reflect influence of the ear inserts on the ability to reliably transmit lower frequencies or interference from the structure of the distal end of the ear canal. PMID:24632891

  7. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge. PMID:24324250

  8. Development of a high temperature ceramic-to-metal seal for Air Force Weapons Laboratory Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Honnell, R.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1987-03-01

    Procedures were developed for fabricating vacuum tight metal-to-ceramic ring seals between Inconel 625 and MgO-3 wt % Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ tubes metallized with a calcia-alumina-silica glass (CaO-29 wt % Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-35 wt % SiO/sub 2/) containing 50 vol % molybdenum filler. Palniro No. 1 (Au-25 wt % Pd-25 wt % Ni) was found to be the most reliable braze for joining Inconel to metallized MgO-3 wt % Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ bodies. The reliabilities of the processing procedures and the material systems were demonstrated. A prototype electrical feedthrough was fabricated for 1173/sup 0/K operation in air or vacuum.

  9. An investigation of ingress for an 'air-cooled' shrouded rotating disk system with radial-clearance seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadke, U. P.; Owen, J. M.

    1982-04-01

    The quest for improved performance has led to great interest in the study of disk sealing and cooling air systems of gas turbines. The disk cooling air must not only remove the heat conducted in the disk from the blades but must also prevent the ingress of hot gas into the cavity between the disk and the stator. The present investigation is concerned with the study of several different rotor-stator seals with radial clearances between cylindrical shrouds on both the rotor and the stator. The tests were conducted in the absence of an external axial flow, which occurs in an actual gas turbine. Flow visualization and pressure measurements were used to study the performance of the radial-clearance seals.

  10. Reconfigurable optothermal microparticle trap in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, O A; Garbos, M K; Euser, T G; Russell, P St J

    2012-07-13

    We report a novel optothermal trapping mechanism that occurs in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. In the confined environment of the core, the motion of a laser-guided particle is strongly influenced by the thermal-gradient-driven flow of air along the core surface. Known as "thermal creep flow," this can be induced either statically by local heating, or dynamically by the absorption (at a black mark placed on the fiber surface) of light scattered by the moving particle. The optothermal force on the particle, which can be accurately measured in hollow-core fiber by balancing it against the radiation forces, turns out to exceed the conventional thermophoretic force by 2 orders of magnitude. The system makes it possible to measure pN-scale forces accurately and to explore thermally driven flow in micron-scale structures. PMID:23030165

  11. Measurements of two types of dilatational waves in an air-filled unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.J.; Sabatier, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    This study consists of laboratory measurements of dilatational waves propagating through an air-filled unconsolidated sand. One excitation technique consists of a loudspeaker suspended in the air above the packing of sand. A second excitation technique uses a mechanical shaker in contact with the sand. The transmitted signals are received using microphones and geophones located at various depths within the sand. An interpretation based on measured phase speeds indicates that the transmitted energy from the suspended loudspeaker source is partitioned primarily but not exclusively into the type-II dilatational wave. This wave attenuates rapidly and is only detected at depths of less than about 15 cm for this particular sample. At the deeper depths the detected signal is associated with the type-I dilatational wave. The mechanical shaker produces only a type-I dilatational wave. Both the geophone and microphone sensors can detect both types of dilatational waves. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  12. Reconfigurable Optothermal Microparticle Trap in Air-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, O. A.; Garbos, M. K.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2012-07-01

    We report a novel optothermal trapping mechanism that occurs in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. In the confined environment of the core, the motion of a laser-guided particle is strongly influenced by the thermal-gradient-driven flow of air along the core surface. Known as “thermal creep flow,” this can be induced either statically by local heating, or dynamically by the absorption (at a black mark placed on the fiber surface) of light scattered by the moving particle. The optothermal force on the particle, which can be accurately measured in hollow-core fiber by balancing it against the radiation forces, turns out to exceed the conventional thermophoretic force by 2 orders of magnitude. The system makes it possible to measure pN-scale forces accurately and to explore thermally driven flow in micron-scale structures.

  13. Measure Guideline. Wall Air Sealing and Insulation Methods in Existing Homes; An Overview of Opportunity and Process

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-09-01

    This guide provides renovators and retrofit contractors an overview of considerations when including wall air sealing and insulation in an energy retrofit project. It also outlines the potential project risks, various materials for insulating, possible field inspections needed, installation procedures, as well as the benefits and drawbacks.

  14. Engineering report. Part 1: NASA wheel air seal development for space shuttle type environmental requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The sealing techniques are studied for existing aircraft wheel-tire designs to meet the hard vacuum .00001 torr and cold temperature -65 F requirements of space travel. The investigation covers the use of existing wheel seal designs.

  15. Sealing ability of three root-end filling materials prepared using an erbium: Yttrium aluminium garnet laser and endosonic tip evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nanjappa, A Salin; Ponnappa, KC; Nanjamma, KK; Ponappa, MC; Girish, Sabari; Nitin, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine, and Chitra-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root-end filling, evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope using Rhodamine B dye. (2) To evaluate effect of ultrasonic retroprep tip and an erbium:yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser on the integrity of three different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 80 extracted teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha. The apical 3 mm of each tooth was resected and 3 mm root-end preparation was made using ultrasonic tip (n = 30) and Er:YAG laser (n = 30). MTA, Biodentine, and Chitra-CPC were used to restore 10 teeth each. The samples were coated with varnish and after drying, they were immersed in Rhodamine B dye for 24 h. The teeth were then rinsed, sectioned longitudinally, and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Tukey's test at P < 0.05 (R software version 3.1.0). Results: Comparison of microleakage showed maximum peak value of 0.45 mm for Biodentine, 0.85 mm for MTA, and 1.05 mm for Chitra-CPC. The amount of dye penetration was found to be lesser in root ends prepared using Er:YAG laser when compared with ultrasonics, the difference was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Root-end cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and restored with Biodentine showed superior sealing ability compared to those prepared with ultrasonics. PMID:26180420

  16. Concentration of dimethylnitrosamine in the air of smoke-filled rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Stehlik, G.; Richter, O.; Altmann, H.

    1982-12-01

    In order to evaluate the contribution of volatile nitrosamines from tobacco smoke to indoor air pollution, N-nitroso-dimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitroso-diethylamine (NDEA) were measured in indoor air under artificial and natural conditions. In controlled experiments under extreme conditions, we found that tobacco smoke-related NDMA levels above 0.07 ng/liter were associated with a highly irritating atmosphere which was scarcely tolerable to those present. In smoke-filled rooms under natural conditions NDMA levels ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 ng/liter except a minimum value of less than 0.01 ng/liter in a restaurant and a maximum of 0.07 ng/liter in a dancing bar. These NDMA levels are thus below comparable values reported by others. The NDMA/NDEA ratios found in air samples taken from some rooms under conditions of everyday life are quite different from those found in sidestream smoke of cigarettes. Irritation was not reported under natural conditions. From the results it is concluded that NDMA levels, measured under real life conditions, are usually not caused by tobacco smoke alone. Evidence for other sources of volatile nitrosamines is discussed.

  17. Challenges to a blow/fill/seal process with airborne microorganisms having different resistances to dry heat.

    PubMed

    Poisson, Patrick; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Controlled challenges with air dispersed microorganisms having widely different resistances to dry heat, carried out on 624 BFS machine processing growth medium, have shown that higher the heat resistance, the greater the extent of vial contamination. Differences in heat resistance affected also the extent of vial contamination when parison and vial formation were knowingly manipulated through changes made to each of three process variables, provision of ballooning air, mould vacuum delay, and parison extrusion rate. The findings demonstrate that, in this investigational system, exposure of challenge micoorganisms to heat inherent in the process has a controlling influence on vial contamination, an influence that could also control microbiological risk in production environments. PMID:17089701

  18. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107-1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103-104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30-700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  19. Building America Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  20. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  1. Mode-based microparticle conveyor belt in air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver A; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-01

    We show how microparticles can be moved over long distances and precisely positioned in a low-loss air-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber using a coherent superposition of two co-propagating spatial modes, balanced by a backward-propagating fundamental mode. This creates a series of trapping positions spaced by half the beat-length between the forward-propagating modes (typically a fraction of a millimeter). The system allows a trapped microparticle to be moved along the fiber by continuously tuning the relative phase between the two forward-propagating modes. This mode-based optical conveyor belt combines long-range transport of microparticles with a positional accuracy of 1 µm. The technique also has potential uses in waveguide-based optofluidic systems. PMID:24514492

  2. Interaction of finite-amplitude sound with air-filled porous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of high intensity sound waves through an air-filled porus material was studied. The material is assumed: (1) to be rigid, incompressible, and homogeneous, and (2) to be adequately described by two properties: resistivity r and porosity. The resulting wave equation is still nonlinear, however, because of the u sgn(u) term in the resistivity. The equation is solved in the frequency domain as an infinite set of coupled inhomogeneous Helmholtz equations, one for each harmonic. An approximate but analytical solution leads to predictions of excess attenuation, saturation, and phase speed reduction for the fundamental component. A more general numerical solution is used to calculate the propagation curves for the higher harmonics. The u sgn(u) nonlinearity produces a cubic distortion pattern; when the input signal is a pure tone, only odd harmonic distortion products are generated.

  3. Evaluation of Sealing Ability of Biodentine as Retrograde Filling Material by Using two Different Manipulation Methods: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj Kumar; Garg, Gaurav; Kalita, Chandana; Saikia, Anjan; Srinivasa, T S; Satish, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: The study was aimed to evaluate the microleakage of Biodentine using two different manipulation methods by dye penetration. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 single-rooted human maxillary permanent teeth were cleaned and obturated with gutta-percha using lateral condensation method. Standardized root-end cavities were prepared after apical resection. All teeth were divided randomly into two groups of 30 specimens and were filled with Biodentine by trituration and hand manipulation methods. The samples were coated with varnish and immersed in 1% methylene blue dye for 72 h. Then the teeth were sectioned longitudinally and observed under a stereomicroscope. The depth of dye penetration was measured in millimeters. Results: There was highly statistical significant difference observed between Group I and Group II (P < 0.001) when dye penetration scores were compared. Conclusion: More microleakage was seen when Biodentine was manually manipulated as compared to machine trituration. PMID:26229383

  4. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.; Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Alvarez, Patricio D.

