Sample records for secondary mineral microtextures

  1. Mineral County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.0% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 466.5 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Unintentional Injuries**, CLRD*, Cerebrovascular Disease 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Mineral County

  2. Raman Study of Secondary Minerals in a Recent Lava Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Finizola, A.; Delcher, E.; Raimboux, N.; Veron, E.; Simon, P.; Devouard, B.; Bertil, A.

    2014-06-01

    We present here the technical adaptations made for a field use of a laboratory in situ Raman spectrometer, and the characterization of secondary mineral phases growing in a recent, still hot on some spots, lava tube (2007 Piton de la Fournaise).

  3. Bisphosphonates do not Alter the Rate of Secondary Mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    R Fuchs; M Faillace; M Allen; R Phipps; L Miller; D Burr

    2011-12-31

    Bisphosphonates function to reduce bone turnover, which consequently increases the mean degree of tissue mineralization at an organ level. However, it is not clear if bisphosphonates alter the length of time required for an individual bone-modeling unit (BMU) to fully mineralize. We have recently demonstrated that it takes {approx}350 days (d) for normal, untreated cortical bone to fully mineralize. The aim of this study was to determine the rate at which newly formed trabecular BMUs become fully mineralized in rabbits treated for up to 414 d with clinical doses of either risedronate (RIS) or alendronate (ALN). Thirty-six, 4-month old virgin female New Zealand white rabbits were allocated to RIS (n=12; 2.4 {mu}g/kg body weight), ALN (n=12; 2.4 {mu}g/kg body weight), or volume-matched saline controls (CON; n=12). Fluorochrome labels were administered at specific time intervals to quantify the rate and level of mineralization of trabecular bone from the femoral neck (FN) by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The organic (collagen) and inorganic (phosphate and carbonate) IR spectral characteristics of trabecular bone from undecalcified 4 micron thick tissue sections were quantified from fluorescently labels regions that had mineralized for 1, 8, 18, 35, 70, 105, 140, 210, 280, and 385 d (4 rabbits per time point and treatment group). All groups exhibited a rapid increase in mineralization over the first 18 days, the period of primary mineralization, with no significant differences between treatments. Mineralization continued to increase, at a slower rate up, to 385 days (secondary mineralization), and was not different among treatments. There were no significant differences between treatments for the rate of mineralization within an individual BMU; however, ALN and RIS both increased global tissue mineralization as demonstrated by areal bone mineral density from DXA. We conclude that increases in tissue mineralization that occur following a period of bisphosphonate treatment is a function of the suppressed rate of remodeling that allows for a greater number of BMUs to obtain a greater degree of mineralization.

  4. Bisphosphonates do not alter the rate of secondary mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs R. K.; Miller L.; Faillace M.E.; Allen M.R.; Phipps R.J. and Burr D.B.

    2011-05-18

    Bisphosphonates function to reduce bone turnover, which consequently increases the mean degree of tissue mineralization at an organ level. However, it is not clear if bisphosphonates alter the length of time required for an individual bone-modeling unit (BMU) to fully mineralize. We have recently demonstrated that it takes {approx}350 days (d) for normal, untreated cortical bone to fully mineralize. The aim of this study was to determine the rate at which newly formed trabecular BMUs become fully mineralized in rabbits treated for up to 414 d with clinical doses of either risedronate (RIS) or alendronate (ALN). Thirty-six, 4-month old virgin female New Zealand white rabbits were allocated to RIS (n = 12; 2.4 {micro}g/kg body weight), ALN (n = 12; 2.4 {micro}g/kg body weight), or volume-matched saline controls (CON; n = 12). Fluorochrome labels were administered at specific time intervals to quantify the rate and level of mineralization of trabecular bone from the femoral neck (FN) by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The organic (collagen) and inorganic (phosphate and carbonate) IR spectral characteristics of trabecular bone from undecalcified 4 micron thick tissue sections were quantified from fluorescently labels regions that had mineralized for 1, 8, 18, 35, 70, 105, 140, 210, 280, and 385 d (4 rabbits per time point and treatment group). All groups exhibited a rapid increase in mineralization over the first 18 days, the period of primary mineralization, with no significant differences between treatments. Mineralization continued to increase, at a slower rate up, to 385 days (secondary mineralization), and was not different among treatments. There were no significant differences between treatments for the rate of mineralization within an individual BMU; however, ALN and RIS both increased global tissue mineralization as demonstrated by areal bone mineral density from DXA. We conclude that increases in tissue mineralization that occur following a period of bisphosphonate treatment is a function of the suppressed rate of remodeling that allows for a greater number of BMUs to obtain a greater degree of mineralization.

  5. Secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff: Microscopy and microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Microcrystals of secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in the SEM. Among the samples the author discovered three new rare-earth sulfates: coskrenite-(Ce), levinsonite-(Y), and zugshunstite-(Ce). Other minerals illustrated in this report include sulfur, tschermigite, gypsum, epsomite, melanterite, halotrichite, apjohnite, jarosite, slavikite, magnesiocopiapite, and diadochite. Additional specimens whose identification is more tentative include pickeringite, aluminite, basaluminite, and botryogen. Alum Cave is a ``Dana locality`` for apjohnite and potash alum, and is the first documented North American occurrence of slavikite.

  6. Formation of secondary minerals and its effect on anorthite dissolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TAKASHI MURAKAMI; TOSHIHIRO KOGURE; HIROYUKI KADOHARA; TOSHIHIKO OHNUKI

    1998-01-01

    To examine the relationship between product secondary minerals and dissolution of anorthite (An95Ab5 from Fugoppe, Hokkaido, Japan), anorthite batch dissolution experi- ments were carried out. The dissolution experiments were done at 90, 150, and 210 8C for 3 to 355 days at pH 4.56 measured at 25 8C, which corresponds to 4.69, 4.97, and 5.40 at the respective experimental temperatures.

  7. The origins of microtexture in duplex Ti alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Glavicic; B. B. Bartha; S. K. Jha; C. J. Szczepanski

    2009-01-01

    A previously developed methodology was used to transform electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data for the primary and secondary alpha phases of Ti–6Al–2Sn–4Zr–6Mo (Ti-6246) to the prior beta phase. The results established that the observed microtexture in duplex alloys is a direct result of the prior beta grain orientations, and variant selection. In addition, for a homogeneous duplex microstructure, all of

  8. An automated method to analyze separately the microtextures of primary {alpha}{sub p} grains and the secondary {alpha}{sub s} inherited colonies in bimodal titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, L. [Laboratoire d'Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux, LETAM, CNRS UMR 7078, Universite de Metz, F-57045 Metz Cedex 01 (France)]. E-mail: germain@letam.univ-metz.fr; Gey, N. [Laboratoire d'Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux, LETAM, CNRS UMR 7078, Universite de Metz, F-57045 Metz Cedex 01 (France); Humbert, M. [Laboratoire d'Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux, LETAM, CNRS UMR 7078, Universite de Metz, F-57045 Metz Cedex 01 (France); Hazotte, A. [Laboratoire d'Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux, LETAM, CNRS UMR 7078, Universite de Metz, F-57045 Metz Cedex 01 (France); Bocher, P. [Centre des technologies de fabrication en aerospatiale, Institut de recherche aerospatiale, CNRC, Montreal, Quebec, H3T 2B2 (Canada); Jahazi, M. [Mc Gill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2005-03-15

    A method was developed to automatically recognize the orientations of primary {alpha}{sub p} grains and secondary {alpha}{sub s} colonies of a bimodal titanium alloy, on the orientation map. Both populations of grains are dissociated by correlating the Electron Back Scattering Diffraction data with the corresponding Back Scattered Electron image on which a high chemical contrast is observed between the {alpha}{sub p} and ({alpha}{sub s}+{beta}{sub residual}) phases. The whole data processing is successfully applied to a large EBSD map of a bimodal IMI 834 billet. This allows to discuss the contribution of {alpha}{sub p} grains and {alpha}{sub s} colonies to the sharp texture heterogeneities observed in the billet.

  9. Post microtextures accelerate cell proliferation and osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Mata, Alvaro; Fleischman, Aaron J.; Muschler, George F.; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-01-01

    The influence of surface microtexture on osteogenesis was investigated in vitro by examining the proliferation and differentiation characteristics of a class of adult stem cells and their progeny, collectively known as connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs). Human bone marrow-derived CTPs were cultured for up to 60 days on smooth polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and on PDMS with post microtextures that were 10 µm in diameter and 6 µm in height, with 10 µm separation. DNA quantification revealed that the numbers of CTPs initially attached to both substrates were similar. However, cells on microtextured PDMS transitioned from lag phase after 4 days of culture, in contrast to 6 days for cells on smooth surfaces. By day 9 cells on the smooth surfaces exhibited arbitrary flattened shapes and migrated without any preferred orientation. In contrast, cells on the microtextured PDMS grew along the array of posts in an orthogonal manner. By days 30 and 60 cells grew and covered all surfaces with extracellular matrix. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of integrin ?5 was greater on the microtextured PDMS compared with smooth surfaces. Real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that gene expression of alkaline phosphatase had decreased by days 30 and 60, compared with that on day 9, for both substrates. Gene expression of collagen I and osteocalcin was consistently greater on post microtextures relative to smooth surfaces at all time points. PMID:19539062

  10. The Chronology of Asteroid Accretion, Differentiation, and Secondary Mineralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Kleine, T.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y. D.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluate initial (Al-26/Al-27)(sub I), (Mn-53/Mn-55)(sub I), (Hf-182/Hf-180)(sub I), and Pb-207/Pb-206 ages for igneous differentiated meteorites and chondrules from ordinary chondrites for consistency with radioactive decay of the parent nuclides within a common, closed isotopic system, i.e., the early solar nebula. We find that the relative abundances of Al-26, Mn-53, and Hf-182, here denoted by I(Al)(sub CAI, I(Mn)(sub CAI) and I(Hf)(sub CAI), are consistent with decay from common initial values for the bulk solar system. I(Mn)(sub CAI) and I(Hf)(sub CAI) = 9.1+/-1.7 x 10(exp -6) and 1.06+/-0.09 x 10(exp -6) respectively, correspond to the canonical value of I(Al)(sub CAI) = 5.1 x 10(exp -5). I(Hf)(sub CAI) thus determined is consistent with I(Hf)(sub CAI) = 1.003+/-0.045 x 10(exp -6) directly determined in separate work. I(Mn)(sub CAI) is within error of the lowest value directly determined for CAI. We suggest that erratically higher values directly determined for CAI in carbonaceous chondrites reflect proton irradiation of unaccreted CAIs by the early Sun after other asteroids destined for melting by Al-26 decay had already accreted. The Mn-53 incorporated within such asteroids would have been shielded from further "local" spallogenic contributions. The relative abundances of the short-lived nuclides are less consistent with the Pb-207/Pb-206 ages of the corresponding materials with the best consistency being obtained between (Hf-182/Hf-180)(sub I) and Pb-207/Pb-206 ages of angrites. (Hf-182/Hf-180)(sub I) decreases with decreasing Pb-207/Pb-206 ages at the rate expected from the 8.90+/-0.09 Ma half-life of Hf-182. However, the model "CAI age" thus determined, T(sub CAI,Mn-W) = 4568.6+/-0.7 Ma, is older than the commonly accepted directly measured value T(sub CAI) = 4567.l+/-0.2 Ma. I(Al)(sub I), and (Mn-53/Mn-55)(sub I) are less consistent with Pb-207/Pb-206 ages, but determine T(sub CAI, Mn-Cr) = 4568.3+/-0.5 Ma relative to I(AI)(sub CAI)= 5.1 x 10(exp -5) and a Pb-207/Pb-206 age of 4558.6 Ma for the LEW86010 angrite. However. the (Mn-53/Mn-55)(sub I) and Pb-207/Pb-206 ages of "intermediate" age D'Orbigny-clan angrites and Asuka 881394 are inconsistent with radioactive decay from CAI values with a Mn-55 half-life of 3.7+/-0.4 Ma. in spite of consistency between (Mn-53/Mn-55)(sub I) and (Al-26/Al-27)(sub I). Nevertheless, it appears that the Mn-Cr method with I(Mn)(sub CAI) = 9.1+/-1.7 x 10(exp -6) can be used to date primary igneous events and also secondary mineralization on asteroid parent bodies. We summarize ages thus determined for igneous events on differentiated asteroids and for carbonate and fayalite formation on carbonaceous asteroids.

  11. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  12. Sorption of selected radionuclides on secondary minerals associated with the Columbia River basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Salter, P.F.; Ames, L.L.; McGarrah, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The sorption behavior of selected radionuclides on the secondary minerals which fill and/or line the vesicles, vugs, and fractures in the Columbia River basalts has been investigated. Radionuclide distribution coefficients (Kd), using a batch equilibrium technique, have been determined for selenium, strontium, technetium, iodine, cesium, neptunium, americium, plutonium, uranium, and radium under oxidizing conditions at both 23/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/C. Groundwater compositions simulating those found in the water-bearing zones of the Columbia River basalts were used in the Kd determinations. In addition, sorption isotherms, describing the dependence of radionuclide sorption on radionuclide concentration, were determined for uranium, cesium, and strontium. Based on these sorption data, it appears that the secondary minerals are capable of retarding the migration of cesium, stronium, radium, plutonium, americium, and uranium from a repository in basalt. Under oxidizing conditions, however, the secondary minerals do not adequately retard the migration of selenium, technetium, neptunium, and iodine. Additional information is needed on the sorption behavior of selenium, technetium, neptunium, and iodine under the highly reducing conditions expected for a sealed repository in basalt before further evaluation can be made of the retardation capability of the secondary minerals for these isotopes. A review of the available sorption data for cesium, strontium, plutonium, americium, neptunium, radium, and zirconium on Hanford Site sediments also is presented.

  13. Reduction of jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and secondary mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingjie, Ouyang; Xiancai, Lu; Huan, Liu; Juan, Li; Tingting, Zhu; Xiangyu, Zhu; Jianjun, Lu; Rucheng, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Jarosite is a common mineral in a variety of environments formed by the oxidation of iron sulfide normally accompanying with the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) in mining areas or acid rock drainages (ARD) in many localities. Decomposition of jarosite by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) influences the mobility of many heavy metals generally accommodated in natural jarosite. This study examined the anaerobic reduction of synthesized jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a typical facultative bacteria. The release of ferrous and ferric ion, as well as sulfate and potassium, in the inoculated experimental group lasting 80 days is much higher than that in abiotic control groups. The detection of bicarbonate and acetate in experimental solution further confirms the mechanism of microbial reduction of jarosite, in which lactate acts as the electron donor. The produced ferrous iron stimulates the subsequent secondary mineralization, leading to precipitation and transformation of various iron-containing minerals. Green rust and goethite are the intermediate minerals of the microbial reduction process under anoxic conditions, and the end products include magnetite and siderite. In aerobic environments, goethite, magnetite and siderite were also detected, but the contents were relatively lower. While in abiotic experiments, only goethite has been detected as a product. Thus, the microbial reduction and subsequent mineral transformation can remarkably influence the geochemical cycling of iron and sulfur in supergene environments, as well as the mobility of heavy metals commonly accommodated in jarosite.

  14. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  15. Minerals

    MedlinePLUS

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including building bones, making ... regulating your heartbeat. There are two kinds of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your ...

  16. Unit-cell intergrowth of pyrochlore and hexagonal tungsten bronze structures in secondary tungsten minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Grey, Ian E. [CSIRO Minerals, Box 312, Clayton South, Vic. 3169 (Australia)]. E-mail: ian.grey@csiro.au; Birch, William D. [Geosciences Department, Museum Victoria, GPO Box 666, Melbourne, Vic. 3001 (Australia); Bougerol, Catherine [Equipe CEA-CNRS NPSC SP2M/DRFMC/CEA, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Mills, Stuart J. [CSIRO Minerals, Box 312, Clayton South, Vic. 3169 (Australia); Geosciences Department, Museum Victoria, GPO Box 666, Melbourne, Vic. 3001 (Australia)

    2006-12-15

    Structural relations between secondary tungsten minerals with general composition A{sub x}[(W,Fe)(O,OH){sub 3}]{sub .y}H{sub 2}O are described. Phyllotungstite (A=predominantly Ca) is hexagonal, a=7.31(3)A, c=19.55(1)A, space group P6{sub 3}/mmc. Pittongite, a new secondary tungsten mineral from a wolframite deposit near Pittong in Victoria, southeastern Australia (A=predominantly Na) is hexagonal, a=7.286(1)A, c=50.49(1)A, space group P-6m2. The structures of both minerals can be described as unit-cell scale intergrowths of (111){sub py} pyrochlore slabs with pairs of hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) layers. In phyllotungstite, the (111){sub py} blocks have the same thickness, 6A, whereas pittongite contains pyrochlore blocks of two different thicknesses, 6 and 12A. The structures can alternatively be described in terms of chemical twinning of the pyrochlore structure on (111){sub py} oxygen planes. At the chemical twin planes, pairs of HTB layers are corner connected as in hexagonal WO{sub 3}.

  17. Inhibition Effect of Secondary Phosphate Mineral Precipitation on Uranium Release from Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Deng, Baolin

    2009-11-01

    The inhibitory effect of phosphate mineral precipitation on uranium release was evaluated using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment collected from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The sediment contained U(VI) that was associated with diffusion-limited intragrain regions within its mm-size granitic lithic fragments. The sediment was first treated to promote phosphate mineral precipitation in batch suspensions spiked with 1 and 50 mM aqueous phosphate, and calcium in a stoichiometric ratio of mineral hydroxyapatite. The phosphate-treated sediment was then leached to solubilize contaminant U(VI) in a column system using a synthetic groundwater that contained chemical components representative of Hanford groundwater. Phosphate treatment significantly decreased the extent of U(VI) release from the sediment. Within the experimental duration of about 200 pore volumes, the effluent U(VI) concentrations were consistently lower by over one and two orders of magnitude after the sediment was treated with 1 and 50 mM of phosphate, respectively. Measurements of solid phase U(VI) using various spectroscopes and chemical extraction of the sediment collectively indicated that the inhibition of U(VI) release from the sediment was caused by: 1) U(VI) adsorption to the secondary phosphate precipitates and 2) the transformation of initially present U(VI) mineral phases to less soluble forms.

  18. Mineralogical study of secondary mineral phases from weathered MSWI bottom ash: implications for the modelling and trapping of heavy metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Piantone; F. Bodénan; L. Chatelet-Snidaro

    2004-01-01

    A mineralogical study of 3 samples of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash collected from different storage sites and with storage times varying from 3 weeks to 2 years, has enabled identification of the main secondary mineral species formed during weathering. The frequencies of the secondary phases were determined and a diagram is proposed for the relative distribution of the

  19. Liquid crystal orientation transition on microtextured substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoshe; Lee, Fuk Kay; Tsui, Ophelia K C; Sheng, Ping

    2003-11-21

    A uniform alignment of liquid crystal (LC) with finite pretilt was observed on microtextured substrates that were lithographically fabricated with alternating horizontal and vertical corrugations. As the period of alternation was decreased toward 0.8 microm, the nematic LC alignment on these substrates changed from inhomogeneous in plane, copying the substrate corrugations, to a uniform configuration with a large pretilt of approximately 40 degrees. This transition is pertinent to a frustrated boundary wherein a lowering in the LC elastic energy due to spatial variation in the LC orientation compromises an increase in the surface anchoring energy. A model based on this idea demonstrates good agreement with the experiment. This result may open up a new arena for tailoring substrate characteristics for LC alignment. PMID:14683312

  20. Control of mineral scale deposition in cooling systems using secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is a promising alternative to freshwater as power plant cooling system makeup water, especially in arid regions. A prominent challenge for the successful use of MWW for cooling is potentially severe mineral deposition (scaling) on pipe surfaces. In this study, theoretical, laboratory, and field work was conducted to evaluate the mineral deposition potential of MWW and its deposition control strategies under conditions relevant to power plant cooling systems. Polymaleic acid (PMA) was found to effectively reduce scale formation when the makeup water was concentrated four times in a recirculating cooling system. It was the most effective deposition inhibitor of those studied when applied at 10 mg/L dosing level in a synthetic MWW. However, the deposition inhibition by PMA was compromised by free chlorine added for biogrowth control. Ammonia present in the wastewater suppressed the reaction of the free chlorine with PMA through the formation of chloramines. Monochloramine, an alternative to free chlorine, was found to be less reactive with PMA than free chlorine. In pilot tests, scaling control was more challenging due to the occurrence of biofouling even with effective control of suspended bacteria. Phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors are not appropriate due to their significant loss through precipitation reactions with calcium. Chemical equilibrium modeling helped with interpretation of mineral precipitation behavior but must be used with caution for recirculating cooling systems, especially with use of MWW, where kinetic limitations and complex water chemistries often prevail. PMID:20851443

  1. Lava cave microbial communities within mats and secondary mineral deposits: implications for life detection on other planets.

    PubMed

    Northup, D E; Melim, L A; Spilde, M N; Hathaway, J J M; Garcia, M G; Moya, M; Stone, F D; Boston, P J; Dapkevicius, M L N E; Riquelme, C

    2011-09-01

    Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai'i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai'i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai'i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. PMID:21879833

  2. Lava Cave Microbial Communities Within Mats and Secondary Mineral Deposits: Implications for Life Detection on Other Planets

    PubMed Central

    Melim, L.A.; Spilde, M.N.; Hathaway, J.J.M.; Garcia, M.G.; Moya, M.; Stone, F.D.; Boston, P.J.; Dapkevicius, M.L.N.E.; Riquelme, C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lava caves contain a wealth of yellow, white, pink, tan, and gold-colored microbial mats; but in addition to these clearly biological mats, there are many secondary mineral deposits that are nonbiological in appearance. Secondary mineral deposits examined include an amorphous copper-silicate deposit (Hawai‘i) that is blue-green in color and contains reticulated and fuzzy filament morphologies. In the Azores, lava tubes contain iron-oxide formations, a soft ooze-like coating, and pink hexagons on basaltic glass, while gold-colored deposits are found in lava caves in New Mexico and Hawai‘i. A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular techniques was used to analyze these communities. Molecular analyses of the microbial mats and secondary mineral deposits revealed a community that contains 14 phyla of bacteria across three locations: the Azores, New Mexico, and Hawai‘i. Similarities exist between bacterial phyla found in microbial mats and secondary minerals, but marked differences also occur, such as the lack of Actinobacteria in two-thirds of the secondary mineral deposits. The discovery that such deposits contain abundant life can help guide our detection of life on extraterrestrial bodies. Key Words: Biosignatures—Astrobiology—Bacteria—Caves—Life detection—Microbial mats. Astrobiology 11, 601–618. PMID:21879833

  3. Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    This site provides an in-depth look at mineral properties and identification. An alphabetical listing of common minerals allows the user to see a picture and view physical properties of the particular mineral. Properties of minerals are explained, including cleavage, hardness, crystal form, and luster. There are also downloadable labs for crystal models and mineral data sheets. Dichotomous and hardness keys are given for easier mineral identification.

  4. Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Kathryn L.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2003-06-01

    This project, renewal of a previous EMSP project of the same title, is in its first year of funding at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The purpose is to continue investigating rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals found in the Hanford subsurface and leaked waste tank solutions. The goals are to understand processes that result in (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. A post-doctoral scientist, Dr. Sherry Samson, has been hired and two masters of science students are beginning to conduct experimental research. One research project that is underway is focused on measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms. The first set of experiments is being conduced at room temperature. Subsequent experiments will examine the role of temperature because tank solutions in many cases were near boiling when leakage is thought to have occurred and temperature gradients have been observed beneath the SX and BX tank farms. The dissolution experiments are being conducted in stirred-flow kinetic reactors using powdered labradorite feldspar from Pueblo Park, New Mexico.

  5. Mutual replacement reactions in alkali feldspars I: microtextures and mechanisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Parsons; Martin R. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Intracrystal microtextures formed by a process of mutual replacement in alkali feldspars record fluid–rock reactions that\\u000a have affected large volumes of the Earth’s crust. Regular, ?1 ?m-scale ‘strain-controlled’ perthitic microtextures coarsen,\\u000a by up to 103, by a dissolution–reprecipitation process, producing microporous patch or vein perthites on scales >100 ?m. We have developed\\u000a earlier studies of such reactions in alkali feldspar cm-scale primocrysts

  6. Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Walls

    2011-01-30

    Create a poster about minerals! Directions: Make a poster about minerals. (20 points) Include at least (1) large picture (15 points) on your poster complete with labels of every part (10 points). (15 points) Include at least three (3) facts about minerals. (5 points each) (15 points) Write at ...

  7. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; El Badawy, Amro M; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Adkins, Renata; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2015-09-01

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78 BHD samples collected from 13 different SAP facilities across the U.S. were investigated. The XRD semi-quantitative analysis of BHD samples suggests the presence of metallic aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride and its oxides, spinel, elpasolite as well as diaspora. BHD also contains halite, sylvite and fluorite, which are used as fluxes in SAP activities. Total aluminum (Al) in the BHD samples averaged 18% by weight. Elevated concentrations of trace metals (>100?gL(-1) As; >1000?gL(-1) Cu, Mn, Se, Pb, Mn and Zn) were also detected in the leachate. The U.S. toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that some samples leached above the toxicity limit for Cd, Pb and Se. Exceeding the TCLP limits in all sample is independent of facilities generating the BHD. From the metal content perspective only, it appears that BHD has a higher potential to exhibit toxicity characteristics than salt cake (the largest waste stream generated by SAP facilities). PMID:25898346

  8. 9 M.y. record of southern Nevada climate from Yucca Mountain secondary minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.F.; Moscati, R.J.

    1998-12-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation`s high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs within which the depth to water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present day arid to semi-arid climate, is considered a favorable attribute of the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relation between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible future transport and release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration. Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences, coupled with the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite, allow broadbrush reconstructions of climate patterns during the past 9 M.y.

  9. Correlations between primary and secondary Fe-bearing minerals identified in rocks in Gusev Crater by the MER Mössbauer spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroder, C.; Klingelhofer, G.; Morris, R. V.; Rodionov, D. S.

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit identified six different rock classes during its traverse from the landing site across the plains and into the Columbia Hills to the top of Husband Hill [1, 2]. The classification is based on the rocks' chemical composition [3, 4], and can be further divided into several subclasses on the basis of mineralogical composition from Mössbauer spectra [5]. Rocks in Gusev Crater show various degrees of alteration, both between different rock classes and within individual rock classes. The degree of alteration can be estimated from the mineral content, i.e., the ratio between primary and secondary minerals, or the degree of oxidation, i.e., the Fe3+ /FeT otal ratio as determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Spirit's Mössbauer spectrometer [6] identified eight different Fe-bearing mineral phases [5]: The primary minerals olivine, pyroxene, ilmenite, and magnetite as well as the secondary minerals hematite, goethite, an unspecified nanophase ferric oxide phase, and a ferric sulfate. Correlations between primary and secondary minerals and correlations between primary minerals and Fe3+ /FeT otal ratios show that olivine is the mineral undergoing alteration in all rock classes encountered, whereas evidence for the alteration of pyroxene is only present in the more severely weathered rocks found only in the Columbia Hills. Whereas the slow alteration of olivine seems to be an ongoing process, the alteration of pyroxene does not seem to proceed under the current conditions. [1] S.W. Squyres et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res. 111, E02S11, doi:10.1029/2005JE002562. [2] H.Y. McSween et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res. 111, E02S10, doi:10.1029/2005JE002477. [3] D.W. Ming et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res. 111, E02S12, doi:10.1029/2005JE002560. [4] R. Gellert et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res. 111, E02S05, doi:10.1029/2005JE002555. [5] R.V. Morris et al. (2006), J. Geophys. Res. 111, E02S13, 1 doi:10.1029/2005JE002584. [6] G. Klingelhöfer et al. (2003), J. Geophys. Res. 108(E12), 8067, doi:10.1029/2003JE002138. 2

  10. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO2(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total mass removed from the weathering profile. Our analysis suggests that secondary clay precipitation is as important as aqueous transport in governing the amount of dissolution that occurs within a profile because clay minerals exert a strong control over the reaction affinity of the dissolving primary minerals. The modeling also indicates that the weathering advance rate and the total mass of mineral dissolved is controlled by the thermodynamic saturation of the primary dissolving phases plagioclase and K-feldspar, as is evident from the difference in propagation rates of the reaction fronts for the two minerals despite their very similar kinetic rate laws. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Comparison of microstructure of superplastically deformed synthetic materials and ultramylonite: Coalescence of secondary mineral grains via grain boundary sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraga, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Tasaka, M.; Yoshida, H.

    2011-12-01

    Using very fine-grained aggregates of forsterite containing ~10vol% secondary mineral phase such as periclase and enstatite, we have been able to demonstrate their superplascity, that is, achievement of more than a few 100 % tensile strain (Hiraga et al. 2010). Superplastic deformation is commonly considered to proceed via grain boundary sliding (GBS) which results in grain switching in the samples. Hiraga et al. (2010) succeeded in detecting the operation of GBS from observing the coalescence of grains of secondary phase in superplastically deformed samples. The secondary phase pins the motion of grain boundaries of the primary phase; however, the reduction of the number of the grains of secondary phase due to their coalescence allows grain growth of the primary phase. We analyzed the relationships between grain size of the primary and secondary phases, between strain and grain size, and between strain and the number of coalesced grains in the superplastically deformed samples. The results supports participation of all the grains of the primary phase in grain switching process indicating that the grain boundary sliding accommodates almost entire strain during the deformation. Mechanical properties of these materials such as their stress and grain size exponents of 1-2 do not conflict this conclusion. We applied the relationships obtained from analyzing superplastic materials to the microstructure of the natural samples, which has been considered to have deformed via grain boundary sliding, that is, ultramylonite. The microstructure of greenschist-grade ultramylonite reported by Fliervoet et al. (1997) was analyzed. Distributions of the mineral phases (i.e., quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar and biotite) show distinct coalescence of the same mineral phases in the direction almost perpendicular to the foliation of the rock. The number of coalesced grains indicates that the strain that rock experienced is > 2. [reference] Hiraga et al. (2010) Nature 468, 1091-1094; Fliervoet et al. (1997) Journal of Structural Geology 19, 1495-1520

  12. Spectroscopic vibrations of austinite (CaZnAsO4?OH) and its mineral structure: implications for identification of secondary arsenic-containing mineral.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ming, Dengshi; Cheng, Hongfei; Xu, Zhiqiang; Frost, Ray L

    2015-01-25

    Austinite (CaZnAsO4?OH) is a unique secondary mineral in arsenic-contaminated mine wastes. The infrared and Raman spectroscopies were used to characterize the austenite vibrations. The IR bands at 369, 790 and 416 cm(-1) are assigned to the ?2, ?3 and ?4 vibrations of AsO4(3-) unit, respectively. The Raman bands at 814, 779 and 403 cm(-1) correspond to the ?1, ?3 and ?4 vibrations of AsO4(3(-) unit respectively. The sharp bands at 3265 cm(-1) for IR and 3270 cm(-(1) both reveals that the structural hydroxyl units exist in the austenite structure. The IR and Raman spectra both show that some SO4 units isomorphically replace AsO4 in austinite. X-ray single crystal diffraction provides the arrangement of each atom in the mineral structure, and also confirms that the conclusions made from the vibrational spectra. Micro-powder diffraction was used to confirm our mineral identification due to the small quantity of the austenite crystals. PMID:25087167

  13. Optimal design of superhydrophobic surfaces using a paraboloid microtexture.

    PubMed

    Tie, Lu; Guo, Zhiguang; Li, Wen

    2014-12-15

    Due to the crucial role of surface roughness, it has been recently proposed to design optimal and extract geometrical microstructures for practical fabrications of superhydrophobic surfaces. In this work, a paraboloid microtexture is employed as a typical example to theoretically establish a relationship between surface geometry and superhydrophobic behavior for a final optimal design. In particular, based on a thermodynamic approach, the effects of all the geometrical parameters for such a paraboloid microtexture on free energy (FE) and free energy barrier (FEB) as well as equilibrium contact angle (ECA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of a superhydrophobic surface have been systematically investigated in detail. It is interestingly noted that the droplet position for metastable state is closely related to the intrinsic CA of the surface. Furthermore, the paraboloid base steepness plays a significant important role in ECA and CAH, and a critical steepness is necessary for the transition from noncomposite to composite states, which can be judged using a proposed criterion. Moreover, the superhydrophobicity depends strongly the surface geometrical dimension for noncomposite state, while it is not sensitive for composite state. Additionally, both vibrational energy and geometrical dimension affect the transition from noncomposite to composite wetting states, and a comprehensive criterion for such transition can be obtained. Finally, using such criterion, it is revealed that the paraboloidal protrusion is the most optimal geometry among the three typical microtextures for ideal superhydrophobicity. PMID:25265581

  14. Minerals and rocks, what a passion! A CLIL unit in an Italian lower secondary class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Piera; Fiorineschi, Beatrice

    2015-04-01

    CLIL means Content and Language Integrated Learning. Since September 2014 the teaching of a discipline in a foreign language has been compulsory in the final year of all high schools of Italy and recommended in lower secondary schools. So I decided to take part in a training course about "CLIL in Sciences teaching " that ANISN (Associazione Nazionale Insegnanti di Scienze Naturali ) was being held in Bologna from October to December 2014. There I learned that CLIL is much more than the translation of a traditional lecture to a foreign language. It is actually a set of new methodologies, largely based on Bloom's taxonomy, and making use of many kinds of technical support often referred to as "scaffolding" . It provides a context to improve communication because "natural language is never learned divorced from meaning". But CLIL is even more effective in order to learn the content, which is more important here than in immersion methodology. In the course we had to chose a subject , develop it in a structured unit, experiment the unit in a class of ours, using just English, and finally present it to the colleagues in Bologna. I decided to do the activity with 13 year old students. We had started the science lessons with chemistry, this year and I needed a subject consistent with that. So the choice was: Minerals! Because they belong to chemistry, being chemical compounds. Subsequently, even when the course in Bologna had come to an end, we continued with: Rocks! Since the pupils were pleased to do it and I was satisfied with their results. I worked together with my colleague who teaches English in the same class. We developed the subject following the instructions I had been given at the course: we showed the students videos found on line, providing them with the script; we made the text easier for them; we made them work in couples; I organized lab activities to improve learning skills to which they could apply their knowledge . Cross - curricolar links are an important advantage of such a unit; minerals and rocks are linked to physics, chemistry, geomorphology, and also to geography , history, econonomics, and maths. The follow up activities were even more interesting. When we found that the weathering of feldspars to clay can increase the probability of a landslide, I gave the students an example of one of the most famous landslides in the world, Vajont. The students were so interested that they looked by themselves for further information about that tragedy, and the context in which it was possible to happen. Another concept which turned out to be fascinating to the students was how rocks can tell us the geological history of a region . The results of the activities were quite good in Sciences and good in English; the students accepted the challenge, they played along with us and had fun explaining their activities during the open labs devoted to the families of younger students.

  15. A granulometry and secondary mineral fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes and its application to blockfield origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Bradley W.

    2012-12-01

    A review of published literature was undertaken to determine if there was a fingerprint of chemical weathering in regoliths subjected to periglacial conditions during their formation. If present, this fingerprint would be applied to the question of when blockfields in periglacial landscapes were initiated. These blocky diamicts are usually considered to represent remnants of regoliths that were chemically weathered under a warm, Neogene climate and therefore indicate surfaces that have undergone only a few metres to a few 10s of metres of erosion during the Quaternary. Based on a comparison of clay and silt abundances and secondary mineral assemblages from blockfields, other regoliths in periglacial settings, and regoliths from non-periglacial settings, a fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes was identified. A mobile regolith origin under, at least seasonal, periglacial conditions is indicated where clay(%) ? 0.5*silt(%) + 8 across a sample batch. This contrasts with a mobile regolith origin under non-periglacial conditions, which is indicated where clay(%) ? 0.5*silt(%) - 6 across a sample batch with clay(%) ? 0.5*silt(%) + 8 in at least one sample. A range of secondary minerals, which frequently includes interstratified minerals and indicates high local variability in leaching conditions, is also commonly present in regoliths exposed to periglacial conditions during their formation. Clay/silt ratios display a threshold response to temperature, related to the freezing point of water, but there is little response to precipitation or regolith residence time. Lithology controls clay and silt abundances, which increase from felsic, through intermediate, to mafic compositions, but does not control clay/silt ratios. Use of a sedigraph or Coulter Counter to determine regolith granulometry systematically indicates lower clay abundances and intra-site variability than use of a pipette or hydrometer. In contrast to clay/silt ratios, secondary mineral assemblages vary according to regolith residence time, temperature, and/or precipitation. A microsystems model is invoked as a conceptual framework in which to interpret the concurrent formation of the observed secondary mineral ranges. According to the fingerprint of chemical weathering in periglacial landscapes, there is generally no evidence of blockfield origins under warm Neogene climates. Nearly all blockfields appear to be a product of Quaternary physical and chemical weathering. A more dominant role for periglacial processes in further bevelling elevated, low relief, non-glacial surface remnants in otherwise glacially eroded landscapes is therefore indicated.

  16. Secondary Mineral Deposits and Evidence of Past Seismicity and Heating of the Proposed Repository Horizon at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, Josheph F.

    2004-01-01

    The Drift Degradation Analysis (DDA) (BSC, 2003) for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, describes model simulations of the effects of pre- and post-closure seismicity and waste-induced heating on emplacement drifts. Based on probabilistic seismic hazard analyses of the intensity and frequency of future seismic events in the region (CRWMS M&O, 1998), the DDA concludes that future seismicity will lead to substantial damage to emplacement drifts, particularly those in the lithophysal tuffs, where some simulations predict complete collapse of the drift walls. Secondary mineral studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1995 indicate that secondary calcite and silica have been deposited in some fractures and lithophysal cavities in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain during at least the past 10 million years (m.y.), and probably since the tuffs cooled to less than 100?C. Tuff fragments, likely generated by past seismic activity, have commonly been incorporated into the secondary mineral depositional sequences. Preliminary observations indicate that seismic activity has generated few, if any, tuff fragments during the last 2 to 4 m.y., which may be inconsistent with the predictions of drift-wall collapse described in the DDA. Whether or not seismicity-induced tuff fragmentation occurring at centimeter to decimeter scales in the fracture and cavity openings relates directly to failure of tuff walls in the 5.5-m-diameter waste emplacement drifts, the deposits do provide a potential record of the spatial and temporal distribution of tuff fragments in the UZ. In addition, the preservation of weakly attached coatings and (or) delicate, upright blades of calcite in the secondary mineral deposits provides an upper limit for ground motion during the late stage of deposition that might be used as input to future DDA simulations. Finally, bleaching and alteration at a few of the secondary mineral sites indicate that they were subjected to heated gases at approximately the temperatures expected from waste emplacement. These deposits provide at least limited textural and mineralogic analogs for waste-induced, high-humidity thermal alteration of emplacement drift wall rocks.

  17. Feldspar microtextures and multistage thermal history of syenites from the Coldwell Complex, Ontario

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim A. Waldron; Ian Parsons

    1992-01-01

    Optical and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) observations of perthites from augite syenites in the Coldwell Complex (Ontario) reveal a complex set of microtextures that outline a multistage thermal history. Regular microtextures (linear or braid texture, straincontrolled, coherent intergrowths) show a progressive evolution from the margin of the intrusion inwards with lamellar spacings in the range 40–100 nm. The textures evolve

  18. Secondary alteration of the impactite and mineralization in the basal Tertiary sequence, Yaxcopoil-1, Chicxulub impact crater, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Doreen E.; Kjarsgaard, Ingrid M.; Pope, Kevin O.; Dressler, Burkhard; Pilkington, Mark

    2004-07-01

    The 65 Ma Chicxulub impact crater formed in the shallow coastal marine shelf of the Yucatán Platform in Mexico. Impacts into water-rich environments provide heat and geological structures that generate and focus sub-seafloor convective hydrothermal systems. Core from the Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) hole, drilled by the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP), allowed testing for the presence of an impact-induced hydrothermal system by: a) characterizing the secondary alteration of the 100 m-thick impactite sequence; and b) testing for a chemical input into the lower Tertiary sediments that would reflect aquagene hydrothermal plume deposition. Interaction of the Yax-1 impactites with seawater is evident through redeposition of the suevites (unit 1), secondary alteration mineral assemblages, and the subaqueous depositional environment for the lower Tertiary carbonates immediately overlying the impactites. The least-altered silicate melt composition intersected in Yax-1 is that of a calc-alkaline basaltic andesite with 53.4-56 wt% SiO2 (volatile-free). The primary mineralogy consists of fine microlites of diopside, plagioclase (mainly Ab 47), ternary feldspar (Ab 37 to 77), and trace apatite, titanite, and zircon. The overprinting alteration mineral assemblage is characterized by Mg-saponite, Kmontmorillonite, celadonite, K-feldspar, albite, Fe-oxides, and late Ca and Mg carbonates. Mg and K metasomatism resulted from seawater interaction with the suevitic rocks producing smectite-Kfeldspar assemblages in the absence of any mixed layer clay minerals, illite, or chlorite. Rare pyrite, sphalerite, galena, and chalcopyrite occur near the base of the impactites. These secondary alteration minerals formed by low temperature (0-150 °C) oxidation and fixation of alkalis due to the interaction of glass-rich suevite with down-welling seawater in the outer annular trough intersected at Yax-1. The alteration represents a cold, Mg-K-rich seawater recharge zone, possibly recharging higher temperature hydrothermal activity proposed in the central impact basin. Hydrothermal metal input into the Tertiary ocean is shown by elevated Ni, Ag, Au, Bi, and Te concentrations in marcasite and Cd and Ga in sphalerite in the basal 25 m of the Tertiary carbonates in Yax-1. The lower Tertiary trace element signature reflects hydrothermal metal remobilization from a mafic source rock and is indicative of hydrothermal venting of evolved seawater into the Tertiary ocean from an impact generated hydrothermal convective system.

