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Sample records for seca2-dependent secretory protein

  1. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  2. RFP tags for labeling secretory pathway proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Liyang; Zhao, Yanhua; Xu, Pingyong; Huan, Shuangyan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Membrane protein Orai1 can be used to report the fusion properties of RFPs. • Artificial puncta are affected by dissociation constant as well as pKa of RFPs. • Among tested RFPs mOrange2 is the best choice for secretory protein labeling. - Abstract: Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are useful tools for live cell and multi-color imaging in biological studies. However, when labeling proteins in secretory pathway, many RFPs are prone to form artificial puncta, which may severely impede their further uses. Here we report a fast and easy method to evaluate RFPs fusion properties by attaching RFPs to an environment sensitive membrane protein Orai1. In addition, we revealed that intracellular artificial puncta are actually colocalized with lysosome, thus besides monomeric properties, pKa value of RFPs is also a key factor for forming intracellular artificial puncta. In summary, our current study provides a useful guide for choosing appropriate RFP for labeling secretory membrane proteins. Among RFPs tested, mOrange2 is highly recommended based on excellent monomeric property, appropriate pKa and high brightness.

  3. Secretory protein trafficking in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Adrian B; Marti, Matthias

    2004-07-01

    Early diverged extant organisms, which may serve as convenient laboratory models to look for and study evolutionary ancient features of eukaryotic cell biology, are rare. The diplomonad Giardia intestinalis, a protozoan parasite known to cause diarrhoeal disease, has become an increasingly popular object of basic research in cell biology, not least because of a genome sequencing project nearing completion. Commensurate with its phylogenetic status, the Giardia trophozoite has a very basic secretory system and even lacks hallmark structures such as a morphologically identifiable Golgi apparatus. The cell's capacity for protein sorting is nevertheless unimpeded, exemplified by its ability to cope with massive amounts of newly synthesized cyst wall proteins and glycans, which are sorted to dedicated Golgi-like compartments termed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs) generated from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived transport intermediates. This soluble bulk cargo is kept strictly separate from constitutively transported variant surface proteins during export, a function that is dependent on the stage-specific recognition of trafficking signals. Encysting Giardia therefore provide a unique system for the study of unconventional, Golgi-independent protein trafficking mechanisms in the broader context of eukaryotic endomembrane organization and evolution. PMID:15225300

  4. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. PMID:25789606

  5. Progressive quality control of secretory proteins in the early secretory compartment by ERp44

    PubMed Central

    Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Degano, Massimo; Fagioli, Claudio; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    ERp44 is a pH-regulated chaperone of the secretory pathway. In the acidic milieu of the Golgi, its C-terminal tail changes conformation, simultaneously exposing the substrate-binding site for cargo capture and the RDEL motif for ER retrieval via interactions with cognate receptors. Protonation of cysteine 29 in the active site allows tail movements in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that also conserved histidines in the C-terminal tail regulate ERp44 in vivo. Mutants lacking these histidines are hyperactive in retaining substrates. Surprisingly, they are also O-glycosylated and partially secreted. Co-expression of client proteins prevents secretion of the histidine mutants, forcing tail opening and RDEL accessibility. Client-induced RDEL exposure allows retrieval of proteins from distinct stations along the secretory pathway, as indicated by the changes in O-glycosylation patterns upon over-expression of different partners. The ensuing gradients may help optimising folding and assembly of different cargoes. Endogenous ERp44 is O-glycosylated and secreted by human primary endometrial cells, suggesting possible pathophysiological roles of these processes. PMID:25097228

  6. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06120.001 PMID:25789606

  7. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  8. Nociceptive sensitization by the secretory protein Bv8

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Giannini, Elisa; Metere, Alessio; Colucci, Mariantonella; Barra, Donatella; Kreil, Günther; Melchiorri, Pietro

    2002-01-01

    The small protein Bv8, isolated from amphibian skin, belongs to a novel family of secretory proteins (Bv8-Prokineticin family, SWISS-PROT: Q9PW66) whose orthologues have been conserved throughout evolution, from invertebrates to humans. When injected intravenously or subcutaneously (from 0.06 to 500 pmol kg−1) or intrathecally (from 6 fmol to 250 pmol) in rats, Bv8 produced an intense systemic nociceptive sensitization to mechanical and thermal stimuli applied to the tail and paws. Topically delivered into one rat paw, 50 fmol of Bv8 decreased by 50% the nociceptive threshold to pressure in the injected paw without affecting the threshold in the contralateral paw. The two G-protein coupled prokineticin receptors, PK-R1 and PK-R2, were expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and in dorsal quadrants of spinal cord (DSC) and bound Bv8 and the mammalian orthologue, EG-VEGF, with high affinity. In DSC, PK-R1 was more abundant than PK-R2, whereas both receptors were equally expressed in DRG. IC50 of Bv8 and EG-VEGF to inhibit [125I]-Bv8 binding to rat DRG and DSC were 4.1±0.4 nM Bv8 and 76.4±7.6 nM EG-VEGF, in DRG; 7.3±0.9 nM Bv8 and 330±41 nM EG-VEGF, in DSC. In the small diameter neurons (<30 μm) of rat DRG cultures, Bv8 concentrations, ranging from 0.2 to 10 nM, raised [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that Bv8, through binding to PK receptors of DSC and primary sensitive neurons, results in intense sensitization of peripheral nociceptors to thermal and mechanical stimuli. PMID:12466223

  9. In-silico prediction of blood-secretory human proteins using a ranking algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Computational identification of blood-secretory proteins, especially proteins with differentially expressed genes in diseased tissues, can provide highly useful information in linking transcriptomic data to proteomic studies for targeted disease biomarker discovery in serum. Results A new algorithm for prediction of blood-secretory proteins is presented using an information-retrieval technique, called manifold ranking. On a dataset containing 305 known blood-secretory human proteins and a large number of other proteins that are either not blood-secretory or unknown, the new method performs better than the previous published method, measured in terms of the area under the recall-precision curve (AUC). A key advantage of the presented method is that it does not explicitly require a negative training set, which could often be noisy or difficult to derive for most biological problems, hence making our method more applicable than classification-based data mining methods in general biological studies. Conclusion We believe that our program will prove to be very useful to biomedical researchers who are interested in finding serum markers, especially when they have candidate proteins derived through transcriptomic or proteomic analyses of diseased tissues. A computer program is developed for prediction of blood-secretory proteins based on manifold ranking, which is accessible at our website http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/publications/materials/qiliu/blood_secretory_protein.html. PMID:20465853

  10. Not All Secretory Granules Are Created Equal: Partitioning of Soluble Content Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sobota, Jacqueline A.; Ferraro, Francesco; Bäck, Nils; Eipper, Betty A.

    2006-01-01

    Secretory granules carrying fluorescent cargo proteins are widely used to study granule biogenesis, maturation, and regulated exocytosis. We fused the soluble secretory protein peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) to green fluorescent protein (GFP) to study granule formation. When expressed in AtT-20 or GH3 cells, the PHM-GFP fusion protein partitioned from endogenous hormone (adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone) into separate secretory granule pools. Both exogenous and endogenous granule proteins were stored and released in response to secretagogue. Importantly, we found that segregation of content proteins is not an artifact of overexpression nor peculiar to GFP-tagged proteins. Neither luminal acidification nor cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains play essential roles in soluble content protein segregation. Our data suggest that intrinsic biophysical properties of cargo proteins govern their differential sorting, with segregation occurring during the process of granule maturation. Proteins that can self-aggregate are likely to partition into separate granules, which can accommodate only a few thousand copies of any content protein; proteins that lack tertiary structure are more likely to distribute homogeneously into secretory granules. Therefore, a simple “self-aggregation default” theory may explain the little acknowledged, but commonly observed, tendency for both naturally occurring and exogenous content proteins to segregate from each other into distinct secretory granules. PMID:17005911

  11. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D-mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  12. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  13. Oligomerization of green fluorescent protein in the secretory pathway of endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, R K; Joyce, P B; Molinete, M; Halban, P A; Gorr, S U

    2001-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is used extensively as a reporter protein to monitor cellular processes, including intracellular protein trafficking and secretion. In general, this approach depends on GFP acting as a passive reporter protein. However, it was recently noted that GFP oligomerizes in the secretory pathway of endocrine cells. To characterize this oligomerization and its potential role in GFP transport, cytosolic and secretory forms of enhanced GFP (EGFP) were expressed in GH4C1 and AtT-20 endocrine cells. Biochemical analysis showed that cytosolic EGFP existed as a 27 kDa monomer, whereas secretory forms of EGFP formed disulphide-linked oligomers. EGFP contains two cysteine residues (Cys(49) and Cys(71)), which could play a role in this oligomerization. Site-directed mutagenesis of Cys(49) and Cys(71) showed that both cysteine residues were involved in disulphide interactions. Substitution of either cysteine residue resulted in a reduction or loss of oligomers, although dimers of the secretory form of EGFP remained. Mutation of these residues did not adversely affect the fluorescence of EGFP. EGFP oligomers were stored in secretory granules and secreted by the regulated secretory pathway in endocrine AtT-20 cells. Similarly, the dimeric mutant forms of EGFP were still secreted via the regulated secretory pathway, indicating that the higher-order oligomers were not necessary for sorting in AtT-20 cells. These results suggest that the oligomerization of EGFP must be considered when the protein is used as a reporter molecule in the secretory pathway. PMID:11736655

  14. Secretory autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ponpuak, Marisa; Mandell, Michael A; Kimura, Tomonori; Chauhan, Santosh; Cleyrat, Cédric; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy, once viewed exclusively as a cytoplasmic auto-digestive process, has its less intuitive but biologically distinct non-degradative roles. One manifestation of these functions of the autophagic machinery is the process termed secretory autophagy. Secretory autophagy facilitates unconventional secretion of the cytosolic cargo such as leaderless cytosolic proteins, which unlike proteins endowed with the leader (N-terminal signal) peptides cannot enter the conventional secretory pathway normally operating via the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Secretory autophagy may also export more complex cytoplasmic cargo and help excrete particulate substrates. Autophagic machinery and autophagy as a process also affect conventional secretory pathways, including the constitutive and regulated secretion, as well as promote alternative routes for trafficking of integral membrane proteins to the plasma membrane. Thus, autophagy and autophagic factors are intimately intertwined at many levels with secretion and polarized sorting in eukaryotic cells. PMID:25988755

  15. Structure and regulation of the murine Clara cell secretory protein gene.

    PubMed

    Stripp, B R; Huffman, J A; Bohinski, R J

    1994-03-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC10 or CCSP) is an abundant component of airway secretions and has the ability to bind small hydrophobic molecules. Genomic clones were isolated for the murine gene coding for Clara cell secretory protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene was composed of three exons that span 4316 bp. Organization of the murine CCSP gene was very similar to that of the rabbit gene that codes for the biochemically related uteroglobin protein. Messenger RNAs for both genes were coded for by three exons, counterparts of which encode similar structural and functional protein domains. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the 5' flanking DNA were conserved between species, as were the functional properties of these elements when characterized in assays of promoter function. These data support the notion that Clara cell secretory protein genes from the rat and mouse, and the uteroglobin gene in rabbit, represent interspecies homologues. PMID:8020953

  16. Identify Secretory Protein of Malaria Parasite with Modified Quadratic Discriminant Algorithm and Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong-E

    2016-06-01

    Malaria parasite secretes various proteins in infected red blood cell for its growth and survival. Thus identification of these secretory proteins is important for developing vaccine or drug against malaria. In this study, the modified method of quadratic discriminant analysis is presented for predicting the secretory proteins. Firstly, 20 amino acids are divided into five types according to the physical and chemical characteristics of amino acids. Then, we used five types of amino acids compositions as inputs of the modified quadratic discriminant algorithm. Finally, the best prediction performance is obtained by using 20 amino acid compositions, the sensitivity of 96 %, the specificity of 92 % with 0.88 of Mathew's correlation coefficient in fivefold cross-validation test. The results are also compared with those of existing prediction methods. The compared results shown our method are prominent in the prediction of secretory proteins. PMID:26286010

  17. Wide distribution of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms: isolation and cloning of novel snake venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Hyodo, Fumiko; Morita, Takashi

    2003-04-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are found in epididymis and granules of mammals, and they are thought to function in sperm maturation and in the immune system. Recently, we isolated and obtained clones for novel snake venom proteins that are classified as CRISP family proteins. To elucidate the distribution of snake venom CRISP family proteins, we evaluated a wide range of venoms for immuno-cross-reactivity. Then we isolated, characterized, and cloned genes for three novel CRISP family proteins (piscivorin, ophanin, and catrin) from the venom of eastern cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus piscivorus), king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). Our results show the wide distribution of snake venom CRISP family proteins among Viperidae and Elapidae from different continents, indicating that CRISP family proteins compose a new group of snake venom proteins. PMID:12646276

  18. Secretory protein traffic. Chromogranin A contains a dominant targeting signal for the regulated pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, R J; Xi, X P; Wu, H J; Helman, L J; Petz, L N

    1993-01-01

    Secretory proteins are targeted into either constitutive (secreted upon synthesis) or regulated (stored in vesicles and released in response to a secretagogue) pathways. To investigate mechanisms of protein targeting into catecholamine storage vesicles (CSV), we stably expressed human chromogranin A (CgA), the major soluble protein in human CSV, in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cell line. Chromaffin cell secretagogues (0.1 mM nicotinic cholinergic agonist, 55 mM K+, or 2 mM Ba++) caused cosecretion of human CgA and catecholamines from human CgA-expressing cells. Sucrose gradients colocalized human CgA and catecholamines to subcellular particles of the same buoyant density. Chimeric proteins, in which human CgA (either full-length [457 amino acids] or truncated [amino-terminal 226 amino acids]) was fused in-frame to the ordinarily nonsecreted protein chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), were expressed transiently in PC-12 cells. Both constructs directed CAT activity into regulated secretory vesicles, as judged by secretagogue-stimulated release. These data demonstrate that human CgA expressed in PC-12 cells is targeted to regulated secretory vesicles. In addition, human CgA can divert an ordinarily non-secreted protein into the regulated secretory pathway, consistent with the operation of a dominant targeting signal for the regulated pathway within the peptide sequence of CgA. Images PMID:8394383

  19. Regulated phosphorylation of secretory granule membrane proteins of the rat parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, C.R.; Castle, J.D.; Gorelick, F.S. )

    1990-07-01

    An antiserum raised against purified rat parotid secretory granule membrane proteins has been used to identify organelle-specific protein phosphorylation events following stimulation of intact cells from the rat parotid gland. After lobules were prelabeled with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and exposed to secretagogues, phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated with the granule membrane protein antiserum, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography. Parallel studies of stimulated amylase release were performed. Isoproterenol treatment of parotid lobules resulted in an increase in the phosphate content of immunoprecipitable 60- and 72-kDa proteins that correlated with amylase release in a time-dependent manner. Forskolin addition mimicked these effects, but only the isoproterenol effects were reversed by propranolol treatment. To confirm the specificity of the antiserum to the secretory granule membrane fraction, subcellular isolation techniques were employed following in situ phosphorylation. The 60- and 72-kDa phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated from both a particulate fraction and a purified secretory granule fraction. Furthermore, the extraction properties of both species suggest that they are integral membrane proteins. These findings support the possibility that stimulus-regulated secretion may involve phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins of the exocrine secretory granule.

  20. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallen, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a…

  1. Development of a new platform for secretory production of recombinant proteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Yim, Sung Sun; Choi, Jae Woong; Lee, Roo Jin; Lee, Yong Jae; Lee, Se Hwa; Kim, So Young; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, which has been for long an industrial producer of various L-amino acids, nucleic acids, and vitamins, is now also regarded as a potential host for the secretory production of recombinant proteins. To harness its potential as an industrial platform for recombinant protein production, the development of an efficient secretion system is necessary. Particularly, regarding protein production in large-scale bioreactors, it would be appropriate to develop a secretory expression system that is specialized for high cell density cultivation conditions. Here we isolated a new signal peptide that mediates the efficient secretion of recombinant proteins under high cell density cultivation conditions. The secretome of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 under high cell density cultivation conditions was initially investigated, and one major protein was identified as a hypothetical protein encoded by cg1514. Novel secretory production systems were then developed using the Cg1514 signal peptide and its own promoter. Efficient protein secretion was demonstrated using three protein models: endoxylanase, α-amylase, and camelid antibody fragment (VHH). For large-scale production, fed-batch cultivations were also conducted and high yields were successfully achieved--as high as 1.07 g/L (endoxylanase), 782.6 mg/L (α-amylase), and 1.57 g/L (VHH)--in the extracellular medium. From the culture media, all model proteins could be simply purified by one-step column chromatography with high purities and recovery yields. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the development of an efficient secretory expression system by secretome analysis under high cell density cultivation conditions in C. glutamicum. PMID:26134574

  2. Bovine parotid secretory protein: structure, expression and relatedness to other BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein)-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T T; Hood, K; Oden, K; McCracken, J; Morris, C A

    2003-08-01

    Members of the family of BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein)-like proteins are as yet incompletely characterized, particularly in cattle, where full-length sequence information is available for only three of the 13 family members known from other species. Structural bioinformatic analyses incorporating bovine homologues of several members of the BPI-like protein family, including two forms of bovine parotid secretory protein (PSP), showed that this family is also present in cattle. Expression analyses of several members of the BPI-like protein family in cattle, including PSP (Bsp30), von Ebner's minor salivary gland protein (VEMSGP) and lung-specific X protein (LUNX), showed a restricted pattern of expression, consistent with earlier hypotheses that these proteins function in the innate immune response to bacteria. The possible role of bovine PSP in susceptibility to pasture bloat in cattle is discussed. PMID:12887305

  3. Intracellular and transcellular transport of secretory and membrane proteins in the rat hepatocyte

    SciTech Connect

    Sztul, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    The intra- and transcellular transport of hepatic secretory and membrane proteins was studied in rats in vivo using (/sup 3/H)fucose and (/sup 35/S)cyteine as metabolic precursors. Incorporated radioactivity in plasma, bile, and liver subcellular fractions was measured and the labeled proteins of the Golgi complex, bile and plasma were separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by fluorography. /sup 3/H-radioactivity in Golgi fractions peaked at 10 min post injection (p.i.) and then declined concomitantly with the appearance of labeled glycoproteins in plasma. Maximal secretion of secretory fucoproteins from the Golgi complex occurred between 10 and 20 min p.i. In contrast, the clearance of labeled proteins from Golgi membrane subfractions occurred past 30 min p.i., indicating that membrane proteins leave the Golgi complex at least 10 min later than the bulk of content proteins. A major 80K form of Secretory Component (SC) was identified in the bile by precipitation with an anti IgA antibody. A comparative study of kinetics of transport of /sup 35/S-labeled SC and /sup 35/S-labeled albumin showed that albumin peaked in bile at approx.45 min p.i., whereas the SC peak occurred at 80 min p.i., suggesting that the transit time differs for plasma and membrane proteins which are delivered to the bile canaliculus (BC).

  4. Nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms: Transcriptional profiling of secretory proteins and the implication for the protein corona.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Engelmann, Péter; Autrup, Herman; Sutherland, Duncan S; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J

    2016-04-01

    Previously we have identified lysenin as a key protein constituent of the secretome from Eisenia fetida coelomocytes and revealed its critical importance in priming interactions between the cells and the protein corona around nanosilver. As alterations of the protein environment can directly affect the corona composition, the extent to which nanoparticles influence the cells' protein secretion profile is of remarkable interest that has rarely acquired attention. Here, we have probed transcriptional responses of E. fetida coelomocytes to the representative nanosilver NM-300K (15 nm) in a time-dependent manner (2, 4, 8 and 24 h at a low-cytotoxic concentration), and examined the implication of the temporal changes in transcriptional profiles of secretory proteins with a particular reference to that of lysenin. NM-300K was accumulated in/at the cells and lysenin was, after transient induction, gradually suppressed over time indicating a negative feedback cycle. This may limit further enrichment of lysenin in the corona and thereby decrease the lysenin-assisted uptake of the nanoparticles. Other differentially expressed genes were those involved in metal stress (likewise in AgNO3-stressed cells) and in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. This offers an intriguing perspective of the nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms, in which the conserved pattern recognition receptor TLRs may play an effector role. PMID:26119277

  5. TRC40 can deliver short secretory proteins to the Sec61 translocon

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas; Vilardi, Fabio; Lang, Sven; Leznicki, Pawel; Zimmermann, Richard; High, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Summary Whilst the co-translational translocation of nascent proteins across the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is well defined, the capacity of this organelle for post-translational translocation is poorly delineated. Here we identify two human secretory protein precursors, apelin and statherin, as bona fide substrates for post-translational translocation across the ER membrane. Further studies, in combination with Hyalophora cecropia preprocecropin A (ppcecA), show that all three proteins bind to TRC40 and can utilise this component for their delivery to the ER membrane in a well-established in vitro system. However, ppcecA is not an obligate TRC40 substrate, and it can also be delivered to the ER by an alternative TRC40-independent pathway. Upon arrival at the ER membrane, these short secretory proteins appear to be ubiquitously transported across the ER membrane through the Sec61 translocon, apparently irrespective of their delivery route. We speculate that the post-translational translocation of secretory proteins in higher eukaryotes is more prevalent than previously acknowledged. PMID:22505607

  6. Cysteine-Rich Atrial Secretory Protein from the Snail Achatina achatina: Purification and Structural Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Shabelnikov, Sergey; Kiselev, Artem

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of cardiac bioactive peptides and their functions in molluscs, soluble proteins expressed in the heart and secreted into the circulation have not yet been reported. In this study, we describe an 18.1-kDa, cysteine-rich atrial secretory protein (CRASP) isolated from the terrestrial snail Achatina achatina that has no detectable sequence similarity to any known protein or nucleotide sequence. CRASP is an acidic, 158-residue, N-glycosylated protein composed of eight alpha-helical segments stabilized with five disulphide bonds. A combination of fold recognition algorithms and ab initio folding predicted that CRASP adopts an all-alpha, right-handed superhelical fold. CRASP is most strongly expressed in the atrium in secretory atrial granular cells, and substantial amounts of CRASP are released from the heart upon nerve stimulation. CRASP is detected in the haemolymph of intact animals at nanomolar concentrations. CRASP is the first secretory protein expressed in molluscan atrium to be reported. We propose that CRASP is an example of a taxonomically restricted gene that might be responsible for adaptations specific for terrestrial pulmonates. PMID:26444993

  7. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker's yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities. PMID:27441920

  8. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker’s yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities. PMID:27441920

  9. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  10. Planar cell polarity protein localization in the secretory ameloblasts of rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sumio; Kawamoto, Tadafumi

    2012-05-01

    The localization of the planar cell polarity proteins Vang12, frizzled-3, Vang11, and Celsr1 in the rat incisors was examined using immunocytochemistry. The results showed that Vang12 was localized at two regions of the Tomes' processes of inner enamel-secretory ameloblasts in rat incisors: a proximal and a distal region. In contrast, frizzled-3 was localized at adherens junctions of the proximal and distal areas of inner enamel- and outer enamel-secretory ameloblasts, where N-cadherin and β-catenin were localized. frizzled-3 was also localized in differentiating inner enamel epithelial cells. Vang11 was localized sparsely in differentiating preameloblasts and extensively at the cell boundary of stratum intermedium. Celsr1 was not localized in ameloblasts but localized in odontoblasts extensively. These results suggest the involvement of planar cell polarity proteins in odontogenesis. PMID:22378702

  11. Subcellular distribution of docking/fusion proteins in neutrophils, secretory cells with multiple exocytic compartments.

    PubMed

    Brumell, J H; Volchuk, A; Sengelov, H; Borregaard, N; Cieutat, A M; Bainton, D F; Grinstein, S; Klip, A

    1995-12-15

    Neutrophils contain at least four distinct types of secretory organelles, which undergo exocytosis during infection and inflammation. The signaling pathways leading to secretion of individual granules and their kinetics of exocytosis vary greatly, causing temporal and regional differences in docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. As a step toward understanding the processes underlying differential granular secretion in neutrophils, we assessed the presence and distribution of a number of proteins reported to be involved in vesicular docking and/or fusion in other systems. Specific Abs were used for immunoblotting of cells fractionated by density gradients and free-flow electrophoresis, and for localization by confocal immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Syntaxin 1, VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)-1, synaptosome-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and cellubrevin were not detectable in human neutrophils. In contrast, syntaxin 4, VAMP-2, and the 39-kDa isoform of secretory carrier membrane protein (SCAMP) were present. SCAMP was found mainly in secondary and tertiary granules and in a fraction containing secretory vesicles, but was virtually absent from the primary (lysosomal) granules. This profile is consistent with the proposed "post-Golgi" distribution of SCAMP. VAMP-2 was largely absent from primary and secondary granules, but concentrated in tertiary granules and secretory vesicles. This pattern of distribution parallels the increasing sensitivity of these exocytic compartments to intracellular free calcium. Accordingly, ionomycin induced translocation of VAMP-2 toward the plasma membrane. Syntaxin 4 was found almost exclusively in the plasma membrane, and it accumulated in lamellipodia of migrating cells. This regional accumulation may contribute to localized secretion into the phagosomal lumen. PMID:7499863

  12. Sending proteins to dense core secretory granules: still a lot to sort out

    PubMed Central

    Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Reudelhuber, Timothy L.

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular sorting of peptide hormone precursors to the dense core secretory granules (DCSGs) is essential for their bioactivation. Despite the fundamental importance of this cellular process, the nature of the sorting signals for entry of proteins into DCSGs remains a source of vigorous debate. This review highlights recent discoveries that are consistent with a model in which several protein domains, acting in a cell-specific fashion and at different steps in the sorting process, act in concert to regulate the entry of proteins into DCSGs. PMID:17438078

  13. Sputum and BAL Clara cell secretory protein and surfactant protein D levels in asthma.

    PubMed

    Emmanouil, P; Loukides, S; Kostikas, K; Papatheodorou, G; Papaporfyriou, A; Hillas, G; Vamvakaris, I; Triggidou, R; Katafigiotis, P; Kokkini, A; Papiris, S; Koulouris, N; Bakakos, P

    2015-06-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) is associated with Th2 modulation. Surfactant protein D (SPD) plays an important role in surfactant homeostasis and eosinophil chemotaxis. We measured CC16 and SPD in sputum supernatants of 84 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy controls. In 22 asthmatics, we additionally measured CC16 and SPD levels in BAL and assessed smooth muscle area (SMA), reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, and epithelial detachment (ED) in bronchial biopsies. Induced sputum CC16 and SPD were significantly higher in patients with severe asthma (SRA) compared to mild-moderate and healthy controls. BAL CC16 and SPD levels were also higher in SRA compared to mild-moderate asthma. CC16 BAL levels correlated with ED, while SPD BAL levels correlated with SMA and RBM. Severity represented a significant covariate for these associations. CC16 and SPD levels are upregulated in SRA and correlate with remodeling indices, suggesting a possible role of these biomarkers in the remodeling process. PMID:25728058

  14. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  15. Avl9p, a Member of a Novel Protein Superfamily, Functions in the Late Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schekman, Randy

    2007-01-01

    The branching of exocytic transport routes in both yeast and mammalian cells has complicated studies of the late secretory pathway, and the mechanisms involved in exocytic cargo sorting and exit from the Golgi and endosomes are not well understood. Because cargo can be sorted away from a blocked route and secreted by an alternate route, mutants defective in only one route do not exhibit a strong secretory phenotype and are therefore difficult to isolate. In a genetic screen designed to isolate such mutants, we identified a novel conserved protein, Avl9p, the absence of which conferred lethality in a vps1Δ apl2Δ strain background (lacking a dynamin and an adaptor-protein complex 1 subunit). Depletion of Avl9p in this strain resulted in secretory defects as well as accumulation of Golgi-like membranes. The triple mutant also had a depolarized actin cytoskeleton and defects in polarized secretion. Overexpression of Avl9p in wild-type cells resulted in vesicle accumulation and a post-Golgi defect in secretion. Phylogenetic analysis indicated evolutionary relationships between Avl9p and regulators of membrane traffic and actin function. PMID:17229886

  16. Toxoplasma Rhoptries: Unique Secretory Organelles and Source of Promising Vaccine Proteins for Immunoprevention of Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Dlugonska, Henryka

    2008-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite classified in the phylum Apicomplexa, which includes numerous notable human and animal pathogens (Plasmodium species, Cryptosporidium species, Neospora caninum, etc.). The invasive stages of apicomplexans are characterized by the presence of an apical complex composed of specialized cytoskeletal and secretory organelles, including rhoptries. Rhoptries, unique apical secretory organelles shared exclusively by all apicomplexan parasites, are known to be involved in an active parasite's penetration into the host cell associated with the biogenesis of specific intracellular compartment, parasitophorous vacuole in which the parasite multiplies intensively, avoiding intracellular killing. Due to the key biological role of rhoptries, rhoptry proteins have recently become vaccine candidates for the prevention of several parasitoses, toxoplasmosis among them. The article presents current data on T. gondii rhoptries biology and new approaches to the development of effective vaccines against toxoplasmosis using rhoptry antigens. PMID:18670609

  17. A signal sequence is sufficient for green fluorescent protein to be routed to regulated secretory granules.

    PubMed

    El Meskini, R; Jin, L; Marx, R; Bruzzaniti, A; Lee, J; Emeson, R; Mains, R

    2001-02-01

    To investigate trafficking in neuroendocrine cells, green fluorescent protein (GFP) tags were fused to various portions of the preproneuropeptide Y (NPY) precursor. Two neuroendocrine cell lines, AtT-20 corticotrope tumor cells and PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells, along with primary anterior pituitary cells, were examined. Expression of chimeric constructs did not disrupt trafficking or regulated secretion of endogenous ACTH and prohormone convertase 1 in AtT-20 cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that the chimeric constructs remained intact, as long as the Lys-Arg cleavage site within preproNPY was deleted. GFP was stored in, and released from, regulated granules in cells expressing half of the NPY precursor fused to GFP, and also in cells in which only the signal sequence of preproNPY was fused to GFP. Thus, in neuroendocrine cells, entering the lumen of the secretory pathway is sufficient to target GFP to regulated secretory granules. PMID:11159860

  18. Antigenic homogeneity of male Müllerian gland (MG) secretory proteins of a caecilian amphibian with secretory proteins of the mammalian prostate gland and seminal vesicles: evidence for role of the caecilian MG as a male accessory reproductive gland.

    PubMed

    Radha, Arumugam; Sree, Sreesha; Faisal, Kunnathodi; Kumar, G Pradeep; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2014-10-01

    Whereas in all other vertebrates the Müllerian ducts of genetic males are aborted during development, under the influence of Müllerian-inhibiting substance, in the caecilian amphibians they are retained as a pair of functional glands. It has long been speculated that the Müllerian gland might be the male accessory reproductive gland but there has been no direct evidence to this effect. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the caecilian Müllerian gland secretory proteins would bear antigenic similarity to secretory proteins of the prostate gland and/or the seminal vesicles of a mammal. The secretory proteins of the Müllerian gland of Ichthyophis tricolor were evaluated for cross-reactivity with antisera raised against rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle secretory proteins, adopting SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblot techniques. Indeed there was a cross-reaction of five Müllerian gland secretory protein fractions with prostatic protein antiserum and of three with seminal vesicle protein antiserum. A potential homology exists because in mammals the middle group of the prostate primordia is derived from a diverticulum of the Müllerian duct. Thus this study, by providing evidence for expression of prostatic and seminal vesicle proteins in the Müllerian gland, substantiates the point that in caecilians the Müllerian glands are the male accessory reproductive glands. PMID:25160003

  19. Subcellular location of secretory proteins retained in the liver during the ethanol-induced inhibition of hepatic protein secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Volentine, G.D.; Tuma, D.J.; Sorrell, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol administration inhibits the secretion of proteins by the liver, resulting in their hepatocellular retention. Experiments were designed in this study to determine the subcellular location of the retained secretory proteins. Ethanol was administered acutely to nonfasted rats by gastric intubation, whereas control animals received an isocaloric dose of glucose. Two hours after intubation, when maximum blood ethanol levels (45 mM) were observed, (/sup 3/H)leucine and (/sup 14/C)fucose were injected simultaneously into the dorsal vein of the penis. The labelling of secretory proteins was determined in the liver and plasma at various time periods after label injection. Ethanol treatment decreased the secretion of both leucine- and fucose-labeled proteins into the plasma. This inhibition of secretion was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the hepatic retention of both leucine- and fucose-labeled immunoprecipitable secretory proteins. At the time of maximum inhibition of secretion, leucine labeled secretory proteins located in the Golgi apparatus represented about 50% of the accumulated secretory proteins in the livers of the ethanol-treated rats, whereas the remainder was essentially equally divided among the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol. Because fucose is incorporated into secretory proteins almost exclusively in the Golgi complex, fucose-labeled proteins accumulated in the livers of the ethanol-treated rats mainly in the Golgi apparatus, with the remainder located in the cytosol. These results show that ethanol administration causes an impaired movement of secretory proteins along the secretory pathway, and that secretory proteins accumulate mainly, but not exclusively, in the Golgi apparatus.