    2010-09-21

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  5. Rotary shaft sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L; Schroeder, John E; Kalsi, Manmohan S; Alvarez, Patricio D

    2013-08-13

    A rotary shaft sealing assembly in which a first fluid is partitioned from a second fluid in a housing assembly having a rotary shaft located at least partially within. In one embodiment a lip seal is lubricated and flushed with a pressure-generating seal ring preferably having an angled diverting feature. The pressure-generating seal ring and a hydrodynamic seal may be used to define a lubricant-filled region with each of the seals having hydrodynamic inlets facing the lubricant-filled region. Another aspect of the sealing assembly is having a seal to contain pressurized lubricant while withstanding high rotary speeds. Another rotary shaft sealing assembly embodiment includes a lubricant supply providing a lubricant at an elevated pressure to a region between a lip seal and a hydrodynamic seal with a flow control regulating the flow of lubricant past the lip seal. The hydrodynamic seal may include an energizer element having a modulus of elasticity greater than the modulus of elasticity of a sealing lip of the hydrodynamic seal.

  6. Self sealing disconnect for tubing forms metal seal after breakaway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernandt, H. H.

    1964-01-01

    Disconnect fittings form a positive metal seal when the fill tube pulls against a metal sleeve when disconnected by force. A specially designed sleeve surrounds the fill tube. O-rings in the shoulder of the sleeve and near the outer end of the fill tube seal against leakage.

  7. Seals and Sealing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Developments by the aerospace industry in seals and sealing techniques are announced for possible use in other areas. The announcements presented are grouped as: sealing techniques for cryogenic fluids, high pressure applications, and modification for improved performance.

  8. Rotary kiln seal

    DOEpatents

    Drexler, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A rotary seal used to prevent the escape of contaminates from a rotating kiln incinerator. The rotating seal combines a rotating disc plate which is attached to the rotating kiln shell and four sets of non-rotating carbon seal bars housed in a primary and secondary housing and which rub on the sides of the disc. A seal air system is used to create a positive pressure in a chamber between the primary and secondary seals to create a positive air flow into the contaminated gas chamber. The seal air system also employs an air inlet located between the secondary and tertiary seals to further insure that no contaminates pass the seal and enter the external environment and to provide makeup air for the air which flows into the contaminated gas chamber. The pressure exerted by the seal bars on the rotating disc is controlled by means of a preload spring. The seal is capable of operating in a thermally changing environment where the both radial expansion and axial movement of the rotating kiln do not result in the failure of the seal.

  9. Protective supplied-breathing-air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; von Hortenau, E.F.

    1982-05-28

    A breathing-air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants is disclosed. The garment includes a suit and a separate head-protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air-delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air-delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  10. Profiles of exercise history and overuse injuries among United States Navy Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) recruits.

    PubMed

    Shwayhat, A F; Linenger, J M; Hofherr, L K; Slymen, D J; Johnson, C W

    1994-01-01

    This prospective study examined running history as a risk factor for subsequent overuse injury in Navy Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) recruits. Recruits preparing to be Navy SEALs undergo 6 months of rigorous physical training programs, which place these recruits at high risk for developing an overuse injury. We assessed the independent variables of age; prior running frequency, duration, and pace; and training surface. Univariate and multivariate estimates of risk were determined for each variable. We observed an incidence of 3.4 overuse injuries per 1000 recruit-days. Assessing the physical activity of the recruits in the 6 months before entrance into basic training, we found that the recruits who ran at a pace slower than 8 minutes per mile and on softer training surfaces were more likely to sustain an overuse injury during basic training, in both univariate and multivariate estimates of risk. Recruits who ran fewer weekly miles and for shorter durations before basic training were also more likely to sustain an overuse injury according to univariate estimates of risk. Our findings suggest that risk of overuse injuries can be reduced by adjusting exercise routines before training. Running on different type surfaces with a gradual increase in speed, duration, and weekly mileage in the period preceding basic training may reduce risk of overuse injury. PMID:7856809

  11. Sliding durability of two carbide-oxide candidate high temperature fiber seal materials in air to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    A test program to determine the friction and wear properties of two complex carbide oxide ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is described. The fibers are based on Si, C, O, and Ti or Si, C, N, and O ceramic systems. Pin on disk tests using ceramic fiber covered pins and Inconel 718 disks, were conducted in air from 25 to 900 C to evaluate potential seal materials. This testing procedure was used in a previous study of oxide ceramic fibers which were found to exhibit wear behavior based predominantly on their mechanical properties. Like the oxide fibers tested previously, these carbide oxide ceramic fibers, show an increase in friction and wear with increased test temperature. At room temperature, the wear behavior seems to be based upon mechanical properties, namely tensile strength. At 500 and especially 900 C, the fibers wear by both mechanical fracture and by oxidative type wear. Based upon post test microscopic and x ray analyses, interaction between the fiber constituents and elements transferred from the counterface, namely Ni and Cr, may have occurred enhancing the tribochemical wear process. These results are interpreted.

  12. Flow Field in a Single-Stage Model Air Turbine With Seal Rings and Pre-Swirled Purge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Dennis M.

    Modern gas turbines operate at high mainstream gas temperatures and pressures, which requires high durability materials. A method of preventing these hot gases from leaking into the turbine cavities is essential for improved reliability and cost reduction. Utilizing bleed-off air from the compressor to cool internal components has been a common solution, but at the cost of decreasing turbine performance. The present work thoroughly describes the complex flow field between the mainstream gas and a single rotor-stator disk cavity, and mechanisms of mainstream gas ingestion. A combined approach of experimental measurement and numerical simulation are performed on the flow in a single-stage model gas turbine. Mainstream gas ingestion into the cavity is further reduced by utilizing two axially overlapping seal rings, one on the rotor disk and the other on the stator wall. Secondary purge air is injected into the rotor-stator cavity pre-swirled through the stator radially inboard of the two seal rings. Flow field predictions from the simulations are compared against experimental measurements of static pressure, velocity, and tracer gas concentration acquired in a nearly identical model configuration. Operational conditions were performed with a main airflow Reynolds number of 7.86e4 and a rotor disk speed of 3000rpm. Additionally the rotational Reynolds number was 8.74 e5 with a purge air nondimensional flow rate cw=4806. The simulation models a 1/14 rotationally periodic sector of the turbine rig, consisting of four rotor blades and four stator vanes. Gambit was used to generate the three-dimensional unstructured grids ranging from 10 to 20 million cells. Effects of turbulence were modeled using the single-equation Spalart-Allmaras as well as the realizable k-epsilon models. Computations were performed using FLUENT for both a simplified steady-state and subsequent time-dependent formulation. Simulation results show larger scale structures across the entire sector angle

  13. 30 CFR 57.8535 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seals. 57.8535 Section 57.8535 Mineral....8535 Seals. Seals shall be provided with a means for checking the quality of air behind the seal and a means to prevent a water head from developing unless the seal is designed to impound water....

  14. 30 CFR 57.8535 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seals. 57.8535 Section 57.8535 Mineral....8535 Seals. Seals shall be provided with a means for checking the quality of air behind the seal and a means to prevent a water head from developing unless the seal is designed to impound water....

  15. 30 CFR 57.8535 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seals. 57.8535 Section 57.8535 Mineral....8535 Seals. Seals shall be provided with a means for checking the quality of air behind the seal and a means to prevent a water head from developing unless the seal is designed to impound water....

  16. 30 CFR 57.8535 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seals. 57.8535 Section 57.8535 Mineral....8535 Seals. Seals shall be provided with a means for checking the quality of air behind the seal and a means to prevent a water head from developing unless the seal is designed to impound water....

  17. 30 CFR 57.8535 - Seals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seals. 57.8535 Section 57.8535 Mineral....8535 Seals. Seals shall be provided with a means for checking the quality of air behind the seal and a means to prevent a water head from developing unless the seal is designed to impound water....

  18. Beam focusing and unidirectional excitation from four nanoslits filled with air and non-linear material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yan; Quan, Wei; Wei, Qi; Qiu, Peng

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically design a device composed of four nanoslits to dynamically modulate the propagation direction of light beam by embedding non-linear material and air, respectively. Directions of radiation fields are determined by the phase difference of the surface waves at the exit interface and distance of each slit. Numerical simulations using finite element method verify that the unidirectional excitation and beam focusing can be achieved easily by changing the intensity of incident light.

  19. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  20. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) air-filled nanocapsules as a contrast agent for ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Néstor, Mendoza-Muñoz; Kei, Noriega-Peláez Eddy; Guadalupe, Nava-Arzaluz María; Elisa, Mendoza-Elvira Susana; Adriana, Ganem-Quintanar; David, Quintanar-Guerrero

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare air-filled nanocapsules intended ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) with a biodegradable polymeric shell composed of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Because of their size, current commercial UCAs are not capable of penetrating the irregular vasculature that feeds growing tumors. The new generation of UCAs should be designed on the nanoscale to enhance tumor detection, in addition, the polymeric shell in contrast with monomolecular stabilized UCAs improves the mechanical properties against ultrasound pressure and lack of stability. The preparation method of air-filled nanocapsules was based on a modification of the double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Air-filled nanocapsules with a mean diameter of 370±96nm were obtained. Electronic microscopies revealed spherical-shaped particles with smooth surfaces and a capsular morphology, with a shell thickness of ∼50nm. Air-filled nanocapsules showed echogenic power in vitro, providing an enhancement of up to 15dB at a concentration of 0.045mg/mL at a frequency of 10MHz. Loss of signal for air-filled nanocapsules was 2dB after 30min, suggesting high stability. The prepared contrast agent in this work has the potential to be used in ultrasound imaging. PMID:21570702

  1. Isolating scattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell using iterative, single-channel time reversal.