  19. minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildner, Manfred; Giester, Gerald; Kersten, Monika; Langer, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Polarized electronic absorption spectra of colourless chalcocyanite, CuSO4, have been measured using microscope-spectrometric techniques. The spectra are characterized by a structured and clearly polarized band system in the near-infrared spectral range with components centred at 11,720, 10,545, 9,100, and 7,320 cm-1, which have been assigned to crystal field d- d transitions of Cu2+ cations in pseudo-tetragonally elongated CuO6 polyhedra with point symmetry C i (). The polarization behaviour is interpreted based on a D 2( C 2?) pseudo-symmetry. Crystal field calculations were performed for the actual triclinic point symmetry by applying the Superposition Model of crystal fields, as well as in terms of a `classic' pseudo-tetragonal crystal field approach yielding the parameters Dq (eq) = 910, Dt = 395, and Ds = 1,336 cm-1, corresponding to a cubically averaged Dq cub = 679 cm-1. A comparative survey on crystal fields in Cu2+ minerals shows that the low overall crystal field strength in chalcocyanite, combined with a comparatively weak pseudo-tetragonal splitting of energy levels, is responsible for its unique colourless appearance among oxygen-based Cu2+ minerals. The weak crystal field in CuSO4 can be related to the lower position of the SO4 2- anion compared to, e.g. the H2O molecule in the spectrochemical series of ligands.

  20. Collagen type-I leads to in vivo matrix mineralization and secondary stabilization of Mg-Zr-Ca alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Mushahary, Dolly; Wen, Cuie; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Lin, Jixing; Harishankar, Nemani; Hodgson, Peter; Pande, Gopal; Li, Yuncang

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-zirconia-calcium (Mg-Zr-Ca) alloy implants were coated with Collagen type-I (Coll-I) and assessed for their rate and efficacy of bone mineralization and implant stabilization. The phases, microstructure and mechanical properties of these alloys were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and compression test, respectively, and the corrosion behavior was established by their hydrogen production rate in simulated body fluid (SBF). Coll-I extracted from rat tail, and characterized using fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, was used for dip-coating the Mg-based alloys. The coated alloys were implanted into the femur bones of male New Zealand white rabbits. In vivo bone formation around the implants was quantified by measuring the bone mineral content/density (BMC/BMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Osseointegration of the implant and new bone mineralization was visualized by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Upon surface coating with Coll-I, these alloys demonstrated high surface energy showing enhanced performance as an implant material that is suitable for rapid and efficient new bone tissue induction with optimal mineral content and cellular properties. The results demonstrate that Coll-I coated Mg-Zr-Ca alloys have a tendency to form superior trabecular bone structure with better osteoinduction around the implants and higher implant secondary stabilization, through the phenomenon of contact osteogenesis, compared to the control and uncoated ones in shorter periods of implantation. Hence, Coll-I surface coating of Mg-Zr-Ca alloys is a promising method for expediting new bone formation in vivo and enhancing osseointegration in load bearing implant applications. PMID:25179112

  1. Design and fabrication of micro-textures for inducing a superhydrophobic behavior on hydrophilic materials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liangliang; Hu, Hsin-Hua; Gao, Di

    2007-04-10

    Artificial superhydrophobic surfaces are typically fabricated by tuning the surface roughness of intrinsically hydrophobic surfaces. We report here the design and fabrication of micro-textures for inducing a superhydrophobic behavior on hydrogen-terminated Si surfaces with an intrinsic water contact angle of approximately 74 degrees . The micro-textures consist of overhang structures with well-defined geometries fabricated by microfabrication technologies, which provide positions to support the liquid and prevent the liquid from entering into the indents between the micro-textures. As a result, water is in contact with a composite surface of solid and air, which induces the observed macroscopic superhydrophobic behavior. PMID:17371061

  2. Fibroblast extracellular matrix and adhesion on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Morgan M; Parrillo, Allegra; Thomas, Gawain M; McGimpsey, W Grant; Wen, Qi; Bellin, Robert M; Lambert, Christopher R

    2015-05-01

    The immediate physical and chemical surroundings of cells provide important biochemical cues for their behavior. Designing and tailoring biomaterials for controlled cell signaling and extracellular matrix (ECM) can be difficult due to the complexity of the cell-surface relationship. To address this issue, our research has led to the development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold with defined microtopography and chemistry for surface driven ECM assembly. When human fibroblasts were cultured on this microtextured PDMS with 2-6 µm wide vertical features, significant changes in morphology, adhesion, actin cytoskeleton, and fibronectin generation were noted when compared with cells cultured on unmodified PDMS. Investigation of cellular response and behavior was performed with atomic force microscopy in conjunction with fluorescent labeling of focal adhesion cites and fibronectin in the ECM. Changes in the surface topography induced lower adhesion, an altered actin cytoskeleton, and compacted units of fibronectin similar to that observed in vivo. Overall, these findings provide critical information of cell-surface interactions with a microtextured, polymer substrate that can be used in the field of tissue engineering for controlling cellular ECM interactions. PMID:25142015

  3. The Effects of Secondary Mineral Precipitates on 90Sr Mobility at the Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2013-06-03

    The effects of secondary precipitates on 90Sr transport at the Hanford Site were investigated using quartz column experiments with simulated caustic tank waste leachates (STWL). Significantly enhanced retardation of Sr transport was observed in the column contacted with STWL due to Sr sorption and co-precipitation with neo-formed nitratecancrinite. However, the column results also suggest that neo-formed secondary precipitates could behave like native mobile colloids that can enhance Sr transport. Initially immobilized Sr within secondary precipitates could remobilize given a change in the porewater background conditions. The mobility of the neo-formed Sr-bearing precipitates increased with increased solution flow rate. In the field, porewater contents and flow rates can be changed by snowmelt (or storm water) events or artificial infiltration. The increased porewater flow rate caused by these events could affect the mobility of 90Sr-containing secondary precipitates, which can be a potential source for facilitated Sr transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

  4. Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2013-12-02

    In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

  5. Solution spraying of poly(methyl methacrylate) blends to fabricate microtextured, superoleophobic surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siddarth Srinivasan; Shreerang S. Chhatre; Joseph M. Mabry; Robert E. Cohen; Gareth H. McKinley

    2011-01-01

    We describe a simple technique to prepare superhydrophobic and superoleophobic microtextured surfaces by spray coating a blend of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and the low surface energy molecule 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (fluorodecyl POSS, ?sv?10mN\\/m) using an air brush with a pressurized nitrogen stream. Scanning electron micrographs show the formation of microtextured surfaces possessing re-entrant curvature; a critical feature for obtaining

  6. Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Microtexturing AISI-O1 Surface for Thermal Spray Coating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelvii Wei Guo; Hon Yuen Tam

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Pulsed Nd:YAG laser was,used to microtexture AISI-O1 cold work,steel to control the substrate surface characteristics for later thermal spray coating to enhance the wearability. Influence of microtexturing parameters on the 3D surface morphology was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Optical Microscopy (OM). Results show,that when AISI-O1 specimens are irradiated with various parameters, the

  7. Design and Fabrication of Micro-textures for Inducing a Superhydrophobic Behavior on Hydrophilic Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Di Gao; Liangliang Cao; Anmin Cao; Hsin-Hua Hu

    2008-01-01

    Artificial superhydrophobic surfaces are typically fabricated by tuning the surface roughness of intrinsically hydrophobic surfaces. We here report the design and fabrication of micro-textures for inducing a superhydrophobic behavior on intrinsically hydrophilic hydrogen-terminated Si surfaces with an intrinsic water contact angle of about 74 degree. The micro-textures consist of overhang structures with well-defined geometries fabricated by microfabrication technologies, which provide

  8. Bone growth enhancement in vivo on press-fit titanium alloy implants with acid etched microtexture

    PubMed Central

    Daugaard, Henrik; Elmengaard, Brian; Bechtold, Joan E.; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Early bone ongrowth secures long-term fixation of primary implants inserted without cement. Implant surfaces roughened with a texture on the micrometer scale are known to be osseoconductive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone formation at the surface of acid etched implants modified on the micro-scale. We compared implants with a nonparticulate texture made by chemical milling (hydrofluoric acid, nitric acid) (control) with implants that had a dual acid etched (hydrofluoric acid, hydrochloric acid) microtexture surface superimposed on the primary chemically milled texture. We used an experimental joint replacement model with cylindrical titanium implants (Ti-6Al-4V) inserted paired and press-fit in cancellous tibia metaphyseal bone of eight canines for 4 weeks and evaluated by histomorphometric quantification. A significant twofold median increase was seen for bone ongrowth on the acid etched surface [median, 36.1% (interquartile range, 24.3–44.6%)] compared to the control [18.4% (15.6–20.4%)]. The percentage of fibrous tissue at the implant surface and adjacent bone was significantly less for dual acid textured implants compared with control implants. These results show that secondary roughening of titanium alloy implant surface by dual acid etching increases bone formation at the implant bone interface. PMID:18186059

  9. Secondary sulfate minerals associated with acid drainage in the eastern US: recycling of metals and acidity in surficial environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Hammarstrom; R SEALII; A. L. Meier; J. M. Kornfeld

    2005-01-01

    Weathering of metal-sulfide minerals produces suites of variably soluble efflorescent sulfate salts at a number of localities in the eastern United States. The salts, which are present on mine wastes, tailings piles, and outcrops, include minerals that incorporate heavy metals in solid solution, primarily the highly soluble members of the melanterite, rozenite, epsomite, halotrichite, and copiapite groups. The minerals were

  10. Oxygen-isotope composition of ground water and secondary minerals in Columbia Plateau basalts: Implications for the paleohydrology of the Pasco Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Evans; W. C. Steinkampf; D. G. Horton; G. C. Solomon; L. D. White

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of ¹⁸O and deuterium in ground waters beneath the Handford Reservation, Washington State, suggest that the meteoric waters recharging the basalt aquifers have been progressively depleted in these isotopes since at least Pleistocene time. This conclusion is supported by oxygen-isotope analyses of low-temperature secondary minerals filing vugs and fractures in the basalts, which are used to approximate the ¹⁸O

  11. Mutual replacement reactions in alkali feldspars I: microtextures and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ian; Lee, Martin R.

    2009-05-01

    Intracrystal microtextures formed by a process of mutual replacement in alkali feldspars record fluid-rock reactions that have affected large volumes of the Earth’s crust. Regular, ?1 ?m-scale ‘strain-controlled’ perthitic microtextures coarsen, by up to 103, by a dissolution-reprecipitation process, producing microporous patch or vein perthites on scales >100 ?m. We have developed earlier studies of such reactions in alkali feldspar cm-scale primocrysts in layered syenites from the Klokken intrusion, South Greenland. We present new hyperspectral CL, SEM images, and laser ICPMS analytical data, and discuss the mechanism of such replacement reactions. The feldspars grew as homogeneous sodic sanidines which unmixed and ordered by volume diffusion during cooling into the microcline field at 450°C, giving regular, fully coherent ‘braid’ cryptoperthite. At ?450°C the crystals reacted with a circulating post-magmatic aqueous fluid. The braid perthite behaved as a single reactant ‘phase’ which was replaced by two product phases, incoherent subgrains of low albite and microcline, with micropores at their boundaries. The driving force for the reactions was coherency strain energy, which was greater than the surface energy in the subgrain mosaic. The external euhedral crystal shapes and bulk major element composition of the primocrysts were unchanged but they became largely pseudomorphs composed of subgrains usually with the ‘pericline’ and ‘adularia’ habits (dominant {110} and subordinate {010} morphology) characteristic of low T growth. The subgrains have an epitactic relationship with parent braid perthite. Individual subgrains show oscillatory zoning in CL intensity, mainly at blue wavelengths, which correlates with tetrahedral Ti. Regular zoning is sometimes truncated by irregular, discordant surfaces suggesting dissolution, followed by resumption of growth giving regular zoning. Zones can be traced through touching subgrains, of both albite and microcline, for distances up to 500 ?m. At ?340°C, the microcline subgrains underwent a third stage of unmixing to give straight lamellar film perthites with periodicities of 1 ?m, which with further cooling became semicoherent by the development of spaced misfit dislocations. Sub-grain growth occurred in fluid films that advanced through the elastically strained braid perthite crystals, which dissolved irreversibly. Braid perthite was more soluble than the strain-free subgrain mosaics which precipitated from the supersaturated solution. Some volumes of braid texture have sharp surfaces that suggest rapid dissolution along planes with low surface energies. Others have complex, diffuse boundaries that indicate a phase of coherent lamellar straightening by volume diffusion in response to strain relief close to a slowly advancing interface. Nucleation of strain-free subgrains was the overall rate-limiting step. To minimise surface energy subgrains grew with low energy morphologies and coarsened by grain growth, in fluid films whose trace element load (reflected in the oscillatory zoning) was dictated by the competitive advance of subgrains over a range of a few tens of mm. The cross-cutting dissolution surfaces suggest influxes of fresh fluid. Removal of feldspar to give 2 vol% porosity would require a feldspar:fluid ratio of 1:26 (by wt). The late reversion to strain-controlled exsolution in microcline subgrains is consistent with loss of fluid above 340°C following depressurization of the intrusion. A second paper (Part II) describes trace element partitioning between the albite and microcline subgrains, and discusses the potential of trace elements as a low- T geothermometer.

  12. Systematic variations in sinter mineralogy, microtexture and diagenesis in modern siliceous hot springs: Clues for interpreting depositional conditions in ancient deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, V. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Ruff, S. W.; Nunez, J.; Jahnke, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    The deposits of siliceous hydrothermal springs are known to capture and preserve a wide range of microbial fossil information. The recent discovery of hydrothermal silica at Home Plate, Columbia Hills, Mars has once again raised interest in the potential importance of ancient spring sinters as targets for future astrobiological mission to Mars. To create additional context information to support future in situ missions to Mars, we have documented systematic changes in the mineralogy and microtexture of modern siliceous hot spring deposits, observed along gradients in temperature, pH and flow velocity. Specific objectives are to: 1) identify chemical and physical factors that promote early diagenetic transformations of amorphous silica (opal-A), to progressively more ordered and crystalline phases (cristobalite, tridymite and quartz); 2) determine the composition and abundance of minor mineral phases, especially clays, in relationship to pH, temperature and paragenesis; and 3) to assess the usefulness of sinter mineralogy and microtexture in reconstructing the paleoenvironmental records preserved in ancient deposits. Study sites for acidic (pH 2-5) sinters included Nymph Creek, located in the Norris Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Active alkaline (pH 7-10) springs included Rabbit Creek, Steep Cone and Mound Spring located in the Lower Geyser Basin, YNP. Field measurements in active springs included pH, temperature and flow velocity, along with general microfacies assignments. To better constrain types and rates of silica diagenesis, the study also sampled older (Holocene-Pleistocene-aged) deposits. Laboratory analyses included X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal infrared spectroscopy (TIR) and thin section petrography for characterizing sinter microtextures and for placing mineral phases (identified by XRPD and TIR) into a time-ordered diagenetic framework. In analyzing the phyllosilicates present in sinters, we applied clay separation and glycolization methods, with XRPD. Results indicate that all of the acidic sinters we studied showed more extensive early diagenetic ordering of silica phases (opal-A to cristobalite and quartz) than the comparable microfacies of alkaline-neutral sinters. Clay analyses showed no evidence for smectitic (expansive) clays, but kaolin family clays (dickite, kaolinite and halloysite) were present in both acidic and alkaline sinters. The microfacies distribution observed for clays suggests: 1) dickite being more abundant in higher temperature (near-vent) microfacies, 2) kaolinite dominating mid-temperature outflow channels, slope and upper distal apron microfacies, and 3) halloysite being restricted to lower distal apron-marsh microfacies transitions. Future work will expand clay analyses to apply near-IR spectroscopy to a broader range of samples to assess the consistency with patterns suggested from XRPD.

  13. A patterned microtexture to reduce friction and increase longevity of prosthetic hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Chyr, Anthony; Qiu, Mingfeng; Speltz, Jared; Jacobsen, Ronald L.; Sanders, Anthony P.; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-01-01

    More than 285,000 total hip replacement surgeries are performed in the US each year. Most prosthetic hip joints consist of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) femoral head that articulates with a polyethylene acetabular component, lubricated with synovial fluid. The statistical survivorship of these metal-on-polyethylene prosthetic hip joints declines significantly after 10 to 15 years of use, primarily as a result of polyethylene wear and wear debris incited disease. The current engineering paradigm to increase the longevity of prosthetic hip joints is to improve the mechanical properties of the polyethylene component, and to manufacture ultra-smooth articulating surfaces. In contrast, we show that adding a patterned microtexture to the ultra-smooth CoCr femoral head reduces friction when articulating with the polyethylene acetabular liner. The microtexture increases the load-carrying capacity and the thickness of the joint lubricant film, which reduces contact between the articulating surfaces. As a result, friction and wear is reduced. We have used a lubrication model to design the geometry of the patterned microtexture, and experimentally demonstrate reduced friction for the microtextured compared to conventional smooth surrogate prosthetic hip joints. PMID:25013240

  14. A weakening mechanism for intermediate-depth seismicity? Detailed petrographic and microtextural observations from blueschist facies pseudotachylytes, Cape Corse, Corsica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deseta, N.; Andersen, T. B.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2014-01-01

    Gabbro- and peridotite-hosted pseudotachylytes from the Alpine Schistes Lustres Unit in Corsica, previously determined to have formed at blueschist to lawsonite-eclogite facies conditions, have been causally linked to the generation of intermediate-depth earthquakes, which occur at depths of 50-300 km. Detailed petrographic and microtextural analyses of these pseudotachylytes suggest that their initiation may be controlled by a thermally-activated shear runaway process that is controlled by rheology rather than mineralogy. This is documented by sheared out, prolate, kinked and twinned wallrock clasts that have been peeled off and entrained into the pseudotachylyte vein as sigmoid survivor clasts. The presence of metastable high temperature crystallisation products in the pseudotachylyte, such as hoppers and dendrites of olivine, enstatite and diopside (peridotite) and Al-rich omphacite and Fe-rich anorthite in metagabbro, are suggestive of a short-lived high-temperature event resulting from thermal instability. These high temperature mineral assemblages are overprinted by ones indicating a return to ambient conditions of lower temperatures, but still high pressures: glaucophane, albite and epidote in metagabbro and clinochlore; and fine-grained granoblastic olivine, enstatite and diopside in peridotite. The observations from this detailed study of natural samples suggest that intermediate-depth seismicity may be generated by a thermal runaway process.

  15. Zoned ternary feldspars in the Klokken intrusion: exsolution microtextures and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, William L.; Parsons, Ian

    1988-04-01

    The microtextures developed during relatively slow cooling as a function of bulk composition in zoned ternary feldspars from syenodiorites and syenites in the Klokken intrusion, described in the preceding paper, were determined by TEM and their origin and evolution deduced. The feldspars normally have a plagioclase core and an alkali feldspar rim; cores become smaller and rims larger and the An content of both decrease with distance from the contact of the intrusion. The following microtextural sequence was observed. The inner plagioclase cores are homogeneous oligoclase-andesine with Albite growth twins only, but are crypto-antiperthitic towards the outer core. At first small platelets of low sanidine a few nanometres thick and up to ˜10 nm long occur sporadically only on Albite-twin composition planes. With further increase in bulk Or they are homogeneously distributed in the plagioclase. Thicker, through-going plates in platelet-free areas are found, which induce Albite twins in the surrounding plagioclase. The microtextures in the rims are regular cryptomesoperthitic, with (¯601) lenses or lamellae, depending on the bulk Or-content, of low sanidine in Albite-twinned low oligoclase-andesine. Albite and Pericline twins in plagioclase in an M-twin relationship, together with lenticular low sanidine, were found in only one small area. The overall diffraction symmetry of the mesoperthites is monoclinic, showing that exsolution started in a monoclinic feldspar, whereas that of the antiperthites is triclinic. The intermediate zone between the core and rim is more complex and microtextures vary over distances of a few micrometres. The cryptomesoperthites are very regular where Or-rich and probably arose by spinodal decomposition. The platelets in the outer cores arose by heterogeneous nucleation on twin composition planes and by homogeneous nucleation elsewhere. Near the intermediate zone they coarsened to give larger plates which induced Albite-twins in the plagioclase. Because of the zoning, microtextures that were initiated in areas of given composition, can propagate laterally into zones of different composition. A diagram is given showing the relationship between ternary bulk composition and the microtexture developed in coherent perthitic alkali feldspars and plagioclases from slowly-cooled rocks.

  16. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in secondary sulfate minerals in soils of mined areas in Southeast Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Carmona; Á. Faz Cano; J. M. Arocena

    2009-01-01

    Soils in mined areas in southeastern Spain are commonly characterized by extreme acidity, high salinity, and metals. These present challenges to establish vegetation as a management option for these environmentally-problematic landscapes. We collected salt efflorescence and the corresponding soil materials to better understand the geochemical cycling of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in soils of mined areas. Mineral composition was

  17. Reaction path modelling used to explore the relationship between secondary mineral precipitation and low Si content in the meltwaters of a polythermal surge-type glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crompton, J. W.; Flowers, G. E.; Kirste, D. M.; Hagedorn, B.

    2014-12-01

    The subglacial chemical weathering environment is characterized by low temperatures and the hydrolysis and carbonation of freshly comminuted mineral surfaces. Such conditions motivate the hypothesis that relatively low silica fluxes should be found in glacierized basins. Additionally, it is often assumed that glacier meltwaters are far from saturation and that the water chemistry is controlled solely by the dissolution of primary silicates and trace quantities of sulphide and carbonate minerals. Alternatively, we propose that the formation of secondary minerals and precipitates in the delayed drainage system play an important role in controlling the low silica fluxes observed in subglacial envrionments. Borehole and proglacial meltwater samples were collected from a polythermal surge-type glacier overlying granodiorite bedrock in the St. Elias Mountains of Yukon, Canada. The meltwater chemistry, along with the mineralogy of the bedrock and suspended sediments indicate the presence of mineral precipitation accompanied by substantial basal freeze-on. This is supported by field evidence of debris rich basal ice at the terminus and at the base of a borehole. The surplus of Cl- above the supraglacial input is used to calculate the amount of basal freeze-on in the delayed drainage system, and the amount of mixing between the delayed and fast drainage systems. We use Geochemist's Workbench for reaction path modelling with a focus on the silica composition to simulate the chemical evolution of glacial meltwater from (1) the initial water rock contact, (2) basal freeze on, and (3) mixing and post mixing reactions. Unless there is a substantial degree of non-stoichiometric dissolution, we find that the observed proglacial water chemistry at the terminus is largely controlled by the hydrochemistry of water in the delayed drainage system. Lastly, we use this model to explore the relationship between the proglacial water chemistry and the daily glacier surface velocities for the period of July, 2013, with an eye to identifying a relationship between water chemistry and short-term glacier dynamics.

  18. Secondary sulfate minerals associated with acid drainage in the eastern US: Recycling of metals and acidity in surficial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R., II; Meier, A.L.; Kornfeld, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Weathering of metal-sulfide minerals produces suites of variably soluble efflorescent sulfate salts at a number of localities in the eastern United States. The salts, which are present on mine wastes, tailings piles, and outcrops, include minerals that incorporate heavy metals in solid solution, primarily the highly soluble members of the melanterite, rozenite, epsomite, halotrichite, and copiapite groups. The minerals were identified by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron-microprobe. Base-metal salts are rare at these localities, and Cu, Zn, and Co are commonly sequestered as solid solutions within Fe- and Fe-Al sulfate minerals. Salt dissolution affects the surface-water chemistry at abandoned mines that exploited the massive sulfide deposits in the Vermont copper belt, the Mineral district of central Virginia, the Copper Basin (Ducktown) mining district of Tennessee, and where sulfide-bearing metamorphic rocks undisturbed by mining are exposed in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Dissolution experiments on composite salt samples from three minesites and two outcrops of metamorphic rock showed that, in all cases, the pH of the leachates rapidly declined from 6.9 to 30 mg L-1), Fe (>47 mg L-1), sulfate (>1000 mg L-1), and base metals (>1000 mg L-1 for minesites, and 2 mg L-1 for other sites). Geochemical modeling of surface waters, mine-waste leachates, and salt leachates using PHREEQC software predicted saturation in the observed ochre minerals, but significant concentration by evaporation would be needed to reach saturation in most of the sulfate salts. Periodic surface-water monitoring at Vermont minesites indicated peak annual metal loads during spring runoff. At the Virginia site, where no winter-long snowpack develops, metal loads were highest during summer months when salts were dissolved periodically by rainstorms following sustained evaporation during dry spells. Despite the relatively humid climate of the eastern United States, where precipitation typically exceeds evaporation, salts form intermittently in open areas, persist in protected areas when temperature and relative humidity are appropriate, and contribute to metal loadings and acidity in surface waters upon dissolution, thereby causing short-term perturbations in water quality.

  19. Formation of nanotextured surfaces on microtextured Si solar cells by metal-assisted chemical etching process.

    PubMed

    Parida, Bhaskar; Choi, Jaeho; Lim, Gyoungho; Park, Seungil; Kim, Keunjoo

    2014-12-01

    We investigated a nanotexturization process on the microtextured surface of monocrystalline Si solar cells which utilized a metal assisted chemical etching process. P-type Si solar cell wafers were used for nanotexturing followed by saw damage removal and a microtexturing process. As the nanotexturing time was increased, green and red-orange photoluminescence spectra at wavelengths of 506, 507, and 637 nm were observed from the nanotextured cells, indicating that the quantum size effect caused the confinement of charge carriers in nanocrystalline silicon. The nanotextured cells showed a low photoreflectance of 4.5% in the visible spectral region of 400-600 nm. However, the reduced quantum efficiency from the nanotextured samples suggests that a shallow nanopore depth and density are required to prevent surface-related phenomena of charge recombination and surface current leakage. PMID:25971041

  20. Bacterial patterning at the three-phase line of contact with microtextured alkanes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Song Ha; Webb, Hayden K; Mainwaring, David E; Mahon, Peter J; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2015-03-01

    Aliphatic crystallites, characteristic of the eicosane and docosane components of naturally occurring lipids, were found to form microtextures that were structured by specific interactions with ordered graphite (HOPG) used as the underlying substratum, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM) showed highly directed bacterial alignment for two bacterial species (spherical and rod-shaped), reflecting the preferential orientation of the crystallite-air-water interfaces to give linear and triangular bacterial patterning. The mechanisms of bacterial attachment are demonstrated in terms of the balance between effective radial adhesional forces and the capillary forces resulting from the water contact angle of the bacteria at the three-phase line (TPL) of the lipid surface. It is suggested that these microtextured surfaces, which exhibit the ability to limit bacterial adhesion to a precise patterning at the lipid TPL, could be used as a means of controlling bacterial colonization. PMID:25959368

  1. Cell\\/surface interactions on laser micro-textured titanium-coated silicon surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Mwenifumbo; Mingwei Li; Jianbo Chen; Aboubaker Beye; Wolé Soboyejo

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of nano-scale titanium coatings, and micro-groove\\/micro-grid patterns on cell\\/surface interactions\\u000a on silicon surfaces. The nature of the cellular attachment and adhesion to the coated\\/uncoated micro-textured surfaces was\\u000a elucidated by the visualization of the cells and relevant cytoskeletal & focal adhesion proteins through scanning electron\\u000a microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. Increased cell spreading and proliferation rates are

  2. Teasing apart the contributions of hard dietary items on 3D dental microtextures in primates.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Ivan; Schulz, Ellen; Pinnow, Mona; Krohn, Susanne; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2012-07-01

    3D dental microtexture analysis is a powerful tool for reconstructing the diets of extinct primates. This method is based on the comparison of fossils with extant species of known diet. The diets of primates are highly diversified and include fruits, seeds, grass, tree leaves, bark, roots, tubers, and animal resources. Fruits remain the main component in the diets of most primates. We tested whether the proportion of fruit consumed is correlated with dental microtexture. Two methods of microtexture analysis, the scale-sensitive fractal analysis (SSFA) and the Dental Areal Surface Texture Analysis (DASTA; after ISO/FDIS 25178-2), were applied to specimens of eight primate species (Alouatta seniculus, Gorilla gorilla, Lophocebus albigena, Macaca fascicularis, Pan troglodytes, Papio cynocephalus, Pongo abelii, Theropithecus gelada). These species largely differ in the mean annual proportion of fruit (from 0 to 90%) in their diet, as well as in their consumption of other hard items (seeds, bark, and insect cuticles) and of abrasive plants. We find the complexity and heterogeneity of textures (SSFA) to correlate with the proportion of fruits consumed. Textural fill volume (SSFA) indicates the proportion of both fruits and other hard items processed. Furthermore, anisotropy (SSFA) relates to the consumption of abrasive plants like grass and other monocots. ISO parameters valley height, root mean square height, material volume, density of peaks, and closed hill and dale areas (DASTA) describe the functional interaction between food items and enamel facets during mastication. The shallow, plastic deformation of enamel surfaces induced by small hard particles, such as phytoliths or dust, results in flat microtexture relief, whereas the brittle, deep fracture caused by large hard items such as hard seeds creates larger relief. PMID:22705031

  3. Adhesion Study of Escherichia coli Cells on Nano\\/Microtextured Surfaces in a Microfluidic System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hengyu Wang; Jeong-Hwan Kim; Min Zou; Steve Tung; Jin Woo Kim

    2008-01-01

    Control of cell-to-surface adhesion has significant impacts on various biological and biomedical applications. In this study, nano-\\/microtextured surfaces produced by a unique surface texturing technique, Al-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon, were utilized to control the adhesion of Escherichia coli cells on glass substrates in the fabrication of an E. coli-based whole-cell chemical sensor. Cell adhesion experiments were conducted in microfluidic

  4. Microstructure and Microtexture Formation of AZ91D Magnesium Alloys Solidified in a Static Magnetic Field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mingjun Li; Takuya Tamura; Kenji Miwa

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we solidified AZ91D magnesium alloys in a static magnetic field with a magnetic flux density up to 10 Tesla\\u000a (T). Three different regions can be identified in a solidified alloy, according to their microtexture and microstructure;\\u000a these regions are: (a) region (A), the central region with equiaxed dendrites, (b) region (B), the transitional region with\\u000a directional dendrites

  5. Spectral reflectance properties (0.4-2.5 ?m) of secondary Fe-oxide, Fe-hydroxide, and Fe-sulphate-hydrate minerals associated with sulphide-bearing mine wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Williams, D.E.; Hammarstrom, J.M.; Piatak, N.; Chou, I.-Ming; Mars, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectra of 15 mineral species commonly associated with sulphide-bearing mine wastes show diagnostic absorption bands related to electronic processes involving ferric and/or ferrous iron, and to vibrational processes involving water and hydroxyl. Many of these absorption bands are relatively broad and overlapping; however, spectral analysis methods, including continuum removal and derivative analysis, permit most of the minerals to be distinguished. Key spectral differences between the minerals are illustrated in a series of plots showing major absorption band centres and other spectral feature positions. Because secondary iron minerals are sensitive indicators of pH, Eh, relative humidity, and other environmental conditions, spectral mapping of mineral distributions promises to have important application to mine waste remediation studies.

  6. HISTOLOGIC STRUCTURE AND MINERAL COMPONENTS OF SECONDARY DENTIN FORMED BY ENDOCHONDRAL BONE MATRIX GELATIN IMPLANTATION IN RABBIT PULP CAVITY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Sobhani; A. Shoa-Kazemi; B. Niknafs; A. Hedaiatpour

    Many investigators use bone matrix gelatin for bone induction but it is used rarely for repair of teeth defects. This study was designed to evaluate secondary dentin formation by endochondral bone matrix gelatin (E-BMG) in rabbit. E-BMG was prepared from tibia and femur of 4 Deutsche-Poland rabbits with average ages of 4-6 months. The prepared E-BMG was implanted in right

  7. Effects of oxyanions, natural organic matter, and bacterial cell numbers on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) and the formation of secondary mineralization products.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Edward J; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2010-06-15

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides results in the production of Fe(II) and may lead to the subsequent formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products including magnetite, siderite, vivianite, chukanovite (ferrous hydroxy carbonate (FHC)), and green rust; however, the factors controlling the formation of specific Fe(II) phases are often not well-defined. This study examined effects of (i) a range of inorganic oxyanions (arsenate, borate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, and tungstate), (ii) natural organic matter (citrate, oxalate, microbial extracellular polymeric substances [EPS], and humic substances), and (iii) the type and number of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite and formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products. The bioreduction kinetics clustered into two distinct Fe(II) production profiles. "Fast" Fe(II) production kinetics [19-24 mM Fe(II) d(-1)] were accompanied by formation of magnetite and FHC in the unamended control and in systems amended with borate, oxalate, gellan EPS, or Pony Lake fulvic acid or having "low" cell numbers. Systems amended with arsenate, citrate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, tungstate, EPS from Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, or humic substances derived from terrestrial plant material or with "high" cell numbers exhibited comparatively slow Fe(II) production kinetics [1.8-4.0 mM Fe(II) d(-1)] and the formation of green rust. The results are consistent with a conceptual model whereby competitive sorption of more strongly bound anions blocks access of bacterial cells and reduced electron-shuttling compounds to sites on the iron oxide surface, thereby limiting the rate of bioreduction. PMID:20476735

  8. Oxygen-isotope composition of ground water and secondary minerals in Columbia Plateau basalts: implications for the paleohydrology of the Pasco Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, P.P., Jr.; Steinkampf, W.C.; Horton, D.G.; Solomon, G.C.; White, L.D.; Evans, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of 18O and deuterium in ground waters beneath the Hanford Reservation, Washington State, suggest that the meteoric waters recharging the basalt aquifers have been progressively depleted in these isotopes since at least Pleistocene time. This conclusion is supported by oxygen-isotope analyses of low-temperature secondary minerals filling vugs and fractures in the basalts, which are used to approximate the 18O content of ground water at the time the mineral assemblage formed. A fossil profile of ??18O values projected for ground water in a 1500 m vertical section beneath the reservation suggests that the vertical mixing of shallow and deep ground water indicated by present-day hydrochemical data was also occurring during Neogene time. These data also suggest that a unidirectional depletion of 18O and deuterium recorded in Pleistocene ground waters may have extended considerably further back in time. This shift is tentatively attributed to the orographic depletion of 18O associated with the progressive uplift of the Cascade Range since the middle Miocene. -Authors

  9. DOE FG02-03ER63557: Final Technical Report: Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kathryn L. Nagy

    2009-05-04

    The purpose of the project was to investigate rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals and key components of waste tank solutions that leaked into the subsurface at the Hanford Site. Results were expected to enhance understanding of processes that cause (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. Measured rates can also be used directly in reactive transport models. Project tasks included (1) measurement of the dissolution rates of biotite mica from low to high pH and over a range of temperature relevant to the Hanford subsurface, (2) measurement of dissolution rates of quartz at high pH and in the presence of dissolved alumina, (3) measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms, (4) incorporation of perrhenate in iron-oxide minerals as a function of pH, and (5) initiation of experiments to measure the formation of uranium(VI)-silicate phases under ambient conditions. Task 2 was started under a previous grant from the Environmental Management Science Program and Task 4 was partially supported by a grant to the PI from the Geosciences Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Task 5 was continued under a subsequent grant from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  10. Radioactive Bench-scale Steam Reformer Demonstration of a Monolithic Steam Reformed Mineralized Waste Form for Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste - 12306

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Brent; Olson, Arlin; Mason, J. Bradley; Ryan, Kevin [THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC - 106 Newberry St. SW, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); Jantzen, Carol; Crawford, Charles [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNL), LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Hanford currently has 212,000 m{sup 3} (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive mixed waste stored in the Hanford tank farm. This waste will be processed to produce both high-level and low-level activity fractions, both of which are to be vitrified. Supplemental treatment options have been under evaluation for treating portions of the low-activity waste, as well as the liquid secondary waste from the low-activity waste vitrification process. One technology under consideration has been the THOR{sup R} fluidized bed steam reforming process offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC (TTT). As a follow-on effort to TTT's 2008 pilot plant FBSR non-radioactive demonstration for treating low-activity waste and waste treatment plant secondary waste, TTT, in conjunction with Savannah River National Laboratory, has completed a bench scale evaluation of this same technology on a chemically adjusted radioactive surrogate of Hanford's waste treatment plant secondary waste stream. This test generated a granular product that was subsequently formed into monoliths, using a geo-polymer as the binding agent, that were subjected to compressibility testing, the Product Consistency Test and other leachability tests, and chemical composition analyses. This testing has demonstrated that the mineralized waste form, produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay using the TTT process, is as durable as low-activity waste glass. Testing has shown the resulting monolith waste form is durable, leach resistant, and chemically stable, and has the added benefit of capturing and retaining the majority of Tc-99, I-129, and other target species at high levels. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of Bone Height and Bone Mineral Density Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography After Secondary Bone Graft in Alveolar Cleft.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dai-Zun; Xiao, Wen-Lin; Zhou, Rong; Xue, Ling-Fa; Ma, Long

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the optimal timing of subsequent dental implant placement and orthodontics after alveolar bone grafting (ABG) in patients with unilateral complete clefts of the alveolar process. Iliac bone graft surgery was performed on 60 patients. Bone mineral density (BMD) and height of the ABG areas were assessed using cone beam computed tomography at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The heights of the labial and palatal bone graft areas were classified using the modified Bergland classification. The study found that there was no change in BMD between 3 months (mean?±?SD: 406.51?±?71.28 Hounsfield units [HU]) and 6 months (409.53?±?46.37?HU; P?=?0.381). Significant changes in the distribution of bone height classifications were observed in the labial and palatal sides of the ABG between 3 and 6 months (P?=?0.025 for labial bone height, P?=?0.008 for palatal bone height). These results indicate that the alveolar density remained stable between 3 and 6 months, whereas bone height level declined during that period after ABG, the latter indicating bone graft absorption over time. It is, therefore, suggested that subsequent orthodontic or dental implants be placed 3 months after ABG rather than at 6 months or later. PMID:26114510

  12. Laser surface micro-texturing to enhance the frictional behavior of lubricated steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Antonio; Carbone, Giuseppe; Scaraggi, Michele; Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Sorgente, Donato; Lugarà, Pietro M.

    2014-03-01

    Surface micro-texturing has been widely theoretically and experimentally demonstrated to be beneficial to friction reduction in sliding contacts under lubricated regimes. Several microscopic mechanisms have been assessed to concur to this macroscopic effect. In particular, the micro-textures act as lubricant reservoirs, as well as traps for debris. Furthermore, they may produce a local reduction of the shear stress coupled with a stable hydrodynamic pressure between the lubricated sliding surfaces. All these mechanisms are strongly dependent both on the micro-texturing geometry and on the operating conditions. Among the various micro-machining techniques, laser ablation with ultrashort pulses is an emerging technology to fabricate surface textures, thanks to the intrinsic property of laser light to be tightly focused and the high flexibility and precision achievable. In addition, when using sub-ps pulses, the thermal damage on the workpiece is negligible and the laser surface textures (LST) are not affected by burrs, cracks or resolidified melted droplets, detrimental to the frictional properties. In this work several LST geometries have been fabricated by fs-laser ablation of steel surfaces, varying the diameter, depth and spacing of micro-dimples squared patterns. We compared their frictional performance with a reference nontextured sample, on a range of sliding velocities from the mixed lubrication to the hydrodynamic regime. The measured Stribeck curves data show that the depth and diameter of the microholes have a huge influence in determining the amount of friction reduction at the interface. Different theoretical interpretations to explain the experimental findings are also provided.

  13. Aeolian microtextures in silica spheres induced in a wind tunnel experiment: Comparison with aeolian quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, P. J. M.; Andrade, C.; Mahaney, W. C.; Marques da Silva, F.; Freire, P.; Freitas, M. C.; Janardo, C.; Oliveira, M. A.; Silva, T.; Lopes, V.

    2013-01-01

    Microtextures in quartz attributed to aeolian transport, principally bulbous edges and abrasion fatigue have seldom been tested in the laboratory under controlled conditions. A wind tunnel experiment was conducted, using glass spheres (> 70% SiO2) as a proxy for quartz, with the objective of determining the extent of mechanical damage to silica/glass transported in a mixture with quartz beach sand. The microspheres were microscopically imaged prior to transport in a wind tunnel, subjected at velocities ranging from 4 to 13 m/s in sequential runs of 10 min. The range in velocity is capable of lifting grains into the air column or saltating quartz grains and silica/glass spheres to produce mechanical impact, i.e. abrasion commonly experienced in aeolian transport. With increasing velocity silica/glass spheres, which displayed minor imperfections prior to transport, began to show significant grain damage exhibiting increasing depth into the silica/glass fabric - a result of mechanical contact - as well as increasing frequency of craters, dislodged plates and abrasion fatigue. While pits appear earlier in the experiment (8 m/s), dislodged plates and abrasion fatigue need a threshold velocity of near 10 m/s to become more frequent. Bulbous edges on the grain surface, often considered the hallmark of aeolian transport, are not seen in the grain population analyzed, possibly because of the initial near-perfect sphericity of the silica/glass spheres. The experiment proved that aeolian transport throughout short distances and during a relatively short period of time is enough to imprint significant abrasion marks in microspheres. In fact, the microtextures produced were fresh surfaces, fractures and abrasion that imprinted areas of different sizes. A comparison of microtextural imprints on silica/glass spheres relative to coastal dune sands was made to better understand energy thresholds required to achieve grain damage.

  14. Geochemical, microtextural and petrological studies of the Samba prospect in the Zambian Copperbelt basement: a metamorphosed Palaeoproterozoic porphyry Cu deposit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Master, Sharad; Mirrander Ndhlovu, N.