  20. Signal Recognition Particle and SecA Cooperate during Export of Secretory Proteins with Highly Hydrophobic Signal Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufan; Ueda, Takuya; Müller, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The Sec translocon of bacterial plasma membranes mediates the linear translocation of secretory proteins as well as the lateral integration of membrane proteins. Integration of many membrane proteins occurs co-translationally via the signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent targeting of ribosome-associated nascent chains to the Sec translocon. In contrast, translocation of classical secretory proteins across the Sec translocon is a post-translational event requiring no SRP but the motor protein SecA. Secretory proteins were, however, reported to utilize SRP in addition to SecA, if the hydrophobicity of their signal sequences exceeds a certain threshold value. Here we have analyzed transport of this subgroup of secretory proteins across the Sec translocon employing an entirely defined in vitro system. We thus found SecA to be both necessary and sufficient for translocation of secretory proteins with hydrophobic signal sequences, whereas SRP and its receptor improved translocation efficiency. This SRP-mediated boost of translocation is likely due to the early capture of the hydrophobic signal sequence by SRP as revealed by site-specific photo cross-linking of ribosome nascent chain complexes. PMID:24717922

  1. Overproduction of a Model Sec- and Tat-Dependent Secretory Protein Elicits Different Cellular Responses in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Gullón, Sonia; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an efficient host for the secretory production of homologous and heterologous proteins. To identify possible bottlenecks in the protein production process, a comparative transcriptomic approach was adopted to study cellular responses during the overproduction of a Sec-dependent model protein (alpha-amylase) and a Tat-dependent model protein (agarase) in Streptomyces lividans. The overproduction of the model secretory proteins via the Sec or the Tat route in S. lividans does elicit a different major cell response in the bacterium. The stringent response is a bacterial response to nutrients' depletion, which naturally occurs at late times of the bacterial cell growth. While the induction of the stringent response at the exponential phase of growth may limit overall productivity in the case of the Tat route, the induction of that response does not take place in the case of the Sec route, which comparatively is an advantage in secretory protein production processes. Hence, this study identifies a potential major drawback in the secretory protein production process depending on the secretory route, and provides clues to improving S. lividans as a protein production host. PMID:26200356

  2. p24 family proteins: key players in the regulation of trafficking along the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Cantizano, Noelia; Montesinos, Juan Carlos; Bernat-Silvestre, César; Marcote, María Jesús; Aniento, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    p24 family proteins have been known for a long time, but their functions have remained elusive. However, they are emerging as essential regulators of protein trafficking along the secretory pathway, influencing the composition, structure, and function of different organelles in the pathway, especially the ER and the Golgi apparatus. In addition, they appear to modulate the transport of specific cargos, including GPI-anchored proteins, G-protein-coupled receptors, or K/HDEL ligands. As a consequence, they have been shown to play specific roles in signaling, development, insulin secretion, and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The search of new putative ligands may open the way to discover new functions for this fascinating family of proteins. PMID:26224213

  3. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  4. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R.; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  5. The Arf family G protein Arl1 is required for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Isabel L.; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Munro, Sean

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small G protein Arf like 1 (Arl1) is found at the Golgi complex, and its GTP-bound form recruits several effectors to the Golgi including GRIP-domain-containing coiled-coil proteins, and the Arf1 exchange factors Big1 and Big2. To investigate the role of Arl1, we have characterised a loss-of-function mutant of the Drosophila Arl1 orthologue. The gene is essential, and examination of clones of cells lacking Arl1 shows that it is required for recruitment of three of the four GRIP domain golgins to the Golgi, with Drosophila GCC185 being less dependent on Arl1. At a functional level, Arl1 is essential for formation of secretory granules in the larval salivary gland. When Arl1 is missing, Golgi are still present but there is a dispersal of adaptor protein 1 (AP-1), a clathrin adaptor that requires Arf1 for its membrane recruitment and which is known to be required for secretory granule biogenesis. Arl1 does not appear to be required for AP-1 recruitment in all tissues, suggesting that it is crucially required to enhance Arf1 activation at the trans-Golgi in particular tissues. PMID:24610947

  6. Munc13-1-mediated vesicle priming contributes to secretory amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Steffen; Fuchsbrunner, Katrin; Lange-Dohna, Christine; Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Bigl, Volker; Betz, Andrea; Reim, Kerstin; Brose, Nils

    2004-07-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) gives rise toc beta-amyloid peptides, which are the main constituents of senile plaques in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Non-amyloidogenic processing of the APP can be stimulated by phorbol esters (PEs) and by intracellular diacylglycerol (DAG) generation. This led to the hypothesis that classical and novel protein kinase Cs (PKCs), which are activated by DAG/PEs, regulate APP processing. However, in addition to PKCs, there are other DAG/PE receptors present in neurons that may participate in the modulation of APP processing. Munc13-1, a presynaptic protein with an essential role in synaptic vesicle priming, represents such an alternative target of the DAG second messenger pathway. Using Munc13-1 knock-out mice and knock-in mice expressing a Munc13-1(H567K) variant deficient in DAG/PE binding, we determined the relative contributions of PKCs and Munc13-1 to PE-stimulated secretory APP processing. We establish that, in addition to PKC, Munc13-1 significantly contributes to the regulation of secretory APP metabolism. PMID:15123597

  7. SPRED: A machine learning approach for the identification of classical and non-classical secretory proteins in mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Moeller, Steffen; Suganthan, P.N.; Martinetz, Thomas

    2010-01-15

    Eukaryotic protein secretion generally occurs via the classical secretory pathway that traverses the ER and Golgi apparatus. Secreted proteins usually contain a signal sequence with all the essential information required to target them for secretion. However, some proteins like fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1, FGF-2), interleukins (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta), galectins and thioredoxin are exported by an alternative pathway. This is known as leaderless or non-classical secretion and works without a signal sequence. Most computational methods for the identification of secretory proteins use the signal peptide as indicator and are therefore not able to identify substrates of non-classical secretion. In this work, we report a random forest method, SPRED, to identify secretory proteins from protein sequences irrespective of N-terminal signal peptides, thus allowing also correct classification of non-classical secretory proteins. Training was performed on a dataset containing 600 extracellular proteins and 600 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. The algorithm was tested on 180 extracellular proteins and 1380 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. We obtained 85.92% accuracy from training and 82.18% accuracy from testing. Since SPRED does not use N-terminal signals, it can detect non-classical secreted proteins by filtering those secreted proteins with an N-terminal signal by using SignalP. SPRED predicted 15 out of 19 experimentally verified non-classical secretory proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified 566 protein sequences potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. The dataset and standalone version of the SPRED software is available at (http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/spred/spred).

  8. The role of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Koppers, Adam J; Reddy, Thulasimala; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2011-01-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are a subgroup of the CRISP, antigen 5 and Pr-1 (CAP) protein superfamily, and are found only in vertebrates. They show a strong expression bias to the mammalian male reproductive tract and the venom of poisonous reptiles. Within the male reproductive tract CRISPs have been implicated in many aspects of male germ cell biology spanning haploid germ cell development, epididymal maturation, capacitation, motility and the actual processes of fertilization. At a structural level, CRISPs are composed of two domains, a CAP domain, which has been implicated in cell–cell adhesion, and a CRISP domain, which has been shown to regulate several classes of ion channels across multiple species. Herein, we will review the current literature on the role of CRISPs in male fertility, and by inference to related non-mammalian protein, infer potential biochemical functions. PMID:20972450

  9. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  10. Identification of Secretory Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Pseudo Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Tang, Hua; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Jian; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Ding, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is killing millions of lives every year and on the blacklist of the most appalling public health problems. Recent findings suggest that secretory protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may serve the purpose of developing specific vaccines and drugs due to their antigenicity. Responding to global infectious disease, we focused on the identification of secretory proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel method called MycoSec was designed by incorporating g-gap dipeptide compositions into pseudo amino acid composition. Analysis of variance-based technique was applied in the process of feature selection and a total of 374 optimal features were obtained and used for constructing the final predicting model. In the jackknife test, MycoSec yielded a good performance with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93, demonstrating that the proposed system is powerful and robust. For user's convenience, the web server MycoSec was established and an obliging manual on how to use it was provided for getting around any trouble unnecessary. PMID:27597968

  11. A pH-Regulated Quality Control Cycle for Surveillance of Secretory Protein Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vavassori, Stefano; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Caserta, Imma R.; Fagioli, Claudio; Mossuto, Maria F.; Fornili, Arianna; van Anken, Eelco; Degano, Massimo; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Summary To warrant the quality of the secretory proteome, stringent control systems operate at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi interface, preventing the release of nonnative products. Incompletely assembled oligomeric proteins that are deemed correctly folded must rely on additional quality control mechanisms dedicated to proper assembly. Here we unveil how ERp44 cycles between cisGolgi and ER in a pH-regulated manner, patrolling assembly of disulfide-linked oligomers such as IgM and adiponectin. At neutral, ER-equivalent pH, the ERp44 carboxy-terminal tail occludes the substrate-binding site. At the lower pH of the cisGolgi, conformational rearrangements of this peptide, likely involving protonation of ERp44’s active cysteine, simultaneously unmask the substrate binding site and −RDEL motif, allowing capture of orphan secretory protein subunits and ER retrieval via KDEL receptors. The ERp44 assembly control cycle couples secretion fidelity and efficiency downstream of the calnexin/calreticulin and BiP-dependent quality control cycles. PMID:23685074

  12. Annexins V and VI: major calcium-dependent atrial secretory granule-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F; Bester, A J; Thibault, G

    1991-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is stored by atrial myocytes in secretory granules, known as atrial specific granules, and is released from these granules by exocytosis. We have isolated a group of atrial proteins by affinity chromatography that bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner. The two major proteins isolated (32.5 kd and 67 kd) are calcium-binding proteins and have been identified as annexins V and VI by immunoblotting with specific antisera. The calcium dependence of their binding to atrial specific granules has been characterized in vitro and indicates that this interaction takes place at micromolar levels of calcium. In addition, the group of proteins isolated includes another calcium-binding protein of 20 kd, as well as GTP-binding proteins of 22 to 26 kd. Membrane interactions during exocytosis are presumably mediated by the interaction of specific proteins with the granule membrane. The properties of the proteins described here, and their ability to bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner, make them likely candidates in the search for regulatory proteins mediating atrial natriuretic peptide secretion. PMID:1834552

  13. A bacterial signal peptide is functional in plants and directs proteins to the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Lorena; Gan, Qinglei; Wang, Kan

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LT-B) has been used as a model antigen for the production of plant-derived high-valued proteins in maize. LT-B with its native signal peptide (BSP) has been shown to accumulate in starch granules of transgenic maize kernels. To elucidate the targeting properties of the bacterial LT-B protein and BSP in plant systems, the subcellular localization of visual marker green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to LT-B and various combinations of signal peptides was examined in Arabidopsis protoplasts and transgenic maize. Biochemical analysis indicates that the LT-B::GFP fusion proteins can assemble and fold properly retaining both the antigenicity of LT-B and the fluorescing properties of GFP. Maize kernel fractionation revealed that transgenic lines carrying BSP result in recombinant protein association with fibre and starch fractions. Confocal microscopy analysis indicates that the fusion proteins accumulate in the endomembrane system of plant cells in a signal peptide-dependent fashion. This is the first report providing evidence of the ability of a bacterial signal peptide to target proteins to the plant secretory pathway. The results provide important insights for further understanding the heterologous protein trafficking mechanisms and for developing effective strategies in molecular farming. PMID:19491306

  14. A dynamic study of protein secretion and aggregation in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Sannino, Sara; Mazza, Davide; Fagioli, Claudio; Vitale, Milena; Yoboue, Edgar Djaha; Sitia, Roberto; Anelli, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination of protein biogenesis, traffic and homeostasis within the early secretory compartment (ESC) is key for cell physiology. As a consequence, disturbances in these processes underlie many genetic and chronic diseases. Dynamic imaging methods are needed to follow the fate of cargo proteins and their interactions with resident enzymes and folding assistants. Here we applied the Halotag labelling system to study the behavior of proteins with different fates and roles in ESC: a chaperone, an ERAD substrate and an aggregation-prone molecule. Exploiting the Halo property of binding covalently ligands labelled with different fluorochromes, we developed and performed non-radioactive pulse and chase assays to follow sequential waves of proteins in ESC, discriminating between young and old molecules at the single cell level. In this way, we could monitor secretion and degradation of ER proteins in living cells. We can also follow the biogenesis, growth, accumulation and movements of protein aggregates in the ESC. Our data show that protein deposits within ESC grow by sequential apposition of molecules up to a given size, after which novel seeds are detected. The possibility of using ligands with distinct optical and physical properties offers a novel possibility to dynamically follow the fate of proteins in the ESC. PMID:25279560

  15. A Dynamic Study of Protein Secretion and Aggregation in the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Sannino, Sara; Mazza, Davide; Fagioli, Claudio; Vitale, Milena; Yoboue, Edgar Djaha; Anelli, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination of protein biogenesis, traffic and homeostasis within the early secretory compartment (ESC) is key for cell physiology. As a consequence, disturbances in these processes underlie many genetic and chronic diseases. Dynamic imaging methods are needed to follow the fate of cargo proteins and their interactions with resident enzymes and folding assistants. Here we applied the Halotag labelling system to study the behavior of proteins with different fates and roles in ESC: a chaperone, an ERAD substrate and an aggregation-prone molecule. Exploiting the Halo property of binding covalently ligands labelled with different fluorochromes, we developed and performed non-radioactive pulse and chase assays to follow sequential waves of proteins in ESC, discriminating between young and old molecules at the single cell level. In this way, we could monitor secretion and degradation of ER proteins in living cells. We can also follow the biogenesis, growth, accumulation and movements of protein aggregates in the ESC. Our data show that protein deposits within ESC grow by sequential apposition of molecules up to a given size, after which novel seeds are detected. The possibility of using ligands with distinct optical and physical properties offers a novel possibility to dynamically follow the fate of proteins in the ESC. PMID:25279560

  16. Immunoproteomic Analysis of the Excretory-Secretory Proteins from Spirometra mansoni Sparganum

    PubMed Central

    HU, Dan Dan; CUI, Jing; WANG, Li; LIU, Li Na; WEI, Tong; WANG, Zhong Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background Sparganosis is caused by the invasion of Spirometra sparganum into various tissues/organs. Subcutaneous sparganosis can be diagnosed by biopsy, while visceral/cerebral sparganosis is not easy to be diagnosed. The diagnosis depends largely on the detection of specific anti-sparganum antibodies. The specificity of the ELISA could be increased by using S. mansoni sparganum excretory–secretory (ES) antigens, but it also had the cross-reactions with sera of patients with cysticercosis or paragonimiasis. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens in S. mansoni sparganum ES proteins. Methods The sparganum ES proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blot probed with early sera from infected mice at 14 days post-infection. The immunoreactive protein spots were characterized by MALDI-TOF/ TOF-MS. Results A total of approximately 149 proteins spots were detected with isoelectric point (pI) varying from 3 to 7.5 and molecular weight from 20 to 115 kDa and seven protein spots with molecular weight of 23-31 kDa were recognized by the infection sera. Three of seven spots were successfully identified and characterized as the same S. mansoni protein (cysteine protease), and the proteins of other 4 spots were not included in the databases. Conclusion The cysteine protease from S. mansoni ES proteins recognized by early infection sera might be the early diagnostic antigens for sparganosis. PMID:24454434

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Trichinella spiralis Muscle Larval Excretory-Secretory Proteins Recognized by Early Infection Sera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Wang, Zhong Quan; Hu, Dan Dan; Cui, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Although the excretory-secretory (ES) proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, their main disadvantage is the false negative results during the early stage of infection and cross-reaction of their main components (43, 45, 49, and 53 kDa) with sera of patients with other helminthiasis. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens in T. spiralis ES proteins with 30–40 kDa. The ES proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), and a total of approximately 150 proteins spots were detected with isoelectric point (pI) varying from 4 to 7 and molecular weight from 14 to 66 kDa. When probed with sera from infected mice at 18 days postinfection, ten protein spots with molecular weight of 30–40 kDa were recognized and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. All of ten spots were successfully identified and characterized to correlate with five different proteins, including two potential serine proteases, one antigen targeted by protective antibodies, one deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II, and one conserved hypothetical protein. These proteins might be the early specific diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis. PMID:23844355

  18. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a multifunctional protein in the host defense response.

    PubMed

    Majchrzak-Gorecka, Monika; Majewski, Pawel; Grygier, Beata; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cichy, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a ∼12kDa nonglycosylated cationic protein, is emerging as an important regulator of innate and adaptive immunity and as a component of tissue regenerative programs. First described as an inhibitor of serine proteases such as neutrophil elastase, this protein is increasingly recognized as a molecule that benefits the host via its anti-proteolytic, anti-microbial and immunomodulatory activities. Here, we discuss the diverse functions of SLPI. Moreover, we review several novel layers of SLPI-mediated control that protect the host from excessive/dysregulated inflammation typical of infectious, allergic and autoinflammatory diseases and that support healing responses through affecting cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. PMID:26718149

  19. Serum amyloid A protein enhances the activity of secretory non-pancreatic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Pruzanski, W; de Beer, F C; de Beer, M C; Stefanski, E; Vadas, P

    1995-01-01

    The acute-phase proteins serum amyloid A protein (SAA) and secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) are simultaneously expressed during inflammatory conditions. SAA associates with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) altering its physicochemical composition. We found that purified acute-phase SAA, but not the constitutive form, markedly enhances the lipolytic activity of sPLA2 in a dose-related manner with phosphatidylcholine/lysophosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine/lysophosphatidylethanolamine liposomal substrates. Normal HDL was found to reduce activity of sPLA2 in a dose-dependent manner, but when acute-phase HDL containing 27% SAA was tested, it enhanced sPLA2 activity. Immunopurified monospecific antibodies against SAA completely abolished the enhancing activity of SAA and acute-phase HDL. Given the central role of HDL in lipoprotein metabolism, the interaction between HDL, SAA and sPLA2 may account for changes detected in lipoprotein metabolism during the acute phase. PMID:7542869

  20. Persistent dominant follicle alters pattern of oviductal secretory proteins from cows at estrus.

    PubMed

    Binelli, M; Hampton, J; Buhi, W C; Thatcher, W W

    1999-07-01

    The experimental objective was to compare synthesis of oviductal secretory proteins of dairy cows bearing a persistent dominant follicle (PDF) versus a fresh dominant follicle (FDF) at estrus. On Day 7 after synchronized estrus (Day 0), cows received an intravaginal progesterone device and injection of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). On Day 9, cows received an injection of a GnRH agonist (FDF group; n = 3) or received no injection (PDF group, n = 3). On Day 16, all cows received PGF2alpha, and progesterone devices were removed. At slaughter on Day 18 or Day 19, oviducts ipsilateral and contralateral to the dominant follicle were divided into infundibulum, ampulla, and isthmus regions. Explants from oviductal regions were cultured in minimal essential medium supplemented with [3H]leucine for 24 h. Two-dimensional fluorographs of proteins in conditioned media were analyzed by densitometry. Rate of incorporation of [3H]leucine into macromolecules was greater in the infundibulum, ampulla, and isthmus of FDF cows (p < 0.01). Overall, intensities of radiolabeled secretory protein (P) 2 and P13 were greater for FDF than for PDF. In the ampulla, P14 was more intense for FDF while P7 was more intense for PDF. Abundance of P1 in the isthmus was greater for PDF cows. Across regions, P5, P6, P8, P9, and P11 were more intense for PDF than for FDF in the ipsilateral side. In the contralateral side, P19 was more intense for PDF than for FDF, whereas P6, P8, P9, and P11 were more intense for FDF. Differences in biosynthetic activity and in secreted oviductal proteins from cows bearing a PDF may contribute to the decrease in fertility associated with a PDF. PMID:10377040

  1. Absence of E protein arrests transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus maturation in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ortego, Javier; Ceriani, Juan E.; Patino, Cristina; Plana, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2007-11-25

    A recombinant transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (rTGEV) in which E gene was deleted (rTGEV-{delta}E) has been engineered. This deletion mutant only grows in cells expressing E protein (E{sup +} cells) indicating that E was an essential gene for TGEV replication. Electron microscopy studies of rTGEV-{delta}E infected BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells showed that only immature intracellular virions were assembled. These virions were non-infectious and not secreted to the extracellular medium in BHK-pAPN-E{sup -} cells. RNA and protein composition analysis by RNase-gold and immunoelectron microscopy showed that rTGEV-{delta}E virions contained RNA and also all the structural TGEV proteins, except the deleted E protein. Nevertheless, full virion maturation was blocked. Studies of the rTGEV-{delta}E subcellular localization by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy in infected E{sup -} cells showed that in the absence of E protein virus trafficking was arrested in the intermediate compartment. Therefore, the absence of E protein in TGEV resulted in two actions, a blockade of virus trafficking in the membranes of the secretory pathway, and prevention of full virus maturation.

  2. Apocrine Secretion in Drosophila Salivary Glands: Subcellular Origin, Dynamics, and Identification of Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Farkaš, Robert; Ďatková, Zuzana; Mentelová, Lucia; Löw, Péter; Beňová-Liszeková, Denisa; Beňo, Milan; Sass, Miklós; Řehulka, Pavel; Řehulková, Helena; Raška, Otakar; Kováčik, Lubomír; Šmigová, Jana; Raška, Ivan; Mechler, Bernard M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the well defined mechanism of merocrine exocytosis, the mechanism of apocrine secretion, which was first described over 180 years ago, remains relatively uncharacterized. We identified apocrine secretory activity in the late prepupal salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster just prior to the execution of programmed cell death (PCD). The excellent genetic tools available in Drosophila provide an opportunity to dissect for the first time the molecular and mechanistic aspects of this process. A prerequisite for such an analysis is to have pivotal immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, biochemical and proteomic data that fully characterize the process. Here we present data showing that the Drosophila salivary glands release all kinds of cellular proteins by an apocrine mechanism including cytoskeletal, cytosolic, mitochondrial, nuclear and nucleolar components. Surprisingly, the apocrine release of these proteins displays a temporal pattern with the sequential release of some proteins (e.g. transcription factor BR-C, tumor suppressor p127, cytoskeletal β-tubulin, non-muscle myosin) earlier than others (e.g. filamentous actin, nuclear lamin, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase). Although the apocrine release of proteins takes place just prior to the execution of an apoptotic program, the nuclear DNA is never released. Western blotting indicates that the secreted proteins remain undegraded in the lumen. Following apocrine secretion, the salivary gland cells remain quite vital, as they retain highly active transcriptional and protein synthetic activity. PMID:24732043

  3. N-hypermannose glycosylation disruption enhances recombinant protein production by regulating secretory pathway and cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hongting; Wang, Shenghuan; Wang, Jiajing; Song, Meihui; Xu, Mengyang; Zhang, Mengying; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust host for heterologous protein expression. The efficient expression of cellulases in S. cerevisiae is important for the consolidated bioprocess that directly converts lignocellulose into valuable products. However, heterologous proteins are often N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae, which may affect protein activity. In this study, the expression of three heterologous proteins, β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and cellobiohydrolase, was found to be N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae. To block the formation of hypermannose glycan, these proteins were expressed in strains with deletions in key Golgi mannosyltransferases (Och1p, Mnn9p and Mnn1p), respectively. Their extracellular activities improved markedly in the OCH1 and MNN9 deletion strains. Interestingly, truncation of the N-hypermannose glycan did not increase the specific activity of these proteins, but improved the secretion yield. Further analysis showed OCH1 and MNN9 deletion up-regulated genes in the secretory pathway, such as protein folding and vesicular trafficking, but did not induce the unfolded protein response. The cell wall integrity was also affected by OCH1 and MNN9 deletion, which contributed to the release of secretory protein extracellularly. This study demonstrated that mannosyltransferases disruption improved protein secretion through up-regulating secretory pathway and affecting cell wall integrity and provided new insights into glycosylation engineering for protein secretion. PMID:27156860

  4. N-hypermannose glycosylation disruption enhances recombinant protein production by regulating secretory pathway and cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongting; Wang, Shenghuan; Wang, Jiajing; Song, Meihui; Xu, Mengyang; Zhang, Mengying; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust host for heterologous protein expression. The efficient expression of cellulases in S. cerevisiae is important for the consolidated bioprocess that directly converts lignocellulose into valuable products. However, heterologous proteins are often N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae, which may affect protein activity. In this study, the expression of three heterologous proteins, β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and cellobiohydrolase, was found to be N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae. To block the formation of hypermannose glycan, these proteins were expressed in strains with deletions in key Golgi mannosyltransferases (Och1p, Mnn9p and Mnn1p), respectively. Their extracellular activities improved markedly in the OCH1 and MNN9 deletion strains. Interestingly, truncation of the N-hypermannose glycan did not increase the specific activity of these proteins, but improved the secretion yield. Further analysis showed OCH1 and MNN9 deletion up-regulated genes in the secretory pathway, such as protein folding and vesicular trafficking, but did not induce the unfolded protein response. The cell wall integrity was also affected by OCH1 and MNN9 deletion, which contributed to the release of secretory protein extracellularly. This study demonstrated that mannosyltransferases disruption improved protein secretion through up-regulating secretory pathway and affecting cell wall integrity and provided new insights into glycosylation engineering for protein secretion. PMID:27156860

  5. Effects of fluoride on matrix proteins and their properties in rat secretory enamel.

    PubMed

    Aoba, T; Moreno, E C; Tanabe, T; Fukae, M

    1990-06-01

    This publication concerns the selective adsorption of rat enamel proteins onto hydroxyapatite, their solubility in aqueous solutions, and the effect that systemic fluoride has on these properties. The enamel proteins used as adsorbates were extracted in 0.5 mol/L acetic acid from the secretory enamel of the upper and lower incisors of SD rats (females, 200-220 g body weight). Equilibration of the proteins with hydroxyapatite was performed in two solutions: (i) 50 mmol/L acetate buffer at pH 6.0 and 0 degrees C, and (ii) 50 mmol/L Tris buffer containing 4 mol/L guanidine at pH 7.4 and room temperature. Enamel was dissected from animals, which were given either de-ionized water (control group) or water containing 25, 50, 75, or 100 ppm fluoride as NaF for four weeks. From these enamel samples, the proteins were extracted in sequence with 160 mmol/L NaCl and 3 mmol/L phosphate (pH 7.3), 50 mmol/L carbonate buffer (pH 10.8), and finally, with 0.5 mol/L acetic acid for dissolution of the enamel mineral. The F, Ca, and P contents of the various enamel samples were determined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2162362

  6. Purification and characterization of a cysteine-rich secretory protein from Philodryas patagoniensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María E; Mackessy, Stephen P; Teibler, Pamela; Tavares, Flávio L; Burckhardt, Paula L; Breno, María C; Acosta, Ofelia; Santoro, Marcelo L

    2009-07-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRiSPs) are widespread in reptile venoms, but most have functions that remain unknown. In the present study we describe the purification and characterization of a CRiSP (patagonin) from the venom of the rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and demonstrate its biological activity. Patagonin is a single-chain protein, exhibiting a molecular mass of 24,858.6 Da, whose NH(2)-terminal and MS/MS-derived sequences are nearly identical to other snake venom CRiSPs. The purified protein hydrolyzed neither azocasein nor fibrinogen, and it could induce no edema, hemorrhage or inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. In addition, patagonin did not inhibit contractions of rat aortic smooth muscle induced by high K(+). However, it caused muscular damage to murine gastrocnemius muscle, an action that has not been previously described for any snake venom CRiSPs. Thus, patagonin will be important for studies of the structure-function and evolutionary relationships of this family of proteins that are widely distributed among snake venoms. PMID:19285568

  7. POSVP21, a major secretory androgen-dependent protein from sand rat seminal vesicles, identified as a transgelin

    PubMed Central

    Kaci-Ouchfoun, Naïma; Incamps, Anne; Hadj-Bekkouche, Fatima; Abbadi, Mohamed Cherif; Bellanger, Laurent; Gernigon-Spychalowicz, Thérèse

    2010-01-01

    The seminal vesicles of adult sand rat contain a major secretory protein band (MW 21 kDa) designated as Psammomys obesus seminal vesicles protein of 21 kDa (POSVP21). This protein is abundant in secretions, regulated by androgens and also present in the vaginal plug. POSVP21 accounts for over 22.3% of soluble proteins from homogenate during the breeding season, 13.3% during the middle season and 5.3% during the hormonal regression season. It is absent during the non-breeding season. POSVP21 is localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells and in secretory products in the lumen. It presents an immunological homology with two epididymal proteins with the same molecular weight and a high degree of homology with transgelin from rat (Rattus norvegicus). PMID:20400972

  8. Serodiagnosis of fasciolosis by fast protein liquid chromatography-fractionated excretory/secretory antigens.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarian, Kobra; Akhlaghi, Lame; Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Razmjou, Elham; Manouchehri Naeini, Kourosh; Gholami, Samaneh; Najafi Samei, Masoomeh; Falak, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In several studies, different antigenic preparations and diverse immunological tests were applied for serodiagnosis of Fasciola hepatica infections. Most of these preparations showed cross-reactivity with proteins of other parasites. Application of purified antigens might reduce these cross-reactivities. Here, we used fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-fractionated extracts of F. hepatica excretory/secretory antigens (E/S Ags) for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis. To develop an improved diagnostic method, we fractionated F. hepatica E/S Ags by anion exchange chromatography on a Sepharose CL-6B column and then tested the serodiagnostic values of the fractions. We used sera from F. hepatica-infected human and sheep as positive controls. Sera from patients with hydatidosis and strongyloidiasis were used for cross-reactivity studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) of the second FPLC peak, containing 20, 25, and 70 kDa proteins, discriminated between F. hepatica-infected and uninfected human and sheep samples. Fractionation of F. hepatica E/S Ags by FPLC is a fast and reproducible way of obtaining antigens useful for serodiagnosis of human and sheep fasciolosis with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:27130320

  9. A new tool in C. elegans reveals changes in secretory protein metabolism in ire-1-deficient animals.

    PubMed

    Safra, Modi; Henis-Korenblit, Sivan

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that the ire-1/xbp-1 arm of the UPR plays a crucial role in maintaining basic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functions required for the metabolism of secreted proteins even during unstressed growth conditions. During these studies we realized that although C. elegans is a powerful system to study the genetics of many cellular processes; it lacks effective tools for tracking the metabolism of secreted proteins at the cell and organism levels. Here, we outline how genetic manipulations and expression analysis of a DAF-28::GFP translational fusion transgene can be combined to infer different steps in the life cycle of secretory proteins. We demonstrate how we have used this tool to reveal folding defects, clearance defects, and secretion defects in ire-1 and xbp-1 mutants. We believe that further studies using this tool will deepen the understanding of secretory protein metabolism. PMID:25191629

  10. Sorting of a HaloTag protein that has only a signal peptide sequence into exocrine secretory granules without protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Yokoyama, Megumi; Katsumata-Kato, Osamu

    2013-11-15

    The mechanism involved in the sorting and accumulation of secretory cargo proteins, such as amylase, into secretory granules of exocrine cells remains to be solved. To clarify that sorting mechanism, we expressed a reporter protein HaloTag fused with partial sequences of salivary amylase protein in primary cultured parotid acinar cells. We found that a HaloTag protein fused with only the signal peptide sequence (Met(1)-Ala(25)) of amylase, termed SS25H, colocalized well with endogenous amylase, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Percoll-density gradient centrifugation of secretory granule fractions shows that the distributions of amylase and SS25H were similar. These results suggest that SS25H is transported to secretory granules and is not discriminated from endogenous amylase by the machinery that functions to remove proteins other than granule cargo from immature granules. Another reporter protein, DsRed2, that has the same signal peptide sequence also colocalized with amylase, suggesting that the sorting to secretory granules is not dependent on a characteristic of the HaloTag protein. Whereas Blue Native PAGE demonstrates that endogenous amylase forms a high-molecular-weight complex, SS25H does not participate in the complex and does not form self-aggregates. Nevertheless, SS25H was released from cells by the addition of a β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, which also induces amylase secretion. These results indicate that addition of the signal peptide sequence, which is necessary for the translocation in the endoplasmic reticulum, is sufficient for the transportation and storage of cargo proteins in secretory granules of exocrine cells. PMID:24029466

  11. DSPMP: Discriminating secretory proteins of malaria parasite by hybridizing different descriptors of Chou's pseudo amino acid patterns.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Yan-Ling; Nang, Yi; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Identification of the proteins secreted by the malaria parasite is important for developing effective drugs and vaccines against infection. Therefore, we developed an improved predictor called "DSPMP" (Discriminating Secretory Proteins of Malaria Parasite) to identify the secretory proteins of the malaria parasite by integrating several vector features using support vector machine-based methods. DSPMP achieved an overall predictive accuracy of 98.61%, which is superior to that of the existing predictors in this field. We show that our method is capable of identifying the secretory proteins of the malaria parasite and found that the amino acid composition for buried and exposed sequences, denoted by AAC(b/e), was the most important feature for constructing the predictor. This article not only introduces a novel method for detecting the important features of sample proteins related to the malaria parasite but also provides a useful tool for tackling general protein-related problems. The DSPMP webserver is freely available at http://202.207.14.87:8032/fuwu/DSPMP/index.asp. PMID:26484844

  12. The secretory epithelial cells of the choroid plexus employ a novel kinesin-related protein.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K R; Griffin, M; Brophy, P J

    1997-11-01

    The proteins of the kinesin superfamily (KIFs) are microtubule-based molecular motors whose functions include the transport of membrane-bound organelles. We have isolated the cDNA encoding a novel kinesin by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers that flank the highly conserved motor domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of this protein shows considerable similarity to both KIF1A and KIF1B thus defining it as a new member of the monomeric KIF1/unc104 family. The C-terminal domain of KIF1D is the most divergent by comparison with the other members of the family, which supports the view that the tail region is responsible for conferring specificity on the interactions of these kinesins with their cargoes. In the adult rat brain KIF1D mRNA is expressed in neurons in the hippocampus and in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. However, the levels of KIF1D are particularly high in the choroid plexus which is a polarised epithelium that lines the lateral, third and fourth ventricles. The major function of the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus is to produce cerebrospinal fluid, which suggests that KIF1D plays an important role in their secretory function. PMID:9427518

  13. A Dynamic Analysis of Secretory Granules Containing Proteins Involved In Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Louis; Simon, Alex; Jacobs, Conor; Fulwiler, Audrey; Hilken, Lindsay; Scalettar, Bethe; Lochner, Janis

    2010-10-01

    Formation and encoding of long-term memories requires a series of structural changes at synapses, or sites of neuronal communication, in the hippocampus; these changes are mediated by neuromodulatory proteins and serve to strengthen synapses to improve communication. Two prominent neuromodulators, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are copackaged into secretory granules (SGs) in the body of nerve cells and are transported to distal synapses by motor proteins. At synapses, particularly presynaptic sites, the fate of tPA and BDNF is largely unknown. Motivated by this, and by recent data implicating presynaptic BDNF in early phases of learning, we used fluorescence microscopy to elucidate dynamic properties of presynaptic tPA and BDNF. We find that presynaptic SGs containing tPA and/or BDNF undergo Brownian and anomalous diffusive motion that, in 75% of cases, is so slow that it typically would be classified as immobility. These results suggest that tPA and BDNF are retained at presynaptic sites to facilitate their corelease and role in learning.