    PubMed

    Waters, Zachary J; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R; Simpson, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    Iterative, single-channel time reversal is employed to isolate backscattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell in a frequency range of 0.5-20 kHz. Numerical simulations of free-field target scattering suggest improved isolation of the dominant target response frequency in the presence of varying levels of stochastic noise, compared to processing returns from a single transmission and also coherent averaging. To test the efficacy of the technique in a realistic littoral environment, monostatic scattering experiments are conducted in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida. The time reversal technique is applied to returns from a hollow spherical shell target sitting proud on a sandy bottom in 14 m deep water. Distinct resonances in the scattering response of the target are isolated, depending upon the bandwidth of the sonar system utilized. PMID:22280594

  2. Spectral broadening and temporal compression of ∼ 100 fs pulses in air-filled hollow core capillary fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Rishad, K P M; Horak, P; Matsuura, Y; Faccio, D

    2014-01-13

    We experimentally study the spectral broadening of intense, ∼ 100 femtosecond laser pulses at 785 nm coupled into different kinds of hollow core capillary fibers, all filled with air at ambient pressure. Differently from observations in other gases, the spectra are broadened with a strong red-shift due to highly efficient intrapulse Raman scattering. Numerical simulations show that such spectra can be explained only by increasing the Raman fraction of the third order nonlinearity close to 100%. Experimentally, these broadened and red-shifted pulses do not generally allow for straightforward compression using, for example, standard chirped mirrors. However, using special hollow fibers that are internally coated with silver and polymer we obtain pulse durations in the sub-20 fs regime with energies up to 300 μJ. PMID:24515074

  3. Effects of Thermal Cycling and Thermal Aging on the Hermeticity and Strength of Silver-Copper Oxide Air-Brazed Seals

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Coyle, Christopher A.; Darsell, Jens T.; Xia, Gordon; Hardy, John S.

    2005-12-01

    Thermal cycle and exposure tests were conducted on ceramic-to-metal joints prepared by a new sealing technique. Known as reactive air brazing, this joining method is currently being considered for use in sealing various high-temperature solid-state electrochemical devices, including planar solid oxide fuel cells (pSOFC). In order to simulate a typical pSOFC application, test specimens were prepared by joining ceramic anode/electrolyte bilayers to washers, of the same composition as the common frame materials employed in pSOFC stacks, using a filler metal composed of 4mol% CuO in silver. The brazed samples were exposure tested at 750°C for 200, 400, and 800hrs in both simulated fuel and air environments and thermally cycled at rapid rate (75°C/min) between room temperature and 750°C for as many as fifty cycles. Subsequent joint strength testing and microstructural analysis indicated that the samples exposure tested in air displayed little degradation with respect to strength, hermeticity, or microstructure out to 800hrs of exposure. Those tested in fuel showed no change in rupture strength or loss in hermeticity after 800hrs of high-temperature exposure, but did undergo microstructural change due to the dissolution of hydrogen into the silver-based braze material. Air brazed specimens subjected to rapid thermal cycling exhibited no loss in joint strength or hermeticity, but displayed initial signs of seal delamination along the braze/electrolyte interface after 50 cycles.

  4. Nonlinear analysis of orbital motion of a rotor subject to leakage air flow through an interlocking seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. Z.; Liu, Y. Z.; Meng, G.; Jiang, P. N.

    2009-07-01

    A nonlinear mathematical model for orbital motion of the rotor under the influence of leakage flow through a labyrinth seal was established in the present study. An interlocking seal was chosen for study. The rotor-seal system was modeled as a Jeffcot rotor subject to aerodynamic forcing induced by the leakage flow. Particular attention was placed on the serpentine flow path by spatially separating the aerodynamic force on the rotor surface into two parts, e.g., the seal clearance and the cavity volume. Spatio-temporal variation of the aerodynamic force on the rotor surface in the coverage of the seal clearance and the cavity volume was delineated by using the Muzynska model and perturbation analysis, respectively. The governing equation of rotor dynamics, which was incorporated with the aerodynamic force integrated over all seal clearances and cavity volumes, was solved by using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to obtain the orbit of the whirling rotor. Stability of the rotating rotor was inspected using the Liapunov first method. The results convincingly demonstrate that the destabilization speed of the rotor was reduced due to the aerodynamic force induced by the leakage flow through the interlocking seal. The nonlinear analysis method proposed in the present study is readily applied to dynamics of various rotor-seal systems with labyrinth seals.

  5. Response of ozone to changes in hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide concentrations in outdoor smog chambers filled with Los Angeles air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Nelson A.; Gunst, Richard F.

    During the summer portion of the 1987 Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS), outdoor smog chamber experiments were performed on Los Angeles air to determine the response of maximum ozone levels, O 3(max), to changes in the initial concentrations of hydrocarbons, HC, and nitrogen oxides, NO x. These captive-air experiments were conducted in downtown Los Angeles and in the downwind suburb of Claremont. Typically, eight chambers were filled with LA air in the morning. In some chambers the initial HC and/or NO x concentrations were changed by 25% to 50% by adding various combinations of a mixture of HC, clean air, or NO x. The O 3 concentration in each chamber was monitored throughout the day to determine O 3(max). An empirical mathematical model for O 3(max) was developed from regression fits to the initial HC and NO x concentrations and to the average daily temperature at both sites. This is the first time that a mathematical expression for the O 3-precursor relationship and the positive effect of temperature on O 3(max) have been quantified using captive-air experiments. An ozone isopleth diagram prepared from the empirical model was qualitatively similar to those prepared from photochemical mechanisms. This constitutes the first solely empirical corroboration of the O 3 contour shape for Los Angeles. To comply with the Federal Ozone Standard in LA, O 3(max) must be reduced by approximately 50%. Several strategies for reducing O 3(max) by 50% were evaluated using the empirical model. For the average initial conditions that we measured in LA, the most efficient strategy is one that reduces HC by 55-75%, depending on the ambient HC/NO x ratio. Any accompanying reduction in NO x would be counter-productive to the benefits of HC reductions. In fact, reducing HC and NO x simultaneously requires larger percentage reductions for both than the reduction required when HC alone is reduced. The HC-reduction strategy is the most efficient on average, but no single

  6. Spectral Evidence for Ionization in Air-Filled Glow Discharge Tubes: Application to Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. A.; Williams, E. R.; Golka, R. K.; Williams, D. R.

    2001-12-01

    The question of ionization in sprites and the evidence for VLF backscatter from sprites has motivated a quantitative spectral analysis of the various (classical) regions of the glow discharge tube under DC excitation and at air densities appropriate for sprites in the mesosphere. A PR-650 colorimeter (Photo Research, Inc.) has enabled calibrated irradiance measurements for localized zones along the axis of the discharge tube--in the dominantly blue negative glow, in the Faraday dark space and in the red/pink positive column. Consistent with historical nomenclature, nitrogen first and second positive emission is dominant in the positive column (associated with neutral N2), and nitrogen first negative emission, with a prominent peak at 4278 A, is dominant in the blue negative glow (associated with ionized N2+). Whereas nitrogen first and second positive emission are also detected in the negative glow, no spectral evidence for ionization (no 4279, no 3914, no Meinel) is found in the red/pink positive column. This negative result is attributed not to an absence of ionization in the positive column, but rather to a sparse population of N2+ relative to neutral nitrogen in this region, and to the prominent emission in the blue part of the spectrum due to nitrogen second positive. A similar interpretation may be appropriate for the time-integrated spectra from the red body of sprites, also lacking direct evidence for ionization.

  7. On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria

    2014-05-01

    The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation. PMID:24670909

  8. Photoacoustic Detection of Perfluorocarbon Tracers in Air for Application to Leak Detection in Oil-Filled Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajarevich, N.; Slezak, V.; Peuriot, A.; Villa, G.; Láttero, A.; Crivicich, R.

    2013-09-01

    The underground oil-filled cable consists of a hollow copper conductor surrounded by oiled paper which acts as electrical insulation. The oil flows along the conductor and diffuses through it to the insulating paper. A lead sheath is used as the outer retaining wall. As the deterioration of this cover may cause a loss of insulation fluid, its detection is very important since this high voltage and power cable is used in cities even under sidewalks. The method of perfluorocarbon vapor tracers, based on the injection and subsequent detection of these volatile chemical substances in the vicinity of the cable, is one of the most promising methods, so far used in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this study, the possibility of detecting two different tracers, and , by means of resonant photoacoustic spectroscopy is studied. The beam from a tunable amplitude-modulated laser goes through an aluminum cell with quarter wave filters at both ends of an open resonator and an electret microphone in its center, attached to the walls. The calibration of the system for either substance diluted in chromatographic air showed a higher sensitivity for , so the experiment was completed checking the behavior of this substance in samples prepared with ambient air in order to analyze the application of the system to field studies.

  9. Fluid sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Nau, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 41 papers. Some of the titles are: Evaluation of secondary containment seals for pumps on hydrocarbon duties; Valve steam sealing in nuclear plants; Design directives for liquid spattered labyrinth seals; Analysis of a novel rotary seal; Contacting mechanical seal design using a simplified hydrostatic model; and Transient thermoelastic effects in a mechanical face.

  10. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  11. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  12. Multiple Solutions in Natural Convection in an Air Filled Square Enclosure: Fractal Dimension of Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklouche Benouaguef, S.; Zeghmati, B.; Bouhadef, K.; Daguenet, M.