    2015-04-01

    Ever since Wakefield (1978, IMM Trans., B87, 43-52) described a porphyry-type meta-morphosed Cu prospect, the ca 50 Mt, 0.5% Cu Samba deposit (12.717°S, 27.833°E), hosted by porphyry-associated quartz-sericite-biotite schists in northern Zambia, there has been controversy about its origin and significance. This is because it is situated in the basement to the world's largest stratabound sediment-hosted copper province, the Central African Copperbelt, which is hosted by rocks of the Neoproterozoic Katanga Supergroup. Mineralization in the pre-Katangan basement has long played a prominent role in ore genetic models, with some authors suggesting that basement Cu mineralization may have been recycled into the Katangan basin through erosion and redeposition, while others have suggested that the circulation of fluids through Cu-rich basement may have leached out the metals which are found concentrated in the Katangan orebodies. On the basis of ca 490-460 Ma Ar-Ar ages, Hitzman et al. (2012, Sillitoe Vol., SEG Spec. Publ., 16, 487-514) suggested that Samba represents late-stage impregnation of copper mineralization into the basement, and that it was one of the youngest copper deposits known in the Central African Copperbelt. If the Samba deposit really is that young, then it would have post-dated regional deformation and metamorphism (560-510 Ma), and it ought to be undeformed and unmetamorphosed. The Samba mineralization consists of chalcopyrite and bornite, occurring as disseminations, stringers and veinlets, found in a zone >1 km along strike, in steeply-dipping lenses up to 10m thick and >150m deep. Our new major and trace element XRF geochemical data (14 samples) show that the host rocks are mainly calc-alkaline metadacites. Cu is correlated with Ag (Cu/Ag ~10,000:1) with no Au or Mo. Our study focused on the microtextures and petrology of the Samba ores. We confirm that there is alteration of similar style to that accompanying classical porphyry Cu mineralization, including potassic (biotite+sericite+ quartz), propylitic (clinozoisite+chlorite+saussuritized plagioclase), phyllic (sericite+quartz+ pyrite+hydromuscovite/illite) and argillic (kaolinite+chlorite+dolomite) alteration. The clays were identified with XRD. All the rocks show penetrative deformational textures and fabrics. Our textural studies show that phyllic zone pyrite crystals have quartz-rich pressure shadows, and they predate all phases of deformation. Similarly, in the potassic zone, fracture-controlled biotite stringers in particular orientations are deformed, and partly replaced by chlorite, again showing their pre-deformational, pre-metamorphic origin. Copper sulfide-bearing quartz veinlets are deformed. Many of the alteration assemblages containing biotite or sericite have been deformed into crenulated schists, showing that they were formed early in the deformation history. Coupled with the dating of a Samba metavolcanic rock at 1964±12 Ma (Rainaud et al., 2005, JAES, 42, 1-31), we regard the Samba deposit as a metamorphosed Palaeoproterozoic porphyry-type Cu deposit, which has undergone deformation, and retrograde metamorphism of its alteration assemblages, during the Neoproterozoic Lufilian Orogeny, followed by post-tectonic cooling, which occurred throughout the Copperbelt at about 480±20 Ma. Samba, together with the Mkushi deposits, is part of a long-lived (>100 Ma) Palaeoproterozoic porphyry-Cu province in the Zambian Copperbelt basement, and ore genetic theories for the Copperbelt mineralization must now seriously take this into account.

  15. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

  16. Acid-etched microtexture for enhancement of bone growth into porous-coated implants.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Harvey, E J; Tanzer, M; Krygier, J J; Bobyn, J D

    2003-11-01

    We designed an in vivo study to determine if the superimposition of a microtexture on the surface of sintered titanium beads affected the extent of bone ingrowth. Cylindrical titanium intramedullary implants were coated with titanium beads to form a porous finish using commercial sintering techniques. A control group of implants was left in the as-sintered condition. The test group was etched in a boiling acidic solution to create an irregular surface over the entire porous coating. Six experimental dogs underwent simultaneous bilateral femoral intramedullary implantation of a control implant and an acid etched implant. At 12 weeks, the implants were harvested in situ and the femora processed for undecalcified, histological examination. Eight transverse serial sections for each implant were analysed by backscattered electron microscopy and the extent of bone ingrowth was quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The extent of bone ingrowth into the control implants was 15.8% while the extent of bone ingrowth into the etched implants was 25.3%, a difference of 60% that was statistically significant. These results are consistent with other research that documents the positive effect of microtextured surfaces on bone formation at an implant surface. The acid etching process developed for this study represents a simple method for enhancing the potential of commonly available porous coatings for biological fixation. PMID:14653605

  17. Microtexture tracking of sub-boundary evolution during hot deformation of aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Quey, R.; Driver, J.H., E-mail: driver@emse.fr

    2011-12-15

    The microstructure and microtexture evolution of the same 3 grains around a triple point has been followed during hot plane strain compression by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) up to a strain of 1.2. A large grained model alloy of Al-0.1 wt% Mn was deformed in the form of a split sample in channel die compression at 400 Degree-Sign C by 3 repeated cycles, each involving EBSD grain orientation mapping, hot deformation and quenching. Detailed substructure maps of 3 grains on an inner surface demonstrates that their dislocation substructure develops up to a strain of about 0.5 then stabilises at approximately constant size, disorientation distribution and boundary alignment. The results are consistent with the repolygonisation model of steady state sub-boundary creation and dissolution during hot deformation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Same area around triple point in Al followed by EBSD during hot deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strains from 0 to 1.2 by intervals of about 0.4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-grain microstructure and microtexture stabilise after strains of about 0.5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results consistent with model of continuous creation and dissolution of sub-grains.

  18. Osteoblast maturation on microtextured titanium involves paracrine regulation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Pan, Qingfen; Dunn, Ginger; Williams, Joseph K; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2015-05-01

    Osteoblasts are sensitive to surface microtopography and chemistry. Osteoblast differentiation and maturation are higher in vitro and bone formation and osseointegration enhanced in vivo on microstructured titanium (Ti) compared to smooth surfaces. Cells increased BMP2 expression on microtextured Ti alloy, suggesting a paracrine role in regulating osteoblast maturation. However, recent studies show that exogenous BMP2 inhibits osteoblast production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and osteocalcin, indicating that control of BMP-signaling may be involved. This study examined whether cells modulate BMP ligands, receptors, and inhibitors during osteoblast maturation on Ti, specifically focusing on the roles of BMP2 and Noggin (NOG). mRNA and protein for BMP2, BMP4, and BMP7 and receptors BMPR1A, BMPR1B, and BMPR2, and BMP inhibitors were upregulated on microtextured surfaces in comparison to smooth surfaces. Maturation on microstructured Ti was slightly enhanced with exogenous BMP2 while NOG addition inhibited osteoblast maturation. Cells with NOG knocked down significantly increased osteoblast maturation. These results demonstrate that BMP-related molecules are controlled during osteoblast maturation on microstructured Ti surfaces and that endogenous NOG is an important regulator of the process. Modifying paracrine BMP signaling may yield more robust bone formation than application of exogenous BMPs. PMID:25111281

  19. Sinus grafting with mineralized allograft and staged implant placement.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Svea

    2010-03-01

    Advanced atrophy of the partially edentulous maxilla necessitates bone augmentation as a prerequisite for successful implant osseointegration. This case shows that sinus grafting at the left first molar (free-end gap) by means of particulated mineralized solvent-preserved cancellous bone and sealing of the recipient site with a bioabsorbable xenogenic collagenous membrane provides optimum conditions for a staged implant placement. Four months after sinus membrane elevation, a trephine biopsy was recovered from the augmented floor and a microtextured implant placed into the augmented area. The ultrastructural observations testify to the biocompatibility and osteoconductivity of the grafting material used. PMID:20213019

  20. Microtexture of constituent phases in a heavily warm- rolled and annealed duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, M.; Bhattacharjee, P. P.

    2015-04-01

    Evolution of microtexture during isothermal annealing of a heavily warm-rolled Fe- 0.08%C-24.18%Cr-10.5%Ni duplex stainless steel (DSS) having approximately equal volume fraction of ferrite and austenite was investigated in the present work. The DSS was warm-rolled to ?90% reduction in thickness at three different temperatures, namely, 225°C, 425°C and 625°C followed by isothermal annealing at 1175°C for different length of time. Austenite showed pure metal or copper type texture at different warm-rolling temperatures. In contrast, the texture of ferrite in different warm-rolled DSS revealed the presence of RD (RD//<110>) and ND (ND//<111>) fibers. The annealing texture of austenite showed retention of the deformation texture components while ferrite revealed strong RD-fiber.

  1. Optimal geometrical design for superhydrophobic surfaces: effects of a trapezoid microtexture.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Cui, X S; Fang, G P

    2010-03-01

    It is now becoming possible to control and tailor micro/nanoscale chemical structures with different geometrical patterns on various substrates to achieve so-called superhydrophobic surfaces, which show promising industrial applications. In spite of significant advances in preparation of such surfaces, to date the effects of surface patterns or geometries on superhydrophobicity have not been understood completely, in particular, in the theoretical aspect. It has therefore been a challenge to design optimal geometry for ideal superhydrophobic behavior. In this study, a trapezoid microtextured superhydrophobic surface has been thermodynamically analyzed using a 2-D model. Furthermore, based on the calculations of free energy (FE) and free energy barrier (FEB), the effects of all the geometrical parameters for the trapezoid microtexture on contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) have been investigated systematically. It is demonstrated that besides height, base angle plays a significant important role in equilibrium contact angle (ECA) and CAH; in particular, a critical base angle for the present geometrical system is necessary for the transition from noncomposite to composite states. Moreover, the trapezoid base width affects strongly various CAs; a small base width is necessary for the large ECA and the small CAH. However, the effects of trapezoid base spacing are considerably complex. For the above transition, a small base spacing is necessary, but decreasing base spacing can decrease the ECA only for the composite state and can increase CAH only for the noncomposite state. Based on the above findings, some fundamental principles for the design of optimal geometry of ideal superhydrophobic surfaces are therefore suggested, which are also consistent with the experimental observations and previous theoretical investigations. PMID:20112932

  2. The responses to surface wettability gradients induced by chitosan nanofilms on microtextured titanium mediated by specific integrin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Hwa; Wasilewski, Christine E.; Almodovar, Noelia; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Boyan, Barbara D.; Tannenbaum, Rina; Schwartz, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Microtexture and chemistry of implant surfaces are important variables for modulating cellular responses. Surface chemistry and wettability are connected directly. While each of these surface properties can influence cell response, it is difficult to decouple their specific contributions. To address this problem, the aims of this study were to develop a surface wettability gradient with a specific chemistry without altering micron scale roughness and to investigate the role of surface wettability on osteoblast response. Microtextured sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA, Sa = 3.1 ?m) titanium disks were treated with oxygen plasma to increase reactive oxygen density on the surface. At 0, 2, 6, 10, and 24 h after removing them from the plasma, the surfaces were coated with chitosan for 30 min, rinsed and dried. Modified SLA surfaces are denoted as SLA/h in air prior to coating. Surface characterization demonstrated that this process yielded differing wettability (SLA0 < SLA2 < SLA10 < SLA24) without modifying the micron scale features of the surface. Cell number was reduced in a wettability-dependent manner, except for the most water-wettable surface, SLA24. There was no difference in alkaline phosphatase activity with differing wettability. Increased wettability yielded increased osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin production, except on the SLA24 surfaces. mRNA for integrins ?1, ?2, ?5, ?1, and ?3 was sensitive to surface wettability. However, surface wettability did not affect mRNA levels for integrin ?3. Silencing ?1 increased cell number with reduced osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin in a wettability-dependent manner. Surface wettability as a primary regulator enhanced osteoblast differentiation, but integrin expression and silencing ?1 results indicate that surface wettability regulates osteoblast through differential integrin expression profiles than microtexture does. The results may indicate that both microtexture and wettability with a specific chemistry have important regulatory effects on osseointegration. Each property had different effects, which were mediated by different integrin receptors. PMID:22835642

  3. Nanotexturing process on microtextured surfaces of silicon solar cells by SF6/O2 reactive ion etching.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyungyong; Choi, Jaeho; Lim, Gyoungho; Parida, Bhaskar; Kim, Keunjoo; Jo, Jung Hee; Kim, Hong Seub

    2013-12-01

    We investigated a nanotexturing process on the microtextured surface of single crystalline silicon solar cell by the reactive ion etching process in SF6/O2 mixed gas ambient. P-type Si wafer samples were prepared using a chemical wet etching process to address saw damage removal and achieve microtexturing. The microtextured wafers were further processed for nanotexturing by exposure to reactive ions within a circular tray of wafer carrier containing many small holes for uniform etching. As the dry etching times were increased to 2, 4 and finally to 8 min, surface structures were observed in a transition from nanoholes to nanorods, and a variation in wafer color from dark blue to black. The surface nanostructures showed a lowered photoreflectance and enhanced quantum efficiency within the visible light region with wavelengths of less than 679 nm. The nanohole structure etched for 2 min showed enhanced conversion efficiency when compared to the bare sample; however, the nanorod structure etched for 8 min exhibited the decreased efficiency with a reduced short circuit current, indicating that the surface nanostructural damage with the enlarged nanoperimetric surface area is sensitive to surface passivation from the surface recombination process. PMID:24266144

  4. Microtextural evolution of different TRC AA8006 alloy sections with homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong-wei; Shen, Long-fei; Zhao, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Grain microtexture evolution in twin-roll cast AA8006 alloy sheets subjected to different treatments was investigated using electron backscatter diffraction. The textures of rolling-transverse and normal-transverse sections were characterized in original as-cast twin-roll casting and cold-rolled samples as well as samples homogenized at 500°C for 8 h and at 580°C for 4 h. It is found that grains on both the rolling-transverse and normal-transverse sections of cold-rolled samples are made finer by rolling deformation and coarsened after homogenization. Annealing temperature has a stronger effect on the microstructural evolution than annealing time. The grain growth direction is parallel to the normal-transverse section, while grain deformation is more stable on the rolling direction than on the normal direction. The rolling orientations display more obvious anisotropy on the normal-transverse sections than on the rolling-transverse sections. Grain recrystallization and growth occur much easier on the normal-transverse section than on the rolling-transverse section for samples homogenized at 500°C for 8 h. A special misorientation relationship between cold deformation texture, such as S orientation {123}<634> and cube orientation <110>? X axis [cubic], and recrystallization texture after homogenization, such as R orientation {124}<211> and P orientation {011}<122>, is observed.

  5. Metal nanoparticle-enhanced photocurrent in GaAs photovoltaic structures with microtextured interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dmitruk, Nicolas L; Borkovskaya, Olga Yu; Mamontova, Iryna B; Mamykin, Sergii V; Malynych, Sergii Z; Romanyuk, Volodymyr R

    2015-01-01

    The photocurrent enhancement effect caused by Au and Ag nanoparticles for GaAs-based photovoltaic structures of surface barrier or p-n junction type with microtextured interfaces has been investigated in dependence on the conditions of nanoparticles deposition and, respectively, on the shape and local dielectric environment of obtained nanoparticle arrays. Three nanoparticle deposition methods have been checked: 1) photoinduced chemical deposition of Au from aqueous AuCl3 solution forming nanowires on the ridges of quasigrating-type surface microrelief, 2) deposition of Ag nanoparticles from colloidal suspension on the GaAs substrate covered with poly(vinylpyridine), and 3) drop and dry deposition of Au/SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles from aqueous colloid solution. The comprehensive investigation of optical reflectance, photoelectric, and electrical characteristics of the fabricated barrier structures has shown the highest photovoltaic parameters for surface microrelief of quasigrating-type and electroless Au nanoparticle deposition. The analysis of characteristics obtained allowed us also to define the mechanisms of the total photocurrent enhancement. PMID:25852368

  6. Microtextured metals for stray-light suppression in the Clementine startracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Anodized blacks for suppressing stray light in optical systems can now be replaced by microscopically textured metal surfaces. An application of these black surfaces to the Clementine star-tracker navigational system, which will be launched in early 1994 to examine the Moon, en route to intercept an asteroid, is detailed. Rugged black surfaces with Lambertian BRDF less than 10(exp -2) srad(sup -1) are critical for suppressing stray light in the star-tracker optical train. Previously available materials spall under launch vibrations to contaminate mirrors and lenses. Microtextured aluminum is nearly as dark, but much less fragile. It is made by differential ion beam sputtering, which generates light-trapping pores and cones slightly smaller than the wavelength to be absorbed. This leaves a sturdy but light-absorbing surface that can survive challenging conditions without generating debris or contaminants. Both seeded ion beams and plasma immersion (from ECR plasmas) extraction can produce these microscopic textures without fragile interfaces. Process parameters control feature size, spacing, and optical effects (THR, BRDF). Both broad and narrow absorption bands can be engineered with tuning for specific wavelengths and applications. Examples are presented characterized by FTIR in reflection librators (0.95 normal emissivity), heat rejection, and enhanced nucleate boiling.

  7. Mineralogical and microtextural characterization of ``gel-zircon`` from the Manibay uranium mine, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Helean, K.B.; Ewing, R.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Burakov, B.E.; Anderson, E.B.; Strykanova, E.E.; Ushakov, S.V. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Gel-zircon, an unusual Zr-silicate phase from the Manibay uranium mine, northern Kazakhstan, was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD results indicate that gel-zircon is mostly amorphous and occurs with numerous impurity phases. Microprobe EDS results indicate a UO{sub 2} content up to 9.14 wt.% HRTEM images revealed that the microtexture of gel-zircon consists of nanocrystallites of zircon, 2--10 nm in size, in a dominantly amorphous matrix. Despite the U-Pb age of 420 {+-} 25 my and the lack of significant crystallinity, the gel-zircon is an apparently chemically durable phase. Leaching of uranium ores which contain gel-zircon as the major U-bearing phase is impossible using existing uranium plant technologies. The alpha-decay dose, 2.64 displacements per atom (dpa), corresponding to the age of gel-zircon is much higher than that (0.5 dpa) required to cause metamictization of crystalline zircon. However, the morphology of gel-zircon which occurs as veins up to 5 mm thick and tens of mm long does not indicate initial crystallinity. Initially crystalline natural zircons often preserve their crystal morphology after metamictization. This amorphous phase is analogous to the highly damaged state characteristic of zircon proposed as a waste form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  8. Characterization of the sulphate mineral coquimbite, a secondary iron sulphate from Javier Ortega mine, Lucanas Province, Peru - Using infrared, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Gobac, Željka Žigove?ki; López, Andrés; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Lana, Cristiano; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes

    2014-04-01

    The mineral coquimbite has been analysed using a range of techniques including SEM with EDX, thermal analytical techniques and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The mineral originated from the Javier Ortega mine, Lucanas Province, Peru. The chemical formula was determined as ()?2.00()3·9HO. Thermal analysis showed a total mass loss of ˜73.4% on heating to 1000 °C. A mass loss of 30.43% at 641.4 °C is attributed to the loss of SO3. Observed Raman and infrared bands were assigned to the stretching and bending vibrations of sulphate tetrahedra, aluminium oxide/hydroxide octahedra, water molecules and hydroxyl ions. The Raman spectrum shows well resolved bands at 2994, 3176, 3327, 3422 and 3580 cm-1 attributed to water stretching vibrations. Vibrational spectroscopy combined with thermal analysis provides insight into the structure of coquimbite.

  9. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) grafted onto microtextured poly(dimethylsiloxane) for aligned cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jenny B; Isenberg, Brett C; Shen, Yuankai; Schorsch, Katrin; Sazonova, Olga V; Wong, Joyce Y

    2012-11-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-grafted poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) offers an inexpensive, biocompatible, oxygen permeable, and easily microtextured thermo-responsive substrate for producing cell sheets. This study introduces a method of grafting PNIPAAm onto microtextured PDMS that is suitable for generating aligned vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) sheets. We examined a wide range of processing parameters in order to identify the conditions that led to acceptable sheet growth and detachment behavior. Substrates grafted under these conditions produced confluent cell sheets that fully detached in less than 10 min after lowering the culture temperature from 37 °C to 20 °C. The grafted layer thickness was determined to be 496±8 nm by atomic force microscopy. Surface characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed a relative grafting yield of 0.488±0.10, defined as the ratio of the PNIPAAm 1647 cm(-1) to the PDMS 2962 cm(-1) absorbance peaks. The water contact angle of the substrates was shown to change from 89.6° to 101.0° at 20 °C and 37 °C, respectively. We also found that cell behavior on PNIPAAm-grafted PDMS was not directly related to surface wettability or relative grafting densities. PMID:22088757

  10. Compositional and quantitative microtextural characterization of historic paintings by micro-X-ray diffraction and Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pastor, Julia; Duran, Adrian; Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro Basilio; Van Grieken, René; Cardell, Carolina

    2011-11-15

    This work shows the benefits of characterizing historic paintings via compositional and microtextural data from micro-X-ray diffraction (?-XRD) combined with molecular information acquired with Raman microscopy (RM) along depth profiles in paint stratigraphies. The novel approach was applied to identify inorganic and organic components from paintings placed at the 14th century Islamic University-Madrasah Yusufiyya-in Granada (Spain), the only Islamic University still standing from the time of Al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). The use of ?-XRD to obtain quantitative microtextural information of crystalline phases provided by two-dimensional diffraction patterns to recognize pigments nature and manufacture, and decay processes in complex paint cross sections, has not been reported yet. A simple Nasrid (14th century) palette made of gypsum, vermilion, and azurite mixed with glue was identified in polychromed stuccos. Here also a Christian intervention was found via the use of smalt, barite, hematite, Brunswick green and gold; oil was the binding media employed. On mural paintings and wood ceilings, more complex palettes dated to the 19th century were found, made of gypsum, anhydrite, barite, dolomite, calcite, lead white, hematite, minium, synthetic ultramarine blue, and black carbon. The identified binders were glue, egg yolk, and oil. PMID:21981573

  11. Effect of pad surface micro-texture on dishing and erosion during shallow trench isolation chemical mechanical planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiaoyan; Zhuang, Yun; Borucki, Leonard J.; Cheng, Jiang; Theng, Siannie; Ashizawa, Toranosuke; Philipossian, Ara

    2014-08-01

    The effect of pad surface micro-texture on dishing and erosion during shallow trench isolation (STI) chemical mechanical planarization was investigated. To generate different pad surface micro-textures, a 3M A2810 disc (3M) and a Mitsubishi Materials Corporation disc (MMC) were used to condition a Dow® IC1000™ K-groove pad. For each disc, 200-mm blanket TEOS wafers and SKW3-2 STI wafers were polished. Results showed that the two discs generated similar blanket wafer removal rates, while the MMC disc generated significantly higher dishing and erosion compared to the 3M disc during patterned wafer polishing. Pad surface topography was analyzed using laser confocal microscopy after patterned wafer polishing. Results showed that the MMC disc generated a pad surface with significantly higher mean pad summit curvatures than the 3M disc. As the MMC disc generated more and sharper pad asperities, it resulted in higher dishing and erosion as these sharp asperities make greater direct contact with the “down” features.

  12. Microtexture formation of Ni 99B 1 alloys solidified on an ESL and an EML—a study based on the EBSP technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mingjun Li; Takehiko Ishikawa; Kosuke Nagashio; Kazuhiko Kuribayashi; Shinichi Yoda

    2007-01-01

    We employed an electrostatic levitator (ESL) and an electromagnetic levitator (EML) to solidify Ni99B1 (at.%) alloys at various undercoolings. The microstructures and microtextures were revealed by using the electron backscatter diffraction pattern (EBSP) technique in a scanning electron microscope. It is found that that no significant refinement can be identified at the low and medium undercooling regimes for the primary

  13. Secondary amenorrhea

    MedlinePLUS

    Amenorrhea - secondary; No periods - secondary; Absent periods - secondary; Absent menses - secondary; Absence of periods - secondary ... In addition to having no menstrual periods, other symptoms can ... Weight gain or weight loss Discharge from the breast or change ...

  14. Minerals Yearbook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    According to the Minerals Yearbook Web site, the US Geological Survey Minerals Information Team's mission is to collect, analyze, and disseminate information on the domestic and international supply of and demand for minerals and mineral materials essential to the US economy and national security. The yearbook reviews the mineral and material industries of the United States and foreign countries, contains statistical data on materials and minerals, and includes information on economic and technical trends and development. Volume I contains metals and minerals information, volume II US area reports, and volume III international reports. A lot of data is presented in the various documents; thankfully, the site is organized well and easy to navigate.

  15. Ore Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    This three part lab introduces sulfides and other ore minerals. Part one - Ore Minerals: Students fill in a table giving the metal, formula, and mineral group of several ore minerals. Part two - Box of Rocks: Students examine trays of ore minerals and record their physical properties, composition, habit, occurence, economic value, and use and answer questions about color, luster, density, transparency, and availability. Part three - Famous Digs: Students answer a series of questions related to famous ore deposits.

  16. Mineral Classification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This problem set challenges students to determine the chemical classification of minerals based on their chemical formula (provided). For oxygen-bearing minerals, students must also provide the valences of the various cations.

  17. Mineral Chart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dynamic Stretching A Guy's Guide to Body Image Mineral Chart KidsHealth > Teens > Miscellaneous > Mineral Chart Print A A A Text Size Type ... sources of calcium. You'll also find this mineral in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables. Soy ...

  18. Mineral Properties

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mineralogy 4 Kids

    This site from the Mineralogical Society of America describes the physical properties of minerals in terms that kids will understand. The site also includes the definition of a mineral, an identification chart, and links to descriptions of the physical properties used to identify minerals.

  19. Identifying Minerals from Their Infra-red Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a British secondary school's use of a spectrometer to identify minerals. Discusses the origins of mineral spectra, the preparation of the specimen, the actual spectroscopic scanning, and the interpretation of the spectra. (TW)

  20. Bone Mineral Measurements.

    PubMed

    Doroudinia, Abtin; Colletti, Patrick M

    2015-08-01

    The accurate measurement of bone mineral density using noninvasive methods can be of value in the detection and evaluation of primary and secondary causes of decreased bone mass. This includes primary osteoporosis and secondary disorders, such as hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia, multiple myeloma, diffuse metastases, and glucocorticoid therapy or intrinsic excess.By far, the largest patient population is that encompassed by primary osteoporosis with increased susceptibility to fractures in the absence of other recognizable causes of bone loss.Primary osteoporosis is a common clinical disorder and a major public health problem because of the significant number of related bone fractures occurring annually. Because the risk of vertebral and femoral neck fractures rises dramatically as bone mineral density falls, fracture risk in individual patients may be estimated. Furthermore, in estrogen-deficient women, bone mineral density values may be used to make rational decisions about hormone replacement therapy, or other bone mineral therapies, and as follow-up in assessing the success of such treatment.In this article, we discuss different methods of bone densitometry and will focus on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) with discussing the factors which should be considered for interpretation of DXA scan. PMID:26147459

  1. Mineral Identification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Pratte

    This lesson discusses the question 'What is a mineral?' in the context of the guessing game 'Animal, Vegetable, or Mineral?'. It introduces a definition of the term, discusses the criteria used in the definition, and presents the common physical properties used in mineral identification. The lesson includes an activity in which students observe and record the physical properties of ten specimens and attempt to identify them using an online reference for practice.

  2. Mineral Densities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Students are given cubic cell edge dimensions and asked to calculate mineral densities and vice versa. The final question of this homework assignment provides students with a mineral density and unit cell edge length in order to determine the number of formula units per cell.

  3. Mineral Identification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Passow

    In this activity, students use written and online materials to answer a set of questions on the general properties and identification of minerals. They will learn about physical properties such as color, hardness, and cleavage; special properties such as fluorescence and effervescence; and complete a chart listing properties for a selection of minerals. Links to the necessary information are provided.

  4. Industrial Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Lawrence L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses trends in and factors related to the production of industrial minerals during 1982, indicating that, as 1981 marked a downturn in production of industrial minerals, 1982 continued the trend with temporary and permanent cutbacks in mine and plant production. Includes highlights of several conferences/conference papers in this field.…

  5. Mineral Hunt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners search for various kinds of items made from minerals around their home or school, including toothpaste, wall paint, kitty litter, and bricks. The PDF contains a check off list as well as recommended sites for more information on minerals.

  6. Mystery Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Susan Morgan

    In this activity, students will discover that minerals have specific characteristics that help to identify them. They will learn that minerals are formed by inorganic processes, are crystalline solids with an internal orderly arrangement of atoms, have specific chemical compositions, and have specific physical and chemical characteristics. They will also learn that minerals are commonly identified by the physical properties they possess, such as hardness, color, crystal shape, specific gravity, and streak. In addition, they will discover some other useful properties such as reaction with hydrochloric acid or a characteristic taste. They should also understand that color is not always a useful property for identifying minerals because it can vary. The students will also develop listening and observational skills and learn the uses of a few common minerals.

  7. Numerical and analytical study of the impinging and bouncing phenomena of droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces with microtextured structures.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yunyun; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of droplets impinging on different microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces are modeled with CFD combined with VOF (Volume of Fluid) technique. The method is validated by experimental data and an analytical model (AM) that is used to predict the penetrating depth and the maximum spreading diameter of an impinging droplet. The effects of geometrical shapes and operating conditions on the spreading and bouncing behaviors of impinging droplets are investigated. Six surfaces with different shapes of pillars are considered, namely, triangular prism, square pillar, pentagonal prism, cylindrical pillar, and crisscross pillar surfaces. The bouncing ability of an impinging droplet on textured surfaces can be illustrated from three aspects, namely, the contact time, the ranges of velocities for rebound and the penetrating depth of liquid in the maximum spreading stage. The surface with crisscross pillars exhibits the best ability to rebound, which can be attributed to its large capillary pressure (PC) and its special structures that can capture air in the gaps during the impinging process. PMID:25203603

  8. Estimation of martensite feature size in a low-carbon alloy steel by microtexture analysis of boundaries.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, T; Dash, Manmath Kumar; Saroja, S; Vijayalakshmi, M

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for classifying the hierarchy of martensite boundaries from the EBSD microtexture data of low-carbon steel is presented. Quaternion algebra has been used to calculate the ideal misorientation between product ? variants for Kurdjumov-Sachs (KS) and its nearby orientation relationships, and arrive at the misorientation angle-axis set corresponding to packet (12 types), block (3 types) and sub-block boundaries. Analysis of proximity of experimental misorientation between data points from the theoretical misorientation set is found to be useful for identifying the different types of martensite boundaries. The optimal OR in the alloy system and the critical deviation threshold for identification of martensite boundaries could both be ascertained by invoking the 'Enhancement Factor' concept. The prior-? grain boundaries, packet, block and sub-block boundaries could be identified reasonably well, and their average intercept lengths in a typical tempered martensite microstructure of 9Cr-1Mo-0.1C steel was estimated as 31 ?m, 14 ?m, 9 ?m and 4 ?m respectively. PMID:25464145

  9. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE (WTP-SW) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2014-08-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford’s WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular products (both simulant and radioactive) were tested and a subset of the granular material (both simulant and radioactive) were stabilized in a geopolymer matrix. Extensive testing and characterization of the granular and monolith material were made including the following: ? ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test) testing of granular and monolith; ? ASTM C1308 accelerated leach testing of the radioactive monolith; ? ASTM C192 compression testing of monoliths; and ? EPA Method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The significant findings of the testing completed on simulant and radioactive WTP-SW are given below: ? Data indicates {sup 99}Tc, Re, Cs, and I

  10. Pyrophanite pseudomorphs after perovskite in Perkupa serpentinites (Hungary): a microtextural study and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajzon, N.; Váczi, T.; Fehér, B.; Takács, Á.; Szakáll, S.; Weiszburg, T. G.

    2013-09-01

    Pyrophanite in serpentinite at Perkupa (Hungary) is described in detail for the first time as a replacement product of perovskite. It occurs as a 20- to 30-?m-wide rim, mantling a remnant core composed of perovskite or its alteration products. The pyrophanite rim consists of an inner zone, representing a pseudomorph after perovskite, and an outer overgrowth zone. Raman mapping and electron backscatter diffraction data show that the pyrophanite rims typically represent single crystals rather than being composed of multiple domains in different crystallographic orientations. Perovskite occurs exclusively in the core of pyrophanite and was identified as the orthorhombic CaTiO3 phase, based on Raman spectra. Heterogeneous, polyphase mineral cores, consisting of calcite, anatase and/or brookite, kassite, and Mn-bearing kassite, in some cases in association with relict perovskite, are typical in the larger pyrophanite-rimmed grains. The crystallographically coherent pyrophanite rims could have formed through a process where the precursor perovskite crystal acted as a structural template for the newly forming phase, that is, by interface-coupled dissolution reprecipitation during serpentinization of the precursor rock. This alteration of perovskite to pyrophanite was not complete, resulting in the presence of perovskite fragments enclosed in pyrophanite. During the metamorphic evolution of the rock, some of the remnant perovskite cores further altered to TiO2 polymorphs (anatase and brookite) and calcite, via transitional alteration products.

  11. Mineralogy, microtexture, and composition of shock-induced melt pockets in the Los Angeles basaltic shergottite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, E. L.; Spray, J. G.

    2003-12-01

    Analytical electron microscopy of shock features in the basaltic shergottite Los Angeles (stone 1) reveals: 1) shock recorded in the bulk sample; and 2) localized pressure and temperature excursions that have generated melt pockets up to 4 mm in diameter. Bulk shock effects include microfaulting (offsets 1-200 ?m), mosaicism, deformed exsolution lamellae and planar fracturing in pyroxene, undulose extinction in whitlockite, mechanical twinning in titanomagnetite and ilmenite, and the transformation of plagioclase to maskelynite (4% remnant reduced birefringence). The pressure estimates for bulk shock are 35-40 GPa. Localized shock excursions have generated three types of discrete melt zones (0.07 - 1.3 mm to 3.0 - 3.5 mm apparent diameter) possessing glassy to microcrystalline groundmasses. These melt pockets are differentiated on the basis of size, clast volume, and degree of crystallization and vesiculation. Melt veins and melt dikelets emanate from the melt pockets up to 3 mm into the host rock but do not necessarily connect with other melt pockets. The melt pockets were generated by pressure-temperature excursions of 60-80 GPa and 1600-2000 C, resulting in discrete melting of adjacent host rock minerals at grain boundary margins. Concentric zoning in the margins of clinopyroxenes coincides with a progressive reduction in birefringence as melt pockets are approached. This suggests that the shock excursions were focused as point sources in the wake of the shock front that induced bulk damage.

  12. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of a good thing? What Are Vitamins and Minerals? Vitamins and minerals make people's bodies work properly. ... of them each day. What Do Vitamins and Minerals Do? Vitamins and minerals boost the immune system, ...

  13. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 801 Vitamins and Minerals WHY ARE VITAMINS AND MINERALS IMPORTANT? WHAT ARE ANTIOXIDANTS? HOW MUCH DO I ... HARMFUL? FOR MORE INFORMATION WHY ARE VITAMINS AND MINERALS IMPORTANT? Vitamins and minerals are sometimes called micronutrients. ...

  14. Secondary smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, P. A.

    1993-06-01

    The open literature on secondary smoke formation, prediction, and classification is briefly reviewed. This review was limited to the open literature in order to promote the widest possible discussion within the AGARD engineering community. The recently completed PEP WG 21 proposal for smoke classification is presented. Secondary smoke is defined and the physics of condensation of vapor onto droplets is reviewed. The basis for the existing droplet condensation models is discussed and the existing methodology for predicting secondary smoke light attenuation and scattering is presented. Test data taken to establish the initial conditions for heterogeneous nucleation in rocket plumes is presented. Comparisons between secondary smoke predictions and flight data are presented. The state of the art of secondary smoke modeling is discussed and suggestions are made for improvements.

  15. Mineral Commodities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    This exercise introduces mineral commodities (elements). Students consider the elements aluminum, iron, copper, nickel, zinc, uranium, lead, gold, mercury and tin and match them with their definintions in a table. Then they use minable grade (minable weight percent) and normal crustal abundance (crustal weight percent) to calculate the concentration factor for several commodities to determine their economic minability. Students then graph their calculations and explain their trend.

  16. Rocks and Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    richrigby

    2010-02-23

    Rock Cycle Mineralogy 4 Kids Mineralogy 4 kids : rockin Internet site : the best place to learn about rocks and minerals Rock Cycle Map Rocks and Minerals Rocks and Minerals Pictures Rocks and Minerals Slide Show Rocks and Minerals Slide Show Earth Science Earth Science Uses for Minerals Metamorphic Rock Forming Sedimentary Rocks Observation ...

  17. [Secondary rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Duron, J-B; Nguyen, P S; Bardot, J; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Secondary rhinoplasty is very usual. Some patients are not satisfied by the previous surgery because the result is poor with obvious defaults but, sometimes, the result is good but the patient expects perfection. These two different situations will not lead to the same answer from the surgeon. Techniques of secondary rhinoplasty are the same than primary, but are often more difficult to perform because of scar tissue, retraction and loss of lining. The authors analyse the more frequent deformities in secondary rhinoplasty and the way they fix them. PMID:25213488

  18. Characterization of the state of a droplet at a micro-textured silicon wafer using a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Merheb, B.; Nassar, G.; Campistron, P.; Carlier, J.; Ajaka, M.; Nongaillard, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we introduce a finite difference time domain method to study the propagation and reflection of an acoustic wave on smooth and micro-textured silicon surfaces in interaction with droplets in different states. This will enable numerical investigations of interfaces composed of periodically distributed well-defined pillars. One type of transducer was modeled generating longitudinal wave. Three configurations were studied: the Cassie state, the Wenzel state and a composite state for which the droplet collapsed into the middle height of the pillars. After analysis of the displacement along y direction in the silicon wafer, we were able to show that a longitudinal wave is sensitive to the detection of the state of the droplet. The first experimental results made it possible to show a good agreement between modeling and experiments.

  19. Secondary Headaches

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Migraine and Other Headaches Headache Journal - Public Site Art Gallery Art Gallery Support the AMF American Migraine Foundation The ... but there are usually clues in the medical history or examination to suggest secondary headache. Headache can ...

  20. Secondary atomization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Guildenbecher; C. López-Rivera; P. E. Sojka

    2009-01-01

    When a drop is subjected to a surrounding dispersed phase that is moving at an initial relative velocity, aerodynamic forces\\u000a will cause it to deform and fragment. This is referred to as secondary atomization. In this paper, the abundant literature\\u000a on secondary atomization experimental methods, breakup morphology, breakup times, fragment size and velocity distributions,\\u000a and modeling efforts is reviewed and

  1. Oxygen Isotope and Microtextural Evidence for Fluctuations in Fluid Pressure During Contact Metamorphism, Alta Aureole, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, J. R.; Valley, J. W.; Kita, N.

    2006-12-01

    Thin section-scale textures record a detailed history of prograde and retrograde reactions in the periclase (Per) zone of the Alta Stock aureole. New ion microprobe (SIMS) measurements (10 micron spot, ±0.2 permil, 1sd) of the oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonates preserving these textures provide evidence for at least two cycles of oscillation of fluid pressure (Pfl) between lithostatic (PL) and hydrostatic (Phyd) conditions during evolution of the inner aureole. Infiltration of water-rich fluids during prograde metamorphism converted dolomite (Dol) to Per + calcite (Cal) marble and caused significant 18O/16O depletion in the Dol protolith (Initial ?18O (Cal) > +25 permil), producing Cal with ?18O values of +11 permil. The SIMS values approximate oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium with the Alta stock, indicating that infiltrating fluids were likely magmatic. Exsolution of fluid from the crystallizing magma, coupled with geothermometry from the periclase zone marbles, requires Pfl> PL. Horizontally-oriented expansion cracks filled with brucite (Br) extend from Br pseudomorphs after periclase, and cut retrograde Dol that partially to completely rims the Br pseudomorphs. This earlier retrograde Dol is significantly depleted in 18O/16O relative to matrix Cal, with ?18O of +5 to +7.1 permil. These lower ?18O values indicate that meteoric water infiltrated into the Per marbles during cooling and resulting partial back reaction of Per + Cal to Dol, prior to the hydration of the remaining Per to Br. Influx of meteoric water requires sufficient increase in permeability to permit surface- derived meteoric water to penetrate to the estimated 4.5 km depth of this structural level of the Alta aureole, and suggests a resulting decrease in Pfl to hydrostatic pressure conditions. The horizontally-oriented expansion cracks associated with the Br pseudomorphs indicate that sub-vertical expansion accompanied hydration of Per to Br, requiring that Pfl increase again to values equal to and even slightly in excess of PL. Subsequent formation of a second generation of sub-vertical Dol veins with very low ?18O values (-1.9 to +1.2 permil) indicates another stage of infiltration involving even greater amounts of meteoric water, and a return to hydrostatic Pflconditions. Hence the detailed microtextures in the Per zone marbles, and their ?18O values, measureable with the spatial resolution capability of the ion microprobe, record a history of fluctuating fluid pressure between lithostatic and hydrostatic conditions in the inner Alta aureole. Such fluctuations should not be surprising. Contact metamorphic environments are characterized by strong spatial and temporal gradients in temperature, and a number of thermally-dependent factors (e.g., compaction, crystallization, reaction-generated porosity, thermally-controlled expansion and contraction) would then interact dynamically as sealing and cracking mechanisms to both increase and decrease permeability. Further, transient increases in fluid pressure would be expected from production of volatiles by metamorphic reactions and from multiple pulses of magmatic fluid produced during the assembly of an igneous intrusion.

  2. [Secondary achalasia].

    PubMed

    Arnon, R; Fich, A; Bar-Ziv, J

    1993-08-01

    Achalasia is usually a primary disorder of esophageal motility, but has been described in association with other pathological processes, such as malignancy. A 79-year-old man with achalasia secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma is presented. The differential diagnosis of secondary achalasia includes infectious and infiltrative disease and neuropathy, but mainly malignant diseases. The clinical criteria found for achalasia secondary to malignancy included older age at diagnosis, brief duration of symptoms, and weight loss. While upper gastrointestinal x-rays and computerized tomographic scanning may be helpful, the most reliable diagnostic tool is esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy. This is a terminal disease with short life expectancy. Yet making the correct diagnosis can save the patient from futile treatment with muscle relaxants and endoscopic balloon dilatation, the accepted therapeutic measures in primary achalasia. PMID:8225085

  3. New Minerals and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, William D.

    1997-01-01

    Defines geodiversity, compares it to biodiversity, and discusses the mineral classification system. Charts the discovery of new minerals in Australia over time and focuses on uses of these minerals in technological advances. (DDR)

  4. Mineral Sands Down Under

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource describes what mineral sands are, and discusses the heavy, dark-colored minerals that they contain (rutile, ilmenite, zircon, monazite). A map shows locations of mineral sands deposits in Australia.

  5. Minerals and Fossils

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    mineraltown.com

    This site is dedicated to rock and mineral collecting. It contains information for worldwide mineral and fossil collectors with articles, mineral photos, videos, a search engine and free classified ads.

  6. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and ... fluids White spirits Note: This list may not be all-inclusive.

  7. Minerals yearbook vol. I: metals and minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    0000-01-01

    This volume, covering metals and minerals, contains chapters on approximately 90 commodities. In addition, this volume has chapters on mining and quarrying trends and on statistical surveying methods used by Minerals Information, plus a statistical summary.

  8. Science: Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This article reviews and compares five recent secondary science texts: Addison-Wesley Life Science (Gr. 7-9); Prentice-Hall Life Science (Gr. 7-9); Scott Foresman Biology (Gr. 9-12); Biology: Living Systems (Gr. 10-12); and Biology: The Science of Life (Gr. 10-12). (SJL)

  9. Secondary Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of their name, "secondary" products are essential for plant survival. They are required for basic cell functions as well as communicating the plant's presence to the surrounding environment and defense against pests as defined in the broad sense (i.e., diseases, nematodes, insects and plan...