  14. The effect of total starvation and very low energy diet in lean men on kinetics of whole body protein and five hepatic secretory proteins.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unclear whether the rate of weight loss, independent of magnitude, affects whole body protein metabolism and the synthesis and plasma concentrations of specific hepatic secretory proteins. We examined 1) whether lean men losing weight rapidly (starvation) show greater changes in whole body pro...

  15. Toxoplasma sortilin-like receptor regulates protein transport and is essential for apical secretory organelle biogenesis and host infection.

    PubMed

    Sloves, Pierre-Julien; Delhaye, Stephane; Mouveaux, Thomas; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Slomianny, Christian; Hovasse, Agnes; Dilezitoko Alayi, Tchilabalo; Callebaut, Isabelle; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Van Dorsselear, Alain; Carruthers, Vern B; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2012-05-17

    Apicomplexan parasites have an assortment of unique apical secretory organelles (rhoptries and micronemes), which have crucial functions in host infection. Here, we show that a Toxoplasma gondii sortilin-like receptor (TgSORTLR) is required for the subcellular localization and formation of apical secretory organelles. TgSORTLR is a transmembrane protein that resides within Golgi-endosomal related compartments. The lumenal domain specifically interacts with rhoptry and microneme proteins, while the cytoplasmic tail of TgSORTLR recruits cytosolic sorting machinery involved in anterograde and retrograde protein transport. Ectopic expression of the N-terminal TgSORTLR lumenal domain results in dominant negative effects with the mislocalization of both endogenous TgSORTLR as well as rhoptry and microneme proteins. Conditional ablation of TgSORTLR disrupts rhoptry and microneme biogenesis, inhibits parasite motility, and blocks both invasion into and egress from host cells. Thus, the sortilin-like receptor is essential for protein trafficking and the biogenesis of key secretory organelles in Toxoplasma. PMID:22607804

  16. A Coronavirus E Protein Is Present in Two Distinct Pools with Different Effects on Assembly and the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Westerbeck, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble by budding into the lumen of the early Golgi complex prior to exocytosis. The small CoV envelope (E) protein plays roles in assembly, virion release, and pathogenesis. CoV E has a single hydrophobic domain (HD), is targeted to Golgi complex membranes, and has cation channel activity in vitro. However, the precise functions of the CoV E protein during infection are still enigmatic. Structural data for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV E protein suggest that it assembles into a homopentamer. Specific residues in the HD regulate the ion-conducting pore formed by SARS-CoV E in artificial bilayers and the pathogenicity of the virus during infection. The E protein from the avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) has dramatic effects on the secretory system which require residues in the HD. Here, we use the known structural data from SARS-CoV E to infer the residues important for ion channel activity and the oligomerization of IBV E. We present biochemical data for the formation of two distinct oligomeric pools of IBV E in transfected and infected cells and the residues required for their formation. A high-order oligomer of IBV E is required for the production of virus-like particles (VLPs), implicating this form of the protein in virion assembly. Additionally, disruption of the secretory pathway by IBV E correlates with a form that is likely monomeric, suggesting that the effects on the secretory pathway are independent of E ion channel activity. IMPORTANCE CoVs are important human pathogens with significant zoonotic potential, as demonstrated by the emergence of SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV. Progress has been made toward identifying potential vaccine candidates in mouse models of CoV infection, including the use of attenuated viruses that lack the CoV E protein or express E-protein mutants. However, no approved vaccines or antiviral therapeutics exist. We previously reported that the

  17. Purification and assay of secretory lithostathine in human pancreatic juice by fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, A; Mezzi, G; Malesci, A

    1995-01-01

    Impaired secretion of lithostathine, a pancreatic glycoprotein capable of inhibiting the growth of CaCO3 crystals, has been reported in chronic calcifying pancreatitis. Controversial results were obtained, however, using immunoassays with different antibodies. The aim of this study was to purify and to measure juice lithostathine by a non-immunological method. Fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a cation exchange column eluted by a sodium chloride gradient, was used. The conditions appropriate to separate secretory (S) from hydrolysed (H) isoforms of immunopurified lithostathine were also used for juice analysis. Pancreatic juice was collected by endoscopic cannulation of the major pancreatic duct, after secretin stimulation, from eight patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and from eight controls. In all samples, S-isoforms of lithostathine (ranging from 16 to 19 Mr at SDS-PAGE) were the only constituent of two of the 15 peaks in which FPLC resolved the pancreatic proteins. The nature of these two peaks was confirmed by their coelution with immunopurified S-lithostathine and by immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-lithostathine antibodies. The ratio between the area of S-lithostathine peaks and the total area of proteic eluates, was always lower in CP patients (5.3 micrograms/mg of protein, median value; 0.2-15.4, range) than in controls (35.2 micrograms/mg; 16.6-55.9). It is concluded that lithostathine can be purified and measured in pancreatic juice by FPLC. Our results with a nonimmunological assay confirm a reduced secretion of lithostathine in patients with CP. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7737574

  18. Alpha-latrotoxin modulates the secretory machinery via receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wan, Qunfang; Lin, Xianguang; Zhu, Hongliang; Volynski, Kirill; Ushkaryov, Yuri; Xu, Tao

    2005-09-01

    The hypothesis whether alpha-latrotoxin (LTX) could directly regulate the secretory machinery was tested in pancreatic beta cells using combined techniques of membrane capacitance (Cm) measurement and Ca2+ uncaging. Employing ramp increase in [Ca2+]i to stimulate exocytosis, we found that LTX lowers the Ca2+ threshold required for exocytosis without affecting the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). The burst component of exocytosis in response to step-like [Ca2+]i increase generated by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ was also speeded up by LTX treatment. LTX increased the maximum rate of exocytosis compared with control responses with similar postflash [Ca2+]i and shifted the Ca2+ dependence of the exocytotic machinery toward lower Ca2+ concentrations. LTXN4C, a LTX mutant which cannot form membrane pores or penetrate through the plasma membrane but has similar affinity for the receptors as the wild-type LTX, mimicked the effect of LTX. Moreover, the effects of both LTX and LTXN4C) were independent of intracellular or extracellular Ca2+ but required extracellular Mg2+. Our data propose that LTX, by binding to the membrane receptors, sensitizes the fusion machinery to Ca2+ and, hence, may permit release at low [Ca2+]i level. This sensitization is mediated by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:16101679

  19. Secretory proteins characteristic of environmental changes in cellular signal transduction: Expression in oral fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Burke, J. C.; Sivakumar, T. P.; Hand, A. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Past studies have shown that both hypo- and hyper-gravity have significant consequences on a variety of tissues and organ systems. It is not known if the effects of environmental stimuli such as altered gravity are beneficial or detrimental, and if the effects can be prevented or reversed. Animal experiments from the Space Lab and Cosmos missions indicate that events that are mediated by cyclic AMP, such as cellular responses to catecholamine and peptide hormone action, are significantly altered in a number of tissues as a consequence of space flight. A secretory cyclic AMP-receptor protein (cARP), is present in saliva, and can serve as an indicator of individual responses to physiologic and environmental stress. Animal experiments have shown that the hypergravity component of space flight is a significant stress factor. In humans, cARP levels in each individual are constant under normal conditions, but elevated after acute stress. Additionally, the levels of cARP in secreted saliva can be compared to those in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), which reflects the protein composition of serum. The ratio of cARP in saliva to that in GCF can be used as a measure of basal compared to hyper-or hypo-gravity values. An ultimate goal is to test hyper and zero G responses in human saliva to determine if cARP is a suitable index of acute and chronic stress. A miniaturized test kit for saliva collection has been designed. Samples can be collected and stored till analyses are carried out that will distinguish the effects of increased gravity from those of one and zero G. Such tests can serve as an individualized monitoring system for physiologic responses either in space or on earth. .

  20. Selective screening of secretory vesicle-associated proteins for autoantigens in type 1 diabetes: VAMP2 and NPY are new minor autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroki; Miura, Junnosuke; Hu, Yafang; Larsson, Helena; Larsson, Karin; Lernmark, Ake; Ivarsson, Sten-A; Wu, Tianxia; Kingman, Albert; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Notkins, Abner L

    2008-06-01

    The four major autoantigens (IA-2, IA-2 beta, GAD65 and insulin) of type 1 diabetes are all associated with dense core or synaptic vesicles. This raised the possibility that other secretory vesicle-associated proteins might be targets of the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes. To test this hypothesis 56 proteins, two-thirds of which are associated with secretory vesicles, were prepared by in vitro transcription/translation and screened for autoantibodies by liquid phase radioimmunoprecipitation. Two secretory vesicle-associated proteins, VAMP2 and NPY, were identified as new minor autoantigens with 21% and 9%, respectively, of 200 type 1 diabetes sera reacting positively. These findings add support to the hypothesis that secretory vesicle-associated proteins are particularly important, but not the exclusive, targets of the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes. Selective screening of the human proteome offers a useful approach for identifying new autoantigens in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18359275

  1. Molecular cloning and characterisation of two kinds of proteins in excretory-secretory products of Trichinella pseudospiralis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Isao; Wu, Zhiliang; Boonmars, Thidarut; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2004-03-29

    Two genes encoding Trichinella pseudospiralis excretory-secretory proteins related to the Trichinella spiralis glycoproteins were cloned and the excretory-secretory proteins were characterised. A cloned gene, designated Tp38 (Ts43), contained a cDNA transcript of 1035 bp, and the predicted amino acid sequence of the Tp38 (Ts43) pro-protein had a similarity of about 84% to that of the T. spiralis 43 kDa glycoprotein. A cloned gene, designated Tp53 (Ts53), contained a cDNA transcript of 1239 bp, and the predicted amino acid sequence of the Tp53 (Ts53) pro-protein had a similarity of about 68% to that of the T. spiralis 53 kDa glycoprotein. Southern blots indicated that the Tp38 (Ts43) and Tp53 (Ts53) genes were encoded in a single copy within the T. pseudospiralis genome. Western blots showed that T. pseudospiralis-infected sera recognised the Tp53 (Ts53) recombinant protein, but did not recognise the Tp38 (Ts43) recombinant protein. The Tp38 (Ts43) and Tp53 (Ts53) proteins in the excretory-secretory product were 3 and 9 kDa greater than the expected molecular mass, respectively, and had three isoforms with a similar molecular size. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results showed that the production of the mRNA transcript for the Tp38 (Ts43) or Tp53 (Ts53) gene was restricted predominantly to muscle larvae. Western blots confirmed that the gene products were predominantly expressed by muscle-stage larvae. An immunolocalisation study showed the Tp38 (Ts43) and Tp53 (Ts53) proteins were present within the alpha-stichocyte and the beta-stichocyte of muscle larvae, respectively. PMID:15013739

  2. Predicting Secretory Proteins of Malaria Parasite by Incorporating Sequence Evolution Information into Pseudo Amino Acid Composition via Grey System Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    The malaria disease has become a cause of poverty and a major hindrance to economic development. The culprit of the disease is the parasite, which secretes an array of proteins within the host erythrocyte to facilitate its own survival. Accordingly, the secretory proteins of malaria parasite have become a logical target for drug design against malaria. Unfortunately, with the increasing resistance to the drugs thus developed, the situation has become more complicated. To cope with the drug resistance problem, one strategy is to timely identify the secreted proteins by malaria parasite, which can serve as potential drug targets. However, it is both expensive and time-consuming to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite by experiments alone. To expedite the process for developing effective drugs against malaria, a computational predictor called “iSMP-Grey” was developed that can be used to identify the secretory proteins of malaria parasite based on the protein sequence information alone. During the prediction process a protein sample was formulated with a 60D (dimensional) feature vector formed by incorporating the sequence evolution information into the general form of PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition) via a grey system model, which is particularly useful for solving complicated problems that are lack of sufficient information or need to process uncertain information. It was observed by the jackknife test that iSMP-Grey achieved an overall success rate of 94.8%, remarkably higher than those by the existing predictors in this area. As a user-friendly web-server, iSMP-Grey is freely accessible to the public at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iSMP-Grey. Moreover, for the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematical equations involved in this paper. PMID:23189138

  3. Screening and characterization of early diagnostic antigens in excretory-secretory proteins from Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae by immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruo Dan; Jiang, Peng; Wen, Hui; Duan, Jiang Yang; Wang, Li Ang; Li, Jie Feng; Liu, Chun Ying; Sun, Ge Ge; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but specific IgG antibodies were not detected in early stage of infection. The aim of this study was to identify early diagnostic antigens from ES proteins of intestinal infective larvae (IIL), the first invasive stage of T. spiralis. Six bands (92, 52, 45, 35, 32, and 29 kDa) of IIL ES proteins were recognized by infection sera in Western blotting as early as 10 days post infection. Total of 54 T. spiralis proteins in six bands were identified by shotgun LC-MS/MS, 30 proteins were annotated, and 27 had hydrolase activity. Several proteins (serine protease, putative trypsin, deoxyribonuclease II family protein, etc.) could be considered as the potential early diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis. Our study provides new insights for screening early diagnostic antigens from intestinal worms of T. spiralis. PMID:26468148

  4. Secretory pathway retention of mutant prion protein induces p38-MAPK activation and lethal disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C; Ulbrich, Sarah; Linsenmeier, Luise; Krasemann, Susanne; Chakroun, Karima; Acevedo-Morantes, Claudia Y; Wille, Holger; Tatzelt, Jörg; Glatzel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding of proteins in the biosynthetic pathway in neurons may cause disturbed protein homeostasis and neurodegeneration. The prion protein (PrP(C)) is a GPI-anchored protein that resides at the plasma membrane and may be misfolded to PrP(Sc) leading to prion diseases. We show that a deletion in the C-terminal domain of PrP(C) (PrPΔ214-229) leads to partial retention in the secretory pathway causing a fatal neurodegenerative disease in mice that is partially rescued by co-expression of PrP(C). Transgenic (Tg(PrPΔ214-229)) mice show extensive neuronal loss in hippocampus and cerebellum and activation of p38-MAPK. In cell culture under stress conditions, PrPΔ214-229 accumulates in the Golgi apparatus possibly representing transit to the Rapid ER Stress-induced ExporT (RESET) pathway together with p38-MAPK activation. Here we describe a novel pathway linking retention of a GPI-anchored protein in the early secretory pathway to p38-MAPK activation and a neurodegenerative phenotype in transgenic mice. PMID:27117504

  5. Secretory pathway retention of mutant prion protein induces p38-MAPK activation and lethal disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C.; Ulbrich, Sarah; Linsenmeier, Luise; Krasemann, Susanne; Chakroun, Karima; Acevedo-Morantes, Claudia Y.; Wille, Holger; Tatzelt, Jörg; Glatzel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding of proteins in the biosynthetic pathway in neurons may cause disturbed protein homeostasis and neurodegeneration. The prion protein (PrPC) is a GPI-anchored protein that resides at the plasma membrane and may be misfolded to PrPSc leading to prion diseases. We show that a deletion in the C-terminal domain of PrPC (PrPΔ214–229) leads to partial retention in the secretory pathway causing a fatal neurodegenerative disease in mice that is partially rescued by co-expression of PrPC. Transgenic (Tg(PrPΔ214–229)) mice show extensive neuronal loss in hippocampus and cerebellum and activation of p38-MAPK. In cell culture under stress conditions, PrPΔ214–229 accumulates in the Golgi apparatus possibly representing transit to the Rapid ER Stress-induced ExporT (RESET) pathway together with p38-MAPK activation. Here we describe a novel pathway linking retention of a GPI-anchored protein in the early secretory pathway to p38-MAPK activation and a neurodegenerative phenotype in transgenic mice. PMID:27117504

  6. Effect of mycobacterial secretory proteins on the cellular integrity and cytokine profile of type II alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, Nidhi; Vir, Pooja; Verma, Indu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). In lungs, alveolar macrophages and type II alveolar epithelial cells serve as a replicative niche for this pathogen. Secretory proteins released by actively replicating tubercle bacilli are known to interact with host cells at the initial stages of infection. To understand the role of these cells in TB pathogenesis, it is important to identify the mycobacterial components involved in interaction with alveolar epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: We fractionated the whole secretory proteome of M. tb H37Rv into 10 narrow molecular mass fractions (A1-A10; <20 kDa to >90 kDa) that were studied for their binding potential with A549; type II alveolar epithelial cell line. We also studied the consequences of this interaction in terms of change in epithelial cell viability by MTT assay and cytokine release by ELISA. Results: Our results show that several mycobacterial proteins bind and confer cytolysis in epithelial cells. Amongst all the fractions, proteins ranging from 35-45 kDa (A5) exhibited highest binding to A549 cells with a consequence of cytolysis of these cells. This fraction (A5) also led to release of various cytokines important in anti-mycobacterial immunity. Conclusion: Fraction A5 (35-45 kDa) of mycobacterial secretory proteome play an important role in mediating M. tb interaction with type II alveolar epithelial cells with the consequences detrimental for the TB pathogenesis. Further studies are being carried out to identify the candidate proteins from this region. PMID:23243342

  7. Perturbations in maturation of secretory proteins and their association with endoplasmic reticulum chaperones in a cell culture model for epithelial ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, G; Bush, K T; Zhang, P L; Nigam, S K

    1996-01-01

    The effects of ischemia on the maturation of secretory proteins are not well understood. Among several events that occur during ischemia-reperfusion are a rapid and extensive decrease in ATP levels and an alteration of cellular oxidative state. Since the normal folding and assembly of secretory proteins are mediated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones, the function of which depends on ATP and maintenance of an appropriate redox environment, ischemia might be expected to perturb folding of secretory proteins. In this study, whole animal and cultured cell models for the epithelial ischemic state were used to examine this possibility. After acute kidney ischemia, marked increases in the mRNA levels of the ER chaperones glucose-regulated protein (grp)78/immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP), grp94, and ER protein (ERp)72 were noted. Likewise, when cellular ATP was depleted to less than 10% of control with antimycin A, mRNA levels of BiP, ERp72, and grp94 were increased in kidney and thyroid epithelial cell culture models. Since the signal for the up-regulation of these stress proteins is believed to be the accumulation of misfolded/misassembled secretory proteins in the ER, their induction after ischemia in vivo and antimycin treatment of cultured cells suggests that maturation of secretory proteins in the ER lumen might indeed be perturbed. To analyze the effects of antimycin A on the maturation of secretory proteins, we studied the fate of thyroglobulin (Tg), a large oligomeric secretory glycoprotein, the folding and assembly of which seems to require a variety of ER chaperones. Treatment of cultured thyroid epithelial cells with antimycin A greatly inhibited ( > 90%) the secretion of Tg. Sucrose density gradient analysis revealed that in antimycin A-treated cells Tg associates into large macromolecular complexes which, by immunofluorescence, appeared to localize to the ER. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation studies after antimycin A treatment

  8. Four distinct secretory pathways serve protein secretion, cell surface growth, and peroxisome biogenesis in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Titorenko, V I; Ogrydziak, D M; Rachubinski, R A

    1997-01-01

    We have identified and characterized mutants of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica that are deficient in protein secretion, in the ability to undergo dimorphic transition from the yeast to the mycelial form, and in peroxisome biogenesis. Mutations in the SEC238, SRP54, PEX1, PEX2, PEX6, and PEX9 genes affect protein secretion, prevent the exit of the precursor form of alkaline extracellular protease from the endoplasmic reticulum, and compromise peroxisome biogenesis. The mutants sec238A, srp54KO, pex2KO, pex6KO, and pex9KO are also deficient in the dimorphic transition from the yeast to the mycelial form and are affected in the export of only plasma membrane and cell wall-associated proteins specific for the mycelial form. Mutations in the SEC238, SRP54, PEX1, and PEX6 genes prevent or significantly delay the exit of two peroxisomal membrane proteins, Pex2p and Pex16p, from the endoplasmic reticulum en route to the peroxisomal membrane. Mutations in the PEX5, PEX16, and PEX17 genes, which have previously been shown to be essential for peroxisome biogenesis, affect the export of plasma membrane and cell wall-associated proteins specific for the mycelial form but do not impair exit from the endoplasmic reticulum of either Pex2p and Pex16p or of proteins destined for secretion. Biochemical analyses of these mutants provide evidence for the existence of four distinct secretory pathways that serve to deliver proteins for secretion, plasma membrane and cell wall synthesis during yeast and mycelial modes of growth, and peroxisome biogenesis. At least two of these secretory pathways, which are involved in the export of proteins to the external medium and in the delivery of proteins for assembly of the peroxisomal membrane, diverge at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:9271399

  9. Unconventional pathways of secretory plant proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole bypassing the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the basic mechanisms that regulate vacuolar delivering of proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have a great importance in plant cell biology. Indeed, many aspects of plant physiology are affected by this intracellular traffic, for example, germination or reaction to biotic stresses due to the accumulation of storage proteins in seeds or enzymes in vegetative tissues, respectively. Up to now, the Golgi complex has been considered the main hub in the sorting of vacuolar secretory proteins; those polypeptides able to reach their final destination without the aid of this organelle are regarded as exceptions to an established route. This mini-review aims to emphasize the existence of several Golgi-independent pathways involved in the trafficking of different types of vacuolar proteins. PMID:23733072

  10. Unconventional pathways of secretory plant proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the vacuole bypassing the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    Studies on the basic mechanisms that regulate vacuolar delivering of proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have a great importance in plant cell biology. Indeed, many aspects of plant physiology are affected by this intracellular traffic, for example, germination or reaction to biotic stresses due to the accumulation of storage proteins in seeds or enzymes in vegetative tissues, respectively. Up to now, the Golgi complex has been considered the main hub in the sorting of vacuolar secretory proteins; those polypeptides able to reach their final destination without the aid of this organelle are regarded as exceptions to an established route. This mini-review aims to emphasize the existence of several Golgi-independent pathways involved in the trafficking of different types of vacuolar proteins. PMID:23733072

  11. Primary structure of bovine pituitary secretory protein I (chromogranin A) deduced from the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.G.; Cohn, D.V.; Gorr, S.U.; Ornstein, D.L.; Kashdan, M.A.; Levine, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Secretory protein I (SP-I), also referred to as chromogranin A, is an acidic glycoprotein that has been found in every tissue of endocrine and neuroendocrine origin examined but never in exocrine or epithelial cells. Its co-storage and co-secretion with peptide hormones and neurotransmitters suggest that it has an important endocrine or secretory function. The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a bovine pituitary lambdagt11 expression library using an antiserum to parathyroid SP-I. The largest clone (SP4B) hybridized to a transcript of 2.1 kilobases in RNA from parathyroid, pituitary, and adrenal medulla. Immunoblots of bacterial lysates derived from SP4B lysognes demonstrated specific antibody binding to an SP4B/..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein (160 kDa) with a cDNA-derived component of 46 kDa. Radioimmunoassay of the bacterial lystates with SP-I antiserum yielded parallel displacement curves of /sup 125/I-labeled SP-I by the SP4B lysate and authentic SP-I. SP4B contains a cDNA of 1614 nucleotides that encodes a 449-amino acid protein (calculated mass, 50 kDa). The nucleotide sequences of the pituitary SP-I cDNA and adrenal medullary SP-I cDNAs are nearly identical. Analysis of genomic DNA suggests that pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid SP-I are products of the same gene.

  12. Temperature-sensitive steps in the transport of secretory proteins through the Golgi complex in exocrine pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Saraste, J; Palade, G E; Farquhar, M G

    1986-09-01

    The effect of temperature on secretory protein transport was studied by cell fractionation of rat pancreatic lobules, pulse-labeled in vitro with [35S]methionine and chased for 60 min at 16, 20, or 37 degrees C. Chase at 37 degrees C allowed secretory proteins to reach a zymogen granule fraction, whereas chase at 16 or 20 degrees C led to their extensive retention in a total microsomal fraction. To pinpoint the sites of transport inhibition, total microsomes were subfractionated by flotation in a sucrose density gradient. Five bands were resolved, of which the heaviest or B1 (density = 1.20 g/ml) consisted primarily of rough microsomes. The lighter fractions, B2 (1.17 g/ml), B3 (1.15 g/ml), and B4 (1.14-1.13 g/ml), consisted primarily of smooth vesicles derived from Golgi elements. B4 had the highest specific activity for galactosyltransferase, a trans Golgi cisternal marker; B2, B3, and B4 are assumed to represent cis, middle, and trans Golgi subcompartments, respectively. At the end of a 2-min pulse, a single peak of labeled proteins colocalized with B1. During subsequent 60-min chases, labeled proteins advanced to B2 at 16 degrees C and to B3 at 20 degrees C. At 37 degrees C the radioactivity remaining in the total microsomal fraction was distributed among four peaks (B1-B4). The results indicate that transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is strongly inhibited below 20 degrees C. At 16 degrees C, the bulk of the cohort of labeled secretory proteins is still in the rough endoplasmic reticulum, but its advancing front reaches cis Golgi elements. At 20 degrees C, the front advances to a middle Golgi compartment, and at 37 degrees C most of the cohort (approximately 70%) reaches condensing vacuoles and zymogen granules. It is concluded that transport steps along the endoplasmic reticulum-plasmalemma pathway have distinct temperature requirements. PMID:3462704

  13. Novel cysteine-rich secretory protein in the buccal gland secretion of the parasitic lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naoko; Mita, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Matsushima, Ayano; Watanabe, Yuichi G; Hirano, Shigeki; Odani, Shoji

    2007-06-22

    Lampreys are one of the most primitive vertebrates diverged some 500 million years ago. It has long been known that parasitic lampreys secrete anticoagulant from their buccal glands and prevent blood coagulation of host fishes. We found two major protein components of 160 and 26 kDa in the buccal gland secretion of parasitic river lamprey, Lethenteron japonicum. The larger protein was identified as river lamprey plasma albumin. The complete primary structure of the 26-kDa protein was determined by protein and cDNA analysis. It belonged to the cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) superfamily that includes recently identified reptile venom ion-channel blockers. Lamprey CRISP blocked depolarization-induced contraction of rat-tail arterial smooth muscle, but showed no effect on caffeine-induced contraction. The result suggests that lamprey CRISP is an L-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker and may act as a vasodilator, which facilitates the parasite to feed on the host's blood. The lamprey CRISP protein contains a number of short insertions throughout the sequence, when aligned with reptilian venom CRISP proteins, probably due to the large evolutionary distance between the Agnatha and the Reptilia, and may represent a novel class of venom CRISP family proteins. PMID:17467660

  14. Identification of early diagnostic antigens from major excretory-secretory proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae using immunoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The excretory-secretory (ES) proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) come mainly from the excretory granules of the stichosome and the cuticles (membrane proteins), are directly exposed to the host’s immune system, and are the main target antigens, which induce the immune responses. Although the ES proteins are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, their main disadvantage are the false negative results during the early stage of infection. The aim of this study was to identify early specific diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. Methods Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with Western blot were used to screen the early diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. The protein spots recognized by the sera from BALB/c mice infected with T. spiralis at 18 days post-infection (dpi) were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and putatively annotated using GO terms obtained from the InterPro databases. Results The ES proteins were analyzed by 2-DE, and more than 33 protein spots were detected with molecular weight varying from 40 to 60 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) from 4 to 7. When probed with the sera from infected mice at 18 dpi, 21 protein spots were recognized and then identified, and they were characterized to correlate with five different proteins of T. spiralis, including two serine proteases, one deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II, and two kinds of trypsin. The five proteins were functionally categorized into molecular function and biological process according to GO hierarchy. Conclusions 2-DE and Western blot combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS were used to screen the diagnostic antigens from the main components of T. spiralis muscle larval ES proteins. The five proteins of T. spiralis identified (two serine proteases, DNase II and two kinds of trypsin) might be the early specific diagnostic antigens of trichinellosis. PMID

  15. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  16. The interplay of Hrd3 and the molecular chaperone system ensures efficient degradation of malfolded secretory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Martin; Sommermeyer, Franziska; Berger, Maren; Kumar Lakshmipathy, Sathish; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus; Jarosch, Ernst; Sommer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway are extracted from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), polyubiquitylated by a protein complex termed the Hmg-CoA reductase degradation ligase (HRD-ligase), and degraded by cytosolic 26S proteasomes. This process is termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). We previously showed that the membrane protein Der1, which is a subunit of the HRD-ligase, is involved in the export of aberrant polypeptides from the ER. Unexpectedly, we also uncovered a close spatial proximity of Der1 and the substrate receptor Hrd3 in the ER lumen. We report here on a mutant Hrd3KR that is selectively defective for ERAD of soluble proteins. Hrd3KR displays subtle structural changes that affect its positioning toward Der1. Furthermore, increased quantities of the ER-resident Hsp70-type chaperone Kar2 and the Hsp40-type cochaperone Scj1 bind to Hrd3KR. Of note, deletion of SCJ1 impairs ERAD of model substrates and causes the accumulation of client proteins at Hrd3. Our data imply a function of Scj1 in the removal of malfolded proteins from the receptor Hrd3, which facilitates their delivery to downstream-acting components like Der1. PMID:25428985

  17. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  18. Elevation of susceptibility to ozone-induced acute tracheobronchial injury in transgenic mice deficient in Clara cell secretory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Plopper, C.G. . E-mail: cgplopper@ucdavis.edu; Mango, G.W.; Hatch, G.E.; Wong, V.J.; Toskala, E.; Reynolds, S.D.; Tarkington, B.K.; Stripp, B.R.

    2006-05-15

    Increases in Clara cell abundance or cellular expression of Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) may cause increased tolerance of the lung to acute oxidant injury by repeated exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}). This study defines how disruption of the gene for CCSP synthesis affects the susceptibility of tracheobronchial epithelium to acute oxidant injury. Mice homozygous for a null allele of the CCSP gene (CCSP-/-) and wild type (CCSP+/+) littermates were exposed to ozone (0.2 ppm, 8 h; 1 ppm, 8 h) or filtered air. Injury was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the abundance of necrotic, ciliated, and nonciliated cells was estimated by morphometry. Proximal and midlevel intrapulmonary airways and terminal bronchioles were evaluated. There was no difference in airway epithelial composition between CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice exposed to filtered air, and exposure to 0.2 ppm ozone caused little injury to the epithelium of both CCSP+/+ and CCSP-/- mice. After exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone, CCSP-/- mice suffered from a greater degree of epithelial injury throughout the airways compared to CCSP+/+ mice. CCSP-/- mice had both ciliated and nonciliated cell injury. Furthermore, lack of CCSP was associated with a shift in airway injury to include proximal airway generations. Therefore, we conclude that CCSP modulates the susceptibility of the epithelium to oxidant-induced injury. Whether this is due to the presence of CCSP on the acellular lining layer surface and/or its intracellular distribution in the secretory cell population needs to be defined.