    In this study, we investigated numerically the transient natural convection in a square cavity with two horizontal adiabatic sides and vertical walls composed of two regions of same size maintained at different temperatures. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and bi-dimensional. The governing equations written in dimensionless form and expressed in terms of stream function and vorticity, have been solved using the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method and the GAUSS elimination method. Calculations were performed for air (Pr = 0.71), with a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 3.7x106. We analysed the effect of the Rayleigh number on the route to the chaos of the system. The first transition has been found from steady-state to oscillatory flow and the second is a subharmonic bifurcation as the Rayleigh number is increased further. For sufficiently small Rayleigh numbers, present results show that the flow is characterized by four cells with horizontal and vertical symmetric axes. The attractor bifurcates from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle for a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 2.51x105. A limit cycle settles from Ra = 3x105 and persists until Ra = 5x105. At a Rayleigh number of 2.5x105 the temporal evolution of the Nusselt number Nu(t) was stationary. As the Rayleigh number increases, the flow becomes unstable and bifurcates to a time periodic solution at a critical Rayleigh number between 2.5x105 and 2.51x105. After the first HOPF bifurcation at Ra = 2.51x105, the oscillatory flow undergoes several bifurcations and ultimately evolves into a chaotic flow.

  13. Vibration damping of mechanical seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, R. R.

    1970-01-01

    Bellows seal filled with spherical powder reacts to vibration inputs by absorbing displacement energy through inertia and friction of the particle masses acting on the inside surface of the cylinders.

  14. Small bowel necrosis as a consequence of spontaneous deflation and migration of an air-filled intragastric balloon - a potentially life-threatening complication.

    PubMed

    Drozdowski, Robert; Wyleżoł, Mariusz; Frączek, Mariusz; Hevelke, Piotr; Giaro, Marcin; Sobański, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Intragastric balloon placement is a common method of treatment of obesity and is often used by non-surgical teams in endoscopy departments. The likelihood of spontaneous intragastric balloon damage is a well-known phenomenon. We describe a patient who was disqualified from surgical obesity treatment and in whom intragastric fluid-filled balloons had already been inserted twice and removed due to their intolerance. Therefore we qualified this patient for placement of the air-filled balloon Heliosphere BAG. Two months after the planned check-up, he arrived at the surgery department complaining of nausea and vomiting and due to symptoms of ileus diagnosed with an X-ray and ultrasound examination we qualified him for emergency surgery. We would like to emphasise the following issues: the necessity of air-filled balloon removal according to the producer's instructions and multidisciplinary specialist team care along with appropriate diagnostic tools in every case of intragastric balloon insertion. PMID:25097704

  15. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  16. Thermal barrier and gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, J. O.; Surbat, M.

    1980-01-01

    Resilient baglike seal tolerates thousand-degree temperatures and accommodates small changes in gap size without losing gas-barrier properties; at same time, it maintains smooth aerodynamic surface across gap. Seal includes alumina filler backed by metal plate. Alumina-filled envelope is easily handled and installed, and can be used in high-temperature industrial processes like coal gasification and liquefaction.

  17. Development of helicopter engine seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynwander, P.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of main shaft seals for helicopter gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/s(700 ft/sec), air pressures to 148 N/sq cm (215 psia), and air temperatures to 645 K (675 F). Gas leakage test results indicate that conventional seals will not be satisfactory for high-pressure sealing because of excessive leakage. The self-acting face seal, however, had significantly lower leakage and operated with insignificant wear during a 150-hour endurance test at sliding speeds to 145 m/s (475 ft/sec), air pressures to 124 N/sq cm (180 psia), and air temperatures to 408 K (275 F). Wear measurements indicate that noncontact operation was achieved at shaft speeds of 43,000 rpm. Evaluation of the self-acting circumferential seal was inconclusive because of seal dimensional variations.

  18. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient; the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Building's (CARB) multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in three multifamily buildings.

  19. Glass sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S.

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  20. Navy GTE seal development activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grala, Carl P.

    1993-10-01

    Under the auspices of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative, the Naval Air Warfare Center conducts advanced development programs for demonstration in the next generation of air-breathing propulsion systems. Among the target technologies are gas path and lube oil seals. Two development efforts currently being managed by NAWCAD are the High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal and the Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal. The High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal Program aims at reducing parasitic leakage through application of a film-riding face sea concept to the compressor discharge location of a Phase 2 IHPTET engine. An order-of-magnitude leakage reduction relative to current labyrinth seal configurations is expected. Performance goals for these seals are (1) 1200 F air temperature, (2) 800 feet-per-second surface velocity, and (3) 600 SPI differential pressure. The two designs chosen for fabrication and rig test are a spiral groove and a Rayleigh step seal. Rig testing is currently underway. The Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal Program is developing shaft-to-ground seals for next-generation propulsion systems that will minimize leakage and provide full life. Significantly higher rotor speeds and temperatures will be experienced. Technologies being exploited include, hydrodynamic lift assist features, ultra light weight designs, and improved cooling schemes. Parametric testing has been completed; a final seal design is entering the endurance test phase.

  1. Navy GTE seal development activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grala, Carl P.

    1993-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative, the Naval Air Warfare Center conducts advanced development programs for demonstration in the next generation of air-breathing propulsion systems. Among the target technologies are gas path and lube oil seals. Two development efforts currently being managed by NAWCAD are the High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal and the Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal. The High Performance Compressor Discharge Film-Riding Face Seal Program aims at reducing parasitic leakage through application of a film-riding face sea concept to the compressor discharge location of a Phase 2 IHPTET engine. An order-of-magnitude leakage reduction relative to current labyrinth seal configurations is expected. Performance goals for these seals are (1) 1200 F air temperature, (2) 800 feet-per-second surface velocity, and (3) 600 SPI differential pressure. The two designs chosen for fabrication and rig test are a spiral groove and a Rayleigh step seal. Rig testing is currently underway. The Subsonic Core High Speed Air/Oil Seal Program is developing shaft-to-ground seals for next-generation propulsion systems that will minimize leakage and provide full life. Significantly higher rotor speeds and temperatures will be experienced. Technologies being exploited include, hydrodynamic lift assist features, ultra light weight designs, and improved cooling schemes. Parametric testing has been completed; a final seal design is entering the endurance test phase.

  2. Repository seals requirements study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  3. Sealing device

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  4. Coining seal

    DOEpatents

    Mancebo, Lloyd

    1976-01-01

    A bakeable high pressure-vacuum seal is provided in which an inductile sealing element having a butterfly shaped crosssection with protruding sharp edges at each of the four corners, is sandwiched between two ductile sealing elements, the sandwiched assembly then being compressed between the surfaces of the flange elements of a high pressure or high vacuum vessel to coin the ductile sealing element into the surface of the inductile sealing element as well as the surfaces of the flange elements.

  5. Repository seals requirement study

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-03

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

  6. Preliminary study of cyclic thermal shock resistance of plasma-sprayed zirconium oxide turbine outer air seal shrouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Several experimental concepts representing potential high pressure turbine seal material systems were subjected to cyclic thermal shock exposures similar to those that might be encountered under severe engine start-up and shut-down sequences. All of the experimental concepts consisted of plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized ZrO2 on the high temperature side of the blade tip seal shroud. Between the ZrO2 and a cooled, dense metal backing, various intermediate layer concepts intended to mitigate thermal stresses were incorporated. Performance was judged on the basis of the number of thermal shock cycles required to cause loss of seal material through spallation. The most effective approach was to include a low modulus, sintered metal pad between the ZrO2 and the metallic backing. It was also found that reducing the density of the ZrO2 layer significantly improved the performance of specimens with plasma-sprayed metal/ceramic composite intermediate layers.

  7. Setting properties and sealing ability of hydraulic temporary sealing materials.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoko; Katsuumi, Ichiroh

    2008-09-01

    This study sought to investigate the setting progress and sealing ability of hydraulic temporary sealing materials used in endodontic treatment: Lumicon, Caviton, and HY-Seal. To evaluate setting progress, the materials were filled into glass tubes with one end sealed and immersed in water. After immersion, a measurement apparatus was inserted from the non-immersed end and the set area was determined by subtracting the unset area from the sample thickness. To evaluate sealing ability, materials were filled into glass tubes and divided into four groups based on different immersion times. Thermal cycling and dye penetration were performed. At 7 days, the setting depths of HY-Seal and Caviton were almost equivalent to full sample thickness, while that of Lumicon was only half of full sample thickness (p < 0.01). On sealing ability, Lumicon ranked the highest followed by Caviton, whereas HY-Seal was unstable (p < 0.01). These results suggested that there was no correlation between setting progress and sealing ability. PMID:18972791

  8. Thruster sealing system and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A thruster nozzle sealing system and apparatus is provided for protection of spacecraft thruster motors. The system includes a sealing plug, a sealing plug insertion tool, an outer cover, an outer cover attachment, and a ferry flight attachment. The sealing plug prevents moisture from entering the thruster engine so as to prevent valve failure. The attachments are interchangeably connectable with the sealing plug. The ferry flight attachment is used during air transportation of the spacecraft, and the outer cover attachment is used during storage and service of the spacecraft. The outer cover provides protection to the thruster nozzle from mechanical damage.

  9. Thruster sealing system and apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svejkovsky, Paul A.

    1992-11-01

    A thruster nozzle sealing system and apparatus is provided for protection of spacecraft thruster motors. The system includes a sealing plug, a sealing plug insertion tool, an outer cover, an outer cover attachment, and a ferry flight attachment. The sealing plug prevents moisture from entering the thruster engine so as to prevent valve failure. The attachments are interchangeably connectable with the sealing plug. The ferry flight attachment is used during air transportation of the spacecraft, and the outer cover attachment is used during storage and service of the spacecraft. The outer cover provides protection to the thruster nozzle from mechanical damage.