  10. Secondary hypoadrenalism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Reimondo; Silvia Bovio; Barbara Allasino; Massimo Terzolo; Alberto Angeli

    2008-01-01

    Secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is a clinical disorder that results from hypothalamic or hypophyseal damage or from\\u000a prolonged administration of supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoids. Since glucocorticoids are widely used for a variety\\u000a of diseases, the prevalence of SAI is by far exceeding that of primary adrenal insufficiency. Although the presentation of\\u000a adrenal insufficiency may be insidious and difficult to recognize,

  11. Calculating a Mineral's Density

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Andrea Distelhurst

    2011-10-05

    Students will use the Density=Mass/Volume formula to calculate the density of an unknown mineral. By using water displacement and a triple beam balance students will collect measurements of volume and mass for an unknown mineral. With this data, they will calculate the mineral's density then identify the mineral based on calculated density.

  12. Mineral Scavenger Hunt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Museum of Natural History

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, learners participate in a scavenger hunt, searching for and recognizing minerals and products that contain minerals. They make note of their finds on a Mineral Scavenger Hunt checklist. Learners search for the materials in their classroom, at home, or even in stores. This resource includes discussion questions to encourage learner reflection about how minerals play a role in daily life.

  13. Introduction to Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity can be used as the introduction for a unit on mineral or crystal structure. It requires the students to create shapes cooperatively and put them together. This is analogous to individual crystals forming or to minerals forming. They will understand that minerals are made up of structures in certain patterns, and that these structures determine some of the properties of the minerals.

  14. Minerals in our environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weathers, Judy; Galloway, John; Frank, Dave

    2000-01-01

    Minerals are found everywhere in our daily lives. This poster depicts numerous items found throughout a home, and the mineral(s) or mineral resources used in the ingredients of, or construction/manufacturing of those items. Designed for K-8 Teachers this poster can be scaled and is printable at 36" x 60" and legible at 11" x 17" in size.

  15. Earth's Mineral Evolution

    E-print Network

    Downs, Robert T.

    minerals in ancient interstellar dust grains to the thousands of mineral species on the present-day EarthEarth's Mineral Evolution :: Astrobiology Magazine - earth science - evol...rth science evolution Extreme Life Mars Life Outer Planets Earth's Mineral Evolution Summary (Nov 14, 2008): New research

  16. Mineral chemical study of U-bearing minerals from the Dominion Reefs, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantzsch, Ulrike; Gauert, Christoph D. K.; van der Westhuizen, Willem A.; Duhamel, Isabelle; Cuney, Michel; Beukes, Gerhard J.

    2011-02-01

    The Neo-Archean Dominion Reefs (~3.06 Ga) are thin meta-conglomerate layers with concentrations of U- and Th-bearing heavy minerals higher than in the overlying Witwatersrand Reefs. Ore samples from Uranium One Africa's Rietkuil and Dominion exploration areas near Klerksdorp, South Africa, were investigated for their mineral paragenesis, texture and mineral chemical composition. The ore and heavy mineral assemblages consist of uraninite, other uraniferous minerals, Fe sulphides, Ni-Co sulfarsenides, garnet, pyrite, pyrrhotite, monazite, zircon, chromite, magnetite and minor gold. Sub-rounded uraninite grains occur associated with the primary detrital heavy mineral paragenesis. U-Ti, U-Th minerals, pitchblende (colloform uraninite) and coffinite are of secondary, re-mobilised origin as evidenced by crystal shape and texture. Most of the uranium mineralisation is represented by detrital uraninite with up to 70.2 wt.% UO2 and up to 9.3 wt.% ThO2. Re-crystallised phases such as secondary pitchblende (without Th), coffinite, U-Ti and U-Th phases are related to hydrothermal overprint during low-grade metamorphism and are of minor abundance.

  17. Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces R. G. Ford Metal sorption to clay minerals may lead to the formation of secondary precipitates, by enhanced dissolution of the clay mineral structure as indicated by enhanced levels of dissolved silica

  18. Fungal degradation of calcium-, lead- and silicon-bearing minerals.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Ademola O; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine nutritional influence on the ability of selected filamentous fungi to mediate biogenic weathering of the minerals, apatite, galena and obsidian in order to provide further understanding of the roles of fungi as biogeochemical agents, particularly in relation to the cycling of metals and associated elements found in minerals. The impact of three organic acid producing fungi (Aspergillus niger, Serpula himantioides and Trametes versicolor) on apatite, galena and obsidian was examined in the absence and presence of a carbon and energy source (glucose). Manifestation of fungal weathering included corrosion of mineral surfaces, modification of the mineral substrate through transformation into secondary minerals (i.e. crystal formation) and hyphal penetration of the mineral substrate. Physicochemical interactions of fungal metabolites, e.g. H+ and organic acids, with the minerals are thought to be the primary driving forces responsible. All experimental fungi were capable of mineral surface colonization in the absence and presence of glucose but corrosion of the mineral surface and secondary mineral formation were affected by glucose availability. Only S. himantioides and T. versicolor were able to corrode apatite in the absence of glucose but none of the fungi were capable of doing so with the other minerals. In addition, crystal formation with galena was entirely dependent on the availability of glucose. Penetration of the mineral substrates by fungal hyphae occurred but this did not follow any particular pattern. Although the presence of glucose in the media appeared to influence positively the mineral penetrating abilities of the fungi, the results obtained also showed that some geochemical change(s) might occur under nutrient-limited conditions. It was, however, unclear whether the hyphae actively penetrated the minerals or were growing into pre-existing pores or cracks. PMID:15984571

  19. Minerals 4 Kids

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nancy McMillan

    Minerals 4 Kids contains four Web-based activities offered for K-12 Education by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA). These activities are entitled: Minerals in Your House, Mineral Groups, Mineral Properties, and All About Crystals. Also included are links to Mineral Games, the Rock Cycle diagram that leads to descriptions of the three rock types, and Ask-A-Mineralogist that enables the user to submit a mineralogical question. Many of these activities are linked to other mineralogy-related Web sites. Minerals in Your House is designed to introduce the concept of how minerals are present in common household items found in the bedroom, bathroom, living room, and kitchen. Mineral Groups introduces mineral classification according to chemical composition. The learner can explore each of the seven major chemical groups and several minor chemical groups. Mineral Properties introduces learners to the physical properties of minerals such as hardness, cleavage, streak, color, luster, specific gravity, as well as other miscellaneous properties (i.e., magnetic, effervescence, striations, etc.). Mineral Properties, additionally, contains a five-step Mineral Identification process that uses the physical properties to narrow down a mineral's identity that, ultimately, leads to a Mineral Identification Chart. All About Crystals enables the learner to become familiar with symmetry, crystal symmetry, crystal chemistry, and crystal forms. This activity includes online 3-D models, an activity that enables the user to draw and explore symmetry patterns, a variety of detailed descriptions with figures, and an extensive vocabulary

  20. Textures of Secondary Alteration Zones in Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Longazo, T. G.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Gibson, E. K.

    2001-01-01

    Textures of secondary minerals in cracks in Nakhla are described and illustrated with high resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and BSE. Some Nakhla textures resemble alteration textures of glass in seafloor basalts. Criteria for inorganic vs. biogenic alteration are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Influence of cross-rolling on the micro-texture and biodegradation of pure iron as biodegradable material for medical implants.

    PubMed

    Obayi, Camillus Sunday; Tolouei, Ranna; Paternoster, Carlo; Turgeon, Stephane; Okorie, Boniface Adeleh; Obikwelu, Daniel Oray; Cassar, Glenn; Buhagiar, Joseph; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Iron-based biodegradable metals have been shown to present high potential in cardiac, vascular, orthopaedic and dental in adults, as well as paediatric, applications. These require suitable mechanical properties, adequate biocompatibility while guaranteeing a low toxicity of degradation products. For example, in cardiac applications, stents need to be made by homogeneous and isotropic materials in order to prevent sudden failures which would impair the deployment site. Besides, the presence of precipitates and pores, chemical inhomogeneity or other anisotropic microstructural defects may trigger stress concentration phenomena responsible for the early collapse of the device. Metal manufacturing processes play a fundamental role towards the final microstructure and mechanical properties of the materials. The present work assesses the effect of mode of rolling on the micro-texture evolution, mechanical properties and biodegradation behaviour of polycrystalline pure iron. Results indicated that cross-rolled samples recrystallized with lower rates than the straight-rolled ones due to a reduction in dislocation density content and an increase in intensity of {100} crystallographic plane which stores less energy of deformation responsible for primary recrystallization. The degradation resulted to be more uniform for cross-rolled samples, while the corrosion rates of cross-rolled and straight-rolled samples did not show relevant differences in simulated body solution. Finally, this work shows that an adequate compromise between biodegradation rate, strength and ductility could be achieved by modulating the deformation mode during cold rolling. PMID:25644452

  2. Mathematical Model for the Mineralization of Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the transport and precipitation of mineral in refilling osteons. One goal of this model was to explain calcification 'halos,' in which the bone near the haversian canal is more highly mineralized than the more peripheral lamellae, which have been mineralizing longer. It was assumed that the precipitation rate of mineral is proportional to the difference between the local concentration of calcium ions and an equilibrium concentration and that the transport of ions is by either diffusion or some other concentration gradient-dependent process. Transport of ions was assumed to be slowed by the accumulation of mineral in the matrix along the transport path. ne model also mimics bone apposition, slowing of apposition during refilling, and mineralization lag time. It was found that simple diffusion cannot account for the transport of calcium ions into mineralizing bone, because the diffusion coefficient is two orders of magnitude too low. If a more rapid concentration gradient-driven means of transport exists, the model demonstrates that osteonal geometry and variable rate of refilling work together to produce calcification halos, as well as the primary and secondary calcification effect reported in the literature.

  3. Mineral Spectroscopy Server

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    George Rossman

    This server is primarily dedicated to providing information about color in minerals and access to data on mineral absorption in the visible, infrared, Raman and Mossbauer spectra. Both data coordinates and images of the spectra are available for selected minerals. Most data on the server were obtained in the Caltech mineral spectroscopy labs, but individuals throughout the world also contribute to this ever growing community resource. In addition to data files, the site provides an extensive list of references to papers on mineral optical spectroscopy. Citations are available sorted both by mineral name and by first authors of papers.

  4. Remnants of Melt Pools and Melt Films Associated with Dewatering of Nominally Anhydrous Minerals in Lower Crustal Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, S. J.; Williams, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Water locked in structural sites and in fluid inclusions in nominally anhydrous minerals in lower crustal granitoids may act as a flux for partial melting of these source rocks. Microtextural study of the 2.6 Ga Stevenson granite of the Athabasca Granulite Terrane of northern Saskatchewan shows that increasing intensity of deformation of the granite correlates with migration of water from within crystals to grain boundaries. Dark, ultrafine-grained, water-richer matrix material consisting of quartz, plagioclase, alkali feldspar and fine iron oxides are interpreted to be former melt films that resulted, at least in part, from fluxing by NAM-derived water. Melt films on the grain boundaries of plagioclase, potassium feldspar and quartz are approximately 20 microns wide. Melt pools are up to 100+ microns in diameter. Water in nominally anhydrous minerals has the potential to lower the solidus significantly enough to initiate partial melting in lower crustal granitoids at high ambient temperatures. 3000 ppm water in minerals that make up large volumes of crustal rocks (alkali feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, quartz) would lower the dry solidus of granite by 273oC at 1 GPa, for initiation of partial melting. Generation of small volumes of partial melt on grain boundaries may lead to further rock weakening and localization of further deformation.

  5. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    -Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological #12;#12;ALGERIA Algeria Mineral Facilities Northwest of Africa Scale: 1:9 km #12;IRAN Northwest

  6. Bartering for Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Kathie

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students are assigned occupations that rely on specific minerals. To obtain the needed minerals, students learn how to trade services and commodities. Includes details on preparation, modeling behaviors, and printed materials. (DDR)

  7. Sedimentary and Related Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    In this three-part exercise, students study hand samples and thin sections of sedimentary minerals and rocks. Part one - Box of Rocks: Students examine a tray of Halides, Carbonates, Borates, and Clays and record their physical properties, composition, habit, and occurence. They note chemical and physical similarities and differences of the minerals. Part two - Definitions: Define a list of terms relevent to the lab. Part three - Minerals in Thin Section: Observe sedimentary minerals in thin section and answer questions about them.

  8. INTRODUCTION TO MINERALS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Hughes

    2005-10-23

    DESK Standard: Understand the basic properties of minerals. . DATES: You can begin this activity on December 11. You should complete it by December 15. OBJECTIVE: You will visit Web sites to learn more about minerals. You will record 10 interesting facts about minerals on a blank sheet of paper. After visiting the last Web ...

  9. American Strategic Minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mangone

    1984-01-01

    American Strategic Minerals brings together seven contributors in the fields of marine studies, mining engineering, earth sciences, and economics to discuss and analyze strategic minerals. The future demands of the United States upon limited sources of supply are examined and there is an analysis of alternative sources of strategic minerals from the seabed, including copper, nickel, manganese, and cobalt. The

  10. Minerals in our Environment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This downloadable poster (36 in. by 60 in.) describes how minerals are used in household substances and objects, listed by name, with numbers corresponding to locations in a typical house. For example, in the kitchen, appliances contain steel and copper, clay minerals are found in china, and table salt contains the mineral halite.

  11. Mineral Properties Sheets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dave Hirsch

    These sheets are designed to give students a framework for making observations of minerals in hand specimen and (for selected minerals) in thin section. I place most of the emphasis on the distinguishing properties, rather than requiring an exhaustive list. Students use hand specimen observation, thin section observation (for selected minerals) and references to complete the forms.

  12. Mineral Fast Ion Conductors and Mineral Solid Electrolyte Batteries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenji Wang

    2002-01-01

    This paper is intended to be a review of the recent situation and advances in the studies of mineral fast ion conductors and mineral solid electrolyte batteries. The reviews involve the following parts: The definition of both mineral fast ion conductor and mineral solid electrolyte battery; Comments on mineral fast ion conductors: Describe some very useful starting mineral materials for

  13. Metamorphic Rocks and Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    In this three-part exercise, students study hand samples and thin sections of important metamorphic rocks and minerals. Part one - Box of Rocks: Students examine trays of metamorphic rocks and minerals and record their physical properties, composition, and habit. They note chemical and physical similarities and differences and identify the rock samples and minerals they contain. Part two - Definitions: Define a list of terms relevent to the lab. Part three - Minerals in Thin Section: Observe minerals in thin section and answer questions about them.

  14. Paricalcitol for secondary hyperparathyroidism in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Trillini, Matias; Cortinovis, Monica; Ruggenenti, Piero; Reyes Loaeza, Jorge; Courville, Karen; Ferrer-Siles, Claudia; Prandini, Silvia; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Villa, Alessandro; Perna, Annalisa; Gotti, Eliana; Caruso, Maria Rosa; Martinetti, Davide; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Perico, Norberto

    2015-05-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism contributes to post-transplant CKD mineral and bone disorder. Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, decreased serum parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. This single-center, prospective, randomized, crossover, open-label study compared the effect of 6-month treatment with paricalcitol (1 ?g/d for 3 months and then uptitrated to 2 µg/d if tolerated) or nonparicalcitol therapy on serum parathyroid hormone levels (primary outcome), mineral metabolism, and proteinuria in 43 consenting recipients of renal transplants with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Participants were randomized 1:1 according to a computer-generated sequence. Compared with baseline, median (interquartile range) serum parathyroid hormone levels significantly declined on paricalcitol from 115.6 (94.8-152.0) to 63.3 (52.0-79.7) pg/ml (P<0.001) but not on nonparicalcitol therapy. At 6 months, levels significantly differed between treatments (P<0.001 by analysis of covariance). Serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin decreased on paricalcitol therapy only and significantly differed between treatments at 6 months (P<0.001 for all comparisons). At 6 months, urinary deoxypyridinoline-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria level decreased only on paricalcitol (P<0.05). L3 and L4 vertebral mineral bone density, assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorption, significantly improved with paricalcitol at 6 months (P<0.05 for both densities). Paricalcitol was well tolerated. Overall, 6-month paricalcitol supplementation reduced parathyroid hormone levels and proteinuria, attenuated bone remodeling and mineral loss, and reduced eGFR in renal transplant recipients with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Long-term studies are needed to monitor directly measured GFR, ensure that the bone remodeling and mineral effects are sustained, and determine if the reduction in proteinuria improves renal and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:25194004

  15. Mineral particles, mineral fibers, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Churg, A.; Wiggs, B.

    1985-08-01

    The total fibrous and nonfibrous mineral content of the lung has been analyzed in a series of 14 men with lung cancer but no history of occupational dust exposure, and in a series of 14 control men matched for age, smoking history, and general occupational class. The lung cancer patients had an average of 525 +/- 369 X 10(6) exogenous mineral particles and 17.4 +/- 19.6 X 10(6) exogenous mineral fibers/g dry lung, while the controls had averages of 261 +/- 175 mineral particles and 4.7 +/- 3.2 X 10(6) mineral fibers/g dry lung. These differences are statistically significant for both particles and fibers. Kaolinite, talc, mica, feldspars, and crystalline silica comprised the majority of particles of both groups. Approximately 90% of the particles were smaller than 2 micron in diameter and approximately 60% smaller than 1 micron. In both groups, patients who had smoked more than 35 pack years had greater numbers of particles than patients who had smoked less than 35 pack years. It is concluded that, in this study, lungs from patients with lung cancer had statistically greater numbers of mineral particles and fibers than lungs from controls, and that smoking influences total long-term retention of particles from all sources.

  16. Biological impact on mineral dissolution: Application of the lichen model to understanding mineral weathering in the rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Jillian F.; Barker, William W.; Welch, Susan A.; Taunton, Anne

    1999-01-01

    Microorganisms modify rates and mechanisms of chemical and physical weathering and clay growth, thus playing fundamental roles in soil and sediment formation. Because processes in soils are inherently complex and difficult to study, we employ a model based on the lichen–mineral system to identify the fundamental interactions. Fixed carbon released by the photosynthetic symbiont stimulates growth of fungi and other microorganisms. These microorganisms directly or indirectly induce mineral disaggregation, hydration, dissolution, and secondary mineral formation. Model polysaccharides were used to investigate direct mediation of mineral surface reactions by extracellular polymers. Polysaccharides can suppress or enhance rates of chemical weathering by up to three orders of magnitude, depending on the pH, mineral surface structure and composition, and organic functional groups. Mg, Mn, Fe, Al, and Si are redistributed into clays that strongly adsorb ions. Microbes contribute to dissolution of insoluble secondary phosphates, possibly via release of organic acids. These reactions significantly impact soil fertility. Below fungi–mineral interfaces, mineral surfaces are exposed to dissolved metabolic byproducts. Through this indirect process, microorganisms can accelerate mineral dissolution, leading to enhanced porosity and permeability and colonization by microbial communities. PMID:10097050

  17. O and Pb isotopic analyses of uranium minerals by ion microprobe and UPb ages from the Cigar Lake deposit

    E-print Network

    Fayek, Mostafa

    O and Pb isotopic analyses of uranium minerals by ion microprobe and U­Pb ages from the Cigar Lake intergrown uranium minerals and oxygen isotopic analyes of uraninite from the unconformity-type Cigar Lake uranium deposit. Secondary uranium minerals intergrown with uraninite, such as coffinite, USiO4ÁnH2O

  18. Some secondary ore formation features of the Sar-Cheshmeh porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit, Kerman, Iran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Shahabpour

    1991-01-01

    New secondary mineral features and the control of secondary molybdenum enrichment have now been recognized at the Sar-Cheshmeh copper deposit. In part of the deposit, copper is locally concentrated within a subvolcanic unit — the so-called Late Fine Porphyry in amounts that seem too great to have come from the primary phase of the same unit. Clay minerals are believed

  19. Minerals in Our Environment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    Minerals are all around us. They're in our kitchens and bathrooms, our classrooms and school buildings, and our cars and bicycles. This interactive feature lets users discover which minerals are found in items they probably encounter every day. Rolling the cursor over items in an illustrated room accesses pop-ups that describe what mineral products may be found in them. A background essay and list of discussion questions are also provided.

  20. Minerals by Chemical Composition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interactive periodic table displays a listing of minerals by element, sorted by percent of the element. Clicking on a symbol on the table leads users to information on the element (atomic mass and number, name origin, year of discovery, and a brief description), and to a table listing each mineral known to contain the element in decreasing order by percentage. Each mineral name in the table is linked to additional information on the mineral, such as formula and composition, images, crystallography, physical properties, and many others.

  1. Canadian Minerals Yearbook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    Part of Natural Resources Canada Minerals and Metals Sector, the Canadian Minerals Yearbook Web site provides mineral industry information from 1994 to 2001. Downloadable files from each year include a Year in Review, Reserves of Selected Major Metals, Recent Production Decisions, and a Mineral and Metal Commodity Review. An example of the information provided comes from the 2001 Review: "In 2000, Canadian reserves of copper, nickel, lead, zinc, molybdenum, silver and gold decreased because there were no decisions to bring new mines into production and the amount of new ore discovered at existing mining operations was insufficient to replace the quantity of ore that was mined during the year."

  2. MINER{nu}A Test Beam Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, A.; Castorena, J.; Urrutia, Z.; Felix, J. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division De Ciencias e Ingenerias, Leon Gto., Mex (Mexico); Zavala, G. [Universidad de Guanajuato, DCEA, Guanajuato Gto., Mex (Mexico)

    2009-12-17

    MINER{nu}A Main INjector ExpeRiment {nu}-A is a high-statistic neutrino scattering experiment that will ran in the NuMI Beam Hall at Fermilab. To calibrate the energy response of the MINER{nu}A detector, a beamline is being designed for the MINER{nu}A Test Beam Detector (TBD). The TBD is a replica of the full MINER{nu}A detector at small scale for calibration studies of the main detector. The beamline design consists of the following parts: a copper target, used to generate tertiaries from an incoming secondary beam; a steel collimator for tertiaries, which also serves as a dump for the incoming beam; a time of fight system (scintillator planes); four wire chambers, for angle measurements and tracking; and two dipole magnets, used as an spectrometer. During last October, the first commissioning run of the MINER{nu}A Test Beam took place in the Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab. We commissioned the target and collimator of the new tertiary beamline.

  3. High-pressure to ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism of kyanite eclogites from Pohorje, Slovenia: microtextural and thermobarometric evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janak, M.; Vrabec, M.; Horvath, P.; Konecny, P.; Luptak, B.

    2003-04-01

    The evidence for high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism in the Pohorje Mts. (Slovenia) has been found in the kyanite eclogites near Slovenska Bistrica. These eclogites are associated with the metaultrabasite body of 5 x 1 km size, with remnants of garnet peridotite. The country rocks of eclogites and metaultrabasites are amphibolites, paragneisses and micaschists. They belong to the pre-Neogene, metamorphic sequences within the Austroalpine units of the Eastern Alps, exposed in the proximity of the Periadriatic line. Kyanite eclogites consist of garnet, omphacite, kyanite and zoisite as a major primary phases. Garnet is unzoned, with 50 mol % of pyrope and 20 % of grossular content. Omphacite has up to 37 % of jadeite component. Phengite occurs as minor inclusions in garnet, with up to 3.4 Si p.f.u. Quartz inclusions in garnet, omphacite and kyanite are surrounded by radial fractures. Some of these inclusions contain a polycrystalline quartz which is diagnostic of pseudomorphs after coesite. Secondary phases occur in the coronas, symplectites and fractures. The most typical are diopside, amphibole and plagioclase after omphacite, and sapphirine, corundum, spinel and anorthite after kyanite. Sapphirine is peraluminous, close to the 3 : 5 : 1 end-member. Peak metamorphic conditions have been calculated from a combination of the garnet-clinopyroxene and garnet-phengite Fe-Mg exchange thermometers with the net-transfer reactions equilibria: (1) grossular + pyrope + 2 quartz/coesite = 3 diopside + 2 kyanite, and (2) 3 celadonite + 2 grossular + pyrope = 6 diopside + 3 muscovite. The ferric Fe was calculated from the stoichiometry. The intersections of garnet-clinopyroxene thermometer with equilibrium (1) define maximum pressure of 3.3 - 3.6 GPa at temperatures ranging from 760 - 870 °C, well within the coesite stability field. The P-T values obtained from reactions involving phengite are lower (700 - 750 °C; 2.0 - 2.3 GPa), consistent with the stability of quartz. This is interpreted due to retrograde re-equilibration of phengite inclusions. The results obtained from THERMOCALC (version 3.1) cluster close to the quartz/coesite boundary. The age of metamorphism in Pohorje eclogites is unknown. Based on Sm-Nd dating of garnet in the surrounding micaschists and the eclogites from the Koralpe and Saualpe, we suppose that HP and even UHP metamorphism in Pohorje eclogites was Alpine, related to continental subduction during the Cretaceous orogeny.

  4. PSC 424: Rocks and Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Graham

    2011-10-13

    This is a webpage designed to give students access to basic information about rocks and minerals. Rocks and Minerals Introduction Video Basic Definitions- Mineral: a solid inorganic substance of natural occurrence Rock: a mixture of minerals Ways to identify a mineral: Hardness Luster (metallic/nonmetallic) Streak Color Rock Song Three basic rock types: Igneous Metamorphic Sedimentary Rock Cycle Animation ...

  5. Vitamin and mineral requirements

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Vitamin and mineral requirements in human nutrition Second edition Please go to the Table and mineral requirements in human nutrition : report of a joint FAO/WHO expert consultation, Bangkok, Thailand REQUIREMENTS IN HUMAN NUTRITION iv 2.2.4 Risk factors 22 2.2.5 Morbidity and mortality 23 2.3 Units

  6. Rocks and Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This description of rocks and minerals includes representatives of all three major groups: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic. Users can access introductory information about the three major rock types and the minerals that form them. A simple rock classification chart is included, with embedded links to a glossary and more detailed material for advanced learners.

  7. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  8. Minerals, Crystals and Gems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This module introduces students to minerals, crystals, and gems by using pictures and discussions of some of the extraordinary specimens residing in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution. It includes three lessons in which they draw pictures of specimens, grow their own crystals of magnesium sulfate, and perform a scavenger hunt in which they look for minerals in commonly used objects and products.

  9. Minerals in Our Environment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Frank, Dave

    This color poster shows how we use minerals in our everyday life. It depicts common household items (furniture, appliances, plumbing fixtures, personal products, etc.) which are keyed by number to short descriptions that provide information on the minerals used in the manufacture of these items.

  10. VITAMINS AND MINERALS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Hughes

    2006-03-05

    DESK Standard: Specify key vitamins and minerals and their functions. . DATES: You can begin this activity on May 21. You should complete it by May 25. OBJECTIVE: A healthy body needs vitamins and minerals. You\\'ve probably heard these words before, but do you really know what they mean? This activity will help you better understand the ...

  11. USGS: Energy & Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-06-20

    The Energy and Minerals Mission Area of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) "conducts research and assessments on the location, quantity, and quality of material and energy resources, including the economic and environmental effects of resource extraction and use." Visitors to the site can click on thematic sections such as Energy Resources and Mineral Resources. Each of these areas contains information about each program, along with fact sheets, databases, and detailed geospatial maps. The Program News area contains links to documents such as "Understanding the Global Distribution of Nonfuel Mineral Resources" and a host of summary documents on mineral commodities. Finally, the site is rounded out by the Mineral Resources Products area. Here, visitors can look into hundreds of statistical reports, bulletins, and data sets intended for scientists, journalists, and members of the general public.

  12. Why Mineral Interfaces Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Andrew; Putnis, Christine V.

    2015-04-01

    While it is obvious that reactions between a mineral and an aqueous solution take place at the mineral-fluid interface it is only relatively recently that high spatial resolution studies have demonstrated how the local structure of the mineral surface and the chemical composition of the fluid at the interface control both the short-range and the long-range consequences of mineral-fluid interaction. Long-range consequences of fluid-mineral interaction control element cycles in the earth, the formation of ore-deposits, the chemical composition of the oceans through weathering of rocks and hence climate changes. Although weathering is clearly related to mineral dissolution, to what extent do experimentally measured dissolution rates of minerals help to understand weathering, especially weathering mechanisms? This question is related to the short-range, local reactions that take place when a mineral, that is not stable in the fluid, begins to dissolve. In this case the fluid composition at the interface will become supersaturated with respect to a different phase or phases. This may be a different composition of the same mineral e.g. a Ca-rich feldspar dissolving in a Na-rich solution results in a fluid at the interface which may be supersaturated with respect to an Na-rich feldspar. Alternatively, the interfacial fluid could be supersaturated with respect to a different mineral e.g. an Na-rich zeolite, depending on the temperature. Numerous experiments have shown that the precipitation of a more stable phase at the mineral-fluid interface results in a coupling between the dissolution and the precipitation, and the replacement of one mineral by another. This process separates the short-range mechanisms which depend only on the composition of the interfacial solution, and the long-range consequences that depend on the composition of the residual fluid released from the reacting parent mineral. Typically such residual fluids may carry metal ions tens to hundreds of kilometres from the initial reaction site to form ore deposits. The coupling of dissolution and precipitation has important consequences for all reactions between fluids and rocks and understanding this coupling has applications well beyond mineralogy, for example, in developing new methods of materials synthesis, for carbon removal from the atmosphere and for safe storage of nuclear waste.

  13. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE MINERAL MINING INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a multimedia (air, liquid and solid wastes) environmental assessment of the domestic mineral mining industry. The primary objective of the study was to identify the major pollution problems associated with the industry. A secondary objective was to define res...

  15. Private Mineral Gallery Walk

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    Students make and display posters of the mineral they researched throughout the semester. The instructor and TA review the posters while students answer questions as they walk around and examine each other's posters.

  16. Biological effects of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    In general, clay materials exhibit a range of biological activities, from apparently inactive or slightly active, such as hematite, to highly fibrogenic and carcinogenic, such as fibrous brucite (nemalite). The zeolites also exhibit such as range, with some mordenite being slightly active and erionite being highly active; however, erionite is the only zeolite that has been studied extensively. The diversity of mineral species holds great potential for probing these mechanisms, especially when mineralogical data are integrated with biological data. Unfortunately, many of the studies reporting data on the biological effects of clays and zeolites fail to report detailed mineralogical information; hence, it is difficult at present to interpret the biological activities of minerals in terms of their physical and chemical properties. Important mineralogical data that are only rarely considered in biological research include exact mineralogy of the specimen (i.e., identification and abundance of contaminants), physical and chemical properties of minerals, and surface properties of minerals. 141 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  17. Ken's Fluorescent Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kenneth Colosky

    This web site provides photos of fluorescent minerals photographed under long wave (LW) or short wave (SW) ultraviolet light. Links to additional resources, and a list of books and information sources are also included.

  18. Minerals Yearbook, 1988. Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Glass-fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The report discusses the following: domestic data coverage; legislation and government programs; domestic production; comsumption and uses; prices; foreign trade; world capacity; world review--Argentina, Chile, France, Italy, Turkey, United Kingdom; Technology.

  19. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  20. Ice is a Mineral

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson about the characteristics of ice as a mineral and how it compares to other minerals with respect to hardness. Learners will observe ice crystals, develop a hardness scale and position ice on it. Learners will also practice working collaboratively in a team. Activities include small group miming, speaking, drawing, and/or writing. This is lesson 3 of 12 in the unit, Exploring Ice in the Solar System.

  1. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Kowatsch

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three\\u000a types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along\\u000a with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within\\u000a the

  2. Microbial control of mineral weathering kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.; Hiebert, F.K. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The influence of native microorganisms on mineral dissolution and precipitation kinetics was examined in a petroleum contaminated aquifer. In situ microcosms containing clean mineral fragments (calcite, dolomite, quartz, albite, microcline, anorthite, muscovite, biotite) were allowed to colonize and react over 1 year periods, and the surfaces then examined for microbial colonization patterns and weathering features. These experiments revealed distinct patterns of colonization, and weathering associated with microbial metabolism. Feldspar surfaces were widely colonized, and the colonized surfaces were deeply weathered, while secondary clays precipitated on uncolonized surfaces. Calcite surfaces were sparsely colonized, but deeply pitted around microbial colonies. Distinctive precipitation features were otherwise observed on all other surfaces, with overgrowth morphology related to crystal orientation. The rates of calcite dissolution was directly controlled at the microscopic level by microbial activity around colonies, while precipitation rate is probably related to microbial perturbation of the meso-scale inorganic geochemistry, and may be limited by dolomite dissolution rate.

  3. Secondary electron emission studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Shih; J. Yater; C. Hor; R. Abrams

    1997-01-01

    Secondary-electron-emission processes under electron bombardment play an important role in the performance of a variety of electron devices. While in some devices, the anode and the grid require materials that suppress the secondary-electron-generation process, the crossed-field amplifier (CFA) is an example where the cathode requires an efficient secondary-electron-emission material. Secondary-electron-emission processes will be discussed by a three-step process: penetration of

  4. Mineral impurities in coal combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raask

    1985-01-01

    This article discusses the many and varied problems associated with coal combustion and suggests remedial measures to assist in producing electrical energy from coal more efficiently. Contents include: influence of coal mineral matter on boiler design; mineral impurities in coal; quality of coal utilized in power stations; coal grinding, abrasive fuel minerals and plant wear; particulates silicate minerals in boiler

  5. Mineral Physical Properties and Identification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Richard Harwood

    2011-01-01

    This Physical Geology 101 lab consists of a chart which defines the physical properties and provides the means for determining the physical property of a mineral sample. Also presented is a table listing some of the aspects of the common lab minerals. Armed with an image of a mineral and a series of physical properties tests, students are asked to identify each mineral.

  6. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  7. Isotopic bone mineralization rates in maintenance dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, M.; Stephens, E.

    1983-09-01

    The expanding pool model of radiocalcium kinetics has been used in 13 maintenance dialysis patients to measure bone mineralization rate. No difficulties were met in applying the data to the model, and values for the bone mineralization rate ranged from 0.0 to 2.0 mmol/kg Ca++ per day. The bone histology obtained at the time of the study showed a correlation between the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism and the bone mineralization rate, with low values of the latter occurring in atypical osteomalacia (two patients) or inactive-looking bone (one patient) and raised values in seven patients. The plasma alkaline phosphatase and immunoassayable parathyroid hormone levels each correlated significantly with the bone mineralization rate. These findings suggest that the technique is valid when applied to hemodialysis patients and provides quantitative information about skeletal calcium metabolism in different types of renal bone disease.

  8. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Patients with Endemic Skeletal Fluorosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. S. Teotia; Mohini Teotia

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of 20 patients with skeletal fluorosis showed that five had clear evidence of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The hyperactivity of the parathyroid glands in skeletal fluorosis in the presence of decreased solubility of the bone mineral (fluoroapatite) strongly suggests that it is a compensatory attempt to maintain a normal extracellular ionized calcium equilibrium. Further study of the parathyroid glands and of

  9. The IMA Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names: procedures and guidelines on mineral nomenclature, 1998

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. Nickel; J. D. Grice

    1998-01-01

    Summary An author wishing to introduce a new mineral name into the literature, or to redefine, discredit or rename an existing mineral, must obtain prior approval of the IMA Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names. This paper outlines the procedure to be followed in the preparation and submission of a proposal for approval, and describes how such proposals are

  10. Mineral hydrolysis kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, H.R.; Cygan, R.T.; Arnold, G.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casey, W.H. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air, and Water Resources

    1993-07-01

    Dissolution rate laws for silicate mineral weathering can be related to kinetics of ligand-exchange reactions. This relation is being tested with an experimental/analytical/theoretical program for measuring the dissolution kinetics of orthosilicate minerals for use in ionic modeling and molecular dynamics computer simulations of solid, aqueous solution, and solid/liquid interface. To date, dissolution rate have been measured for a suite of endmember and mixed-cation orthosilicate minerals (both olivine and willemite structures) as well as a few inosilicate minerals (pyroxenes). Dissolution rates appear to correlate well with solvent exchange rates around the hydrated divalent cations. Siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds are relatively unreactive at low pH`s close to zero point of neutral charge for quartz. The correlation suggests that silicic acid would be released from the reacting surfaces after protonation and hydration of bonds between divalent metals and structural oxygens; congruent dissolution is confirmed by Rutherford backscattered analysis of the near-surface of an acid-reacted forsterite. In the ionic modeling, except for liebenbergite, there is a general trend of increasing lattice energy with decreasing dissolution rate for endmember and mixed-cation orthosilicate minerals at pH 2. 3 figs, 4 refs.

  11. The JMU Mineral Museum - Observing Physical Properties of Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cynthia A. Kearns

    Mineral museums provide a resourse for students to explore beautiful examples of minerals. During the exploration process, they can also apply or reinforce visual observation skills they have learned in lab. The James Madison University Mineral Museum (http://csm.jmu.edu/minerals/) provides educational opportunities for both introductory geology and earth science courses as well as advanced major. In this exercise, students have possibly their first opportunity to enjoy the wonderous world of minerals in an exhilerating display. During the exploration process, students are provided a reinforcment of visual observation skills previously experienced in lab and an introduction to mineral names and classifications.

  12. Minerals from Macedonia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petre Makreski; Gligor Jovanovski; Sandra Dimitrovska

    2005-01-01

    The following six sulfate minerals: anhydrite, CaSO4; brochantite, Cu4(SO4)(OH)6; jarosite, KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6; potassium alum, KAl(SO4)2·12H2O; chalcanthite, CuSO4·5H2O and epsomite, MgSO4·7H2O collected from different localities of Macedonia (Debar, Alšar, Bu?im, Bukovik), are studied and identified using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The difficulties related to the contamination, identification and characterization of the mentioned minerals are discussed. The identification is based

  13. Properties of Minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Rapp

    Mineral chemistry as a science was established in the early years of the nineteenth century by Joseph-Louis Proust’s proposal\\u000a of the Law of Constant Composition in 1799, John Dalton’s Atomic Theory in 1805, and the development of accurate methods of\\u000a chemical analysis. By definition, a mineral has a characteristic composition expressed by its formula, e.g., halite (NaCl)\\u000a or quartz (SiO2).

  14. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O ? (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily implemented and economically efficient alternative to other technologies currently under development for mineral sequestration. Dismukes GC, Carrieri D, Bennette N, Ananyev GM, Posewitz MC (2008) Aquatic phototrophs: efficient alternatives to land-based crops for biofuels. Current Opinion in Biotechnology, 19, 235-240. Ferris FG, Wiese RG, Fyfe WS (1994) Precipitation of carbonate minerals by microorganisms: Implications of silicate weathering and the global carbon dioxide budget. Geomicrobiology Journal, 12, 1-13. Lackner KS, Wendt CH, Butt DP, Joyce EL, Jr., Sharp DH (1995) Carbon dioxide disposal in carbonate minerals. Energy, 20, 1153-1170. Power IM, Wilson SA, Thom JM, Dipple GM, Gabites JE, Southam G (2009) The hydromagnesite playas of Atlin, British Columbia, Canada: A biogeochemical model for CO2 sequestration. Chemical Geology, 206, 302-316. Thompson JB, Ferris FG (1990) Cyanobacterial precipitation of gypsum, calcite, and magnesite from natural alkaline lake water. Geology, 18, 995-998.

  15. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  16. Rocks and Minerals Of Kentucky

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Kentucky rocks highlighted on this website are chiefly sedimentary, such as limestone and dolostone, since sedimentary rocks cover approximately 99 percent of the state. You will find an extensive list of minerals and mineral groups, such as oxides or halides, and mineral property descriptions that cover hardness, cleavage, color, crystal system, streak, and more. These properties are also discussed in relation to their use in identifying unknown minerals. Igneous and metamorphic rocks are covered in relation to gold and silver deposits, and the legend of the Jonathon Swift Silver mines. Information on Kentucky's state rock and mineral, museums, rock clubs, and mineral deposits are included.

  17. Bioleaching of Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    F. Roberto

    2002-02-01

    Bioleaching is the term used to describe the microbial dissolution of metals from minerals. The commercial bioleaching of metals, particularly those hosted in sulfide minerals, is supported by the technical disciplines of biohydrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, chemistry, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering. The study of the natural weathering of these same minerals, above and below ground, is also linked to the fields of geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry. Studies of abandoned and disused mines indicate that the alterations of the natural environment due to man's activities leave as remnants microbiological activity that continues the biologically mediated release of metals from the host rock (acid rock drainage; ARD). A significant fraction of the world's copper, gold and uranium is now recovered by exploiting native or introduced microbial communities. While some members of these unique communities have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, our knowledge of the composition of these communities, and the function of the individual species present remains relatively limited. Nevertheless, bioleaching represents a major strategy in mineral resource recovery whose importance will increase as ore reserves decline in quality, become more difficult to process (due to increased depth, increased need for comminution, for example), and as environmental considerations eliminate traditional physical processes such as smelting, which have served the mining industry for hundreds of years.

  18. Mineral Characterization for Combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin R. Ward

    The material referred to as “mineral matter” in coal has been to the combustion engineer a close to random association of chemical elements. These “random” elements are transformed in the combustion process to ash, react to form boiler deposits (slagging); abrade the internal parts of the boiler (erosion), and produce vapor phases that react with the metals in the boiler

  19. Marine Mineral Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fren N. Spiess

    1988-01-01

    This book is the forty-first in the Elsevier Oceanography Series, and with it the series has come full circle. Its first title, published in 1964, was John Mero's landmark study The Mineral Resources of the Sea [Mero, 1964]. Looking back at that first major treatise and comparing it with this and other recent books on the topic [e.g., Teleki et

  20. ARM: Automatic Rule Miner

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Slim Abdennadher; Abdellatif Olama; Noha Salem; Amira Thabet

    2006-01-01

    Rule-based formalisms are ubiquitous in computer science. However, a difficulty that arises frequently when specifyingor program- ming the rules is to determine which effects should be propagated by these rules. In this paper, we present a tool called ARM (Automatic Rule Miner) that generates rules for relations over finite domains. ARM offers a rich functionality to provide the user with

  1. Mineral mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Monks, H.

    1980-11-25

    A mineral mining machine hauls itself along a working face by engaging a round link chain. The links of the chain are fed sequentially from link-retaining pockets in a track component arranged around the working face, around a driven sprocket assembly on the machine and returned to the pockets.

  2. TRACE MINERAL DEFICIENCIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of trace element deficiencies of human health and well-being is presented in an abridged form. The general biological roles, mechanisms involved in homeostasis, factors affecting the manifestation of deficiency signs, and treatments for deficiencies of trace mineral elements are described...

  3. Mixtures and mineral reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, S.; Ganguly, J.

    1987-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the physicochemical evolution of natural rocks through systematic analysis of the compositional properties and phase relations of their mineral assemblages. This book brings together concepts of classical thermodynamics, solution models, and atomic ordering and interactions that constitute a basis of such analysis, with examples of application to subsolidus petrological problems.