  19. Casein phosphopeptides drastically increase the secretion of extracellular proteins in Aspergillus awamori. Proteomics studies reveal changes in the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The secretion of heterologous animal proteins in filamentous fungi is usually limited by bottlenecks in the vesicle-mediated secretory pathway. Results Using the secretion of bovine chymosin in Aspergillus awamori as a model, we found a drastic increase (40 to 80-fold) in cells grown with casein or casein phosphopeptides (CPPs). CPPs are rich in phosphoserine, but phosphoserine itself did not increase the secretion of chymosin. The stimulatory effect is reduced about 50% using partially dephosphorylated casein and is not exerted by casamino acids. The phosphopeptides effect was not exerted at transcriptional level, but instead, it was clearly observed on the secretion of chymosin by immunodetection analysis. Proteomics studies revealed very interesting metabolic changes in response to phosphopeptides supplementation. The oxidative metabolism was reduced, since enzymes involved in fermentative processes were overrepresented. An oxygen-binding hemoglobin-like protein was overrepresented in the proteome following phosphopeptides addition. Most interestingly, the intracellular pre-protein enzymes, including pre-prochymosin, were depleted (most of them are underrepresented in the intracellular proteome after the addition of CPPs), whereas the extracellular mature form of several of these secretable proteins and cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes was greatly overrepresented in the secretome of phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Another important 'moonlighting' protein (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which has been described to have vesicle fusogenic and cytoskeleton formation modulating activities, was clearly overrepresented in phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Conclusions In summary, CPPs cause the reprogramming of cellular metabolism, which leads to massive secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:22234238

  20. EsiB, a Novel Pathogenic Escherichia coli Secretory Immunoglobulin A-Binding Protein Impairing Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pastorello, Ilaria; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Rosini, Roberto; Mattera, Rossella; Ferrer Navarro, Mario; Urosev, Dunja; Nesta, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Rippa, Valentina; Bertoldi, Isabella; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Laarman, Alexander J.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Daura, Xavier; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serino, Laura; Soriani, Marco

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we have characterized the functional properties of a novel Escherichia coli antigen named EsiB (E. coli secretory immunoglobulin A-binding protein), recently reported to protect mice from sepsis. Gene distribution analysis of a panel of 267 strains representative of different E. coli pathotypes revealed that esiB is preferentially associated with extraintestinal strains, while the gene is rarely found in either intestinal or nonpathogenic strains. These findings were supported by the presence of anti-EsiB antibodies in the sera of patients affected by urinary tract infections (UTIs). By solving its crystal structure, we observed that EsiB adopts a superhelical fold composed of Sel1-like repeats (SLRs), a feature often associated with bacterial proteins possessing immunomodulatory functions. Indeed, we found that EsiB interacts with secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) through a specific motif identified by an immunocapturing approach. Functional assays showed that EsiB binding to SIgA is likely to interfere with productive FcαRI signaling, by inhibiting both SIgA-induced neutrophil chemotaxis and respiratory burst. Indeed, EsiB hampers SIgA-mediated signaling events by reducing the phosphorylation status of key signal-transducer cytosolic proteins, including mitogen-activated kinases. We propose that the interference with such immune events could contribute to the capacity of the bacterium to avoid clearance by neutrophils, as well as reducing the recruitment of immune cells to the infection site. PMID:23882011

  1. Species-specific antibody responses to the recombinant 53-kilodalton excretory and secretory proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Isao; Wu, Zhiliang; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2008-03-01

    The 53-kDa proteins in larval excretory and secretory (E-S) products were expressed from five Trichinella species (T. spiralis, T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae), using the Escherichia coli expression system, and the antibody responses to the 53-kDa recombinant proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp. were analyzed by Western blotting. The 53-kDa protein is conserved among the five Trichinella species, with >60% similarity in amino acid sequences. The 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis reacted to sera from mice infected with T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis at 8 days postinfection (p.i.), respectively. An antibody against the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis recognized the 53-kDa protein in the crude extracts from adult worms and 30-day p.i. muscle larvae and E-S products from muscle larvae of T. spiralis but did not recognize any proteins from T. pseudospiralis. The sera from the mice infected with T. spiralis strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis but did not react with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae. Similarly, the sera from mice infected with T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae, respectively. These results showed that the 53-kDa recombinant proteins provide early and species-specific antibody responses in mice infected with Trichinella spp. PMID:18184826

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of an Rcd1-like protein in excretory-secretory products of Trichinella pseudospiralis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, I; Wu, Z; Takahashi, Y

    2006-12-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from muscle larvae of Trichinella pseudospiralis. A cDNA clone, designated as Tp8 contained a cDNA transcript of 1326 bp length with a single open reading frame, which encoded 303 amino acid residues (34,187 Da, estimated molecular mass). The predicted amino acid sequence of the clone had an identity of approximately 60% to the Rcd1 (Required cell differentiation 1) -like proteins among a wide range of organisms. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the transcription level of Tp8 gene reached the highest value in adult worms, and that the transcription level in muscle larvae before stichosome formation was higher than in muscle larvae after stichosome formation. The recombinant Tp8 protein migrated at 37 kDa and reacted to antibody against T. pseudospiralis excretory-secretory (E-S) products and sera from mice infected with T. pseudospiralis. An antibody against the Tp8 recombinant protein could stain proteins migrating at approximately 34 kDa (which is the expected size from the sequence) on Western blotting of E-S products from muscle larvae. An immunocytochemical study showed that the Tp8 protein was present within the stichocyte of muscle larvae and adults worms. PMID:16899141

  3. Identification of Regulatory and Cargo Proteins of Endosomal and Secretory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by Proteomic Dissection*

    PubMed Central

    Heard, William; Sklenář, Jan; Tomé, Daniel F. A.; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Alexandra M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The cell's endomembranes comprise an intricate, highly dynamic and well-organized system. In plants, the proteins that regulate function of the various endomembrane compartments and their cargo remain largely unknown. Our aim was to dissect subcellular trafficking routes by enriching for partially overlapping subpopulations of endosomal proteomes associated with endomembrane markers. We selected RABD2a/ARA5, RABF2b/ARA7, RABF1/ARA6, and RABG3f as markers for combinations of the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), early endosomes (EE), secretory vesicles, late endosomes (LE), multivesicular bodies (MVB), and the tonoplast. As comparisons we used Golgi transport 1 (GOT1), which localizes to the Golgi, clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) labeling clathrin-coated vesicles and pits and the vesicle-associated membrane protein 711 (VAMP711) present at the tonoplast. We developed an easy-to-use method by refining published protocols based on affinity purification of fluorescent fusion constructs to these seven subcellular marker proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We present a total of 433 proteins, only five of which were shared among all enrichments, while many proteins were common between endomembrane compartments of the same trafficking route. Approximately half, 251 proteins, were assigned to one enrichment only. Our dataset contains known regulators of endosome functions including small GTPases, SNAREs, and tethering complexes. We identify known cargo proteins such as PIN3, PEN3, CESA, and the recently defined TPLATE complex. The subcellular localization of two GTPase regulators predicted from our enrichments was validated using live-cell imaging. This is the first proteomic dataset to discriminate between such highly overlapping endomembrane compartments in plants and can be used as a general proteomic resource to predict the localization of proteins and identify the components of regulatory complexes and provides a useful tool for the identification of new protein

  4. iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis of excretory-secretory proteins of schistosomula and adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Min; Han, Yanhui; Han, Hongxiao; Han, Qian; Lu, Ke; Hong, Yang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2016-04-14

    Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with 200 million people infected and 779 million people at risk worldwide. The schistosomulum and adult worm are two stages of the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma japonicum and excretory/secretory proteins (ESPs) play a major role in host-parasite interactions. In this study, iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS was used to investigate the proteome of ESPs obtained from schistosomula and adult worms of S. japonicum, and 298 differential ESPs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis of differential ESPs in the two developmental stages showed that 161 ESPs upregulated in schistosomula were associated with stress responses, carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation, whereas ESPs upregulated in adult worms were mainly related to immunoregulation and purine metabolism. Recombinant heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), two differential proteins identified in this study, were expressed. Further studies showed that rSjHSP70 and rSjTPx stimulated macrophages expressing high levels of the anti-inflammatory factors TGF-β, IL-10 and Arg-1, and suppressed the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and iNOS in LPS-induced macrophages. This study provides new insights into the survival and development of schistosomes in the final host and helps identify vaccine candidates or new diagnostic reagents for schistosomiasis. PMID:26915583

  5. Protein domain of unknown function 3233 is a translocation domain of autotransporter secretory mechanism in gamma proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3(rd) of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system. PMID:22073138

  6. The C-terminal silencing domain of Rap1p is essential for the repression of ribosomal protein genes in response to a defect in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, K; Tsujii, R; Warner, J R; Nishiyama, M

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that a functional secretory pathway is essential for continued ribosome synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When a temperature-sensitive mutant defective in the secretory pathway is transferred to the non-permissive temperature, transcription of both rRNA genes and ribosomal protein genes is nearly abolished. In order to define the cis -acting element(s) of ribosomal protein genes sensitive to a defect in the secretory pathway, we have constructed a series of fusion genes containing the CYH2 promoter region, with various deletions, fused to lacZ. Each fusion gene for which transcription is detected is subject to the repression. Rap1p is the transcriptional activator for most ribosomal protein genes, as well as having an important role in silencing in the vicinity of telomeres and at the silent mating-type loci. To assess its role in the repression of transcription by the defect in the secretory pathway, we have introduced rap1 mutations. The replacement of wild-type Rap1p by Rap1p truncated at the C-terminal region caused substantial attenuation of the repression. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the Rap1p-truncation affects the repression of TCM1 , encoding ribosomal protein L3, which has no Rap1p-binding site in its upstream regulatory region. These results suggest that the repression of transcription of ribosomal protein genes by a secretory defect is mediated through Rap1p, but does not require a Rap1p-binding site within the UAS. PMID:9461469

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of secretory phospholipase A(2)-like protein in the pituitary gland and surrounding tissue of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Y; Kikuyama, S; Hayashi, H; Hanaoka, Y; Sakai, M; Tanaka, S

    2001-05-01

    Previously, we obtained a protein that has considerable amino acid sequence homology with secretory phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) from a bullfrog pituitary fraction obtained during the purification of thyrotropin (TSH). Subsequently, partial amino acid sequence (N-terminal 45 amino acid residues) analysis revealed this protein to be identical to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of otoconin-22, the major protein of aragonitic otoconia in the Xenopus saccule. In this study we developed an antibody against the N-terminal peptide of the bullfrog protein and applied it for immunocytochemical study of the pituitary and its surrounding tissue. Western blotting analysis showed that this antibody recognizes a 20.4-kD protein that has a molecular mass close to that of otoconin-22. Immunohistochemical reaction with the antibody was not found in any anterior pituitary cells but was intense in the monolayer epithelial cells of the endolymphatic sac surrounding the pituitary gland, which is a major storage site of calcium carbonate in amphibians. An electron microscopic study revealed that the cuboidal cells in the endolymphatic sac contained large, polymorphic secretory granules in their apical cytoplasm. Immunogold particles indicating the presence of a PLA(2)-like protein were observed predominately in these secretory granules. These findings support the view that this PLA(2)-like protein obtained during purification of TSH was derived from the endolymphatic sac adhering to the pituitary and that this protein is a bullfrog otoconin. (J Histochem Cytochem 49:631-637, 2001) PMID:11304801

  8. The CAP superfamily: cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5, and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins--roles in reproduction, cancer, and immune defense.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerard M; Roelants, Kim; O'Bryan, Moira K

    2008-12-01

    The cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5, and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) superfamily members are found in a remarkable range of organisms spanning each of the animal kingdoms. Within humans and mice, there are 31 and 33 individual family members, respectively, and although many are poorly characterized, the majority show a notable expression bias to the reproductive tract and immune tissues or are deregulated in cancers. CAP superfamily proteins are most often secreted and have an extracellular endocrine or paracrine function and are involved in processes including the regulation of extracellular matrix and branching morphogenesis, potentially as either proteases or protease inhibitors; in ion channel regulation in fertility; as tumor suppressor or prooncogenic genes in tissues including the prostate; and in cell-cell adhesion during fertilization. This review describes mammalian CAP superfamily gene expression profiles, phylogenetic relationships, protein structural properties, and biological functions, and it draws into focus their potential role in health and disease. The nine subfamilies of the mammalian CAP superfamily include: the human glioma pathogenesis-related 1 (GLIPR1), Golgi associated pathogenesis related-1 (GAPR1) proteins, peptidase inhibitor 15 (PI15), peptidase inhibitor 16 (PI16), cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs), CRISP LCCL domain containing 1 (CRISPLD1), CRISP LCCL domain containing 2 (CRISPLD2), mannose receptor like and the R3H domain containing like proteins. We conclude that overall protein structural conservation within the CAP superfamily results in fundamentally similar functions for the CAP domain in all members, yet the diversity outside of this core region dramatically alters target specificity and, therefore, the biological consequences. PMID:18824526

  9. A 29-kilodalton Golgi soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (Vti1-rp2) implicated in protein trafficking in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Wong, S H; Tang, B L; Subramaniam, V N; Zhang, T; Hong, W

    1998-08-21

    Expressed sequence tags coding for a potential SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) were revealed during data base searches. The deduced amino acid sequence of the complete coding region predicts a 217-residue protein with a COOH-terminal hydrophobic membrane anchor. Affinity-purified antibodies raised against the cytoplasmic region of this protein specifically detect a 29-kilodalton integral membrane protein enriched in the Golgi membrane. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that this protein is mainly associated with the Golgi apparatus. When detergent extracts of the Golgi membrane are incubated with immobilized glutathione S-transferase alpha soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (GST-alpha-SNAP), this protein was specifically retained. This protein has been independently identified and termed Vti1-rp2, and it is homologous to Vti1p, a yeast Golgi SNARE. We further show that Vti1-rp2 can be qualitatively coimmunoprecipitated with Golgi syntaxin 5 and syntaxin 6, suggesting that Vti1-rp2 exists in at least two distinct Golgi SNARE complexes. In cells microinjected with antibodies against Vti1-rp2, transport of the envelope protein (G-protein) of vesicular stomatitis virus from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane was specifically arrested at the Golgi apparatus, providing further evidence for functional importance of Vti1-rp2 in protein trafficking in the secretory pathway. PMID:9705316

  10. Elevated intracellular calcium concentration increases secretory processing of the amyloid precursor protein by a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Petryniak, M A; Wurtman, R J; Slack, B E

    1996-01-01

    Secretory cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a process that releases soluble APP derivatives (APPs) into the extracellular space, is stimulated by the activation of muscarinic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The signalling pathways involved in the release process exhibit both protein kinase C- and protein tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent components [Slack, Breu, Petryniak, Srivastava and Wurtman (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 8337-8344]. The possibility that elevations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration initiate the tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent release of APPs was examined in human embryonic kidney cells expressing muscarinic m3 receptors. Inhibition of protein kinase C with the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X decreased the carbachol-evoked release of APPs by approx. 30%, as shown previously. The residual response was further decreased, in an additive manner, by the Ca2+ chelator EGTA, or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin A25. The Ca2+ ionophore, ionomycin, like carbachol, stimulated both the release of APPs and the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, one of which was identified as paxillin, a component of focal adhesions. The effects of ionomycin on APPs release and on protein tyrosine phosphorylation were concentration-dependent, and occurred over similar concentration ranges; both effects were inhibited only partly by GF 109203X, but were abolished by EGTA or by tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The results demonstrate for the first time that ionophore-induced elevations in intracellular Ca2+ levels elicit APPs release via increased tyrosine phosphorylation. Part of the increase in APPs release evoked by muscarinic receptor activation might be attributable to a similar mechanism. PMID:9003386

  11. Protein Disulfide Isomerase-2 of Arabidopsis Mediates Protein Folding and Localizes to Both the Secretory Pathway and Nucleus, Where It Interacts with Maternal Effect Embryo Arrest Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Ju; Yuen, Christen Y.L.; Kang, Byung-Ho; Ondzighi, Christine A.; Staehelin, L. Andrew; Christopher, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a thiodisulfide oxidoreductase that catalyzes the formation, reduction and rearrangement of disulfide bonds in proteins of eukaryotes. The classical PDI has a signal peptide, two CXXCcontaining thioredoxin catalytic sites (a,a′), two noncatalytic thioredoxin fold domains (b,b′), an acidic domain (c) and a C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Although PDI resides in the ER where it mediates the folding of nascent polypeptides of the secretory pathway, we recently showed that PDI5 of Arabidopsis thaliana chaperones and inhibits cysteine proteases during trafficking to vacuoles prior to programmed cell death of the endothelium in developing seeds. Here we describe Arabidopsis PDI2, which shares a primary structure similar to that of classical PDI. Recombinant PDI2 is imported into ER-derived microsomes and complements the E. coli protein- folding mutant, dsbA. PDI2 interacted with proteins in both the ER and nucleus, including ER-resident protein folding chaperone, BiP1, and nuclear embryo transcription factor, MEE8. The PDI2-MEE8 interaction was confirmed to occur in vitro and in vivo. Transient expression of PDI2- GFP fusions in mesophyll protoplasts resulted in labeling of the ER, nucleus and vacuole. PDI2 is expressed in multiple tissues, with relatively high expression in seeds and root tips. Immunoelectron microscopy with GFP- and PDI2-specific antisera on transgenic seeds (PDI2-GFP) and wild type roots demonstrated that PDI2 was found in the secretory pathway (ER, Golgi, vacuole, cell wall) and the nuclei. Our results indicate that PDI2 mediates protein folding in the ER and has new functional roles in the nucleus. PMID:21909944

  12. Characterization of the DMAE-modified juvenile excretory-secretory protein Juv-p120 of Litomosoides sigmodontis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ulrike; Hirzmann, Jörg; Hintz, Martin; Beck, Ewald; Geyer, Rudolf; Hobom, Gerd; Taubert, Anja; Zahner, Horst

    2011-04-01

    Juv-p120 is an excretory-secretory 160 kDa glycoprotein of juvenile female Litomosoides sigmodontis and exhibits features typical for mucins. 50% of its molecular mass is attributed to posttranslational modifications with the unusual substituent dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE). By that Juv-p120 corresponds to the surface proteins of the microfilarial sheath, Shp3 and Shp3a. The secreted protein consists of 697 amino acids, organized in two different domains of repeat elements separated by a stretch of polar residues. The N-terminal domain shows fourteen P/S/T/F-rich repeat elements highly modified with phospho-DMAE substituted O-glycans confering a negative charge to the protein. The C-terminal domain is extremely rich in glutamine (35%) and leucine (25%) in less organized repeats and may play a role in oligomerization of Juv-p120 monomers. A protein family with a similar Q/L-rich region and conserved core promoter region was identified in Brugia malayi by homology screening and in Wuchereria bancrofti and Loa loa by database similarity search. One of the Q/L-rich proteins in each genus has an extended S/T-rich region and due to this feature is supposed to be a putative Juv-p120 ortholog. The corresponding modification of Juv-p120 and the microfilarial sheath surface antigens Shp3/3a explains the appearance of anti-sheath antibodies before the release of microfilariae. The function of Juv-p120 is unknown. PMID:21241743

  13. Secretory Expression and Purification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus G and F Proteins in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhao, Samadhan J; Anderson, Larry J

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of range of symptoms from mild upper to serious lower respiratory virus infections in infants, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. Despite many decades of research and development, a licensed RSV vaccine is not available for use in human. Since the RSV F and G proteins induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protection from infection, they are important for understanding disease and for developing vaccines and access to purified, expressed proteins is important to RSV research and diagnostics. We describe methods to produce recombinant RSV F and G proteins in human cells and purify these proteins using Ni Sepharose affinity chromatography. PMID:27464687

  14. Nϵ-lysine acetylation in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum: A way to regulate autophagy and maintain protein homeostasis in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yajing; Puglielli, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The Nϵ-lysine acetylation of cargo proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) requires a membrane transporter (SLC33A1) and 2 acetyltransferases (NAT8B and NAT8). The ER acetylation machinery regulates the homeostatic balance between quality control/efficiency of the secretory pathway and autophagy-mediated disposal of toxic protein aggregates. We recently reported that the autophagy pathway that acts downstream of the ER acetylation machinery specifically targets protein aggregates that form within the secretory pathway. Genetic and biochemical manipulation of ER acetylation in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease is able to restore normal proteostasis and rescue the disease phenotype. Here we summarize these findings and offer an overview of the ER-acetylation machinery. PMID:27124586

  15. Neurally expressed Drosophila genes encoding homologs of the NSF and SNAP secretory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, R W; Pallanck, L; Ganetzky, B

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of investigation have now converged to indicate that the neurotransmitter release apparatus is formed by assembly of cytosolic proteins with proteins of the synaptic vesicle and presynaptic terminal membranes. We are undertaking a genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the functions of two types of cytosolic proteins thought to function in this complex: N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and the soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs). We have identified Drosophila homologs of the vertebrate and yeast NSF and SNAP genes. Both Drosophila genes encode polypeptides that closely resemble their vertebrate counterparts and are expressed in the nervous system; neither appears to be in a family of closely related Drosophila genes. These results indicate that the Drosophila NSF and SNAP genes are excellent candidates for mutational analysis of neurotransmitter release. Images PMID:8202553

  16. Characterization of toxins from the broad-banded water snake Helicops angulatus (Linnaeus, 1758): isolation of a cysteine-rich secretory protein, Helicopsin.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Amalid; Sánchez, Elda E; Galán, Jacob A; Tao, W Andy; Guerrero, Belsy; Navarrete, Luis F; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2011-04-01

    Helicops angulatus (broad-banded water snake) according to recent proposals is presently cited in the family Dipsadidae, subfamily Xenodontinae, forming the tribe Hydropsini along with the genera Hydrops and Pseudoeryx. The current work characterizes the proteolytic and neurotoxic activities of H. angulatus crude toxins from salivary excretion (SE) and describes the isolation and identification of a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) called helicopsin. The SE lethal dose (LD₅₀) was 5.3 mg/kg; however, the SE did not contain hemorrhagic activity. Helicopsin was purified using activity-guided, Superose 12 10/300 GL molecular exclusion, Mono Q10 ion exchange, and Protein Pak 60 molecular exclusion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed a highly purified band of approximately 20 kDa. The minimal lethal dose for helicopsin was 0.4 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis identified 2 unique peptides MEWYPEAAANAER and YTQIVWYK, representing a protein sequence (deleted homology) belonging to cysteine-rich secretory proteins, which are conserved in snake venoms (CRISPs). CRISPs are a large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins found in various organisms and participate in diverse biological processes. Helicopsin exhibited robust neurotoxic activity as evidenced by immediate death (~8 min) due to respiratory paralysis in NIH mice. These observations for helicopsin purified from H. angulatus provide further evidence of the extensive distribution of highly potent neurotoxins in the Colubroidea superfamily of snakes than previously described. PMID:20931174

  17. Crovirin, a Snake Venom Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein (CRISP) with Promising Activity against Trypanosomes and Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Adade, Camila M.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia O.; Tomaz, Marcelo A.; Costa, Tatiana F. R.; Godinho, Joseane L.; Melo, Paulo A.; Lima, Ana Paula C. A.; Rodrigues, Juliany C. F.; Zingali, Russolina B.; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2014-01-01

    Background The neglected human diseases caused by trypanosomatids are currently treated with toxic therapy with limited efficacy. In search for novel anti-trypanosomatid agents, we showed previously that the Crotalus viridis viridis (Cvv) snake venom was active against infective forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Here, we describe the purification of crovirin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) from Cvv venom with promising activity against trypanosomes and Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Crude venom extract was loaded onto a reverse phase analytical (C8) column using a high performance liquid chromatographer. A linear gradient of water/acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid was used. The peak containing the isolated protein (confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry) was collected and its protein content was measured. T. cruzi trypomastigotes and amastigotes, L. amazonensis promastigotes and amastigotes and T. brucei rhodesiense procyclic and bloodstream trypomastigotes were challenged with crovirin, whose toxicity was tested against LLC-MK2 cells, peritoneal macrophages and isolated murine extensor digitorum longus muscle. We purified a single protein from Cvv venom corresponding, according to Nano-LC MS/MS sequencing, to a CRISP of 24,893.64 Da, henceforth referred to as crovirin. Human infective trypanosomatid forms, including intracellular amastigotes, were sensitive to crovirin, with low IC50 or LD50 values (1.10–2.38 µg/ml). A considerably higher concentration (20 µg/ml) of crovirin was required to elicit only limited toxicity on mammalian cells. Conclusions This is the first report of CRISP anti-protozoal activity, and suggests that other members of this family might have potential as drugs or drug leads for the development of novel agents against trypanosomatid-borne neglected diseases. PMID:25330220

  18. The Rab-binding protein Noc2 is associated with insulin-containing secretory granules and is essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cheviet, Séverine; Coppola, Thierry; Haynes, Lee P; Burgoyne, Robert D; Regazzi, Romano

    2004-01-01

    The small GTPases Rab3 and Rab27 are associated with secretory granules of pancreatic beta-cells and regulate insulin exocytosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Noc2, a potential partner of these two GTPases, in insulin secretion. In the beta-cell line INS-1E wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, and Noc258A, a mutant capable of interacting with Rab27 but not Rab3, colocalized with insulin-containing vesicles. In contrast, two mutants (Noc2138S,141S and Noc2154A,155A,156A) that bind neither Rab3 nor Rab27 did not associate with secretory granules and were uniformly distributed throughout the cell cytoplasm. Overexpression of wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, or Noc258A inhibited hormone secretion elicited by insulin secretagogues. In contrast, overexpression of the mutants not targeted to secretory granules was without effect. Silencing of the Noc2 gene by RNA interference led to a strong impairment in the capacity of INS-1E cells to respond to insulin secretagogues, indicating that appropriate levels of Noc2 are essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis. The defect was already detectable in the early secretory phase (0-10 min) but was particularly evident during the sustained release phase (10-45 min). Protein-protein binding studies revealed that Noc2 is a potential partner of Munc13, a component of the machinery that controls vesicle priming and insulin exocytosis. These data suggest that Noc2 is involved in the recruitment of secretory granules at the plasma membrane possibly via the interaction with Munc13. PMID:14593078

  19. Isolation, characterization, and distribution of an unusual pancreatic human secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J; Carlson, R I; Brauer, A W; Margolies, M N; Warshaw, A L; Wands, J R

    1985-01-01

    An unusual protein was isolated from acid extracts of normal human pancreas and pancreatic secretion in the form of uniform 7-10-nm long single threads without visible axial periodicity or other structure, as seen in the electron microscope. It accounts for as much as 300 micrograms/ml in some pancreatic secretions as measured by specific radioimmunoassay. The protein undergoes a freely reversible, pH dependent, globule-fibril transformation, being stable in the fibril form between pH 5.4 and 9.2. The monomer at acid pH has an apparent molecular weight of approximately 14,000 and consists of a single polypeptide chain, the amino acid composition of which is rich in aromatic amino acids and lacks carbohydrate, fatty acid, and phosphate. The amino acid sequence of 45 residues from the amino terminus shows no homology with any other reported protein sequences other than that of the A chain of the bovine pancreas thread protein (reported elsewhere). A sensitive radioimmunoassay employing monoclonal antibodies against human pancreatic thread protein failed to detect the antigen in a wide range of human tissues other than pancreas, nor was the antigen measurable in normal human sera. Immunohistochemistry utilizing these antibodies revealed the antigen as a component of the cytoplasm of some but not all the pancreatic acinar cells. A physiologic function has not yet been determined for this protein. Images PMID:3908481

  20. Enhancement of protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overproduction of Sso protein, a late-acting component of the secretory machinery.

    PubMed

    Ruohonen, L; Toikkanen, J; Tieaho, V; Outola, M; Soderlund, H; Keranen, S

    1997-03-30

    Increased production of secreted proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was achieved by overexpressing the yeast syntaxins. Sso1 or Sso2 protein, the t-SNAREs functioning at the targeting/fusion of the Golgi-derived secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. Up to four- or six-fold yields of a heterologous secreted protein, Bacillus alpha-amylase, or an endogenous secreted protein, invertase, were obtained respectively when expressing either one of the SSO genes, SSO1 or SSO2, from the ADH1 promoter on a multicopy plasmid. Direct correlation between the Sso protein level and the amount of secreted alpha-amylase was demonstrated by modulating the expression level of the SSO2 gene. Quantitation of the alpha-amylase activity in the culture medium, periplasmic space and cytoplasm suggests that secretion into the periplasmic space is the primary stage at which the SSO genes exert the secretion-enhancing function. Pulse-chase data also support enhanced secretion efficiently obtained by SSO overexpression. Our data suggest that the Sso proteins may be rate-limiting components of the protein secretion machinery at the exocytosis step in yeast. PMID:9133737

  1. Elevated levels of an exocrine pancreatic secretory protein in Alzheimer disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, M; de la Monte, S M; Gross, J; Wands, J R

    1989-01-01

    We identified by a monoclonal antibody-based immunoradiometric assay high concentrations of an exocrine pancreatic protein called pancreatic thread protein (PTP) in several areas of Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. The saline-extractable soluble immunoreactivity shares at least three epitopes in common with the native pancreatic form of the protein; the Mr varies from approximately 17,000 to 20,000. Quantitative measurements of PTP immunoreactivity in various regions of several AD brains revealed levels varying from 12 to 295 ng/g of tissue (mean, 116 ng/g) compared with 1-11 ng/g of tissue (mean, 5 ng/g) found in comparable areas of control brains. Immunocytochemistry performed with the anti-PTP monoclonal antibodies demonstrate PTP immunoreactivity within large pyramidal neurons--many of which contain neurofibrillary tangles in both AD and Down syndrome. Less accumulation was observed in astrocytes, and some PTP immunoreactivity was found extracellularly. The highest number of labeled cells in AD and Down syndrome was seen in the hippocampal formation. Fewer positive-staining cells were noted in normal and disease control brains. We conclude, therefore, that an exocrine pancreatic protein is present in the central nervous system of normal individuals at low levels; in AD brain concentrations of this protein are much higher. Images PMID:2463628

  2. Structural features within the nascent chain regulate alternative targeting of secretory proteins to mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Natalie V; Dirndorfer, Daniela; Lang, Sven; Resenberger, Ulrike K; Restelli, Lisa M; Hemion, Charles; Miesbauer, Margit; Frank, Stephan; Neutzner, Albert; Zimmermann, Richard; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Tatzelt, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Protein targeting to specified cellular compartments is essential to maintain cell function and homeostasis. In eukaryotic cells, two major pathways rely on N-terminal signal peptides to target proteins to either the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or mitochondria. In this study, we show that the ER signal peptides of the prion protein-like protein shadoo, the neuropeptide hormone somatostatin and the amyloid precursor protein have the property to mediate alternative targeting to mitochondria. Remarkably, the targeting direction of these signal peptides is determined by structural elements within the nascent chain. Each of the identified signal peptides promotes efficient ER import of nascent chains containing α-helical domains, but targets unstructured polypeptides to mitochondria. Moreover, we observed that mitochondrial targeting by the ER signal peptides correlates inversely with ER import efficiency. When ER import is compromised, targeting to mitochondria is enhanced, whereas improving ER import efficiency decreases mitochondrial targeting. In conclusion, our study reveals a novel mechanism of dual targeting to either the ER or mitochondria that is mediated by structural features within the nascent chain. PMID:23481258

  3. Secretory protein profiling reveals TNFα inactivation by selective and promiscuous Sec61 modulators

    PubMed Central

    Maifeld, Sarah V.; MacKinnon, Andrew L.; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Sharma, Ajay; Kunkel, Eric J.; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Taunton, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cotransins are cyclic heptadepsipeptides that bind the Sec61 translocon to inhibit cotranslational translocation of a subset of secreted and type I transmembrane proteins. The few known cotransin-sensitive substrates are all targeted to the translocon by a cleavable signal sequence, previously shown to be a critical determinant of cotransin sensitivity. By profiling two cotransin variants against a panel of secreted and transmembrane proteins, we demonstrate that cotransin side-chain differences profoundly affect substrate selectivity. Among the most sensitive substrates we identified is the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Like all type II transmembrane proteins, TNFα is targeted to the translocon by its membrane-spanning domain, indicating that a cleavable signal sequence is not strictly required for cotransin sensitivity. Our results thus reveal an unanticipated breadth of translocon substrates whose expression is inhibited by Sec61 modulators. PMID:21944747

  4. A Protective Role For Club Cell Secretory Protein-16 (CC16) In The Development of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Laucho-Contreras, Maria E.; Polverino, Francesca; Gupta, Kushagra; Taylor, Katherine L.; Kelly, Emer; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Divo, Miguel; Afshaq, Naveed; Petersen, Hans; Stripp, Barry; Pilon, Aprile L.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Celli, Bartolome R.; Owen, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Club cell secretory protein-16 (CC16) is the major secreted product of airway Club cells, but its role in the pathogenesis of COPD is unclear. We measured CC16 airway expression in humans with and without COPD and CC16 function in a cigarette smoke (CS)-induced COPD mice model. Methods Airway CC16 expression was measured in COPD patients, smokers without COPD, and non-smokers. We exposed wild-type (WT) and CC16-/- mice to CS or air for up to 6 months, and measured airway CC16 expression, pulmonary inflammation, alveolar septal cell apoptosis, airspace enlargement, airway MUC5AC expression, small airway remodeling, and pulmonary function. Results Smokers and COPD patients had reduced airway CC16 immunostaining that decreased with increasing COPD severity. Exposing mice to CS reduced airway CC16 expression. CC16-/- mice had greater CS-induced emphysema, airway remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, alveolar cell apoptosis, airway MUC5AC expression, and more compliant lungs than WT mice. These changes were associated with increased nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) activation in CC16-/- lungs. CS-induced acute pulmonary changes were reversed by adenoviral-mediated over-expression of CC16. Conclusions CC16 protects lungs from CS-induced injury by reducing lung NFκB activation. CS-induced airway CC16 deficiency increases CS-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25700379

  5. Difference in distribution of membrane proteins between low- and high-density secretory granules in parotid acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko . E-mail: yoshigaki.junko@nihon-u.ac.jp; Katsumata, Osamu; Matsuki, Miwako; Yoshigaki, Tomoyoshi; Furuyama, Shunsuke; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2006-05-26

    Secretory granules (SGs) are considered to be generated as immature granules and to mature by condensation of their contents. In this study, SGs of parotid gland were separated into low-, medium-, and high-density granule fractions by Percoll-density gradient centrifugation, since it was proposed that the density corresponds to the degree of maturation. The observation with electron microscopy showed that granules in the three fractions were very similar. The average diameter of high-density granules was a little but significantly larger than that of low-density granules. Although the three fractions contained amylase, suggesting that they are all SGs, distribution of membrane proteins was markedly different. Syntaxin6 and VAMP4 were localized in the low-density granule fraction, while VAMP2 was concentrated in the high-density granule fraction. Immunoprecipitation with anti-syntaxin6 antibody caused coprecipitation of VAMP2 from the medium-density granule fraction without solubilization, but not from Triton X-100-solubilized fraction, while VAMP4 was coprecipitated from both fractions. Therefore, VAMP2 is present on the same granules, but is separated from syntaxin6 and VAMP4, which are expected to be removed from immature granules. These results suggest that the medium-density granules are intermediates from low- to high-density granules, and that the membrane components of SGs dynamically change by budding and fusion during maturation.

  6. Bone Marrow Cells Expressing Clara Cell Secretory Protein Increase Epithelial Repair After Ablation of Pulmonary Clara Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Martha L; Mura, Marco; Marcus, Paula; Hwang, David; Ludkovski, Olga; Wong, Amy P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported a subpopulation of bone marrow cells (BMC) that express Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP), generally felt to be specific to lung Clara cells. Ablation of lung Clara cells has been reported using a transgenic mouse that expresses thymidine kinase under control of the CCSP promoter. Treatment with ganciclovir results in permanent elimination of CCSP+ cells, failure of airway regeneration, and death. To determine if transtracheal delivery of wild-type bone marrow CCSP+ cells is beneficial after ablation of lung CCSP+ cells, transgenic mice were treated with ganciclovir followed by transtracheal administration of CCSP+ or CCSP− BMC. Compared with mice administered CCSP− cells, mice treated with CCSP+ cells had more donor cells lining the airway epithelium, where they expressed epithelial markers including CCSP. Although donor CCSP+ cells did not substantially repopulate the airway, their administration resulted in increased host ciliated cells, better preservation of airway epithelium, reduction of inflammatory cells, and an increase in animal survival time. Administration of CCSP+ BMC is beneficial after permanent ablation of lung Clara cells by increasing bronchial epithelial repair. Therefore, CCSP+ BMC could be important for treatment of lung diseases where airways re-epithelialization is compromised. PMID:23609017

  7. Bacteriocin release protein-mediated secretory expression of recombinant chalcone synthase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2011-09-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites synthesized by plants shown to exhibit health benefits such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor effects. Thus, due to the importance of this compound, several enzymes involved in the flavonoid pathway have been cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. However, the formation of inclusion bodies has become a major disadvantage of this approach. As an alternative, chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens was secreted into the medium using a bacteriocin release protein expression vector. Secretion of P. patens chalcone synthase into the culture media was achieved by co-expression with a psW1 plasmid encoding bacteriocin release protein in E. coli Tuner (DE3) plysS. The optimized conditions, which include the incubation of cells for 20 h with 40 ng/ml mitomycin C at OD(600) induction time of 0.5 was found to be the best condition for chalcone synthase secretion. PMID:21633820

  8. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. PMID:26496881

  9. Role of Endoproteolytic Dibasic Proprotein Processing in Maturation of Secretory Proteins in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Goller, Sabine P.; Schoisswohl, Doris; Baron, Michel; Parriche, Martine; Kubicek, Christian P.