  10. Seal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salt, Jonathan G.; Korzun, Ronald W.; Abbott, David R.

    1993-01-01

    A unitary annular seal structure is provided for attachment to a turbine nozzle in a gas turbine engine. The nozzle includes an annular platform disposed about a longitudinal axis of the engine. An annular array of vanes is secured to the platform. The seal structure includes an abradable annular seal member, a seal backing member, and a seal attachment ring. The ring includes an annular, radially extending, axially acting spring member positioned to cooperate with a plurality of radially extending tabs on the backing member. In use, the seal structure is positioned within a circular opening within the turbine nozzle. The nozzle includes a radially depending appendage formed as part of the nozzle platform. The spring member abuts one side of the appendage and the tabs are positioned to abut another side of the appendage for holding the annular spring member in gas sealing engagement with the appendage to thus provide a seal against gas leakage and to restrain the seal structure axially. The spring member and tabs comprise a radially slideable joint for the seal structure. To restrict circumferential motion of the structure, slots are formed in the appendage for receiving the tabs. The seal is easily replaced by bending the tabs and sliding the seal structure axially out of the nozzle. Differential thermal expansion is accommodated by the slideable seal arrangement.

  11. Security seal

    DOEpatents

    Gobeli, Garth W.

    1985-01-01

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  12. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, E.L.; Hortenau, E.F. von.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment is disclosed for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap. 17 figs.

  13. Protective supplied breathing air garment

    DOEpatents

    Childers, Edward L.; von Hortenau, Erik F.

    1984-07-10

    A breathing air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants includes a suit and a separate head protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit rear torso panel permits access into the suit and is sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  14. Turbomachine Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Designers and customers are demanding higher performance turbomachine systems that have long life between overhauls and satisfy the more restrictive environmental constraints. This overview provides sources of design data, numerical, and experimental results along with selected new seal configurations and static sealing challenges such as in the combustors. The following categories are presented: (1) Seal Rotordynamic Data Base (experimental analytical program at Texas A&M); (2) Secondary Flow Interactions (validation studies at CFDRC, Huntsville AL); (3) Contact Sealing (selected types with finger seal model); and (4) Environmental Constraints (emphasis on combustors).

  15. Seals cap rotary kiln emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Gunkle, D.W. )

    1993-09-01

    The possibility of producing fugitive emissions is one of the most critical aspects of an incineration system. Whether such a system processes hazardous, medical, mixed or municipal waste, fugitive emissions are of special concern to system operators and the public alike. Effectively designed rotary-kiln seals can reduce fugitive emissions to acceptable, minimal levels. Modern air monitoring systems track incineration site emissions. Possible emissions sources include excavation and transfer sites, storage areas, material-feed systems, rotary kiln seals, and exhaust stacks. Several options are available for rotary-kiln seals. Six are discussed here: labyrinth; overlapping spring plate; graphite block; pneumatic; shrouded; and overpressure. Kiln seals are used to prevent process gases from escaping or ambient air from entering a rotary kiln uncontrolled. They are not designed to function as material seals, or prevent spills of solids or liquids. Seal design involves considering differential pressure produced by a kiln's internal-to-external temperature, pressure excursions (explosions) and material spills.

  16. Seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roger Neal; Longfritz, William David

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

  17. Enhancement of fill factor in air-processed inverted organic solar cells using self-assembled monolayer of fullerene catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Il; Ogumi, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Takafumi; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    [60]Fullerene catechol self-assembled monolayers were prepared and applied to inverted organic solar cells by an immersion method, and their energy conversion properties were measured. By introducing fullerenes at the surface, we improved the hole-blocking capability of electron-transporting metal oxide, as shown by the fill factor enhancement. The fullerene catechol-treated TiO x -containing device gave a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.81% with a fill factor of 0.56 while the non treated device gave a PCE of 2.46% with a fill factor of 0.49. The solar cell efficiency improved by 13% compared with the non treated reference device.

  18. Bismuth alloy potting seals aluminum connector in cryogenic application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J. F.; Stafford, R. L.

    1966-01-01

    Bismuth alloy potting seals feedthrough electrical connector for instrumentation within a pressurized vessel filled with cryogenic liquids. The seal combines the transformation of high-bismuth content alloys with the thermal contraction of an external aluminum tube.

  19. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/s (700 ft/sec), air pressures to 148 Newtons per square centimeter abs. (215 psia), and air temperatures to 412k(282 F). A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150-hour endurance test of the self-acting face seal was conducted.

  20. Overview of NASA Glenn Seal Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Proctor, Margaret P.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Delgado, Irebert; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Lattime, Scott B.

    2003-01-01

    The Seal Team is divided into four primary areas. These areas include turbine engine seal development, structural seal development, acoustic seal development, and adaptive seal development. The turbine seal area focuses on high temperature, high speed shaft seals for secondary air system flow management. The structural seal area focuses on high temperature, resilient structural seals required to accommodate large structural distortions for both space- and aero-applications. Our goal in the acoustic seal project is to develop non-contacting, low leakage seals exploiting the principles of advanced acoustics. We are currently investigating a new acoustic field known as Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis (RMS) to see if we can harness the large acoustic standing pressure waves to form an effective air-barrier/seal. Our goal in the adaptive seal project is to develop advanced sealing approaches for minimizing blade-tip (shroud) or interstage seal leakage. We are planning on applying either rub-avoidance or regeneration clearance control concepts (including smart structures and materials) to promote higher turbine engine efficiency and longer service lives.

  1. Performance characteristics of brush seals for limited-life engines

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, R.E. ); Dowler, C.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Brush seals are potential replacements for air-to-air labyrinth seals in gas turbine engines. An investigation has been conducted to determine the performance characteristics of brush seals for application in limited-life gas turbine engines. An elevated temperature, rotating test rig was designed and built to test labyrinth and brush seals in simulated subsonic and supersonic engine conditions. Results from initial tests for subsonic applications demonstrated that brush seals exhibit appreciably lower leakage compared to labyrinth seals, and thus offer significant engine performance improvements. Performance results have been obtained showing the effect of various brush seal parameters, including: initial interference, backplate gap, and multiple brush seals in series.

  2. Nozzle seal

    DOEpatents

    Groff, Russell Dennis; Vatovec, Richard John

    1978-06-11

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with annular sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop and partly within a retaining annulus formed in the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and one of the sealing members is provided with a piston type pressure ring sealing member which effectively closes the path between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle establishing a leak-proof condition. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel.

  3. Nozzle seal

    DOEpatents

    Herman, Richard Frederick

    1977-10-25

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and are connected by a leak restraining member establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel.

  4. Single-mode pumped high air-fill fraction photonic crystal fiber taper for high-power deep-blue supercontinuum sources.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Simon T; Larsen, Casper; Jakobsen, Christian; Thomsen, Carsten L; Bang, Ole

    2014-02-15

    Dispersion control with axially nonuniform photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) permits supercontinuum (SC) generation into the deep-blue from an ytterbium pump laser. In this Letter, we exploit the full degrees of freedom afforded by PCFs to fabricate a fiber with longitudinally increasing air-fill fraction and decreasing diameter directly on the draw-tower. We demonstrate SC generation extending down to 375 nm in one such monolithic fiber device that is single-mode at 1064 nm at the input end. PMID:24562287

  5. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device is disclosed for mounting between two surfaces to provide an air-tight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  6. Ferrules seals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.

    1984-01-01

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible.

  7. Ferrules seals

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.L.

    1984-07-10

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible. 3 figs.

  8. Labyrinth seal testing for lift fan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobek, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    An abradable buffered labyrinth seal for the control of turbine gas path leakage in a tip-turbine driven lift fan was designed, tested, and analyzed. The seal configuration was not designed to operate in any specific location but was sized to be evaluated in an existing test rig. The final sealing diameter selected was 28 inches. Results of testing indicate that the flow equations predicted seal air flows consistent with measured values. Excellent sealing characteristics of the abradable coating on the stator land were demonstrated when a substantial seal penetration of .030 inch into the land surface was encountered without appreciable wear on the labyrinth knife edges.

  9. Foam-filled cushions for sliding trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahin, S. B.; Robb, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene tube filled with polyurethane foam forms low friction sliding surface that cushions vibrations and absorbs manufacturing tolerances and misalignment. Possible uses include packaging of components for shipping and seals for doors in lockers, cars, and refrigerators.

  10. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  11. Electron beam selectively seals porous metal filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J. A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1968-01-01

    Electron beam welding selectively seals the outer surfaces of porous metal filters and impedances used in fluid flow systems. The outer surface can be sealed by melting a thin outer layer of the porous material with an electron beam so that the melted material fills all surface pores.

  12. Ferrofluid Would Seal Linear-Motion Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed valve employs ferrofluid to make tight seal. Seal requires no precisely machined parts, and hand lapping of valve seats are unnecessary. Magnetic fluid fills gap between shaft and annular pole piece in chamber wall. Precise shaft fit is not necessary.

  13. Seal arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Lundholm, Gunnar

    1987-01-01

    A seal arrangement is provided for preventing gas leakage along a reciprocating piston rod or other reciprocating member passing through a wall which separates a high pressure gas chmber and a low pressure gas chamber. Liquid lubricant is applied to the lower pressure side of a sealing gland surrounding the piston rod to prevent the escape of gas between the rod and the gland. The sealing gland is radially forced against the piston rod by action of a plurality of axially stacked O-rings influenced by an axially acting spring as well as pressure from the gas.

  14. Gas Turbine Engine Carbon Oil Seals Computerized Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In a bearing compartment there are a series of parts when assembled determine the location of the bearing and seal as related to the centerline of rotation. We see part datums that do not establish A coincident path from the bearing to the seal. High engine vibration can cause severe oil leakage. The inability of the seal to respond fast enough to the rotating element Radial Seal: Sensitive to housing air pressure Sensitive to seal runout ? Axial Seal: Very sensitive to seal perpendicularity to shaft. Goals include: 1) Repeatable assembly process; 2) Accurate assembly process; 3) Minimize seal runout; 4) Design to engine centerline of rotation, i.e. bearings.