  4. Energy and Mineral Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy Heaton

    This site contains 16 questions on the topic of energy and mineral resources, which covers energy sources, resource types, and uses of resources. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit their answers and are provided immediate verification.

  5. Oxalate minerals on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, D. M.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Goltz, D.; Johnson, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Small amounts of unidentified organic compounds have only recently been inferred on Mars despite strong reasons to expect significant concentrations and decades of searching. Based on X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectroscopic analyses we show that solid oxalic acid and its most common mineral salts are stable under the pressure and ultraviolet irradiation environment of the surface of Mars, and could represent a heretofore largely overlooked reservoir of organic carbon in the martian near-surface. In addition to the delivery to Mars by carbonaceous chondrites, oxalate minerals are among the predicted breakdown products of meteoritic organic matter delivered to the martian surface, as well as any endogenic organic carbon reaching the martian surface from the interior. A reinterpretation of pyrolysis experiments from the Viking, Phoenix, and Mars Science Laboratory missions shows that all are consistent with the presence of significant concentrations of oxalate minerals. Oxalate minerals could be important in numerous martian geochemical processes, including acting as a possible nitrogen sink (as ammonium oxalate), and contributing to the formation of “organic” carbonates, methane, and hydroxyl radicals.

  6. Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

  7. MINERAL WATERS OF BOHEMIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Zhevlakov

    1961-01-01

    Mineral waters of Bohemia are characterized by a considerable variety of chemical gaseous composition. They may be subdivided chemically into: calcium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, magnesium sulfate, sodium sulfate, and ferruginous sulfate. Carbonated-water springs are chiefly developed along the periphery of the Bohemian massif. The conditions of formation of such springs in Karlovy Vary, Frantiskovy Lázn? and Mariánské Lazne and Luga?evice

  8. International minerals: a national perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, A.F. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Seven authors bring a variety of perspectives to the subject of minerals availability. In the domestic area, an overview of the US strategic mineral situation is followed by a discussion of changes in one state's mineral policy decisions over a 200-year period. Later chapters describe the potential of Alaska's mineral resources, with a focus on the immediate need for a thorough inventory of this vast area, and the nature and sources of mineral information available to Canadian policymakers as useful models in making inventories. In the international area, there is a discussion of the key role of South Africa in the world mineral picture and the strategic importance to the Soviet Union of the mineral wealth of Afghanistan. The volume concludes with a review of the history of US mineral policies. Separate abstracts were prepared for the seven chapters selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  9. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  10. Vitamins and Minerals during Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... added to your dashboard . Vitamins and minerals during pregnancy Your body uses vitamins, minerals and other nutrients ... certain foods. Which nutrients are most important during pregnancy? All nutrients are important, but these six play ...

  11. Private Mineral Project - Part 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    In this semester-long private mineral project, students become experts on one mineral. They write a paper about their mineral and use key information about it to publish a web page. Information should include provenance, physical properties, composition, recent related literature, photos of samples, optical properties, x-ray pattern, crystallography, economic value, atomic structure, other closely related minerals, associated myths, and a complete list of references based on GSA format.

  12. Physics for Secondary Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harold P. Knauss

    1958-01-01

    A modernized course in physics for secondary schools being prepared by the Physical Science Study Committee is undergoing classroom development in eight schools during 1957-1958. This paper describes the collaboration of university physicists, secondary school teachers, and others in working out details of the course, and reports on developments and convictions growing out of classroom experience.

  13. The Secondary Emission Phototube

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Iams; B. Salzberg

    1935-01-01

    A type of phototube is described in which the secondary electron emission from an auxiliary cathode (bombarded by the photo-electrons) is utilized to obtain amplification of the primary photocurrent. Phenomena of secondary emission, particularly as applied to the vacuum phototube, are discussed. The operating performance of a typical developmental embodiment is illustrated, and it is shown that its static sensitivity

  14. Efflorescent minerals associated with coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nuhfer

    1967-01-01

    A study of efforescent coal minerals was made which included the identification, description, and mode of occurrence of coal associated mineral efflorescenses found in the bituminous coal mining area surrounding Morgantown, West Virginia. Samples of efflorescences were collected from road cuts, strip mines, entrances to underground mines, and mine discharge pumps and were analyzed for mineral and chemical composition by

  15. The Indian Mineral Development Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Antoinette

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of the Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) and the possible effects it may have on Indian mineral development. Explains how the provisions of IMDA work to provide Indian tribes with greater flexibility for the development and sale of their mineral resources. (ML)

  16. High and low temperature alteration of uranium and thorium minerals, Um Ara granites, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamdy H. Abd El-Naby

    2009-01-01

    The Um Ara area, in the south Eastern Desert of Egypt contains a number of uranium occurrences related to granitic rocks. U-rich thorite, thorite and zircon are the main primary uranium- and thorium-bearing minerals found in mineralized zones of the Um Ara alkali-feldspar granites; uranophane is the most common secondary uranium mineral. U-rich thorite contains blebs of galena, has rims

  17. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M. (Oviedo, FL); Cai, Weidong (Oviedo, FL); Garan, Daniel W. (Orlando, FL); Harris, Arthur J. (Orlando, FL)

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  18. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section...the Interior WILDERNESS PRESERVATION National Wilderness Preservation System § 19.8 Prospecting...mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness....

  19. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section...the Interior WILDERNESS PRESERVATION National Wilderness Preservation System § 19.8 Prospecting...mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness....

  20. Silicosis in barium miners.

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, A; Ruckley, V A; Addison, J; Brown, W R

    1986-01-01

    Four men who mined barytes in Scotland and who developed pneumoconiosis are described. Three developed progressive massive fibrosis, from which two died; and one developed a nodular simple pneumoconiosis after leaving the industry. The radiological and pathological features of the men's lungs were those of silicosis and high proportions of quartz were found in two of them post mortem. The quartz was inhaled from rocks associated with the barytes in the mines. The features of silicosis in barium miners are contrasted with the benign pneumoconiosis, baritosis, that occurs in workers exposed to crushed and ground insoluble barium salts. Diagnostic difficulties arise when silicosis develops in workers mining minerals known to cause a separate and benign pneumoconiosis. These difficulties are compounded when, as not infrequently happens, the silicotic lesions develop or progress after exposure to quartz has ceased. Images PMID:3787542

  1. Taxation of mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, R.F.; Hool, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in recent years in the level of taxation imposed on mining firms by state and local governments. This increase can be attributed to three factors: (1) a heightened awareness that resources are limited in quantity; (2) environmental damage resulting from mining operations has brought demands for just compensations; and (3) significant price increases for some minerals have often been viewed by states as an opportunity to collect additional tax revenue. The broad aim of this book is to provide a comprehensive economic analysis of the effects of mining taxation on the extraction of mineral resources and to offer a set of recommendations for tax policy. The primary objective of this design is to minimize the distortionary incentives created by the taxation. From a practical standpoint, however, one must also recognize the degrees of difficulty in the administration of the various taxes. 90 references, 1 figure, 14 tables.

  2. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, H.C.; Thomson, B.M. [Tetra Technical Inc, Denver, CO (United States)

    2009-09-15

    A review of literature published in 2008 and early 2009 on research related to the production of acid mine drainage and/or in the dissolution of minerals as a result of mining, with special emphasis on the effects of these phenomena on the water quality in the surrounding environment, is presented. This review is divided into six sections: 1) Site Characterization and Assessment, 2) Protection, Prevention, and Restoration, 3) Toxicity Assessment, 4) Environmental Fate and Transport, 5) Biological Characterization, and 6) Treatment Technologies. Because there is much overlap in research areas associated with minerals and mine drainage, many papers presented in this review can be classified into more than one category, and the six sections should not be regarded as being mutually-exclusive, nor should they be thought of as being all-inclusive.

  3. Mineral Requirements of Sheep.

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1918-01-01

    constituents in feed, residues, and excrements were estimated. In connection with other digestion experiments, estimates were made of certain ash constituents in feeds, excrements and urine. The results of this work throw light upon the mineral requirements...,11 grams phosphoric acid. The ratio of lime to phosphoric acid in tri- calcium phosphate is 1 :0.80. Table 7.-Average magnesia eaten and digested. BALANCE EXPEBIMENTS In twenty tests with ten rations, the urine was analyzed in addition to the feeds...

  4. The Clay Minerals Society

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    "The Clay Minerals Society (CMS) is an international community of scientists who promote research in and disseminate information on clay science and technology." The website provides downloads of materials dealing with various aspects of mineralogy, geochemistry, and petrology. Researchers can find out about annual meetings, awards and grants, and publications. Students and educators can find information on teaching materials, clay science workshops, and games. The website offers physical and chemical data for Source and Special Clays.

  5. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  6. Precipitation and Transformation of Secondary Fe Oxyhydroxides in a Histosol Impacted by Runoff from a Lead Smelter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaodong Gao; Darrell G. Schulze

    2010-01-01

    Secondary Fe(III) oxyhydroxides play a key role in controlling the mobility and bioavailability of trace metals in acidic, sulfate-rich soils, such as mining and smelter sites. Schwertmannite, jarosite, goethite, and ferrihydrite are the most common mineral phases identified in such soils. A good understanding of the precipitation and transformation of these minerals in soils is very important for predicting the

  7. Personalizing Secondary Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, William J.

    1974-01-01

    To facilitate "personalizing" and individualizing secondary school curriculum, the author presents eight conceptual aspects of individualization and discusses the relationship of these concepts to program design and implementation of an individual learning program. (HMD)

  8. Secondary Storage in LISP

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Daniel J.

    1963-12-01

    A principal limitation of LISP processors in many computations is that of inadequate primary random-access storage. This paper explores several methods of using a secondary storage medum (such as drums, disk files or magetic ...

  9. Are colors Secondary Qualities?

    E-print Network

    Byrne, Alex

    Introduction: Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century discussions of the senses are often thought to contain a profound truth: some perceptible properties are secondary qualities, dispositions to produce certain sorts of ...

  10. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body ... weakness. Many medications may affect the development of neuropathy, including: Heart or blood pressure medications Amiodarone Hydralazine ...

  11. Bacteriophage secondary infection.

    PubMed

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2015-02-01

    Phages are credited with having been first described in what we now, officially, are commemorating as the 100(th) anniversary of their discovery. Those one-hundred years of phage history have not been lacking in excitement, controversy, and occasional convolution. One such complication is the concept of secondary infection, which can take on multiple forms with myriad consequences. The terms secondary infection and secondary adsorption, for example, can be used almost synonymously to describe virion interaction with already phage-infected bacteria, and which can result in what are described as superinfection exclusion or superinfection immunity. The phrase secondary infection also may be used equivalently to superinfection or coinfection, with each of these terms borrowed from medical microbiology, and can result in genetic exchange between phages, phage-on-phage parasitism, and various partial reductions in phage productivity that have been termed mutual exclusion, partial exclusion, or the depressor effect. Alternatively, and drawing from epidemiology, secondary infection has been used to describe phage population growth as that can occur during active phage therapy as well as upon phage contamination of industrial ferments. Here primary infections represent initial bacterial population exposure to phages while consequent phage replication can lead to additional, that is, secondary infections of what otherwise are not yet phage-infected bacteria. Here I explore the varying meanings and resultant ambiguity that has been associated with the term secondary infection. I suggest in particular that secondary infection, as distinctly different phenomena, can in multiple ways influence the success of phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria, also known as, phage therapy. PMID:25595214

  12. Secondary psychoses: an update

    PubMed Central

    Keshavan, Matcheri S; Kaneko, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Psychotic disorders due to a known medical illness or substance use are collectively termed secondary psychoses. In this paper, we first review the historic evolution of the concept of secondary versus primary psychosis and how this distinction supplanted the earlier misleading classification of psychoses into organic and functional. We then outline the clinical features and approach to the diagnosis of secondary psychotic disorders. Features such as atypical presentation, temporal relation to detectable medical cause, evidence of direct physiological causal relationship to the etiological agent, and the absence of evidence of a primary psychotic illness that may better explain the presentation suggest consideration of a secondary psychosis. Finally, we discuss how careful studies of secondary psychotic disorders can help elucidate the pathophysiology of primary, or idiopathic, psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. We illustrate this issue through a discussion of three secondary psychotic disorders — psychoses associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, velocardiofacial syndrome, and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis — that can, respectively, provide neuroanatomical, genetic, and neurochemical models of schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:23471787

  13. Hearing protection for miners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T. [Sperian Hearing Protection (United States)

    2008-10-15

    A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  14. Microelectrophoresis of selected mineral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, B. J.; Tipps, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Particle mobilities of ilmenite, labradorite plagioclase, enstatite pyroxene, and olivine were measured with a Rank microelectrophoresis system to evaluate indicated mineral separability. Sodium bicarbonate buffer suspension media with and without additives (0.0001 M DTAB and 5 percent v/v ethylene glycol) were used to determine differential adsorption by mineral particles and modification of relative mobilities. Good separability between some minerals was indicated; additives did not enhance separability.

  15. MICROBIOLOGY: How Bacteria Respire Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dianne K. Newman (California Institute of Technology; Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences)

    2001-05-18

    Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required: Some bacteria respire minerals; that is, they harvest energy from minerals through using them as electron acceptors. Many details of this respiration process have remained obscure. In her Perspective, Newman highlights the study by Lower et al., who have used a customized atomic force microscope to observe bacteria during mineral respiration.

  16. Mineral Time Capsules on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Like dinosaur-age insects trapped in amber, biomolecules sequestered in million-year-old sulfate minerals could provide a glimpse into the past, say researchers who've recently analyzed such minerals from N orth America. The same minerals have recently been discovered on Mars , so they may be a good place to look for traces of past life on the red planet, the researchers say.

  17. Bisphophonates in CKD Patients with Low Bone Mineral Density

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Chih; Yen, Jen-Fen; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) have a high risk of bone fracture because of low bone mineral density and poor bone quality. Osteoporosis also features low bone mass, disarranged microarchitecture, and skeletal fragility, and differentiating between osteoporosis and CKD-MBD in low bone mineral density is a challenge and usually achieved by bone biopsy. Bisphosphonates can be safe and beneficial for patients with a glomerular filtration rate of 30?mL/min or higher, but prescribing bisphosphonates in advanced CKD requires caution because of the increased possibility of low bone turnover disorders such as osteomalacia, mixed uremic osteodystrophy, and adynamic bone, even aggravating hyperparathyroidism. Therefore, bone biopsy in advanced CKD is an important consideration before prescribing bisphosphonates. Treatment also may induce hypocalcemia in CKD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, but vitamin D supplementation may ameliorate this effect. Bisphosphonate treatment can improve both bone mineral density and vascular calcification, but the latter becomes more unlikely in patients with stage 3-4 CKD with vascular calcification but no decreased bone mineral density. Using bisphosphonates requires considerable caution in advanced CKD, and the lack of adequate clinical investigation necessitates more studies regarding its effects on these patients. PMID:24501586

  18. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO2-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water) in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10-50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100-1000, pH of ~7.5-12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.

  19. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Patients with Endemic Skeletal Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Teotia, S. P. S.; Teotia, Mohini

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of 20 patients with skeletal fluorosis showed that five had clear evidence of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The hyperactivity of the parathyroid glands in skeletal fluorosis in the presence of decreased solubility of the bone mineral (fluoroapatite) strongly suggests that it is a compensatory attempt to maintain a normal extracellular ionized calcium equilibrium. Further study of the parathyroid glands and of bone lesions in skeletal fluorosis is in progress. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4692708

  20. Mineral composition of the modern bottom sediments of the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, A. I.

    2013-03-01

    The mineral composition of the modern bottom sediments were studied in the White Sea. The single terrigenous-mineralogical province is defined; it is characterized by the mineral association of amphibole, epidote, garnet, and pyroxene. Five regions are assigned in the White Sea in accordance with the mineral composition of the surface bottom sediments. We argue that the granite-metamorphic rock complexes of the Baltic Shield are the main source of the modern sediments in the White Sea, while the East European Craton (Russian Platform) plays a secondary role.

  1. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Preservation System. No person shall have any right or interest in or to any mineral deposits which may be discovered through prospecting or other information-gathering activity after the legal date on which the laws pertaining to mineral leasing cease...

  2. Spectroscopic investigation and theoretical modeling of kaolinite-group minerals and other low-temperature phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Etienne; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Allard, Thierry; Morin, Guillaume; Guillaumet, Maxime; Delattre, Simon; Blanchard, Marc; Calas, Georges

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes some recent results obtained on the physical properties of environmental minerals, mostly kaolinite-group minerals and Fe- and Al-(hydr)oxides occurring in lateritic soils. The defective structure of these minerals, including impurities, stacking faults and radiation-induced defects, is probed using infrared spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. Resulting information bears on models of soil formation and transformation mechanisms of minerals in low-temperature environments. We underline the increasing impact of quantum chemical modeling in this field, providing straightforward interpretations of spectroscopic signals and overcoming the limits of fingerprint approaches. Importantly, the first-principles modeling of isotopic fractionation factors provides new links between mineralogical and geochemical investigations of secondary minerals.

  3. Secondary differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusyatnikova, V. N.; Vinogradov, A. M.; Umaguzhin, V. A.

    Let ? be an arbitrary sustem of partial (non-linear differential equations. Higher infinitesimal sysmmetries of ? may be interpreted as vector fields on the «manifoldå Sol ? of all local solution of this system. The paper deals with construction of differential operators of arbitrary orders on Sol ?. These approaches to construction of the theory of these operators, geometric and functional are presented, and their equivalence is proved when ? is the trivial equation. Coincidence of «extrinsicå and «intrinsicå geometric secondary operator is proved for an arbitrary system ?. It is shown that each geometric secondary operator may be approximated by a sum of compositions of evolution differentiations with any possible accuracy, a description of geometric secondary operators in local coordinates is algo given. These results are obtained by studying the geometry of finite jets and infinitely prolonged equations.

  4. Improving Cattle Health Through Trace Mineral Supplementation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry W. Spears

    1995-01-01

    A number of trace minerals are required by beef cattle. Feeds consumed by cattle may supply most trace minerals in adequate amounts. However, some minerals may be severely or at least marginally deficient in beef cattle diets. Even marginal mineral deficiencies can reduce growth, reproduction and\\/or health of cattle showing few if any clinical signs of deficiency. Other trace minerals

  5. Marine Mineral Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Fren N.

    This book is the forty-first in the Elsevier Oceanography Series, and with it the series has come full circle. Its first title, published in 1964, was John Mero's landmark study The Mineral Resources of the Sea [Mero, 1964]. Looking back at that first major treatise and comparing it with this and other recent books on the topic [e.g., Teleki et al., 1987] one cannot help but be impressed with how well Mero used the sparse data and studies that had been put together by his time. Twenty-two years and many millions of dollars later a substantial mining-oriented base of knowledge has been built — we know much more about the economics and the engineering — yet the basic premises and conclusions that Mero assembled are still intact, and answers to the fundamental questions (e.g., formation processes for manganese nodules) are not in much better condition than they were then.

  6. The minerals of milk.

    PubMed

    Gaucheron, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    The salt of milk constitutes a small part of milk (8-9 g.L(-1)); this fraction contains calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium for the main cations and inorganic phosphate, citrate and chloride for the main anions. In milk, these ions are more or less associated between themselves and with proteins. Depending on the type of ion, they are diffusible (cases of sodium, potassium and chloride) or partially associated with casein molecules (cases of calcium, magnesium, phosphate and citrate), to form large colloidal particles called casein micelles. Today, our knowledge and understanding concerning this fraction is relatively complete. In this review, the different models explaining (i) the nature and distribution of these minerals (especially calcium phosphate) in both fractions of milk and (ii) their behaviour in different physico-chemical conditions, are discussed. PMID:16045895

  7. Longwall mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, H.; Erwien, H.; Grundken, D.; Kerklies, B.; Kumor, B.; Linke, H.; Mainusch, R.; Mohn, U.; Wleklinski, B.

    1983-06-21

    A mineral mining installation comprises a longwall conveyor, a plough movable to and fro along a guide fixed to the face side of the longwall conveyor, and a drive station at one end of the longwall conveyor. The drive station includes a drive frame supporting drive means for driving the longwall conveyor. A support beam is provided at the goaf side of the drive station. The support beam extends substantially parallel to the drive frame. A floor plate extends beneath the drive frame. The goafside end portion of the floor plate is supported on the support beam by means of a lifting device, whereby the goaf-side end portion of the floor plate can be moved up and down relative to the support beam by the lifting device.

  8. The Mineral Physics Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineral Physics Committee members for the period July 1, 1986, to J ne 30, 1988, have been announced. They are Murli H. Manghnani (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu), and Orson L. Anderson (University of California, Los Angeles), Thomas J. Ahrens (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.), Subir K. Banerjee (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), William A. Bassett (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.), Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Michael Brown (University of Washington, Seattle), Robert M. Hazen (Geophysical Laboratory, Washington, D.C.), Raymond F. Jeanloz (University of California, Berkeley), Robert C. Liebermann (State University of New York (SUNY),(Stony Brook), Alexandra Navrotsky (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), Robert N. Schock (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif.), and Donald J. Weidner (SUNY Stony Brook).

  9. Mineral Cleavage: a practical experiment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sharon Browning

    In this geology activity, students investigate the physical property of mineral cleavage by physically trying to break down a block of halite and describing the results. This lab addresses many misunderstandings non-majors have about the physical properties of minerals and includes a brief write up of their conclusions.

  10. Institute for Mineral and Energy

    E-print Network

    to 10 per cent per annum while other minerals such as uranium and rare earth elements will become to enhance the prospectivity, discovery and extraction of mineral and energy resources, including petroleum fields of research are: · Earth Sciences ­ geology; geochemistry; geo-sequestration; geophysics

  11. From Mountain Men to Miners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robert L.; Fogel, Jared A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines three of the changes wrought by coal mining: (1) the miner's working conditions; (2) the establishment of company towns; and (3) the violence that ensued when miners from Harlan County, Kentucky, referred to as "Bloody Harlan," tried to better their lives by joining labor unions. (CMK)

  12. Investigating Minerals: Promoting Integrated Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rudi; Carmack, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    "Mineral Detectives!" is one of eighteen lessons in the "Private Whys?" integrated science unit, which uses a guided inquiry investigation to teach students in grades three through five about the role of minerals in our lives. The University of North Texas developed "Private Whys?" with funding from the Copper Development Association. This lesson…

  13. Radioactivity in bottled mineral waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Mart??n Sánchez; M. P Rubio Montero; V Gómez Escobar; M Jurado Vargas

    1999-01-01

    Consumption of bottled mineral water is a growing practice and is sometimes a necessity rather than a choice. In this work, a study of the radioactive content of a wide selection of commercial bottled mineral waters for human intake was carried out. The origins of the analyzed waters were very different, coming from various locations in France, Portugal and Spain.

  14. Organo-mineral ultrafiltration membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Genné; W. Doyen; W. Adriansens; R. Leysen

    1997-01-01

    A new kind of membrane material, resulting from the addition of minerals (inorganics) to a polymer solution, is presented. This innovative concept allows us to combine the interesting properties of organic membranes (such as flexibility) with those of mineral membranes (such as pressure resistance, and surface properties). These organo-material membranes are prepared by immersion precipitation in a water bath, as

  15. Atomistic Simulation of Mineral Surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. H. De Leeuw; S. C. Parker

    2000-01-01

    Atomistic simulation techniques are now able to model the structure of mineral surfaces at the atomic level. In this paper we begin to address the question of whether surface reactivity can be studied reliably by modelling the surface reactivity of calcite, fluorite and forsterite under aqueous conditions. We first used energy minimisation techniques to investigate the interaction between the minerals

  16. Evaporates, petroleum and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This book covers oxide minerals under the following topics: oxygen fugacity and its petrologic importance; crystal chemistry of oxides and oxyhydroxides; petrogenetic indicators; oxygen barometry of spinel peridotites; iron-titanium oxides in igneous rocks; oxide minerals in metamorphic rocks; and magnetic petrology.

  17. Ways to defuse miners' anger

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The violence and riots which often occur with mining personnel are considered. The emotions and feelings which miners often experience because of their work environment are dealth with. From recognizing the pressures, the article then works to present methods to help defuse the miners' hostility and anger.

  18. Compensation of Navajo Uranium Miners

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    World Information Service on Energy Uranium Project

    This site addresses policy issues of the compensation of Navajo uranium miners. The site provides an annotated index of current issues, legislation, papers and presentations, books, and links that lead to more information on uranium miners. Imbedded links throughout the text lead to related information.

  19. Pulmonary complications in lead miners

    SciTech Connect

    Masjedi, M.R.; Estineh, N.; Bahadori, M.; Alavi, M.; Sprince, N.L.

    1989-07-01

    We carried out a study to assess the prevalence of respiratory disease in lead miners and to investigate the roles of silica and lead. We used a questionnaire for symptoms and examinations for signs of respiratory disease, chest roentgenograms, and spirometric study in 45 lead miners. Six underwent bronchoscopy and transbronchial lung biopsy (TBB) and five lung lead analysis. Lung lead levels from five patients with no occupational lead exposure were obtained for comparison. Results showed restriction in five of 45 and reticulonodular opacities in 16 of 45 workers. Squamous metaplasia and other histopathologic changes were observed, although silicotic nodules were absent by TBB. Lung lead levels above those of control subjects were observed in four of five lead miners. These findings show that lead miners are at risk for lung disease. Although silica is a likely cause, elevated lung lead content found in these miners merits further investigation.

  20. Adverse possession of subsurface minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts applicable to adverse possession of subsurface minerals are generally the same as those that apply to adverse possession of all real estate. However, special requirements must be satisfied in order to perfect title to subsurface minerals by adverse possession, particularly when there has been a severance of the true title between surface and subsurface minerals. In those jurisdictions where senior and junior grants came from the state or commonwealth covering the same or some of the same land and in those areas where descriptions of land were vague or not carefully drawn, adverse possession serves to solidify land and mineral ownership. There may be some public, social, and economic justification in rewarding, with good title, those who take possession and use real estate for its intended use, including the extraction of subsurface minerals. 96 refernces.

  1. Secondary metabolism in tobacco

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurentius H. Nugroho; Robert Verpoorte

    2002-01-01

    Tobacco has been quite well studied phytochemically, more than 2500 compounds have been identified. Here, the secondary metabolism in tobacco will be reviewed in a biosynthetic perspective. Major groups of compounds which have extensively been studied are the isoprenoids, alkaloids, cinnamoylputrescines, flavonoids, and anthocyanins. Their biosynthetic pathways and its regulation, and their occurrence in cell cultures and in intact plants

  2. Recycling Secondary Index Structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Aoki

    Many database reorganization techniques move tuples in a table from one loca- tion to another in a single pass. For example, distributed database systems move or copy tables between sites to optimize data placement. However, such systems typically drop and then rebuild the secondary indices defined over the table being moved. There are two primary reasons for this. First, moving

  3. Innovative Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, A. J. C.

    In this report, four secondary schools with programs varying from innovative to traditional are studied to evaluate the impact of innovation on the learning experience of students. Questionnaires were administered to students and staff, and interviews were conducted with smaller groups. Teacher marks were employed to evaluate student achievement.…

  4. Suicide among Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coder, Tamara L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated incidence of adolescent suicide in Kansas and assessed prevention guidelines and services dealing with adolescent suicide, and perceived needs of Kansas secondary school counselors in the area of teenage suicide. Findings from 484 school counselors indicated increase in suicide rates with age and need for suicide prevention programing…

  5. Secondary minimal change disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J. Glassock

    2003-01-01

    The great majority of patients identified as having a 'minimal change lesion' accompanying the nephrotic syndrome have a primary or 'idiopathic' disorder. Nevertheless, it is quite apparent that a similar or identical lesion can appear consequent to a growing number of underlying diseases; it is then known as 'secondary minimal change disease'. The predisposing conditions include neoplastic diseases, toxic or

  6. Linking Home Plate and Algonquin Class Rocks through Microtextural Analysis: Evidence for Hydrovolcanism in the Inner Basin of Columbia Hills, Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Yingst, R. Aileen; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Herkenhoff, Ken E.

    2007-01-01

    Examining the his-tory of a rock as the summed history of its constituent grains is a proven and powerful strategy that has been used on Earth to maximize the information that can be gleaned from limited samples. Grain size, sorting, roundness, and texture can be observed at the handlens scale, and may reveal clues to transport regime (e.g. fluvial, glacial, eolian) and transport distance. Diagenetic minerals may be of a form and textural context to allow identification, and to point to dominant diagenetic processes (e.g. evaporitic concentration, intermittent dissolution, early vs. late diagenetic emplacement). Handlens scale features of volcaniclastic particles may be diagnostic of primary vs recycled (by surface processes) grains and may provide information about eruptive patterns and processes. When the study site is truly remote, such as Mars, and when there are severe limitations on sample return or sample analysis with other methods, examination at the hand lens scale becomes critical both for extracting a maximum of information, and for best utilizing finite analytical capabilities.

  7. Mineral Losses During Extreme Environmental Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advisory groups that make recommendations for mineral intakes continue to identify accurate determinations of sweat mineral losses during physical activity as a critical void in their deliberations. Although estimates of sweat mineral concentrations are available, they are highly variable. Practica...

  8. 76 FR 44892 - Information Collection; Locatable Minerals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...USDA, Forest Service, Minerals and Geology Management Staff, Mail Stop 1126, 1601...at USDA Forest Service, Minerals and Geology Management Staff, 1601 N. Kent St...Tony Ferguson, Director, Minerals and Geology Management, at 703-605-4785....

  9. Mindat.org: The Mineral Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This database contains worldwide information on minerals, mineral localities and other mineralogical information. In part supported by advertising, it stores data on 25,000 different minerals, varieties and synonyms listed with over 4,000 valid mineral and mineraloid names. The database is searchable by name, properties, chemistry and locality. Many photographs and some maps are provided. Information is available on over 300,000 mineral occurrences worldwide with over 68,000 localities. Users can also submit their own data for new minerals or occurrences of minerals. Links are also provided to a chatroom, messageboard, and a clearinghouse that contains links to other sites dealing with mineral collection and study.

  10. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients was to attribute, on the one hand to the physico-chemical properties of the water and on the other hand to the climatic, nutritional and social factors characterising the selected health resort. All over Europe, pharmacists were dealing with mineral waters, among them even very famous names such as Klaproth, Trommsdorf, Lampadius and Fresenius. They were on one side involved in the development and analysis of the waters, while on the other side they were interested in their artificial production. Their knowledge and findings in the area of the mineral water source chemistry gave a crucial impetus to the future evolution of analytic chemistry. Following the improvements in the precision of analysis and classification of the composition of the mineral waters, the imitation of artificial mineral waters increased significantly. Certain pharmacists tried to copy well-known mineral waters in their properly furnished laboratories. At the same time, pharmacies were important sales points: natural and artificial mineral waters as well as their dried components were either sold there, or delivered upon prescription. In the second part of this work, specifically concerning the situation in the Canton Tessin, the most important local sources and spa resorts are described, as well as the analyses performed and the researchers involved. Moreover, the types of therapies used at that time are mentioned. The integration of the local mineral waters into the pharmacopoeia of the Canton Tessin, the Farmacopea Ticinese, is also discussed. Of particular interest are the delivery and the sale of mineral waters and their dried components by a local pharmacy. In the Canton Tessin, the five most frequented spa resorts were Acquarossa, Brissago, Craveggia, Rovio and Stabio. Craveggia spa resort is of course based in Italy; it has however been included in the present work due to its proximity to Switzerland and to a connected historical Substantial differences existed among the individual health resorts mentioned, especially regarding the quality and quantity aspects of the per

  11. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type (galena, sphalerite, wurtzite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, covellite and molybdenite types). Some examples of more complex phases, where fracture surfaces of unspecified orientation have been studied, are then discussed (millerite, marcasite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and enargite) before a brief summary of possible future developments in the field. In this chapter, the focus is on the nature of the pristine surface, i.e., the arrangement of atoms at the surface, and the electronic structure of the surface. This is an essential precursor to any fundamental understanding of processes such as dissolution, precipitation, sorption/desorption, or catalytic activity involving the sulfide surface at an interface with a fluid phase.

  12. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  13. Mineral-fluid interaction in the Reykjanes and Svartsengi geothermal systems, Iceland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. W. Lonker; H. Franzson; H. Kristmannsdottir

    2009-01-01

    Physical observations on features such as temperature, pressure, and formation permeability are integrated with alteration intensity, fluid and secondary mineral compositions, and textures to show the most important thermal, chemical, hydrodynamic, and kinetics factors that control the evolution of two Icelandic geothermal systems, the Reykjanes and Svartsengi systems. There is an increase in alteration intensity and the abundance of fracture

  14. Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 21412157 Mixing of mineral with pollution aerosols in dust season in

    E-print Network

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric Environment 42 (2008) 2141­2157 Mixing of mineral with pollution aerosols in dust aerosol with pollution aerosol and their apportionments in different dust episodes were elucidated. Ca-S or from pollutants introduced on the pathway) but little nitrate. The secondary sulfate

  15. Secondary Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Malha, Line; August, Phyllis

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension is a common medical complication of pregnancy. Although 75-80 % of women with preexisting essential hypertension will have uncomplicated pregnancies, the presence of secondary forms of hypertension adds considerably to both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Renovascular hypertension, pheochromocytoma, and Cushing's syndrome in particular are associated with accelerating hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and fetal loss. Primary aldosteronism is a more heterogeneous disorder; there are well-documented cases where blood pressure and hypokalemia are improved during pregnancy due to elevated levels of progesterone. However, superimposed preeclampsia, worsening hypertension, and early delivery are also reported. When possible, secondary forms of hypertension should be diagnosed and treated prior to conception in order to avoid these complications. PMID:26068655

  16. Miner's rule revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, W.; Heuler, P.

    1994-03-01

    In the first sections, the requirements to be met by hypotheses for fatigue life prediction (including those for the crack initiation and crack propagation phases) are discussed in detail. These requirements are shown to be different for 'scientific' and for 'industrial' fatigue life prediction. Aspects with regard to an assessment of fatigue life prediction hypotheses are discussed. The last section presents the results of a large cooperative program between IABG and several automobile manufacturers, in which Miner's Rule in several versions was assessed against spectrum tests with five different actual automobile components: forged steel stub axle; forged steel stub axle, induction hardened; sheet steel welded rear axle (front wheel drive car); cast aluminum wheel; and welded sheet steel wheel. Since up to 80 components each were available, and two different, but typical, automotive stress-time histories were employed, the assessment was very thorough, avoiding many of the drawbacks of previous assessments. It is shown that damage sums to failure were usually far below 1.0; they also depended on the component in question, the aluminum wheel resulting in the lowest damage sums to failure; the damage sums to failure where always lower for a mild spectrum than for a severe one; and the influence of spectrum variation was predicted best - among the hypotheses tested - by use of a recent proposal of Zenner and Liu.

  17. Moon's Pink Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.; Taylor, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 2010 remote-sensing discovery of lunar regolith rich in Mg-Al spinel on the rims and central peaks of impact craters and inner rings of basins on the Moon, researchers have been designing experiments to better understand the origin and formation history of spinel-rich rocks and what they mean for the construction of the lunar crust. The newly detected rock type is referred to as pink spinel anorthosite, or PSA, due to high plagioclase and low abundance (<5%) of mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. Two recent studies tested specific hypotheses of PSA production on the Moon. Juliane Gross (American Museum of Natural History and the Lunar and Planetary Institute, LPI) and colleagues at the LPI, University of Hawaii, and NASA Johnson Space Center conducted experiments to model the crystallization of spinel in impact melts from impact events. Tabb Prissel (Brown University) and colleagues from Brown conducted experiments to model a plutonic formation of spinel from magma-wallrock interactions. In each study, comparisons of the remote sensing data with Apollo lunar samples or lunar meteorites were crucial for testing the PSA formation hypotheses with the experimental results. Definitive answers aren't in yet. PSA could form from impact melting of the right target rocks. Equally likely is PSA formation by reaction of basaltic magma and crust. One big unknown is the effect space weathering has in determining the amount of spinel in the PSA..

  18. Secondary Forms of Hypertension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kjell Tullus

    \\u000a In most studies, hypertension in children has been secondary to an identifiable cause in a large majority of those studied\\u000a (1,2). This has changed during the relatively recent epidemic of childhood obesity, where primary hypertension in many centers\\u000a now is the most common cause form of hypertension (3). In adults primary hypertension is the dominating diagnosis. This chapter will discuss

  19. Designing Clothing for Coal Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Susan M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes procedures taken by apparel design students, working in an industrial setting, in designing functional clothing for coal miners as part of the Armco Steel Corporation's Student Design Program. (TA)

  20. Trace mineral feeding and assessment.

    PubMed

    Swecker, William S

    2014-11-01

    This article gives practitioners an overview of trace mineral requirements, supplementation, and assessment in dairy herds. In addition, a step-by-step guideline for liver biopsy in cows is provided with interpretive results from a sample herd. PMID:25214468

  1. Secondary sources of seismic noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Geyer

    1977-01-01

    Examples of terrane response derived from the analysis and interpretation of data obtained by Stanolind Research Party 45 (now Amoco Production Company) in New Mexico, North Dakota, and West Texas, are presented. The secondary sources, the types of waves, the mechanisms of secondary-wave generation, and the relations between secondary waves and reflection quality were identified. Analysis was restricted to waves

  2. Persulfate activation by subsurface minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L.; Watts, Richard J.

    2010-06-01

    Persulfate dynamics in the presence of subsurface minerals was investigated as a basis for understanding persulfate activation for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). The mineral-mediated decomposition of persulfate and generation of oxidants and reductants was investigated with four iron and manganese oxides and two clay minerals at both low pH (< 7) and high pH (> 12). The manganese oxide birnessite was the most effective initiator of persulfate for degrading the oxidant probe nitrobenzene, indicating that oxidants are generated at both low and high pH regimes. The iron oxide goethite was the most effective mineral for degrading the reductant probe hexachloroethane. A natural soil and two soil fractions were used to confirm persulfate activation by synthetic minerals. The soil and soil fractions did not effectively promote the generation of oxidants or reductants. However, soil organic matter was found to promote reductant generation at high pH. The results of this research demonstrate that synthetic iron and manganese oxides can activate persulfate to generate reductants and oxidants; however, iron and manganese oxides in the natural soil studied do not show the same reactivity, most likely due to the lower masses of the metal oxides in the soil relative to the masses studied in isolated mineral systems.

  3. Minerals Arranged by the New Dana Classification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Barthelmy

    This directory provides a listing of mineral species based on Dana's New Mineralogy, in which a number is assigned to each class based on a combination of chemistry and crystal structure. Clicking on each class heading provides access to a list of each mineral that conforms to that class. Each mineral name is a link to additional information on the mineral.

  4. 1996 annual report on Alaska's mineral resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Jill L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the fifteenth annual report that has been prepared in response to the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. Current Alaskan mineral projects and events that occurred during 1995 are summarized. For the purpose of this document, the term 'minerals' encompasses both energy resources (oil and gas, coal and peat, uranium, and geothermal) and nonfuel-mineral resources (metallic and industrial minerals).

  5. Economic Evaluation of Cinacalcet in the Treatment of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mario Eandi; Lorenzo Pradelli; Sergio Iannazzo; Silvia Chiroli; Giuseppe Pontoriero

    2010-01-01

    Background: Imbalanced levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) death and fracture in dialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). The calcimimetic agent cinacalcet can attenuate the mineral and hormonal imbalances characteristic of SHPT and may improve outcomes in such patients. Here we describe a cost-utility analysis of

  6. Recovering byproduct heavy minerals from sand and gravel, placer gold, and industrial mineral operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Gomes; G. M. Martinez; M. M. Wong

    1979-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines, as part of an effort to maximize minerals and metals recovery from domestic resources, has investigated the feasibility of recovering heavy minerals as byproducts from sand and gravel, placer gold, and industrial mineral operations in northern California. Sand samples from about 50 locations were treated by gravity separation to yield heavy-mineral cocentrates (black sands). Mineral compositions

  7. 43 CFR 3809.101 - What special provisions apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? 3809.101 Section 3809...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? (a) Mineral examination...

  8. 43 CFR 3809.101 - What special provisions apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? 3809.101 Section 3809...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? (a) Mineral examination...

  9. 43 CFR 3809.101 - What special provisions apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? 3809.101 Section 3809...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? (a) Mineral examination...

  10. 43 CFR 3809.101 - What special provisions apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? 3809.101 Section 3809...apply to minerals that may be common variety minerals, such as sand, gravel, and building stone? (a) Mineral examination...

  11. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  12. Calcioolivine, ?-Ca2SiO4, an old and New Mineral species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadov, A. E.; Gazeev, V. M.; Pertsev, N. N.; Gurbanov, A. G.; Gobechiya, E. R.; Yamnova, N. A.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2009-12-01

    Calcioolivine has been included into the MDI mineral database in the list of grandfathered minerals. Its history, together with related artificial compounds, is extremely complex: various minerals and compounds received this name, including natural orthorhombic Ca orthosilicate. In this paper, the crystal structure and properties of natural calcioolivine are described for the first time. The new mineral has been found at Mt. Lakargi, Upper Chegem Plateau, the northern Caucasus, Kabarda-Balkaria Republic, Russia. It has been identified in skarnified, primary carbonate xenoliths entrained by middle to late Pliocene silicic ignimbrites of the Upper Chegem caldera. These xenoliths of a few centimeters to a few meters in size are located close to the volcanic vent. Calcioolivine rims relics of larnite and occurs as relict grains among crystals of spurrite, rondorfite, wadalite or secondary hillebrandite, afwillite, thaumasite, and ettringite. Hillebrandite is the major product of alteration of calcioolivine; larnite is relatively more resistant to low-temperature alteration. Spurrite, larnite, tilleyite, kilchoanite, cuspidine, wadalite, rondorfite, reinhardbraunsite, lakargiite (CaZrO3), members of ellestadite series, afwillite, ettringite, katoite, and thaumasite are associated minerals. It is inferred that calcioolivine has been produced as a result of interaction of host carbonate rocks in xenoliths with volcanic lava and gases during eruption. The name calcioolivine was approved by the Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names, International Mineralogical Association, September 6, 2007 (no. 07-B).