    1998-01-01

    Cell extracts of Trichoderma reesei exhibited dibasic endopeptidase activity toward the carboxylic side of KR, RR, and PR sequences. This activity was stimulated by the presence of Ca2+ ions and localized in vesicles of low bouyant density; it therefore exhibited some similarity to yeast Kex2. Analytical chromatofocusing revealed a single peak of activity. The dibasic endopeptidase activity was strongly and irreversibly inhibited in vitro as well as in vivo by 1 mM p-amidinophenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (pAPMSF) but not by PMSF at concentrations up to 5 mM. We therefore used pAPMSF to study the role of the dibasic endopeptidase in the secretion of protein by T. reesei. Secretion of xylanase I (proprotein processing sequence -R-R-↓-R-↓-A-) and xylanase II (-K-R-↓-Q-) was strongly inhibited by 1 mM pAPMSF, and a larger, unprocessed enzyme form was detected intracellularly under these conditions. Secretion of cellobiohydrolase II (CBH II; -E-R-↓-Q-) was only slightly inhibited by pAPMSF, and no accumulation of unprocessed precursors was detected. In contrast, secretion of CBH I (-R-A-↓-Q-) was stimulated by pAPMSF addition, and a simultaneous decrease in the concentration of intracellular CBH I was detected. Similar experiments were also carried out with a single heterologous protein, ShBLE, the phleomycin-binding protein from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus, fused to a series of model proprotein-processing sequences downstream of the expression signals of the Aspergillus nidulans gpdA promoter. Consistent with the results obtained with homologous proteins, pAPMSF inhibited the secretion of ShBLE with fusions containing dibasic (RK and KR) target sequences, but it even stimulated secretion in fusions to LR, NHA, and EHA target sequences. Addition of 5 mM PMSF, a nonspecific inhibitor of serine protease, nonspecifically inhibited the secretion of heterologous proteins from fusions bearing the NHA and LR targets. These data point to the existence of different

  10. Structures of Azemiops feae venom phospholipases and cys-rich-secretory protein and implications for taxonomy and toxinology.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Inn-Ho; Wang, Ying-Ming; Huang, Kai-Fa

    2016-05-01

    The Azemiops snakes are pit-less and phylogenetically located at the Crotalinae and Viperinae divergence. cDNAs encoding five Azemiops venom phospholipase (sPLA2) molecules were cloned and sequenced; their signal-peptides were similar to those of crotalid sPLA2s. Based on their calculated pI-values and residue-49 substitutions, they were designated as Af-E6, Af-N49a, Af-N49a1, Af-N49a2, and Af-N49b, respectively. The first three isoforms, comprising 3-4% of the venom proteins, were purified by reversed-phase HPLC. Af-E6 is catalytically active and has >80% sequence-similarity to other Glu(6)-PLA2 (a pitviper venom-marker). Results of phylogenetic analyses reveal that acidic Af-N49a and Af-N49a1 are rather unique and loosely linked with crotalid PLA2s, while Af-N49b is related to the viperid PLA2s with Ser(1) substitution. Notably, the Asn(49)-substitutions in these molecules imply catalytic-independent mechanisms. The 3D-models of Af-E6 and Af-N49a have surface electropotential maps similar to each other and to those of antiplatelet PLA2s, while the Af-N49b model is similar to basic and myotoxic sPLA2 molecules. From Azemiops feae and four other Viperidae, we cloned five novel Cys-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs). Azemiops CRISP and natriuretic-peptide precursors share more sequence similarities with those of crotalid venoms than with viperid venoms, further supporting the theory that Azemiops are sister taxons to pit vipers, especially Tropedolaemus. PMID:26908291

  11. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Sandra; Hempel, Madlen; Brückner, Sandra; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Kaufmann, Roland; Christ, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1) increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM) decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor) signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration. PMID:27409608

  12. Implantable Three-Dimensional Salivary Spheroid Assemblies Demonstrate Fluid and Protein Secretory Responses to Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Harrington, Daniel A.; Duncan, Randall L.; Jia, Xinqiao; Witt, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation treatment in patients with head and neck tumors commonly results in hyposalivation and xerostomia due to the loss of fluid-secreting salivary acinar cells. Patients develop susceptibility to oral infections, dental caries, impaired speech and swallowing, reducing the quality of life. Clinical management is largely unsatisfactory. The development of a tissue-engineered, implantable salivary gland will greatly benefit patients suffering from xerostomia. This report compares the ability of a 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) and a three-dimensional (3D) hyaluronic acid (HA)-based culture system to support functional salivary units capable of producing fluid and phenotypic proteins. Parotid cells seeded on 2.5D, as well as those encapsulated in 3D HA hydrogels, self-assembled into acini-like structures and expressed functional neurotransmitter receptors. Structures in 3D hydrogels merged to form organized 50 μm spheroids that could be maintained in culture for over 100 days and merged to form structures over 500 μm in size. Treatment of acini-like structures with the β-adrenergic agonists norepinephrine or isoproterenol increased granule production and α-amylase staining in treated structures, demonstrating regain of protein secretion. Upon treatment with the M3 muscarinic agonist acetylcholine, acini-like structures activated the fluid production pathway by increasing intracellular calcium levels. The increase in intracellular calcium seen in structures in the 3D hydrogel culture system was more robust and prolonged than that in 2.5D. To compare the long-term survival and retention of acini-like structures in vivo, cell-seeded 2.5D and 3D hydrogels were implanted into an athymic rat model. Cells in 2.5D failed to maintain organized acini-like structures and dispersed in the surrounding tissue. Encapsulated cells in 3D retained their spheroid structure and structural integrity, along with the salivary biomarkers and maintained viability for over 3 weeks in vivo

  13. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  14. Ancylostoma ceylanicum Excretory-Secretory Protein 2 Adopts a Netrin-Like Fold and Defines a Novel Family of Nematode Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    K Kucera; L Harrison; M Cappello; Y Modis

    2011-12-31

    Hookworms are human parasites that have devastating effects on global health, particularly in underdeveloped countries. Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects humans and animals, making it a useful model organism to study disease pathogenesis. A. ceylanicum excretory-secretory protein 2 (AceES-2), a highly immunoreactive molecule secreted by adult worms at the site of intestinal attachment, is partially protective when administered as a mucosal vaccine against hookworm anemia. The crystal structure of AceES-2 determined at 1.75 {angstrom} resolution shows that it adopts a netrin-like fold similar to that found in tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (TIMPs) and in complement factors C3 and C5. However, recombinant AceES-2 does not significantly inhibit the 10 most abundant human matrix metalloproteases or complement-mediated cell lysis. The presence of a highly acidic surface on AceES-2 suggests that it may function as a cytokine decoy receptor. Several small nematode proteins that have been annotated as TIMPs or netrin-domain-containing proteins display sequence homology in structurally important regions of AceES-2's netrin-likefold. Together, our results suggest that AceES-2 defines a novel family of nematode netrin-like proteins, which may function to modulate the host immune response to hookworm and other parasites.

  15. Transport through the yeast endocytic pathway occurs through morphologically distinct compartments and requires an active secretory pathway and Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hicke, L; Zanolari, B; Pypaert, M; Rohrer, J; Riezman, H

    1997-01-01

    Molecules travel through the yeast endocytic pathway from the cell surface to the lysosome-like vacuole by passing through two sequential intermediates. Immunofluorescent detection of an endocytosed pheromone receptor was used to morphologically identify these intermediates, the early and late endosomes. The early endosome is a peripheral organelle that is heterogeneous in appearance, whereas the late endosome is a large perivacuolar compartment that corresponds to the prevacuolar compartment previously shown to be an endocytic intermediate. We demonstrate that inhibiting transport through the early secretory pathway in sec mutants quickly impedes transport from the early endosome. Treatment of sensitive cells with brefeldin A also blocks transport from this compartment. We provide evidence that Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, a protein required for membrane fusion, is directly required in vivo for forward transport early in the endocytic pathway. Inhibiting protein synthesis does not affect transport from the early endosome but causes endocytosed proteins to accumulate in the late endosome. As newly synthesized proteins and the late steps of secretion are not required for early to late endosome transport, but endoplasmic reticulum through Golgi traffic is, we propose that efficient forward transport in the early endocytic pathway requires delivery of lipid from secretory organelles to endosomes. Images PMID:9017592

  16. Cytoplasmic Fragment of Alcadein α Generated by Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis Enhances Amyloid β-Protein Precursor (APP) Transport into the Late Secretory Pathway and Facilitates APP Cleavage*

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Norio; Sobu, Yuriko; Kimura, Ayano; Urano, Satomi; Piao, Yi; Araki, Yoichi; Taru, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Hata, Saori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    The neural type I membrane protein Alcadein α (Alcα), is primarily cleaved by amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) α-secretase to generate a membrane-associated carboxyl-terminal fragment (Alcα CTF), which is further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alcα peptides and generate an intracellular cytoplasmic domain fragment (Alcα ICD) in the late secretory pathway. By association with the neural adaptor protein X11L (X11-like), Alcα and APP form a ternary complex that suppresses the cleavage of both Alcα and APP by regulating the transport of these membrane proteins into the late secretory pathway where secretases are active. However, it has not been revealed how Alcα and APP are directed from the ternary complex formed largely in the Golgi into the late secretory pathway to reach a nerve terminus. Using a novel transgenic mouse line expressing excess amounts of human Alcα CTF (hAlcα CTF) in neurons, we found that expression of hAlcα CTF induced excess production of hAlcα ICD, which facilitated APP transport into the nerve terminus and enhanced APP metabolism, including Aβ generation. In vitro cell studies also demonstrated that excess expression of Alcα ICD released both APP and Alcα from the ternary complex. These results indicate that regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Alcα by γ-secretase regulates APP trafficking and the production of Aβ in vivo. PMID:25406318

  17. Cytoplasmic fragment of Alcadein α generated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis enhances amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) transport into the late secretory pathway and facilitates APP cleavage.

    PubMed

    Takei, Norio; Sobu, Yuriko; Kimura, Ayano; Urano, Satomi; Piao, Yi; Araki, Yoichi; Taru, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Hata, Saori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    The neural type I membrane protein Alcadein α (Alcα), is primarily cleaved by amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) α-secretase to generate a membrane-associated carboxyl-terminal fragment (Alcα CTF), which is further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alcα peptides and generate an intracellular cytoplasmic domain fragment (Alcα ICD) in the late secretory pathway. By association with the neural adaptor protein X11L (X11-like), Alcα and APP form a ternary complex that suppresses the cleavage of both Alcα and APP by regulating the transport of these membrane proteins into the late secretory pathway where secretases are active. However, it has not been revealed how Alcα and APP are directed from the ternary complex formed largely in the Golgi into the late secretory pathway to reach a nerve terminus. Using a novel transgenic mouse line expressing excess amounts of human Alcα CTF (hAlcα CTF) in neurons, we found that expression of hAlcα CTF induced excess production of hAlcα ICD, which facilitated APP transport into the nerve terminus and enhanced APP metabolism, including Aβ generation. In vitro cell studies also demonstrated that excess expression of Alcα ICD released both APP and Alcα from the ternary complex. These results indicate that regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Alcα by γ-secretase regulates APP trafficking and the production of Aβ in vivo. PMID:25406318

  18. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and VDR protein levels in relation to vitamin D status, insulin secretory capacity, and VDR genotype in Bangladeshi Asians.

    PubMed

    Ogunkolade, Babatunji-William; Boucher, Barbara J; Prahl, Jean M; Bustin, Stephen A; Burrin, Jacky M; Noonan, Kate; North, Bernard V; Mannan, Nassima; McDermott, Michael F; DeLuca, Hector F; Hitman, Graham A

    2002-07-01

    Associations have been reported between vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms, type 1 diabetes, insulin secretion, and the insulin resistance syndrome. As VDR polymorphisms have no known functional significance, these findings may implicate a variant of the VDR gene or a locus in linkage disequilibrium with the VDR. We have examined VDR mRNA and VDR protein levels in relation to VDR polymorphisms (41 Bangladeshi subjects) and analyzed insulin secretory capacity (143 Bangladeshi subjects), allowing for other known determinants. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from subjects who had been genotyped for BsmI, ApaI, TaqI, and FokI VDR restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used for both total VDR mRNA quantitation (using TaqMan) and measurement of VDR protein levels (using a specific micro-immunoassay). Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used (to P < 0.05) to analyze the data. For the insulin secretion index, the best-fit model (n = 143, P < 0.0001) gave age (P = 0.002), TaqI (P < 0.0001), and BMI (P = 0.001) as independent determinants; with the inclusion of VDR mRNA and VDR protein levels, VDR mRNA was the sole independent determinant (n = 41, P = 0.024). However, the best-fit model for VDR mRNA (P = 0.004) gave FokI (P = 0.044) and TaqI (P = 0.04) genotypes and insulin secretory capacity (P = 0.042) as independent determinants. For VDR protein levels, the best-fit model (P = 0.006) gave TaqI genotype (P = 0.005) and circulating 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D levels (P = 0.03) as independent determinants. In conclusion, these studies confirm an association between VDR polymorphisms and insulin secretory capacity and demonstrate the VDR genotype to be a significant determinant of VDR mRNA and VDR protein levels in PBMCs, providing functional support to previously described genetic associations with the VDR gene. Furthermore, VDR expression has been shown to be a determinant of insulin secretory capacity. PMID:12086963

  19. Bem3, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, traffics to an intracellular compartment and recruits the secretory Rab GTPase Sec4 to endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Boettner, Douglas R.; Fairn, Gregory D.; Schlam, Daniel; Bonilla Valentin, Fernando J.; Michael McCaffery, J.; Hazbun, Tony; Staiger, Chris J.; Grinstein, Sergio; Lemmon, Sandra K.; Claudio Aguilar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell polarity is essential for many cellular functions including division and cell-fate determination. Although RhoGTPase signaling and vesicle trafficking are both required for the establishment of cell polarity, the mechanisms by which they are coordinated are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast RhoGAP (GTPase activating protein), Bem3, is targeted to sites of polarized growth by the endocytic and recycling pathways. Specifically, deletion of SLA2 or RCY1 led to mislocalization of Bem3 to depolarized puncta and accumulation in intracellular compartments, respectively. Bem3 partitioned between the plasma membrane and an intracellular membrane-bound compartment. These Bem3-positive structures were polarized towards sites of bud emergence and were mostly observed during the pre-mitotic phase of apical growth. Cell biological and biochemical approaches demonstrated that this intracellular Bem3 compartment contained markers for both the endocytic and secretory pathways, which were reminiscent of the Spitzenkörper present in the hyphal tips of growing fungi. Importantly, Bem3 was not a passive cargo, but recruited the secretory Rab protein, Sec4, to the Bem3-containing compartments. Moreover, Bem3 deletion resulted in less efficient localization of Sec4 to bud tips during early stages of bud emergence. Surprisingly, these effects of Bem3 on Sec4 were independent of its GAP activity, but depended on its ability to efficiently bind endomembranes. This work unveils unsuspected and important details of the relationship between vesicle traffic and elements of the cell polarity machinery: (1) Bem3, a cell polarity and peripherally associated membrane protein, relies on vesicle trafficking to maintain its proper localization; and (2) in turn, Bem3 influences secretory vesicle trafficking. PMID:23943876

  20. Vesicle Associated Membrane Protein 8 (VAMP8)-mediated Zymogen Granule Exocytosis Is Dependent on Endosomal Trafficking via the Constitutive-Like Secretory Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Scott W; Falkowski, Michelle A.; Thomas, Diana D. H.; Jones, Elaina K.; Hong, Wanjin; Giasano, Herbert Y.; Boulis, Nicholas M.; Groblewski, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Acinar cell zymogen granules (ZG) express 2 isoforms of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family (VAMP2 and -8) thought to regulate exocytosis. Expression of tetanus toxin to cleave VAMP2 in VAMP8 knock-out (−/−) acini confirmed that VAMP2 and -8 are the primary VAMPs for regulated exocytosis, each contributing ∼50% of the response. Analysis of VAMP8−/− acini indicated that although stimulated secretion was significantly reduced, a compensatory increase in constitutive secretion maintained total secretion equivalent to wild type (WT). Using a perifusion system to follow secretion over time revealed VAMP2 mediates an early rapid phase peaking and falling within 2–3 min, whereas VAMP8 controls a second prolonged phase that peaks at 4 min and slowly declines over 20 min to support the protracted secretory response. VAMP8−/− acini show increased expression of the endosomal proteins Ti-VAMP7 (2-fold) and Rab11a (4-fold) and their redistribution from endosomes to ZGs. Expression of GDP-trapped Rab11a-S25N inhibited secretion exclusively from the VAMP8 but not the VAMP2 pathway. VAMP8−/− acini also showed a >90% decrease in the early endosomal proteins Rab5/D52/EEA1, which control anterograde trafficking in the constitutive-like secretory pathway. In WT acini, short term (14–16 h) culture also results in a >90% decrease in Rab5/D52/EEA1 and a complete loss of the VAMP8 pathway, whereas VAMP2-secretion remains intact. Remarkably, rescue of Rab5/D52/EEA1 expression restored the VAMP8 pathway. Expressed D52 shows extensive colocalization with Rab11a and VAMP8 and partially copurifies with ZG fractions. These results indicate that robust trafficking within the constitutive-like secretory pathway is required for VAMP8- but not VAMP2-mediated ZG exocytosis. PMID:25138214

  1. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP) Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Wang, Shuai; Bo, Gao; Ehsan, Muhammad; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai; Xu, LiXin; Li, XiangRui

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO) distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis. PMID:27467391

  2. The 11S rat seminal vesicle mRNA directs the in vitro synthesis of two precursors of the major secretory protein IV.

    PubMed Central

    Metafora, S; Guardiola, J; Paonessa, G; Abrescia, P

    1984-01-01

    The 11s mRNA extracted from the rat seminal vesicles directs the synthesis of two different precursors of the major secretory protein RSV-IV. These two precursors are not interconvertible and seemingly originate from different translational events. Sucrose gradients, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and positive hybridization translation experiments do not allow the separation of the two putatively different mRNAs. It is concluded that the two RSV-IV precursors either derive from two extremely similar, but physically not separable mRNA species, or from two different modes of translation of the same mRNA molecule. Images PMID:6701092

  3. Identification of a second homolog of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein that is expressed in the nervous system and secretory tissues of Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Boulianne, G L; Trimble, W S

    1995-01-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) is an ATPase known to have an essential role in intracellular membrane transport events. Recently, cDNA clones encoding a Drosophila melanogaster homolog of this protein, named dNSF, were characterized and found to be expressed in the nervous system. We now report the identification of a second homolog of NSF, called dNSF-2 within this species and report evidence that this ubiquitous and widely utilized fusion protein belongs to a multigene family. The predicted amino acid sequence of dNSF-2 is 84.5% identical to dNSF (hereafter named dNSF-1), 59% identical to NSF from Chinese hamster, and 38.5% identical to the yeast homolog SEC18. The highest similarity was found in a region of dNSF-2 containing one of two ATP-binding sites; this region is most similar to members of a superfamily of ATPases. dNSF-2 is localized to a region between bands 87F12 and 88A3 on chromosome 3, and in situ hybridization techniques revealed expression in the nervous system during embryogenesis and in several imaginal discs and secretory structures in the larvae. Developmental modulation of dNSF-2 expression suggests that quantitative changes in the secretory apparatus are important in histogenesis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7624376

  4. Transient developmental expression of IgY and secretory component like protein in the gut of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Iscaki, S; Vaerman, J P; Charlemagne, J

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that a primitive vertebrate, the Mexican axolotl (Amphibian, Urodela) synthesizes two classes of immunoglobulins. IgM are present in serum early in the development, and represent the bulk of specific antibody synthesis after an antigenic challenge. IgY occur in the serum later during the development, and are relatively insensitive to immunization. We demonstrate in the present work, using immunofluorescence with specific Mabs, that IgY are expressed in the gut epithelium, as secretory molecules. Secretory IgY are well expressed in the stomach and intestinal mucosae of young animals from 1 month after hatching to the seventh month. Thereafter, IgY progressively disappear from the gut and become readily detectable in the serum of 9-month-old preadult immunologically mature animals. Axolotl IgY are closely associated in the gut to secretory component-like (SC) molecules that are well-recognized by antisera to the SC of different mammalian species. This is the first description, in a primitive tetrapode, of an immunoglobulin class that could be the physiological counterpart of mammalian IgA. PMID:1627950

  5. DEVELOPMENTALLY REGULATED PLASMA MEMBRANE PROTEIN of Nicotiana benthamiana Contributes to Potyvirus Movement and Transports to Plasmodesmata via the Early Secretory Pathway and the Actomyosin System1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Chao; Cong, Qian-Qian; Li, Xiang-Dong; Mou, An-Li; Gao, Rui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Tian, Yan-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular movement of plant viruses requires both viral and host proteins. Previous studies have demonstrated that the frame-shift protein P3N-PIPO (for the protein encoded by the open reading frame [ORF] containing 5′-terminus of P3 and a +2 frame-shift ORF called Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF and embedded in the P3) and CYLINDRICAL INCLUSION (CI) proteins were required for potyvirus cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide genetic evidence showing that a Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV; genus Potyvirus) mutant carrying a truncated PIPO domain of 58 amino acid residues could move between cells and induce systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants; mutants carrying a PIPO domain of seven, 20, or 43 amino acid residues failed to move between cells and cause systemic infection in this host plant. Interestingly, the movement-defective mutants produced progeny that eliminated the previously introduced stop codons and thus restored their systemic movement ability. We also present evidence showing that a developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein of N. benthamiana (referred to as NbDREPP) interacted with both P3N-PIPO and CI of the movement-competent TVBMV. The knockdown of NbDREPP gene expression in N. benthamiana impeded the cell-to-cell movement of TVBMV. NbDREPP was shown to colocalize with TVBMV P3N-PIPO and CI at plasmodesmata (PD) and traffic to PD via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system. We also show that myosin XI-2 is specially required for transporting NbDREPP to PD. In conclusion, NbDREPP is a key host protein within the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system that interacts with two movement proteins and influences virus movement. PMID:25540331

  6. A novel regulatory mechanism for trimeric GTP-binding proteins in the membrane and secretory granule fractions of human and rodent beta cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Rhodes, C J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Recently we described roles for heterotrimeric and low-molecular-mass GTP-binding proteins in insulin release from normal rat islets. During these studies, we observed that a protein with an apparent molecular mass (37 kDa) similar to that of the beta subunit of trimeric GTP-binding proteins underwent phosphorylation in each of five classes of insulin-secreting cells. Incubation of the beta cell total membrane fraction or the isolated secretory granule fraction (but not the cytosolic fraction) with [gamma-32P]ATP or [gamma-32P]GTP resulted in the phosphorylation of this protein, which was selectively immunoprecipitated by an anti-serum directed against the common beta subunit of trimeric G-proteins. Disruption of the alpha beta gamma trimer (by pretreatment with either fluoroaluminate or guanosine 5'(-)[gamma-thio]triphosphate) prevented beta subunit phosphorylation. Based on differential sensitivities to pH, heat and the histidine-selective reagent diethyl pyrocarbonate (and reversal of the latter by hydroxylamine), the phosphorylated amino acid was presumptively identified as histidine. Incubation of pure beta subunit alone or in combination with the exogenous purified alpha subunit of transducin did not result in the phosphorylation of the beta subunit, but addition of the islet cell membrane fraction did support this event, suggesting that membrane localization (or a membrane-associated factor) is required for beta subunit phosphorylation. Incubation of phosphorylated beta subunit with G alpha.GDP accelerated the dephosphorylation of the beta subunit, accompanied by the formation of G alpha-GTP. Immunoblotting detected multiple alpha subunits (of Gi, G(o) and Gq) and at least one beta subunit in the secretory granule fraction of normal rat islets and insulinoma cells. These data describe a potential alternative mechanism for the activation of GTP-binding proteins in beta cells which contrasts with the classical receptor-agonist mechanism: G beta undergoes

  7. An effective extracellular protein secretion by an ABC transporter system in Escherichia coli: statistical modeling and optimization of cyclodextrin glucanotransferase secretory production.

    PubMed

    Low, Kheng Oon; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Rabu, Amir; Abu Bakar, Farah Diba; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Illias, Rosli Md

    2011-09-01

    Direct transport of recombinant protein from cytosol to extracellular medium offers great advantages, such as high specific activity and a simple purification step. This work presents an investigation on the potential of an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter system, the hemolysin transport system, for efficient protein secretion in Escherichia coli (E. coli). A higher secretory production of recombinant cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) was achieved by a new plasmid design and subsequently by optimization of culture conditions via central composite design. An improvement of at least fourfold extracellular recombinant CGTase was obtained using the new plasmid design. The optimization process consisted of 20 experiments involving six star points and six replicates at the central point. The predicted optimum culture conditions for maximum recombinant CGTase secretion were found to be 25.76 μM IPTG, 1.0% (w/v) arabinose and 34.7°C post-induction temperature, with a predicted extracellular CGTase activity of 68.76 U/ml. Validation of the model gave an extracellular CGTase activity of 69.15 ± 0.71 U/ml, resulting in a 3.45-fold increase compared to the initial conditions. This corresponded to an extracellular CGTase yield of about 0.58 mg/l. We showed that a synergistic balance of transported protein and secretory pathway is important for efficient protein transport. In addition, we also demonstrated the first successful removal of the C-terminal secretion signal from the transported fusion protein by thrombin proteolytic cleavage. PMID:21336875

  8. Purification and in vitro-phospholabeling of secretory envelope proteins E1 and E2 of hepatitis C virus expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Hüssy, P; Schmid, G; Mous, J; Jacobsen, H

    1996-11-01

    The putative envelope glycoproteins of hepatitis C virus (HCV), E1 and E2, were expressed as recombinant, secretory proteins in Sf9 insect cells through infection with recombinant baculoviruses. The influenza virus hemagglutinin signal sequence (HASS) was inserted upstream of the HCV-cDNAs in order to effect secretion. Furthermore, a hexa-histidine tag for purification on a Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni(2+)-NTA) column and a protein kinase A (PKA) recognition sequence for in vitro-phospholabeling were fused upstream of the HCV-cDNA. E1- and E2 proteins lacking their carboxy-terminal, hydrophobic sequence were produced by baculovirus-infected insect cells in bioreactors of 23 1. The medium was concentrated and proteins were purified under native conditions on Ni(2+)-NTA columns. Purified proteins could be phospholabeled in vitro using the catalytic subunit of protein kinase. A isolated from bovine heart and gamma-[32P]ATP. Labeled E1 and E2 proteins expressed in insect cells could be immunoprecipitated with sera from HCV-infected patients. Co-expression of these E1 and E2 proteins led to the formation of E1-E2 complexes within the insect cell and to secretion of these complexes into the medium. PMID:8896240

  9. Proteolysis in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.E.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    Many secretory proteins are degraded intracellularly rather than secreted, however the location of this catabolic process is not known. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the degradation occurs in the organelles of the secretory pathway. Slices of rat liver were incubated with (/sup 14/C)leucine for 3 h and then incubated under chase conditions for 30 min. The tissue was homogenized and the Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The organelles were incubated in 0.3M sucrose-50 mM citrate (pH 4) for 8-12 h at 37 C; control samples were incubated at 4 C. Percent degradation was calculated as the amount of acid soluble radioactivity released relative to total radioactivity in the sample. Proteolysis in the organelles incubated at 37 C was as follows: Golgi: 15-25%; sER: 10-20%; rER: 10-20%. Proteolysis at 4 C was negligible in all cases. These results support the hypothesis that the compartments of the secretory pathway are capable of degrading newly synthesized secretory proteins.

  10. Deletion of atbf1/zfhx3 in mouse prostate causes neoplastic lesions, likely by attenuation of membrane and secretory proteins and multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoying; Li, Jie; Xing, Changsheng; Frierson, Henry F; Wu, Hao; Ding, Xiaokun; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2014-05-01

    The ATBF1/ZFHX3 gene at 16q22 is the second most frequently mutated gene in human prostate cancer and has reduced expression or mislocalization in several types of human tumors. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that ATBF1 has a tumor suppressor function in prostate cancer has not been tested. In this study, we examined the role of ATBF1 in prostatic carcinogenesis by specifically deleting Atbf1 in mouse prostatic epithelial cells. We also examined the effect of Atbf1 deletion on gene expression and signaling pathways in mouse prostates. Histopathologic analyses showed that Atbf1 deficiency caused hyperplasia and mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN) primarily in the dorsal prostate but also in other lobes. Hemizygous deletion of Atbf1 also increased the development of hyperplasia and mPIN, indicating a haploinsufficiency of Atbf1. The mPIN lesions expressed luminal cell markers and harbored molecular changes similar to those in human PIN and prostate cancer, including weaker expression of basal cell marker cytokeratin 5 (Ck5), cell adhesion protein E-cadherin, and the smooth muscle layer marker Sma; elevated expression of the oncoproteins phospho-Erk1/2, phospho-Akt and Muc1; and aberrant protein glycosylation. Gene expression profiling revealed a large number of genes that were dysregulated by Atbf1 deletion, particularly those that encode for secretory and cell membrane proteins. The four signaling networks that were most affected by Atbf1 deletion included those centered on Erk1/2 and IGF1, Akt and FSH, NF-κB and progesterone and β-estradiol. These findings provide in vivo evidence that ATBF1 is a tumor suppressor in the prostate, suggest that loss of Atbf1 contributes to tumorigenesis by dysregulating membrane and secretory proteins and multiple signaling pathways, and provide a new animal model for prostate cancer. PMID:24934715

  11. Deletion of Atbf1/Zfhx3 In Mouse Prostate Causes Neoplastic Lesions, Likely by Attenuation of Membrane and Secretory Proteins and Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoying; Li, Jie; Xing, Changsheng; Frierson, Henry F.; Wu, Hao; Ding, Xiaokun; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D.; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2014-01-01

    The ATBF1/ZFHX3 gene at 16q22 is the second most frequently mutated gene in human prostate cancer and has reduced expression or mislocalization in several types of human tumors. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that ATBF1 has a tumor suppressor function in prostate cancer has not been tested. In this study, we examined the role of ATBF1 in prostatic carcinogenesis by specifically deleting Atbf1 in mouse prostatic epithelial cells. We also examined the effect of Atbf1 deletion on gene expression and signaling pathways in mouse prostates. Histopathologic analyses showed that Atbf1 deficiency caused hyperplasia and mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN) primarily in the dorsal prostate but also in other lobes. Hemizygous deletion of Atbf1 also increased the development of hyperplasia and mPIN, indicating a haploinsufficiency of Atbf1. The mPIN lesions expressed luminal cell markers and harbored molecular changes similar to those in human PIN and prostate cancer, including weaker expression of basal cell marker cytokeratin 5 (Ck5), cell adhesion protein E-cadherin, and the smooth muscle layer marker Sma; elevated expression of the oncoproteins phospho-Erk1/2, phospho-Akt and Muc1; and aberrant protein glycosylation. Gene expression profiling revealed a large number of genes that were dysregulated by Atbf1 deletion, particularly those that encode for secretory and cell membrane proteins. The four signaling networks that were most affected by Atbf1 deletion included those centered on Erk1/2 and IGF1, Akt and FSH, NF-κB and progesterone and β-estradiol. These findings provide in vivo evidence that ATBF1 is a tumor suppressor in the prostate, suggest that loss of Atbf1 contributes to tumorigenesis by dysregulating membrane and secretory proteins and multiple signaling pathways, and provide a new animal model for prostate cancer. PMID:24934715

  12. Secretory Pathway of Trypanosomatid Parasites

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Malcolm J.; Mullin, Kylie A.; Ilgoutz, Steven C.; Teasdale, Rohan D.

    2002-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae comprise a large group of parasitic protozoa, some of which cause important diseases in humans. These include Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness and nagana in cattle), Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas' disease in Central and South America), and Leishmania spp. (the causative agent of visceral and [muco]cutaneous leishmaniasis throughout the tropics and subtropics). The cell surfaces of these parasites are covered in complex protein- or carbohydrate-rich coats that are required for parasite survival and infectivity in their respective insect vectors and mammalian hosts. These molecules are assembled in the secretory pathway. Recent advances in the genetic manipulation of these parasites as well as progress with the parasite genome projects has greatly advanced our understanding of processes that underlie secretory transport in trypanosomatids. This article provides an overview of the organization of the trypanosomatid secretory pathway and connections that exist with endocytic organelles and multiple lytic and storage vacuoles. A number of the molecular components that are required for vesicular transport have been identified, as have some of the sorting signals that direct proteins to the cell surface or organelles in the endosome-vacuole system. Finally, the subcellular organization of the major glycosylation pathways in these parasites is reviewed. Studies on these highly divergent eukaryotes provide important insights into the molecular processes underlying secretory transport that arose very early in eukaryotic evolution. They also reveal unusual or novel aspects of secretory transport and protein glycosylation that may be exploited in developing new antiparasite drugs. PMID:11875130

  13. Caveolin-1 binding to endoplasmic reticulum membranes and entry into the regulated secretory pathway are regulated by serine phosphorylation. Protein sorting at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, A; Arvan, P; Lisanti, M P

    2001-02-01

    Caveolin-1 serves as the main coat protein of caveolae membranes, as an intracellular cholesterol shuttle, and as a regulator of diverse signaling molecules. Of the 12 residues conserved across all caveolin isoforms from all species examined to date, only Ser(80) and Ser(168) could serve as phosphorylation sites. We show here that mimicking chronic phosphorylation of Ser(80) by mutation to Glu (i.e. Cav-1(S80E)), blocks phosphate incorporation. However, Cav-1(S168E) is phosphorylated to the same extent as wild-type caveolin-1. Cav-1(S80E) targets to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, remains oligomeric, and maintains normal membrane topology. In contrast, Cav-1(S80A), which cannot be phosphorylated, targets to caveolae membranes. Some exocrine cells secrete caveolin-1 in a regulated manner. Cav-1(S80A) is not secreted by AR42J pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells even in the presence of dexamethasone, an agent that induces the secretory phenotype. Conversely, Cav-1(S80E) is secreted to a greater extent than wild-type caveolin-1 following dexamethasone treatment. We conclude that caveolin-1 phosphorylation on invariant serine residue 80 is required for endoplasmic reticulum retention and entry into the regulated secretory pathway. PMID:11078729

  14. Proteomic analysis of secretory products from the model gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus reveals dominance of Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, James P.; Harcus, Yvonne; Murray, Janice; van Agtmaal, Maaike; Filbey, Kara J.; Grainger, John R.; Bridgett, Stephen; Blaxter, Mark L.; Ashton, Peter D.; Ashford, David; Curwen, Rachel S.; Wilson, R. Alan; Dowle, Adam A.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal helminth parasite, Heligmosomoides polygyrus offers a tractable experimental model for human hookworm infections such as Ancylostoma duodenale and veterinary parasites such as Haemonchus contortus. Parasite excretory-secretory (ES) products represent the major focus for immunological and biochemical analyses, and contain immunomodulatory molecules responsible for nematode immune evasion. In a proteomic analysis of adult H. polygyrus secretions (termed HES) matched to an extensive transcriptomic dataset, we identified 374 HES proteins by LC-MS/MS, which were distinct from those in somatic extract HEx, comprising 446 identified proteins, confirming selective export of ES proteins. The predominant secreted protein families were proteases (astacins and other metalloproteases, aspartic, cysteine and serine-type proteases), lysozymes, apyrases and acetylcholinesterases. The most abundant products were members of the highly divergent venom allergen-like (VAL) family, related to Ancylostoma secreted protein (ASP); 25 homologues were identified, with VAL-1 and -2 also shown to be associated with the parasite surface. The dominance of VAL proteins is similar to profiles reported for Ancylostoma and Haemonchus ES products. Overall, this study shows that the secretions of H. polygyrus closely parallel those of clinically important GI nematodes, confirming the value of this parasite as a model of helminth infection. PMID:21722761

  15. Effect of colchicine on the transport of precursor enamel protein in secretory ameloblasts studied by /sup 3/H-proline radioautography in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, S.; Takano, Y.; Wakisaka, S.; Ichikawa, H.; Nishikawa, S.; Akai, M.

    1988-08-01

    The incorporation of 3H-proline into the secretory ameloblasts of rat molar tooth germs cultured with or without colchicine was studied by light and electron microscope radioautography to determine the function of microtubules in the transport of precursor enamel protein from the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum (rER) to the Golgi cisternae. The grain counts over the transitional vesicles, which accumulated in various cellular regions with colchicine treatment, continued to increase with chase time, unlike in controls. At 30 and 90 min chase, these counts were significantly higher than in controls. Moreover, the total grain count over the organelles (rER, pale granules, and transitional vesicles), which are positioned before the Golgi cisternae in the synthetic pathway, maintained a significantly higher level at 90 min chase in colchicine-treated tooth germs than in controls. The transport of synthesized protein to the Golgi cisternae via transitional vesicles was suppressed in colchicine-treated tooth germs. Some grains appeared with time over pale granular materials that appeared in the intercellular spaces of secretory ameloblasts with colchicine treatment. However, at each chase period, the grain count over pale granular materials was not so high as the count over the enamel in control. The present results indicate that colchicine affects the transport of newly synthesized protein from the rER to the Golgi cisterna via transitional vesicles, probably by interfering with the oriented transport related to microtubular function. It is suggested that the microtubular system may be concerned with the movement of the transitional vesicles.

  16. Directed Evolution of a Secretory Leader for the Improved Expression of Heterologous Proteins and Full-Length Antibodies in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rakestraw, J. Andy; Sazinsky, Stephen L.; Piatesi, Andrea; Antipov, Eugene; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2010-01-01

    Because of its eukaryotic nature, simple fermentation requirements, and pliable genetics, there have been many attempts at improving recombinant protein production in S. cerevisiae. These strategies typically involve altering the expression of a native protein thought to be involved in heterologous protein trafficking. Usually, these approaches yield three to ten-fold improvements over wild-type strains and are almost always specific to one type of protein. In this study, a library of mutant alpha mating factor 1 leader peptides (MFα1pp) is screened for the enhanced secretion of a single-chain antibody. One of the isolated mutants is shown to enhance the secretion of the scFv up to sixteen-fold over wild-type. These leaders also confer a secretory improvement to two other scFvs as well as two additional, structurally unrelated proteins. Moreover, the improved leader sequences, combined with strain engineering, allow for a one-hundred eighty fold improvement over previous reports in the secretion of full length, functional, glycosylated human IgG1. The production of full-length IgG1 at milligram per liter titers in a simple, laboratory-scale system will significantly expedite drug discovery and reagent synthesis while reducing antibody cloning, production, and characterization costs. PMID:19459139

  17. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin-2 is associated with dense core secretory granules in PC12 neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Papini, E; Rossetto, O; Cutler, D F

    1995-01-20

    The presence and intracellular distribution of vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1) and VAMP-2 were investigated in the PC12 neuroendocrine cell line using isotype-specific polyclonal antibodies. VAMP-2 was detected in the total membrane fraction, while VAMP-1 was undetectable. Subcellular fractionation demonstrates that a substantial amount of the VAMP-2 (24-36%) is associated with dense core, catecholamine-containing granules (DCGs). This was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The L chain of tetanus neurotoxin, known to inhibit granule mediated secretion in permeabilized PC12 cells, as well as botulinum neurotoxins F and G, effectively cleaved DCG-associated VAMP-2. These data demonstrate that VAMP-2 is present on the secretory granules of PC12 cells. PMID:7836399

  18. Larval excretory-secretory products from the parasite Schistosoma mansoni modulate HSP70 protein expression in defence cells of its snail host, Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Zahoor, Zahida; Davies, Angela J.; Kirk, Ruth S.; Rollinson, David

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) following cellular stress is a response shared by many organisms. Amongst the HSP family, the ∼70 kDa HSPs are the most evolutionarily conserved with intracellular chaperone and extracellular immunoregulatory functions. This study focused on the effects of larval excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from the parasite Schistosoma mansoni on HSP70 protein expression levels in haemocytes (defence cells) from its snail intermediate host Biomphalaria glabrata. S. mansoni larval stage ESPs are known to interfere with haemocyte physiology and behaviour. Haemocytes from two different B. glabrata strains, one which is susceptible to S. mansoni infection and one which is resistant, both showed reduced HSP70 protein levels following 1 h challenge with S. mansoni ESPs when compared to unchallenged controls; however, the reduction observed in the resistant strain was less marked. The decline in intracellular HSP70 protein persisted for at least 5 h in resistant snail haemocytes only. Furthermore, in schistosome-susceptible snails infected by S. mansoni for 35 days, haemocytes possessed approximately 70% less HSP70. The proteasome inhibitor, MG132, partially restored HSP70 protein levels in ESP-challenged haemocytes, demonstrating that the decrease in HSP70 was in part due to intracellular degradation. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway appears to regulate HSP70 protein expression in these cells, as the mitogen-activated protein-ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor, U0126, significantly reduced HSP70 protein levels. Disruption of intracellular HSP70 protein expression in B. glabrata haemocytes by S. mansoni ESPs may be a strategy employed by the parasite to manipulate the immune response of the intermediate snail host. PMID:20182834

  19. Immunosuppressive PAS-1 is an excretory/secretory protein released by larval and adult worms of the ascarid nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M F P; Titz, T O; Batista, I F C; Marques-Porto, R; Oliveira, C F; Alves de Araujo, C A; Macedo-Soares, M F

    2015-05-01

    Helminths use several strategies to evade and/or modify the host immune response, including suppression or inactivation of the host antigen-specific response. Several helminth immunomodulatory molecules have been identified. Our studies have focused on immunosuppression induced by the roundworm Ascaris suum and an A. suum-derived protein named protein 1 from A. suum (PAS-1). Here we assessed whether PAS-1 is an excretory/secretory (E/S) protein and whether it can suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. Larvae from infective eggs were cultured in unsupplemented Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) for 2 weeks. PAS-1 was then measured in the culture supernatants and in adult A. suum body fluid at different time points by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the monoclonal antibody MAIP-1. Secreted PAS-1 was detected in both larval culture supernatant and adult body fluid. It suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced leucocyte migration and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and stimulated interleukin (IL)-10 secretion, indicating that larval and adult secreted PAS-1 suppresses inflammation in this model. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory activity of PAS-1 was abolished by treatment with MAIP-1, a PAS-1-specific monoclonal antibody, confirming the crucial role of PAS-1 in suppressing LPS-induced inflammation. These findings demonstrate that PAS-1 is an E/S protein with anti-inflammatory properties likely to be attributable to IL-10 production. PMID:24703095

  20. Stage-specific excretory/secretory small heat shock proteins from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti: putative links to host’s intestinal mucosal defense system

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Geisinger, Frank; Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Soblik, Hanns; Steen, Hanno; Mitreva, Makedonka; Erttmann, Klaus D.; Perbandt, Markus; Liebau, Eva; Brattig, Norbert W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In search of molecules involved in the interaction of intestinal nematodes and mammalian mucosal host cells, we performed mass spectrometry to identify excretory/secretory proteins (ESP) from Strongyloides ratti. In addition to other peptides, we detected in the ESP of parasitic female stage peptides homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans heat shock protein-17, named Sra-HSP-17.1 (~19 kDa) and Sra-HSP-17.2 (~ 18 kDa) with 49% amino acid identity. The full-length cDNAs (483 bp and 474 bp, respectively) were identified and the genomic organization analyzed. To allow further characterization, the proteins were recombinantly expressed and purified. Profiling of transcription by qRT-PCR and of protein by ELISA in various developmental stages revealed parasitic female-specific expression. The sequence analysis of both DNA and amino acid sequence showed two genes share a conserved alpha-crystallin domain and variable N-terminals. The Sra-HSP-17 proteins showed the highest homology to the deduced small heat-shock protein sequence of the human pathogen S. stercoralis. We observed strong immunogenicity of both proteins, leading to high IgG responses following infection of rats. Flow cytometric analysis indicated the binding of Sra-HSP-17s to the monocytes/macrophage lineage but not to peripheral lymphocytes or neutrophils. A rat intestinal epithelial cell line showed dose dependent binding to Sra-HSP-17.1, but not to Sra-HSP-17.2. Exposed monocytes released IL-10 but not TNF-alpha in response to Sra-HSP-17s, suggesting a possible involvement of secreted female proteins in host immune responses. PMID:21762402

  1. Toxoplasma secretory granules: one population or more?

    PubMed

    Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, dense granules are known as the storage secretory organelles of the so-called GRA proteins (for dense granule proteins), which are destined to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and the PV-derived cyst wall. Recently, newly annotated GRA proteins targeted to the host cell nucleus have enlarged this view. Here we provide an update on the latest developments on the Toxoplasma secreted proteins, which to date have been mainly studied at both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages, and we point out that recent discoveries could open the issue of a possible, yet uncharacterized, distinct secretory pathway in Toxoplasma. PMID:25599584

  2. Lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 participates in transport carrier formation and protein trafficking in the early secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Johannes, Ludger; Pyne, Susan; Sarri, Elisabet; Egea, Gustavo

    2013-06-15

    The inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) activity by propanolol indicates that diacylglycerol (DAG) is required for the formation of transport carriers at the Golgi and for retrograde trafficking to the ER. Here we report that the PAP2 family member lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 (LPP3, also known as PAP2b) localizes in compartments of the secretory pathway from ER export sites to the Golgi complex. The depletion of human LPP3: (i) reduces the number of tubules generated from the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and the Golgi, with those formed from the Golgi being longer in LPP3-silenced cells than in control cells; (ii) impairs the Rab6-dependent retrograde transport of Shiga toxin subunit B from the Golgi to the ER, but not the anterograde transport of VSV-G or ssDsRed; and (iii) induces a high accumulation of Golgi-associated membrane buds. LPP3 depletion also reduces levels of de novo synthesized DAG and the Golgi-associated DAG contents. Remarkably, overexpression of a catalytically inactive form of LPP3 mimics the effects of LPP3 knockdown on Rab6-dependent retrograde transport. We conclude that LPP3 participates in the formation of retrograde transport carriers at the ER-Golgi interface, where it transitorily cycles, and during its route to the plasma membrane. PMID:23591818

  3. Secretory diarrhoea: mechanisms and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Donowitz, Mark; Verkman, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease remains a major health burden worldwide. Secretory diarrhoeas are caused by certain bacterial and viral infections, inflammatory processes, drugs and genetic disorders. Fluid secretion across the intestinal epithelium in secretory diarrhoeas involves multiple ion and solute transporters, as well as activation of cyclic nucleotide and Ca2+ signalling pathways. In many secretory diarrhoeas, activation of Cl− channels in the apical membrane of enterocytes, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, increases fluid secretion, while inhibition of Na+ transport reduces fluid absorption. Current treatment of diarrhoea includes replacement of fluid and electrolyte losses using oral rehydration solutions, and drugs targeting intestinal motility or fluid secretion. Therapeutics in the development pipeline target intestinal ion channels and transporters, regulatory proteins and cell surface receptors. This Review describes pathogenic mechanisms of secretory diarrhoea, current and emerging therapeutics, and the challenges in developing antidiarrhoeal therapeutics. PMID:26122478

  4. Quality control in the secretory assembly line.

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, A

    2001-01-01

    As a rule, only proteins that have reached a native, folded and assembled structure are transported to their target organelles and compartments within the cell. In the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells, this type of sorting is particularly important. A variety of molecular mechanisms are involved that distinguish between folded and unfolded proteins, modulate their intracellular transport, and induce degradation if they fail to fold. This phenomenon, called quality control, occurs at several levels and involves different types of folding sensors. The quality control system provides a stringent and versatile molecular sorting system that guaranties fidelity of protein expression in the secretory pathway. PMID:11260794

  5. Cytochrome P450 1A-like proteins expressed in the islets of Langerhans and altered pancreatic β-cell secretory responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Jacqueline; Flatt, Peter R; Barnett, Christopher R

    1997-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) mixed-function oxidase system is widely distributed in body tissues and plays a key role in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Little attention has been paid to the expression of the system in the islets of Langerhans. The current study has examined the expression and potential role of the CYP1A family within the islets of Langerhans of control and 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced Wistar rats. CYP1A expression within pancreatic slices and islets from 3-MC-induced and control rats demonstrated that CYP1A-like protein levels were induced by 3-MC pretreatment (25 mg kg−1 day−1; i.p. for 3 days). Effects of 3-MC-induction on β-cell secretory responsiveness were investigated by use of rat collagenase-isolated islets. Insulin release from control islets incubated with 3 mM glucose (basal) was 1.4±0.2 ng/islet h−1 (mean±s.e.mean, n=7). Incubation with 16.7 mM glucose, 25 mM KCl, 100 μM arachidonic acid, or 100 μM carbachol caused a 4.4, 7.0, 4.0 and 4.2 fold, respectively, increase in insulin release (P<0.001). Forskolin (2 μM), or phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (10 nM) potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin release 1.2 and 1.6 fold (P<0.01) whereas adenalin (1 μM) caused a 76% inhibition (P<0.01). Islets from 3-MC pretreated animals displayed similar responsiveness to all agents tested except arachidonic acid, carbachol and forskolin. Insulin release in response to arachidonic acid and carbachol was enhanced 5.2 and 5.0 fold, respectively, by 3-MC pretreatment (P<0.001 compared to control islets incubated with 3 mM glucose); the effect of forskolin on insulin output was significantly decreased (20%; P<0.01) compared to control islets. 3-MC pretreatment did not cause any significant differences in food intake, plasma glucose or total islet insulin content. Incubation of islets with 3-MC in vitro (1 μM–10 mM) did not affect basal or glucose-stimulated insulin release. These data

  6. SCR96, a small cysteine-rich secretory protein of Phytophthora cactorum, can trigger cell death in the Solanaceae and is important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Li, Yan-Peng; Li, Qi-Yuan; Xing, Yu-Ping; Liu, Bei-Bei; Tong, Yun-Hui; Xu, Jing-You

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and small molecules produced by both the plant pathogen Phytophthora and host plants in the apoplastic space mediate the relationship between the interplaying organisms. Various Phytophthora apoplastic effectors, including small cysteine-rich (SCR) secretory proteins, have been identified, but their roles during interaction remain to be determined. Here, we identified an SCR effector encoded by scr96, one of three novel genes encoding SCR proteins in P. cactorum with similarity to the P. cactorum phytotoxic protein PcF. Together with the other two genes, scr96 was transcriptionally induced throughout the developmental and infection stages of the pathogen. These genes triggered plant cell death (PCD) in the Solanaceae, including Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato. The scr96 gene did not show single nucleotide polymorphisms in a collection of P. cactorum isolates from different countries and host plants, suggesting that its role is essential and non-redundant during infection. Homologues of SCR96 were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. A stable protoplast transformation protocol was adapted for P. cactorum using green fluorescent protein as a marker. The silencing of scr96 in P. cactorum caused gene-silenced transformants to lose their pathogenicity on host plants and these transformants were significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress. Transient expression of scr96 partially recovered the virulence of gene-silenced transformants on plants. Overall, our results indicate that the P. cactorum scr96 gene encodes an important virulence factor that not only causes PCD in host plants, but is also important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance. PMID:26307454

  7. A Retained Secretory Signal Peptide Mediates High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Assembly and Function of Haptoglobin-related Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, John M.; Nishanova, Tuiumkan; Pena, Savannah Rose; Hess, Matthew; Scelsi, Chris L.; Widener, Justin; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) is a component of a minor subspecies of high density lipoproteins (HDL) that function in innate immunity. Here we show that assembly of Hpr into HDL is mediated by its retained N-terminal signal peptide, an unusual feature for a secreted protein and the major difference between Hpr and the soluble acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp). The 18-amino acid signal peptide is necessary for binding to HDL and interacts directly with the hydrocarbon region of lipids. Utilizing model liposomes, we show that the rate of assembly and steady-state distribution of Hpr in lipid particles is mediated by the physical property of lipid fluidity. Dye release assays reveal that Hpr interacts more rapidly with fluid liposomes. Conversely, steady-state binding assays indicate that more rigid lipid compositions stabilize Hpr association. Lipid association also plays a role in facilitating hemoglobin binding by Hpr. Our data may offer an explanation for the distinct distribution of Hpr among HDL subspecies. Rather than protein-protein interactions mediating localization, direct interaction with phospholipids and sensitivity to lipid fluidity may be sufficient for localization of Hpr and may represent a mechanism of HDL subspeciation. PMID:25037218

  8. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 plays a role in prostate cancer cell invasion and affects expression of PSA and ANXA1.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Bhakti R; Breed, Ananya A; Apte, Snehal; Acharya, Kshitish; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) is upregulated in prostate cancer as compared to the normal prostate tissue. Higher expression of CRISP-3 has been linked to poor prognosis and hence it has been thought to act as a prognostic marker for prostate cancer. It is proposed to have a role in innate immunity but its role in prostate cancer is still unknown. In order to understand its function, its expression was stably knocked down in LNCaP cells. CRISP-3 knockdown did not affect cell viability but resulted in reduced invasiveness. Global gene expression changes upon CRISP-3 knockdown were identified by microarray analysis. Microarray data were quantitatively validated by evaluating the expression of seven candidate genes in three independent stable clones. Functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes identified cell adhesion, cell motility, and ion transport to be affected among other biological processes. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, also known as Kallikrein 3) was the top most downregulated gene whose expression was also validated at protein level. Interestingly, expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), a known anti-inflammatory protein, was upregulated upon CRISP-3 knockdown. Re-introduction of CRISP-3 into the knockdown clone reversed the effect on invasiveness and also led to increased PSA expression. These results suggest that overexpression of CRISP-3 in prostate tumor may maintain higher PSA expression and lower ANXA1 expression. Our data also indicate that poor prognosis associated with higher CRISP-3 expression could be due to its role in cell invasion. PMID:26369530

  9. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein is a secretory class 1 acute-phase protein whose gene is transcriptionally activated by APRF/STAT/3 and other cytokine-inducible nuclear proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, R R; Kirschning, C J; Unbehaun, A; Aberle, H P; Knope, H P; Lamping, N; Ulevitch, R J; Herrmann, F

    1996-01-01

    Acute-phase reactants (APRs) are proteins synthesized in the liver following induction by interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and glucocorticoids, involving transcriptional gene activation. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) is a recently identified hepatic secretory protein potentially involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis, capable of binding the bacterial cell wall product endotoxin and directing it to its cellular receptor, CD14. In order to examine the transcriptional induction mechanisms by which the LBP gene is activated, we have investigated the regulation of expression of its mRNA in vitro and in vivo as well as the organization of 5' upstream regulatory DNA sequences. We show that induction of LBP expression is transcriptionally regulated and is dependent on stimulation with IL-1beta, IL-6, and dexamethasone. By definition, LBP thus has to be viewed as a class 1 acute-phase protein and represents the first APR identified which is capable of detecting pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, cloning of the LBP promoter revealed the presence of regulatory elements, including the common APR promoter motif APRE/STAT-3 (acute-phase response element/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Luciferase reporter gene assays utilizing LBP promoter truncation and point mutation variants indicated that transcriptional activation of the LBP gene required a functional APRE/STAT-3 binding site downstream of the transcription start site, as well as an AP-1 and a C/EBP (CCAAT enhancer-binding protein) binding site. Gel retardation and supershift assays confirmed that upon cytokine stimulation APRF/STAT-3 binds to its recognition site, leading to strong activation of the LBP gene. Unraveling of the mechanism of transcriptional activation of the LBP gene, involving three known transcription factors, may contribute to our understanding of the acute-phase response and the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock. PMID:8668165

  10. Secretory expression of a heterologous protein, Aiio-AIO6BS, in Bacillus subtilis via a non-classical secretion pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xingliang; Yang, Yalin; Liu, Xuewei; Li, Dong; Li, Juan; Guo, Xiaoze; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-09-16

    The quenching enzyme AIO6 (AiiO-AIO6) has been reported as a feed additive preparation for application in aquaculture and biological control of pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila. We developed an economical strategy to express AIO6BS (AiiO-AIO6BS, codon optimized AIO6 in Bacillus subtilis) in Bacillus subtilis for facilitating its widespread application. Promoter p43 without the signal peptide was used for secretory expression of AIO6BS in B. subtilis. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that AIO6BS was successfully expressed and secreted into the cell culture. Expression analysis of AIO6BS in the single or double mutant of the lytC and lytD genes for cell autolysis in B. subtilis 1A751 and cell autolysis-resistant engineered strain LM2531 derived from the wild type 168 indicated that the release of the heterologous protein AIO6BS was not simply mediated by cell lysis. Expression level of AIO6BS did not change in the mutants of B. subtilis that harbored mutations in the secA, tatAC, or ecsA genes compared with that in the parent wild type strain. These results suggested the AIO6BS protein was likely secreted via a non-classical secretion pathway. The expression analysis of the various N- or C-terminal truncated gene products indicated that AIO6BS probably acts as an export signal to direct its self-secretion across the cell membrane. PMID:27514447

  11. Chemoattraction of macrophages by secretory molecules derived from cells expressing the signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Eosinophil cationic protein is a clinical asthma biomarker that would be released into blood, especially gathered in bronchia. The signal peptide of eosinophil cationic protein (ECPsp) plays an important role in translocating ECP to the extracellular space. We previously reported that ECPsp inhibits microbial growth and regulates the expression of mammalian genes encoding tumor growth factor-α (TGF-α) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Results In the present study, we first generated a DNA microarray dataset, which showed that ECPsp upregulated proinflammatory molecules, including chemokines, interferon-induced molecules, and Toll-like receptors. The levels of mRNAs encoding CCL5, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL16, STAT1, and STAT2 were increased in the presence of ECPsp by 2.07-, 4.21-, 7.52-, 2.6-, 3.58-, and 1.67-fold, respectively. We then constructed a functional linkage network by integrating the microarray dataset with the pathway database of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Follow-up analysis revealed that STAT1 and STAT2, important transcriptional factors that regulate cytokine expression and release, served as hubs to connect the pathways of cytokine stimulation (TGF-α and EGFR pathways) and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, integrating TGF-α and EGFR with the functional linkage network indicated that STAT1 and STAT2 served as hubs that connect two functional clusters, including (1) cell proliferation and survival, and (2) inflammation. Finally, we found that conditioned medium in which cells that express ECPsp had been cultured could chemoattract macrophages. Experimentally, we also demonstrated that the migration of macrophage could be inhibited by the individual treatment of siRNAs of STAT1 or STAT2. Therefore, we hypothesize that ECPsp may function as a regulator for enhancing the migration of macrophages through the upregualtion of the transcriptional factors STAT1 and STAT2. Conclusion The increased expression and

  12. Liver-Enriched Gene 1, a Glycosylated Secretory Protein, Binds to FGFR and Mediates an Anti-stress Pathway to Protect Liver Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxia; Liu, Feng; Cui, Zongbin; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals and birds, teleost fish undergo external embryogenesis, and therefore their embryos are constantly challenged by stresses from their living environment. These stresses, when becoming too harsh, will cause arrest of cell proliferation, abnormal cell death or senescence. Such organisms have to evolve a sophisticated anti-stress mechanism to protect the process of embryogenesis/organogenesis. However, very few signaling molecule(s) mediating such activity have been identified. liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1) is an uncharacterized gene that encodes a novel secretory protein containing a single domain DUF781 (domain of unknown function 781) that is well conserved in vertebrates. In the zebrafish genome, there are two copies of leg1, namely leg1a and leg1b. leg1a and leg1b are closely linked on chromosome 20 and share high homology, but are differentially expressed. In this report, we generated two leg1a mutant alleles using the TALEN technique, then characterized liver development in the mutants. We show that a leg1a mutant exhibits a stress-dependent small liver phenotype that can be prevented by chemicals blocking the production of reactive oxygen species. Further studies reveal that Leg1a binds to FGFR3 and mediates a novel anti-stress pathway to protect liver development through enhancing Erk activity. More importantly, we show that the binding of Leg1a to FGFR relies on the glycosylation at the 70th asparagine (Asn70 or N70), and mutating the Asn70 to Ala70 compromised Leg1’s function in liver development. Therefore, Leg1 plays a unique role in protecting liver development under different stress conditions by serving as a secreted signaling molecule/modulator. PMID:26901320

  13. Liver-Enriched Gene 1, a Glycosylated Secretory Protein, Binds to FGFR and Mediates an Anti-stress Pathway to Protect Liver Development in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minjie; Bai, Yun; Zhang, Chunxia; Liu, Feng; Cui, Zongbin; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2016-02-01

    Unlike mammals and birds, teleost fish undergo external embryogenesis, and therefore their embryos are constantly challenged by stresses from their living environment. These stresses, when becoming too harsh, will cause arrest of cell proliferation, abnormal cell death or senescence. Such organisms have to evolve a sophisticated anti-stress mechanism to protect the process of embryogenesis/organogenesis. However, very few signaling molecule(s) mediating such activity have been identified. liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1) is an uncharacterized gene that encodes a novel secretory protein containing a single domain DUF781 (domain of unknown function 781) that is well conserved in vertebrates. In the zebrafish genome, there are two copies of leg1, namely leg1a and leg1b. leg1a and leg1b are closely linked on chromosome 20 and share high homology, but are differentially expressed. In this report, we generated two leg1a mutant alleles using the TALEN technique, then characterized liver development in the mutants. We show that a leg1a mutant exhibits a stress-dependent small liver phenotype that can be prevented by chemicals blocking the production of reactive oxygen species. Further studies reveal that Leg1a binds to FGFR3 and mediates a novel anti-stress pathway to protect liver development through enhancing Erk activity. More importantly, we show that the binding of Leg1a to FGFR relies on the glycosylation at the 70th asparagine (Asn(70) or N(70)), and mutating the Asn(70) to Ala(70) compromised Leg1's function in liver development. Therefore, Leg1 plays a unique role in protecting liver development under different stress conditions by serving as a secreted signaling molecule/modulator. PMID:26901320

  14. Proteomic analysis of common bean seed with storage protein deficiency reveals up-regulation of sulfur-rich proteins and starch and raffinose metabolic enzymes, and down-regulation of the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Marsolais, Frédéric; Pajak, Agnieszka; Yin, Fuqiang; Taylor, Meghan; Gabriel, Michelle; Merino, Diana M; Ma, Vanessa; Kameka, Alexander; Vijayan, Perumal; Pham, Hai; Huang, Shangzhi; Rivoal, Jean; Bett, Kirstin; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Liu, Qiang; Bertrand, Annick; Chapman, Ralph

    2010-06-16

    A deficiency in major seed storage proteins is associated with a nearly two-fold increase in sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Their mature seed proteome was compared by an approach combining label-free quantification by spectral counting, 2-DE, and analysis of selective extracts. Lack of phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin was mainly compensated by increases in legumin, alpha-amylase inhibitors and mannose lectin FRIL. Along with legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were major contributors to the elevated sulfur amino acid content. Coordinate induction of granule-bound starch synthase I, starch synthase II-2 and starch branching enzyme were associated with minor alteration of starch composition, whereas increased levels of UDP-glucose 4-epimerase were correlated with a 30% increase in raffinose content. Induction of cell division cycle protein 48 and ubiquitin suggested enhanced ER-associated degradation. This was not associated with a classical unfolded protein response as the levels of ER HSC70-cognate binding protein were actually reduced in the mutant. Repression of rab1 GTPase was consistent with decreased traffic through the secretory pathway. Collectively, these results have implications for the nutritional quality of common bean, and provide information on the pleiotropic phenotype associated with storage protein deficiency in a dicotyledonous seed. PMID:20353836

  15. Isolation of a cDNA clone for spinach lipid transfer protein and evidence that the protein is synthesized by the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard, W.R.; Thoma, S.; Botella, J.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a nonspecific lipid transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was isolated by probing a library with synthetic oligonucleotides based on the amino acid sequence of the protein. Determination of the DNA sequence indicated a 354-nucleotide open reading frame which encodes a 118-amino acid residue polypeptide. The first 26 amino acids of the open reading frame, which are not present in the mature protein, have all the characteristics of a signal sequence which is normally associated with the synthesis of membrane proteins or secreted proteins. In vitro transcription of the cDNA and translation in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes or microsomes from cultured maize endosperm cells indicated that proteolytic processing of the preprotein to the mature form was associated with cotranslational insertion into the microsomal membranes. Because there is no known mechanism by which the polypeptide could be transferred from the microsomal membranes to the cytoplasm, the proposed role of this protein in catalyzing lipid transfer between intracellular membranes is in doubt. Although the lipid transfer protein is one of the most abundant proteins in leaf cells, the results of genomic Southern analysis were consistent with the presence of only one gene. Analysis of the level of mRNA by Northern blotting indicated that the transcript was several-fold more abundant than an actin transcript in leaf and petiole tissue, but was present in roots at less than 1% of the level in petioles.

  16. Ameloblast transcriptome changes from secretory to maturation stages

    PubMed Central

    Simmer, James P.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Wang, Shih-Kai; Reid, Bryan M.; Bai, Yongsheng; Hu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Jan C.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major molecular components in the secretory and maturation stages of amelogenesis through transcriptome analyses. Ameloblasts (40 sections per age group) were laser micro-dissected from Day 5 (secretory stage) and Days 11–12 (maturation stage) first molars. PolyA+ RNA was isolated from the lysed cells, converted to cDNA, and amplified to generate a cDNA library. DNA sequences were obtained using next generation sequencing and analyzed to identify genes whose expression had increased or decreased at least 1.5-fold in maturation stage relative to secretory stage ameloblasts. Among the 9198 genes that surpassed the quality threshold, 373 showed higher expression in secretory stage, while 614 genes increased in maturation stage ameloblasts. The results were crosschecked against a previously published transcriptome generated from tissues overlying secretory and maturation stage mouse incisor enamel and 34 increasing and 26 decreasing expressers common to the two studies were identified. Expression of F2r, which encodes protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) that showed 10-fold higher expression during the secretory stage in our transcriptome analysis, was characterized in mouse incisors by immunohistochemistry. PAR1 was detected in secretory, but not maturation stage ameloblasts. We conclude that transcriptome analyses are a good starting point for identifying genes/proteins that are critical for proper dental enamel formation and that PAR1 is specifically expressed by secretory stage ameloblasts. PMID:25158176

  17. Yeast secretory expression of insulin precursors.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, T

    2000-09-01

    Since the 1980s, recombinant human insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus has been produced using either the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the prokaryote Escherichia coli. Here, development of the insulin secretory expression system in S. cerevisiae and its subsequent optimisation is described. Expression of proinsulin in S. cerevisiae does not result in efficient secretion of proinsulin or insulin. However, expression of a cDNA encoding a proinsulin-like molecule with deletion of threonine(B30) as a fusion protein with the S. cerevisiae alpha-factor prepro-peptide (leader), followed either by replacement of the human proinsulin C-peptide with a small C-peptide (e.g. AAK), or by direct fusion of lysine(B29) to glycine(A1), results in the efficient secretion of folded single-chain proinsulin-like molecules to the culture supernatant. The secreted single-chain insulin precursor can then be purified and subsequently converted to human insulin by tryptic transpeptidation in organic aqueous medium in the presence of a threonine ester. The leader confers secretory competence to the insulin precursor, and constructed (synthetic) leaders have been developed for efficient secretory expression of the insulin precursor in the yeasts S. cerevisiae and Pichia pastories. The Kex2 endoprotease, specific for dibasic sites, cleaves the leader-insulin precursor fusion protein in the late secretory pathway and the folded insulin precursor is secreted to the culture supernatant. However, the Kex2 endoprotease processing of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is incomplete and a significant part of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is secreted to the culture supernatant in a hyperglycosylated form. A spacer peptide localised between the leader and the insulin precursor has been developed to optimise Kex2 endoprotease processing and insulin precursor fermentation yield. PMID:11030562

  18. Docking of Secretory Vesicles Is Syntaxin Dependent

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Toonen, Ruud F.G.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones. PMID:17205130

  19. Mass spectrometry analysis of the excretory-secretory (E-S) products of the model cestode Hymenolepis diminut a reveals their immunogenic properties and the presence of new E-S proteins in cestodes.

    PubMed

    Bień, Justyna; Sałamatin, Rusłan; Sulima, Anna; Savijoki, Kirsi; Bruce Conn, David; Näreaho, Anu; Młocicki, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Hymenolepis diminuta is an important model species in studies of therapeutics, biochemical processes, immune responses and other aspects of cestodiasis. The parasite produces numerous excretory-secretory (E-S) proteins and a glycocalyx covering its body. Our study focused on the mass spectrometry analysis of the E-S material with an objective to determine if E-S contains any new proteins, in particular those that can be identified as: antigens, vaccine candidates and drug targets. These proteins might engage directly in host-parasite interactions. Adult parasites collected from experimentally infected rats were cultured in vitro for 5 and 18h. Immunoblotting was used to verify which E-S protein bands separated in SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) react with specific antibodies from sera of infected rats. We identified thirty-nine proteins by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography mass spectrometry). Results indicated the presence of proteins that have never been identified in cestode E-S material. Immunoblotting showed the immunogenicity of E-S products of H. diminuta, most probably associated with the presence of proteins known as antigens in other flatworm species. Among identified proteins are those engaged in immunomodulatory processes (eg. HSP), in response to oxidative stress (peroxidasin) or metabolism (eg. GAPDH). The predominant functions are associated with metabolism and catalytic activity. This is the first study identifying E-S-proteins in adult tapeworms, thus providing information for better understanding host-parasite interrelationships, and may point out potential targets for vaccines or drug discovery studies, as among the proteins observed in our study are those known to be antigens. PMID:27078671

  20. Secretory pathway of cellulase: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cellulase plays an important role in modern industry and holds great potential in biofuel production. Many different types of organisms produce cellulase, which go through secretory pathways to reach the extracellular space, where enzymatic reactions take place. Secretory pathways in various cells have been the focus of many research fields; however, there are few studies on secretory pathways of cellulases in the literature. It is therefore necessary and important to review the current knowledge on the secretory pathways of cellulases. In this mini-review, we address the subcellular locations of cellulases in different organisms, discuss the secretory pathways of cellulases in different organisms, and examine the secretory mechanisms of cellulases. These sections start with a description of general secreted proteins, advance to the situation of cellulases, and end with the knowledge of cellulases, as documented in UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). Finally, gaps in existing knowledge are highlighted, which may shed light on future studies for biofuel engineering. PMID:24295495

  1. Psychological distress and salivary secretory immunity.

    PubMed

    Engeland, C G; Hugo, F N; Hilgert, J B; Nascimento, G G; Junges, R; Lim, H-J; Marucha, P T; Bosch, J A

    2016-02-01

    Stress-induced impairments of mucosal immunity may increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. The present study investigated the association of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and loneliness with salivary levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA), the subclasses S-IgA1, S-IgA2, and their transporter molecule Secretory Component (SC). S-IgA/SC, IgA1/SC and IgA2/SC ratios were calculated to assess the differential effects of stress on immunoglobulin transport versus availability. This study involved 113 university students, in part selected on high scores on the UCLA Loneliness Scale and/or the Beck Depression Inventory. Stress levels were assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. Unstimulated saliva was collected and analysed for total S-IgA and its subclasses, as well as SC and total salivary protein. Multiple linear regression analyses, adjusted for gender, age, health behaviours, and concentration effects (total protein) revealed that higher perceived stress was associated with lower levels of IgA1 but not IgA2. Perceived stress, loneliness and depressive symptoms were all associated with lower IgA1/SC ratios. Surprisingly, higher SC levels were associated with loneliness and depressive symptoms, indicative of enhanced transport activity, which explained a lower IgA1/SC ratio (loneliness and depression) and IgA2/SC ratio (depression). This is the first study to investigate the effects of protracted psychological stress across S-IgA subclasses and its transporter SC. Psychological stress was negatively associated with secretory immunity, specifically IgA1. The lower immunoglobulin/transporter ratio that was associated with higher loneliness and depression suggested a relative immunoglobulin depletion, whereby availability was not keeping up with enhanced transport demand. PMID:26318411

  2. Label-free Quantitative Proteomics Reveals a Role for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis SecA2 Pathway in Exporting Solute Binding Proteins and Mce Transporters to the Cell Wall*

    PubMed Central

    Feltcher, Meghan E.; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Zulauf, Katelyn E.; Malik, Seidu; Griffin, Jennifer E.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Chen, Xian; Braunstein, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an example of a bacterial pathogen with a specialized SecA2-dependent protein export system that contributes to its virulence. Our understanding of the mechanistic basis of SecA2-dependent export and the role(s) of the SecA2 pathway in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has been hindered by our limited knowledge of the proteins exported by the pathway. Here, we set out to identify M. tuberculosis proteins that use the SecA2 pathway for their export from the bacterial cytoplasm to the cell wall. Using label-free quantitative proteomics involving spectral counting, we compared the cell wall and cytoplasmic proteomes of wild type M. tuberculosis to that of a ΔsecA2 mutant. This work revealed a role for the M. tuberculosis SecA2 pathway in the cell wall localization of solute binding proteins that work with ABC transporters to import solutes. Another discovery was a profound effect of SecA2 on the cell wall localization of the Mce1 and Mce4 lipid transporters, which contribute to M. tuberculosis virulence. In addition to the effects on solute binding proteins and Mce transporter export, our label-free quantitative analysis revealed an unexpected relationship between SecA2 and the hypoxia-induced DosR regulon, which is associated with M. tuberculosis latency. Nearly half of the transcriptionally controlled DosR regulon of cytoplasmic proteins were detected at higher levels in the ΔsecA2 mutant versus wild type M. tuberculosis. By increasing the list of M. tuberculosis proteins known to be affected by the SecA2 pathway, this study expands our appreciation of the types of proteins exported by this pathway and guides our understanding of the mechanism of SecA2-dependent protein export in mycobacteria. At the same time, the newly identified SecA2-dependent proteins are helpful for understanding the significance of this pathway to M. tuberculosis virulence and physiology. PMID:25813378

  3. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, potent peptidic inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, have been prepared and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.25 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction of retinal and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins are structurally classified as cysteine-rich secretory proteins and exhibit structural features that are quite distinct from those of other known small peptidic channel blockers. This article describes the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of these toxins. Crystals of PsTx belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.30, b = 61.59, c = 251.69 Å, and diffraction data were collected to 2.25 Å resolution. Crystals of Pdc also belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with similar unit-cell parameters a = 60.71, b = 61.67, c = 251.22 Å, and diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution.

  5. Needles in the EST Haystack: Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Excretory-Secretory (ES) Proteins in Parasitic Nematodes Using Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Shivashankar H.; Gasser, Robin B.; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2008-01-01

    Background Parasitic nematodes of humans, other animals and plants continue to impose a significant public health and economic burden worldwide, due to the diseases they cause. Promising antiparasitic drug and vaccine candidates have been discovered from excreted or secreted (ES) proteins released from the parasite and exposed to the immune system of the host. Mining the entire expressed sequence tag (EST) data available from parasitic nematodes represents an approach to discover such ES targets. Methods and Findings In this study, we predicted, using EST2Secretome, a novel, high-throughput, computational workflow system, 4,710 ES proteins from 452,134 ESTs derived from 39 different species of nematodes, parasitic in animals (including humans) or plants. In total, 2,632, 786, and 1,292 ES proteins were predicted for animal-, human-, and plant-parasitic nematodes. Subsequently, we systematically analysed ES proteins using computational methods. Of these 4,710 proteins, 2,490 (52.8%) had orthologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas 621 (13.8%) appeared to be novel, currently having no significant match to any molecule available in public databases. Of the C. elegans homologues, 267 had strong “loss-of-function” phenotypes by RNA interference (RNAi) in this nematode. We could functionally classify 1,948 (41.3%) sequences using the Gene Ontology (GO) terms, establish pathway associations for 573 (12.2%) sequences using Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and identify protein interaction partners for 1,774 (37.6%) molecules. We also mapped 758 (16.1%) proteins to protein domains including the nematode-specific protein family “transthyretin-like” and “chromadorea ALT,” considered as vaccine candidates against filariasis in humans. Conclusions We report the large-scale analysis of ES proteins inferred from EST data for a range of parasitic nematodes. This set of ES proteins provides an inventory of known and novel members of ES proteins as a

  6. Control systems and coordination protocols of the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Luini, Alberto; Mavelli, Gabriella; Jung, Juan; Cancino, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Like other cellular modules, the secretory pathway and the Golgi complex are likely to be supervised by control systems that support homeostasis and optimal functionality under all conditions, including external and internal perturbations. Moreover, the secretory apparatus must be functionally connected with other cellular modules, such as energy metabolism and protein degradation, via specific rules of interaction, or "coordination protocols". These regulatory devices are of fundamental importance for optimal function; however, they are generally "hidden" at steady state. The molecular components and the architecture of the control systems and coordination protocols of the secretory pathway are beginning to emerge through studies based on the use of controlled transport-specific perturbations aimed specifically at the detection and analysis of these internal regulatory devices. PMID:25374666

  7. Charting the Secretory Pathway in a Simple Eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    George Palade, a founding father of cell biology and of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), established the ultrastructural framework for an analysis of how proteins are secreted and membranes are assembled in eukaryotic cells. His vision inspired a generation of investigators to probe the molecular mechanisms of protein transport. My laboratory has dissected these pathways with complementary genetic and biochemical approaches. Peter Novick, one of my first graduate students, isolated secretion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and through cytological analysis of single and double mutants and molecular cloning of the corresponding SEC genes, we established that yeast cells use a secretory pathway fundamentally conserved in all eukaryotes. A biochemical reaction that recapitulates the first half of the secretory pathway was used to characterize Sec proteins that comprise the polypeptide translocation channel in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (Sec61) and the cytoplasmic coat protein complex (COPII) that captures cargo proteins into transport vesicles that bud from the ER. PMID:21079008

  8. Secretory function of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuryszko, J; Sławuta, P; Sapikowski, G

    2016-01-01

    There are two kinds of adipose tissue in mammals: white adipose tissue - WAT and brown adipose tissue - BAT. The main function of WAT is accumulation of triacylglycerols whereas the function of BAT is heat generation. At present, WAT is also considered to be an endocrine gland that produces bioactive adipokines, which take part in glucose and lipid metabolism. Considering its endocrine function, the adipose tissue is not a homogeneous gland but a group of a few glands which act differently. Studies on the secretory function of WAT began in 1994 after discovery of leptin known as the satiation hormone, which regulates body energy homeostasis and maintainence of body mass. Apart from leptin, the following belong to adipokines: adiponectin, resistin, apelin, visfatin and cytokines: TNF and IL 6. Adiponectin is a polypeptide hormone of antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity. It plays a key role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Resistin exerts a counter effect compared to adiponectin and its physiological role is to maintain fasting glycaemia. Visfatin stimulates insulin secretion and increases insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake by muscle cells and adipocytes. Apelin probably increases the insulin sensitivity of tissues. TNF evokes insulin resistance by blocking insulin receptors and inhibits insulin secretion. Approximately 30% of circulating IL 6 comes from adipose tissue. It causes insulin resistance by decreasing the expression of insulin receptors, decreases adipogenesis and adiponectin and visfatin secretion, and stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis. In 2004, Bays introduced the notion of adiposopathy, defined as dysfunction of the adipose tissue, whose main feature is insulin and leptin resistance as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines: TNF and IL 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein. This means that excess of adipose tissue, especially visceral adipose tissue, leads to the development of a chronic subclinical

  9. The evolution of plant secretory structures and emergence of terpenoid chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    Secretory structures in terrestrial plants appear to have first emerged as intracellular oil bodies in liverworts. In vascular plants, internal secretory structures, such as resin ducts and laticifers, are usually found in conjunction with vascular bundles, whereas subepidermal secretory cavities and epidermal glandular trichomes generally have more complex tissue distribution patterns. The primary function of plant secretory structures is related to defense responses, both constitutive and induced, against herbivores and pathogens. The ability to sequester secondary (or specialized) metabolites and defense proteins in secretory structures was a critical adaptation that shaped plant-herbivore and plant-pathogen interactions. Although this review places particular emphasis on describing the evolution of pathways leading to terpenoids, it also assesses the emergence of other metabolite classes to outline the metabolic capabilities of different plant lineages. PMID:25621517

  10. The secretory pathway of protists: spatial and functional organization and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, B; Melkonian, M

    1996-01-01

    All cells secrete a diversity of macromolecules to modify their environment or to protect themselves. Eukaryotic cells have evolved a complex secretory pathway consisting of several membrane-bound compartments which contain specific sets of proteins. Experimental work on the secretory pathway has focused mainly on mammalian cell lines or on yeasts. Now, some general principles of the secretory pathway have become clear, and most components of the secretory pathway are conserved between yeast cells and mammalian cells. However, the structure and function of the secretory system in protists have been less extensively studied. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the secretory pathway of five different groups of protists: Giardia lamblia, one of the earliest lines of eukaryotic evolution, kinetoplastids, the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, and two lineages within the "crown" of eukaryotic cell evolution, the alveolates (ciliates and Plasmodium species) and the green algae. Comparison of these systems with the mammalian and yeast system shows that most elements of the secretory pathway were presumably present in the earliest eukaryotic organisms. However, one element of the secretory pathway shows considerable variation: the presence of a Golgi stack and the number of cisternae within a stack. We suggest that the functional separation of the plasma membrane from the nucleus-endoplasmic reticulum system during evolution required a sorting compartment, which became the Golgi apparatus. Once a Golgi apparatus was established, it was adapted to the various needs of the different organisms. PMID:8987360

  11. The Xanthomonas Ax21 protein is processed by the general secretory system and is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Liu, Furong; Ruan, Randy; Fontaine-Bodin, Lisa; Koebnik, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play an important role in detecting invading pathogens and mounting a robust defense response to restrict infection. In rice, one of the best characterized PRRs is XA21, a leucine rich repeat receptor-like kinase that confers broad-spectrum resistance to multiple strains of the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). In 2009 we reported that an Xoo protein, called Ax21, is secreted by a type I-secretion system and that it serves to activate XA21-mediated immunity. This report has recently been retracted. Here we present data that corrects our previous model. We first show that Ax21 secretion does not depend on the predicted type I secretion system and that it is processed by the general secretion (Sec) system. We further show that Ax21 is an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. Finally, we provide data showing that ax21 knockout strains do not overcome XA21-mediated immunity. PMID:24482761

  12. ECHIDNA protein impacts on male fertility in Arabidopsis by mediating trans-Golgi network secretory trafficking during anther and pollen development.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinping; Yang, Caiyun; Klisch, Doris; Ferguson, Alison; Bhaellero, Rishi P; Niu, Xiwu; Wilson, Zoe A

    2014-03-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role in cellular secretion and has been implicated in sorting cargo destined for the plasma membrane. Previously, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) echidna (ech) mutant was shown to exhibit a dwarf phenotype due to impaired cell expansion. However, ech also has a previously uncharacterized phenotype of reduced male fertility. This semisterility is due to decreased anther size and reduced amounts of pollen but also to decreased pollen viability, impaired anther opening, and pollen tube growth. An ECH translational fusion (ECHPro:ECH-yellow fluorescent protein) revealed developmentally regulated tissue-specific expression, with expression in the tapetum during early anther development and microspore release and subsequent expression in the pollen, pollen tube, and stylar tissues. Pollen viability and production, along with germination and pollen tube growth, were all impaired. The ech anther endothecium secondary wall thickening also appeared reduced and disorganized, resulting in incomplete anther opening. This did not appear to be due to anther secondary thickening regulatory genes but perhaps to altered secretion of wall materials through the TGN as a consequence of the absence of the ECH protein. ECH expression is critical for a variety of aspects of male reproduction, including the production of functional pollen grains, their effective release, germination, and tube formation. These stages of pollen development are fundamentally influenced by TGN trafficking of hormones and wall components. Overall, this suggests that the fertility defect is multifaceted, with the TGN trafficking playing a significant role in the process of both pollen formation and subsequent fertilization. PMID:24424320

  13. Novel cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like cysteine protease of Naegleria fowleri excretory-secretory proteins and their biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yang, Hee-Jong; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2014-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes a lethal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals, which leads to death within 7-14 days. Cysteine proteases of parasites play key roles in nutrient uptake, excystment/encystment, host tissue invasion, and immune evasion. In this study, we cloned N. fowleri cathepsin B (nfcpb) and cathepsin B-like (nfcpb-L) genes from our cDNA library of N. fowleri. The full-length sequences of genes were 1,038 and 939 bp (encoded 345 and 313 amino acids), and molecular weights were 38.4 and 34 kDa, respectively. Also, nfcpb and nfcpb-L showed a 56 and 46 % identity to Naegleria gruberi cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like enzyme, respectively. Recombinant NfCPB (rNfCPB) and NfCPB-L (rNfCPB-L) proteins were expressed by the pEX5-NT/TOPO vector that was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21, and they showed 38.4 and 34 kDa bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis using their respective antibodies. Proteolytic activity of refolded rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L was maximum at a pH of 4.5, and the most effective substrate was Z-LR-MCA. rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L showed proteolytic activity for several proteins such as IgA, IgG, IgM, collagen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and albumin. These results suggested that NfCPB and NfCPB-L cysteine protease are important components of the N. fowleri ESP, and they may play important roles in host tissue invasion and immune evasion as pathogens that cause N. fowleri PAM. PMID:24832815

  14. Cysteine-Rich Secretory Protein-3 (CRISP3) Is Strongly Up-Regulated in Prostate Carcinomas with the TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Gene

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vera L.; Barros-Silva, João D.; Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Jerónimo, Carmen; Henrique, Rui; Lind, Guro E.; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2011-01-01

    A large percentage of prostate cancers harbor TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions, leading to aberrant overexpression of the transcription factor ERG. The target genes deregulated by this rearrangement, however, remain mostly unknown. To address this subject we performed genome-wide mRNA expression analysis on 6 non-malignant prostate samples and 24 prostate carcinomas with (n = 16) and without (n = 8) TMPRSS2-ERG fusion as determined by FISH. The top-most differentially expressed genes and their associations with ERG over-expression were technically validated by quantitative real-time PCR and biologically validated in an independent series of 200 prostate carcinomas. Several genes encoding metabolic enzymes or extracellular/transmembrane proteins involved in cell adhesion, matrix remodeling and signal transduction pathways were found to be co-expressed with ERG. Within those significantly over-expressed in fusion-positive carcinomas, CRISP3 showed more than a 50-fold increase when compared to fusion-negative carcinomas, whose expression levels were in turn similar to that of non-malignant samples. In the independent validation series, ERG and CRISP3 mRNA levels were strongly correlated (rs = 0.65, p<0.001) and both were associated with pT3 disease staging. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry results showed CRISP3 protein overexpression in 63% of the carcinomas and chromatin immunoprecipitation with an anti-ERG antibody showed that CRISP3 is a direct target of the transcription factor ERG. We conclude that ERG rearrangement is associated with significant expression alterations in genes involved in critical cellular pathways that define a subset of locally advanced PCa. In particular, we show that CRISP3 is a direct target of ERG that is strongly overexpressed in PCa with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene. PMID:21814574

  15. Lipids implicated in the journey of a secretory granule: from biogenesis to fusion.

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Emeline; Carmon, Ophélie; Wang, Qili; Jeandel, Lydie; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Montero-Hadjadje, Maité; Vitale, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    The regulated secretory pathway begins with the formation of secretory granules by budding from the Golgi apparatus and ends by their fusion with the plasma membrane leading to the release of their content into the extracellular space, generally following a rise in cytosolic calcium. Generation of these membrane-bound transport carriers can be classified into three steps: (i) cargo sorting that segregates the cargo from resident proteins of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) membrane budding that encloses the cargo and depends on the creation of appropriate membrane curvature, and (iii) membrane fission events allowing the nascent carrier to separate from the donor membrane. These secretory vesicles then mature as they are actively transported along microtubules toward the cortical actin network at the cell periphery. The final stage known as regulated exocytosis involves the docking and the priming of the mature granules, necessary for merging of vesicular and plasma membranes, and the subsequent partial or total release of the secretory vesicle content. Here, we review the latest evidence detailing the functional roles played by lipids during secretory granule biogenesis, recruitment, and exocytosis steps. In this review, we highlight evidence supporting the notion that lipids play important functions in secretory vesicle biogenesis, maturation, recruitment, and membrane fusion steps. These effects include regulating various protein distribution and activity, but also directly modulating membrane topology. The challenges ahead to understand the pleiotropic functions of lipids in a secretory granule's journey are also discussed. This article is part of a mini review series on Chromaffin cells (ISCCB Meeting, 2015). PMID:26877188

  16. Sorting and storage during secretory granule biogenesis: looking backward and looking forward.

    PubMed Central

    Arvan, P; Castle, D

    1998-01-01

    Secretory granules are specialized intracellular organelles that serve as a storage pool for selected secretory products. The exocytosis of secretory granules is markedly amplified under physiologically stimulated conditions. While granules have been recognized as post-Golgi carriers for almost 40 years, the molecular mechanisms involved in their formation from the trans-Golgi network are only beginning to be defined. This review summarizes and evaluates current information about how secretory proteins are thought to be sorted for the regulated secretory pathway and how these activities are positioned with respect to other post-Golgi sorting events that must occur in parallel. In the first half of the review, the emerging role of immature secretory granules in protein sorting is highlighted. The second half of the review summarizes what is known about the composition of granule membranes. The numerous similarities and relatively limited differences identified between granule membranes and other vesicular carriers that convey products to and from the plasmalemma, serve as a basis for examining how granule membrane composition might be established and how its unique functions interface with general post-Golgi membrane traffic. Studies of granule formation in vitro offer additional new insights, but also important challenges for future efforts to understand how regulated secretory pathways are constructed and maintained. PMID:9620860

  17. Secretory function in subplate neurons during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shinichi; Al-Hasani, Hannah; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Wang, Wei Zhi; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Subplate cells are among the first generated neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex and have been implicated in the establishment of cortical wiring. In rodents some subplate neurons persist into adulthood. Here we would like to highlight several converging findings which suggest a novel secretory function of subplate neurons during cortical development. Throughout the postnatal period in rodents, subplate neurons have highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are under an ER stress condition. By comparing gene expression between subplate and layer 6, we found that several genes encoding secreted proteins are highly expressed in subplate neurons. One of these secreted proteins, neuroserpin, encoded by the serpini1 gene, is localized to the ER in subplate cells. We propose that subplate might influence cortical circuit formation through a transient secretory function. PMID:25859180

  18. Effects of 5-fluorouracil on the secretory process of the rat parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Sandborg, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental animals were injected intraperitoneally with 100 mg/kg 5-fluorouracil for three days. The total volume, amylase and protein content of cannulated parotid saliva were determined following stimulation with either 5 mg/kg pilocarpine or 5 mg/kg isoproterenol in experimental, pair-fed , and control animals. Saliva from experimental animals was significantly lower in volume, amylase and protein content than both control groups. 5-fluorouracil treatment reduced the total glandular amylase per unit DNA in both unstimulated and isoproterenol-stimulated parotid glands. Decreased protein synthesis may be the mechanism underlying depleted secretory protein stores since the contents of isolated secretory granules from experimental parotid glands contained less radiolabelled protein than either control group and whole gland homogenates showed marked reductions in the activities of three lysosomal enzymes and total RNA content. Experimental animals contained less labelled protein in their secretory granules than controls, but secreted a greater proportion of their total glandular radiolabelled secretory protein into saliva relative to amylase suggesting that newly synthesized secretory proteins are preferentially secreted.

  19. Rab27b regulates exocytosis of secretory vesicles in acinar epithelial cells from the lacrimal gland

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Lilian; Ngo, Julie; Schechter, Joel E.; Karvar, Serhan; Tolmachova, Tanya; Seabra, Miguel C.; Hume, Alistair N.

    2011-01-01

    Tear proteins are supplied by the regulated fusion of secretory vesicles at the apical surface of lacrimal gland acinar cells, utilizing trafficking mechanisms largely yet uncharacterized. We investigated the role of Rab27b in the terminal release of these secretory vesicles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of primary cultured rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells revealed that Rab27b was enriched on the membrane of large subapical vesicles that were significantly colocalized with Rab3D and Myosin 5C. Stimulation of cultured acinar cells with the secretagogue carbachol resulted in apical fusion of these secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. Evaluation of morphological changes by transmission electron microscopy of lacrimal glands from Rab27b−/− and Rab27ash/ash/Rab27b−/− mice, but not ashen mice deficient in Rab27a, showed changes in abundance and organization of secretory vesicles, further confirming a role for this protein in secretory vesicle exocytosis. Glands lacking Rab27b also showed increased lysosomes, damaged mitochondria, and autophagosome-like organelles. In vitro, expression of constitutively active Rab27b increased the average size but retained the subapical distribution of Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b redistributed this protein from membrane to the cytoplasm. Functional studies measuring release of a cotransduced secretory protein, syncollin-GFP, showed that constitutively active Rab27b enhanced, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b suppressed, stimulated release. Disruption of actin filaments inhibited vesicle fusion to the apical membrane but did not disrupt homotypic fusion. These data show that Rab27b participates in aspects of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretory vesicle formation and release. PMID:21525430

  20. The secretory membrane system studied in real-time. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture, 2001.

    PubMed

    Lippincott-Schwartz, J

    2001-08-01

    The discovery and development of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish, Aequorea victoria, has revolutionized studies on protein localization and dynamics by allowing direct observation of a protein's life history and pathway in living cells, previously only deduced from genetic, biochemical, or immunolabeling studies. Applied to the secretory membrane system, which regulates delivery of newly synthesized proteins and lipids to the cell surface, GFP-based studies are providing important new insights into the maintenance and biogenesis of organelles, as well as the origin, pathway, and fate of secretory transport intermediates. PMID:11685538

  1. Menin immunoreactivity in secretory granules of human pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Debelenko, Larisa V; Agarwal, Sunita; Du, Qiang; Yan, Wusheng; Erickson, Heidi S; Abu-Asab, Mones; Raffeld, Mark A; Libutti, Steven K; Marx, Stephen J; Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The protein product of the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I (MEN1) gene is thought to be involved in predominantly nuclear functions; however, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis data on cellular localization are conflicting. To further investigate menin expression, we analyzed human pancreas (an MEN1 target organ) using IHC analyses and 6 antibodies raised against full-length menin or its peptides. In 10 normal pancreas specimens, 2 independently raised antibodies showed unexpected cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in peripheral cells in each islet examined (over 100 total across all 10 patients). The staining exhibited a distinct punctate pattern and subsequent immunoelectron microscopy indicated the target antigen was in secretory granules. Exocrine pancreas and pancreatic stroma were not immunoreactive. In MEN1 patients, unaffected islets stained similar to those in normal samples but with a more peripheral location of positive cells, whereas hyperplastic islets and tumorlets showed increased and diffuse cytoplasmic staining, respectively. Endocrine tumors from MEN1 patients were negative for menin, consistent with a 2-hit loss of a tumor suppressor gene. Secretory granule localization of menin in a subset of islet cells suggests a function of the protein unique to a target organ of familial endocrine neoplasia, although the IHC data must be interpreted with some caution because of the possibility of antibody cross-reaction. The identity, cellular trafficking, and role of this putative secretory granule-form of menin warrant additional investigation. PMID:25153502

  2. AP-1 and clathrin are essential for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason; Jauregui, Miluska; Tan, Julie; Rollins, Janet; Lallet, Sylvie; Leventis, Peter A.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Chang, Henry C.; Le Borgne, Roland; Krämer, Helmut; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

     Regulated secretion of hormones, digestive enzymes, and other biologically active molecules requires the formation of secretory granules. Clathrin and the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) are necessary for maturation of exocrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine secretory granules. However, the initial steps of secretory granule biogenesis are only minimally understood. Powerful genetic approaches available in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were used to investigate the molecular pathway for biogenesis of the mucin-containing “glue granules” that form within epithelial cells of the third-instar larval salivary gland. Clathrin and AP-1 colocalize at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and clathrin recruitment requires AP-1. Furthermore, clathrin and AP-1 colocalize with secretory cargo at the TGN and on immature granules. Finally, loss of clathrin or AP-1 leads to a profound block in secretory granule formation. These findings establish a novel role for AP-1– and clathrin-dependent trafficking in the biogenesis of mucin-containing secretory granules. PMID:21490149

  3. Coordinated activation of the secretory pathway during notochord formation in the Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Rebbert, Martha L; Dawid, Igor B

    2009-11-01

    We compared the transcriptome in the developing notochord of Xenopus laevis embryos with that of other embryonic regions. A coordinated and intense activation of a large set of secretory pathway genes was observed in the notochord, but not in notochord precursors in the axial mesoderm at early gastrula stage. The genes encoding Xbp1 and Creb3l2 were also activated in the notochord. These two transcription factors are implicated in the activation of secretory pathway genes during the unfolded protein response, where cells react to the stress of a build-up of unfolded proteins in their endoplasmic reticulum. Xbp1 and Creb3l2 are differentially expressed but not differentially activated in the notochord. Reduction of expression of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 by injection of antisense morpholinos led to strong deficits in notochord but not somitic muscle development. In addition, the expression of some, but not all, genes encoding secretory proteins was inhibited by injection of xbp1 morpholinos. Furthermore, expression of activated forms of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 in animal explants could activate a similar subset of secretory pathway genes. We conclude that coordinated activation of a battery of secretory pathway genes mediated by Xbp1 and Creb/ATF factors is a characteristic and necessary feature of notochord formation. PMID:19793890

  4. Coordinated activation of the secretory pathway during notochord formation in the Xenopus embryo

    PubMed Central

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Rebbert, Martha L.; Dawid, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We compared the transcriptome in the developing notochord of Xenopus laevis embryos with that of other embryonic regions. A coordinated and intense activation of a large set of secretory pathway genes was observed in the notochord, but not in notochord precursors in the axial mesoderm at early gastrula stage. The genes encoding Xbp1 and Creb3l2 were also activated in the notochord. These two transcription factors are implicated in the activation of secretory pathway genes during the unfolded protein response, where cells react to the stress of a build-up of unfolded proteins in their endoplasmic reticulum. Xbp1 and Creb3l2 are differentially expressed but not differentially activated in the notochord. Reduction of expression of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 by injection of antisense morpholinos led to strong deficits in notochord but not somitic muscle development. In addition, the expression of some, but not all, genes encoding secretory proteins was inhibited by injection of xbp1 morpholinos. Furthermore, expression of activated forms of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 in animal explants could activate a similar subset of secretory pathway genes. We conclude that coordinated activation of a battery of secretory pathway genes mediated by Xbp1 and Creb/ATF factors is a characteristic and necessary feature of notochord formation. PMID:19793890

  5. Porosome: The Universal Secretory Portal in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Bhanu

    2012-10-01

    In the past 50 years it was believed that during cell secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles completely merge at the cell plasma membrane resulting in the diffusion of intra-vesicular contents to the cell exterior and the compensatory retrieval of the excess membrane by endocytosis. This explanation made no sense or logic, since following cell secretion partially empty vesicles accumulate as demonstrated in electron micrographs. Furthermore, with the ``all or none'' mechanism of cell secretion by complete merger of secretory vesicle membrane at the cell plasma membrane, the cell is left with little regulation and control of the amount of content release. Moreover, it makes no sense for mammalian cells to possess such `all or none' mechanism of cell secretion, when even single-cell organisms have developed specialized and sophisticated secretory machinery, such as the secretion apparatus of Toxoplasma gondii, the contractile vacuoles in paramecium, or the various types of secretory structures in bacteria. Therefore, in 1993 in a News and Views article in Nature, E. Neher wrote ``It seems terribly wasteful that, during the release of hormones and neurotransmitters from a cell, the membrane of a vesicle should merge with the plasma membrane to be retrieved for recycling only seconds or minutes later.'' This conundrum in the molecular mechanism of cell secretion was finally resolved in 1997 following discovery of the ``Porosome,'' the universal secretory machinery in cells. Porosomes are supramolecular lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. Since porosomes in exocrine and neuroendocrine cells measure 100-180 nm

  6. (Controls of the plant endomembrane-secretory pathway): Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This project has been directed towards an understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which higher plants control the composition of the plasma membrane, through analysis of the biosynthesis, modification and targeting of plasma membrane proteins and glycoproteins. We have undertaken an identification of molecular markers both for the plasma membrane and for the biosynthetic processes, and the development of techniques for the isolation of conditional-lethal mutants defective at defined stages within the endomembrane-secretory pathway responsible for the biosynthesis, modification and targeting of plasma membrane proteins and glycoproteins. For the identification of molecular markers for the plasma membrane, monoclonal antibodies directed against epitopes present at the plant cell surface have been developed. Novel molecular markers for the plant plasma membrane and for the endomembrane-secretory pathway have been sought. Methods for the analysis of beta-glucuronidase in higher plants have been developed. These technologies have involved the use of flow cytometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In addition, we have been investigating the feasibility of expression of animal plasma membrane marker proteins in plants, specifically the VSV G-protein. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  7. [Identification of serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuegui; He, Lifang; Yuan, Shishan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To isolate and identify serological antigens in the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by the combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technology. Methods The serum IgG of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Muscle larvaes were isolated from the infected muscle, and then purified and cultured to collect excretory-secretory antigens. Serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens were isolated by co-immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE, and analyzed by Western blotting. Moreover, the protein bands in New Zealand rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis were identified by mass spectrometric technology. Results Indirect ELISA showed that the titer of serum antibody of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was 1:6400. The rabbit serum IgG was effectively isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. A total of four clear protein bands of the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis were obtained by electrophoresis. Among them, three clear protein bands with relative molecular mass (Mr) being 40 kDa, 50 kDa and 83 kDa were recognized by the rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis but not recognized by the normal rabbit sera. The obtained four protein molecules were confirmed as serine protease, specific serine protease of muscle larvae, 43 kDa secreted glycoprotein and 53 kDa excretory-secretory antigen. Conclusion Four proteins were obtained from the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technique analysis, which provided new sources and insights for the diagnosis and vaccine candidates of Trichinellosis. PMID:27126943

  8. Cab45 is required for Ca2+-dependent secretory cargo sorting at the trans-Golgi network

    PubMed Central

    Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Kienzle, Christine; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Valverde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+ import into the lumen of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by the secretory pathway calcium ATPase1 (SPCA1) is required for the sorting of secretory cargo. How is Ca2+ retained in the lumen of the Golgi, and what is its role in cargo sorting? We show here that a soluble, lumenal Golgi resident protein, Cab45, is required for SPCA1-dependent Ca2+ import into the TGN; it binds secretory cargo in a Ca2+-dependent reaction and is required for its sorting at the TGN. PMID:23266954

  9. Characterization of a Secretory Annexin in Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Song, Xingju; Hu, Dandan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Wang, Ning; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Tao; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2016-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is a widespread parasitic zoonosis causing economic loss and public health problems. Annexins are important proteins usually present in the plasma membrane, but previous studies have shown that an annexin B33 protein of E. granulosus (Eg-ANX) could be detected in the excretory/secretory products and cyst fluid. In this study, we cloned and characterized Eg-ANX. In silico analysis showed that the amino acid sequence of Eg-ANX was conserved and lacked any signal peptides. The phospholipid-binding activity of recombinant Eg-ANX (rEg-ANX) was tested; liposomes could bind to rEg-ANX only in the presence of Ca(2+). In addition, we performed western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses to further validate the secretory properties of Eg-ANX. The protein could be detected in the cyst fluid of E. granulosus and was also present in the intermediate host tissues, which suggested that Eg-ANX might play an important role in parasite-host interaction. PMID:26787154

  10. THE SECRETORY PATHWAYS OF RAT SERUM GLYCOPROTEINS AND ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Colvin M.; Cherian, M. George

    1972-01-01

    These studies compare the secretory pathways of newly formed rat serum glycoproteins and albumin by studying their submicrosomal localization at early times after the beginning of their synthesis and also by determining the submicrosomal site of incorporation of N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, and leucine into protein. N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, and galactose were only incorporated in vitro into proteins from membrane-attached polysomes and not into proteins from free polysomes. Mannose incorporation occurred in the rough endoplasmic reticulum, was stimulated by puromycin but not by cycloheximide, and 90% of the mannose-labeled protein was bound to the membranes. Galactose incorporation, by contrast, occurred in the smooth microsome fraction and 89% of the radioactive protein was in the cisternae. Albumin was mostly recovered (98%) in the cisternae, with negligible amounts in the membranes. To determine whether the radio-active sugars were being incorporated into serum proteins or into membrane protein, the solubilized in vivo-labeled proteins were treated with specific antisera to rat serum proteins or to albumin. Immunoelectrophoresis of the 14C-labeled leucine membrane and cisternal proteins showed that the membranes contained radioactive serum glycoprotein but no albumin, while the cisternal fraction contained all of the radioactive albumin and some glycoproteins. The results indicate that newly formed serum glycoproteins remain attached to the membranes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum after they are released from the membrane-attached polysomes, while albumin passes directly into the cisternae. PMID:5057975

  11. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... system. 866.5380 Section 866.5380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... body fluids. Measurement of free secretory component (protein molecules) aids in the diagnosis...

  15. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Pacheco-Yépez, Judith; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA) or polymeric IgA (pIgA) and the secretory component (SC), a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models) on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation. PMID:24348350

  16. Amelogenins as Potential Buffers during Secretory-stage Amelogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, J.; Lyaruu, D.M.; Takano, Y.; Gibson, C.W.; DenBesten, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenins are the most abundant protein species in forming dental enamel, taken to regulate crystal shape and crystal growth. Unprotonated amelogenins can bind protons, suggesting that amelogenins could regulate the pH in enamel in situ. We hypothesized that without amelogenins the enamel would acidify unless ameloblasts were buffered by alternative ways. To investigate this, we measured the mineral and chloride content in incisor enamel of amelogenin-knockout (AmelX-/-) mice and determined the pH of enamel by staining with methyl-red. Ameloblasts were immunostained for anion exchanger-2 (Ae2), a transmembrane pH regulator sensitive for acid that secretes bicarbonate in exchange for chloride. The enamel of AmelX-/- mice was 10-fold thinner, mineralized in the secretory stage 1.8-fold more than wild-type enamel and containing less chloride (suggesting more bicarbonate secretion). Enamel of AmelX-/- mice stained with methyl-red contained no acidic bands in the maturation stage as seen in wild-type enamel. Secretory ameloblasts of AmelX-/- mice, but not wild-type mice, were immunopositive for Ae2, and stained more intensely in the maturation stage compared with wild-type mice. Exposure of AmelX-/- mice to fluoride enhanced the mineral content in the secretory stage, lowered chloride, and intensified Ae2 immunostaining in the enamel organ in comparison with non-fluorotic mutant teeth. The results suggest that unprotonated amelogenins may regulate the pH of forming enamel in situ. Without amelogenins, Ae2 could compensate for the pH drop associated with crystal formation. PMID:25535204

  17. Secretory cargo sorting by Ca2+-dependent Cab45 oligomerization at the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Blank, Birgit; Maiser, Andreas; Emin, Derya; Prescher, Jens; Beck, Gisela; Kienzle, Christine; Bartnik, Kira; Habermann, Bianca; Pakdel, Mehrshad; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Lamb, Don C; von Blume, Julia

    2016-05-01

    Sorting and export of transmembrane cargoes and lysosomal hydrolases at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) are well understood. However, elucidation of the mechanism by which secretory cargoes are segregated for their release into the extracellular space remains a challenge. We have previously demonstrated that, in a reaction that requires Ca(2+), the soluble TGN-resident protein Cab45 is necessary for the sorting of secretory cargoes at the TGN. Here, we report that Cab45 reversibly assembles into oligomers in the presence of Ca(2+) These Cab45 oligomers specifically bind secretory proteins, such as COMP and LyzC, in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner in vitro. In intact cells, mutation of the Ca(2+)-binding sites in Cab45 impairs oligomerization, as well as COMP and LyzC sorting. Superresolution microscopy revealed that Cab45 colocalizes with secretory proteins and the TGN Ca(2+) pump (SPCA1) in specific TGN microdomains. These findings reveal that Ca(2+)-dependent changes in Cab45 mediate sorting of specific cargo molecules at the TGN. PMID:27138253

  18. Morphological docking of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-dependent secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones is essential for brain function and neuroendocrine-signaling. Prior to exocytosis, neurotransmitter-containing vesicles dock to the target membrane. In electron micrographs of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, like chromaffin cells many synaptic vesicles (SVs) and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are docked. For many years the molecular identity of the morphologically docked state was unknown. Recently, we resolved the minimal docking machinery in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells using embryonic mouse model systems together with electron-microscopic analyses and also found that docking is controlled by the sub-membrane filamentous (F-)actin. Currently it is unclear if the same docking machinery operates in synapses. Here, I will review our docking assay that led to the identification of the LDCV docking machinery in chromaffin cells and also discuss whether identical docking proteins are required for SV docking in synapses. PMID:20577884

  19. The complete general secretory pathway in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, A P

    1993-01-01

    The unifying feature of all proteins that are transported out of the cytoplasm of gram-negative bacteria by the general secretory pathway (GSP) is the presence of a long stretch of predominantly hydrophobic amino acids, the signal sequence. The interaction between signal sequence-bearing proteins and the cytoplasmic membrane may be a spontaneous event driven by the electrochemical energy potential across the cytoplasmic membrane, leading to membrane integration. The translocation of large, hydrophilic polypeptide segments to the periplasmic side of this membrane almost always requires at least six different proteins encoded by the sec genes and is dependent on both ATP hydrolysis and the electrochemical energy potential. Signal peptidases process precursors with a single, amino-terminal signal sequence, allowing them to be released into the periplasm, where they may remain or whence they may be inserted into the outer membrane. Selected proteins may also be transported across this membrane for assembly into cell surface appendages or for release into the extracellular medium. Many bacteria secrete a variety of structurally different proteins by a common pathway, referred to here as the main terminal branch of the GSP. This recently discovered branch pathway comprises at least 14 gene products. Other, simpler terminal branches of the GSP are also used by gram-negative bacteria to secrete a more limited range of extracellular proteins. PMID:8096622

  20. Mast cell secretory granules: armed for battle.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Sara; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells of the immune system and recent studies show that they have immunomodulatory roles in diverse processes in both health and disease. Mast cells are distinguished by their high content of electron-dense secretory granules, which are filled with large amounts of preformed and pre-activated immunomodulatory compounds. When appropriately activated, mast cells undergo degranulation, a process by which these preformed granule compounds are rapidly released into the surroundings. In many cases, the effects that mast cells have on an immune response are closely associated with the biological actions of the granule compounds that they release, as exemplified by the recent studies showing that mast cell granule proteases account for many of the protective and detrimental effects of mast cells in various inflammatory settings. In this Review, we discuss the current knowledge of mast cell secretory granules. PMID:24903914

  1. An Alternative Terminal Step of the General Secretory Pathway in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Craney, Arryn; Dix, Melissa M.; Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I signal peptidase (SPase) is essential for viability in wild-type bacteria because the terminal step of the bacterial general secretory pathway requires its proteolytic activity to release proteins from their membrane-bound N-terminal leader sequences after translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here, we identify the Staphylococcus aureus operon ayrRABC (SA0337 to SA0340) and show that once released from repression by AyrR, the protein products AyrABC together confer resistance to the SPase inhibitor arylomycin M131 by providing an alternate and novel method of releasing translocated proteins. Thus, the derepression of ayrRABC allows cells to bypass the essentiality of SPase. We demonstrate that AyrABC functionally complements SPase by mediating the processing of the normally secreted proteins, albeit in some cases with reduced efficiency and either without cleavage or via cleavage at a site N-terminal to the canonical SPase cleavage site. Thus, ayrRABC encodes a secretion stress-inducible alternate terminal step of the general secretory pathway. Importance  Addressing proteins for proper localization within or outside a cell in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes is often accomplished with intrinsic signals which mediate membrane translocation and which ultimately must be removed. The canonical enzyme responsible for the removal of translocation signals is bacterial type I signal peptidase (SPase), which functions at the terminal step of the general secretory pathway and is thus essential in wild-type bacteria. Here, we identify a four-gene operon in S. aureus that encodes an alternate terminal step of the general secretory pathway and thus makes SPase nonessential. The results have important implications for protein secretion in bacteria and potentially for protein trafficking in prokaryotes and eukaryotes in general. PMID:26286693

  2. Remodeling of secretory compartments creates CUPS during nutrient starvation.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Garcia, David; Curwin, Amy J; Popoff, Jean-François; Bruns, Caroline; Duran, Juan M; Malhotra, Vivek

    2014-12-22

    Upon starvation, Grh1, a peripheral membrane protein located at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit sites and early Golgi in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under growth conditions, relocates to a compartment called compartment for unconventional protein secretion (CUPS). Here we report that CUPS lack Golgi enzymes, but contain the coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle tethering protein Uso1 and the Golgi t-SNARE Sed5. Interestingly, CUPS biogenesis is independent of COPII- and COPI-mediated membrane transport. Pik1- and Sec7-mediated membrane export from the late Golgi is required for complete assembly of CUPS, and Vps34 is needed for their maintenance. CUPS formation is triggered by glucose, but not nitrogen starvation. Moreover, upon return to growth conditions, CUPS are absorbed into the ER, and not the vacuole. Altogether our findings indicate that CUPS are not specialized autophagosomes as suggested previously. We suggest that starvation triggers relocation of secretory and endosomal membranes, but not their enzymes, to generate CUPS to sort and secrete proteins that do not enter, or are not processed by enzymes of the ER-Golgi pathway of secretion. PMID:25512390

  3. Age-Dependent Labeling and Imaging of Insulin Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  4. Age-dependent labeling and imaging of insulin secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  5. Secretory organelles in ECL cells of the rat stomach: an immunohistochemical and electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C M; Chen, D; Lintunen, M; Panula, P; Håkanson, R

    1999-12-01

    ECL cells are numerous in the rat stomach. They produce and store histamine and chromogranin-A (CGA)-derived peptides such as pancreastatin and respond to gastrin with secretion of these products. Numerous electron-lucent vesicles of varying size and a few small, dense-cored granules are found in the cytoplasm. Using confocal and electron microscopy, we examined these organelles and their metamorphosis as they underwent intracellular transport from the Golgi area to the cell periphery. ECL-cell histamine was found to occur in both cytosol and secretory vesicles. Histidine decarboxylase, the histamine-forming enzyme, was in the cytosol, while pancreastatin (and possibly other peptide products) was confined to the dense cores of granules and secretory vesicles. Dense-cored granules and small, clear microvesicles were more numerous in the Golgi area than in the docking zone, i.e. close to the plasma membrane. Secretory vesicles were numerous in both Golgi area and docking zone, where they were sometimes seen to be attached to the plasma membrane. Upon acute gastrin stimulation, histamine was mobilized and the compartment size (volume density) of secretory vesicles in the docking zone was decreased, while the compartment size of microvesicles was increased. Based on these findings, we propose the following life cycle of secretory organelles in ECL cells: small, electron-lucent microvesicles (pro-granules) bud off the trans Golgi network, carrying proteins and secretory peptide precursors (such as CGA and an anticipated prohormone). They are transformed into dense-cored granules (approximate profile diameter 100 nm) while still in the trans Golgi area. Pro-granules and granules accumulate histamine, which leads to their metamorphosis into dense-cored secretory vesicles. In the Golgi area the secretory vesicles have an approximate profile diameter of 150 nm. By the time they reach their destination in the docking zone, their profile diameter is between 200 and 500 nm

  6. Kinesin-related Smy1 enhances the Rab-dependent association of myosin-V with secretory cargo.

    PubMed

    Lwin, Kyaw Myo; Li, Donghao; Bretscher, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms by which molecular motors associate with specific cargo is a central problem in cell organization. The kinesin-like protein Smy1 of budding yeast was originally identified by the ability of elevated levels to suppress a conditional myosin-V mutation (myo2-66), but its function with Myo2 remained mysterious. Subsequently, Myo2 was found to provide an essential role in delivery of secretory vesicles for polarized growth and in the transport of mitochondria for segregation. By isolating and characterizing myo2 smy1 conditional mutants, we uncover the molecular function of Smy1 as a factor that enhances the association of Myo2 with its receptor, the Rab Sec4, on secretory vesicles. The tail of Smy1-which binds Myo2-its central dimerization domain, and its kinesin-like head domain are all necessary for this function. Consistent with this model, overexpression of full-length Smy1 enhances the number of Sec4 receptors and Myo2 motors per transporting secretory vesicle. Rab proteins Sec4 and Ypt11, receptors for essential transport of secretory vesicles and mitochondria, respectively, bind the same region on Myo2, yet Smy1 functions selectively in the transport of secretory vesicles. Thus a kinesin-related protein can function intimately with a myosin-V and its receptor in the transport of a specific cargo. PMID:27307583

  7. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development.

    PubMed

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N; Bagchi, Milan K; Bagchi, Indrani C

    2015-08-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  8. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J.; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N.; Bagchi, Milan K.; Bagchi, Indrani C.

    2015-01-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  9. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  10. Regulation of renin processing and secretion: chemiosmotic control and novel secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    King, J A; Lush, D J; Fray, J C

    1993-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays an important role in cardiovascular and electrolyte regulation in health and disease. Juxtaglomerular cells in the kidney regulate endocrine RAAS by physiologically controlling conversion of prorenin and secretion of renin. The classical baroceptor, neurogenic, and macula densa mechanisms regulate renin expression at the cellular level by Ca2+, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), and chemiosmotic forces (K+, Cl-, and water flux coupled to H+ movement). The baroceptor mechanism (through Ca2+) activates K+ and Cl- channels in the surface membrane and deactivates a KCl-H+ exchange chemiosmotic transporter in the secretory granular membrane. The neurogenic mechanism (through cAMP) promotes prorenin processing to renin. The macula densa mechanism (through K+ and Cl-) involves the processing of prorenin to renin. Ca2+, by inhibiting the KCl-H+ exchange transporter, prevents secretory granules from engaging in chemiosmotically mediated exocytosis. cAMP, on the other hand, by stimulating H+ influx, provides the acidic granular environment for prorenin processing to renin. It is concluded that, in the presence of a favorable chemiosmotic environment, prorenin is processed to renin, which may then be secreted by regulative degranulation or divergence translocation, a novel secretory pathway used by several secretory proteins, including renin. PMID:7690183

  11. A novel imaging method for quantitative Golgi localization reveals differential intra-Golgi trafficking of secretory cargoes

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Hieng Chiong; Mahajan, Divyanshu; Chen, Bing; Cheng, Li; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.; Lu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular functions of the Golgi are determined by the unique distribution of its resident proteins. Currently, electron microscopy is required for the localization of a Golgi protein at the sub-Golgi level. We developed a quantitative sub-Golgi localization method based on centers of fluorescence masses of nocodazole-induced Golgi ministacks under conventional optical microscopy. Our method is rapid, convenient, and quantitative, and it yields a practical localization resolution of ∼30 nm. The method was validated by the previous electron microscopy data. We quantitatively studied the intra-Golgi trafficking of synchronized secretory membrane cargoes and directly demonstrated the cisternal progression of cargoes from the cis- to the trans-Golgi. Our data suggest that the constitutive efflux of secretory cargoes could be restricted at the Golgi stack, and the entry of the trans-Golgi network in secretory pathway could be signal dependent. PMID:26764092

  12. Isotonic water transport in secretory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Swanson, C H

    1977-01-01

    The model proposed by Diamond and Bossert [1] for isotonic water transport has received wide acceptance in recent years. It assumes that the local driving force for water transport is a standing osmotic gradient produced in the lateral intercellular spaces of the epithelial cell layer by active solute transport. While this model is based on work done in absorptive epithelia where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and the direction of net transport are the same, it has been proposed that the lateral spaces could also serve as the site of the local osmotic gradients for water transport in secretory epithelia, where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and net transport are opposed, by actively transporting solute out of the space rather than into it. Operation in the backward direction, however, requires a lower than ambient hydrostatic pressure within the lateral space which would seem more likely to cause the space to collapse with loss of function. On the other hand, most secretory epithelia are characterized by transport into a restricted ductal system which is similar to the lateral intercellular space in the absorptive epithelia in that its closed to open direction is the same as that of net transport. In vitro micropuncture studies on the exocrine pancreas of the rabbit indicate the presence of a small but statistically significant increase in juice osmolality, 6 mOsm/kg H(2)O, at the site of electrolyte and water secretion in the smallest extralobular ducts with secretin stimulation which suggests that the ductal system in the secretory epithelia rather than the lateral intercellular space is the site of the local osmotic gradients responsible for isotonic water transport. PMID:331693

  13. "Secretory" Carcinoma of the Skin Mimicking Secretory Carcinoma of the Breast: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sixia; Liu, Yan; Su, Jing; Liu, Jianying; Guo, Xiaoning; Mei, Fang; Zheng, Jie; Liao, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    Secretory carcinoma is a unique kind of adenocarcinoma. It has distinct histological features and a special genetic change, that is, t (12; 15) (p13; q25) translocation which leads to the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. Secretory carcinoma has been found to occur both in the breast and salivary gland. Here the authors present a case of 22-year-old woman with a unique cutaneous neoplasm located at the axilla. The tumor was characterized histologically with the formation of round to ovoid microcysts and papillary structure, which was similar to the secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary gland. Furthermore, the gene sequence analysis of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction products demonstrated the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of secretory carcinoma from the skin which has the same genetic change as those from the breast and salivary gland. Local excision was performed on this patient. She had been followed up for nearly 1 year. No recurrence or metastasis was found yet. PMID:26981741

  14. Genetic Evidence for the Role of the Vacuole in Supplying Secretory Organelles with Ca2+ in Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Fokina, Anastasia V.; Chechenova, Maria B.; Karginov, Azamat V.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.; Agaphonov, Michael O.

    2015-01-01

    Processes taking place in the secretory organelles require Ca2+ and Mn2+, which in yeast are supplied by the Pmr1 ion pump. Here we observed that in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha Ca2+ deficiency in the secretory pathway caused by Pmr1 inactivation is exacerbated by (i) the ret1-27 mutation affecting COPI-mediated vesicular transport, (ii) inactivation of the vacuolar Ca2+ ATPase Pmc1 and (iii) inactivation of Vps35, which is a component of the retromer complex responsible for protein transport between the vacuole and secretory organelles. The ret1-27 mutation also exerted phenotypes indicating alterations in transport between the vacuole and secretory organelles. These data indicate that ret1-27, pmc1 and vps35 affect a previously unknown Pmr1-independent route of the Ca2+ delivery to the secretory pathway. We also observed that the vacuolar protein carboxypeptidase Y receives additional modifications of its glycoside chains if it escapes the Vps10-dependent sorting to the vacuole. PMID:26717478

  15. Modulation of endomembranes morphodynamics in the secretory/retrograde pathways depends on lipid diversity.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Moreau, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Membrane lipids are crucial bricks for cell and organelle compartmentalization and their physical properties and interactions with other membrane partners (lipids or proteins) reveal lipids as key actors of the regulation of membrane morphodynamics in many cellular functions and especially in the secretory/retrograde pathways. Studies on membrane models have indicated diverse mechanisms by which membranes bend. Moreover, in vivo studies also indicate that membrane curvature can play crucial roles in the regulation of endomembrane morphodynamics, organelle morphology and transport vesicle formation. A role for enzymes of lipid metabolism and lipid-protein interactions will be discussed as crucial mechanisms in the regulation of membrane morphodynamics in the secretory/retrograde pathways. PMID:25233477

  16. Serous cutaneous glands in anurans: Fourier transform analysis of the repeating secretory granule substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosi, D.; Delfino, G.; Quercioli, F.

    2013-03-01

    A combined transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform analysis has been performed on the secretory granules storing active peptides/proteins in serous cutaneous glands of n = 12 anuran species. Previous TEM investigation showed that the granules are provided with remarkable repeating substructures based on discrete subunits, arranged into a consistent framework. Furthermore, TEM findings revealed that this recurrent arrangement is acquired during a prolonged post-Golgian (or maturational) processing that affects the secretory product. Maturation leads to a variety of patterns depending on the degree of subunit clustering. This variety of recurrent patterns has been plotted into a range of frequency spectra. Through this quantitative approach, we found that the varying granule substructure can be reduced to a single mechanism of peptide/protein aggregation.

  17. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission. PMID:27342860

  18. Secretory pattern of canine growth hormone

    SciTech Connect

    French, M.B.; Vaitkus, P.; Cukerman, E.; Sirek, A.; Sirek, O.V.

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to define the secretory pattern of growth hormone (GH) under basal conditions in fasted, conscious, male dogs accustomed to handling. Blood samples were withdrawn from a cephalic vein at 15-min intervals. In this way, any ultradian rhythms, if present, could be detected within the frequency range of 0.042-2 cycles/h. In addition, samples were drawn at either 1- or 2.5-min intervals for 2.5 or 5 h to determine whether frequency components greater than 2 cycles/h were present. GH was measured by radioimmunoassay and the raw data were submitted to time series analysis employing power spectral estimation by means of fast Fourier transformation techniques. Peak plasma levels were up to 12 times higher than the baseline concentration of approx. 1 ng/ml. Spectral analysis revealed an endogenous frequency of 0.22 cycles/h, i.e., a periodicity of 4.5 h/cycle. The results indicate that under basal conditions the secretory bursts of canine GH are limited to one peak every 4.5 h.

  19. Characterization of the ovine ortholog of secretory leukoprotease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Brown, Thomas I; Mistry, Rohit; Gray, Robert; Imrie, Margaret; Collie, David D; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2005-08-01

    There is great interest in the use of the sheep as a model for the investigation of inflammation in the lung. The serine antiproteases secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) and elafin are important "alarm antiproteases" in the lung and have potentially important roles in the innate immune response. SLPI was first characterized in man and subsequently in murine, porcine, and rat tissues. Here we present the first data concerning the gene and cDNA sequence encoding for the ovine ortholog of SLPI, a protein of 132 amino acids with 66% sequence identity at the amino acid level with human SLPI. A 24-amino-acid signal sequence signifies that, like the other mammalian orthologs, ovine SLPI is a secreted protein. Tissue distribution of expression is demonstrated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and shows features similar to SLPI expression in other mammals, specifically at mucosal surfaces such as the upper respiratory and intestinal tracts, and also the skin, liver, and kidney. This distribution lends credence to SLPI having important roles in innate immunity. We have also cloned the ovine SLPI cDNA into an expression vector and expressed the ovine SLPI protein in vitro. This has enabled us to demonstrate that ovine SLPI is correctly processed (Western blot analysis and SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis) and has biological antihuman neutrophil elastase activity. In summary, the ovine ortholog of SLPI shows similarities to other members of the SLPI family and has all the features of a modulator of innate immunity. PMID:16180144

  20. PROGESTERONE RECEPTOR TRANSACTIVATION OF THE SECRETORY LUEKOCYTE PROTEASE INHIBITOR GENE IN ISHIKAWA ENDOMETRIAL EPHITELIAL CELLS INVOLVES RECRUITMENT OF KRUPPEL-LIKE FACTOR 9/BASIC TRANSCRIPTION ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Progesterone receptor (PR), a ligand-inducible transcription factor mediates the physiological actions of progesterone (P) through two distinct isoforms PR-A and PR-B and numerous nuclear factors. We demonstrated previously that basic transcription element-binding protein-1 (BTEB1), a transcription ...

  1. Functional asymmetry of the sodium-D-glucose cotransporter expressed in yeast secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Firnges, M A; Lin, J T; Kinne, R K

    2001-01-15

    The sodium-D-glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) was expressed in a yeast mutant strain NY 17 (sec6-4) that accumulates secretory vesicles at a nonpermissive temperature because of a block in the delivery of these vesicles to the plasma membrane. By differential centrifugation a microsomal fraction enriched in secretory vesicles was prepared with a high specific activity of the vanadate-sensitive H+-ATPase and invertase. In this membrane fraction one protein band of an apparent molecular weight of 55 kDa representing the nonglycosylated SGLT1 protein could be detected by immunochemical analysis. In addition, higher molecular weight protein bands probably representing dimers and aggregates were found. In transport studies with the microsomes D-glucose fluxes showed asymmetric properties: efflux experiments revealed the typical properties of the SGLT1 such as sodium dependence, inhibition by phlorizin and potential dependence. Influx of D-glucose showed no dependence on sodium and was not inhibited by phlorizin. Furthermore, the transporter exhibited a striking asymmetry with regard to the D-glucose affinity and the sugar specificity. These results suggest that the orientation of the SGLT1 expressed in yeast secretory vesicles is, indeed, inverted with regard to its configuration in the plasma membrane of epithelial cells. Moreover, there are striking functional differences between the periplasmic and cytoplasmic face of the transporter. PMID:11220364

  2. Proteostasis and "redoxtasis" in the secretory pathway: Tales of tails from ERp44 and immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tiziana; Sannino, Sara; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    In multicellular organisms, some cells are given the task of secreting huge quantities of proteins. To comply with their duty, they generally equip themselves with a highly developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and downstream organelles in the secretory pathway. These professional secretors face paramount proteostatic challenges in that they need to couple efficiency and fidelity in their secretory processes. On one hand, stringent quality control (QC) mechanisms operate from the ER onward to check the integrity of the secretome. On the other, the pressure to secrete can be overwhelming, as for instance on antibody-producing cells during infection. Maintaining homeostasis is particularly hard when the products to be released contain disulfide bonds, because oxidative folding entails production of reactive oxygen species. How are redox homeostasis ("redoxtasis") and proteostasis maintained despite the massive fluxes of cargo proteins traversing the pathway? Here we describe recent findings on how ERp44, a multifunctional chaperone of the secretory pathway, can modulate these processes integrating protein QC, redoxtasis, and calcium signaling. PMID:25744412

  3. Redirection of peroxisomal alcohol oxidase of Hansenula polymorpha to the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Meis; Leão, Adriana N; Van der Klei, Ida J; Veenhuis, Marten

    2007-10-01

    We report on the rerouting of peroxisomal alcohol oxidase (AO) to the secretory pathway of Hansenula polymorpha. Using the leader sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating factor alpha (MFalpha) as sorting signal, AO was correctly sorted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which strongly proliferated in these cells. The MFalpha presequence, but not the prosequence, was cleaved from the protein. AO protein was present in the ER as monomers that lacked FAD, and hence was enzymatically inactive. Furthermore, the recombinant AO protein was subject to gradual degradation, possibly because the protein did not fold properly. However, when the S. cerevisiae invertase signal sequence (ISS) was used, secretion of AO protein was observed in conjunction with bulk of the protein being localized to the ER. The amount of secreted AO protein increased with increasing copy numbers of the AO expression cassette integrated into the genome. The secreted AO protein was correctly processed and displayed enzyme activity. PMID:17419772

  4. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in... repetitive lung infections and other hypogammaglobulinemic conditions (low antibody levels)....

  5. The Actomyosin Ring Recruits Early Secretory Compartments to the Division Site in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vjestica, Aleksandar; Tang, Xin-Zi

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cytokinesis is to establish a membrane barrier between daughter cells. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe utilizes an actomyosin-based division ring that is thought to provide physical force for the plasma membrane invagination. Ring constriction occurs concomitantly with the assembly of a division septum that is eventually cleaved. Membrane trafficking events such as targeting of secretory vesicles to the division site require a functional actomyosin ring suggesting that it serves as a spatial landmark. However, the extent of polarization of the secretion apparatus to the division site is presently unknown. We performed a survey of dynamics of several fluorophore-tagged proteins that served as markers for various compartments of the secretory pathway. These included markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, the COPII sites, and the early and late Golgi. The secretion machinery exhibited a marked polarization to the division site. Specifically, we observed an enrichment of the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (tER) accompanied by Golgi cisternae biogenesis. These processes required actomyosin ring assembly and the function of the EFC-domain protein Cdc15p. Cdc15p overexpression was sufficient to induce tER polarization in interphase. Thus, fission yeast polarizes its entire secretory machinery to the cell division site by utilizing molecular cues provided by the actomyosin ring. PMID:18184749

  6. Tracking individual secretory vesicles during exocytosis reveals an ordered and regulated process

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kirk W.

    2015-01-01

    Post-Golgi secretory vesicle trafficking is a coordinated process, with transport and regulatory mechanisms to ensure appropriate exocytosis. While the contributions of many individual regulatory proteins to this process are well studied, the timing and dependencies of events have not been defined. Here we track individual secretory vesicles and associated proteins in vivo during tethering and fusion in budding yeast. Secretory vesicles tether to the plasma membrane very reproducibly for ∼18 s, which is extended in cells defective for membrane fusion and significantly lengthened and more variable when GTP hydrolysis of the exocytic Rab is delayed. Further, the myosin-V Myo2p regulates the tethering time in a mechanism unrelated to its interaction with exocyst component Sec15p. Two-color imaging of tethered vesicles with Myo2p, the GEF Sec2p, and several exocyst components allowed us to document a timeline for yeast exocytosis in which Myo2p leaves 4 s before fusion, whereas Sec2p and all the components of the exocyst disperse coincident with fusion. PMID:26169352

  7. LYST controls the biogenesis of the endosomal compartment required for secretory lysosome function.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Fernando E; Burgess, Agathe; Heiligenstein, Xavier; Goudin, Nicolas; Ménager, Mickaël M; Romao, Maryse; Côte, Marjorie; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Fischer, Alain; Raposo, Graça; Ménasché, Gaël; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    2015-02-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding LYST protein, the function of which remains poorly understood. Prominent features of CHS include defective secretory lysosome exocytosis and the presence of enlarged, lysosome-like organelles in several cell types. In order to get further insight into the role of LYST in the biogenesis and exocytosis of cytotoxic granules, we analyzed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from patients with CHS. Using confocal microscopy and correlative light electron microscopy, we showed that the enlarged organelle in CTLs is a hybrid compartment that contains proteins components from recycling-late endosomes and lysosomes. Enlargement of cytotoxic granules results from the progressive clustering and then fusion of normal-sized endolysosomal organelles. At the immunological synapse (IS) in CHS CTLs, cytotoxic granules have limited motility and appear docked while nevertheless unable to degranulate. By increasing the expression of effectors of lytic granule exocytosis, such as Munc13-4, Rab27a and Slp3, in CHS CTLs, we were able to restore the dynamics and the secretory ability of cytotoxic granules at the IS. Our results indicate that LYST is involved in the trafficking of the effectors involved in exocytosis required for the terminal maturation of perforin-containing vesicles into secretory cytotoxic granules. PMID:25425525

  8. cAMP and Ca2+ signaling in secretory epithelia: Crosstalk and Synergism

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Malini; Jha, Archana; Maléth, Jozsef; Park, Seonghee; Muallem, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+ and cAMP/PKA pathways are the primary signaling systems in secretory epithelia that control virtually all secretory gland functions. Interaction and crosstalk in Ca2+ and cAMP signaling occur at multiple levels to control and tune the activity of each other. Physiologically, Ca2+ and cAMP signaling operate at 5–10% of maximal strength, but synergize to generate the maximal response. Although synergistic action of the Ca2+ and cAMP signaling is the common mode of signaling and has been known for many years, we know very little of the molecular mechanism and mediators of the synergism. In this review, we discuss crosstalk between the Ca2+ and cAMP signaling and the function of IRBIT (IP3 receptors binding protein release with IP3) as a third messenger that mediates the synergistic action of the Ca2+ and cAMP signaling. PMID:24613710

  9. Sorting sweet sorting. Protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Ponnambalam, S; Banting, G

    1996-09-01

    Membrane-spanning, lectin-like proteins in the eukaryotic secretory pathway seem to operate quality-control checkpoints by fine tuning protein exit or retention within each subcompartment. PMID:8805362

  10. Development and validation of a UHPLC-UV method for the determination of a prostate secretory protein 94-derived synthetic peptide (PCK3145) in human plasma and assessment of its stability in human plasma.

    PubMed

    El Mubarak, Mohamed A; Leontari, Iliana; Danika, Charikleia; Katsila, Theodora; Sivolapenko, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    PCK3145 is a synthetic peptide, derived from the Prostate Secreted Protein 94 (PSP94), with promising in vitro and animal in vivo results in prostate cancer. The aim of the present study was to develop and validate a fast and robust ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection for the determination of PCK3145 in human plasma which would be suitable for the assessment of PCK3145 stability to proteolytic degradation. Following protein precipitation, chromatographic separation was carried out on an Aeris Peptide C18 column with mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-water at a flow-rate of 0.50 mL/min. The calibration curve was linear over the range 0.50-20.00 μg/mL. Intra- and inter-day percentage relative standard deviation and relative error were ≤10%. The limit of detection and the lower limit of quantification were 0.15 and 0.50 μg/mL, respectively. Recovery of PCK3145 from human plasma was ≥96%. The peptide presented high stability in whole blood and in human plasma (>98% intact peptide after 24 h incubation at 37°C in human plasma), which represents a distinctive advantage in the therapeutic use of the compound. This is the first validated UHPLC method for the determination of PCK3145 reported, and it was successfully applied in the study of the proteolytic stability of PCK3145 in human plasma ex vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26892539