  15. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  16. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  17. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  18. 7 CFR 58.731 - Closing and sealing containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Closing and sealing containers. 58.731 Section 58.731... Procedures § 58.731 Closing and sealing containers. Pouches, liners, or containers having product contact surfaces, after filling shall be folded or closed and sealed in a sanitary manner, preferably by...

  19. The performance of a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new mixed packing materials for the removal of H2S from air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingwen; Wang, Xiaojun; He, Shuo; Zhu, Shemin; Shen, Shubao

    2016-01-01

    In the work described here, a two-layer biotrickling filter filled with new packing materials was used to remove H2S from air. The upper layer of the filter was packed with activated carbon-loaded polyurethane, whereas the lower layer was filled with modified organism-suspended fillers. The effects of inlet load, empty bed residence time (EBRT) from 79 s to 53 s, pH and contaminant starvation time were investigated. For loads of 15-50 g/(m(3) h), the average removal efficiency (RE) was higher than 96% under a consistent supply of pollutants. The critical elimination capacity was 39.95 g/(m(3) h) for an EBRT of 53 s with an RE of 99.9%. The two-layer BTF was capable of withstanding contaminant starvation periods for 1.5 d and 7 d with only a few hours of recovery time. The biodegradation kinetics was studied using Michaelis-Menten type equations under different EBRTs. At an EBRT of 66 s, the optimal kinetic constants rmax and Km were 333.3 g/(m(3) h) and 0.93 g/m(3), respectively. During the operation, the two-layer BTF performed well under various reasonable conditions. PMID:26397031

  20. Investigations of Shuttle Main Landing Gear Door Environmental Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkbeiner, Joshua; Dunlap, Pat; Steinetz, Bruce; DeMango, Jeff; Newswander, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The environmental seals for the main landing gear doors of the Shuttle Orbiters were raised by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board as a potential safety concern. Inspections of seals installed on the Shuttle Discovery revealed that they were permanently deformed and no longer met certified seal compression requirements. Replacement of the seals led to the inability to fully close the main landing gear doors. Johnson Space Center requested that Glenn Research Center conduct tests on the main landing gear door environmental seals to assist in installing the seals in a manner to allow the main landing gear doors to fully close. Further testing was conducted to fill out the seal performance database. Results from the testing indicated that the method of bonding the seals was important in reducing seal loads on the main landing gear doors. Also, the replacement seals installed in Shuttle Discovery were found to have leakage performance sufficient to meet the certification requirements.

  1. Effective sealing of a disk cavity using a double-toothed rim seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavnani, S. H.; Khilnani, V. I.; Tsai, L.-C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Goodling, J. S.; Waggott, J.

    1992-06-01

    The sealing characteristics of an advanced air-cooled turbo-expander disk cavity are examined employing laser sheet flow visualization and static pressure measurements. Tests are conducted on a simplified half-scale model of an actual low pressure turbo-expander first-stage disk cavity. The superior performance of the seal studied is confirmed by comparison with a single-toothed rim seal and a simple axial rim seal.

  2. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  3. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/sec, air pressures to 215 psia, and air temperatures to 412 K. A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150 hour endurance test of the self-action face seal was conducted at speeds to 145 m/sec, air pressures to 180 psia, and air temperatures to 408 K. The seal wear was not measurable.

  4. Anaerobic sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayre, J.

    1986-05-01

    Anaerobic sealants offer an alternative to conventional methods of joint repair on mains operating at low and medium pressures. The method does not require highly skilled personnel who are diligent in ensuring that the necessary standards of preparation and seal application are achieved. British Gas' experience has shown that lead joints that do not contain yarn or where the yarn has deteriorated are difficult to seal. The evidence so far indicates that yarn is important in ensuring that the low viscosity sealant rapidly wicks around the joint during the injection operation. It is obvious that more research and development is needed in this field, but anaerobic sealing of leaking joints in an effective, innovative method of joint repair.

  5. A nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer concept for hermetically sealed magic angle spinning investigations on highly toxic, radiotoxic, or air sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Somers, J.; Berkmann, C.; Koepp, F.; Rothermel, A.; Pauvert, O.; Selfslag, C.; Farnan, I.

    2013-05-01

    A concept to integrate a commercial high-resolution, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) probe capable of very rapid rotation rates (70 kHz) in a hermetically sealed enclosure for the study of highly radiotoxic materials has been developed and successfully demonstrated. The concept centres on a conventional wide bore (89 mm) solid-state NMR magnet operating with industry standard 54 mm diameter probes designed for narrow bore magnets. Rotor insertion and probe tuning take place within a hermetically enclosed glovebox, which extends into the bore of the magnet, in the space between the probe and the magnet shim system. Oxygen-17 MAS-NMR measurements demonstrate the possibility of obtaining high quality spectra from small sample masses (˜10 mg) of highly radiotoxic material and the need for high spinning speeds to improve the spectral resolution when working with actinides. The large paramagnetic susceptibility arising from actinide paramagnetism in (Th1-xUx)O2 solid solutions gives rise to extensive spinning sidebands and poor resolution at 15 kHz, which is dramatically improved at 55 kHz. The first 17O MAS-NMR measurements on NpO2+x samples spinning at 55 kHz are also reported. The glovebox approach developed here for radiotoxic materials can be easily adapted to work with other hazardous or even air sensitive materials.

  6. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Erik P

    2014-09-30

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to a base and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  7. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOEpatents

    Stang, L.G.

    1979-08-29

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  8. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Louis G.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  9. Turbine engine interstage seal

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, L.L.

    1993-08-10

    A seal structure is described for a turbine engine, the turbine engine including a housing surrounding a centrifugal compressor having a rotor, and a radial inflow turbine including a turbine rotor, the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor being disposed in back-to-back relation, the turbine rotor being drivingly connected with the compressor rotor and axially spaced therefrom to define an annular gap there between, the gap radially bounded at its outer periphery by the housing and at its inner periphery by an annular surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor an annular sealing member disposed in the gap to control air flow from the compressor toward the turbine; the annular sealing member the first axial direction, and a third annular wall portion joining with the second annular wall portion and extending inward therefrom towards the surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor, and biasing means cooperating with the housing for urging the seal structure toward the turbine rotor.

  10. Self-acting seals for helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynwander, P.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted with NASA-designed self-acting face and circumferential seals for use in the main shaft positions of advanced gas turbine engines. The seals featured Rayleigh step pads (self-acting geometry) for lift augmentation. The tested seals incorporated design improvements over previous self-acting configurations. Self-acting face seals were tested to speeds of 214 m/s (700 ft/sec, 63700 rpm), air pressures of 216.8 N/sq cm abs (314.7 psia), and air temperatures of 688K (778 F). Self-acting circumferential seals were tested to speeds of 183 m/s (600 ft/sec, 47700 rpm), air pressures of 61.8 N/sq cm abs (89.7 psia), and air temperatures of 711 K (820 F). Self-acting face-seals are capable of operating at conditions exceeding conventional seal capability. The limit on speed capability was found to be the flatness of the seal-seat. The self-acting circumferential seal design tested requires further development for use in advanced engines.

  11. Python fiber optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  12. A SIFT feature based registration algorithm in automatic seal verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Ding, Xuewen; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Tiegen

    2012-11-01

    A SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) feature based registration algorithm is presented to prepare for the seal verification, especially for the verification of high quality counterfeit sample seal. The similarities and the spatial relationships between the matched SIFT features are combined for the registration. SIFT features extracted from the binary model seal and sample seal images are matched according to their similarities. The matching rate is used to define the similar sample seal that is similar with its model seal. For the similar sample seal, the false matches are eliminated according to the position relationship. Then the homography between model seal and sample seal is constructed and named HS . The theoretical homography is namedH . The accuracy of registration is evaluated by the Frobenius norm of H-HS . In experiments, translation, filling and rotation transformations are applied to seals with different shapes, stroke number and structures. After registering the transformed seals and their model seals, the maximum value of the Frobenius norm of their H-HS is not more than 0.03. The results prove that this algorithm can accomplish accurate registration, which is invariant to translation, filling, and rotation transformation, and there is no limit to the seal shapes, stroke number and structures.

  13. A Hot Dynamic Seal Rig for Measuring Hypersonic Engine Seal Durability and Flow Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts was installed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The test fixture was designed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C (1550 F) and air pressure differentials up to 690 kPa (100 psi). Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or distorted walls. In the fixture two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 30 cm (1 ft) long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. The capabilities of this test fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling are addressed.

  14. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  15. GAS SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

    1961-07-11

    A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

  16. Rechargeability of Li-air cathodes pre-filled with discharge products using an ether-based electrolyte solution: implications for cycle-life of Li-air cells.