  13. Mineral arsenicals in traditional medicines: Orpiment, realgar, and arsenolite

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuanfu; Wu, Qin; Goyer, Robert A; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Mineral arsenicals have long been used in traditional medicines for various diseases, yet arsenic can be highly toxic and carcinogenic. Arsenic in traditional medicines typically comes from deliberate addition for therapeutic purposes, mainly in the form of mineral arsenicals including orpiment (As2S3), realgar (As4S4), and arsenolite (contains arsenic trioxide, As2O3). Inorganic arsenic is now accepted in Western medicine as a first line chemotherapeutic agent against certain hematopoietic cancers. This minireview analyzes the pharmacology and toxicology of these arsenicals used in traditional medicines. Orpiment and realgar are less soluble and poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, while the bioavailability of arsenic trioxide is similar to inorganic arsenic salts like sodium arsenite. Pharmacological studies show that arsenic trioxide and realgar are effective against certain malignancies. Orpiment and realgar are used externally for various skin diseases. Realgar is frequently included as an ingredient in oral traditional remedies for its antipyretic, antiinflammatory, antiulcer, anticonvulsive and anti-schistosmiasis actions, but the pharmacological basis for this inclusion still remains to be fully justified. Toxicological studies show that cardiovascular toxicity is the major concern for arsenic trioxide, and the gastrointestinal and dermal adverse effects may occur after prolonged use of mineral arsenicals. Little is known about possible secondary cancers resulting from the long-term use of any of these arsenicals. Similar to the safety evaluation of seafood arsenicals, total arsenic content alone appears to be insufficient for mineral arsenical safety evaluation. Arsenic speciation, bioavailability, and toxicity/benefit should be considered in evaluation of mineral arsenical-containing traditional medicines. PMID:18463319

  14. Refractory minerals in interplanetary dust.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, R; Buseck, P R

    1986-10-31

    A newly studied interplanetary dust particle contains a unique set of minerals that closely resembles assemblages in the refractory, calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The set of minerals includes diopside, magnesium- aluminum spinel, anorthite, perovskite, and fassaite. Only fassaite has previously been identified in interplanetary dust particles. Diopside and spinel occur in complex symplectic intergrowths that may have formed by a reaction between condensed melilite and the solar nebula gas. The particle represents a new link between interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites; however, the compositions of its two most abundant refractory phases, diopside and spinel, differ in detail from corresponding minerals in calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions. PMID:17835566

  15. Physical controls on matrix mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jinhui; Nielsen, Mike; de Yoreo, Jim

    2013-03-01

    During biomineral formation, protein matrices impose order on nucleating mineral phases. While many studies have examined the structural relationships between mineral and matrix, few have explored the energetics. To address this gap we use in situ TEM and AFM to investigate calcium phosphate nucleation and growth in collagen and amelogenin matrices. In situ TEM results indicate that, in the absence of calcium, amelogenin nanospheres are loose aggregates of oligomers, while in the presence of calcium phosphate solution, can form chain-like structures and become mineralized with an amorphous phase before the appearance of crystalline phases. Results on collagen reveal the evolution of nucleation pathways from direct to indirect with increasing supersaturation and analysis of nucleation rates using classical theory demonstrates a reduction in interfacial energy due to matrix-mineral interactions. However, the calculated thermodynamic barriers are in contradiction to the observed pathways and well in excess of sensible values. We present a model based on cluster aggregation within the classical context that reconciles experiment and theory. During biomineral formation, protein matrices impose order on nucleating mineral phases. While many studies have examined the structural relationships between mineral and matrix, few have explored the energetics. To address this gap we use in situ TEM and AFM to investigate calcium phosphate nucleation and growth in collagen and amelogenin matrices. In situ TEM results indicate that, in the absence of calcium, amelogenin nanospheres are loose aggregates of oligomers, while in the presence of calcium phosphate solution, can form chain-like structures and become mineralized with an amorphous phase before the appearance of crystalline phases. Results on collagen reveal the evolution of nucleation pathways from direct to indirect with increasing supersaturation and analysis of nucleation rates using classical theory demonstrates a reduction in interfacial energy due to matrix-mineral interactions. However, the calculated thermodynamic barriers are in contradiction to the observed pathways and well in excess of sensible values. We present a model based on cluster aggregation within the classical context that reconciles experiment and theory. Authors would like to acknowledge grant no. DK61673 from the National Institutes of Health. Theoretical analysis was supported by Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  16. Deep Seabed Mineral Resources Act

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    The Deep Seabed Mineral Resources Act, approved by the Senate Energy Committee in 1979, would permit U.S. mining interests to begin commercial recovery of hard minerals from the ocean floor. Under the proposed act, NOAA will regulate mining activities by issuing exploration licenses. The act demonstrates the U.S.'s dual commitment to a new and comprehensive internatonal law of the sea treaty and to a national interim regulatory framework for the fast-paced development of necessary deep-seabed mining. (37 references)

  17. Bone Mineral Density and Logarithms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program,

    Students examine an image produced by a cabinet x-ray system to determine if it is a quality bone mineral density image. They write in their journals about what they need to know to be able to make this judgment. Students learn about what bone mineral density is, how a BMD image can be obtained, and how it is related to the x-ray field. Students examine the process used to obtain a BMD image and how this process is related to mathematics, primarily through logarithmic functions. They study the relationship between logarithms and exponents, the properties of logarithms, common and natural logarithms, solving exponential equations and Beer's law.

  18. Mineralogy and temporal relations of coexisting authigenic minerals in altered silicic tuffs and their utility as potential low-temperature dateable minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WoldeGabriel, Giday; Broxton, David E.; Byers, Frank M.

    1996-05-01

    Coexisting fine-grained (0.1-20 ?m) authigenic silicate minerals separated from altered tuffs in Miocene and Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine deposits were characterized petrographically and using X-ray powder diffraction. The authigenic minerals are dominated by clinoptilolite, erionite, phillipsite, K-feldspar, silica, calcite, smectite, and randomly interstratified illite/smectite. Minor accessories of opal-CT, cristobalite, and barite are present with the major alteration minerals. Authigenic minerals from altered tuffs were dated using the {K}/{Ar} method to evaluate the utility of these minerals for determining the time of alteration in low-temperature diagenetic environments. The eruption ages of some of these zeolite-rich tuffs were determined using the {40Ar }/{39Ar } method on single sanidine and plagioclase minerals. The {K}/{Ar} isotopic ages of the fine-grained K-feldspar show minimal variation compared with results from the clinoptilolite separates. The isotopic ages from the authigenic K-feldspar (15-13.8 Ma) and some of the zeolites (16.-6.7 Ma) are similar to the eruption ages of the tuffs and indicate early alteration. Despite their open-framework structure, zeolites apparently can retain part or all of their radiogenic argon under favorable conditions (e.g., saturated environment). How much of the radiogenic argon is retained is estimated from the isotopic ages of other coexisting secondary minerals that are commonly dated by the {K}/{Ar} method. Although zeolite isotopic ages should be interpreted with caution, they may be useful to constrain temporal relations of low-temperature diagenetic processes when used in conjunction with other dateable minerals.

  19. Rocks and Minerals: Unit Outlines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    This article assembles free resources from the Rocks and Minerals issue of the Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears cyberzine into a unit outline based on the 5E learning cycle framework. Outlines are provided for Grades K-2 and 3-5.

  20. PROTEIN TURNOVER AND MINERAL METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Military personnel are regularly exposed to multiple stressors during training and combat. One consequence is self-imposed food restriction which can lead to significant loss of body weight and muscle mass. An unintended result is the loss of minerals associated with inadequate food intake and inc...

  1. Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation due to Carbon Dioxide-Water-Rock Interactions: The Significance of Accessory Minerals in Carbonate Reservoirs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Marcon, V.; Chopping, C.

    2013-12-01

    Accessory minerals in carbonate reservoirs, and in the caprocks that seal these reservoirs, can provide insight into multiphase fluid (CO2 + H2O)-rock interactions and the behavior of CO2 that resides in these water-rock systems. Our program integrates field data, hydrothermal experiments, and geochemical modeling to evaluate CO2-water-rock reactions and processes in a variety of carbonate reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region of the US. These studies provide insights into a wide range of geologic environments, including natural CO2 reservoirs, geologic carbon sequestration, engineered geothermal systems, enhanced oil and gas recovery, and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. One suite of experiments evaluates the Madison Limestone on the Moxa Arch, Southwest Wyoming, a sulfur-rich natural CO2 reservoir. Mineral textures and geochemical features developed in the experiments suggest that carbonate minerals which constitute the natural reservoir will initially dissolve in response to emplacement of CO2. Euhedral, bladed anhydrite concomitantly precipitates in response to injected CO2. Analogous anhydrite is observed in drill core, suggesting that secondary anhydrite in the natural reservoir may be related to emplacement of CO2 into the Madison Limestone. Carbonate minerals ultimately re-precipitate, and anhydrite dissolves, as the rock buffers the acidity and reasserts geochemical control. Another suite of experiments emulates injection of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery in the Desert Creek Limestone (Paradox Formation), Paradox Basin, Southeast Utah. Euhedral iron oxyhydroxides (hematite) precipitate at pH 4.5 to 5 and low Eh (approximately -0.1 V) as a consequence of water-rock reaction. Injection of CO2 decreases pH to approximately 3.5 and increases Eh by approximately 0.1 V, yielding secondary mineralization of euhedral pyrite instead of iron oxyhydroxides. Carbonate minerals also dissolve and ultimately re-precipitate, as determined by experiments in the Madison Limestone, but pyrite will persist and iron oxyhydroxides will not recrystallize.

  2. Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Himanshu

    Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta Storage­1 #12;Outline · Memory Hierarchy · Disk Records/Fields · Deletions and Insertions of Records Himanshu Gupta Storage­2 #12;Himanshu Gupta Storage­3 Memory Hierarchy Cache (1 MB; 1-5 nsec) Main Memory (GBs; 10-100 nsec) Secondary Storage

  3. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Bell; J. C. Blomgren; J. M. Fackelmann

    1982-01-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced tubing degradation by a variety of corrosion-related mechanisms which depend directly on secondary water chemistry. As a result of this experience, the Steam Generator Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major program to provide solutions to PWR steam generator problems. This report, PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines,

  4. Performance Art at Secondary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Sheridan

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the far-reaching potential and the particular characteristics of performance art within the secondary art curriculum. It discusses the means by which an art department has incorporated it into their teaching curriculum at a state secondary school with reference to installations and the work of different performance artists…

  5. Sun, shade, and secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    My research program focuses on understanding plant primary and secondary metabolites. Grape secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, have long been valuable for the organoleptic properties they impart to fruit and wine, and, more recently, for their possible health benefits. These compounds develop...

  6. Reading in the Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching English, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The topic of discussion of this issue of the journal "Teaching English" is reading instruction in the secondary school. Articles include "Reading in the Primary School" (Alastair Hendry), "Patterns of Progress" (Fergus McBride), "Teaching Reading--Whose Business?" (James Maxwell), "A Reading Policy for the Secondary School" (Iain McGillivray),…

  7. Language Study in Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stork, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Calls for the study of language in secondary schools, discusses components of language study, notes the failure of the Bullock Report to point out the importance of language study, and discusses four characteristics of language that could serve as starting points for the study of language in secondary schools. (GT)

  8. Micro-Raman spectroscopic identification of natural mineral phases and their weathering products inside an abandoned zinc/lead mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goienaga, N.; Arrieta, N.; Carrero, J. A.; Olivares, M.; Sarmiento, A.; Martinez-Arkarazo, I.; Fernández, L. A.; Madariaga, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    Mining activities provide a good source of minerals of different nature. On the one hand, the primary minerals for whose formation a geological time-scale is required. On the other hand, secondary minerals, formed from removed products after the earlier weathering and alteration states. These are characteristic of the local geology and the environment context that commonly appears due to the low chemical stability of their original primary minerals. This work shows how quickly the reactions promoting secondary minerals may have taken place, due to the fact that these were found in newly formed solid materials called efflorescences. To achieve this purpose, the sampling is crucial. It was carried out in such a way that tried to guarantee that the samples collected consisted in the very top soil matter (first 2 cm depth). Thus, unlike the deeper soil, the material analysed may have been newly formed due to the interactions that they had with the place weathering agents (i.e. air oxygen, humidity, and microbial activities). Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a good and fast non-destructive technique that provides molecular information of the local mineralogy without the need of any pre-treatment of the samples. At the same time, the work looked for information on the variety of non-stable lead and-or zinc containing minerals due to the possible health and environmental risks they convey. Among the different minerals identified, 16 were of primary nature while 23 may be classified as secondary minerals, probably formed in the last decades as the result of the extractive activities.

  9. Micro-Raman spectroscopic identification of natural mineral phases and their weathering products inside an abandoned zinc/lead mine.

    PubMed

    Goienaga, N; Arrieta, N; Carrero, J A; Olivares, M; Sarmiento, A; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Fernández, L A; Madariaga, J M

    2011-10-01

    Mining activities provide a good source of minerals of different nature. On the one hand, the primary minerals for whose formation a geological time-scale is required. On the other hand, secondary minerals, formed from removed products after the earlier weathering and alteration states. These are characteristic of the local geology and the environment context that commonly appears due to the low chemical stability of their original primary minerals. This work shows how quickly the reactions promoting secondary minerals may have taken place, due to the fact that these were found in newly formed solid materials called efflorescences. To achieve this purpose, the sampling is crucial. It was carried out in such a way that tried to guarantee that the samples collected consisted in the very top soil matter (first 2 cm depth). Thus, unlike the deeper soil, the material analysed may have been newly formed due to the interactions that they had with the place weathering agents (i.e. air oxygen, humidity, and microbial activities). Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a good and fast non-destructive technique that provides molecular information of the local mineralogy without the need of any pre-treatment of the samples. At the same time, the work looked for information on the variety of non-stable lead and-or zinc containing minerals due to the possible health and environmental risks they convey. Among the different minerals identified, 16 were of primary nature while 23 may be classified as secondary minerals, probably formed in the last decades as the result of the extractive activities. PMID:21317026

  10. Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets

    MedlinePLUS

    ... DRI Tool Daily Value (DV) Tables Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets A - E | F - L | M - S | ... Information Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information Vitamin and Mineral Fact Sheets Botanical Supplement Fact Sheets Frequently Asked ...

  11. Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas

    E-print Network

    Herd, Dennis B.

    1997-06-04

    Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas Dennis B. Herd* The proper balance of protein, energy, vitamins and all nutri- tionally important minerals is needed to make a successful nutrition program, one that?s productive yet economical. Nutrient...

  12. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

    E-print Network

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Summer Training Report 2010 Abdul-Aziz Al ...........................................................................................13 #12;2 1. Introduction King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) give an opportunity

  13. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...mineral supplements. (2) To serve as a lubricant in the preparation of pellets, cubes, or blocks and to improve resistance to moisture of such pellets, cubes, or blocks. (3) To prevent the segregation of trace minerals in...

  14. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...mineral supplements. (2) To serve as a lubricant in the preparation of pellets, cubes, or blocks and to improve resistance to moisture of such pellets, cubes, or blocks. (3) To prevent the segregation of trace minerals in...

  15. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...mineral supplements. (2) To serve as a lubricant in the preparation of pellets, cubes, or blocks and to improve resistance to moisture of such pellets, cubes, or blocks. (3) To prevent the segregation of trace minerals in...

  16. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...mineral supplements. (2) To serve as a lubricant in the preparation of pellets, cubes, or blocks and to improve resistance to moisture of such pellets, cubes, or blocks. (3) To prevent the segregation of trace minerals in...

  17. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...mineral supplements. (2) To serve as a lubricant in the preparation of pellets, cubes, or blocks and to improve resistance to moisture of such pellets, cubes, or blocks. (3) To prevent the segregation of trace minerals in...

  18. Primary and secondary hypertriglyceridaemia.

    PubMed

    Kolovou, Genovefa D; Anagnostopoulou, Katherine K; Kostakou, Peggy M; Bilianou, Helen; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2009-04-01

    Familial hypertriglyceridaemia is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. The responsible genetic abnormality is unknown but recently, a novel gene encoding apolipoprotein AV has been linked to familial hypertriglyceridaemia. All patients develop the same phenotype with elevated levels of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in plasma. The main disorder of this dyslipidaemia is decreased intestinal absorption of biliary acids, leading to a compensatory increase of VLDL production. In familial hypertriglyceridaemia, a marked increase in plasma triglyceride (TG) levels can cause acute pancreatitis. Moreover, patients with other genetic factors, like familial chylomicronaemia, familial combined hyperlipidaemia, familial dysbetalipoproteinaemia and other rare disorders (e.g. Tangier disease and fish eye disease) may present increase of TG levels or cholesterol levels or both. Secondary hypertriglyceridaemias include hypothyroidism, kidney abnormalities (e.g. nephrotic syndrome or chronic kidney failure), diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol consumption and obesity. In men and postmenopausal women, it seems that estrogen deficiency is responsible for higher TG levels compared with premenopausal women postprandially. In every state -fasting or postprandial-, women demonstrate lower plasma TG levels compared with men. This fact is due not only to increased muscular TG uptake and storage but also to higher TG clearance. Many studies demonstrated an age impact on plasma TG increase and larger variation of fasting TG levels caused by age. Also, hypertriglyceridaemia (TG >150 mg/dl; 1.7 mmol/l) is one of the diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome. Finally, several drugs may increase TG levels (e.g. chlorthalidone or beta-blockers). PMID:19355858

  19. Control Dewar Secondary Vacuum Container

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-10-04

    This engineering note provides background information regarding the control dewar secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container has it's origin with the CDP control dewar design. The name secondary vacuum container replaced the CDP term 'Watt can' which was named after Bob Watt (SLAC), a PAC/DOE review committee member who participated in a review of CDP and recommended a secondary vacuum enclosure. One of the most fragile parts of the control dewar design is the ceramic electrical feed throughs located in the secondary vacuum container. The secondary vacuum container is provided to guard against potential leaks in these ceramic insulating feed throughs. The secondary vacuum container has a pumping line separate from the main solenoid/control dewar insulating vacuum. This pumping line is connected to the inlet of the turbo pump for initial pumpdown. Under normal operation the container is isolated. Should a feedthrough develop a small leak, alternate pumping arrangements for the secondary vacuum container could be arranged. The pressure in the secondary vacuum container should be kept in a range that the breakdown voltage is kept at a maximum. The breakdown voltage is known to be a function of pressure and is described by a Paschen curve. I cannot find a copy of the curve at this time, but from what I remember, the breakdown voltage is a minimum somewhere around 10-3 torr. Ideally the pressure in the secondary vacuum can should be kept very low, around 10 E-6 or 10 E-7 torr for maximum breakdown voltage. If however a leak developed and this was not possible, then one could operate at a pressure higher than the minima point.

  20. Adhesion of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans to mineral surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Preston Devasia; K. A. Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    Direct contact mechanism in bioleaching implies prior mineral adhesion of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and subsequent enzymatic attack. Prior bacterial adaptation to sulfide mineral substrates influences bacterial ferrous ion oxidation rates. It is highly beneficial to understand major biooxidation mechanisms with reference to solution- and mineral-grown cells in order to optimize bioleaching reactions.For A. ferrooxidans grown in the presence of solid substrates

  1. Minerals yearbook vol. III : area reports international

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    0000-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook provides an annual review of mineral production and trade and of mineral-related government and industry developments in more than 175 foreign countries. Each report includes sections on government policies and programs, environmental issues, trade and production data, industry structure and ownership, commodity sector developments, infrastructure, and a summary outlook.

  2. Mineral matter identification of some Turkish lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Yaman, S.; Taptik, Y.; Kuecuekbayrak, S.; Kadioglu, E. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1995-01-01

    Samples of 15 Turkish lignites were oxidized by performic acid. Their mineral matter was isolated without any important chemical decomposition. The X-ray diffraction method was employed to determine the mineral species in the isolated mineral matter and in the ashes of the lignite samples. The results were compared and discussed.

  3. Looking for traces of life in minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karim Benzerara; Nicolas Menguy

    2009-01-01

    Traces of life have been extensively looked for in minerals. It is indeed thought that a wide diversity of living organisms can control the formation of mineral phases and thus may leave imprints of their activity in the morphology, chemistry and crystallographic structure of the mineral end-product. Here, we illustrate the bases and limits of this approach by reviewing some

  4. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R 621 622 623 623 579 #12;580 Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals 2.20.5.3 2.20.5.4 2, and are present in all types of rocks, sediments, and soils. These minerals retain a memory of the geomagnetic

  5. Defining reactive sites on hydrated mineral surfaces: Rhombohedral carbonate minerals

    E-print Network

    Long, Bernard

    by these surfaces across the pH scale but at circum-neutral pH (5.8­8.2) and relatively high RCO2 (P1 mM), proton range of pH values of isoelectric points (pHiep) reported in the literature for these minerals. � 2009 parameters. In this paper, we address the definition of primary surface sites (i.e., adsorption units

  6. Brazil: Secondary Education Profile. A Summary of "Secondary Education: Time to Move Forward." Secondary Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larach, Linda

    This paper provides a brief profile of the state of secondary education in Brazil. An overview of the organizational structure, objectives, curricular offerings, system size, and governance structure of secondary education is provided. Issues relating to the quality, equity, management, and financing of the system are discussed, and promising…

  7. The Lifecycle of a Mineral Deposit: A Teache's Guide for Hands-On Mineral Education Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This teacher's guide provides an introduction to the process of finding or exploring for a mineral deposit, extracting or mining the resource, recovering it, and reclaiming the mined area (sometimes called 'beneficiation' or 'life cycle'). Topics include what a mineral deposit is; how they are identified and measured, how the minerals are extracted; and how the mining site is reclaimed. There is also discussion of how minerals and mineral resources are processed and how they are used in everyday life. The guide includes ten activities that educate students on basic geologic concepts; the processes of finding, identifying, and extracting the resources from a mineral deposit; and the uses of minerals.

  8. Synchrotron based mass spectrometry to investigate the molecular properties of mineral-organic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Suet Yi; Kleber, Markus; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Nico, Peter; Keiluweit, Marco; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) is important because its decay drives life processes in the biosphere. Analysis of organic compounds in geological systems is difficult because of their intimate association with mineral surfaces. To date there is no procedure capable of quantitatively separating organic from mineral phases without creating artifacts or mass loss. Therefore, analytical techniques that can (a) generate information about both organic and mineral phases simultaneously and (b) allow the examination of predetermined high-interest regions of the sample as opposed to conventional bulk analytical techniques are valuable. Laser Desorption Synchrotron Postionization (synchrotron-LDPI) mass spectrometry is introduced as a novel analytical tool to characterize the molecular properties of organic compounds in mineral-organic samples from terrestrial systems, and it is demonstrated that when combined with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), can provide complementary information on mineral composition. Mass spectrometry along a decomposition gradient in density fractions, verifies the consistency of our results with bulk analytical techniques. We further demonstrate that by changing laser and photoionization energies, variations in molecular stability of organic compounds associated with mineral surfaces can be determined. The combination of synchrotron-LDPI and SIMS shows that the energetic conditions involved in desorption and ionization of organic matter may be a greater determinant of mass spectral signatures than the inherent molecular structure of the organic compounds investigated. The latter has implications for molecular models of natural organic matter that are based on mass spectrometric information.

  9. Corrosion of heavy minerals during weathering and diagenesis: A catalog for optical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andò, Sergio; Garzanti, Eduardo; Padoan, Marta; Limonta, Mara

    2012-12-01

    A practical classification of surface textures observed on detrital grains in sands and sandstones is proposed, in order to enhance data reproducibility among operators and to implement the use of high-resolution heavy-mineral data in studies of sediment-generation, provenance, and diagenesis. Five stages of progressive weathering (unweathered, corroded, etched, deeply etched, skeletal) are recognized for diverse detrital minerals. Archetypal grains displaying increasing degrees of corrosion are illustrated in numerous color tables for visual comparison. This catalog, specifically devised to systematically collect valuable information for paleoclimatic or diagenetic interpretation during routine grain-counting under the microscope, is here shown to represent a useful subsidiary tool to reveal the different degrees of weathering for diverse minerals in modern sands of equatorial Africa, and to identify post-depositional modifications of detrital assemblages in buried orogenic sediments of the Bengal Basin. The data thus obtained need to be interpreted by carefully considering the concentration of heavy minerals in each sample, which provides the fundamental clue to quantify the degree of heavy-mineral depletion caused by either pre-depositional or post-depositional processes. The scrutiny of dissolution effects has applications in the study of the chemical properties of minerals and of diagenetic evolution, helping us to understand the development of secondary porosity and to assess the potential of water and hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  10. Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.

    2009-01-29

    Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making plans to dispose of 54 million gallons of radioactive tank wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The high-level wastes and low-activity wastes will be vitrified and placed in permanent disposal sites. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents, and these need to be processed and disposed of also. The Department of Energy Office of Waste Processing sponsored a meeting to develop a roadmap to outline the steps necessary to design the secondary waste forms. Representatives from DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Oregon Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, technical experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, and private consultants convened in Richland, Washington, during the week of July 21-23, 2008, to participate in a workshop to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with the treatment and disposal of the secondary wastes and to develop a roadmap for addressing those risks and uncertainties. This report describes the results of the roadmap meeting in Richland. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. The secondary waste roadmap workshop focused on the waste streams that contained the largest fractions of the 129I and 99Tc that the Integrated Disposal Facility risk assessment analyses were showing to have the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater. Thus, the roadmapping effort was to focus on the scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids with 99Tc to be sent to the Effluent Treatment Facility for treatment and solidification and the silver mordenite and carbon beds with the captured 129I to be packaged and sent to the IDF. At the highest level, the secondary waste roadmap includes elements addressing regulatory and performance requirements, waste composition, preliminary waste form screening, waste form development, process design and support, and validation. The regulatory and performance requirements activity will provide the secondary waste-form performance requirements. The waste-composition activity will provide workable ranges of secondary waste compositions and formulations for simulants and surrogates. Preliminary waste form screening will identify candidate waste forms for immobilizing the secondary wastes. The waste form development activity will mature the waste forms, leading to a selected waste form(s) with a defensible understanding of the long-term release rate and input into the critical decision process for a secondary waste treatment process/facility. The process and design support activity will provide a reliable process flowsheet and input to support a robust facility design. The validation effort will confirm that the selected waste form meets regulatory requirements. The final outcome of the implementation of the secondary waste roadmap is the compliant, effective, timely, and cost-effective disposal of the secondary wastes. The work necessary to address the programmatic, regulatory, and technical risks and uncertainties identified through the Secondary Waste Roadmap Workshop are assembled into several program needs elements. Programmatic/Regulatory needs include: • Select and deploy Hanford tank waste supplemental treatment technology • Provide treatment capability for secondary waste streams from tank waste treatment • Develop consensus on secondary waste form acceptance. Technology needs include: • Define secondary waste composition ranges and uncertainties • Identify and develop waste forms for secondary waste immobilization and disposal • Develop test methods to characterize secondary waste form performance. Details for each of these program elements are provided.

  11. Forest type affects the coupled relationships of soil C and N mineralization in the temperate forests of northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Quan; Wang, Changhui; He, Nianpeng; Zhang, Zhen; Wen, Xuefa; Su, Hongxin; Wang, Qing; Xue, Jingyue

    2014-10-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is sensitive to vegetation and climate change. Here, we investigated the influence of changes in forest types on the mineralization of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), and their temperature sensitivity (Q10) and coupling relationships by using a laboratory soil incubation experiments. We sampled soils from four forest types, namely, a primary Quercus liaotungensis forest (QL), Larix principis-rupprechtii plantation (LP), Pinus tabulaeformis plantation (PT), and secondary shrub forest (SS) in temperate northern China. The results showed that soil C and N mineralization differed significantly among forest types. Soil C and N mineralization were closely coupled in all plots, and C:N ratios of mineralized SOM ranged from 2.54 to 4.12. Forest type significantly influenced the Q10 values of soil C and N mineralization. The activation energy (Ea) of soil C and N mineralization was negatively related to the SOM quality index in all forest types. The reverse relationships suggested that the carbon quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis was simultaneously applicable to soil C and N mineralization. Our findings show that the coupled relationships of soil C and N mineralization can be affected by vegetation change.

  12. Forest type affects the coupled relationships of soil C and N mineralization in the temperate forests of northern China

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Quan; Wang, Changhui; He, Nianpeng; Zhang, Zhen; Wen, Xuefa; Su, Hongxin; Wang, Qing; Xue, Jingyue

    2014-01-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is sensitive to vegetation and climate change. Here, we investigated the influence of changes in forest types on the mineralization of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), and their temperature sensitivity (Q10) and coupling relationships by using a laboratory soil incubation experiments. We sampled soils from four forest types, namely, a primary Quercus liaotungensis forest (QL), Larix principis-rupprechtii plantation (LP), Pinus tabulaeformis plantation (PT), and secondary shrub forest (SS) in temperate northern China. The results showed that soil C and N mineralization differed significantly among forest types. Soil C and N mineralization were closely coupled in all plots, and C:N ratios of mineralized SOM ranged from 2.54 to 4.12. Forest type significantly influenced the Q10 values of soil C and N mineralization. The activation energy (Ea) of soil C and N mineralization was negatively related to the SOM quality index in all forest types. The reverse relationships suggested that the carbon quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis was simultaneously applicable to soil C and N mineralization. Our findings show that the coupled relationships of soil C and N mineralization can be affected by vegetation change. PMID:25322802

  13. Transition to Secondary - an Experiment in a Scottish Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutch, R. D.; McCall, J.

    1974-01-01

    The attainments, attitudes, personality characteristics and friendship relations of three successive year groups of children (n254, 252 and 234) were assessed towards the end of their first term in secondary school. (Editor/RK)

  14. Microtextured Surfaces for Turbine Blade Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can exceed the blade and disk material limits by 600 F or more, necessitating both internal and film cooling schemes in addition to the use of thermal barrier coatings. Internal convective cooling is inadequate in many blade locations, and both internal and film cooling approaches can lead to significant performance penalties in the engine. Micro Cooling Concepts, Inc., has developed a turbine blade cooling concept that provides enhanced internal impingement cooling effectiveness via the use of microstructured impingement surfaces. These surfaces significantly increase the cooling capability of the impinging flow, as compared to a conventional untextured surface. This approach can be combined with microchannel cooling and external film cooling to tailor the cooling capability per the external heating profile. The cooling system then can be optimized to minimize impact on engine performance.

  15. Polygonal hydraulic jump on microtextured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Courbin, Laurent; Crest, Jerome; Stone, Howard A.

    2008-03-01

    Fluid motion can be drastically influenced by the nature of boundaries. For instance, we have shown recently ootnotetextL. Courbin, E. Denieul, E. Dressaire, M. Roper, A. Ajdari and H.A. Stone, Nature Mater. 6, 661 (2007) that a substrate with a regular array of micron-size posts can cause partially wetting fluids to take on polygonal shapes. Here, we report on the hydraulic jump that occurs when a water jet impinges a topographically patterned surface, i.e. an array of micron-size posts arranged on square or hexagonal lattice. By varying the topographic features (shape and height of the posts, lattice distance) and the jet properties (size of the nozzle, flow rate), we obtain a variety of stable shapes including hexagons, eight corner stars and circles. We rationalize our results by taking into account a fluid velocity that depends on the orientation of the lattice.

  16. Mines and Mineral Occurrences of Afghanistan

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    The USGS has recently released the report Mines and Mineral Occurrences of Afghanistan in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. The 95-page open file report is an inventory of more than 1000 mines and mineral occurrences in the country that resources that include metals, industrial minerals, coal, and peat. The data was compiled from published literature and digital files of the members of the National Industrial Minerals project, and are presented in tables that list mineral showings, deposits, and pegmatite fields. This site is also reviewed in the May 3, 2002 Scout Report.

  17. Neuroimaging in Secondary Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Priyanka; Friedman, Deborah I

    2015-07-01

    A secondary headache may develop de novo or in patients with a history of primary headaches, and a thorough history and neurological exam often helps to suspect a secondary etiology. The causes of secondary headaches include tumors, vascular etiologies, structural brain disorders, infection, inflammation, and alterations of cerebrospinal fluid pressure dynamics. Computed tomography (CT) is very sensitive for detecting acute hemorrhage but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferred over a head CT in subacute and non-emergent cases. Obtaining the correct diagnosis may include incorporation of intravenous contrast agents, special imaging sequences, and functional imaging techniques. PMID:26049776

  18. Uncertainty in Mineral Prospectivity Prediction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pawalai Kraipeerapun; Chun Che Fung; Warick Brown; Kok Wai Wong; Tamás D. Gedeon

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the prediction of mineral prospectivity that provides an assessment of uncertainty. Two\\u000a feed-forward backpropagation neural networks are used for the prediction. One network is used to predict degrees of favourability\\u000a for deposit and another one is used to predict degrees of likelihood for barren, which is opposite to deposit. These two types\\u000a of values

  19. Evaporites, petroleum and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This book illustrates the expanding knowledge of evaporites as important reservoir seals, fluid aquitards, ore-hosting sediments, and economically viable sediments in their own right. Researchers, oil and gas professionals, minerals resource professionals, environmental specialists and others within geology and the other earth sciences shall utilize the information within this book in their understanding of the many recent discoveries and concepts involved in the field of evaporite sedimentology.

  20. Study of coal structure using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; Lytle, J.M.; Baer, D.R.; Thomas, M.T.

    1980-12-01

    Secondary-ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is examined as a tool for studying the chemical structure of coal. SIMS has potential for analysis of coal because of the following characteristics: sensitivity to chemical structure; high sensitivity to all masses; application to solids; excellent depth resolution; and reasonable spatial resolution. SIMS spectra of solid coals show differences with respect to coal rank, the spectra of high rank coal being similar to that of graphite, and the spectra of low rank coal being similar to that of wood. Some functional group analysis is also possible using SIMS. Low rank coals show a larger peak at 15 amu indicating more methyl groups than found in the higher rank coals. Fragments with two and three carbon atoms have also been examined; much larger fragments are undoubtedly present but were not evaluated in this study. Examination of these groups, which are expected to contain valuable information on coal structure, is planned for future work. It has been observed that mineral atoms present in the coal have large secondary ion yields which complicate the interpretation of the spectra. Studies on mineral-free coals and model compounds are therefore recommended to facilitate determination of organic coal structure. In addition, mass spectrometry with much greater mass resolution will aid in distinguishing between various ion species.

  1. Modeling changes in mineral assemblages and sorptive capacity within the altered zone: analytical data for flow-through experiment

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, L., LLNL

    1997-10-01

    Mineral changes that may occur within the altered zone (AZ) will develop in response to complex interactions among condensate, pore waters, fracture mineralogy, and the mineralogy of the in situ rocks. At the Yucca Mountain site, the mineralogy of the in situ rock varies from one lithologic unit to another, reflecting different initial bulk rock chemistries and different degrees of devitrification and welding. To account for these variations when describing the possible changes the potential repository block will experience during heating and fluid movement, a credible database of experimental results describing the chemical and mineralogical consequences of rock-water interaction must be available; against this, modeling capabilities are compared. Once the capability is established to accurately simulate the time-dependent evolution of rock-water systems at elevated temperatures, confidence can be placed in models of the mineral changes expected within the AZ. This report describes experiments and modeling that consider the effects of different starting materials on mineral evolution and on the rates of mineral formation. Bounds are placed on the kinetics of the controlling dissolution-rate constants, which are the fundamental parameters that influence secondary mineral development. The sensitivity of the results to different secondary minerals is considered in the simulations. The most significant parameters affecting the results are shown to be the effective surface areas of the phases involved, the rate constants for the phases, and, for the case of vitric material, the model used for glass dissolution.

  2. Fate of Cd during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction by a novel and Cd-tolerant Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Muehe, E Marie; Obst, Martin; Hitchcock, Adam; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Behrens, Sebastian; Schröder, Christian; Byrne, James M; Michel, F Marc; Krämer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-12-17

    Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides affect the mobility of contaminants in the environment by providing reactive surfaces for sorption. This includes the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), which prevails in agricultural soils and is taken up by crops. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria can mobilize such contaminants by Fe(III) mineral dissolution or immobilize them by sorption to or coprecipitation with secondary Fe minerals. To date, not much is known about the fate of Fe(III) mineral-associated Cd during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Here, we describe the isolation of a new Geobacter sp. strain Cd1 from a Cd-contaminated field site, where the strain accounts for 10(4) cells g(-1) dry soil. Strain Cd1 reduces the poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxide ferrihydrite in the presence of at least up to 112 mg Cd L(-1). During initial microbial reduction of Cd-loaded ferrihydrite, sorbed Cd was mobilized. However, during continuous microbial Fe(III) reduction, Cd was immobilized by sorption to and/or coprecipitation within newly formed secondary minerals that contained Ca, Fe, and carbonate, implying the formation of an otavite-siderite-calcite (CdCO3-FeCO3-CaCO3) mixed mineral phase. Our data shows that microbially mediated turnover of Fe minerals affects the mobility of Cd in soils, potentially altering the dynamics of Cd uptake into food or phyto-remediating plants. PMID:24274146

  3. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O'Connor, W

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  4. Decorin modulates matrix mineralization in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Duarte, Wagner R.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Paschalis, Eleftherios P.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    Decorin (DCN), a member of small leucine-rich proteoglycans, is known to modulate collagen fibrillogenesis. In order to investigate the potential roles of DCN in collagen matrix mineralization, several stable osteoblastic cell clones expressing higher (sense-DCN, S-DCN) and lower (antisense-DCN, As-DCN) levels of DCN were generated and the mineralized nodules formed by these clones were characterized. In comparison with control cells, the onset of mineralization by S-DCN clones was significantly delayed; whereas it was markedly accelerated and the number of mineralized nodules was significantly increased in As-DCN clones. The timing of mineralization was inversely correlated with the level of DCN synthesis. In these clones, the patterns of cell proliferation and differentiation appeared unaffected. These results suggest that DCN may act as an inhibitor of collagen matrix mineralization, thus modulating the timing of matrix mineralization.

  5. High Precision Isotope Petrography by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurimoto, H.

    2009-12-01

    Since Shimizu et al. (GCA 1978) have demonstrated that in-situ micro-scale analyses of isotopes and trace elements in minerals were succeeded by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), geochemists develop the SIMS methods towards isotope mapping with spatial resolution of electron microscopy level. At present, high spatial resolution imaging by SIMS has been succeeded by scanning methods using ion-probe and by projection methods using stigmatic secondary ion optics. For high precision isotope analysis with high spatial resolution, intense secondary ions are indispensable for each pixel in the image. However, one of the major instrumental problems is that there were no adequate detectors for this purpose. In order to solve the problem, we proposed a two-dimensional solid-state ion detector called SCAPS (Takayanagi et al., IEEE Trans. 2003). The development is still continued and performances of recent SCAPS detector is achieved to: (1) direct sensitive for ions from single ion, (2) no dead time, and (3) perfect linearity of five orders of magnitude dynamic range. Installing the SCAPS detector into a stigmatic SIMS of Cameca ims-1270, we obtained oxygen isotope (delta-O-17 and delta-O-18) images of about 100 micrometer field with ~500 nm resolution and ~5 permil precision. The performance of high precision isotope imaging have might not be matured, but overcome a hurdle towards isotope petrography (Isotopography). We apply this isotopography to research fields of (a) survey of isotope anomalous micrograins and (b) isotope micro-distribution in rocks and minerals. In the application (a), we found in-situ presolar grains in meteorites (Nagashima et al., Nature 2004) and cosmic symplectite (COS) from a meteorite (Sakamoto et al., Science 2007). In the application (b), we showed how distribute oxygen isotopic compositions in micro-scale within CAI minerals (Yurimoto et al., Rev. Mineral. 2008; Fagan et al., in prep.). In combination fields of (a) and (b), we demonstrated how preserves Martian water and how contaminates terrestrial water in Martian meteorites (Greenwood et al., GRL 2008). These new knowledge from isotopography provides novel perspective of earth and planetary sciences.

  6. Soil mineral surfaces of paddy soils are accessible for organic carbon accumulation after decalcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissing, Livia

    2013-04-01

    We studied organic carbon (OC) accumulation due to organo-mineral associations during soil development on calcareous parent material. Two chronosequences in Zhejiang Province, PR China, were investigated; one under paddy cultivation with a maximum soil age of 2000 years, and the other under upland crops where the oldest soil was 700 years old. Bulk soils and soil fractions of the uppermost A horizons were analyzed for OC concentrations and radio carbon contents. Total pedogenic iron (Fed) concentration was determined by dithionite extraction and the proportion of oxalate extractable iron (Feox) was extracted by using the method of Schwertmann (1964). The specific surface area (SSA) of soil minerals was measured by the BET-N2 method (Brunauer et al., 1938) under four conditions: untreated, after organic matter removal, after iron removal and after removal of both. Within 700/2000 years of pedogenesis, we observed no change in clay mineral composition and no additional formation of the SSA of soil minerals. But the soils differed in the degree of decalcification, OC accumulation and in the formation of iron. Paddy soil management led to an enhanced decalcification and larger OC accumulation. Management-induced redox cycles caused larger proportions of Feox in paddy soils. Their large SSA, added to the surface area of clay minerals, provided additional options for OC covering. Unexpectedly, there was no evidence of formation of secondary minerals during soil development, which could provide new surfaces for OC accumulation. However, the study revealed higher OC coverings of mineral surfaces after decalcification in paddy soils. As carbonate and Ca2+ ions seemed to interconnect clay minerals, making their surface accessible to OC, the faster dissolution of carbonate and leaching of Ca2+ ions in paddy soils made additional clay mineral surfaces available to OC. In contrast, the surface area of minerals in non-paddy soils, in which decalcification was much lower, seemed to be partly inaccessible for OC covering due to strong microaggregation by cementation with carbonate and Ca2+-bridging. The smaller accumulation of mineral-associated SOM in non-paddy soils was additionally confirmed by the retarded replacement of the inherited carbon. The accelerated decalcification of paddy soils led to enhanced accessibility of mineral surfaces for OC covering, which intensified OC accumulation from the early stages of soil formation onward. References Brunauer, S., Emmett, P.H., Teller, E., (1938). Adsorption of gases in multimolecular layers. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 60 (2), 309-319. Schwertmann, U., 1964. Differenzierung der Eisenoxide des Bodens durch Extraktion mit Ammoniumoxalat-Lösung. Zeitschrift für Pflanzenernährung, Düngung, Bodenkunde 105 (3), 194-202.

  7. 40 CFR 133.102 - Secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Secondary treatment. 133.102 Section 133.102...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.102 Secondary treatment. The following paragraphs...

  8. 40 CFR 133.102 - Secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Secondary treatment. 133.102 Section 133.102...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.102 Secondary treatment. The following paragraphs...

  9. 40 CFR 133.102 - Secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Secondary treatment. 133.102 Section 133.102...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.102 Secondary treatment. The following paragraphs...

  10. 40 CFR 133.102 - Secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 true Secondary treatment. 133.102 Section 133.102...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.102 Secondary treatment. The following paragraphs...

  11. 40 CFR 133.102 - Secondary treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Secondary treatment. 133.102 Section 133.102...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.102 Secondary treatment. The following paragraphs...

  12. Bell-miner-associated dieback at the tree crown scale: a multi-trophic process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Stone

    2005-01-01

    Summary This paper examines some of the factors and processes which interact within eucalypt stands affected by bell-miner-associated dieback. A key symptom of this form of dieback is sustained foliar damage from herbivorous insects, in particular psyllids. Repeated cycles of defoliation\\/refoliation result in branch death and crown contraction. Weakened trees become more susceptible to secondary stressors such as wood borers,

  13. Secondary Masters in Machine Learning

    E-print Network

    Page 1 Secondary Masters in Machine Learning Student Handbook Revised 8/20/14 #12;Page 2 Table:.......................................................................................8 Machine Learning Journal Club.........................................................................................................11 #12;Page 3 Introduction The field of machine learning is concerned with the question of how

  14. Expert Secondary Inclusive Classroom Management 

    E-print Network

    Montague, Marcia

    2011-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the management practices of expert secondary general education teachers in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, expert teachers of classrooms who included students ...

  15. Are Secondary Headteachers Losing Touch?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard English

    1995-01-01

    This article is based on the findings of a questionnaire that asked teachers and headteachers in both primary and secondary schools for their perceptions of the effectiveness of different forms of in?service training. The results revealed significant differences between the perceptions of teachers and headteachers in the secondary school, particularly with regard to school?based Baker?Day sessions. Such differences were not

  16. The secondary alkaline zinc electrode

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank R. McLarnon; Elton J. Cairns

    1991-01-01

    The worldwide studies conducted between 1975 and 1990 with the aim of improving cell lifetimes of secondary alkaline zinc electrodes are overviewed. Attention is given the design features and characteristics of various secondary alkaline zinc cells, including four types of zinc\\/nickel oxide cell designs (vented static-electrolyte, sealed static-electrolyte, vibrating-electrode, and flowing-electrolyte); two types of zinc\\/air cells (mechanically rechargeable consolidated-electrode and

  17. Brecciated and mineralized coals in Union County Western Kentucky coal field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Williams, D.A.; Eble, C.F.; Sakulpitakphon, T.; Moecher, D.P.

    2001-01-01

    Coals from the D-2 and D-3 boreholes in the Grove Center 7 1/2 min quadrangle, Union County, KY, have been found to be highly brecciated and mineralized. The mineralization is dominated by a carbonate assemblage with minor sulfides and sulfates. Included among the secondary minerals is the lead selenide, clausthalite. Overall, the emplacement of secondary vein minerals was responsible for raising the rank of the coals from the 0.6-0.7% Rmax range found in the area to as high as 0.95-0.99% Rmax. A 1.3-m-thick coal found in one of the boreholes is unique among known Western Kentucky coals in having less than 50% vitrinite. Semifusinite and fusinite dominate the maceral assemblages. The coal is also low in sulfur coal, which is unusual for the Illinois Basin. It has an ash yield of less than 10%; much of it dominated by pervasive carbonate veining. The age of the thick coal in core D-2 is similar to that of the Elm Lick coal bed, found elsewhere in the Western Kentucky coalfield. The coals in D-3 are younger, having Stephanian palynomorph assemblages. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation processes during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Patiño-López, Luis D.; Putnis, Christine V.; Geisler, Thorsten; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos M.; Putnis, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The chemical weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals on the Earth's surface controls important geochemical processes such as erosion rates and soil formation, ore genesis or climate evolution. The dissolution of most of these minerals is typically incongruent, and results in the formation of surface coatings (altered layers, also known as leached layers). These coatings may significantly affect mineral dissolution rates over geological timescales, and therefore a great deal of research has been conducted on them. However, the mechanism of leached layer formation is a matter of vigorous debate. Here we report on an in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and real-time Mach-Zehnder phase-shift interferometry (PSI) study of the dissolution of wollastonite, CaSiO3, and dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2, as an example of surface coating formation during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals. Our in situ results provide clear direct experimental evidence that leached layers are formed in a tight interface-coupled two-step process: stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and subsequent precipitation of a secondary phase (silica in the case of wollastonite, or hydrated magnesium carbonate in the case of dolomite) from a supersaturated boundary layer of fluid in contact with the mineral surface. This occurs despite the bulk solution remaining undersaturated with respect to the secondary phase. The validation of such a mechanism given by the results reported here completely changes the conceptual framework concerning the mechanism of chemical weathering, and differs significantly from the concept of preferential leaching of cations postulated by most currently accepted incongruent dissolution models.

  19. Oxygen cycle of the Martian atmosphere-regolith system: Delta17O of secondary phases in Nakhla and Lafayette

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Farquhar; Mark H. Thiemens

    2000-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations among silicates, carbonates, and sulfate from Nakhla and Lafayette can be used to resolve how multiple oxygen isotope reservoirs formed and evolved on Mars and to gain insight into the environment and processes that led to the formation of the SNC carbonates and other secondary minerals. Carbonates and sulfate from Nakhla and Lafayette carry an imprint of

  20. Minerals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... yogurt legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils Zinc Zinc helps your immune system, which is ... peanuts legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils When people don't get enough of these ...

  1. Mineral and organic components of the buried paleosols of the Nevado de Toluca, Central Mexico as indicators of paleoenvironments and soil evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergey Sedov; Elizabeth Solleiro-Rebolledo; Pedro Morales-Puente; Ernestina Vallejo-Gòmez; Carolina Jasso-Castañeda

    2003-01-01

    Results of earlier studies of Quaternary tephra–paleosol sequences in Central Mexico revealed contradictions between paleopedological and lacustrine records. To settle the contradictions, selected quantitative characteristics of mineral and organic components of the paleosols PT1–PT7 from the Nevado de Toluca sequence were studied as independent paleoclimate proxies. Mineralogical composition of sand and clay fractions allows assessment of weathering and secondary mineral

  2. Mapping Fe-bearing hydrated sulphate minerals with short wave infrared (SWIR) spectral analysis at San Miguel mine environment, Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco Velasco; Ana Alvaro; Saioa Suarez; José-Miguel Herrero; Iñaki Yusta

    2005-01-01

    Short-wave infrared reflectance (SWIR) spectra obtained from a Portable Infrared Mineral Analyser (PIMA) were applied to map acidic mine soils at San Miguel massive sulphide deposit, Iberian Pyrite Belt, Spain. Field spectral measurements and laboratory analysis were performed on samples from 58 stations from two very polluted grounds. These analyses identified secondary and tertiary Fe-rich sulphate–hydrate minerals associated with the

  3. Reactivity of Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    In the preceding chapter, the fundamental nature of sulfide mineral surfaces has been discussed, and the understanding we have of the ways in which the surface differs from a simple truncation of the bulk crystal structure reviewed. This naturally leads on to considering our understanding of sulfide surface chemistry, in the sense of how sulfide surfaces interact and react, particularly with gases and liquids. As noted elsewhere in this volume, research on sulfide mineral surfaces and surface reactivity is a relatively recent concern of mineralogists and geochemists, partly prompted by the availability of new imaging and spectroscopic methods, powerful computers and new computer algorithms. There has been a significantly longer history of sulfide mineral surface research associated with technologists working with, or within, the mining industry. Here, electrochemical methods, sometimes combined with analytical and spectroscopic techniques, have been used to probe surface chemistry. The motivation for this work has been to gain a better understanding of the controls of leaching reactions used to dissolve out metals from ores, or to understand the chemistry of the froth flotation systems used in concentrating the valuable (usually sulfide) minerals prior to metal extraction. The need for improved metal extraction technologies is still a major motivation for research on sulfide surfaces, but in the last couple of decades, new concerns have become important drivers for such work. In particular, much greater awareness of the negative environmental impact of acid and toxic metal-bearing waters derived from breakdown of sulfide minerals at former mining operations has prompted research on oxidation reactions, and on sorption of metals at sulfide surfaces. At the interface between fundamental geochemistry and industrial chemistry, the role of sulfide substrates in catalysis, and in the self-assembly and functionalization of organic molecules, has become an area of significant interest. Such work ranges in its application from the development of new industrial processes, to fundamental questions of the possible role of sulfide surfaces in catalyzing the formation of the complex organic molecules leading to the emergence of life on Earth. In this chapter, we aim to provide an overview of current understanding of sulfide surface chemistry. The size of this research field is already such that it is impossible to discuss all of the published work, but key examples are considered and readers directed to the main literature sources. The chapter begins with some examples of reaction with gaseous species (O2, H2O, H2S, CH3OH) as these are the most accessible in terms of understanding reactivity at the molecular scale. The very important oxidation and related electron transfer reactions, in both air and aqueous solution, are then considered before considering examples of catalysis and functionalization/self-assembly and interaction with organic molecules. In the final section, sorption of metal ions onto sulfide mineral surfaces is discussed before a few words concerning the future outlook for research in this entire area.

  4. Evaluating biodiversity of mineral lands

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, G.L. [USDA Forest Service, Burlington, VT (United States); Tritton, L.M.

    1997-12-31

    Increasingly, lands intended for mining, or lands that have been mined and reclaimed, are being evaluated in terms of biological diversity (biodiversity). The concept of biodiversity includes die variety and number of living organisms, their organizations, and the environments that support them. This paper presents a framework for discussing and evaluating biodiversity and for constructing checklists for evaluating biodiversity before and after mining. This framework identifies some of the different types of biodiversity applicable to mineral lands, die ranges of scale at which they are applicable, and the social stakes and stakeholders relevant across scale and diversity types.

  5. Mortality from stomach cancer in Ontario miners.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiak, R A; Ritchie, A C; Springer, J; Muller, J

    1993-01-01

    An excess of mortality from stomach cancer has been found in Ontario gold miners (observed (obs) 104, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 152, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 125-185) and no excess of stomach cancer could be detected in other miners in Ontario (obs 74, SMR 102, 95% CI 80-128). The excess of stomach cancer appeared five to 19 years after the miners began gold mining in Ontario. In that interval, similar patterns of excess mortality from stomach cancer were found in miners born in north America (obs 14, SMR 268, CI 147-450) and in miners born outside north America (obs 12, SMR 280, 95% CI 145-489). Twenty or more years after the miners began mining gold, an excess of mortality from stomach cancer was found in gold miners born outside of north American (obs 41, SMR 160, 95% CI 115-218) but not in gold miners born in north America (obs 37, SMR 113, 95% CI 80-156). The excess of stomach cancer in gold miners under the age of 60 (obs 45, SMR 167, 95% CI 122-223) seems larger than the excess in gold miners between the ages of 60 and 74 (obs 59, SMR 143, 95% CI 109-184). Exposures to arsenic, chromium, mineral fibre, diesel emissions, and aluminium powder were considered as possible explanations of the excess of stomach cancer in Ontario gold miners. Exposure to diesel emissions and aluminium powder was rejected as gold miners and uranium miners were exposed to both agents but an excess of stomach cancer was noted only in gold miners. The association between the excess of stomach cancer and the time since the miner began mining gold suggested that duration of exposure to dust in gold mines ought to be weighted according to the time since the exposure to dust occurred and that an appropriate time weighting function would be one in the interval five to 19 years after each year of exposure to dust and zero otherwise. A statistically significant association between the relative risk of mortality from stomach cancer and the time weighted duration of exposure to dust in gold mines was found in miners under the age of 60. Time weighted indices of exposure to chromium and arsenic were formed for each gold miner by time weighting the product of the duration of exposure to dust in a gold mine and the percentages of arsenic and chromium in rocks in that gold mine. Exposure to mineral fibre was measured in terms of the time weighted duration of employment in those gold mines that contain mineral fibre. A statistically significant association between the excess of stomach cancer in gold miners under the age of 60 and the time weighted index of exposure to chromium occurred and not association was found between the excess of stomach cancer and either the time weighted duration of employment in mines containing mineral fibre. The excess of stomach cancer in gold miners under the age of 60 was better associated with the time weighted index of exposure to chromium than to the time weighted duration of exposure to dust in gold mines. Although the number of cases of gastric cancer that were classified according to the system of Lauren was small, the data suggest that for miners under the age of 60, exposure to chromium is associated with the development of the intestinal rather than the diffuse type of gastric cancer. PMID:8435344

  6. Proteoglycans of mineralizing rib and epiphyseal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lohmander, S; Hjerpe, A

    1975-09-01

    Rib cartilage from growing guinea pigs and epiphyseal cartilage from Beagle puppies were separated into three fractions, representing non-mineralized, low mineralized, and high mineralized, tissue, by centrifuging finely ground material in acetone/bromoform density gradients. Following extraction under dissociative conditions, the proteoglycans were fractionated by density gradient ultracentrifugation under associative and dissociative conditions. With the onset of mineralization, the cartilage lost approximately half its content of proteoglycans. The proteoglycans remaining in the calcified cartilage differed in composition and in size from those of nonmineralized tissue. With the increased mineral content of the tissues the ratios of protein to polysaccharide, of chondroitin sulfate to keratan sulfate, and of 4-sulfate to 6-sulfated chondroitin sulfate increased in the proteoglycan fraction. Furthermore, gel chromatograms indicated decreased proportions of very high molecular weight proteoglycans, in mineralized tissue. PMID:126087

  7. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Zelten, J.E.; Arndt, R.H.

    1994-03-01

    The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed stone, portland cement, and construction sand and gravel, exceeded $168.8 million and comprised almost 67% of the State's total nonfuel mineral value. Although rebounding from the recessionary period, the growth curve for several minerals produced in the State was minimal, and for several others it moved downward. Oklahoma ranked 35th nationally in total nonfuel mineral value. The State ranked 26th nationally in the production of industrial minerals, contributing about 1.38% of the $20.7 billion revenues received. Oklahoma ranked first in the Nation in crude gypsum production, second in the production of tripoli, and was the only domestic source of iodine.

  8. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Takao; Nomura, Masao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Okamoto, Makoto; Kakihana, Hidetake

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the 11B /10B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher 11B /10B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing 11B /10B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite ( Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with higher BO 3/BO 4 ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO 3 triangle units to the number of the BO 4 tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher 11B /10B ratios.

  9. Regulation of bone mineral loss during lactation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brommage, R.; Deluca, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of varyng dietary calcium and phosphorous levels, vitamin D deficiency, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pregnancy on bone mineral loss during lactation in rats are studied. The experimental procedures and evaluations are described. The femur ash weight of lactating and nonlactating rats are calculated. The data reveals that a decrease in dietary calcium of 0.02 percent results in an increased loss of bone mineral, an increase in calcium to 1.4 percent does not lessen bone mineral loss, and bone mineral loss in vitamin D deficient rats is independent of calcium levels. It is observed that changes in dietary phosphorous level, oophorectomy, adrenalectomy, and simultaneous pragnancy do not reduce bone mineral loss during lactation. The analysis of various hormones to determine the mechanism that triggers bone mineral loss during lactation is presented.

  10. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Guazzotti, S. A.; Sodeman, D. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2007-02-01

    The accumulation of secondary acids and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured with an online single-particle mass spectrometer, the ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles correlate with air masses from different source regions. The uptake of secondary acids depended on the individual dust particle mineralogy; high amounts of nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while high amounts of sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by iron in the aluminosilicate dust is a possible explanation for this enrichment of sulphate, which has important consequences for the fertilization of remote oceans by soluble iron. This study shows the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual aged dust particles for the first time. A transport and aging timeline provides an explanation for the observed segregation. Our data suggests that sulphate became mixed with the dust first. This implies that the transport pathway is more important than the reaction kinetics in determining which species accumulate on mineral dust. Early in the study, dust particles in volcanically influenced air masses were mixed predominately with sulphate. Dust mixed with chloride then dominated over sulphate and nitrate when a major dust front reached the R. V. Ronald Brown. We hypothesize that the rapid increase in chloride on dust was due to mixing with HCl(g) released from acidified sea salt particles induced by heterogeneous reaction with volcanic SO2(g), prior to the arrival of the dust front. The amount of ammonium mixed with dust correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent reports that they exist as external mixtures. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous mechanisms of the atmospheric processing of dust and generally agrees with simulated aerosol chemistry from the STEM-2K3 model. This series of novel results has important implications for improving the treatment of dust in global chemistry models and highlights a number of key processes that merit further investigation through laboratory and field studies.

  11. Early secondary sodium drain assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.W.

    1994-09-01

    The FFTF secondary HTS loops can be drained about two years before the planned Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) is available if part of the sodium is stored in the primary sodium drain tank and the reactor overflow tank and the balance is stored in the normal secondary sodium drain tank. This report documents the results of a study to determine the technical and programmatic viability o such and early secondary sodium drain. The drain sequence that would be used is to drain secondary loops 1 and 2, sequentially to T-44 with intermediate transfers to T-42 and T-43 until sufficient capacity is available in T-44 to accommodate the sodium from loop 3. Draining the secondary sodium loops about two years earlier than now planned by utilizing installed tank storage capacity is clearly technically viable and offers significant programmatic advantages. $1,642,000 in electrical power and manpower costs can be avoided and applied to other plant shutdown activities. It is recommended that the drain sequence described herein be implemented.

  12. Correlation of ameloblastin with enamel mineral content

    PubMed Central

    Teepe, John D.; Schmitz, James E.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Fajardo, Roberto J.; Smith, Charles E.; Chun, Yong-Hee P.

    2015-01-01

    In enamel formation, the deposition of minerals as crystallites starts when the mineralization front first forms at the start of the secretory stage. During maturation, the enamel layer accumulates significant amounts of new mineral as the crystallites grow in volume. Inversely related to mineral gain is loss of protein and water from the forming enamel. Both ameloblastin (Ambn) and enamelin are essential components for formation of a functional enamel layer. The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of mineral and non-mineral material present in developing enamel relative to Ambn concentration using Ambn mutant mice mated with others overexpressing full-length Ambn from the mouse amelogenin promoter at lower (+), similar (++) or higher (+++) concentration than normal. Mandibular incisors (age: 7 weeks, n=8) were imaged by micro-computed tomography and the enamel was analyzed from the apical region to the incisal edge in sequential 1.0 mm volumes of interest. Mineral density was determined using a series of hydroxyapatite (HA) phantoms to calibrate enamel density measurements. At the site where the mandibular incisor emerged into the oral cavity, the enamel volume, mineral weight, and mineral density were reduced when Tg Ambn was expressed at lower or higher levels than normal. While in wild-type the % mineral was >95%, it was negligible in Ambn?/?, 22.3% in Ambn?/?, Tg(+), 75.4% in Ambn?/?, Tg(++), and 45.2% in Ambn?/?, Tg(+++). These results document that the deposition of mineral and removal of non-mineral components are both very sensitive to expressed Ambn concentrations. PMID:25158178

  13. Utilization and stabilization of mineral wastes. Bulletin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. C. Dean; L. J. Froisland; M. B. Shirts

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes laboratory research conducted by the Bureau of Mines and cooperative field studies made with the mineral industry to reduce the environmental impacts of air and water pollution deriving from mineral wastes. Research showed that both dry-press and steam-cured building bricks and ceramic tile could be made from copper-mill tailings and other discarded mineral wastes. Sponge iron was

  14. California Institute of Technology: Mineral Spectroscopy Server

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The California Institute of Technology created this website to provide valuable information about the color in minerals and data on mineral absorption spectra and Raman spectra. The modest site features additional information on silica polymorphs, desert varnish, ametrine, and manganese dendrite. Students can discover the technology used to collect the spectra data including the diode-array spectrometer. Researchers can find an updated, lengthy list of references of papers dealing with mineral optical spectroscopy.

  15. Superconductivity and magnetism in naturally occurring minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renxiong; Saha, S. R.; Wang, Xiangfeng; Greene, R. L.; Paglione, J.; Santelli, C.; Post, J.

    2014-03-01

    In a new and unique venture in collaboration with the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History's Department of Mineral Sciences, we present preliminary results from a project focusing on the search for superconductivity in mineral specimens provided by Geologists/Curators of the Smithsonian Institution. Including magnetization and transport studies of Wittichenite, Pyrrhotite, Nagyagite, Pyrargyrite and other related compounds, we report preliminary findings of the physical properties of mineral specimens at low temperatures, including several unreported magnetic phases and unconvetional behaviors.

  16. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation apparatus with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated investigations to explore the potential that sonication may offer to enhance carbonation reactivity. During the second project year, we extended our investigations of the effects of sonication on the extent of carbonation as a function of the following parameters: particle size distribution, the mass of solid reactant, volume fraction of aqueous solution present, sonication power, time, temperature, and CO{sub 2} pressure. To date, none of the conditions investigated have significantly enhanced carbonation. Mechanistic investigations of the stirred ({approx}1,500 rpm) aqueous olivine carbonation process indicate the carbonation process involves both incongruent magnesium dissolution and silica precipitation, which results in robust silica-rich passivating layer formation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry observation of H within the passivating layer that forms during static carbonation suggests 2H{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ion exchange is associated with incongruent dissolution. Apparently, H{sub 2}O forms at or near the olivine/passivating-layer interface during the process and diffuses out through the passivating layers during the carbonation reaction. This is

  17. Persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piergiorgio Messa; Chiara Sindici; Giuseppe Cannella; Valeria Miotti; Andrea Risaliti; Maria Gropuzzo; Pier Luigi Di Loreto; Fabrizio Bresadola; Giuseppe Mioni

    1998-01-01

    Persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism after renal transplanation.BackgroundThe persistence of secondary hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation is frequent and often complicated by overt hypercalcemia. Recent investigations have shown an effect of the different vitamin D receptor (VDR) genotypes on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion in both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The aims of this study were (i) to assess whether persistent secondary hyperparathyroidism after

  18. Mineral Identification of Dust Emissions at the Bodélé Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millham, R. A.; Martins, V.; Todd, M.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust plays an important role in climate that is not entirely understood. The complex meteorological processes, diverse source regions, compositional parameters of emissions, and physical and chemical properties and characteristics of dust emissions make modeling the affects on climate, climate change, and global climate modeling a difficult task. Understanding size, shape, distribution, and composition of mineral dust is required to successfully model climate change. The affect mineral dust has on climate relative to radiative forcing, cloud properties, and the suppression of precipitation makes modeling parameters for climate change more accurate and predictable. Mineral identification allows for accuracy in predicting results of internal and external mixing during dust transport, interactions with other aerosols, hygroscopic characteristics and impact on cloud properties. Studies conducted by Koren, et al.,(2006), suggest that 240 ± 80 Tg of atmospheric mineral dust is emitted from Africa to the Atlantic coast of Africa between 20° and 30° North Latitude annually. Of that total, it is estimated that ~120 ± 40 Tg is deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, ~30 Tg transported to northern Africa and Europe, ~70 Tg reach the Caribbean in NH summers, and some ~50 Tg reach the Amazon River Basin in NH winters. Of the ~50 Tg of dust deposited in the Amazon River Basin, ~50 percent is emitted from a single source, the Bodélé (Koren, et al., 2006; Kaufman, et al., 2005; Tegan, et al., 2006; Todd, et al., 2005; Washington, et al., 2005). Identification of mineral types in dust emissions from the Bodélé in NE Chad, Africa, is determined through a collection of data based on results achieved by traditional X-ray diffractometers, Scanning Electron Microscope images/chemical analyses (filters by Zahra Chaudhry), a new XRD XRF instrumentation, regional geomorphological history, and French geological survey maps. Samples for analysis were obtained by the BodEX 2005 team, with our main collaborator, Martin Todd, of the University College London. The BodEX study was the first in situ study at the Bodélé. The science team, an interdisciplinary study group funded by the Gilchrist Educational Trust and the Royal Geographical Society, collected sample bulk material at the surface of the Bodélé, and aerosol filters 3 meters above the surface. They were collected at four different locations between 17.1° North Lat. and 17.6° North Lat. (~60 km distance), by 18.24° East Long. by 18.15° East Long. (~88 km distance), with three locations ~20 km apart, and one ~100 km from the location of sample three. Through analyses, the minerals have been identified as ferromagnesian and aluminum silicates, amorphous silica, and some calcium carbonates, dolomite, and exotic elements such as titanium and cosmic silicon, mixed with 10- 20 percent desiccated diatom structures. Dust emissions appear to be typical primary and secondary minerals derived from weathered and eroded crustal sediments. Sediments were wetted during humid climate conditions, followed by periods of arid climate conditions. The south Saharan boundary fluctuated over time producing tropical humid conditions for extended periods followed by drier conditions. During wet conditions, changes to sediments occurred as chemical activity altered material in place. Drier conditions allowed for saltation and deflation to occur, causing dust storms to prevail in regions where vegetation is negligible (Tegan, et al., 2002).

  19. Mineral Facilities of Latin America and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernstein, Rachel; Eros, Mike; Quintana-Velazquez, Meliany

    2006-01-01

    This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries of aluminum, cement, coal, copper, diamond, gold, iron and steel, nickel, platinum-group metals, salt, and silver, among others. Records include attributes such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity if applicable, and generalized coordinates. The data were compiled from multiple sources, including the 2003 and 2004 USGS Minerals Yearbooks (Latin America and Candada volume), data to be published in the 2005 Minerals Yearbook Latin America and Canada Volume, minerals statistics and information from the USGS minerals information Web site (minerals.usgs.gov/minerals), and data collected by USGS minerals information country specialists. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies,and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information and explanation is available from the country specialists.

  20. Canadian Micro-Mineral Association: ALKALI - NUTS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website, created by the Canadian Micro-Mineral Association, furnishes information on the minerals and environments near Mont Saint-Hilaire (MSH) in Quebec, Canada. Students and educators can discover the physical characteristics, fluorescence, and the distribution and rarity of the hundreds of species of minerals found around MSH. Each description includes helpful images of the amazing minerals and environments. Users can learn about the two classification systems: Dana and Strunz. The site presents MSH-related current news, articles, and announcements. Users can also discover the meaning and origin of the term, ALKALI-NUTS.

  1. Mineral-Based Amendments for Remediation

    PubMed Central

    O’Day, Peggy A.; Vlassopoulos, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Amending soils with mineral-based materials to immobilize contaminants is both old and new. Although mineral amendments have been used for decades in agriculture, new applications with a variety of natural and reprocessed materials are emerging. By sequestering contaminants in or on solid phases and reducing their ability to partition into water or air, amendments can reduce the risk of exposure to humans or biota. A variety of mineral types are commonly used to amend contaminated soils, with different modes of molecular-scale sequestration. Regulatory, social, and economic factors also influence decisions to employ mineral amendments as a treatment technology. PMID:22203887

  2. Plasmid-mediated mineralization of 4-chlorobiphenyl.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Hooper, S W; Sayler, G S

    1985-01-01

    Strains of Alcaligenes and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from a mixed culture already proven to be proficient at complete mineralization of monohalogenated biphenyls. These strains were shown to harbor a 35 X 10(6)-dalton plasmid mediating a complete pathway for 4-chlorobiphenyl (4CB) oxidation. Subsequent plasmid curing of these bacteria resulted in the abolishment of the 4CB mineralization phenotype and loss of even early 4CB metabolism by Acinetobacter spp. Reestablishment of the Alcaligenes plasmid, denoted pSS50, in the cured Acinetobacter spp. via filter surface mating resulted in the restoration of 4CB mineralization abilities. 4CB mineralization, however, proved to be an unstable characteristic in some subcultured strains. Such loss was not found to coincide with any detectable alteration in plasmid size. Cultures capable of complete mineralization, as well as those limited to partial metabolism of 4CB, produced 4-chlorobenzoate as a metabolite. Demonstration of mineralization of a purified 14C-labeled chlorobenzoate showed it to be a true intermediate in 4CB mineralization. Unlike the mineralization capability, the ability to produce a metabolite has proven to be stable on subculture. These results indicate the occurrence of a novel plasmid, or evolved catabolic plasmid, that mediates the complete mineralization of 4CB. Images PMID:2993249

  3. Secondary Erythromelalgia - A Case Report -

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byoung Chan; Nam, Da Jeong; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Yoon, Duck Mi

    2013-01-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare neurovascular pain syndrome characterized by a triad of redness, increased temperature, and burning pain primarily in the extremities. Erythromelalgia can present as a primary or secondary form, and secondary erythromelalgia associated with a myeloproliferative disease such as essential thrombocythemia often responds dramatically to aspirin therapy, as in the present case. Herein, we describe a typical case of a 48-year-old woman with secondary erythromelalgia linked to essential thrombocythemia in the unilateral hand. As this case demonstrates, detecting and visualizing the hyperthermal area through infrared thermography of an erythromelalgic patient can assist in diagnosing the patient, assessing the therapeutic results, and understanding the disease course of erythromelalgia. PMID:23862006

  4. Secondary erythromelalgia - a case report -.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byoung Chan; Nam, Da Jeong; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Yoon, Duck Mi; Cho, Joung Goo

    2013-07-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare neurovascular pain syndrome characterized by a triad of redness, increased temperature, and burning pain primarily in the extremities. Erythromelalgia can present as a primary or secondary form, and secondary erythromelalgia associated with a myeloproliferative disease such as essential thrombocythemia often responds dramatically to aspirin therapy, as in the present case. Herein, we describe a typical case of a 48-year-old woman with secondary erythromelalgia linked to essential thrombocythemia in the unilateral hand. As this case demonstrates, detecting and visualizing the hyperthermal area through infrared thermography of an erythromelalgic patient can assist in diagnosing the patient, assessing the therapeutic results, and understanding the disease course of erythromelalgia. PMID:23862006

  5. Cu-Ni-PGE mineralization at Rometölväs, Koillismaa layered igneous complex, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piispanen, R.; Tarkian, M.

    1984-04-01

    Sulphides, tellurides and sulpharsenides, with special reference to the platinum-group minerals (PGM), have been studied from a subeconomic Cu-Ni-PGE mineralization encountered within the Syöte section of the Lower Proterozoic (2.44 Ga) Koillismaa layered igneous complex (KLIC) in northern Finland using electron microprobe and ore-microscopical methods. The ore minerals occur partly as strata-bound patches and spots associated with spots of light-coloured secondary low-temperature silicates in the gabbronorite IV of the general igneous stratigraphic column of the complex and partly as a fine-grained impregnation in the penecontemporaneous basic sills and dykes. Among the PGM sperrylite, michenerite and a palladian bismuthian melonite have been encountered. The chemical composition is reported for these minerals as well as for the rest of the ore minerals (chalcopyrite, pentlandite, pyrrhotite, pyrite, sphalerite, cobaltite and hessite). It is concluded that volatile components played a significant role in the solution, transport and the final deposition of the sulphides and the PGM.

  6. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Africa. Volume 3. 1992 international review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The 53 countries that constituted Africa in 1992 accounted for a significant portion of total world output of a number of mineral commodities. Among the most significant mineral commodities produced in Africa were andalusite, antimony, asbestos, bauxite, chromite, coal, cobalt, copper, diamond, fluorspar, gold, lithium minerals, manganese, phosphate, platinum-group metals, the titanium minerals-ilmenite and rutile, vanadium, vermiculite, uranium, and zircon. Chromite, cobalt, and manganese, were not mined in the Untied States.

  7. Secondary Education in Romania. Guide to Secondary Education in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgescu, Dakmara-Ana

    Secondary education in Romania is characterized by innovations introduced by the communist system and by recent efforts to restructure the system. This book presents a systematic and coherent exposition of the Romanian educational system, and outlines the essential problems the system faces. The book opens with the historical, social, and…

  8. Secondary Education in Malta: Guide to Secondary Education in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, Paul A.; Buhagiar, Andrew J.

    The Maltese islands consist of Malta, Gozo, and Comino and two tiny uninhabited islands, strategically located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. This handbook contains a brief description of secondary education in Malta. Following the introduction, section 1 provides an overview of the mission of the Ministry of Education and Human…

  9. Secondary Education in Greece. Guide to Secondary Education in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallen, Denis

    Cultural and national history have profoundly modeled Greek society and continue to play a vital role in Greek policy and in cultural and social life. This handbook provides a brief overview of secondary education in Greece. The first part describes the country's societal, historical, and political background; educational history and current…

  10. TEM and electron tomography studies of carbon nanospheres for lithium secondary batteries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noriko Yoshizawa; Osamu Tanaike; Hiroaki Hatori; Kazuo Yoshikawa; Akira Kondo; Takeshi Abe

    2006-01-01

    The structure of carbon nanospheres of 100–200nm diameter, which showed superior high-speed charge–discharge behavior as the negative electrode in a lithium ion battery, was investigated with XRD, SEM and TEM with an electron tomography attachment. Observation of carbon 002 lattice images, as well as electron diffraction patterns, illustrated that heterogeneous microtexture was formed as the polyhedronization of the particle proceeded

  11. The nanosphere iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these 'Mars-soil analogs' were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxyl mineral such as 'green rust', or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable meaghemite (gamma-Fe203) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (aplha-Fe203) by extensive heat treatment. Their chemical reactivity offers a plausible mechanism for the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxide and silicate phase surfaces. The mode of formation of these (nanophase) iron oxides on Mars is still unknown.

  12. Secondary mineral formation associated with respiration of nontronite, NAu-1 by iron reducing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, S Erin; Watkins, Janet; Furukawa, Yoko

    2005-01-01

    Experimental batch and miscible-flow cultures were studied in order to determine the mechanistic pathways of microbial Fe(III) respiration in ferruginous smectite clay, NAu-1. The primary purpose was to resolve if alteration of smectite and release of Fe precedes microbial respiration. Alteration of NAu-1, represented by the morphological and mineralogical changes, occurred regardless of the extent of microbial Fe(III) reduction in all of our experimental systems, including those that contained heat-killed bacteria and those in which O2, rather than Fe(III), was the primary terminal electron acceptor. The solid alteration products observed under transmission electron microscopy included poorly crystalline smectite with diffuse electron diffraction signals, discrete grains of Fe-free amorphous aluminosilicate with increased Al/Si ratio, Fe-rich grains, and amorphous Si globules in the immediate vicinity of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances. In reducing systems, Fe was also found as siderite. The small amount of Fe partitioned to the aqueous phase was primarily in the form of dissolved Fe(III) species even in the systems in which Fe(III) was the primary terminal electron acceptor for microbial respiration. From these observations, we conclude that microbial respiration of Fe(III) in our laboratory systems proceeded through the following: (1) alteration of NAu-1 and concurrent release of Fe(III) from the octahedral sheets of NAu-1; and (2) subsequent microbial respiration of Fe(III).

  13. Bone mineral measurement from Apollo experiment M-078. [derangement of bone mineral metabolism in spacecrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. M.; Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Loss of mineral from bone during periods of immobilization, recumbency, or weightlessness is examined. This report describes the instrumentation, technique, and bone mineral changes observed preflight and postflight for the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions. The bone mineral changes documented during the Apollo Program are reviewed, and their relevance to future missions is discussed.

  14. 43 CFR 3594.5 - Minerals soluble in water; brines; minerals taken in solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. 3594.5 Section 3594.5 Public...in water; brines; minerals taken in solution. (a) In mining or prospecting...by the mixture of water or valueless solution. (c) Where minerals are taken...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 37, 364-372 (1985) Mineral Particles, Mineral Fibers, and Lung Cancer'

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    1985-01-01

    ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 37, 364-372 (1985) Mineral Particles, Mineral Fibers, and Lung Cancer of the lung has been analyzed in a series of 14 men with lung cancer but no history of occupational dust class. The lung cancer patients had an average of 525 * 369 x lo6 exogenous mineral particles and 17

  16. Uranium minerals from the San Marcos District, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Cortés, Manuel; Fuentes-Cobas, Luis; Torres-Moye, Enrique; Esparza-Ponce, Hilda; Montero-Cabrera, María Elena

    2010-05-01

    The mineralogy of the two uranium deposits (Victorino and San Marcos I) of Sierra San Marcos, located 30 km northwest of Chihuahua City, Mexico, was studied by optical microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction with Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, inductively coupled plasma spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry. At the San Marcos I deposit, uranophane Ca(UO2)2Si2O7·6(H2O) (the dominant mineral at both deposits) and metatyuyamunite Ca(UO2)(V2O8)·3(H2O) were observed. Uranophane, uraninite (UO2+x), masuyite Pb(UO2)3O3(OH)·3(H2O), and becquerelite Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6 ·(8H2O) are present at the Victorino deposit. Field observations, coupled with analytical data, suggest the following sequence of mineralization: (1) deposition of uraninite, (2) alteration of uraninite to masuyite, (3) deposition of uranophane, (4) micro-fracturing, (5) calcite deposition in the micro-fractures, and (6) formation of becquerelite. The investigated deposits were formed by high-to low-temperature hydrothermal activity during post-orogenic evolution of Sierra San Marcos. The secondary mineralization occurred through a combination of hydrothermal and supergene alteration events. Becquerelite was formed in situ by reaction of uraninite with geothermal carbonated solutions, which led to almost complete dissolution of the precursor uraninite. The Victorino deposit represents the second known occurrence of becquerelite in Mexico, the other being the uranium deposits at Peña Blanca in Chihuahua State.

  17. Normalization of Mineral Ion Homeostasis by Dietary Means Prevents Hyperparathyroidism, Rickets, and Osteomalacia, But Not Alopecia in Vitamin D Receptor-Ablated Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YAN CHUN LI; MICHAEL AMLING; ALISON E. PIRRO; MATTHIAS PRIEMEL; JENNIFER MEUSE; ROLAND BARON; GUNTER DELLING; MARIE B. DEMAY

    1998-01-01

    Dihydroxyvitamin D3 plays a major role in intestinal calcium transport. To determine what phenotypic abnormalities observed in vitamin D receptor (VDR)-ablated mice are secondary to impaired intestinal calcium absorption rather than receptor deficiency, mineral ion levels were normalized by dietary means. VDR-ablated mice and control littermates were fed a diet that has been shown to prevent secondary hyperparathyroidism in vitamin

  18. Mineral scaling mitigation in cooling systems using tertiary-treated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenshi; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2012-09-15

    Treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is recognized as a significant potential source of cooling water for power generation. One of the key challenges for the successful use of the effluent from wastewater treatment facilities for cooling is the potential for significant mineral scaling when the raw water is concentrated as much as 4-6 times in recirculating cooling systems. Previous bench- and pilot-scale tests have shown that commonly used phosphorus- and polymer- based scaling inhibitors are ineffective when secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is used as make-up. In this study, two types of tertiary-treated municipal wastewaters, namely secondary-treated MWW with pH adjustment (MWW_pH) and secondary-treated MWW subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF) were evaluated as the sole source of make-up water for recirculating cooling systems. Both laboratory studies and pilot-scale tests revealed that adjusting the pH to 7.8 could reduce the mineral scaling rate by more than 80% without causing any significant corrosion problems. In contrast to MWW, where calcium carbonate was the dominant scaling mineral, the main component of mineral scale in MWW_pH was calcium phosphate. Both static and dynamic bench-scale tests indicated that scaling would not be a significant concern when MWW_NF is used as the make-up water in recirculating cooling systems operated at 4-6 cycles of concentration (CoC). Extended pilot-scale studies confirmed that MWW_NF is suitable makeup water for power plant cooling systems and that no anti-scaling chemicals would be required. PMID:22727862

  19. Study of Hydrothermal Mineralization in 2013 Drill Core from Hawaii Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautze, N. C.; Calvin, W. M.; Moore, J.; Haskins, E.; Thomas, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (HGRP) drilled a continuously-cored hole to nearly 2 km depth near the Saddle Road between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes on Hawaii Island in March of 2013. Temperatures at the bottom of the hole were unexpectedly high and reached over 100 C. A study is underway to characterize hydrothermal (secondary) mineralization in the core at depths below ~ 1 km. Secondary mineralization can indicate the presence, chemistry, and temperature of hydrothermal fluids, therein helping to characterize a present and/or past geothermal system. To date, the study is two pronged. In collaboration with University Nevada Reno (UNR) we used an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) FieldSpec instrument to obtain nearly 800 spectra from core depths spanning 3190 to 5785 feet. This device has a 2 cm contact probe that measures from 0.4 to 2.5 mm, and has been used successfully by UNR to identify depth-associated changes in alteration mineralogy and zoning in drill core from other pilot studies. The spectra indicate that rocks above a depth of ~1 km are only weakly altered. At greater depths to the base of the well, chlorite, possibly with some mica, and zeolites are common. The majority of zeolites are spectrally similar to each other at these wavelengths, however analcime and natrolite are uniquely identified in some sections. Epidote was not observed. The secondary mineral assemblages suggest that the alteration was produced by moderate temperature neutral pH fluids. Here, we used the spectral data as a survey tool to help identify and select over 20 sections of core for sampling and more detailed mineralogical analysis using traditional X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and petrographic techniques, conducted in collaboration with University of Utah. This presentation will include mineral maps with depth and results of the petrographic analyses.

  20. Pathobiology of secondary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cines, Douglas B.; Liebman, Howard; Stasi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) remains a diagnosis of exclusion both from nonimmune causes of thrombocytopenia and immune thrombocytopenia that develops in the context of other disorders (secondary immune thrombocytopenia). The pathobiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the diverse causes of secondary ITP differ from each other and from primary ITP, so accurate diagnosis is essential. Immune thrombocytopenia can be secondary to medications or to a concurrent disease, such as an autoimmune condition (eg, systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], antiphospholipid antibody syndrome [APS], immune thyroid disease, or Evans syndrome), a lymphoproliferative disease (eg, chronic lymphocytic leukemia or large granular T-lymphocyte lymphocytic leukemia), or chronic infection, eg, with Helicobacter pylori, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Response to infection may generate antibodies that cross-react with platelet antigens (HIV, H pylori) or immune complexes that bind to platelet Fc? receptors (HCV) and platelet production may be impaired by infection of megakaryocyte bone marrow-dependent progenitor cells (HCV and HIV), decreased production of thrombopoietin (TPO), and splenic sequestration of platelets secondary to portal hypertension (HCV). Sudden and severe onset of thrombocytopenia has been observed in children after vaccination for measles, mumps, and rubella or natural viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and varicella zoster virus. This thrombocytopenia may be caused by cross-reacting antibodies and closely mimics acute ITP of childhood. Proper diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder, where necessary, play an important role in patient management. PMID:19245930

  1. Rosebud County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.6% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 (Region 1) 455.5 543.2 1 Community County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Rosebud County Secondary Data Analysis

  2. Garfield County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Pneumonia, CLRD*, Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Garfield County Secondary Data Analysis July 23

  3. Valley County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. Diabetes 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Valley County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

  4. Prairie County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT. Heart Disease, Cancer 2. CLRD* 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Prairie County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

  5. Secondary metabolites of Ceratophyllum demersum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Bankova; P. Ivanova; R. Christov; S. Popov; St. Dimitrova-Konaklieva

    1995-01-01

    Ceratophyllum demersum L. is abundant in European rivers and ponds and produces a large amount of biomass. Almost nothing is known about its secondary metabolites. We isolated two flavonoid glycosides and identified one of them an apigenin-7-O-glucoside. Seven sterols, the main one sitosterol, were also identified. Volatile compounds contained mainly n-paraffins, together with benzyl acetate and a sesquiterpene.

  6. Clusterschemes in Dutch secondary schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerhard Post; Henri Ruizenaar

    2004-01-01

    The first step in constructing timetables in secondary schools in Netherlands consists of constructing the clusterschemes for the higher classes. A clusterscheme contains clusterlines with optional subjects that will be taught in parallel; the problem is to divide these optional subjects in clusterlines, such that the number of hours needed is as low as possible. We describe an efficient branch-and-bound

  7. Complex Variables in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Jerry; Moskal, Barbara; Duke, Billy; Wilhelm, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the work of outreach mathematicians introducing the topic of complex variables to eighth and ninth grade students (13- to 15-year-olds) in the US. Complex variables is an area of mathematics that is not typically studied at secondary level. The authors developed seven lessons designed to stimulate students' interest in…

  8. Futuristics. Social Studies. Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    This is one of a series of individualized instructional packets designed to help students and teachers as they cooperatively plan secondary social studies objectives, evaluate learning, and develop curriculum. The learning packet is designed for the intermediate student and includes: a pre- and post test; three lessons with major generalizations…

  9. 7, 90539092, 2007 Secondary organic

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Correspondence to: C. R. Hoyle (c.r.hoyle@geo.uio.no) 9053 #12;ACPD 7, 9053­9092, 2007 Secondary organic aerosol chemical transport model Oslo CTM2 has been extended to include the formation, transport and deposition's atmosphere (Haywood and Shine, 1995; Penner et al., 1998; Schulz et al., 2006), the direct radiative effect

  10. Changing Secondary School Physical Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence F. Locke

    1992-01-01

    Evidence suggests that many secondary school physical education programs fail to achieve their objectives. A disturbing number of students report associating required attendance with strong negative feelings about the class, physical activity, and themselves. Teachers report that workplace conditions do not allow any serious effort to provide instruction. The nature of these problems is such that neither improving instruction nor

  11. Implications for Secondary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoroma, N. S.; Robert-Okah, I.

    2007-01-01

    The school system is a green pasture for inexhaustible investigations for the purpose of enhancing academic achievement. The reason is that factors and variables within the confines of educational activities appear also to be inexhaustible. One such factor that attracted an investigation is "administrative stress" as it affects secondary school…

  12. Incorporating robotics into secondary education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Wedeward; Stephen Bruder

    2002-01-01

    Universities can play an important role in the high school educational system. In particular, New Mexico Tech has developed a robotics outreach program to provide high school students exposure to engineering concepts via building small robots. The authors have developed an integrated approach for incorporating robotics into secondary education with the objective of further engaging students through an exciting application

  13. [Secondary Career Education Activities: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford City Schools, VA.

    The guide is one of a series developed in a pilot project to integrate career education concepts with subject matter in secondary grades. The units are designed to reveal career orientation aspects of traditional topics within five major subject areas: English, social studies, mathematics, science, and health and physical education. The lesson…

  14. Teacher's Guide to Secondary Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval County Schools, Jacksonville, FL.

    This is a teacher's guide to secondary school mathematics. Developed for use in the Duval County Public Schools, Jacksonville, Florida. Areas of mathematics covered are algebra, analysis, calculus, computer literacy, computer science, geometry, analytic geometry, general mathematics, consumer mathematics, pre-algebra, probability and statistics,…

  15. Athletic Trainers in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sandra E.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the role of athletic trainers in New York State secondary schools. Discusses the need for trainers to provide emergency medical care for sports injuries and to develop prevention programs. Reviews efforts to obtain certification for trainers from the New York State Education Department. (FMW)

  16. 8, 16731708, 2008 Secondary sources

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    recently been observed from space, is ex- pected to provide indications on VOC oxidation and secondary during bio- genic VOC oxidation. However, a number of anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbons,5 like In the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx), the photochemical degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads

  17. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  18. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  19. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas rights will not be acquired except where the...

  20. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas rights will not be acquired except where the...

  1. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas rights will not be acquired except where the...

  2. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas rights will not be acquired except where the...

  3. 43 CFR 8.5 - Mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.5 Mineral rights. Mineral, oil and gas rights will not be acquired except where the...

  4. ASEAN Mineral Database and Information System (AMDIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Y.; Ohno, T.; Bandibas, J. C.; Wakita, K.; Oki, Y.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    AMDIS has lunched officially since the Fourth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Minerals on 28 November 2013. In cooperation with Geological Survey of Japan, the web-based GIS was developed using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. The system is composed of the local databases and the centralized GIS. The local databases created and updated using the centralized GIS are accessible from the portal site. The system introduces distinct advantages over traditional GIS. Those are a global reach, a large number of users, better cross-platform capability, charge free for users, charge free for provider, easy to use, and unified updates. Raising transparency of mineral information to mining companies and to the public, AMDIS shows that mineral resources are abundant throughout the ASEAN region; however, there are many datum vacancies. We understand that such problems occur because of insufficient governance of mineral resources. Mineral governance we refer to is a concept that enforces and maximizes the capacity and systems of government institutions that manages minerals sector. The elements of mineral governance include a) strengthening of information infrastructure facility, b) technological and legal capacities of state-owned mining companies to fully-engage with mining sponsors, c) government-led management of mining projects by supporting the project implementation units, d) government capacity in mineral management such as the control and monitoring of mining operations, and e) facilitation of regional and local development plans and its implementation with the private sector.

  5. Ultra-high Pressure Minerals in Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. T.; Bai, W.; Yang, J.; Fang, Q.

    2004-12-01

    Most ultra-high pressure (UHP) minerals are found in kimberlites, deeply subducted continental crustal rocks and meteorites or meteorite impact craters. Graphitized diamonds have been found in subcontinental peridotites of the Ronda and Beni Boursera massifs. Numerous UHP minerals have also been reported from ophiolites, particularly in Russia, Indonesia, Canada, the USA and China. Many of these reported discoveries are from placer deposits and the origin of the UHP minerals has not been confirmed. The best documented occurrence of an UHP mineral-bearing ophiolite is the Luobusa ophiolite, which lies in the Yarlung-Zangbo suture zone of southern Tibet. A wide variety of UHP minerals, including diamond, moissanite, coesite, Fe-silicides, wüstite, silicon rutile, silicon spinel, and CrC alloys, has been recovered from podiform chromitites in Luobusa. These minerals are associated with native elements, such as Si, Fe, Ti, and Cr, and with PGE alloys, some of which may also have an UHP origin. Diamonds have also been reported from the Donqiao ophiolite of the Nujiang-Bangong Lake suture zone in central Tibet but this occurrence as not been confirmed. The demonstrated occurrence of UHP minerals in Luobusa and the reported occurrences from other bodies suggest that ophiolites may be common repositories of UHP minerals.

  6. Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals D A R I A K I B A N O V A , A N T O N I O N and toxicity. Herein, potential hazards of clay particle uptake areaddressed.Thispaperreportsthatthecontentanddistribution of structural Fe influence the ability of expandable clay minerals to induce lipid peroxidation (LP), a major

  7. Clay Minerals and Italy the Nannobacterial

    E-print Network

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Clay Minerals and Italy ­ the Nannobacterial Connection R. L. FOLK THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN This work is dedicated to F. Leo Lynch, a brilliant clay mineralogist who died in 2009. During Leo of nannobacterial precipitation of clay minerals were identified. (Lynch, 1994; Folk, Lynch & Rasbury, 1994). Leo

  8. Mineral Engineering Education in the West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgmann, Carl W.; Bartram, John W.

    A large percentage of all US degrees in mineral engineering fields are awarded by 14 institutions of higher education in 13 western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. But low undergraduate enrollments in the mineral engineering curricula have increased…

  9. Protocol comparison for quantifying in situ mineralization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ mineralization methods are intended to quantify mineralization under realistic environmental conditions. This study was conducted to compare soil moisture and temperature in intake soil cores contained in cylinders to that in adjacent bulk soil, compare the effect of two resin bag techniques...

  10. Rocks and Minerals - Issue 6, September 2008

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Ohio State University

    This issue of the free online magazine, Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears, explores the basic characteristics of rocks and minerals, the types of rocks, the rock cycle, and the specimens found in the polar regions. Find lessons that allow students to observe rock and mineral specimens, perform classification exercises, and read to develop their content knowledge.

  11. Using Excel to Calculate Mineral Chemical Analyses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this assignment, students are provided instructions to make an Excel spreadsheet to calculate mineral chemical analyses from weight percent to atoms per given number of oxygen atoms. This skill will be useful for the major rock-forming mineral groups.

  12. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of Western Anatolian mineral waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. F. Barut; N. Erdogan; E. Basak

    2004-01-01

    Turkey lies on the Alpine-Himalayan belt which is one of the most important geothermal belts in the World. Therefore, there are numerous mineral waters in Anatolia where geological and tectonic activities are intense. Archeological studies conducted in Anatolia, which is the cradle of various civilizations, reveal the fact that mineral water has been used as a spa in many areas.

  13. X-ray Analysis of Unknown Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dexter Perkins

    In this exercise, students use X-ray analysis to identify unknown minerals. They are given two samples to grind up and X-ray, using Jade to identify them. Once the minerals are identified, students make a spreadsheet and do a series of calculations.

  14. Deer preference among various trace mineral mixtures

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    4/25/2009 1 Deer preference among various trace mineral mixtures Marcus Lashley FWF 512 University Implications #12;4/25/2009 2 JustificationJustification White-tailed deer herd characteristics are commonly estimated using infrared cameras Mineral mixtures can help attract deer to camera sites during summer

  15. Minerals yearbook, 1990: Idaho. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Minarik, R.J.; Gillerman, V.S.

    1992-09-01

    The 1990 Annual Report is on the Mineral Industry of Idaho. Idaho ranked 26th nationally for total mineral production value compared with 28th in 1989. The State was first in the Nation in antimony and garnet production; second in silver and vandaium production; and third in output of lead, molybdenum, and marketable phosphate rock.

  16. State of Miners' Health in Germany

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Piekarski; G. Seyl; J. v. Bardeleben

    1997-01-01

    Underground mining has a long tradition in Germany. While the mineral royalty created the basis for government mining inspectorates in the Middle Ages, the medical care of the miners and their families is also documented as early as 1225 in the Iglau Mining Act. In the last 20 to 30 years, iron ore mining has stopped in western Germany; only

  17. Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology

    E-print Network

    Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology Remote Sensing of Soils,Remote Sensing, solid Earth comprised of bedrock and the weathered bedrock called soil. · Remote sensing can play, and geomorphology (landforms). Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology Remote Sensing of Soils

  18. Regional Air Impact Modeling Initiative Data Miner

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data Miner is a large client-server database processing system that provides access to large and complex databases and facilitates the assembly of multi-source emissions inventories to support air dispersion modeling and risk modeling. U.S. EPA developed Data Miner under the Regi...

  19. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  20. Monitoring genotoxic exposure in uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Sram, R.J.; Binkova, B.; Dobias, L.; Roessner, P.T.; Topinka, J.; Vesela, D.; Vesely, D.; Stejskalova, J.; Bavorova, H.; Rericha, V. (Institute of Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1993-03-01

    Recent data from deep uranium mines in Czechoslovakia indicated that in addition to radon daughter products, miners are also exposed to chemical mutagens. Mycotoxins were identified as a possible source of mutagenicity present in the mines. Various methods of biomonitoring were used to examine three groups of miners from different uranium mines. Cytogenetic analysis of peripheral lymphocytes, unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in lymphocytes, and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in both plasma and lymphocytes were studied on 66 exposed miners and 56 controls. Throat swabs were taken from 116 miners and 78 controls. Significantly increased numbers of aberrant cells were found in all groups of miners, as well as decreased UDS values in lymphocytes and increased LPO plasma levels in comparison to controls. Molds were detected in throat swabs from 27% of miners, and 58% of these molds were embryotoxic. Only 5% of the control samples contained molds and none of them was embryotoxic. The following mycotoxins were isolated from miners' throat swab samples: rugulosin, sterigmatocystin, mycophenolic acid, brevianamid A, citreoviridin, citrinin, penicilic acid, and secalonic acid. These data suggest that mycotoxins are a genotoxic factor affecting uranium miners.

  1. Mineral resource of the month: tantalum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2011-01-01

    The article offers information on a rare transition metal called tantalum. It says that the blue-gray mineral resource was discovered in 1801 or 1802 and was used for capacitors in 1940. It adds that the tantalite ore and other minerals in the ore should be separated in order to generate concentrates of tantalum. The use of tantalum are also cited.

  2. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

    E-print Network

    .09 Mt in 2005. Because of the closure of mines in Florida and Georgia, domestic production of zircon decreased in 2006 compared with production in 2005. Production of milled zircon and zirconium oxide mineral zircon (ZrSiO4 ). A relatively small quantity of zirconium is derived from the mineral baddeleyite

  3. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, James L.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical reaction path modeling is useful for rapidly assessing the extent of water-aqueous-gas interactions both in natural systems and in industrial processes. Modeling of some systems, such as those at low temperature with relatively high hydrologic flow rates, or those perturbed by the subsurface injection of industrial waste such as CO2 or H2S, must account for the relatively slow kinetics of mineral-gas-water interactions. We have therefore compiled parameters conforming to a general Arrhenius-type rate equation, for over 70 minerals, including phases from all the major classes of silicates, most carbonates, and many other non-silicates. The compiled dissolution rate constants range from -0.21 log moles m-2 s-1 for halite, to -17.44 log moles m-2 s-1 for kyanite, for conditions far from equilibrium, at 25 ?C, and pH near neutral. These data have been added to a computer code that simulates an infinitely well-stirred batch reactor, allowing computation of mass transfer as a function of time. Actual equilibration rates are expected to be much slower than those predicted by the selected computer code, primarily because actual geochemical processes commonly involve flow through porous or fractured media, wherein the development of concentration gradients in the aqueous phase near mineral surfaces, which results in decreased absolute chemical affinity and slower reaction rates. Further differences between observed and computed reaction rates may occur because of variables beyond the scope of most geochemical simulators, such as variation in grain size, aquifer heterogeneity, preferred fluid flow paths, primary and secondary mineral coatings, and secondary minerals that may lead to decreased porosity and clogged pore throats.

  4. Mineral malnutrition following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Wright, Breanne N

    2013-01-01

    Moderate/severe obesity is on the rise in the United States. Weight management includes bariatric surgery, which is effective and can alleviate morbidity and mortality from obesity-associated diseases. However, many individuals are dealing with nutritional complications. Risk factors include: 1) preoperative malnutrition (e.g., vitamin D, iron); 2) decreased food intake (due to reduced hunger and increased satiety, food intolerances, frequent vomiting); 3) inadequate nutrient supplementation (due to poor compliance with multivitamin/multimineral regimen, insufficient amounts of vitamins and/or minerals in supplements); 4) nutrient malabsorption; and 5) inadequate nutritional support (due to lack of follow-up, insufficient monitoring, difficulty in recognizing symptoms of deficiency). For some nutrients (e.g., protein, vitamin B-12, vitamin D), malnutrition issues are reasonably addressed through patient education, routine monitoring, and effective treatment strategies. However, there is little attention paid to other nutrients (e.g., zinc, copper), which if left untreated may have devastating consequences (e.g., hair loss, poor immunity, anemia, defects in neuro-muscular function). This review focuses on malnutrition in essential minerals, including calcium (and vitamin D), iron, zinc, and copper, which commonly occur following popular bariatric procedures. There will be emphasis on the complexities, including confounding factors, related to screening, recognition of symptoms, and, when available, current recommendations for treatment. There is an exceptionally high risk of malnutrition in adolescents and pregnant women and their fetuses, who may be vulnerable to problems in growth and development. More research is required to inform evidence-based recommendations for improving nutritional status following bariatric surgery and optimizing weight loss, metabolic, and nutritional outcomes. PMID:24038242

  5. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron oxide/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these "Mars-soil analogs" were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging, specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The clay acted as an effective matrix, both chemically and sterically, preventing the major part of the synthesized iron oxides from ripening, i.e., growing and developing larger crystals. The precipitated iron oxides appear as isodiametric or slightly elongated particles in the size range 1-10 nm, having large specific surface area. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxy mineral such as "green rust," or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) by extensive heat treatment. After mild heating, the iron-enriched clay became slightly magnetic, to the extent that it adheres to a hand-held magnet, as was observed with Mars soil. The chemical reactivity of the iron-enriched clays strongly resembles, and offers a plausible mechanism for, the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxides and silicate phase surfaces. The reflectance spectrum of the clay-iron preparations in the visible range is generally similar to the reflectance curves of bright regions on Mars. This strengthens the evidence for the predominance of nanophase iron oxides/oxyhydroxides in Mars soil. The mode of formation of these nanophase iron oxides on Mars is still unknown. It is puzzling that despite the long period of time since aqueous weathering took place on Mars, they have not developed from their transitory stage to well-crystallized end-members. The possibility is suggested that these phases represent a continuously on-going, extremely slow weathering process.

  6. 42 CFR 37.8 - Roentgenographic examination at miner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.8 Roentgenographic examination at miner's expense. Any miner who wishes to...

  7. 42 CFR 37.8 - Radiographic examination at miner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.8 Radiographic examination at miner's expense. Any miner who wishes...

  8. 42 CFR 37.8 - Roentgenographic examination at miner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.8 Roentgenographic examination at miner's expense. Any miner who wishes to...

  9. 42 CFR 37.8 - Roentgenographic examination at miner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.8 Roentgenographic examination at miner's expense. Any miner who...

  10. 30 CFR 72.510 - Miner health training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01...2010-07-01 false Miner health training. 72.510 Section 72.510 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...Secretary of Health and Human Services, or from...

  11. Minerals, Tobacco and Smoking-Related Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, W. E.

    2003-12-01

    As much as 8% (by dry weight) of commercial tobacco is mineral, and the view that minerals are inert, playing no more than a passive role in smoking-related disease, is challenged. An inventory of minerals in tobacco is presented and an interpretation of their sources given. Using elemental abundances the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to the commercial product is quantitatively modelled relative to average crustal abundances. A framework is presented for investigating the potential ways in which minerals with, or acquire, toxic properties behave in the smoking environment. In order to represent a potential hazard any mineral (or mineral reaction product) with suspected toxic properties must partition into smoke and be respirable. For inhalation a significant proportion of the particles must be smaller than 10 microns. Three categories of potential hazard are recognised: 1. Minerals with intrinsic toxic properties. Quartz can amount to 1% or more in some cigarettes and is defined as a human carcinogen by the IARC. It is not likely to represent a hazard as its grain size is probably too coarse to be respirable. However talc, also a Type 1 carcinogen when it is contaminated with asbestos, is a common constituent of cigarette paper and may be of respirable size. Some other minerals also fall into this category. 2. Minerals that generate toxic products on combustion. Examples are the biominerals calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) and dihydrate (weddellite), which amount to about 5 wt% of popular UK brands. These minerals decompose at tobacco combustion temperatures yielding large quantities of carbon monoxide. A substantial fraction of the CO budget of UK cigarettes may derive from this source. 3. Minerals that acquire toxic properties on combustion. Little is known about free radical generation on mineral surfaces during tobacco combustion, but the devolatilisation of calcic phases (carbonates and oxalates) creates oxide particles with surfaces highly adsorbent to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Calcic mineral particles are two orders of magnitude more abundant in smokers' lungs compared with non-smoking controls in residents of Vancouver. Such particles may thus be potential agents for the delivery of PAH carcinogens, including benzo(a)pyrene, to the lungs. None of the potential hazards listed above has yet been properly evaluated.

  12. The role of mineral resource assessments in ecological stewardship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Sandra H.B.

    1996-01-01

    Bedrock geology and mineral resource assessments can provide important information for ecologically based stewardship of land and water. Combining information derived from mineral resource assessments and geoenvironmental mineral deposit models provides a means to rapidly screen a large region for potential for mineral concentrations, to assess the environmental risk associated with mineralized bedrock and with human disturbances of mineralized bedrock, and to establish priorities for further studies.

  13. The secondary alkaline zinc electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1991-02-01

    The worldwide studies conducted between 1975 and 1990 with the aim of improving cell lifetimes of secondary alkaline zinc electrodes are overviewed. Attention is given the design features and characteristics of various secondary alkaline zinc cells, including four types of zinc/nickel oxide cell designs (vented static-electrolyte, sealed static-electrolyte, vibrating-electrode, and flowing-electrolyte); two types of zinc/air cells (mechanically rechargeable consolidated-electrode and mechanically rechargeable particulate-electrode); zinc/silver oxide battery; zinc/manganese dioxide cell; and zinc/ferric cyanide battery. Particular consideration is given to recent research in the fields of cell thermodynamics, zinc electrodeposition, zinc electrodissolution, zinc corrosion, electrolyte properties, mathematical and phenomenological models, osmotic pumping, nonuniform current distribution, and cell cycle-life perforamnce.

  14. Secondary ELM Filaments in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Maqueda, R. J. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, NJ; Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Ahn, J W [University of California, San Diego; NSTX Team, [Multiple Institutions

    2009-01-01

    Filamentary structures are observed in the scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experime05nt during ELMs. While the primary filaments correspond to a direct result of the ELM event, the 'secondary' filaments which occur generally later but still within 1 ms of the ELM onset are observed to have the same characteristics as inter-ELM filaments (or blobs): poloidal auto-correlation lengths of similar to 4 cm, broadband frequency and poloidal wave number spectra and radial velocities of 1-2 km/s. At the same time, no MHD modes are observed during the phase in which secondary filaments are present. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Building a secondary containment system

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, M.F.

    1994-10-01

    Retail fertilizer and pesticide dealers across the United States are installing secondary containment at their facilities or are seriously considering it. Much of this work is in response to new state regulations; however, many dealers not facing new regulations are upgrading their facilities to reduce their liability, lower their insurance costs, or comply with anticipated regulations. The Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) has assisted dealers in 22 states in retrofitting containment to their facilities. Simultaneous improvements in the operational efficiency of the facilities have been achieved at many of the sites. This paper is based on experience gained in that work and details the rationale used in planning secondary containment and facility modifications.

  16. Persulfate activation by naturally occurring trace minerals.

    PubMed

    Teel, Amy L; Ahmad, Mushtaque; Watts, Richard J

    2011-11-30

    The potential for 13 naturally occurring minerals to mediate the decomposition of persulfate and generate a range of reactive oxygen species was investigated to provide fundamental information on activation mechanisms when persulfate is used for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Only four of the minerals (cobaltite, ilmenite, pyrite, and siderite) promoted the decomposition of persulfate more rapidly than persulfate-deionized water control systems. The other nine minerals decomposed persulfate at the same rate or more slowly than the control systems. Mineral-mediated persulfate activation was conducted with the addition of one of three probe compounds to detect the generation of reactive oxygen species: anisole (sulfate+hydroxyl radical), nitrobenzene (hydroxyl radical), and hexachloroethane (reductants and nucleophiles). The reduced mineral pyrite promoted rapid generation of sulfate+hydroxyl radical. However, the remainder of the minerals provided minimal potential for the generation of reactive oxygen species. The results of this research demonstrate that the majority of naturally occurring trace minerals do not activate persulfate to generate reactive oxygen species, and other mechanisms of activation are necessary to promote contaminant destruction in the subsurface during persulfate ISCO. PMID:21968122

  17. Toole County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.4% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 455.5 543.2 1 Community) Leading Causes of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Toole County Secondary Data

  18. Lincoln County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.0% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 466.5 (Region 5) 455.5 543.2 1 Community of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Lincoln County Secondary Data Analysis July 23

  19. Wibaux County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Wibaux County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

  20. Dawson County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Dawson County Secondary Data Analysis July 23

  1. Teton County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.4% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Teton County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

  2. Phillips County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Myocardial Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Phillips County Secondary Data Analysis July 23

  3. Pondera County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.4% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Pondera County Secondary Data Analysis

  4. Maxillary osteomyelitis secondary to osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Hanada, T; Furuta, S; Moriyama, I; Hanamure, Y; Miyanohara, T; Ohyama, M

    1996-12-01

    A 41-year-old Japanese woman complained of a gradually enlarging swelling of her left cheek for seven months. She was diagnosed with osteopetrosis by standard skeletal radiographs, and her cheek swelling was diagnosed as maxillary osteomyelitis secondary to osteopetrosis. She underwent a left partial maxillectomy, and her post-operative course was stable with no complications. A literature review is also presented. PMID:9050105

  5. Fractals for secondary key retrieval

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christos Faloutsost; Shari Roseman

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we propose the use of fractals and especially the Hilbert curve, in order to design good distance-preserving mappings. Such mappings improve the performance of secondary-key- and spatial- access methods, where multi-dimensional points have to be stored on an 1-dimensional medium (e.g., disk). Good clustering reduces the number of disk accesses on retrieval, improving the response time. Our

  6. Dissolution Kinetics of Synthetic and Natural Meta-Autunite Minerals, X??n????[(UO?)(PO?)]? ? xH?O, Under Acidic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Forrester, Steven W.

    2007-11-01

    Mass transport within the uranium geochemical cycle is impacted by the availability of phosphorous. In oxidizing environments, in which the uranyl ionic species is typically mobile, formation of sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate minerals exert a strong influence on uranium transport. Autunite group minerals have been identified as the long-term uranium controlling phases in many systems of geochemical interest. Anthropogenic operations related to uranium mining operations have created acidic environments, exposing uranyl phosphate minerals to low pH groundwaters. Investigations regarding the dissolution behavior of autunite group minerals under acidic conditions have not been reported; consequently, knowledge of the longevity of uranium controlling solids is incomplete. The purpose of this investigation was to: 1) quantify the dissolution kinetics of natural calcium and synthetic sodium meta-autunite, under acidic conditions, 2) measure the effect of temperature and pH on meta-autunite mineral dissolution, and 3) investigate the formation of secondary uranyl phosphate phases as long-term controls on uranium migration. Single-pass flow-through (SPFT) dissolution tests were conducted over the pH range of 2 to 5 and from 5° to 70°C. Results presented here illustrate meta-autunite dissolution kinetics are strongly dependent on pH, but are relatively insensitive to temperature variations. In addition, the formation of secondary uranyl-phosphate phases such as, uranyl phosphate, (UO2)3(PO4)2 ? 4 H2O, may serve as a secondary phase limiting the migration of uranium in the environment.

  7. Rapid Ascent of Aphyric Mantle Melts through the Overriding Crust in Subduction Zones: Evidence from Variable Uranium-Series Disequilibria, Amorphous Hydrous Alteration Microtextures in Crystal Rims, and Two-Pyroxene Pseudo-Decompression Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, G. F.; Freymuth, H.; Hsieh, H. H.; Hwang, S. L.; Iizuka, Y.; Miller, C. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Sakamoto, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic hazard mitigation at subduction zones critically depends on knowledge of magma generation and ascent processes and timescales. Two diametrically opposite scenarios are presently debated: One paradigm is the generation of low-silica (basaltic) melts in the mantle wedge, followed by protracted sub-liquidus magma ascent and evolution through crystal growth and fractionation in crustal reservoirs, which are tapped during volcanic eruptions. In contrast, a diametrically opposite model favours the generation of higher silica melts in the mantle or in a lower crustal hot zone, followed by rapid decompression to the surface under super-liquidus conditions. In the latter case, crystals are picked up during magma ascent, and are in the process of dissolving. We present multiple lines of evidence that point to crystal uptake as the principal processes by which arc melts acquire their crystal cargo: (i) variable 234U-238U disequilibria in mineral separates; (ii) hydrous mineral rims with amorphous alteration textures; and (iii) two-pyroxene pseudo-decompression paths; cf. Zellmer et al. (2014a,b,c), doi: 10.1144/SP385.3 and 10.1144/SP385.9 and 10.1144/SP410.1. These observations point to a scarcity of true phenocrysts in many arc magmas, and thus to decompression of aphyric melts that take up their crystal cargo during ascent. The data imply that many hydrous wedge melts are more silica-rich than basalts and achieve super-liquidus conditions during rapid ascent from great depth.

  8. Positional variation in grain mineral nutrients within a rice panicle and its relation to phytic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Su, Da; Sultan, Faisal; Zhao, Ning-chun; Lei, Bing-ting; Wang, Fu-biao; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Fang-min

    2014-11-01

    Six japonica rice genotypes, differing in panicle type, grain density, and phytic acid (PA) content, were applied to investigate the effect of grain position on the concentrations of major mineral nutrients and its relation to PA content and grain weight within a panicle. Grain position significantly affected the concentrations of the studied minerals in both the vertical and horizontal axes of a rice panicle. Heavy-weight grains, located on primary rachis and top rachis, generally had higher mineral concentrations, but were lower in PA concentration and molar ratios of PA/Zn, compared with the small-weight grains located on secondary rachis and bottom rachis, regardless of rice genotypes. However, on the basis of six rice genotypes, no significant correlations were found among mineral elements, PA, and grain weight. These results suggested that some desired minerals, like Zn and Fe, and their bioavailability, can be enhanced simultaneously by the modification of panicle patterns, and it will be helpful in the selection of rice genotypes with low PA and high mineral nutrients for further breeding strategy without sacrificing their high yields. PMID:25367791

  9. Positional variation in grain mineral nutrients within a rice panicle and its relation to phytic acid concentration*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Da; Sultan, Faisal; Zhao, Ning-chun; Lei, Bing-ting; Wang, Fu-biao; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Fang-min

    2014-01-01

    Six japonica rice genotypes, differing in panicle type, grain density, and phytic acid (PA) content, were applied to investigate the effect of grain position on the concentrations of major mineral nutrients and its relation to PA content and grain weight within a panicle. Grain position significantly affected the concentrations of the studied minerals in both the vertical and horizontal axes of a rice panicle. Heavy-weight grains, located on primary rachis and top rachis, generally had higher mineral concentrations, but were lower in PA concentration and molar ratios of PA/Zn, compared with the small-weight grains located on secondary rachis and bottom rachis, regardless of rice genotypes. However, on the basis of six rice genotypes, no significant correlations were found among mineral elements, PA, and grain weight. These results suggested that some desired minerals, like Zn and Fe, and their bioavailability, can be enhanced simultaneously by the modification of panicle patterns, and it will be helpful in the selection of rice genotypes with low PA and high mineral nutrients for further breeding strategy without sacrificing their high yields. PMID:25367791

  10. Clay Minerals are controlled by the environment - Clay Minerals control the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahr, K.; Zarei, M.

    2012-04-01

    Where clay minerals are analyzed in soils, often there is some confusion, because in the widespread loess-affected and moraine landscapes of Europe quite a variety of clay minerals is found. The sources of these minerals are inherited from the local solid rock, transported through different processes, transformed through mineral changes and inherited from paleo-environments. Very often a miserable assemblage in the clay fraction is found with mica clay, smectite, kaolinite, chlorite and also some quartz. In order to understand the current dynamic of clay mineral formation, very detailed and quantitative analysis in comparison of horizons and landscape are necessary. It is much easier to through light on the development, if conditions are looked for where a single specific mineral can be formed like short range order minerals from volcanic ashes or smectites from basaltic parent material. Old leaching land surfaces will form kaolinitic and in tropical areas gibbsitic clay fractions. In arid environments of deserts and desert fringes, palygorskite and sepiolite can dominate. In general, clay minerals buffer the environment. This is mainly due to the extraordinary large interfaces between mineral surface and pore systems. In the last years mainly the processes of buffering through charging soil solution and of buffering through mineral organic compounds have been analyzed. Development of new microscopic and spectromethods have brought great progress in understanding the role of clays in soil environments.

  11. Secondary Voc Ed: Preparing the Future Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dignan, Richard

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the current state of secondary vocational education in Wisconsin, where each public secondary school is required to offer vocational education. Topics covered include (1) goals and expectations, (2) curriculum development, and (3) educational equity. (CH)

  12. 30 CFR 56.3400 - Secondary breakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Precautions § 56.3400 Secondary breakage. Prior to secondary breakage operations,...

  13. 30 CFR 56.3400 - Secondary breakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Precautions § 56.3400 Secondary breakage. Prior to secondary breakage operations,...

  14. 30 CFR 56.3400 - Secondary breakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Precautions § 56.3400 Secondary breakage. Prior to secondary breakage operations,...

  15. 30 CFR 56.3400 - Secondary breakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Precautions § 56.3400 Secondary breakage. Prior to secondary breakage operations,...

  16. 30 CFR 56.3400 - Secondary breakage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ground Control Precautions § 56.3400 Secondary breakage. Prior to secondary breakage operations,...

  17. Secondary English Teacher Certification Requirements Undergraduate Program

    E-print Network

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    :______________ Date:______________ ENGLISH CORE REQUIREMENTS (6 Credits) ENGL 300 Communication and Technology of Teaching and Learning EDUC 425/ENGL 396 Methods of Teaching English in the Secondary School EDUC 456Secondary English Teacher Certification Requirements English Undergraduate Program Candidate

  18. Measurement of bone mineral density by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in patients with the Wisconsin hip, an uncemented femoral stem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Jenny Kiratli; Mary M. Checovich; Andrew A. McBeath; Michael A. Wilson; John P. Heiner

    1996-01-01

    Although qualitative evidence of femoral bone remodeling, secondary to total hip arthroplasty (THA), is apparent on radiographs, quantification of change in bone mass from radiographs is limited. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry overcomes many of the limitations and yields accurate and precise bone mineral density (BMD) data. In this study, regional changes in femoral BMD were examined in 89 THA patients with

  19. Partition of land and mineral rights

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, A.L. III

    1983-05-01

    A legal review of the right to require partition when there is common ownership of surface land and subsurface minerals, such as oil and gas, concludes that equitable considerations should be a factor in deciding the method of partition even though they are irrelevant to its propriety. The review covers the place of venue, the legal procedure, the division of assets and liabilities, partition involving inherited ownership, prescription, mortgages, holding in common, predial servitudes, and mineral rights. The examples and court cases cited refer to the Civil Code and the Mineral Code. 142 references.

  20. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  1. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOEpatents

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  2. Environmental Studies of Mineral Deposits in Alaska

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1996-01-01

    This collection of articles summarizes environmental geochemical studies of metallic mineral deposits in Alaska, including sulfide, gold, mercury, chromium, and uranium mines and deposits. The studies report metal and acid concentrations in samples collected around such mines and deposits, and evaluate environmental effects of the deposits. An introduction explains geochemical processes, how metals enter environments downstream from mineral deposits, and background geochemical studies. Other articles are: Studies of Mineral Deposits Rich in Heavy Metals; Environmental Geochemistry of Mercury Mines in Southwestern Alaska; Environmental Geochemistry of Alaskan Gold Deposits; Geochemistry of Surface Waters Draining Alaskan Chromite Deposits; and Radioactivity Concerns of Uranium and Thorium Deposits at Bokan Mountain, Southeastern Alaska.

  3. Bone Mineralization in Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Larussa, Tiziana; Suraci, Evelina; Nazionale, Immacolata; Abenavoli, Ludovico; Imeneo, Maria; Luzza, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates a well-established relationship between low bone mineral density (BMD) and celiac disease (CD), but data on the pathogenesis of bone derangement in this setting are still inconclusive. In patients with symptomatic CD, low BMD appears to be directly related to the intestinal malabsorption. Adherence to a strict gluten-free diet (GFD) will reverse the histological changes in the intestine and also the biochemical evidence of calcium malabsorption, resulting in rapid increase of BMD. Nevertheless, GFD improves BMD but does not normalize it in all patients, even after the recovery of intestinal mucosa. Other mechanisms of bone injury than calcium and vitamin D malabsorption are thought to be involved, such as proinflammatory cytokines, parathyroid function abnormalities, and misbalanced bone remodeling factors, most of all represented by the receptor activator of nuclear factor B/receptor activator of nuclear factor B-ligand/osteoprotegerin system. By means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), it is now rapid and easy to obtain semiquantitative values of BMD. However, the question is still open about who and when submit to DXA evaluation in CD, in order to estimate risk of fractures. Furthermore, additional information on the role of nutritional supplements and alternative therapies is needed. PMID:22737164

  4. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D A

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications. PMID:24589423

  5. Control of groundwater pH during bioremediation: Improvement and validation of a geochemical model to assess the buffering potential of ground silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Elsa; Brovelli, Alessandro; Holliger, Christof; Barry, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate control of groundwater pH is of critical importance for in situ biological treatment of chlorinated solvents. The use of ground silicate minerals mixed with groundwater is an appealing buffering strategy as silicate minerals may act as long-term sources of alkalinity. In a previous study, we developed a geochemical model for evaluation of the pH buffering capacity of such minerals. The model included the main microbial processes driving groundwater acidification as well as mineral dissolution. In the present study, abiotic mineral dissolution experiments were conducted with five silicate minerals (andradite, diopside, fayalite, forsterite, nepheline). The goal of the study was to validate the model and to test the buffering capacity of the candidate minerals identified previously. These five minerals increased the pH from acidic to neutral and slightly basic values. The model was revised and improved to represent better the experimental observations. In particular, the experiments revealed the importance of secondary mineral precipitation on the buffering potential of silicates, a process not included in the original formulation. The main secondary phases likely to precipitate were identified through model calibration, as well as the degree of saturation at which they formed. The predictions of the revised geochemical model were in good agreement with the observations, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 in most cases. This study confirmed the potential of silicates to act as pH control agents and showed the reliability of the geochemical model, which can be used as a design tool for field applications.

  6. Secondary Trauma in Children and School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motta, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    A review of childhood secondary trauma is presented. Secondary trauma involves the transfer and acquisition of negative affective and dysfunctional cognitive states due to prolonged and extended contact with others, such as family members, who have been traumatized. As such, secondary trauma refers to a spread of trauma reactions from the victim…

  7. Secondary and Postsecondary Agricultural Competency Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This articulation project includes competencies for secondary and postsecondary vocational agriculture in the cluster areas of animal science, plant science, and agricultural management. Each cluster includes three types of competencies: secondary competencies; postsecondary competencies; and a combination of secondary and postsecondary…

  8. Job Satisfaction of Secondary Content Area Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Christine K.

    2012-01-01

    Educational researchers have examined both observed and perceived influences of the job satisfaction levels of secondary teachers and post-secondary department chairs. However, researchers have largely ignored a third group of educators: secondary Content Area Leaders (CALs). The overall satisfaction levels and the potentially influencing factors…

  9. Arangasite, Al2(PO4)(SO4)F · 7.5H2O, a new mineral from the Alyaskitovy deposit, Eastern Yakutia, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamyanin, G. N.; Zayakina, N. V.; Galenchikova, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    A new hydrous aluminum sulfate-phosphate-fluoride arangasite, Al2(PO4)(SO4)F · 7.5H2O, has been found in cassiterite-silicate-sulfide ore at the Alyaskitovy deposit, Indigirka River basin, eastern Sakha (Yakutia) (64°39' N, 142°70' E). The new mineral was named after its type locality, Arangas Creek. It belongs to the secondary minerals of the oxidation zone and occurs in cavities within quartz-muscovite-tourmaline-sulfide veins and adjacent greisen. Arangasite is associated with other secondary minerals: phosphorscorodite, fluellite, gypsum, colquiriite, strengite, mansfieldite, and sinkankasite. Arangasite forms white compact segregations composed of fine-lamellar aggregates. This paper reports data on its chemical composition, optical, radiographic, thermal, and IR-spectroscopic characteristics.

  10. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria formed extensive biofilms or flocs that contained U and V in the exopolymer, but excluded these metals from the bacteria. This suggests a specific mechanism to inhibit metal sorption to cell wall components. The example illustrates the interplay between bacteria and minerals under conditions that model oligotrophic survival, and provides insight on U mobilization from common uranium ore minerals.

  11. Sustainable growth and valuation of mineral reserves

    E-print Network

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1994-01-01

    The annual change in the value of an in-ground mineral is equal to the increase or decrease of inventories ("reserves"), multiplied by the market value of a reserve unit. The limited shrinking resource base does not exist. ...

  12. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other...

  13. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION, USE AND MANAGEMENT OF THE FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AREA, KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other...

  14. PASM : a Policy Aware Social Miner

    E-print Network

    Paradesi, Sharon M. (Sharon Myrtle), 1986-

    2013-01-01

    The Policy Aware Social Miner (PASM) project focuses on creating awareness of how seemingly harmless social data might reveal sensitive information about a person, which could be potentially abused. It seeks to define good ...

  15. [Mineralization of cartilage in growth plate].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Saito, Taku; Tanaka, Sakae

    2014-02-01

    Endochondral ossification is an essential process for skeletal development, in which chondrocyte undergoes apoptosis and induces mineralization after terminal differentiation. The apoptosis of chondrocyte is accompanied by marked accumulation of extracellular phosphate ions, which up-regulates the concentration of intra-cellular phosphate ions and leads to the activation of pro-apoptotic factors. The mineralization of chondrocyte is regulated by the orchestrated process mediated by intra-vesicular phosphate ion production by PHOSPHO1, phosphate ion influx into matrix vesicles through Pit-1, and the functions of TNAP and NPP1 that controls pyrophosphate to phosphate ratio in the extra-vesicular progression of mineralization. The apoptosis and mineralization of chondrocyte are related to not only skeletal development but also pathological conditions such as rickets/osteomalacia and osteoarthritis. PMID:24473350

  16. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-07-19

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation.

  17. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeYoung, J.H., Jr.; Lee, M.P.; Lipin, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    Major world resources of chromium, a strategic mineral commodity, are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of chromium on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  18. International Strategic Minerals Inventory summary report; nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeYoung, John H.; Sutphin, D.M.; Werner, A.B.T.; Foose, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    Major world resources of nickel, a strategic mineral commodity, are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of nickel on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  19. Contributions of Fe Minerals to Abiotic Dechlorination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most applications of enhanced in situ bioremediation are based on biological reductive dechlorination. Anaerobic metabolism can also produce reactive minerals that allow for in situ biogeochemical transformation of chlorinated organic contaminants such as PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE. ...

  20. Minerals yearbook vol. II: area reports domestic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    0000-01-01

    This volume reviews the U.S. mineral industry by State and Island possessions. It presents salient statistics on production, consumption, and other pertinent data for each State and is prepared in cooperation with State Geological Surveys or related agencies.