    PubMed

    Meini, Stefano; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Schwenke, K Uta; Piana, Michele; Beyer, Hans; Lange, Lukas; Gasteiger, Hubert A

    2013-07-21

    The instability of currently used electrolyte solutions and of the carbon support during charge-discharge in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen cells can lead to discharge products other than the desired Li2O2, such as Li2CO3, which is believed to reduce cycle-life. Similarly, discharge in an O2 atmosphere which contains H2O and CO2 impurities would lead to LiOH and Li2CO3 discharge products. In this work we therefore investigate the rechargeability of model cathodes pre-filled with four possible Li-air cell discharge products, namely Li2O2, Li2CO3, LiOH, and Li2O. Using Online Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry (OEMS), we determined the charge voltages and the gases evolved upon charge of pre-filled electrodes, thus determining the reversibility of the formation/electrooxidation reactions. We show that Li2O2 is the only reversible discharge product in ether-based electrolyte solutions, and that the formation of Li2CO3, LiOH, or Li2O is either irreversible and/or reacts with the electrolyte solution or the carbon during its oxidation. PMID:23748698

  17. Comparison of effects of ProSeal LMA™ laryngeal mask airway cuff inflation with air, oxygen, air:oxygen mixture and oxygen:nitrous oxide mixture in adults: A randomised, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mona; Sinha, Renu; Trikha, Anjan; Ramachandran, Rashmi; Chandralekha, C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) cuff pressure increases when the air is used for the cuff inflation during oxygen: nitrous oxide (O2:N2O) anaesthesia, which may lead to various problems. We compared the effects of different gases for ProSeal LMA™ (PLMA) cuff inflation in adult patients for various parameters. Methods: A total of 120 patients were randomly allocated to four groups, according to composition of gases used to inflate the PLMA cuff to achieve 40 cmH2 O cuff pressure, air (Group A), 50% O2 :air (Group OA), 50% O2:N2O (Group ON) and 100% O2 (Group O). Cuff pressure, cuff volume and ventilator parameters were monitored intraoperatively. Pharyngolaryngeal parameters were assessed at 1, 2 and 24 h postoperatively. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA, Fisher's exact test and step-wise logistic regression. Results: Cuff pressure significantly increased at 10, 15 and 30 min in Group A, OA and O from initial pressure. Cuff pressure decreased at 5 min in Group ON (36.6 ± 3.5 cmH2 O) (P = 0.42). PLMA cuff volume increased in Group A, OA, O, but decreased in Group ON (6.16 ± 2.8 ml [P < 0.001], 4.7 ± 3.8 ml [P < 0.001], 1.4 ± 3.19 ml [P = 0.023] and − 1.7 ± 4.9 ml [P = 0.064], respectively), from basal levels. Ventilatory parameters were comparable in all four groups. There was no significant association between sore throat and cuff pressure, with odds ratio 1.002. Conclusion: Cuff inflation with 50% O2:N2O mixture provided more stable cuff pressure in comparison to air, O2 :air, 100% O2 during O2:N2O anaesthesia. Ventilatory parameters did not change with variation in PLMA cuff pressure. Post-operative sore throat had no correlation with cuff pressure. PMID:27601739

  18. The Relationship Between Soil Air Filled Porosity and Soil Methane Oxidation is Almost Identical in Both Dry and Wet Temperate Eucalypt Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fest, B. J.; Wardlaw, T.; Hinko-Najera, N.; Arndt, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the temporal variation in soil methane (CH4) exchange in temperate evergreen eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia we measured soil CH4 exchange in high temporal resolution (every 2 hours or less) over two consecutive years (Wombat State Forest, Victoria, AUS) and over one year (Warra, Tasmania, AUS) in two temperate Eucalyptus obliqua (L. Her) forests with contrasting annual precipitation (Wombat State Forest = 870 mm yr-1, Warra = 1700 mm yr-1). Both forests were continuous CH4 sinks with the Victorian site having a sink strength of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 and the Tasmanian site having a sink strength of -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1. Our results show that CH4 uptake was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both sites and explained up to 90% of the temporal variability in CH4 uptake. Furthermore, when soil moisture was expressed as soil air filled porosity (AFP) we were able to predict the CH4 uptake of one site by the linear regression between AFP and CH4 uptake from the other site. Soil temperature only had an apparent control over seasonal variation in CH4 uptake during periods when soil moisture and soil temperature were closely correlated. The fluctuation of the generally low soil nitrogen levels did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either site.

  19. Rapid assessment of methanotrophic capacity of compost-based materials considering the effects of air-filled porosity, water content and dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, Uriel; Hettiaratchi, J Patrick A

    2015-02-01

    Since the global warming potential of CH4 is 25 times that of CO2 on a 100-year time horizon, the development of methanotrophic applications for the conversion of CH4 to CO2 is emerging as an area of interest for researchers and practicing engineers. Compost exhibits most of the characteristics required for methanotroph growth media and has been used in several projects. This paper presents results from a study that was undertaken to assess the influence of physical and chemical characteristics of compost-based materials on the biological oxidation of CH4 when used in methane biofilters. The results showed that easily-measurable parameters, such as air filled porosity, water content and dissolved organic carbon, are correlated with maximum CH4 removal rates. The results obtained were used to develop an empirical relationship that could be regarded as a rapid assessment tool for the estimation of the performance of compost-based materials in engineered methanotrophic applications. PMID:25484123

  20. Low thermal expansion seal ring support

    DOEpatents

    Dewis, David W.; Glezer, Boris

    2000-01-01

    Today, the trend is to increase the temperature of operation of gas turbine engines. To cool the components with compressor discharge air, robs air which could otherwise be used for combustion and creates a less efficient gas turbine engine. The present low thermal expansion sealing ring support system reduces the quantity of cooling air required while maintaining life and longevity of the components. Additionally, the low thermal expansion sealing ring reduces the clearance "C","C'" demanded between the interface between the sealing surface and the tip of the plurality of turbine blades. The sealing ring is supported by a plurality of support members in a manner in which the sealing ring and the plurality of support members independently expand and contract relative to each other and to other gas turbine engine components.

  1. Cryogenic Flange and Seal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of flanges, seals, and pipes are used to carry cryogenic fluid from a storage tank to the vehicle at launch sites. However, after a certain amount of cycles these raised face flanges with glass-filled Teflon gaskets have been found to have torque relaxation and are as a result susceptible to cryogenic fluid leakage if not re-torqued. The intent of this project is to identify alternate combinations of flanges and seals which may improve thermal cycle performance and decrease re-torque requirements. The general approach is to design a test fixture to evaluate leak characteristics between spiral and concentric serrations and to test alternate flange and seal combinations. Due to insufficient time, it was not possible to evaluate these different types of combinations for the combination that improved thermal cycle performance the most. However, the necessary drawings for the test fixture were designed and assembled along with the collection of the necessary parts.

  2. Variable friction secondary seal for face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirusso, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Vibration and stability of a primary seal ring is controlled by a secondary seal system. An inflatable bladder which forms a portion of the secondary seal varies the damping applied to this seal ring. The amplitude of vibration of the primary seal ring is sensed with a proximity probe that is connected to a microprocessor in a control system. The bladder pressure is changed by the control system to mitigate any sensed instability or vibration.

  3. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100 C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changed suddenly.

  4. Fluid pressure balanced seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. W. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A seal which increases in effectiveness with increasing pressure is presented. The seal's functional capability throughout both static and dynamic operation makes it particularly useful for sealing ball valve ports. Other features of the seal include the ability to seal two opposed surfaces simultaneously, tolerance of small misalignments, tolerance of wide temperature ranges, ability to maintain positive sealing contact under conditions of internal or external pressurization, and ability to conform to slight irregularities in seal or surface contours.

  5. Combustion heated cold sealed TEC

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, V.I.; Klepikov, V.V.; Meleta, Y.A.; Mikheyev, A.S.; Yarygin, D.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a thermionic domestic boiler system using natural gas, which as performed under an ECS-project in 1992 to 1994 by a Russian-Dutch team of researchers, will be continued again. Thanks to financial support on the part of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), the major effort in 1997 to 1999 will be focused on the development, manufacture and testing of an improved, easier to fabricate, more repairable and less expensive combustion heated TEC with a longer life-time. The achievement of the aim of this project will make it possible to expand the field of the terrestrial thermionics application and to embark on the commercialization stage. This report discusses the concept of the combustion heated Cold Seal TEC. A Cold Seal TEC will be developed and tested, in which the rubber O-ring seal will electrically insulate the hot shell from the collector heat pipe. The Cold Seal TEC will use a noble gas + cesium as the working medium (the idea of such a TEC was first proposed in 1973 by Professor Musa from Romania). In its cold state, the cesium will short circuit the emitter and the collector. During operation, the interelectrode space will be filled with cesium vapor. The upper part of a Cold Seal TEC will be filled with a noble gas. This noble gas will prevent the O-ring seal from being attacked by the cesium. The TEC output characteristics will be considerably improved by using electrode materials that were developed earlier in the course of an ECS-project for the development of low temperature TEC electrodes.

  6. Seals/Secondary Fluid Flows Workshop 1997; Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 1997 Conference provided discussions and data on (a) program overviews, (b) developments in seals and secondary air management systems, (c) interactive seals flows with secondary air or fluid flows and powerstream flows, (d) views of engine externals and limitations, (e) high speed engine research sealing needs and demands, and (f) a short course on engine design development margins. Sealing concepts discussed include, mechanical rim and cavity seals, leaf, finger, air/oil, rope, floating-brush, floating-T-buffer, and brush seals. Engine externals include all components of engine fluid systems, sensors and their support structures that lie within or project through the nacelle. The clean features of the nacelle belie the minefield of challenges and opportunities that lie within. Seals; Secondary air flows; Rotordynamics; Gas turbine; Aircraft; CFD; Testing; Turbomachinery

  7. Dynamic Face Seal Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radial face seal arrangement is disclosed comprising a stationary seal ring that is spring loaded against a seal seat affixed to a rotating shaft. The radial face seal arrangement further comprises an arrangement that not only allows for preloading of the stationary seal ring relative to the seal seat, but also provides for dampening yielding a dynamic seating response for the radial face seal arrangement. The overall seal system, especially regarding the selection of the material for the stationary seal ring, is designed to operate over a wide temperature range from below ambient up to 900 C.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation of sealing ability of MTA and EndoSequence as root-end filling materials with chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) as retrograde smear layer removing agents

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, Bolla; Jeevani, Eppala; Sujana, Varri; Damaraju, Bharagavi; Sreeha, Kaluvakolanu; Ramesh, Penumaka

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and EndoSequence with chitosan and carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) as retrograde smear layer removing agents using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Forty human single rooted teeth were taken. Crowns were decoronated and canals were obturated. Apically roots were resected and retrograde cavities were done. Based on the type of retrograde material placed and the type of smear layer removal agent used for retrograde cavities, they were divided into four groups (N = 10): Group I chitosan with EndoSequence, group II chitosan with MTA, group III CMC with EndoSequence, and Group IV CMC with MTA. All the samples were longitudinally sectioned, and the SEM analysis was done for marginal adaptation. Statistical Analysis: Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Witney analysis tests. Results: SEM images showed the presence of less gaps in group III, i.e., CMC with EndoSequence when compared to other groups with statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Within the limited scope of this study, it was concluded that EndoSequence as retrograde material showed better marginal sealing ability. PMID:27099420

  9. Regenerator seal design

    DOEpatents

    Eckart, Francis H.

    1982-01-01

    A rotary regenerator disc matrix has a face seal with a cross arm and arcuate rim segments joined by prestress clamps to prestrain the arcuate rim seals so as to compensate seal rim twisting or coning and resultant disc face seal leakage as produced by operating thermal gradients across the seal.

  10. Sealing Mechanical Cryogenic Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1985-01-01

    Metal bellows used to seal Vuilleumier and Stirling-cycle cryogenic coolers, replacing sliding seals that failed after only 3,000 hours of service. Metal bellows, incorporated in displacer design provide nonrubbing dynamic seal. Lifetime of cryogenic cooler no longer limited by loss of sealing material and by deterioration of regenerators due to clogging by seal debris.

  11. Dynamic, High-Temperature, Flexible Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    New seal consists of multiple plies of braided ceramic sleeves filled with small ceramic balls. Innermost braided sleeve supported by high-temperature-wire-mesh sleeve that provides both springback and preload capabilities. Ceramic balls reduce effect of relatively high porosity of braided ceramic sleeves by acting as labyrinth flow path for gases and thereby greatly increasing pressure gradient seal can sustain. Dynamic, high-temperature, flexible seal employed in hypersonic engines, two-dimensional convergent/divergent and vectorized-thrust exhaust nozzles, reentry vehicle airframes, rocket-motor casings, high-temperature furnaces, and any application requiring non-asbestos high-temperature gaskets.

  12. Regenerator seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Leonard C. (Inventor); Pacala, Theodore (Inventor); Sippel, George R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  13. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section 122.132 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor...

  14. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  15. High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2003-01-01

    A finger seal, designed and fabricated by Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services, was tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center at surface speeds up to 1200 ft/s, air temperatures up to 1200 F, and pressures across the seal of 75 psid. These are the first test results obtained with NASA s new High-Temperature, High-Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig (see the photograph). The finger seal is an innovative design recently patented by AlliedSignal Engines, which has demonstrated considerably lower leakage than commonly used labyrinth seals and is considerably cheaper than brush seals. The cost to produce finger seals is estimated to be about half of the cost to produce brush seals. Replacing labyrinth seals with fingers seals at locations that have high-pressure drops in gas turbine engines, typically main engine and thrust seals, can reduce air leakage at each location by 50 percent or more. This directly results in a 0.7- to 1.4-percent reduction in specific fuel consumption and a 0.35- to 0.7-percent reduction in direct operating costs . Because the finger seal is a contacting seal, this testing was conducted to address concerns about its heat generation and life capability at the higher speeds and temperatures required for advanced engines. The test results showed that the seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable for advanced engines.

  16. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  17. Fundamentals of fluid sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of fluid sealing, including seal operating regimes, are discussed and the general fluid-flow equations for fluid sealing are developed. Seal performance parameters such as leakage and power loss are presented. Included in the discussion are the effects of geometry, surface deformations, rotation, and both laminar and turbulent flows. The concept of pressure balancing is presented, as are differences between liquid and gas sealing. Mechanisms of seal surface separation, fundamental friction and wear concepts applicable to seals, seal materials, and pressure-velocity (PV) criteria are discussed.

  18. Crater Fill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03082 Crater Fill

    This VIS image shows part of the floor of an unnamed crater located between the Hellas and Argyre Basins. At some point in time the entire floor of the crater was filled by material. That material is now being eroded away to form the depressions seen in the center and bottom of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 46.6S, Longitude 5.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. A Comparison of Candidate Seal Designs for Future Docking Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick, H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce, M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, and other destinations. A key component of this system is the seal at the main docking interface which inhibits the loss of cabin air once docking is complete. Depending on the mission, the seal must be able to dock in either a seal-on-flange or seal-on-seal configuration. Seal-on-flange mating would occur when a docking system equipped with a seal docks to a system with a flat metal flange. This would occur when a vehicle docks to a node on the International Space Station. Seal-on-seal mating would occur when two docking systems equipped with seals dock to each other. Two types of seal designs were identified for this application: Gask-O-seals and multi-piece seals. Both types of seals had a pair of seal bulbs to satisfy the redundancy requirement. A series of performance assessments and comparisons were made between the candidate seal designs indicating that they meet the requirements for leak rate and compression and adhesion loads under a range of operating conditions. Other design factors such as part count, integration into the docking system tunnel, seal-on-seal mating, and cost were also considered leading to the selection of the multi-piece seal design for the new docking system. The results of this study can be used by designers of future docking systems and other habitable volumes to select the seal design best-suited for their particular application.

  20. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  1. Pneumatic stowing seals mines

    SciTech Connect

    Brezovec, D.

    1983-11-01

    A mechanized technique to seal abandoned mines has been used successfully to close 13 openings at Duquesne Light Co.'s mined-out Warwick No. 2 mine, near Greensboro, Pa. The mechanized system, which uses a pneumatic stower and crushed limestone, closed the entries more economically and in less time than it would have taken to install traditional concrete block stopping and clay plug seals, according to John C. Draper. Draper, a mining engineer with Duquesne Light's coal department, was in charge of installing the Warwick seals in a Bureau of Mines-sponsored field test on the pneumatic sealing technique. The lowest estimated cost for installing conventional stopping and plug closures for the 13 Warwick openings was $225,000, says Draper, while the openings were closed using the mechanized system for $245,000. Draper says the newer stopping cost more in the instance because work was stopped often to gather information for the experiment. The experimental closures were installed in 38 days. The job would have taken at least 149 days if traditional closures were being installed, Draper say. To install a traditional concrete block/clay plug closure, the mine opening must be cleaned thoroughly and the roof must be supported for some 3 ft from the outside. Then a solid wall or stopping must be built 25 ft from the surface and the entry must be packed with clay to the surface. Much of this job requires workers to remain underground. In pneumatic stowing, 1 1/2-in. crushed limestone with fines is conveyed through a pipeline and into the mine opening under low air pressure. Watertight seals can be installed by blowing about 10 ft of rock into the opening against the top to act as roof support. Safety posts are installed and about 10 or 15 ft of mine entry is cleaned. About 2 in. of raw cement or bentonite is placed on the floor and limestone mixed with dry cement or bentonite is blown into the opening.

  2. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  3. Indium sealing techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.; Haldemann, P.

    1972-01-01

    Gold films are used as an alloying flux to form 5-micron-thick indium film seals at temperatures below 300 C. Pyrex was sealed to quartz, ULE, CER-VIT, Irtran 2, Ge, GaAs, Invar, Kovar, Al, and Cu. The seals can also be used as current feedthroughs and graded seals.

  4. Sealing packer

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, T.G.; Brookey, R.L.

    1987-02-03

    A sealing packer is described for a well casing characterized by: a tubular inner sleeve with a passage therethrough; an upper outer sleeve assembly mounted about the inner sleeve and including: a resiliently deformable upper packing element; seat means for seating the upper packing element; hold down means for engaging a well casing and retaining the outer sleeve assembly stationary against upwardly directed well pressures; a lower outer sleeve assembly slidably mounted about the inner sleeve and including: a resiliently deformable lower packing element; first seat means for seating the lower packing element; abutment means for compressing the upper packing element between the abutment means and the seat of the upper outer sleeve assembly; the upper packing element constructed such that when compressed it engages the well casing, setting means for fixing a second seat means of the lower outer sleeve assembly relative to the well casing: the lower packing element being deformable between the first and second seat means of the lower outer sleeve assembly to engage the well casing; and piston means normally adjacent the abutment means and separable therefrom, the piston means responsive to fluid pressure in the passage and in the well casing between the lower and upper packing elements when the packing elements deformably engage the well casing to separate from the abutment means and further deform the upper packing element.

  5. Method of making hermetic seals for hermetic terminal assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2010-04-13

    This invention teaches methods of making a hermetic terminal assembly comprising the steps of: inserting temporary stops, shims and jigs on the bottom face of a terminal assembly thereby blocking assembly core open passageways; mounting the terminal assembly inside a vacuum chamber using a temporary assembly perimeter seal and flange or threaded assembly interfaces; mixing a seal admixture and hardener in a mixer conveyor to form a polymer seal material; conveying the polymer seal material into a polymer reservoir; feeding the polymer seal material from the reservoir through a polymer outlet valve and at least one polymer outlet tube into the terminal assembly core thereby filling interstitial spaces in the core adjacent to service conduits, temporary stop, and the terminal assembly casing; drying the polymer seal material at room temperature thereby hermetically sealing the core of the terminal assembly; removing the terminal assembly from the vacuum chamber, and; removing the temporary stops, shims.

  6. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transfering it to the mechanical diode.

  7. Turbine blade platform seal

    DOEpatents

    Zagar, Thomas W.; Schiavo, Anthony L.

    2001-01-01

    A rotating blade group 90 for a turbo-machine having an improved device for sealing the gap 110 between the edges 112,114 of adjacent blade platforms 96,104. The gap 110 between adjacent blades 92,100 is sealed by a seal pin 20 its central portion 110 and by a seal plate 58,60 at each of the front 54 and rear 56 portions. The seal plates 58,60 are inserted into corresponding grooves 62,64 formed in the adjacent edges 112,114 of adjoining blades 92,100 and held in place by end plates 40,42. The end of the seal plates 58,60 may be chamfered 78,80 to improve the seal against the end plate 40,42. The seal pin 20 provides the required damping between the blades 92,100 and the seal plates 58,60 provide improved sealing effectiveness.

  8. Mechanical seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  9. Seal design alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sambeek, L.L.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information.

  10. Actively Controlled Shaft Seals for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.; Wolff, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed