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Sample records for secondary standard laboratory

  1. Standardizing clinical laboratory data for secondary use.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Swapna; Demner-Fushman, Dina; McDonald, Clement J

    2012-08-01

    Clinical databases provide a rich source of data for answering clinical research questions. However, the variables recorded in clinical data systems are often identified by local, idiosyncratic, and sometimes redundant and/or ambiguous names (or codes) rather than unique, well-organized codes from standard code systems. This reality discourages research use of such databases, because researchers must invest considerable time in cleaning up the data before they can ask their first research question. Researchers at MIT developed MIMIC-II, a nearly complete collection of clinical data about intensive care patients. Because its data are drawn from existing clinical systems, it has many of the problems described above. In collaboration with the MIT researchers, we have begun a process of cleaning up the data and mapping the variable names and codes to LOINC codes. Our first step, which we describe here, was to map all of the laboratory test observations to LOINC codes. We were able to map 87% of the unique laboratory tests that cover 94% of the total number of laboratory tests results. Of the 13% of tests that we could not map, nearly 60% were due to test names whose real meaning could not be discerned and 29% represented tests that were not yet included in the LOINC table. These results suggest that LOINC codes cover most of laboratory tests used in critical care. We have delivered this work to the MIMIC-II researchers, who have included it in their standard MIMIC-II database release so that researchers who use this database in the future will not have to do this work. PMID:22561944

  2. Secondary standards laboratories for ionizing radiation calibrations: The national laboratory interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, P. I.; Campbell, G. W.

    1984-11-01

    The national laboratories are probable candidates to serve as secondary standards laboratories for the federal sector. Representatives of the major Department of Energy laboratories were polled concerning attitudes toward a secondary laboratory structure. Generally, the need for secondary laboratories was recognized and the development of such a program was encouraged. The secondary laboratories should be reviewed and inspected by the National Bureau of Standards. They should offer all of the essential, and preferably additional, calibration services in the field of radiological health protection. The selection of secondary laboratories should be based on economic and geographic criteria and/or be voluntary.

  3. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  4. [Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Ruder Bosković Institute, Zagreb].

    PubMed

    Vekić, Branko; Ban, Renata; Miljanić, Saveta

    2006-06-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Ruder Bosković Institute (SSDL), Zagreb, Croatia, was set up over the last few years with a strong support by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Technical Cooperation Project CRO/1/004, Establishing Calibration Services. The SSDL occupies two calibration rooms, each 9.6 m long and 6 m wide and each with proper air conditioning. Their walls are concrete and 1 m thick, and the entrance doors are plated with lead to protect the control rooms and the surroundings against radiation. In the first calibration room in the basement, there are two sealed sources which share the same, 6 m long calibration bench. A 30 TBq 60Co source on one side of the bench is used for calibrating ionising chambers and other high-dose radiation equipment. The irradiation unit on the other side of the bench combines two sealed sources, that is, a 740 MBq 137Cs source and a 185 MBq 60Co source, and is used for radiation protection purposes. It has three attenuators with nominal attenuations of x10, x100, and x1000. The second calibration room, which is just above the first, accommodates an X-ray unit (ISOVOLT 420, 40 kV to 300 kV, 1 mA to 20 mA) with a 5 m long calibration bench, aperture wheel assembly designed to modify the X-ray beam diameter to meet various configuration requirements for calibration instruments, a set of filter assemblies to control beam definition according to ISO 4037-3, and a half-value layer kit. PMID:16832975

  5. Primary Standards Laboratory report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) for the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL). This report summarizes metrology activities that received emphasis in the first half of 1990 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL system-wide Standards and Calibration Program.

  6. Standards Laboratory environments

    SciTech Connect

    Braudaway, D.W.

    1990-09-01

    Standards Laboratory environments need to be carefully selected to meet the specific mission of each laboratory. The mission of the laboratory depends on the specific work supported, the measurement disciplines required and the level of uncertainty required in the measurements. This document reproduces the contents of the Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory Memorandum Number 3B (PSLM-3B) which was issued on May 16, 1988, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office, to guide the laboratories of the Nuclear Weapons Complex in selecting suitable environments. Because of both general interest and specific interest in Standards Laboratory environments this document is being issued in a more available form. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance in selection of laboratory environments suitable for standards maintenance and calibration operations. It is not intended to mandate a specific environment for a specific calibration but to direct selection of the environment and to offer suggestions on how to extend precision in an existing and/or achievable (practical) environment. Although this documents pertains specifically to standards laboratories, it can be applied to any laboratory requiring environmental control.

  7. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOEpatents

    Beugelsdijk, Tony; Hollen, Robert M.; Erkkila, Tracy H.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.; Roybal, Jeffrey E.; Clark, Michael Leon

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  8. Proficiency Testing as a tool to monitor consistency of measurements in the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Czap, Ladislav; Shortt, Ken

    2008-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) established a Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (IAEA/WHO SSDL Network) in 1976. Through SSDLs designated by Member States, the Network provides a direct link of national dosimetry standards to the international measurement system of standards traceable to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). Within this structure and through the proper calibration of field instruments, the SSDLs disseminate S.I. quantities and units. To ensure that the services provided by SSDL members to end-users follow internationally accepted standards, the IAEA has set up two different comparison programmes. One programme relies on the IAEA/WHO postal TLD service and the other uses comparisons of calibrated ionization chambers to help the SSDLs verify the integrity of their national standards and the procedures used for the transfer of the standards to the end-users. The IAEA comparisons include 60Co air kerma (NK) and absorbed dose to water (ND,W) coefficients. The results of the comparisons are confidential and are communicated only to the participants. This is to encourage participation of the laboratories and their full cooperation in the reconciliation of any discrepancy. This work describes the results of the IAEA programme comparing calibration coefficients for radiotherapy dosimetry, using ionization chambers. In this programme, ionization chambers that belong to the SSDLs are calibrated sequentially at the SSDL, at the IAEA, and again at the SSDL. As part of its own quality assurance programme, the IAEA has participated in several regional comparisons organized by Regional Metrology Organizations. The results of the IAEA comparison programme show that the majority of SSDLs are capable of providing calibrations that fall inside the acceptance level of 1.5% compared to the IAEA.

  9. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the dental laboratory technology program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The dental laboratory technology program, either diploma or associate degree, is designed to ensure that students gain basic competence in the job skills needed for an entry-level employee in dental laboratory…

  10. Essential Laboratory Activities Guide. Secondary Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval County Schools, Jacksonville, FL.

    This teacher's guide was developed for use in junior and senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida, for the purpose of identifying those secondary science laboratory experiences which are essential to the development of science content knowledge and competency in handling science laboratory equipment and consumables. The guide…

  11. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  12. Laboratory testing for secondary osteoporosis evaluation.

    PubMed

    Adler, Robert A

    2012-08-01

    Osteoporosis has been classified into primary and secondary forms. All patients with osteoporosis should have measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, serum and urine calcium, and some estimation of renal function. There are a wide variety of disorders that lead to secondary osteoporosis, and the tests that confirm these diagnoses are described herein. Making the specific diagnosis is important because treatment of the underlying condition may be sufficient to lessen fracture risk, although some patients may also need usual treatment for osteoporosis. Laboratory testing in addition to a careful history and physical examination will often lead to diagnoses of treatable conditions. PMID:22333732

  13. Characterization of halogen lamps as secondary standard of luminous flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. A. R.; Sanchez, O., Jr.; Ferreira, A. F. G., Jr.

    2011-09-01

    This work presents a study of lamps characterization concerning its lamp output, current and voltage drift during seasoning and regarding the use of theses lamps as luminous flux secondary standard. The 200W halogen lamps are seasoned for 30 hours and during the seasoning period the relative drift of the lamp illuminance, current and voltage are measured at each 3 minutes. The illuminance is measured using a photometer with detector head, the lamp voltage is measured using a 6.5 digits voltmeter and the current is measured using a 6.5 digits voltmeter and 0.1 Ohms standard resistor. The lamp current is controlled by a calibrated current power source with stability better than 1 mA. To reduce the stray light, baffles are positioned between the lamp and the detector head. The alignment of experimental assembly is made by a He-Ne Laser. Data of illuminance, current and voltage is acquired by software built in Labview database. Among the 5 lamps seasoned, the best result presents the variation of illuminance of 0.04% per hour. This lamp is chosen to become the secondary standard and its luminous flux is measured using an Ulbricht integrating sphere. This method allows the laboratory to create secondary standard of luminous flux for its routine test and measurements and to supply theses standards for Brazilian industry.

  14. Standard Specifications for Language Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Administration, Raleigh.

    Specifications are presented covering the components of electronic and electro-mechanical equipment, non-electrical materials for the teacher-student positions, and other items of a miscellaneous nature to provide for a complete, workable language laboratory facility. Instructions for the use of specifications are included for the purchaser,…

  15. OSHA Laboratory Standard: Driving Force for Laboratory Safety!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Laboratory Safety Standards as the major driving force in establishing and maintaining a safe working environment for teachers and students. (Author)

  16. Standardizing laboratory data by mapping to LOINC.

    PubMed

    Khan, Agha N; Griffith, Stanley P; Moore, Catherine; Russell, Dorothy; Rosario, Arnulfo C; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a pilot project to standardize local laboratory data at five Indian Health Service (IHS) medical facilities by mapping laboratory test names to Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC). An automated mapping tool was developed to assign LOINC codes. At these sites, they were able to map from 63% to 76% of the local active laboratory tests to LOINC using the mapping tool. Eleven percent to 27% of the tests were mapped manually. They could not assign LOINC codes to 6% to 19% of the laboratory tests due to incomplete or incorrect information about these tests. The results achieved approximate other similar efforts. Mapping of laboratory test names to LOINC codes will allow IHS to aggregate laboratory data more easily for disease surveillance and clinical and administrative reporting efforts. This project may provide a model for standardization efforts in other health systems. PMID:16501183

  17. Standardization of Terminology in Laboratory Medicine II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kap No; Yoon, Jong-Hyun; Min, Won Ki; Lim, Hwan Sub; Song, Junghan; Chae, Seok Lae; Jang, Seongsoo; Ki, Chang-Seok; Bae, Sook Young; Kim, Jang Su; Kwon, Jung-Ah; Lee, Chang Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Standardization of medical terminology is essential in data transmission between health care institutes and in maximizing the benefits of information technology. The purpose of this study was to standardize medical terms for laboratory observations. During the second year of the study, a standard database of concept names for laboratory terms that covered those used in tertiary health care institutes and reference laboratories was developed. The laboratory terms in the Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC) database were adopted and matched with the electronic data interchange (EDI) codes in Korea. A public hearing and a workshop for clinical pathologists were held to collect the opinions of experts. The Korean standard laboratory terminology database containing six axial concept names, components, property, time aspect, system (specimen), scale type, and method type, was established for 29,340 test observations. Short names and mapping tables for EDI codes and UMLS were added. Synonym tables were prepared to help match concept names to common terms used in the fields. We herein described the Korean standard laboratory terminology database for test names, result description terms, and result units encompassing most of the laboratory tests in Korea. PMID:18756062

  18. Challenges of Implementing Iranian National Laboratory Standards

    PubMed Central

    Safadel, N; Dahim, P; Anjarani, S; Rahnamaye Farzami, M; Samiee, S Mirab; Amini, R; Farsi, Sh; Mahdavi, S; Khodaverdian, K; Rashed Marandi, F

    2013-01-01

    After four years of publishing the Iranian National Laboratory Standard and following a strategic plan to implement its requirements, it was decided to review the taken actions, evaluating the achievements and the failures, as well as analyzing the gaps and planning the interventional activities to resolve the problems. A thorough evaluation revealed that the progress of implementation process varies considerably in different provinces, as well as in laboratories in different public and private sectors. Diversity and heterogeneousity of laboratories throughout the country is one of unresolvable problems. Although we encounter shortage of resources in the country, improper allocation or distribution of resources and budgets make the problems more complicated. Inadequacy of academic training in laboratory sciences has resulted in necessity of holding comprehensive post-graduate training courses. Revising academic curriculum of laboratory sciences could be mostly helpful, moreover there should be organized, training courses with pre-determined practical topics. providing specific technical guidelines, to clarify the required technical details could temporarily fill the training gaps of laboratory staff. Inadequate number of competent auditors was one of the difficulties in universities. Another important challenge returns to laboratory equipment, developing the national controlling system to manage the laboratory equipment in terms of quality and accessibility has been planned in RHL. At last cultural problems and resistance to change are main obstacles that have reduced the pace of standardization, it needs to rationalize the necessity of establishing laboratory standards for all stakeholders. PMID:23865029

  19. Certification standards transfer: from committee to laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, H P

    1998-12-01

    The ISO 9000 Standards series were developed to provide the international manufacturing industry with a framework to ensure purchased products meet quality criteria. Section 4 of ISO 9001, Quality System Model for Quality Assurance in Design, Development, Production, Installation and Servicing, contains 20 aspects of a quality system that must be addressed by an organization in order to receive ISO 9001 certification. This concept is extended to the clinical laboratory, where a quality system program establishes for the customer (patient/clinician) that the purchased product (requested information on a submitted specimen-test result) meets established quality norms. In order to satisfy the customer, the providing organization must have policies and procedures in place that ensure a quality product, and be certified. To become certified the organization must, through an inspection process, demonstrate to an independent accrediting agency that it meets defined standards. In the United States, the government through the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) 1988 established quality standards for the clinical laboratory. The College of American Pathologists (CAP), through its Laboratory Accreditation Program (LAP), serves as an independent agency that certifies that laboratories meet standards. To demonstrate the applicability of an established clinical laboratory accreditation program to ISO 9001 certification, the standards and checklists of CLIA 1988 and the CAP LAP will be examined to determine their conformance to ISO 9001, Section 4. PMID:10023820

  20. Radioactive Standards Laboratory ININ as a reference laboratory in Mexico.

    PubMed

    GarcíaDíaz, O; MartínezAyala, L; HerreraValadez, L; TovarM, V; Karam, L

    2016-03-01

    The Radioactive Standards Laboratory of the National Institute of Nuclear Research is the National reference laboratory for the measurement of radioactivity in Mexico. It has a gamma-ray spectrometry system with a high-purity Ge-detector for measurements from 50 keV to 2000 keV, and develops standardized radioactive (beta-particle and gamma-ray emitting) sources in different geometries with uncertainties less than or equal to 5% for applications such as the calibration of radionuclide calibrators (clinically used dose calibrators), Ge-detectors and NaI(Tl) detectors. PMID:27358942

  1. Laboratory Technicians in Australian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackling, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    A number of reports have argued that secondary science education needs to be more inquiry oriented and involve authentic and practical investigations to develop scientific literacy and better engage students in learning science. Inquiry-oriented approaches, such as those advocated in the new science national curriculum, require that teachers have…

  2. [International standardization of laboratory information systems].

    PubMed

    Ishigami, T

    1997-06-01

    The standardization of clinical laboratory information systems is one of the most difficult but important subjects for clinical laboratory community and laboratorians. International Standard Organization (ISO) has the projects in this field (JTC1/SC7) which is the part of approach to the international laboratory standardization (ISO/TC 212). US NCCLS and European CEN/TC 251 are working under ISO/TC 212. In the United States, the National Academy for Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) had started recently to organize the international collaboration program on the subject. The Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP)'s Council of Laboratory Informatics had joined this program in 1995. NACB/AACC's Ad Hoc Committee which was organized in 1996 is now trying to collect the general opinions ("what and how") through their internet home page. The current status of the works on the standardization of clinical laboratory information systems in the U.S., Europe, and Japan is reviewed briefly in this article. HL7 electronic data exchange specification and clinical testing coding systems such as LOINC coding project and JSCP's coding project are also reviewed. PMID:9306712

  3. The Nature of Laboratory Learning Experiences in Secondary Science Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crippen, Kent J.; Archambault, Leanna M.; Kern, Cindy L.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching science to secondary students in an online environment is a growing international trend. Despite this trend, reports of empirical studies of this phenomenon are noticeably missing. With a survey concerning the nature of laboratory activities, this study describes the perspective of 35-secondary teachers from 15-different U.S. states who…

  4. The need for standardization in laboratory networks.

    PubMed

    Peter, Trevor F; Shimada, Yoko; Freeman, Richard R; Ncube, Bekezela N; Khine, Aye-Aye; Murtagh, Maurine M

    2009-06-01

    Expanding health care services for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria has increased the demand for affordable and reliable laboratory diagnostics in resource-limited countries. Many countries are responding by upgrading their public laboratories and introducing new technology to provide expanded testing services into more regions. This expansion carries the risk of increasing the diversity of an already highly diverse technology and testing platform landscape, making it more difficult to manage laboratory networks across different levels of the health care system. To prevent this trend, countries are recommended to implement policies and guidelines that standardize test menus, technology, platforms, and commodities across multiple laboratories. The benefits of standardization include rational prioritization of resources for capacity development and more efficient supply chain management through volume-based price discounts for reagents and instrument service. Procurement procedures, including specification, prequalification, and contract negotiation, need to align with the standardization policies for maximum benefit. Standardization should be adhered to irrespective of whether procurement is centralized or decentralized or whether carried out by national bodies or development partners. PMID:19461096

  5. Science Laboratory Learning Environments in Junior Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Ping Wai

    2015-01-01

    A Chinese version of the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) was used to study the students' perceptions of the actual and preferred laboratory learning environments in Hong Kong junior secondary science lessons. Valid responses of the SLEI from 1932 students of grade 7 to grade 9 indicated that an open-ended inquiry approach seldom…

  6. Adaptive secondary P30 prototype: laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Ragland, Sam; Esposito, Simone; del Vecchio, Ciro; Fini, Luca; Stefanini, Paolo; Biliotti, Valdemaro; Ranfagni, Piero; Salinari, Piero; Gallieni, Daniele; Biasi, Roberto; Mantegazza, Paolo; Sciocco, G.; Noviello, G.; Invernizzi, S.

    1998-09-01

    We present the result of electrical and optical measurements performed on a reduced size adaptive secondary prototype named P30. The design of this concave deformable mirror consists of a thin deformable glass shell whose figure is controlled by electromagnetic actuators and capacitive position senors. Static measurements of the mirror optical figure, performed with a commercial interferometer, have provided the calibration of the internal position sensor. Dynamic test were performed to experimentally derive the mechanical response of the mirror to the electromagnetic actuators in order to design the mirror closed loop control law. The test, although performed on a reduced scale, are representative of the complexity and capabilities of the full size mirror. In fact, all the key-elements of the full size mirror, i.e. central supporting membrane, actuator spacing closed loop control of the device, have been implemented on the prototype.

  7. 77 FR 16551 - Standards for Private Laboratory Analytical Packages and Introduction to Laboratory Related...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Standards for Private Laboratory Analytical Packages and Introduction to Laboratory Related Portions of the Food Modernization Safety Act for Private Laboratory... Administration (FDA) is announcing two meetings entitled ``Standards for Private Laboratory Analytical...

  8. Outcome Standards for Secondary Marketing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James R., III

    A national panel consisting of marketing education advisory committee members, former marketing education students, and marketing education teacher-coordinators reacted to a list of 34 outcome standards developed through a literature review. The 34 standards focused on program quality, program relevance, individual transition to and growth in the…

  9. 42 CFR 493.1445 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities. 493... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1445 Standard; Laboratory...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1407 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities. 493... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1407 Standard; Laboratory...

  11. Teachers' Use of Agricultural Laboratories in Secondary Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoulders, Catherine W.; Myers, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    Trends in the agriculture industry require students to have the ability to solve problems associated with scientific content. Agricultural laboratories are considered a main component of secondary agricultural education, and are well suited to provide students with opportunities to develop problem-solving skills through experiential learning. This…

  12. Farm Laboratory Aids Post-Secondary Instruction in Agricultural Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statler, Larry L.; Juhl, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Reports a farm laboratory of 1500 swine, 40 beef cattle, 52 sheep, a 300-crop acres, and a full line of leased new farm machinery for post-secondary agricultural production students. A student board of directors manages the demonstration farm. (DM)

  13. 42 CFR 493.1357 - Standard; laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; laboratory director qualifications. 493...; laboratory director qualifications. The laboratory director must be qualified to manage and direct the... laboratory director must possess a current license as a laboratory director issued by the State in which...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1357 - Standard; laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; laboratory director qualifications. 493...; laboratory director qualifications. The laboratory director must be qualified to manage and direct the... laboratory director must possess a current license as a laboratory director issued by the State in which...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1357 - Standard; laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; laboratory director qualifications. 493...; laboratory director qualifications. The laboratory director must be qualified to manage and direct the... laboratory director must possess a current license as a laboratory director issued by the State in which...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1357 - Standard; laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; laboratory director qualifications. 493...; laboratory director qualifications. The laboratory director must be qualified to manage and direct the... laboratory director must possess a current license as a laboratory director issued by the State in which...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1445 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities. 493.1445 Section 493.1445 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1407 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities. 493.1407 Section 493.1407 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1407 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities. 493.1407 Section 493.1407 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1445 - Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Laboratory director responsibilities. 493.1445 Section 493.1445 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1357 - Standard; laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; laboratory director qualifications. 493... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Provider-Performed Microscopy (ppm) Procedures § 493.1357...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1359 - Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Provider-Performed Microscopy (ppm) Procedures § 493.1359...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1359 - Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Provider-Performed Microscopy (ppm) Procedures § 493.1359...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1359 - Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Provider-Performed Microscopy (ppm) Procedures § 493.1359...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1359 - Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; PPM laboratory director responsibilities... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Provider-Performed Microscopy (ppm) Procedures § 493.1359...

  6. An automated secondary standard for calibrating liquid flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobart, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    A secondary working standard of flow calibration has been developed to be used in place of a primary weight-time standard, and which can thereby effect a 75 percent reduction in calibration time while maintaining acceptable accuracies. The secondary standard uses six previously calibrated turbine-type flowmeters built into two manifold systems containing automatically switched flow valves. The pair of systems is capable of covering the flow range of 0.0004 to 19 l/s (0.007 to 300 gpm) with the uncertainty in volume flow rate not exceeding + or - 0.25 percent over the range of 0.06 to 19 l/s and not exceeding + or - 0.5 percent over the range 0.0004 to 0.06 1/s. Data reduction and plotting of results are by computer.

  7. VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF BUILDING 125, THE STANDARDS LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF BUILDING 125, THE STANDARDS LABORATORY. THE PRIMARY FUNCTION OF THE STANDARDS LABORATORY WAS TO ENSURE AND IMPLEMENT A SYSTEM OF QUALITY CONTROL FOR INCOMING MATERIALS USED IN MANUFACTURING PROCESSES. SEVERAL ENGINEERING CONTROLS WERE USED TO ASSURE ACCURACY OF THE CALIBRATION PROCESSES INCLUDING: FLEX-FREE GRANITE TABLES, AIR LOCKED DOORS, TEMPERATURE CONTROLS, AND A SUPER-CLEAN ENVIRONMENT - Rocky Flats Plant, Standards Laboratory, Immediately north of 215A water tower & adjacent to Third Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. The Nature of Laboratory Learning Experiences in Secondary Science Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippen, Kent J.; Archambault, Leanna M.; Kern, Cindy L.

    2013-06-01

    Teaching science to secondary students in an online environment is a growing international trend. Despite this trend, reports of empirical studies of this phenomenon are noticeably missing. With a survey concerning the nature of laboratory activities, this study describes the perspective of 35-secondary teachers from 15-different U.S. states who are teaching science online. The type and frequency of reported laboratory activities are consistent with the tradition of face-to-face instruction, using hands-on and simulated experiments. While provided examples were student-centered and required the collection of data, they failed to illustrate key components of the nature of science. The features of student-teacher interactions, student engagement, and nonverbal communications were found to be lacking and likely constitute barriers to the enactment of inquiry. These results serve as a call for research and development focused on using existing communication tools to better align with the activity of science such that the nature of science is more clearly addressed, the work of students becomes more collaborative and authentic, and the formative elements of a scientific inquiry are more accessible to all participants.

  9. Use and qualification of primary and secondary standards employed in quantitative ¹H NMR spectroscopy of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Torgny; McEwen, Ian; Johansson, Monika; Arvidsson, Torbjörn

    2014-05-01

    Standards are required in quantitative NMR (qNMR) to obtain accurate and precise results. In this study acetanilide was established and used as a primary standard. Six other chemicals were selected as secondary standards: 3,4,5-trichloropyridine, dimethylterephthalate, maleic acid, 3-sulfolene, 1,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)benzene, and 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene. The secondary standards were quantified using the primary standard acetanilide. A protocol for qualification and periodic checks of these secondary standards was developed, and used for evaluation of the stability of the compounds. Periodic monitoring of purity was performed for several years. The purity was higher than 99% for all secondary standards. All standards maintained the initial purity during the time period of monitoring, with very small variations in purity (0.3-0.4%). The selected secondary standards were shown to be suitable qNMR standards and that periodic requalification of the standards by qNMR ensures reliable analytical results. These standards have been used in our laboratory for compliance testing of pharmaceutical active substances and approved medicinal products as well as for analysis of suspected illegal medicines. In total more than 1000 samples have been tested using both internal and external standardization and examples are given. PMID:24206940

  10. Standard terminology in the laboratory and classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehlow, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the materials produced by modern technologists is associated with a family of immaterials--all the concepts of substance, process, and purpose. It is concepts that are essential to transfer knowledge. It is concepts that are the stuff of terminology. Terminology is standardized today by companies, standards organizations, governments, and other groups. Simply described, it is the pre-negotiation of the meanings of terms. Terminology has become a key issue in businesses, and terminology knowledge is essential in understanding the modern world. The following is a introductory workshop discussing the concepts of terminology and methods of its standardization.

  11. Radioxenon standards used in laboratory inter-comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gohla, H; Auer, M; Cassette, Ph; Hague, R K; Lechermann, M; Nadalut, B

    2016-03-01

    Preparation methods for (133)Xe standards of activity concentration and the results of the 2014 (133)Xe laboratory inter-comparison exercise are described. One element of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program for laboratories of the International Monitoring System (IMS) will be regular inter-comparison exercises. However, until recently, no activity concentration standards for benchmarking were available. Therefore, two (133)Xe activity concentration reference standards were produced independently by Idaho National Laboratory and Seibersdorf Laboratories and used for the 2014 laboratory inter-comparison exercise. The preparation of a complementary (127)Xe activity concentration standard as well as a (127)Xe laboratory inter-comparison exercise suggests (127)Xe as a suitable isotope for QA/QC of remote IMS noble gas stations. PMID:26682890

  12. Intercomparison of Laboratory Radiance Calibration Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavri, Betina; Chrien, Tom; Green, Robert; Williams, Orlesa

    2000-01-01

    Several standards for radiometric calibration were measured repeatedly with a spectroradiometer in order to understand how they compared in accuracy and stability. The tested radiance standards included a NIST 1000 W bulb and halon panel, two calibrated and stabilized integrating spheres, and a cavity blackbody. Results indicate good agreement between the blackbody and 1000 W bulb/spectralon panel, If these two radiance sources are assumed correct, then the integrating spheres did not conform. to their manufacturer-reported radiances in several regions of the spectrum. More detailed measurements am underway to investigate the discrepancy.

  13. Clinical pathology accreditation: standards for the medical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, D; Blair, C; Haeney, M R; Jeffcoate, S L; Scott, K W M; Williams, D L

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a new set of revised standards for the medical laboratory, which have been produced by Clinical Pathology Accreditation (UK) Ltd (CPA). The original standards have been in use since 1992 and it was recognised that extensive revision was required. A standards revision group was established by CPA and this group used several international standards as source references, so that the resulting new standards are compatible with the most recent international reference sources. The aim is to make the assessment of medical laboratories as objective as possible in the future. CPA plans to introduce these standards in the UK in 2003 following extensive consultation with professional bodies, piloting in selected laboratories, and training of assessors. PMID:12354795

  14. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CONFERENCE (NELAC): CONSTITUTION, BYLAWS, AND STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principles and operating procedures for the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC) are contained in the NELAC Constitution and Bylaws. The major portion of this document (standards) contains detailed requirements for accrediting environmental labo...

  15. Dehydration Parameters and Standards for Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bekkevold, Christine M; Robertson, Kimberly L; Reinhard, Mary K; Battles, August H; Rowland, Neil E

    2013-01-01

    Water deprivation and restriction are common features of many physiologic and behavioral studies; however, there are no data-driven humane standards regarding mice on water deprivation or restriction studies to guide IACUC, investigators, and veterinarians. Here we acutely deprived outbred CD1 mice of water for as long as 48 h or restricted them to a 75% or 50% water ration; physical and physiologic indicators of dehydration were measured. With acute water deprivation, the appearance and attitude of mice deteriorated after 24 h, and weight loss exceeded 15%. Plasma osmolality was increased, and plasma volume decreased with each time interval. Plasma corticosterone concentration increased with duration of deprivation. There were no differences in any dehydration measures between mice housed in conventional static cages or ventilated racks. Chronic water restriction induced no significant changes compared with ad libitum availability. We conclude that acute water deprivation of as long as 24 h produces robust physiologic changes; however, deprivation in excess of 24 h is not recommended in light of apparent animal distress. Although clearly thirsty, mice adapt to chronic water restriction of as much as 50% of the ad libitum daily ration that is imposed over an interval of as long as 8 d. PMID:23849404

  16. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Agricultural Laboratory and Field Technician Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These Illinois skill standards for the agricultural laboratory and field technician cluster are intended to serve as a guide to workforce preparation program providers as they define content for their programs and to employers as they establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. They could also serve as a mechanism for…

  17. Primary Standards Laboratory report, 2nd half 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) operates a system-wide primary standards and calibration program for the US Department of Energy, Albuquerque Field Office (DOE/AL). The PSL mission is as follows: to develop and maintain primary standards; to calibrate electrical, physical, and radiation reference standards for customer laboratories (DOE/AL nuclear weapon contractors); to conduct the technical surveys and measurement audits of these laboratories; and to recommend and implement system-wide improvements. This report summarizes activities of the PSL for the second half of 1993 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL Standards and Calibration Program. Specific areas covered include development projects, improvement projects, calibration and special measurements, surveys and audits, customer service, and significant events. Appendixes include certifications and reports;; a discussion about commercial calibration laboratories; PSL memoranda (PSLM); test numbers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), formerly the National Bureau of Standards (NBS); and DOE/PSL memoranda on the Standards and Calibration Program with emphasis on traceability of PSL calibrations.

  18. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for clinical laboratory occupations programs. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process used to develop the…

  19. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program administration

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), organizational responsibilities, and the accreditation process. DOELAP evaluates and accredits personnel dosimetry and radiobioassay programs used for worker monitoring and protection at DOE and DOE contractor sites and facilities as required in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The purpose of this technical standard is to establish procedures for administering DOELAP and acquiring accreditation.

  20. The Availability and Use of Science Laboratories at Secondary Education Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, T. J. M. S.; Suryanarayana, N. V. S.

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the availability and use of Science Laboratories at the secondary education level in Visakhapatnam District of Andhra Pradesh, India. It is commented that most of the schools do not possess well equipped laboratories and even when equipment is available some science teachers are not utilizing the laboratory facilities.…

  1. Agricultural Mechanics Laboratory Management Professional Development Needs of Wyoming Secondary Agriculture Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Billy R.; Saucier, P. Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Accidents happen; however, the likelihood of accidents occurring in the agricultural mechanics laboratory is greatly reduced when agricultural mechanics laboratory facilities are managed by secondary agriculture teachers who are competent and knowledgeable. This study investigated the agricultural mechanics laboratory management in-service needs…

  2. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  3. 40 CFR 50.16 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for lead. 50.16 Section 50.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead. (a) The national primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead (Pb) and its compounds are 0.15 micrograms per cubic...

  4. 40 CFR 50.12 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for lead. 50.12 Section 50.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead. (a) National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead and its compounds, measured as elemental lead by a reference...

  5. 40 CFR 50.12 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for lead. 50.12 Section 50.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead. (a) National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead and its compounds, measured as elemental lead by a reference...

  6. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  7. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  8. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  9. 40 CFR 50.15 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for ozone. 50.15 Section 50.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....15 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone (O3) is 0.075 parts...

  10. 40 CFR 50.16 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for lead. 50.16 Section 50.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead. (a) The national primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead (Pb) and its compounds are 0.15 micrograms per cubic...

  11. 40 CFR 50.12 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for lead. 50.12 Section 50.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead. (a) National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead and its compounds, measured as elemental lead by a reference...

  12. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  13. Use of channel electron multipliers as secondary standard detectors at EUV wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Lapson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    The procedures available for photometric calibration at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths are outlined and the requirements for a secondary standard EUV photomultiplier defined. The performance of a number of commercially available channel electron multipliers over the 304-1350-A wavelength range is described, and their suitability for use as secondary standards is discussed in detail. Although none of the multipliers evaluated fully met the requirements for a secondary standard, it proved possible to calibrate absolutely a Mullard cone channel over the required wavelength range to an accuracy of plus or minus 9% and to employ it as a secondary standard in the calibration of a series of sounding rocket spectrometers.

  14. Use of Channel Electron Multipliers as Secondary Standard Detectors at EUV Wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Timothy, J G; Lapson, L B

    1974-06-01

    The procedures available for photometric calibration at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths are outlined and the requirements for a secondary standard EUV photomultiplier defined. The performance of a number of commercially available channel electron multipliers over the 304-1350-A wavelength range is described and their suitability for use as secondary standards discussed in detail. Although none of the multipliers evaluated fully met the requirements for a secondary standard it proved possible to calibrate absolutely a Mullard cone channel over the required wavelength range to an accuracy of +/-9% and to employ it as a secondary standard in the calibration of a series of sounding rocket spectrometers. PMID:20126208

  15. Role of primary standards, reference materials, and laboratory intercomparisons in an accredited INAA Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, P.

    1994-12-31

    The terms accreditation and certification may be confusing to newcomers in the field of quality management. One of the differences between ISO-25 (from the International Organization for Standardization) laboratory accreditation and ISO-9000 laboratory certification is that an ISO-25-accredited laboratory has been assessed by an expert outsider on its technical competence, whereas an ISO-9000-certified laboratory has not. Laboratory accreditation includes, therefore, a certainty to the {open_quotes}customer{close_quotes} that analyses will be performed at the state of the practice with a given accuracy and precision, a certainty according to documented criteria, regularly evaluated by peers during their audits. But, when analyses are being carried out by a certified laboratory, this customer has to take all measures himself to ensure the quality of the results, e.g., by blind control samples.

  16. Immediate needs for MQA testing at state secondary calibration laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, R.

    1993-12-31

    The Calibration Laboratory attempts to provide services that satisfy the needs and requests for a variety of customers. New needs and requests have resulted in calibration of instrumentation outside the original laboratory designs. These tasks require several changes at the laboratory and a need for new support services, especially measurement quality assurance (MQA). The MQA tests are gamma (Cs-137) below 0.5 mrem (5{mu}Sv) per hour and x-ray kVp. Modification to the current gamma (Cs-137) MQA test is recommended because lower intensity fields are commonly measured.

  17. Molecular transformations accompanying the aging of laboratory secondary organic aerosol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aging of fresh secondary organic aerosol, generated by alpha-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor, was studied by passing it through a second reaction chamber where hydroxyl radicals were generated. Two types of experiments were performed: plug injection experiments where the particle mass a...

  18. Laboratory Teaching: Implication on Students' Achievement in Chemistry in Secondary Schools in Ebonyi State of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akani, Omiko

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigation of the roles of the laboratory in students' academic achievement in chemistry in secondary schools in Ebonyi State of Nigeria. Four research questions and two hypotheses guided the study. A sample of 240 students selected through simple random sampling technique from ten secondary schools in the 3 Education Zones…

  19. Calibration of the Standards and Calibration Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors report measurements of dose rates at various locations in the LLNL Standards and Calibrations Laboratory`s Co{sup 60} Radiation Pool. Plots show the dependence of dose rate on radius near the bottom of the pool and the dependence of dose rate on height at a fixed distance from the pool center. The effect of varying sample location within the pool`s dry-well was also investigated.

  20. Extensions to the Beta Secondary Standard BSS 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, R.; Buchholz, G.

    2011-11-01

    Since several years, the irradiation facility for beta radiation, the Beta Secondary Standard BSS 2 developed at PTB, has been in worldwide use for the performance of irradiations with calibrated beta sources. Due to recent developments in eye tumor therapy, in eye lens dosimetry, and in soft- and hardware technology, several extensions have been added to the BSS 2. These extensions are described in this paper: 1. The possibility of using a 106Ru/106Rh beta source was added as this radionuclide is often used in tumor therapy. 2. The (small) contribution due to photon radiation was included in the dose (rate) reported by the BSS 2, as this was missing in the past. 3. The quantity personal dose equivalent at a depth of 3 mm, Hp(3), was implemented due to recent findings on the radio sensitivity of the eye lens regarding cataract induction and the subsequent lowering of the dose limit from 150 mSv down to 20 mSv per year; 4. The correction for ambient conditions (air temperature, pressure, and relative humidity) was improved in order to adequately handle the quantity Hp(3) and in order to extend the range of use beyond 25°C. 5. A checksum test was added to the software to secure the calibration data against (un)intended changes. 6. The connection of the PC and the BSS 2 has been changed to a network interface (TCP/IP) in order to be able to use up-to-date computers not containing a parallel and a serial port. 7. A rod phantom was added in order to make sure the mechanical set-up is of high quality. All these extensions have been implemented in the PTB's BSS 2 model. The routine implementation of extension 1 is still under investigation by the manufacturer. The commercially available BSS 2 will contain extensions 2 to 6 starting approximately in 2012, while extension 7 has already been incorporated since 2011. Extensions 2 to 4 will also be available for old BSS 2 versions via a software update, starting approximately at the beginning of 2012. Extension 6 will be

  1. 40 CFR 50.16 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for lead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary ambient air quality standards for lead (Pb) and its compounds are 0.15 micrograms per cubic meter, arithmetic mean concentration over a 3-month period, measured in the ambient air as Pb either by: (1) A... primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for Pb are met when the maximum arithmetic...

  2. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS NATIONAL PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS §...

  3. State Secondary Career and Technical Education Standards: Creating a Framework from a Patchwork of Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Marisa; Harrison, Linda; Schneider, Sherrie

    2008-01-01

    Many states are currently working to define secondary career and technical education (CTE) content standards that specify the knowledge and skills students are expected to master in CTE program areas. This study explores the progress and status of states in developing statewide secondary CTE standards systems. An exhaustive online query of CTE…

  4. 76 FR 38591 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Secondary Lead Smelting; Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Secondary Lead Smelting (76 FR 29032... current rule. DATES: Comments on the proposed rule published May 19, 2011 (76 FR 29032) must be received... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Secondary Lead Smelting, was published May 19, 2011 (76 FR...

  5. Consumer-Oriented Laboratory Activities: A Manual for Secondary Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jacqueline; McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

    This document provides a laboratory manual for use by secondary level students in performing consumer-oriented laboratory experiments. Each experiment includes an introductory question outlining the purpose of the investigation, a detailed discussion, detailed procedures, questions to be answered upon completing the experiment, and information for…

  6. Laboratory Practices of Beginning Secondary Science Teachers: A Five-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sissy S.; Firestone, Jonah B.; Luft, Julie A.; Weeks, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    During the beginning years of teaching, science teachers develop the knowledge and skills needed to design and implement science laboratories. In this regard, this quantitative study focused on the reported laboratory practices of 61 beginning secondary science teachers who participated in four different induction programs. The results…

  7. Initiating a secondary education apprenticeship program for the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Grau, Adam

    2003-01-01

    The shortage of medical laboratory professionals entering the work field has prompted the clinical laboratory at North Memorial Medical Center to take a proactive stance. Working together with Minnesota School District 287 and North Memorial's education and human resources departments, we have created a high school-age program to teach young students. The focus of this program will be the science behind health care. The state has chosen our program to be the template for the statewide model. Labs in the state will follow this template when starting their new programs. This is the first apprenticeship program in the state of Minnesota for a health-care laboratory. The new program will bring students to our lab and teach them practical skills. These skills will include client services skills (phone etiquette, critical thinking) and technical skills (computer skills, EKGs, testing a patient's blood sugar). More important, it will expose high school students to a career in science--a career option that they might not have been familiar with. This article presents the steps we have completed to introduce this new program. PMID:12701571

  8. Measurement of photoemission and secondary emission from laboratory dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelton, Robert C.; Yadlowsky, Edward J.; Settersten, Thomas B.; Spanjers, Gregory G.; Moschella, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is experimentally determine the emission properties of dust grains in order to provide theorists and modelers with an accurate data base to use in codes that predict the charging of grains in various plasma environments encountered in the magnetospheres of the planets. In general these modelers use values which have been measured on planar, bulk samples of the materials in question. The large enhancements expected due to the small size of grains can have a dramatic impact upon the predictions and the ultimate utility of these predictions. The first experimental measurement of energy resolved profiles of the secondary electron emission coefficient, 6, of sub-micron diameter particles has been accomplished. Bismuth particles in the size range of .022 to .165 micrometers were generated in a moderate pressure vacuum oven (average size is a function of oven temperature and pressure) and introduced into a high vacuum chamber where they interacted with a high energy electron beam (0.4 to 20 keV). Large enhancements in emission were observed with a peak value, delta(sub max) = 4. 5 measured for the ensemble of particles with a mean size of .022 micrometers. This is in contrast to the published value, delta(sub max) = 1.2, for bulk bismuth. The observed profiles are in general agreement with recent theoretical predictions made by Chow et al. at UCSD.

  9. 42 CFR 493.1239 - Standard: General laboratory systems quality assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: General laboratory systems quality... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1239 Standard: General laboratory...

  10. 46 CFR 159.010-3 - Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance. 159... Laboratory: Acceptance, Recognition, and Termination § 159.010-3 Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance. (a) To be accepted by the Coast Guard as an independent laboratory, a laboratory must— (1)...

  11. Iodine Standard Materials: Preparation and Inter-Laboratory Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    D D Jenson; M L Adamic; J E Olson; M G Watrous; C Vockenhuber

    2014-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is preparing to enter the community of AMS practioners who analyze for 129Iodine. We expect to take delivery of a 0.5 MV compact accelerator mass spectrometry system, built by NEC, in the early summer of 2014. The primary mission for this instrument is iodine; it is designed to analyze iodine in the +3 charge state. As part of the acceptance testing for this instrument, both at NEC and on-site in our laboratory, some sort of standard or reference material is needed to verify performance. Appropriate standard materials are not readily available in the commercial marketplace. Small quantities can sometimes be acquired from other laboratories already engaged in iodine analyses. In the longer-term, meaningful quantities of standard materials are needed for routine use in analyses, and for quality control functions1. We have prepared some standard materials, starting with elemental Woodward iodine and NIST SRM 3231 [Iodine-129 Isotopic Standard (high level)] 10-6 solution. The goal was to make mixtures at the 5x10-10, 5x10-11, 5x10-12 ratio levels, along with some unmodified Woodward, in the chemical form of silver iodide. Approximately twenty grams of each of these mixtures were prepared. The elemental Woodward iodine was dissolved in chloroform, then reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite in water. At this point the NIST spike material was added, in the form of sodium iodide. The mixed iodides were oxidized back to iodine in chloroform using hydrogen peroxide. This oxidation step was essential for isotopic equilibration of the 127 and 129 atoms. The iodine was reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite as before. Excess sulfites and sulfates were precipitated with barium nitrate. After decanting, silver nitrate was used to precipitate the desired silver iodide. Once the silver iodide was produced, the material was kept in darkness as much as possible to minimize photo-oxidation. The various mixtures were synthesized independently of each

  12. RNAVLab: A virtual laboratory for studying RNA secondary structures based on grid computing technology

    PubMed Central

    Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying; Solorio, Thamar; Licon, Abel; Mireles, David; Araiza, Roberto; Johnson, Kyle L.

    2009-01-01

    As ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation, their secondary structures have been the focus of many recent studies. Despite the computing power of supercomputers, computationally predicting secondary structures with thermodynamic methods is still not feasible when the RNA molecules have long nucleotide sequences and include complex motifs such as pseudoknots. This paper presents RNAVLab (RNA Virtual Laboratory), a virtual laboratory for studying RNA secondary structures including pseudoknots that allows scientists to address this challenge. Two important case studies show the versatility and functionalities of RNAVLab. The first study quantifies its capability to rebuild longer secondary structures from motifs found in systematically sampled nucleotide segments. The extensive sampling and predictions are made feasible in a short turnaround time because of the grid technology used. The second study shows how RNAVLab allows scientists to study the viral RNA genome replication mechanisms used by members of the virus family Nodaviridae. PMID:19885376

  13. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Time Commitment When Addressing the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenna, Joshua L.; Russell, William Benedict, III

    2015-01-01

    In 2010 the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) were officially released in America for mathematics and English language arts and soon adopted by 45 of the 50 states. However, within the English langue arts domain there were standards intended for secondary social studies teachers under the title, Common Core State Standards for English Language…

  14. ACMG clinical laboratory standards for next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Heidi L.; Bale, Sherri J; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Berg, Jonathan S; Brown, Kerry K; Deignan, Joshua L; Friez, Michael J; Funke, Birgit H; Hegde, Madhuri R; Lyon, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have been and continue to be deployed in clinical laboratories, enabling rapid transformations in genomic medicine. These technologies have reduced the cost of large-scale sequencing by several orders of magnitude, and continuous advances are being made. It is now feasible to analyze an individual's near-complete exome or genome to assist in the diagnosis of a wide array of clinical scenarios. Next-generation sequencing technologies are also facilitating further advances in therapeutic decision making and disease prediction for at-risk patients. However, with rapid advances come additional challenges involving the clinical validation and use of these constantly evolving technologies and platforms in clinical laboratories. To assist clinical laboratories with the validation of next-generation sequencing methods and platforms, the ongoing monitoring of next-generation sequencing testing to ensure quality results, and the interpretation and reporting of variants found using these technologies, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has developed the following professional standards and guidelines. PMID:23887774

  15. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16).

  16. 76 FR 46083 - Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...This proposed rule is being issued as required by a consent decree governing the schedule for completion of this review of the air quality criteria and the secondary national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for oxides of nitrogen and oxides of sulfur. Based on its review, EPA proposes to retain the current nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) secondary......

  17. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Experiences Implementing Common Core State Literacy Standards: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Krista Faith Huskey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of secondary social studies teachers who implemented Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in history/social studies, science and technical subjects in social studies courses requiring End of Course Tests at secondary schools in one suburban…

  18. Secondary Student Motivation Orientations and Standards-Based Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.; McClure, John; Walkey, Frank; Weir, Kirsty F.; McKenzie, Lynanne

    2009-01-01

    Background: Individual student characteristics such as competence motivation, achievement values, and goal orientations have been related in meaningful ways to task attainment. The standards-based National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) was developed in New Zealand with the intention of strengthening connections between student…

  19. FCS National Standards: Do They Underpin Secondary Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bettye P.; Hall, Helen C.; Jones, Karen H.

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on the seven standards that are included in a comprehensive (family-oriented) FCS program: (1) Family; (2) Nutrition and Wellness; (3) Human Development; (4) Interpersonal relationships; (5) Career, Community, and Family Connections; (6) Parenting; and (7) Family and Community Services. The study was conducted to better…

  20. Setting the Standard: Role Definition for a Secondary Literacy Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMeglio, Rachele A.; Mangin, Melinda M.

    2010-01-01

    This case introduces Karen, a middle school literacy coach attempting to navigate the myriad tasks she performs. As she aims to satisfy everyone's needs Karen struggles to prioritize and focus her work. The accompanying teaching notes utilize the International Reading Association's "Standards for Middle and High School Literacy Coaches" to…

  1. Neutron field characteristics of Ciemat's Neutron Standards Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Garcia, Karen A; Mendez-Villafañe, Roberto; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to characterize the neutron field produced by the calibration neutron sources of the Neutron Standards Laboratory at the Research Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain. For (241)AmBe and (252)Cf neutron sources, the neutron spectra, the ambient dose equivalent rates and the total neutron fluence rates were estimated. In the calibration hall, there are several items that modify the neutron field. To evaluate their effects different cases were used, from point-like source in vacuum up to the full model. Additionally, using the full model, the neutron spectra were estimated to different distances along the bench; with these spectra, the total neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent rates were calculated. The hall walls induce the largest changes in the neutron spectra and the respective integral quantities. The free-field neutron spectrum is modified due the room return effect. PMID:25468287

  2. Designing Experiments on Thermal Interactions by Secondary-School Students in a Simulated Laboratory Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkos, Ioannis; Psillos, Dimitris; Hatzikraniotis, Euripides

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of investigative activities with manipulations in a virtual laboratory on students' ability to design experiments. Sample: Fourteen students in a lower secondary school in Greece attended a teaching sequence on thermal phenomena based on the use of information and…

  3. 77 FR 555 - National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Secondary Lead Smelting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ...This action finalizes the residual risk and technology review conducted for the secondary lead smelting source category regulated under national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants. These final amendments include revisions to the emissions limits for lead compounds; revisions to the standards for fugitive emissions; the addition of total hydrocarbon and dioxin and furan emissions......

  4. 40 CFR 50.6 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM10. 50.6 Section 50.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM10. (a) The level of the national... PM10 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 10 micrometers) by: (1)...

  5. 40 CFR 50.6 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM10.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM10. 50.6 Section 50.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM10. (a) The level of the national... PM10 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 10 micrometers) by: (1)...

  6. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  7. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  8. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  9. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  10. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  11. Development of a quality assurance program for ionizing radiation secondary calibration laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, H.T. II; Taylor, A.R. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    For calibration laboratories, routine calibrations of instruments meeting stated accuracy goals are important. One method of achieving the accuracy goals is to establish and follow a quality assurance program designed to monitor all aspects of the calibration program and to provide the appropriate feedback mechanism if adjustments are needed. In the United States there are a number of organizations with laboratory accreditation programs. All existing accreditation programs require that the laboratory implement a quality assurance program with essentially the same elements in all of these programs. Collectively, these elements have been designated as a Measurement Quality Assurance (MQA) program. This paper will briefly discuss the interrelationship of the elements of an MQA program. Using the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) X-ray Calibration Laboratory (XCL) as an example, it will focus on setting up a quality control program for the equipment in a Secondary Calibration Laboratory.

  12. Evaluation of the Use of Remote Laboratories for Secondary School Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, David; Newcombe, Peter; Stumpers, Ben

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experimentation is generally considered central to science-based education. Allowing students to "experience" science through various forms of carefully designed practical work, including experimentation, is often claimed to support their learning and motivate their engagement while fulfilling specific curriculum requirements. However, logistical constraints (most especially related to funding) place significant limitations on the ability of schools to provide and maintain high-quality science laboratory experiences and equipment. One potential solution that has recently been the subject of growing interest is the use of remotely accessible laboratories to either supplant, or more commonly to supplement, conventional hands-on laboratories. Remote laboratories allow students and teachers to use high-speed networks, coupled with cameras, sensors, and controllers, to carry out experiments on real physical laboratory apparatus that is located remotely from the student. Research has shown that when used appropriately this can bring a range of potential benefits, including the ability to share resources across multiple institutions, support access to facilities that would otherwise be inaccessible for cost or technical reasons, and provide augmentation of the experimental experience. Whilst there has been considerable work on evaluating the use of remote laboratories within tertiary education, consideration of their role within secondary school science education is much more limited. This paper describes trials of the use of remote laboratories within secondary schools, reporting on the student and teacher reactions to their interactions with the laboratories. The paper concludes that remote laboratories can be highly beneficial, but considerable care must be taken to ensure that their design and delivery address a number of critical issues identified in this paper.

  13. Integrating standard operating procedures and industry notebook standards to evaluate students in laboratory courses.

    PubMed

    Wallert, Mark A; Provost, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the preparedness of graduates from the Biochemistry and Biotechnology (BCBT) Major at Minnesota State University Moorhead for employment in the bioscience industry we have developed a new Industry certificate program. The BCBT Industry Certificate was developed to address specific skill sets that local, regional, and national industry experts identified as lacking in new B.S. and B.A. biochemistry graduates. The industry certificate addresses concerns related to working in a regulated industry such as Good Laboratory Practices, Good Manufacturing Practices, and working in a Quality System. In this article we specifically describe how we developed a validation course that uses Standard Operating Procedures to describe grading policy and laboratory notebook requirements in an effort to better prepare students to transition into industry careers. PMID:24376028

  14. Electrolysis of Water in the Secondary School Science Laboratory with Inexpensive Microfluidics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, T. A.; Athey, S. L.; Vandevender, M. L.; Crihfield, C. L.; Kolanko, C. C. E.; Shao, S.; Ellington, M. C. G.; Dicks, J. K.; Carver, J. S.; Holland, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This activity allows students to visualize the electrolysis of water in a microfluidic device in under 1 min. Instructional materials are provided to demonstrate how the activity meets West Virginia content standards and objectives. Electrolysis of water is a standard chemistry experiment, but the typical laboratory apparatus (e.g., Hoffman cell)…

  15. Standardized Laboratory Feeding of Larval Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Friederike; Kuch, Ulrich; Pfenninger, Markus; Müller, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The Asian bush mosquito (Aedes japonicus japonicus, Theobald 1901) is an invasive culicid species which originates in Asia but is nowadays present in northern America and Europe. It is a competent vector for several human disease pathogens. In addition to the public health threat, this invasive species may also be an ecological threat for native container-breeding mosquitoes which share a similar larval habitat. Therefore, it is of importance to gain knowledge on ecological and eco-toxicological features of the Asian bush mosquito. However, optimal laboratory feeding conditions have not yet been established. Standardized feeding methods will be needed in assessing the impact of insecticides or competitional strength of this species. To fill this gap, we performed experiments on food quality and quantity for Ae. j. japonicus larvae. We found out that the commercial fish food TetraMin (Tetra, Melle, Germany) in a dose of 10 mg per larva is the most suitable food tested. We also suggest a protocol with a feeding sequence of seven portions for all larval stages of this species. PMID:26452522

  16. Standardized Laboratory Feeding of Larval Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Bock, Friederike; Kuch, Ulrich; Pfenninger, Markus; Müller, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The Asian bush mosquito (Aedes japonicus japonicus, Theobald 1901) is an invasive culicid species which originates in Asia but is nowadays present in northern America and Europe. It is a competent vector for several human disease pathogens. In addition to the public health threat, this invasive species may also be an ecological threat for native container-breeding mosquitoes which share a similar larval habitat. Therefore, it is of importance to gain knowledge on ecological and eco-toxicological features of the Asian bush mosquito. However, optimal laboratory feeding conditions have not yet been established. Standardized feeding methods will be needed in assessing the impact of insecticides or competitional strength of this species. To fill this gap, we performed experiments on food quality and quantity for Ae. j. japonicus larvae. We found out that the commercial fish food TetraMin (Tetra, Melle, Germany) in a dose of 10 mg per larva is the most suitable food tested. We also suggest a protocol with a feeding sequence of seven portions for all larval stages of this species. PMID:26452522

  17. 42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... earned doctoral degree in a chemical, physical, biological, or clinical laboratory science from an... laboratory director under regulations at 42 CFR 493.1415, published March 14, 1990 at 55 FR 9538, on...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... earned doctoral degree in a chemical, physical, biological, or clinical laboratory science from an... laboratory director under regulations at 42 CFR 493.1415, published March 14, 1990 at 55 FR 9538, on...

  19. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National primary and secondary ambient... PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS § 50.11 National primary and secondary ambient air... national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  20. Environmental standards for primary and secondary containment systems and transfer stations

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, D.M.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Standards for Primary and Secondary Containment Systems and Transfer Stations will supersede all previous requirements for design of dikes, storage tanks, and transfer stations in order to maintain consistency throughout the Y-12 Plant. This document is organized into six distinct sections, each with a specific purpose. Section I outlines the objectives of the document along with its applications and limitations; this section should be of interest to all readers for essential background information. Section II lists all definitions and is consistent with definitions outlined by environmental regulations. Section III discusses primary containment standards. Section IV outlines secondary containment standards; this section contains the actual standards for the diking of storage tanks and storage containers. Section V discusses transfer station standards. Section VI of this document outlines how exemptions may be granted for specific cases.

  1. 42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... laboratory director under regulations at 42 CFR 493.1415, published March 14, 1990 at 55 FR 9538, on or... laboratory director must— (1)(i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be certified in...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... laboratory director under regulations at 42 CFR 493.1415, published March 14, 1990 at 55 FR 9538, on or... laboratory director must— (1)(i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be certified in...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... laboratory director under regulations at 42 CFR 493.1415, published March 14, 1990 at 55 FR 9538, on or... laboratory director must— (1)(i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be certified in...

  4. 46 CFR 159.010-3 - Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance. 159..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS Independent Laboratory: Acceptance, Recognition, and Termination § 159.010-3 Independent laboratory: Standards...

  5. 46 CFR 159.010-3 - Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance. 159..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS Independent Laboratory: Acceptance, Recognition, and Termination § 159.010-3 Independent laboratory: Standards...

  6. 46 CFR 159.010-3 - Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance. 159..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS Independent Laboratory: Acceptance, Recognition, and Termination § 159.010-3 Independent laboratory: Standards...

  7. 46 CFR 159.010-3 - Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Independent laboratory: Standards for acceptance. 159..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS Independent Laboratory: Acceptance, Recognition, and Termination § 159.010-3 Independent laboratory: Standards...

  8. "Standards"-based Mathematics Curricula and Secondary Students' Performance on Standardized Achievement Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Michael R.; Post, Thomas R.; Maeda, Yukiko; Davis, Jon D.; Cutler, Arnold L.; Andersen, Edwin; Kahan, Jeremy A.

    2007-01-01

    The current study examined the mathematical achievement of high school students enrolled for 3 years in one of three NSF funded "Standards"-based curricula (IMP, CMIC, MMOW). The focus was on traditional topics in mathematics as measured by subtests of a standardized achievement test and a criterion-referenced test of mathematics achievement.…

  9. Identifying the Clinical Laboratory Tests from Unspecified “Other Lab Test” Data for Secondary Use

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuequn; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory results are stored in electronic health records (EHRs) as structured data coded with local or standard terms. However, laboratory tests that are performed at outside laboratories are often simply labeled “outside test” or something similar, with the actual test name in a free-text result or comment field. After being aggregated into clinical data repositories, these ambiguous labels impede the retrieval of specific test results. We present a general multi-step solution that can facilitate the identification, standardization, reconciliation, and transformation of such test results. We applied our approach to data in the NIH Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) to identify laboratory tests, map comment values to the LOINC codes that will be incorporated into our Research Entities Dictionary (RED), and develop a reference table that can be used in the EHR data extract-transform-load (ETL) process. PMID:26958239

  10. Improving Consistency in Large Laboratory Courses: A Design for a Standardized Practical Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xinnian; Graesser, Donnasue; Sah, Megha

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory courses serve as important gateways to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. One of the challenges in assessing laboratory learning is to conduct meaningful and standardized practical exams, especially for large multisection laboratory courses. Laboratory practical exams in life sciences courses are frequently…

  11. INTER-LABORATORY STUDY OF CELLULAR FLUORESCENCE INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH FLUORESCEIN-LABELED MICROBEAD STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the precision of cellular fluorescence intensity (FI) measurements derived from labeled microbead standards, FI results were compared from 43 different flow cytometers in 34 laboratories. ll laboratories analyzed prepared aliquots of fluoresceinated calf thymocyte nu...

  12. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  13. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  14. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  15. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  16. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  17. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  18. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone measured by...

  19. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  20. 40 CFR 50.10 - National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.10 Section 50.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....10 National 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level of the national 8-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone, measured by...

  1. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  2. 42 CFR 493.1405 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... degree in a chemical, physical, biological, or clinical laboratory science from an accredited institution...) Have earned a master's degree in a chemical, physical, biological or clinical laboratory science or..., physical, or biological science or medical technology from an accredited institution; (ii) Have at least...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1405 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... degree in a chemical, physical, biological, or clinical laboratory science from an accredited institution...) Have earned a master's degree in a chemical, physical, biological or clinical laboratory science or..., physical, or biological science or medical technology from an accredited institution; (ii) Have at least...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1405 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; and (b) The laboratory director must— (1) (i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be... certification; or (2)(i) Be a doctor of medicine, doctor of osteopathy, or doctor of podiatric medicine...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1405 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; and (b) The laboratory director must— (1) (i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be... certification; or (2)(i) Be a doctor of medicine, doctor of osteopathy, or doctor of podiatric medicine...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1405 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; and (b) The laboratory director must— (1) (i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be... certification; or (2)(i) Be a doctor of medicine, doctor of osteopathy, or doctor of podiatric medicine...

  7. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus) Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments

    PubMed Central

    Makowska, I. Joanna; Weary, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals’ anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a) reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b) before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further scientific support for

  8. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus) Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments.

    PubMed

    Makowska, I Joanna; Weary, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals' anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a) reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b) before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further scientific support for

  9. The Main Reasons of Declining Educational Standards at Secondary Level in Karachi, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faizi, Waqar-un-Nisa; Shakil, Anila Fatima; Lodhi, Farida Azim

    2011-01-01

    The cause of this investigation was to identify the main reasons which decline the educational standards at secondary level in Karachi, Pakistan. It was carried out through survey. The population of the study was both "government and private" schools students and teachers. The views of male and female students and teachers were sought out. One…

  10. Constructing Assessment Model of Primary and Secondary Educational Quality with Talent Quality as the Core Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Benyou

    2014-01-01

    Quality is the core of education and it is important to standardization construction of primary and secondary education in urban (U) and rural (R) areas. The ultimate goal of the integration of urban and rural education is to pursuit quality urban and rural education. Based on analysing the related policy basis and the existing assessment models…

  11. Language Arts Core Curriculum: Secondary Core Curriculum Standards. Levels 7-12, Language Arts (Drama). Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This curriculum guide presents the core standards and objectives for level 7-12 language arts instruction in Utah. The curriculum guide begins with a statement of the elementary and secondary school program of studies and high school graduation requirements. After a brief statement on the importance of language arts and core curriculum standards…

  12. Applying Standards for Leaders to the Selection of Secondary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildy, Helen; Pepper, Coral; Guanzhong, Luo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report innovative research aimed at ascertaining whether standards for school leaders could be applied to the process of selecting senior secondary school principals for appointment. Specifically, psychometrically robust measures of performance are sought that would sufficiently differentiate performance to…

  13. State Secondary CTE Standards: Developing a Framework out of a Patchwork of Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Marisa; Harrison, Linda; Schneider, Sherrie

    2007-01-01

    Many state educational administrators are currently working to define secondary career and technical education (CTE) content standards that specify the knowledge and skills students are expected to master in CTE program areas. The two-phase project on which this report is based explored (a) the progress and status of states in developing statewide…

  14. Jordanian Vocational, Secondary Education Teachers and Acquisition of the National Professional Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Dajeh, Hesham I.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to estimate the level of acquisition of the Jordanian national professional standards by vocational, secondary education teachers. Two hundred teachers participated in the study. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. Questionnaire validity was assessed by content validity,…

  15. A comparison of two microscale laboratory reporting methods in a secondary chemistry classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Lance Michael

    This study attempted to determine if there was a difference between the laboratory achievement of students who used a modified reporting method and those who used traditional laboratory reporting. The study also determined the relationships between laboratory performance scores and the independent variables score on the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) test, chronological age in months, gender, and ethnicity for each of the treatment groups. The study was conducted using 113 high school students who were enrolled in first-year general chemistry classes at Pueblo South High School in Colorado. The research design used was the quasi-experimental Nonequivalent Control Group Design. The statistical treatment consisted of the Multiple Regression Analysis and the Analysis of Covariance. Based on the GALT, students in the two groups were generally in the concrete and transitional stages of the Piagetian cognitive levels. The findings of the study revealed that the traditional and the modified methods of laboratory reporting did not have any effect on the laboratory performance outcome of the subjects. However, the students who used the traditional method of reporting showed a higher laboratory performance score when evaluation was conducted using the New Standards rubric recommended by the state. Multiple Regression Analysis revealed that there was a significant relationship between the criterion variable student laboratory performance outcome of individuals who employed traditional laboratory reporting methods and the composite set of predictor variables. On the contrary, there was no significant relationship between the criterion variable student laboratory performance outcome of individuals who employed modified laboratory reporting methods and the composite set of predictor variables.

  16. SECONDARY STANDARD CALIBRATION, MEASUREMENT AND IRRADIATION CAPABILITIES OF THE INDIVIDUAL MONITORING SERVICE AT THE HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN: ASPECTS OF UNCERTAINTY AND AUTOMATION.

    PubMed

    Greiter, M B; Denk, J; Hoedlmoser, H

    2016-09-01

    The individual monitoring service at the Helmholtz Zentrum München has adopted the recommendations of the ISO 4037 and 6980 standards series as base of its dosimetric systems for X-ray, gamma and beta dosimetry. These standards define technical requirements for radiation spectra and measurement processes, but leave flexibility in the implementation of irradiations as well as in the resulting uncertainty in dose or dose rate. This article provides an example for their practical implementation in the Munich IAEA/WHO secondary standard dosimetry laboratory. It focusses on two aspects: automation issues and uncertainties in calibration. PMID:26838065

  17. Preservice Secondary Teachers Perceptions of College-Level Mathematics Content Connections with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Travis A.

    2016-01-01

    Preservice Secondary Mathematics Teachers (PSMTs) were surveyed to identify if they could connect early-secondary mathematics content (Grades 7-9) in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) with mathematics content studied in content courses for certification in secondary teacher preparation programs. Respondents were asked to…

  18. 42 CFR 493.1406 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications on or before February 28, 1992.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... exists; and (b) The laboratory director must: (1) Be a physician certified in anatomical or clinical... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Laboratory director qualifications on or... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  19. 48 CFR 1552.211-80 - Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transmission of laboratory measurement results. 1552.211-80 Section 1552.211-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.211-80 Data standards for the transmission of laboratory... Transmission of Laboratory Measurement Results (OCT 2000) This contract requires the transmission...

  20. Frequency standards from government laboratories over the next 25 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    1994-01-01

    Based on a number of considerations including projected needs, current status, future trends, and status of key technologies, an attempt is made to project the future of government supported frequency standards development in the next 25 years.

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Standard Reference Sample Project: Performance Evaluation of Analytical Laboratories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, H. Keith; Daddow, Richard L.; Farrar, Jerry W.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1962, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated the Standard Reference Sample Project to evaluate the performance of USGS, cooperator, and contractor analytical laboratories that analyze chemical constituents of environmental samples. The laboratories are evaluated by using performance evaluation samples, called Standard Reference Samples (SRSs). SRSs are submitted to laboratories semi-annually for round-robin laboratory performance comparison purposes. Currently, approximately 100 laboratories are evaluated for their analytical performance on six SRSs for inorganic and nutrient constituents. As part of the SRS Project, a surplus of homogeneous, stable SRSs is maintained for purchase by USGS offices and participating laboratories for use in continuing quality-assurance and quality-control activities. Statistical evaluation of the laboratories results provides information to compare the analytical performance of the laboratories and to determine possible analytical deficiences and problems. SRS results also provide information on the bias and variability of different analytical methods used in the SRS analyses.

  2. Parachute drawing standards currently in use at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ronquillo, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    A need exists in the parachute industry for a standard method of defining and guiding the formation of textile drawings. Textile drawings have their own unique problems associated with their development. Unlike mechanical parts, textiles have no mass in cross section. Therefore, a cross-sectioned view has no hash marks. Hidden views are not usually incorporated in textile drawings as they are easily confused with stitch formations. Side views of textile parts are depicted using only one line to show thickness. This report will address these and other unique drawing problems associated with the development of parachute drawings and will offer, as a base, standards to be used when developing these drawings. 21 figs.

  3. Updated standards and processes for accreditation of echocardiographic laboratories from The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Bogdan A; Stefanidis, Alexandros; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Fox, Kevin F; Ray, Simon; Cardim, Nuno; Rigo, Fausto; Badano, Luigi P; Fraser, Alan G; Pinto, Fausto; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Habib, Gilbert; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Andrade, Maria Joao; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Varga, Albert

    2014-07-01

    Standards for echocardiographic laboratories were proposed by the European Association of Echocardiography (now the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging) 7 years ago in order to raise standards of practice and improve the quality of care. Criteria and requirements were published at that time for transthoracic, transoesophageal, and stress echocardiography. This paper reassesses and updates the quality standards to take account of experience and the technical developments of modern echocardiographic practice. It also discusses quality control, the incentives for laboratories to apply for accreditation, the reaccreditation criteria, and the current status and future prospects of the laboratory accreditation process. PMID:24662444

  4. Profile of laboratory instruction in secondary school level chemistry and indication for reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei

    This study is a profile of the laboratory component of instruction in secondary school level chemistry. As one of several companion studies, the purpose of the study is to investigate present practices related to instruction as a means of producing reform that improve cognitive and non-cognitive learning outcomes. Five hundred-forty students, from 18 chemistry classes taught by 12 teachers in ten high schools were involved in this study. Three schools included public and private schools, urban school, suburban schools, and rural schools. Three levels or types of chemistry courses were offered in these schools: school regular chemistry for college bound students, Chemistry in the Community or "ChemCom" for non-college bound students, and a second year of chemistry or advanced placement chemistry. Laboratory sessions in each of these three levels of courses were observed, videotaped, and later analyzed using the Modified Revised Science Teachers Behaviors Inventory (MR-STBI). The 12 chemistry teachers, eight science supervisors, and selected students were interviewed to determine their professional backgrounds and other factors that might influence how they teach, how they think, and how they learn. The following conclusions developed from the research are: (1) The three levels of chemistry courses are offered across high schools of varying sizes and locations. (2) Teachers perceive that students come to chemistry classes poorly prepared to effectively carry out laboratory experiences and/or investigations. (3) While students indicated that they are able to effectively use math skills in analyzing the results of chemistry laboratory experiments, teachers, in general, are not satisfied with the level at which students are prepared to use these skills, or to use writing skills. (4) Students working in pairs, is the typical approach. Group cooperation is sometimes used in carrying out the laboratory component of chemistry instruction in the ChemCom and AP chemistry

  5. Minimum Experimental Standards in the Laboratory Search for Gravity Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, H.; Hathaway, G.

    2006-01-20

    Peer-reviewed reports of experimental modifications of gravity over rotating superconductors (Podkletnov, 1992), or of a weight increase during cool-down of superconductors (Reiss, 2003), have stimulated considerable recent discussion. Precise descriptions of sample composition, ancillary apparatus and balance specifications were not given by Podkletnov. Accordingly, a carefully-designed replication (Hathaway, 2003) could not confirm the experimental findings possibly because detailed information was unavailable. On the other hand Tajmar et al. (Tajmar, 2005) failed to replicate previous results due to lack of serious analysis of weight measurements of solids in atmosphere and subject to buoyancy and wetting forces. Also an acceptable measuring technique and a detailed analysis of the sample's temperature excursions versus time were not performed. Both examples clearly indicate that minimum standards of experimental precision, accounting for boundary conditions, error analysis and thorough reporting of the experiment are necessary to distinguish a true anomaly from prosaic explanations and artefacts. We will discuss some types of errors that can occur and how standards of analysis and reporting should be improved to allow others a thorough physical understanding.

  6. Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    Two types of secondary zinc cell have been evaluated in our laboratory to assess their suitability to power an electric van. Single cells were charged and discharged with constant-current cycles as well as with controlled-power discharge profiles, scaled to the predicted mass of a full-size battery. Both cells were able to meet the requirements for power discharge specified by the so-called Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule (SFUDS) early in life (the first 15 cycles). The Zn/air cell achieved an average of 72 SFUDS repetions (7.2 h) per discharge. The Zn/NiOOH cell achieved an average of 51 SFUDS repetitions (5.1 h) per discharge. The bifunctional air electrodes did not reach oxygen-evolution potentials during the 8-s regenerative breaking portions of the SFUDS cycle.

  7. Laboratory measurements of radiance and reflectance spectra of dilute secondary-treated sewage sludge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), conducted a research program to evaluate the feasibility of remotely monitoring ocean dumping of waste products such as acid and sewage sludge. One aspect of the research program involved the measurements of upwelled spectral signatures for sewage-sludge mixtures of different concentrations in an 11600-liter tank. This paper describes the laboratory arrangement and presents radiance and reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared ranges for concentrations ranging from 9.7 to 180 ppm of secondary-treated sewage sludge mixed with two types of base water. Results indicate that upwelled radiance varies in a near-linear manner with concentration and that the sludge has a practically flat signal response between 420 and 970 nm. Reflectance spectra were obtained for the sewage-sludge mixtures at all wavelengths and concentrations.

  8. Secondary students in professional laboratories: Discoveries about science learning in a community of practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mary Elizabeth

    This study explores what educators may learn from the experiences of secondary students working in professional scientific laboratories. My investigation is guided by the methodology of phenomenological; I depend primarily on interviews conducted with students and professional researchers. This material is supported primarily by on-site observations, and by informal conversations between me and the study participants. My dissertation has three goals: (one) to use the work of secondary students in scientific research laboratories to consider how they know the discipline; (two) to distinguish the students' professional accomplishments from science learning at school; and, (three) to engage readers in a reflection about authority within the scientific community, and the possibility that by accomplishing research, students take their legitimate place among those who construct scientific knowledge. My methods and focus have allowed me to capture qualities of the student narratives that support the emergence of three major themes: the importance of doing "real work" in learning situations; the inapplicability of "school learning" to professional research arenas; and the inclusive nature of the scientific community. At the same time, the study is confined by the narrow pool of participants I interviewed over a short period of time. These talented students were all academically successful, articulate, "well-rounded" and in this sense, mature. They typically had strong family support, and they talked about ideas with their parents. Indeed, the students were all capable story-tellers who were anxious to share their experiences publicly. Yet they themselves remind the reader of their struggles to overcome naivete in the lab. By doing so they suggested to me that their experiences might be accessible to a broad range of young men and women; thus this study is a good beginning for further research.

  9. 78 FR 63999 - Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) Symposium: Tools To Improve Laboratory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) Symposium: Tools To Improve Laboratory Measurement SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health, Office...

  10. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CONFERENCE; CONSTITUTION, BYLAWS AND STANDARDS: APPROVED MAY 25, 2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principles and operating procedures for the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC) are contained in the NELAC Constitution and Bylaws. The major portion of this document (standards) contains detailed requirements for accrediting environmental labo...

  11. The effects of mentoring upon first year Missouri secondary science teachers` stages of concern with respect to science laboratory utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    This study tested the hypothesis that {open_quotes}There is no statistically significant mentoring variable, or linear combination of mentoring variables, affecting Missouri beginning secondary science teachers` SOC (Stages of Concern) with respect to science laboratory utilization. Demographic data analysis, SOC maximum peak score analysis, item analysis, Pearson r correlation analysis, and factor analysis techniques were applied to data collected from three survey instruments-Science Laboratory Concerns. Mentoring Perceptions, and Demographic-designed for this study. All potential respondents were included in the original mailings. A total of eighty-seven (51.1%) usable responses were obtained. The findings of the study were that four mentoring factors-Professional Assistance, Science Laboratory Assistance, Mentor Availability, and Classroom Instructional Assistance-were used to determine mentoring affects upon Missouri beginning secondary science teachers. Also, the most prevalent stage of concern was Stage 4 (Consequences). This indicated that Missouri beginning secondary science teachers were primarily concerned with the impact of science laboratory utilization upon student learning. Mentoring Factor Four (Classroom Instructional Assistance) was found to be significantly related to Missouri beginning secondary science teachers` stages of concern with respect to science laboratory utilization. Individual mentoring items also were found to be significantly related to science laboratory utilization stages of concern. These relationships were both positive and negative.

  12. [Presentation for the use of a clinical laboratories of standards of metrology (Document A)].

    PubMed

    Dumontet, M; Fuss-Ohlen, I; Beaudeux, J-L; Perrin, A; Vassault, A; Giroud, C; Le Moel, G; Guitel, F; Ziani, S; Zerah, S; Robineau, S; Braconnier, F

    2004-01-01

    Clinical laboratories shall have a perfect control of "in vitro diagnostic medical devices" to ensure the quality of their analytical results. This introductory presentation to a serie of documents of recommendations tackles the different standards of metrology concerning the requirements to reference materials, metrological traceability, metrological confirmation, management of measurement as well as uncertainty of measurement. The standards concerning clinical laboratories are then succinctly described. PMID:15047503

  13. 40 CFR 50.9 - National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour standards are codified in 40 CFR part 81. (c) EPA's authority under paragraph (b) of this section... ambient air quality standards for ozone. 50.9 Section 50.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....9 National 1-hour primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone. (a) The level...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone P Appendix P to Part 50 Protection of Environment... Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General (a) This appendix explains the data handling conventions... air quality standards for ozone (O3) specified in § 50.15 are met at an ambient O3 air...

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory standard nuclear material container

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy A

    2009-01-01

    The shut down of United States (U.S.) nuclear-weapons production activities in the early 1990s left large quantities of nuclear materials throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex in forms not intended for long-term storage. In May 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which called for the stabilization and disposition of 'thousands of containers of plutonium-bearing liquids and solids' in the DOE complex, including LANL in the nuclear-weapons-manufacturing pipeline when manufacturing ended. This resulted in the development of the 3013 standard with container requirements for long term storage (up to 50 years). A follow on was the Criteria For Interim Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials, Charles B. Curtis, in 1996 to address storage other than the 3013 standard for shorter time frames. In January 2000, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2000-1, which stated the need for LANL to repackage 'about one ton of plutonium metal and oxide,' declared excess to Defense Program (DP) needs. The DNFSB recommended that LANL 'stabilize and seal within welded containers with an inert atmosphere the plutonium oxides ... which are not yet in states conforming to the long-term storage envisaged by DOE-STD-3013,' and that they '... enclose existing and newly-generated legacy plutonium metal in sealed containers with an inert atmosphere,' and 'remediate and/or safely store the various residues.' Recommendation 2000-1, while adding to the number of items needing remediation, also reiterated the need to address remaining items from 1994-1 in a timely fashion. Since timetables slipped, the DNFSB recommended that the Complex 'prioritize and schedule tasks according to the consideration of risks.' In March 2005, the DNFSB issued Recommendation 2005-1. This recommendation addresses the need for a consistent set of criteria across the DOE complex for the interim storage of nuclear material packaged outside an engineered barrier. The

  19. Designing experiments on thermal interactions by secondary-school students in a simulated laboratory environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefkos, Ioannis; Psillos, Dimitris; Hatzikraniotis, Euripides

    2011-07-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of investigative activities with manipulations in a virtual laboratory on students' ability to design experiments. Sample Fourteen students in a lower secondary school in Greece attended a teaching sequence on thermal phenomena based on the use of information and communication technology, and specifically of the simulated virtual laboratory 'ThermoLab'. Design and methods A pre-post comparison was applied. Students' design of experiments was rated in eight dimensions; namely, hypothesis forming and verification, selection of variables, initial conditions, device settings, materials and devices used, process and phenomena description. A three-level ranking scheme was employed for the evaluation of students' answers in each dimension. Results A Wilcoxon signed-rank test revealed a statistically significant difference between the students' pre- and post-test scores. Additional analysis by comparing the pre- and post-test scores using the Hake gain showed high gains in all but one dimension, which suggests that this improvement was almost inclusive. Conclusions We consider that our findings support the statement that there was an improvement in students' ability to design experiments.

  20. The adaptive secondary mirror for the Large Binocular Telescope: results of acceptance laboratory test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Zanotti, D.; Busoni, L.; Del Vecchio, C.; Salinari, P.; Ranfagni, P.; Brusa Zappellini, G.; Biasi, R.; Andrighettoni, M.; Gallieni, D.; Anaclerio, E.; Martin, H. M.; Miller, S. M.

    2008-07-01

    The first of the two Gregorian Adaptive Secondary Mirror (ASM) units for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has been fully integrated and tested for laboratory acceptance. The LBT unit represents the most advanced ASM device existing in hardware. The unit has 672 electro-magnetic force actuators to change the shape of the 1.6mm-thick and 911mm-diameter Zerodur shell. The actuators control the mirror figure using the position feedback from the internal metrology provided by co-located capacitive sensors. The on-board real-time control electronics has a parallel computational power of 163Gflop/s providing not only the internal control of the unit with a 72kHz loop but also the wavefront reconstruction for the 1kHz Adaptive Optics loop. The paper describes the final configuration of the system and reports the results of the characterization and optimization process together with the results of the laboratory acceptance tests.

  1. 75 FR 20595 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft (75 FR 11877; March 12, 2010... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides... a proposal addressing the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) secondary...

  2. 40 CFR 262.103 - What is the scope of the laboratory environmental management standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the scope of the laboratory environmental management standard? 262.103 Section 262.103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS...

  3. Creating Cost-Effective DNA Size Standards for Use in Teaching and Research Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    I have devised a method with which a molecular size standard can be readily manufactured using Lambda DNA and PCR. This method allows the production of specific sized DNA fragments and is easily performed in a standard molecular biology laboratory. The material required to create these markers can also be used to provide a highly robust and…

  4. 40 CFR 262.103 - What is the scope of the laboratory environmental management standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the scope of the laboratory environmental management standard? 262.103 Section 262.103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS...

  5. 40 CFR 262.103 - What is the scope of the laboratory environmental management standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the scope of the laboratory environmental management standard? 262.103 Section 262.103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS...

  6. 48 CFR 1511.011-80 - Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results. 1511.011-80 Section 1511.011-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-80 Data standards for the transmission...

  7. 48 CFR 1511.011-80 - Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results. 1511.011-80 Section 1511.011-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-80 Data standards for the transmission...

  8. Improving consistency in large laboratory courses: a design for a standardized practical exam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinnian; Graesser, Donnasue; Sah, Megha

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory courses serve as important gateways to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. One of the challenges in assessing laboratory learning is to conduct meaningful and standardized practical exams, especially for large multisection laboratory courses. Laboratory practical exams in life sciences courses are frequently administered by asking students to move from station to station to answer questions, apply knowledge gained during laboratory experiments, interpret data, and identify various tissues and organs using various microscopic and gross specimens. This approach puts a stringent time limit on all questions regardless of the level of difficulty and also invariably increases the potential risk of cheating. To avoid potential cheating in laboratory courses with multiple sections, the setup for practical exams is often changed in some way between sections. In laboratory courses with multiple instructors or teaching assistants, practical exams may be handled inconsistently among different laboratory sections, due to differences in background knowledge, perceptions of the laboratory goals, or prior teaching experience. In this article, we describe a design for a laboratory practical exam that aims to align the assessment questions with well-defined laboratory learning objectives and improve the consistency among all laboratory sections. PMID:26031726

  9. Standardization of Hemagglutination Inhibition Assay for Influenza Serology Allows for High Reproducibility between Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Zacour, Mary; Ward, Brian J; Brewer, Angela; Tang, Patrick; Boivin, Guy; Li, Yan; Warhuus, Michelle; McNeil, Shelly A; LeBlanc, Jason J; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Standardization of the hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay for influenza serology is challenging. Poor reproducibility of HAI results from one laboratory to another is widely cited, limiting comparisons between candidate vaccines in different clinical trials and posing challenges for licensing authorities. In this study, we standardized HAI assay materials, methods, and interpretive criteria across five geographically dispersed laboratories of a multidisciplinary influenza research network and then evaluated intralaboratory and interlaboratory variations in HAI titers by repeatedly testing standardized panels of human serum samples. Duplicate precision and reproducibility from comparisons between assays within laboratories were 99.8% (99.2% to 100%) and 98.0% (93.3% to 100%), respectively. The results for 98.9% (95% to 100%) of the samples were within 2-fold of all-laboratory consensus titers, and the results for 94.3% (85% to 100%) of the samples were within 2-fold of our reference laboratory data. Low-titer samples showed the greatest variability in comparisons between assays and between sites. Classification of seroprotection (titer ≥ 40) was accurate in 93.6% or 89.5% of cases in comparison to the consensus or reference laboratory classification, respectively. This study showed that with carefully chosen standardization processes, high reproducibility of HAI results between laboratories is indeed achievable. PMID:26818953

  10. The evaluation of hospital laboratory information management systems based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute

    PubMed Central

    Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Khajouei, Reza; Jahanbakhsh, Maryan; Mirmohamadi, Mahboubeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, modern laboratories are faced with a huge volume of information. One of the goals of the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is to assist in the management of the information generated in the laboratory. This study intends to evaluate the LIMS based on the standards of the American National Standard Institute (ANSI). Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive–analytical study, which had been conducted in 2011, on the LIMSs in use, in the teaching and private hospitals in Isfahan. The data collecting instrument was a checklist, which was made by evaluating three groups of information components namely: ‘System capabilities’, ‘work list functions,’ and ‘reporting’ based on LIS8-A. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 20. Data were analyzed using (relative) frequency, percentage. To compare the data the following statistical tests were used: Leven test, t-test, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results: The results of the study indicated that the LIMS had a low conformity (30%) with LIS8-A (P = 0.001), with no difference between teaching and private hospitals (P = 0.806). The ANOVA revealed that in terms of conformity with the LIS8-A standard, there was a significant difference between the systems produced by different vendors (P = 0.023). According to the results, a Kowsar system with more than %57 conformity in the three groups of information components had a better conformity to the standard, compared to the other systems. Conclusions: This study indicated that none of the LIMSs had a good conformity to the standard. It seems that system providers did not pay sufficient attention to many of the information components required by the standards when designing and developing their systems. It was suggested that standards from certified organizations and institutions be followed in the design and development process of health information systems. PMID:25077154

  11. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 8-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone I Appendix I to Part 50 Protection of... Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone 1. General. This appendix explains the data... secondary ambient air quality standards for ozone specified in § 50.10 are met at an ambient ozone...

  16. Implementing an integrated standards-based management system to ensure compliance at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hjeresen, D.; Roybal, S.; Bertino, P.; Gherman, C.; Hosteny, B.

    1995-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) is developing and implementing a comprehensive, Integrated Standards-Based Management System (ISBMS) to enhance environmental, safety, and health (ESH) compliance efforts and streamline management of ESH throughout the Laboratory. The Laboratory recognizes that to be competitive in today`s business environment and attractive to potential Partnerships, Laboratory operations must be efficient and cost-effective. The Laboratory also realizes potential growth opportunities for developing ESH as a strength in providing new or improved services to its customers. Overall, the Laboratory desires to establish and build upon an ESH management system which ensures continuous improvement in protecting public health and safety and the environment and which fosters a working relationship with stakeholders. A team of process experts from the LANL Environmental Management (EM) Program Office, worked with management system consultants, and the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an ESH management systems process to compare current LANL ESH management Systems and programs against leading industry standards. The process enabled the Laboratory to gauge its performance in each of the following areas: Planning and Policy Setting; Systems and Procedures; Implementation and Education; and Monitoring and Reporting. The information gathered on ESH management systems enabled LANL to pinpoint and prioritize opportunities for improvement in the provision of ESH services throughout the Laboratory and ultimately overall ESH compliance.

  17. A gender analysis of secondary school physics textbooks and laboratory manuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostas, Nancy Ann

    Secondary school physics textbooks and laboratory manuals were evaluated for gender balance. The textbooks and manuals evaluated were all current editions available at the time of the study with copyrights of 1988 to 1992. Illustrations, drawings and photographs were judged gender balanced based on the number of men and women, boys and girls shown in both active and passive roles. Illustrations, drawings and photographs were also evaluated by the number of male and female scientists identified by name. The curricular content of the textbooks was analyzed for gender balance by three criteria: the number of named male and female scientists whose accomplishments were described in the text; the number of careers assigned to men and women; and the number of verbal analogies assigned to girls interests, boys interests or neutral interests. The laboratory activities in the manuals were categorized as demonstrations, experiments and observations. Three of each of these types of activities from each manual were analyzed for skills and motivating factors important to girls as identified by Potter and Rosser (1992). Data were analyzed by use of descriptive statistics of frequencies, means and chi-square goodness of fit. The.05 level of significance was applied to all analyses based upon an expected frequency of 50 - 50 percentage of men and women and a 4.5 percent for women scientists to 95.5 percent for men scientists. The findings were as follows. None of the textbooks had a balance of men/women, boys/girls in the illustrations, drawings and photographs. The Hewitt (Scott-Foresman, 1989) textbook was the only textbook with no significant difference. Using the expected frequency for male and female scientists, two textbooks were gender balanced for illustrations, drawings and photographs while all textbooks were gender balanced for described accomplishments of scientists. The Hewitt (Scott Foresman, 1989) textbook had the only gender balanced representation of careers

  18. Teaching a Standard-Based Communicative English Textbook Series to Secondary School Students in Egypt: Investigating Teachers' Practices and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel Latif, Muhammad M. Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Since any standards-based reform is made to bring about an improvement in students' learning, it requires changes in teachers' practices as well. This study examined how a standards-based communicative curricular reform in general secondary school English in Egypt has changed teachers' classroom practices, and the factors influencing such…

  19. The Implementation of Standards-Based Teacher Evaluation in Vietnamese Secondary Schools: A Case Study in Dong Thap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pham, Huy Q.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher quality has become a critical area of concern in Vietnamese education. Recently, new professional standards for teachers in secondary schools have been developed, piloted, and implemented. This study explores the perceptions of teachers, school principals, and other administrators about the new teacher professional standards, the…

  20. 40 CFR 50.13 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.13 Section 50.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....13 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary... the ambient air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal...

  1. 40 CFR 50.13 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.13 Section 50.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....13 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary... the ambient air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal...

  2. 40 CFR 50.7 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.7 Section 50.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary and... air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 2.5...

  3. 40 CFR 50.13 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.13 Section 50.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....13 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary... the ambient air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal...

  4. 40 CFR 50.7 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.7 Section 50.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary and... air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 2.5...

  5. 40 CFR 50.13 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.13 Section 50.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....13 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary... the ambient air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal...

  6. 40 CFR 50.7 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.7 Section 50.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary and... air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 2.5...

  7. 40 CFR 50.7 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.7 Section 50.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary and... air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 2.5...

  8. 40 CFR 50.13 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.13 Section 50.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....13 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary... the ambient air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal...

  9. 40 CFR 50.7 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for PM2.5. 50.7 Section 50.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for PM2.5. (a) The national primary and... air as PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 2.5...

  10. Standardization in laboratory medicine: Adoption of common reference intervals to the Croatian population

    PubMed Central

    Flegar-Meštrić, Zlata; Perkov, Sonja; Radeljak, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Considering the fact that the results of laboratory tests provide useful information about the state of health of patients, determination of reference value is considered an intrinsic part in the development of laboratory medicine. There are still huge differences in the analytical methods used as well as in the associated reference intervals which could consequently significantly affect the proper assessment of patient health. In a constant effort to increase the quality of patients’ care, there are numerous international initiatives for standardization and/or harmonization of laboratory diagnostics in order to achieve maximum comparability of laboratory test results and improve patient safety. Through the standardization and harmonization processes of analytical methods the ability to create unique reference intervals is achieved. Such reference intervals could be applied globally in all laboratories using methods traceable to the same reference measuring system and analysing the biological samples from the populations with similar socio-demographic and ethnic characteristics. In this review we outlined the results of the harmonization processes in Croatia in the field of population based reference intervals for clinically relevant blood and serum constituents which are in accordance with ongoing activity for worldwide standardization and harmonization based on traceability in laboratory medicine. PMID:27019800

  11. Utilization of an automated multimeter calibration system by the Rocky Flats Standards Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wickoff, B.; Stant, R.S.; Brown, G.R. Jr.

    1982-09-10

    The Physical Metrology Laboratory (PML) of the Rocky Flats (RF) Standards Laboratory, like many other standards laboratories, was inundated during the past decade with the vast variety of new digital multimeters. These multimeters were produced by several companies, and required accurate calibrations and certification to support the requirements at the Rocky Flats Plant. The need to automate the calibration and certification process accurately was vividly indicated by a time study of performing the process manually, for both the digital and the analog multimeters, in the PML Reference Standards Laboratory. By using an automated calibration system, approximately 90% of these calibrations could be completed in the Physical Metrology Support Laboratories with a reduction of 50% or more in hours required for the calibrations. With these specific requirements and other specifications deemed necessary, the automated calibration systems for digital and analog multimeters were purchased. Two Fluke 5101B Calibrators with Fluke 5220A Transconductance Amplifiers and two printers were procured for use by the Physical Metrology Support Laboratories. There operation and performance are described.

  12. Standardization in laboratory medicine: Adoption of common reference intervals to the Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Flegar-Meštrić, Zlata; Perkov, Sonja; Radeljak, Andrea

    2016-03-26

    Considering the fact that the results of laboratory tests provide useful information about the state of health of patients, determination of reference value is considered an intrinsic part in the development of laboratory medicine. There are still huge differences in the analytical methods used as well as in the associated reference intervals which could consequently significantly affect the proper assessment of patient health. In a constant effort to increase the quality of patients' care, there are numerous international initiatives for standardization and/or harmonization of laboratory diagnostics in order to achieve maximum comparability of laboratory test results and improve patient safety. Through the standardization and harmonization processes of analytical methods the ability to create unique reference intervals is achieved. Such reference intervals could be applied globally in all laboratories using methods traceable to the same reference measuring system and analysing the biological samples from the populations with similar socio-demographic and ethnic characteristics. In this review we outlined the results of the harmonization processes in Croatia in the field of population based reference intervals for clinically relevant blood and serum constituents which are in accordance with ongoing activity for worldwide standardization and harmonization based on traceability in laboratory medicine. PMID:27019800

  13. Assessment and evaluation of science process skills in secondary school biology laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawinski, Daniel Bernard

    Awareness of the importance of process skills in science education has increased, but practical methods of assessing student performance of these skills has received minimal attention. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine how student science process skills may be accurately and reliably measured and evaluated. A set of laboratory activities that emphasized process skills was developed by 12 science educators from the western New York area who were participants in a summer institute sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. These innovative laboratory activities were designed to be used in existing secondary school biology courses by students of different ages and ability levels. Student performance in the four general process categories of planning, performing, reasoning, and communicating was broken down into twenty specific, individual science process skills deemed important to science education. Nine teacher developers used these twelve activities, entirely and/or partially with their high school biology students during the 1995-1996 school year. Two types of assessment instruments were developed and field-tested for the purpose of evaluating student self evaluation and performance of the twenty individual science process skills. The first was an inventory that asked for the students' self-evaluation of their abilities to perform each of the twenty process skills based on the current year's laboratory experiences. The second was a set of three performance tasks which assessed the twenty skills and were to be completed by the students in a laboratory setting under supervision of their classroom teacher and the researcher. During May and early June, 1996, the student self-evaluation inventory and the three performance tasks were administered to 94 students of teachers in 6 schools who developed and used the activities (HH95, experimental group) and to 126 students of teachers in 9 schools that did not use the activities (HH96, control group). All

  14. 42 CFR 493.1777 - Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of compliance. 493.1777 Section 493.1777 Public Health CENTERS... CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Inspection § 493.1777 Standard: Inspection of laboratories that...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1777 - Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of compliance. 493.1777 Section 493.1777 Public Health CENTERS... CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Inspection § 493.1777 Standard: Inspection of laboratories that...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1777 - Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of compliance. 493.1777 Section 493.1777 Public Health CENTERS... CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Inspection § 493.1777 Standard: Inspection of laboratories that...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1777 - Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of compliance. 493.1777 Section 493.1777 Public Health CENTERS... CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Inspection § 493.1777 Standard: Inspection of laboratories that...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1777 - Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard: Inspection of laboratories that have requested or have been issued a certificate of compliance. 493.1777 Section 493.1777 Public Health CENTERS... CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Inspection § 493.1777 Standard: Inspection of laboratories that...

  19. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for radiobioassay

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for Radiobioassay, for use by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE Contractor radiobioassay programs. This standard is intended to be used in conjunction with the general administrative technical standard that describes the overall DOELAP accreditation process--DOE-STD-1111-98, Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program Administration. This technical standard pertains to radiobioassay service laboratories that provide either direct or indirect (in vivo or in vitro) radiobioassay measurements in support of internal dosimetry programs at DOE facilities or for DOE and DOE contractors. Similar technical standards have been developed for other DOELAP dosimetry programs. This program consists of providing an accreditation to DOE radiobioassay programs based on successful completion of a performance-testing process and an on-site evaluation by technical experts. This standard describes the technical requirements and processes specific to the DOELAP Radiobioassay Accreditation Program as required by 10 CFR 835 and as specified generically in DOE-STD-1111-98.

  20. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CONFERENCE: CONSTITUTION, BYLAWS AND STANDARDS; APPROVED JUNE 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    As Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's National Environmental
    Laboratory Accreditation Program (NELAP), I offer my sincere appreciation to the many individuals who worked on the 2000 revision of the NELAC standards. I would like to give special recognition to th...

  1. Importance of the Primary Radioactivity Standard Laboratory and Implementation of its Quality Management

    SciTech Connect

    Sahagia, Maria; Razdolescu, Anamaria Cristina; Luca, Aurelian; Ivan, Constantin

    2007-04-23

    The paper presents some specific aspects of the implementation of the quality management in the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory, from IFIN-HH, the owner of the primary Romanian standard in radioactivity. The description of the accreditation, according to the EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005, is presented.

  2. Verification and standardization of blood cell counters for routine clinical laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Huisman, Albert

    2015-03-01

    The use of automated blood cell counters (automated hematology analyzers) for diagnostic purposes is inextricably linked to clinical laboratories. However, the need for uniformity among the various methods and parameters is increasing and standardization of the automated analyzers is therefore crucial. Standardization not only involves procedures based on reference methods but it also involves validation, verification, quality assurance, and quality control, and it includes the involvement of several participants. This article discusses the expert guidelines and provides an overview of issues involved in complete blood count parameter reference methods and standardization of reporting units. PMID:25676379

  3. Laboratory robotics -- An automated tool for preparing ion chromatography calibration standards

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes the use of a laboratory robot as an automated tool for preparing multi-level calibration standards for On-Line Ion Chromatography (IC) Systems. The robot is designed for preparation of up to six levels of standards, with each level containing up to eleven ionic species in aqueous solution. The robot is required to add the standards` constituents as both a liquid and solid additions and to keep a record of exactly what goes into making up every standard. Utilizing a laboratory robot to prepare calibration standards provides significant benefits to the testing environment. These benefits include: accurate and precise calibration standards in individually capped containers with preparation traceability; automated and unattended multi-specie preparation for both anion and cation analytical channels; the ability to free up a test operator from a repetitive routine and re-apply those efforts to test operations; The robot uses a single channel IC to analyze each prepared standard for specie content and concentration. Those results are later used as a measure of quality control. System requirements and configurations, robotic operations, manpower requirements, analytical verification, accuracy and precision of prepared solutions, and robotic downtime are discussed in detail.

  4. Coupled Pendulums: A Physical System for Laboratory Investigations at Upper Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picciarelli, Vittorio; Stella, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    The topic of coupled oscillations is rich in physical content which is both interesting and complex. The study of the time evolution of coupled oscillator systems involves a mathematical formalization beyond the level of the upper secondary school student's competence. Here, we present an original approach, suitable even for secondary students, to…

  5. 42 CFR 493.1773 - Standard: Basic inspection requirements for all laboratories issued a CLIA certificate and CLIA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS... laboratory at any time to evaluate the ability of the laboratory to provide accurate and reliable...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1773 - Standard: Basic inspection requirements for all laboratories issued a CLIA certificate and CLIA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS... laboratory at any time to evaluate the ability of the laboratory to provide accurate and reliable...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1773 - Standard: Basic inspection requirements for all laboratories issued a CLIA certificate and CLIA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS... laboratory at any time to evaluate the ability of the laboratory to provide accurate and reliable...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1773 - Standard: Basic inspection requirements for all laboratories issued a CLIA certificate and CLIA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS... laboratory at any time to evaluate the ability of the laboratory to provide accurate and reliable...

  9. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  10. An investigation of the use of microcomputer-based laboratory simulations in promoting conceptual understanding in secondary physics instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomshaw, Stephen G.

    Physics education research has shown that students bring alternate conceptions to the classroom which can be quite resistant to traditional instruction methods (Clement, 1982; Halloun & Hestenes, 1985; McDermott, 1991). Microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) experiments that employ an active-engagement strategy have been shown to improve student conceptual understanding in high school and introductory university physics courses (Thornton & Sokoloff, 1998). These (MBL) experiments require a specialized computer interface, type-specific sensors (e.g. motion detectors, force probes, accelerometers), and specialized software in addition to the standard physics experimental apparatus. Tao and Gunstone (1997) have shown that computer simulations used in an active engagement environment can also lead to conceptual change. This study investigated 69 secondary physics students' use of computer simulations of MBL activities in place of the hands-on MBL laboratory activities. The average normalized gain in students' conceptual understanding was measured using the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation (FMCE). Student attitudes towards physics and computers were probed using the Views About Science Survey (VASS) and the Computer Attitude Scale (CAS). While it may be possible to obtain an equivalent level of conceptual understanding using computer simulations in combination with an active-engagement environment, this study found no significant gains in students' conceptual understanding ( = -0.02) after they completed a series of nine simulated experiments from the Tools for Scientific Thinking curriculum (Thornton & Sokoloff, 1990). The absence of gains in conceptual understanding may indicate that either the simulations were ineffective in promoting conceptual change or problems with the implementation of the treatment inhibited its effectiveness. There was a positive shift in students' attitudes towards physics in the VASS dimensions of structure and reflective thinking

  11. Current practices and challenges in the standardization and harmonization of clinical laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Vesper, Hubert W; Myers, Gary L; Miller, W Greg

    2016-09-01

    Effective patient care, clinical research, and public health efforts require comparability of laboratory results independent of time, place, and measurement procedure. Comparability is achieved by establishing metrological traceability, which ensures that measurement procedures measure the same quantity and that the calibration of measurement procedures is traceable to a common reference system consisting of reference methods and materials. Whereas standardization ensures traceability to the International System of Units, harmonization ensures traceability to a reference system agreed on by convention. This article provides an overview of standardization and harmonization with an emphasis on commutability as an important variable that affects testing accuracy. Commutability of reference materials is required to ensure that traceability is established appropriately and that laboratory results are comparable. The use of noncommutable reference materials leads to inaccurate results. Whereas procedures and protocols for standardizing measurements are established and have been successfully applied in efforts such as the Hormones Standardization Program of the CDC, harmonization activities require new, more complex procedures and approaches. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, together with its domestic and international partners, formed the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results to coordinate harmonization efforts. Reference systems, as well as procedures and protocols to establish traceability of clinical laboratory tests, have been established and continue to be developed by national and international groups and organizations. Serum tests of thyroid function, including those for the thyroid hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine, are among the clinical procedures for which standardization efforts are well under way. Approaches to the harmonization of measurement procedures for serum concentrations of thyroid

  12. Comparison of Laboratories Directors’ and Assessors’ Opinions on Challenges and Solutions of Standardization in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ravaghi, Hamid; Abolhassani, Nazanin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The quality medical laboratory services play a vital role in healthcare systems. Iran has set national standards based on the international standard ISO15189. These standards came into force in September 2007. Given the important role of both laboratories professional and assessors in the standardization, this study aims to compare and analyze medical laboratory directors’ and assessors’ opinions about this process, its challenges and relevant solutions. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted on two populations in 2013. The first survey population consisted of 150 assessors. The second group consisted of directors working in medical laboratory settings. From all universities of medical sciences, 258 medical laboratories were randomly selected. Data were gathered using two open-ended questionnaires and analyzed using the thematic analysis. Results: Challenges and relevant solutions regarding the standardization and standards, the assessment process and assessor, laboratories, external entities and contextual factors across laboratories directors and assessors were derived and compared. Both groups had a positive attitude towards the standardization process. However, they expressed some concerns regarding the process and accordingly proposed solutions to overcome the challenges. Conclusion: This study provides insights into the challenges and solutions of the standardization from two professional groups’ viewpoint. These two factors are closely related and should be considered when implementing standards since a positive perception of them increases the likelihood of successful standardization. Similarities and divergences regarding challenges and solutions of the standardization, in turn, can provide insights into how this process can be improved and deserve policy makers’ attention to continue the progress. PMID:25946940

  13. A Comparison of Secondary Principals' Use of Data Systems to Increase Student Achievement in Mathematics as Measured by Standardized Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    The pressure to meet the demands of "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) Act coupled with poor results by secondary students on national assessments in mathematics have forced school principals to develop skill sets in the use of data in efforts to increase student performance on standardized assessments. The effective use of data by school principals…

  14. Bypass, Augment, or Integrate: How Secondary Mathematics Teachers Address the Literacy Demands of Standards-Based Curriculum Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler-Olcott, Kelly; Doerr, Helen M.; Hinchman, Kathleen A.; Masingila, Joanna O.

    2015-01-01

    This 3-year qualitative study examined how 26 teachers in four U.S. secondary schools addressed the literacy demands of curriculum materials based on standards from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. It was grounded in sociocultural perspectives that encourage study of language in local contexts, including classrooms, communities,…

  15. Workshop in Support of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Nitrogen (NOx) and Sulfur Oxides (SOx)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is announcing a workshop to discuss policy-relevant science to Inform EPA’s "Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur" report. The workshop is being organized by EPA’s Office of Research and Development’s, Nation...

  16. Handbook on Tentative Standards and Procedures for the Registration of Secondary Schools. 1979-80 Field Trial Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This handbook contains the tentative secondary school registration standards and procedures approved by the New York State Board of Regents for the 1979-80 school year. It explains the program providing for the registration (or accreditation) of New York schools and outlines the steps that will make up the registration procedure. Most of the…

  17. Investigation and Development of Competency Standards and Certification Requirements for Secondary-Level Vocational Foodservice Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiewicz, Ronald A.

    An investigation ascertained, analyzed, and documented competency standards and certification requirements for secondary-level vocational food service programs. A literature review produced no instruments used in past studies to measure the attitudes of food service professionals toward task competencies. Six occupations were selected for the…

  18. The Relationship between Computer and Internet Use and Performance on Standardized Tests by Secondary School Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Li; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Kelley, Pat; Banda, Devender R.; Lan, William Y.; Parker, Amy T.; Smith, Derrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The study presented here explored the relationship between computer and Internet use and the performance on standardized tests by secondary school students with visual impairments. Methods: With data retrieved from the first three waves (2001-05) of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2, the correlational study focused on…

  19. Termite-Susceptible Species of Wood for Inclusion as a Reference in Indonesian Standardized Laboratory Testing

    PubMed Central

    Arinana; Tsunoda, Kunio; Herliyana, Elis N.; Hadi, Yusuf S.

    2012-01-01

    Standardized laboratory testing of wood and wood-based products against subterranean termites in Indonesia (SNI 01.7207-2006) (SNI) has no requirement for the inclusion of a comparative reference species of wood (reference control). This is considered a weakness of the Indonesian standard. Consequently, a study was undertaken to identify a suitable Indonesian species of community wood that could be used as a reference control. Four candidate species of community woods: Acacia mangium, Hevea brasiliensis, Paraserianthes falcataria and Pinus merkusii were selected for testing their susceptibility to feeding by Coptotermes formosanus. Two testing methods (SNI and the Japanese standard method JIS K 1571-2004) were used to compare the susceptibility of each species of wood. Included in the study was Cryptomeria japonica, the reference control specified in the Japanese standard. The results of the study indicated that P. merkusii is a suitable reference species of wood for inclusion in laboratory tests against subterranean termites, conducted in accordance with the Indonesian standard (SNI 01.7207-2006). PMID:26466532

  20. Termite-Susceptible Species of Wood for Inclusion as a Reference in Indonesian Standardized Laboratory Testing.

    PubMed

    Arinana; Tsunoda, Kunio; Herliyana, Elis N; Hadi, Yusuf S

    2012-01-01

    Standardized laboratory testing of wood and wood-based products against subterranean termites in Indonesia (SNI 01.7207-2006) (SNI) has no requirement for the inclusion of a comparative reference species of wood (reference control). This is considered a weakness of the Indonesian standard. Consequently, a study was undertaken to identify a suitable Indonesian species of community wood that could be used as a reference control. Four candidate species of community woods: Acacia mangium, Hevea brasiliensis, Paraserianthes falcataria and Pinus merkusii were selected for testing their susceptibility to feeding by Coptotermes formosanus. Two testing methods (SNI and the Japanese standard method JIS K 1571-2004) were used to compare the susceptibility of each species of wood. Included in the study was Cryptomeria japonica, the reference control specified in the Japanese standard. The results of the study indicated that P. merkusii is a suitable reference species of wood for inclusion in laboratory tests against subterranean termites, conducted in accordance with the Indonesian standard (SNI 01.7207-2006). PMID:26466532

  1. Services of the CDRH X-ray calibration laboratory and their traceability to National Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Cerra, F.; Heaton, H.T.

    1993-12-31

    The X-ray Calibration Laboratory (XCL) of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) provides calibration services for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The instruments calibrated are used by FDA and contract state inspectors to verify compliance with federal x-ray performance standards and for national surveys of x-ray trends. In order to provide traceability of measurements, the CDRH XCL is accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for reference, diagnostic, and x-ray survey instrument calibrations. In addition to these accredited services, the CDRH XCL also calibrates non-invasive kVp meters in single- and three-phase x-ray beams, and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips used to measure CT beam profiles. The poster illustrates these services and shows the traceability links back to the National Standards.

  2. Traceability as a unique tool to improve standardization in laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Panteghini, Mauro

    2009-03-01

    The standardization of measurements is of high priority in Laboratory Medicine, its purpose being to achieve closer comparability of results obtained using routine analytical systems. In order to achieve standardization, an approach is required that provides reliable transfer of the measurement values from the highest hierarchical level to methods which are routinely used in the clinical laboratories. Such a structure is presented by the reference measurement system (RS), based on the concepts of metrological traceability. Key elements of a comprehensive RS are the reference measurement procedure and reference materials. Other essential elements include the definition of the measurand in regards to the intended clinical use and the reference laboratories that may collaborate in a network. At present, there is international cooperation in developing RS for analytes of clinical significance. Thanks to the work of the Joint Committee on Traceability in Laboratory Medicine (JCTLM), a list of higher order reference materials and reference methods is now publicly available. JCTLM has also published the list of reference laboratories that are able to deliver a reference measurement service. As soon as a new RS is implemented, clinical validation of the correctly calibrated routine methods (the IVD products sold onto the market) should take place. Other important issues concerning the implementation of a metrologically-correct approach for result standardization are: 1) the clear definition of the clinically allowable error of measurements and 2) the post-market surveillance of the performance of IVD products. These are tasks of our profession through the organization of appropriate External Quality Assessment programs. PMID:19863912

  3. Laboratory Experiences in Marine Biology for Upper Elementary and Secondary School Grades, Teachers Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raimist, Roger J.

    Designed to assist the teacher who wishes to use marine organisms for biological laboratory investigations, this manual includes general information on maintaining marine aquaria and collecting marine organisms as well as five tested laboratory exercises. The exercises deal with the measurement of oxygen consumption (giving techniques for…

  4. Microfluidic cartridges for DNA purification and genotyping processed in standard laboratory instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, Maximilian; Mark, Daniel; Stumpf, Fabian; Müller, Martina; Roth, Günter; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2011-06-01

    Two microfluidic cartridges intended for upgrading standard laboratory instruments with automated liquid handling capability by use of centrifugal forces are presented. The first microfluidic cartridge enables purification of DNA from human whole blood and is operated in a standard laboratory centrifuge. The second microfluidic catridge enables genotyping of pathogens by geometrically multiplexed real-time PCR. It is operated in a slightly modified off-the-shelf thermal cycler. Both solutions aim at smart and cost-efficient ways to automate work flows in laboratories. The DNA purification cartridge automates all liquid handling steps starting from a lysed blood sample to PCR ready DNA. The cartridge contains two manually crushable glass ampoules with liquid reagents. The DNA yield extracted from a 32 μl blood sample is 192 +/- 30 ng which corresponds to 53 +/- 8% of a reference extraction. The genotyping cartridge is applied to analyse isolates of the multi-resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA) by real-time PCR. The wells contain pre-stored dry reagents such as primers and probes. Evaluation of the system with 44 genotyping assays showed a 100% specificity and agreement with the reference assays in standard tubes. The lower limit of detection was well below 10 copies of DNA per reaction.

  5. Accuracy of the Clinical Diagnosis of Vaginitis Compared to a DNA Probe Laboratory Standard

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Nancy K.; Neal, Jeremy L.; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of the three most common causes of acute vulvovaginal symptoms (bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis vaginitis, and trichomoniasis vaginalis) using a traditional, standardized clinical diagnostic protocol compared to a DNA probe laboratory standard. Methods This prospective clinical comparative study had a sample of 535 active duty United States military women presenting with vulovaginal symptoms. Clinical diagnoses were made by research staff using a standardized protocol of history, physical examination including pelvic examination, determination of vaginal pH, vaginal fluid amines test, and wet-prep microscopy. Vaginal fluid samples were obtained for DNA analysis. The research clinicians were blinded to the DNA results. Results The participants described a presenting symptom of abnormal discharge (50%), itching/irritation (33%), malodor (10%), burning (4%), or others such as vulvar pain and vaginal discomfort. According to laboratory standard, there were 225 cases (42%) of bacterial vaginosis 76 cases (14%) of candidiasis vaginitis, 8 cases (1.5%) of trichomoniasis vaginalis, 87 cases of mixed infections (16%), and 139 negative cases (26%). For each single infection, the clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.8% and 70.0% for bacterial vaginosis; 83.8% and 84.8% for candidiasis vaginitis; and 84.6% and 99.6% for trichomoniasis vaginalis when compared to the DNA probe standard. Conclusion Compared to a DNA probe standard, clinical diagnosis is 81-85% sensitive and 70- 99% specific for bacterial vaginosis, candida vaginitis, and trichomoniasis. Even under research conditions that provided clinicians with sufficient time and materials to conduct a thorough and standardized clinical evaluation, the diagnosis and therefore, subsequent treatment of these common vaginal problems remains difficult. PMID:19104364

  6. Full-system laboratory testing of the F/15 deformable secondary mirror for the new MMT adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcguire, Patrick C.; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; Angel, J. Roger P.; Angeli, George Z.; Johnson, Robert L.; Fitz-Patrick, Bruce C.; Davison, Warren B.; Sarlot, Roland J.; Bresloff, Cynthia J.; Hughes, John M.; Miller, Stephen M.; Schaller, Skip; Wildi, Francois P.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Cordova, Richard M.; Rademacher, Matthew J.; Rascon, Mario H.; Burge, James H.; Stamper, Brian L.; Zhao, Chunyu; Salinari, Piero; del Vecchio, Ciro; Riccardi, Armando; Brusa, Guido; Biasi, Roberto; Andrighettoni, Mario; Gallieni, Daniele; Franchini, Claudio; Sandler, David G.; Barrett, Todd K.

    1999-09-01

    We will present a system to perform closed-loop optical tests of the 64 cm diameter, 336 actuator adaptive secondary made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory. Testing will include Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing and modal correction of static and dynamic aberrated wavefronts. The test optical system is designed so that experiments can be made with both the focal plane instrument and secondary installed in their normal configuration at the MMT, or with the same 9 m spacing in a laboratory test tower. The convex secondary will be illuminated at normal incidence through two 70 cm diameter lenses mounted just below. The artificial, aberrated star is projected from near the wavefront sensor in the Cassegrain focus assembly. Computer generated holograms correct for spherical aberration in the really optics at the test wavelengths of 0.594 and 1.5 micrometers . Atmospheric turbulence is reproduced by two spinning transmission plates imprinted with Kolmogorov turbulence. The Shimmulator will give us the opportunity to test fully the adaptive optics system before installation at the new MMT, hence saving much precious telescope time.

  7. 42 CFR 493.1773 - Standard: Basic inspection requirements for all laboratories issued a CLIA certificate and CLIA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Basic inspection requirements for all laboratories issued a CLIA certificate and CLIA-exempt laboratories. 493.1773 Section 493.1773 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  8. A fish-feeding laboratory bioassay to assess the antipredatory activity of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Marty, Micah J; Pawlik, Joseph R

    2015-01-01

    Marine chemical ecology is a young discipline, having emerged from the collaboration of natural products chemists and marine ecologists in the 1980s with the goal of examining the ecological functions of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms. The result has been a progression of protocols that have increasingly refined the ecological relevance of the experimental approach. Here we present the most up-to-date version of a fish-feeding laboratory bioassay that enables investigators to assess the antipredatory activity of secondary metabolites from the tissues of marine organisms. Organic metabolites of all polarities are exhaustively extracted from the tissue of the target organism and reconstituted at natural concentrations in a nutritionally appropriate food matrix. Experimental food pellets are presented to a generalist predator in laboratory feeding assays to assess the antipredatory activity of the extract. The procedure described herein uses the bluehead, Thalassoma bifasciatum, to test the palatability of Caribbean marine invertebrates; however, the design may be readily adapted to other systems. Results obtained using this laboratory assay are an important prelude to field experiments that rely on the feeding responses of a full complement of potential predators. Additionally, this bioassay can be used to direct the isolation of feeding-deterrent metabolites through bioassay-guided fractionation. This feeding bioassay has advanced our understanding of the factors that control the distribution and abundance of marine invertebrates on Caribbean coral reefs and may inform investigations in diverse fields of inquiry, including pharmacology, biotechnology, and evolutionary ecology. PMID:25650625

  9. Molecular composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry: linking laboratory and field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Fuller, Stephen; Aalto, Juho; Healy, Robert; Alfara, Rami; Ruuskanen, Taina; Wenger, John; McFiggans, Gordon; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and give rise to secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which have effects on climate and human health. Laboratory chamber experiments have been performed during several decades in an attempt to mimic atmospheric SOA formation. However, it is still unclear how close the aerosol particles generated in laboratory experiments resemble atmospheric SOA with respect to their detailed chemical composition. To date, most laboratory experiments have been performed using a single organic precursor (e.g., alpha- or beta-pinene, isoprene) while in the atmosphere a wide range of precursors contribute to SOA, which results most likely in a more complex SOA composition compared to the one-precursor laboratory systems. The objective of this work is to compare laboratory generated SOA from oxidation of BVOCs mixtures and remote ambient samples using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (UHR-MS) that allows detection of hundreds of individual SOA constituents. We examined aerosol samples from a boreal forest site, Hyytiälä, Finland and determined that a dominant fraction of the detected compounds are reaction products of a multi-component mixture of BVOCs. In the subsequent smog chamber experiments, SOA was generated from the ozonolysis and OH initiated reactions with BVOC mixtures containing species (alpha- and beta-pinene, delta-3-carene, and isoprene) that are most abundant in Hyytiälä's environment. The laboratory experiments were performed at conditions (e.g., RH, aerosol seed, and VOC ratios) that would resemble those at the boreal sampling site during the summer period. The elemental composition of the complex mixtures from laboratory generated SOA samples were compared with field samples using statistical data analysis methods.

  10. 40 CFR 52.1875 - Attainment dates for achieving the sulfur dioxide secondary standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....; Interlake, Inc.; Austin Power Co.; Diamond Crystal Salt Co.; The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.; The Gulf Oil Co... to achieve the secondary SO2 NAAQS by January 4, 1983: Diamond Crystal Salt; Firestone Tire &...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1875 - Attainment dates for achieving the sulfur dioxide secondary standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....; Interlake, Inc.; Austin Power Co.; Diamond Crystal Salt Co.; The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.; The Gulf Oil Co... to achieve the secondary SO2 NAAQS by January 4, 1983: Diamond Crystal Salt; Firestone Tire &...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1875 - Attainment dates for achieving the sulfur dioxide secondary standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....; Interlake, Inc.; Austin Power Co.; Diamond Crystal Salt Co.; The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.; The Gulf Oil Co... to achieve the secondary SO2 NAAQS by January 4, 1983: Diamond Crystal Salt; Firestone Tire &...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1875 - Attainment dates for achieving the sulfur dioxide secondary standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....; Interlake, Inc.; Austin Power Co.; Diamond Crystal Salt Co.; The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.; The Gulf Oil Co... to achieve the secondary SO2 NAAQS by January 4, 1983: Diamond Crystal Salt; Firestone Tire &...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1875 - Attainment dates for achieving the sulfur dioxide secondary standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....; Interlake, Inc.; Austin Power Co.; Diamond Crystal Salt Co.; The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.; The Gulf Oil Co... to achieve the secondary SO2 NAAQS by January 4, 1983: Diamond Crystal Salt; Firestone Tire &...

  15. Environmental control requirements for the Weapons Production Primary Standards Laboratory (WPPSL)

    SciTech Connect

    Braudaway, D.W.

    1990-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Weapons Production Primary Standards Laboratory (WPPSL) for the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex. The present facility is housed principally in a three story building shared with other organizations but has some functions located in other buildings. The building has been occupied for 30 years and the environmental control equipment, while functional, shows the ravages of time. This facility was quite advanced for its time but does not meet current needs. Replacement of obsolete measuring equipment, extension of measurement capability to additional disciplines and to higher precision levels have made the facility inadequate for current and future needs. Accordingly, plans have been under way for a new updated facility which is planned to meet today's requirements and to be sufficiently flexible to cover changes in the near future. Where practical in this set of requirements, reference has been made to existing documents on standards laboratory environments. Because of the history of the facility and because of the advanced features, interest has been expressed in the requirements developed for the new facility. Accordingly, this document has been prepared so that these requirements are published. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Coupled pendulums: a physical system for laboratory investigations at upper secondary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picciarelli, Vittorio; Stella, Rosa

    2010-07-01

    The topic of coupled oscillations is rich in physical content which is both interesting and complex. The study of the time evolution of coupled oscillator systems involves a mathematical formalization beyond the level of the upper secondary school student's competence. Here, we present an original approach, suitable even for secondary students, to investigate a coupled pendulum system through a series of carefully designed hands-on and minds-on modelling activities. We give a detailed description of these activities and of the strategy developed to promote both the understanding of this complex system and a sound epistemological framework. Students are actively engaged (1) in system exploration; (2) in simple model building and its implementation with an Excel spreadsheet; and (3) in comparing the measurements of the system behaviour with predictions from the model.

  17. Measurement of Henry's Law Constants Using Internal Standards: A Quantitative GC Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis or Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Chang; Boisvert, Susanne M.; Arida, Ann-Marie C.; Day, Shannon E.

    2008-01-01

    An internal standard method applicable to undergraduate instrumental analysis or environmental chemistry laboratory has been designed and tested to determine the Henry's law constants for a series of alkyl nitriles. In this method, a mixture of the analytes and an internal standard is prepared and used to make a standard solution (organic solvent)…

  18. Physics Instruction in Secondary Schools: An Investigation of Teachers' Beliefs towards Physics Laboratory and ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siorenta, Anastassia; Jimoyiannis, Athanassios

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the examination of physics teachers' beliefs and perceptions of laboratory and ICT supported physics instruction. The findings indicate that the teachers in the sample were generally positive about the affordances offered by the physics lab and ICT in physics instruction. However, school culture context, mainly the need to…

  19. Laboratory Approach to Secondary Teacher Professional Development: Impacting Teacher Behavior and Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haug, Carolyn A.; Sands, Deanna Iceman

    2013-01-01

    The Literacy Lab Professional Development provided a laboratory approach to professional development for 42 high school teachers in two schools. Three main activities included: (1) planning and professional development days, (2) lab and professional development days, and (3) individual coaching. The targets of the Literacy Lab Professional…

  20. Evaluation of the Use of Remote Laboratories for Secondary School Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, David; Newcombe, Peter; Stumpers, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experimentation is generally considered central to science-based education. Allowing students to "experience" science through various forms of carefully designed practical work, including experimentation, is often claimed to support their learning and motivate their engagement while fulfilling specific curriculum requirements. However,…

  1. Preservice Middle and Secondary School Teachers' Misconceptions about Making Measurements Using Laboratory Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Donna R.; Hall, Alfred L., II

    This study was conceived when it was observed that in the laboratory, with few exceptions, college freshmen chemistry students did not know how to make accurate measurements. Once the students were made aware of this, they easily learned how. From this experience and in the interest of breaking the cycle, it was decided to assess the ability of…

  2. 42 CFR 493.1780 - Standard: Inspection of CLIA-exempt laboratories or laboratories requesting or issued a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... laboratories or laboratories requesting or issued a certificate of accreditation. (a) Validation inspection. CMS or a CMS agent may conduct a validation inspection of any accredited or CLIA-exempt laboratory at... requirements of this part. (c) Noncompliance determination. If a validation or complaint inspection results...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1780 - Standard: Inspection of CLIA-exempt laboratories or laboratories requesting or issued a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... laboratories or laboratories requesting or issued a certificate of accreditation. (a) Validation inspection. CMS or a CMS agent may conduct a validation inspection of any accredited or CLIA-exempt laboratory at... requirements of this part. (c) Noncompliance determination. If a validation or complaint inspection results...

  4. Nanotechnology Laboratory Continues Partnership with FDA and National Institute of Standards and Technology | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI-funded Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL)—a leader in evaluating promising nanomedicines to fight cancer—recently renewed its collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to continue its groundbreaking work on characterizing nanomedicines and moving them toward the clinic. In partnership with NIST and the FDA, NCL has laid a solid, scientific foundation for using the power of nanotechnology to increase the potency and target the delivery

  5. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  6. 77 FR 20217 - Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... 1971. These standards were set at a level of 0.053 parts per million (ppm) as an annual average (36 FR... EPA proposed to retain the standards set in 1971 (49 FR 6866). After taking into account public comments, the EPA published the final decision to retain these standards in June 1985 (50 FR 25532)....

  7. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haydary, J.; Susa, D.; Dudáš, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  8. Partnerships between secondary/elementary science teachers and laboratory-based scientists: Delineating best practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Sandra

    Given the high probability of national and federal research laboratories continuing to sponsor science education partnerships between their staff and classroom science teachers and the dearth of research in this area, this study set out to delineate best practices associated with such partnerships for the purpose of increasing the effectiveness of future partnerships. This investigation critically examined two science education partnerships at selected federal research laboratories over the course of summer workshops and the subsequent academic year. Sources of data included interviews, workshop observations, electronic mail communication, written program evaluations, and casual conversation. A unique feature of this research was the inclusion of all representative groups including program administrators, laboratory scientists, and the participating classroom teachers. By capturing the perspectives of all participant groups, this research was able to present a complete portrayal of science education partnerships at two national research laboratories. The longitudinal nature of this investigation allowed for all components of each program (e.g. planning, organization, implementation, evaluation, and follow-up) to be included in the research. The determination of best practices in science education partnerships provided the framework for this research which clearly showed the underlying importance of the need for all participants to understand the goals and what is expected of them before the program gets underway. To be achievable, individual and programmatic expectations must be in alignment with the overall goals of a program. To be attainable, the goals must be understood by all and provide a framework for the expectations. Without a clear and shared vision of a programs direction, goals and expectations are not likely to be fulfilled. The common thread for each of these components is communication and its importance during all stages of a program cannot be

  9. Design and verification of the shielding around the new Neutron Standards Laboratory (LPN) at CIEMAT.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Villafañe, R; Guerrero, J E; Embid, M; Fernández, R; Grandio, R; Pérez-Cejuela, P; Márquez, J L; Alvarez, F; Ortego, P

    2014-10-01

    The construction of the new Neutron Standards Laboratory at CIEMAT (Laboratorio de Patrones Neutrónicos) has been finalised and is ready to provide service. The facility is an ∼8 m×8 m×8 m irradiation vault, following the International Organization for Standardization 8529 recommendations. It relies on several neutron sources: a 5-GBq (5.8× 10(8) s(-1)) (252)Cf source and two (241)Am-Be neutron sources (185 and 11.1 GBq). The irradiation point is located 4 m over the ground level and in the geometrical centre of the room. Each neutron source can be moved remotely from its storage position inside a water pool to the irradiation point. Prior to this, an important task to design the neutron shielding and to choose the most appropriate materials has been developed by the Radiological Security Unit and the Ionizing Radiations Metrology Laboratory. MCNPX was chosen to simulate the irradiation facility. With this information the walls were built with a thickness of 125 cm. Special attention was put on the weak points (main door, air conditioning system, etc.) so that the ambient dose outside the facility was below the regulatory limits. Finally, the Radiation Protection Unit carried out a set of measurements in specific points around the installation with an LB6411 neutron monitor and a Reuter-Stokes high-pressure ion chamber to verify experimentally the results of the simulation. PMID:24478306

  10. 77 FR 16987 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Secondary Aluminum Production

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... for hazardous air pollutants for secondary aluminum production (77 FR 8576). The EPA is extending the... the proposed rule published February 14, 2012, (77 FR 8576) is being extended for 14 days to April 13... Aluminum Production AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of extension of...

  11. Addressing the English Language Arts Technology Standard in a Secondary Reading Methodology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkley, Donna J.; Schmidt, Denise A.; Allen, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    Describes efforts to integrate technology into a reading methodology course for secondary English majors. Discusses the use of e-mail, multimedia, distance education for videoconferences, online discussion technology, subject-specific software, desktop publishing, a database management system, a concept mapping program, and the use of the World…

  12. Teacher-Reported Use of Empirically Validated and Standards-Based Instructional Approaches in Secondary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Joseph Calvin; Maccini, Paula

    2007-01-01

    A random sample of 167 secondary special and general educators who taught math to students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) and learning disabilities (LD) responded to a mail survey. The survey examined teacher perceptions of (a) definition of math; (b) familiarity with course topics; (c) effectiveness of methods courses; (d)…

  13. 25 CFR 36.24 - Standard IX-Secondary instructional program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 69.) (d) The high school program shall provide program coordination with feeder schools, career... that lead to high school completion for secondary students who do not function successfully in the... instructional program shall reflect the philosophy of the student, tribe, community, and school, and...

  14. 25 CFR 36.24 - Standard IX-Secondary instructional program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 69.) (d) The high school program shall provide program coordination with feeder schools, career... that lead to high school completion for secondary students who do not function successfully in the... instructional program shall reflect the philosophy of the student, tribe, community, and school, and...

  15. 25 CFR 36.24 - Standard IX-Secondary instructional program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 69.) (d) The high school program shall provide program coordination with feeder schools, career... that lead to high school completion for secondary students who do not function successfully in the... instructional program shall reflect the philosophy of the student, tribe, community, and school, and...

  16. WATER EXERCISE COMPARED TO LAND EXERCISE OR STANDARD CARE IN FEMALE CANCER SURVIVORS WITH SECONDARY LYMPHEDEMA.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, H; Enblom, A; Dunberger, G; Nyberg, T; Bergmark, K

    2015-06-01

    There are few studies showing that physical exercise can improve secondary lymphedema. We hypothesized that water exercise would be more effective than land exercise in reducing limb volume. Secondary objectives were joint movement, BMI, daily function, well-being, and body image. Limb volume was measured with circumference or was volumetric. Well-being and body image were measured with a study-specific questionnaire and daily function with DASH and HOOS questionnaires. Eighty-eight eligible patients with secondary lymphedema after breast or gynecological cancer participated in this controlled clinical intervention study. There was a higher proportion of women who participated in water exercises who reduced their secondary arm limb volume (p = 0.029), and there were also significant differences for BMI (p = 0.047) and self-reported frequency of swelling (p = 0.031) in the water exercise group after intervention. Women with arm lymphedema in the land exercise group improved DASH scores (p = 0.047) and outer rotation in the shoulder (p = 0.001). Our results suggest that to reduce objective and self-reported swelling, lymphedema patients may be offered water exercise training while to improve daily shoulder function, land exercises are preferred. To guide female cancer survivors with lymphedema to effective exercise resulting in reduced limb volume and improved function, adequate evidenced-based programs are needed. PMID:26714371

  17. Critical Supports for Secondary Educators in Common Core State Standard Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruchti, Wendy P.; Jenkins, Susan J.; Agamba, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Teacher professional development (PD) is a complex, ongoing challenge as educational systems attempt to deliver excellent programming in pursuit of increased student achievement (Opfer and Pedder 2011). This article examines Idaho Total Instructional Alignment (TIA), a model for teacher PD that is currently being utilized in secondary schools…

  18. Evaporation Kinetics and Phase of Laboratory and Ambient Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, Dan G.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-02-08

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense efforts to find additional SOA sources but leaving the assumption of rapid SOA evaporation unchallenged. We characterized room-temperature evaporation of pure SOA and SOA formed in the presence of spectator organic vapors with and without aging. We find that it takes ~24 hrs for pure SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ~10 minutes timescales predicted by models. The presence of spectator organic vapors and aging dramatically reduces the evaporation, and in some cases nearly stops it. For all cases, SOA evaporation behavior is size independent and does not follow the liquid droplet evaporation kinetics assumed by models.

  19. The effects of calculator-based laboratories on standardized test scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Charlotte Bethany Rains

    Nationwide, the goal of providing a productive science and math education to our youth in today's educational institutions is centering itself around the technology being utilized in these classrooms. In this age of digital technology, educational software and calculator-based laboratories (CBL) have become significant devices in the teaching of science and math for many states across the United States. Among the technology, the Texas Instruments graphing calculator and Vernier Labpro interface, are among some of the calculator-based laboratories becoming increasingly popular among middle and high school science and math teachers in many school districts across this country. In Tennessee, however, it is reported that this type of technology is not regularly utilized at the student level in most high school science classrooms, especially in the area of Physical Science (Vernier, 2006). This research explored the effect of calculator based laboratory instruction on standardized test scores. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of traditional teaching methods versus graphing calculator teaching methods on the state mandated End-of-Course (EOC) Physical Science exam based on ability, gender, and ethnicity. The sample included 187 total tenth and eleventh grade physical science students, 101 of which belonged to a control group and 87 of which belonged to the experimental group. Physical Science End-of-Course scores obtained from the Tennessee Department of Education during the spring of 2005 and the spring of 2006 were used to examine the hypotheses. The findings of this research study suggested the type of teaching method, traditional or calculator based, did not have an effect on standardized test scores. However, the students' ability level, as demonstrated on the End-of-Course test, had a significant effect on End-of-Course test scores. This study focused on a limited population of high school physical science students in the middle Tennessee

  20. 76 FR 72216 - Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories Standard; Extension of the Office of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories... Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories (29 CFR 1910.1450). ] DATES: Comments must be submitted (postmarked... on Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories applies to laboratories that...

  1. Quantification of xanthohumol, isoxanthohumol, 8-prenylnaringenin, and 6-prenylnaringenin in hop extracts and derived capsules using secondary standards.

    PubMed

    Dhooghe, Liene; Naessens, Tania; Heyerick, Arne; De Keukeleire, Denis; Vlietinck, Arnold J; Pieters, Luc; Apers, Sandra

    2010-12-15

    Hop is a well-known and already frequently used estrogenic phytotherapeutic, containing the interesting prenylflavonoids, xanthohumol (XN), isoxanthohumol (IXN), 8- and 6-prenylnaringenin (8-PN and 6-PN). Since the use of secondary standards can form a solution whenever the determination is required of certain components, not commercially available or too expensive, it was decided to develop an accessible HPLC-DAD method for the determination of these prenylflavonoids. The amounts were determined in hop extract and capsules, using quercetin and naringenin as secondary standards. After optimization of the sample preparation and HPLC conditions, the analysis was validated according to the ICH guidelines. The response function of XN, 8-PN, quercetin and naringenin showed a linear relationship. For the determination of XN, a calibration line of at least three concentrations of quercetin has to be constructed. The correction factors for XN (quercetin) and for 8-PN (naringenin) were validated and determined to be 0.583 for XN, and 1.296 for IXN, 8-PN and 6-PN. The intermediate precision was investigated and it could be concluded that the standard deviation of the method was equal considering time and concentration (RSD of 2.5-5%). By means of a recovery experiment, it was proven that the method is accurate (recoveries of 96.1-100.1%). Additionally, by analysing preparations containing hop extracts on the Belgian market, it was shown that the method is suitable for its use, namely the determination of XN, IXN, 8-PN and 6-PN in hop extract and capsules, using quercetin and naringenin as secondary standards. PMID:21111159

  2. Secondary electron emission from lunar soil by solar wind type ion impact: Laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukes, Catherine; Bu, Caixia; Baragiola, Raul A.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction: The lunar surface potential is determined by time-varying fluxes of electrons and ions from the solar wind, photoelectrons ejected by UV photons, cosmic rays, and micrometeorite impacts. Solar wind ions have a dual role in the charging process, adding positive charge to the lunar regolith upon impact and ejecting negative secondary electrons (SE). Electron emission occurs when the energy from the impacting ion is transferred to the solid, ionizing and damaging the material; electrons with kinetic energy greater than the ionization potential (band gap + electron affinity) are ejected from the solid[1].Experiment: We investigate the energy distribution of secondary electrons ejected from Apollo soils of varying maturity and lunar analogs by 4 keV He+. Soils are placed into a shallow Al cup and compressed. In-situ low-energy oxygen plasma is used to clean atmospheric contaminants from the soil before analysis[2]. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ascertains that the sample surface is clean. Experiments are conducted in a PHI 560 system (<10-9 Torr), equipped with a double-pass, cylindrical-mirror electron energy analyzer (CMA) and μ-metal shield. The spectrometer is used to measure SE distributions, as well as for in situ surface characterization. A small negative bias (~5V) with respect to the grounded entrance grid of the CMA may be placed on the sample holder in order to expose the low energy cutoff.To measure SE energy distributions, primary ions rastered over a ~6 x 6 mm2 area are incident on the sample at ~40° relative to the surface normal, while SE emitted with an angle of 42.3°± 3.5° in a cone are analyzed.Results: The energy distribution of SE ejected from 4 keV He ion irradiation of albite with no bias applied shows positive charging of the surface. The general shape and distribution peak (~4 eV) are consistent with spectra for low energy ions on insulating material[1].Acknowledgements: We thank the NASA LASER program for support

  3. [Implementation of the technical requirements of the UNE-EN-ISO 15189 quality standard in a mycobacterial laboratory].

    PubMed

    Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Ocete Mochón, M Dolores; Lahiguera, M José; Bresó, M Carmen; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2013-02-01

    The UNE-EN-ISO 15189:2007 standard defines the requirements for quality and competence that must be met by medical laboratories. These laboratories should use this international standard to develop their own quality management systems and to evaluate their own competencies; in turn, this standard will be used by accreditation bodies to confirm or recognize the laboratories' competence. In clinical microbiology laboratories, application of the standard implies the implementation of the technical and specific management requirements that must be met to achieve optimal quality when carrying out microbiological tests. In Spain, accreditation is granted by the Spanish Accreditation Body (Entidad Nacional de Acreditación). This review aims to discuss the practical application of the standard's technical requirements in mycobacterial laboratory. Firstly, we define the scope of accreditation. Secondly, we specify how the items of the standard on personnel management, control of equipment, environmental facilities, method validation, internal controls and customer satisfaction surveys were developed and implemented in our laboratory. PMID:23453231

  4. The Role of the National Laboratory in Improving Secondary Science Education

    SciTech Connect

    White,K.; Morris, M.; Stegman, M.

    2008-10-20

    While the role of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers in our education system is obvious, their role in our economic and national security system is less so. Our nation relies upon innovation and creativity applied in a way that generates new technologies for industry, health care, and the protection of our national assets and citizens. Often, it is our science teachers who generate the excitement that leads students to pursue science careers. While academia provides these teachers with the tools to educate, the rigors of a science and technology curriculum, coupled with the requisite teaching courses, often limit teacher exposure to an authentic research environment. As the single largest funding agency for the physical sciences, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science plays an important role in filling this void. For STEM teachers, the DOE Academies Creating Teacher Scientists program (ACTS) bridges the worlds of research and education. The ACTS program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one of several across the country, exemplifies the value of this program for participating teachers. Outcomes of the work at BNL as evidenced by the balance of this report, include the following: (1) Teachers have developed long-term relationships with the Laboratory through participation in ongoing research, and this experience has both built enthusiasm for and enriched the content knowledge of the participants. (2) Teachers have modified the way they teach and are more likely to engage students in authentic research and include more inquiry-based activities. (3) Teachers have reported their students are more interested in becoming involved in science through classes, extra-curricular clubs, and community involvement. (4) Teachers have established leadership roles within their peer groups, both in their own districts and in the broader teaching community. National laboratories are making an important contribution to the science

  5. Evaporation Kinetics of Laboratory Generated Secondary Organic Aerosols at Elevated Relative Humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semi-solid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at 0%, 50% and 90% RH. We find that in all cases evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30% to 70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 hours, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at 0% and 50% RH are nearly the same, while at 90% RH a slightly larger fraction evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses, with aging at elevated RH leading to more significant effect. In all cases, SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent, providing direct evidence that oligomers play a crucial role in determining the evaporation kinetics.

  6. Laboratory studies on secondary organic aerosol formation from crude oil vapors.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Palm, B B; Borbon, A; Graus, M; Warneke, C; Ortega, A M; Day, D A; Brune, W H; Jimenez, J L; de Gouw, J A

    2013-01-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosol composition and gas phase compounds over the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in June 2010 indicated the presence of high concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from organic compounds of intermediate volatility. In this work, we investigated SOA formation from South Louisiana crude oil vapors reacting with OH in a Potential Aerosol Mass flow reactor. We use the dependence of evaporation time on the saturation concentration (C*) of the SOA precursors to separate the contribution of species of different C* to total SOA formation. This study shows consistent results with those at the DWH oil spill: (1) organic compounds of intermediate volatility with C* = 10(5)-10(6) μg m(-3) contribute the large majority of SOA mass formed, and have much larger SOA yields (0.37 for C* = 10(5) and 0.21 for C* = 10(6) μg m(-3)) than more volatile compounds with C*≥10(7) μg m(-3), (2) the mass spectral signature of SOA formed from oxidation of the less volatile compounds in the reactor shows good agreement with that of SOA formed at DWH oil spill. These results also support the use of flow reactors simulating atmospheric SOA formation and aging. PMID:24088179

  7. Evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols at elevated relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jacqueline; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semisolid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on α-pinene SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at <5%, 50 and 90% RH, and on limonene SOA particles at <5% and 90% RH. We find that in all cases evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30-70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 h, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at <5% and 50% RH are nearly the same, while at 90% RH a slightly larger fraction evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses; with aging at elevated RH leading to a more significant effect. In all cases, the observed SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent. PMID:25494490

  8. Laboratory measurement of secondary pollutant yields from ozone reaction with HVAC filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Zhang, Jianshun; Fisk, William J.

    2009-09-09

    We used Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional sampling methods to monitor and identify trace level organic pollutants formed in heterogeneous reactions between ozone and HVAC filters in real time. Experiments were carried out using a bench-scale flow tube reactor operating with dry air and humidified air (50% RH), at realistically high ozone concentrations (150 ppbv). We explored different filter media (i.e., fiberglass and cotton/polyester blends) and different particle loadings (i.e., clean filter and filters loaded with particles for 3 months at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Port of Oakland, CA). Detailed emission dynamics of very low levels of certain organic pollutants from filter media upon ozone exposure in the presence of moisture have been obtained and analyzed.

  9. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition.

    PubMed

    Haydary, J; Susa, D; Dudáš, J

    2013-05-01

    Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work. PMID:23428565

  10. Rain simulator as a standardized laboratory measurement of soil structural stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Luz; Cancelo González, Javier; Benito, Elena; Álvarez, Manuel; Barral, Maria Teresa; Díaz-Fierros, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall simulations are used since the 30's by scientist and technicians to study the soil erosion and soil hydrology. The basis of the rainfall simulation is that can reproduce the natural soil degradation processes, more accurately than the traditional methods used for the determination of structural stability. A rainfall simulator was built in 2006 based on those made by Guitián and Méndez (1961), and Morin (1967), to obtain standardized laboratory measurements of soil structural stability and a final implementation were made in the rainfall simulator to incorporate a intermittent fan-like water yet system with four sieves of 250 micrometres where the soil samples can be placed, and allow the simultaneous measurement of soil losses in the samples. Data obtained in the rainfall simulator, using different soils of the study basins, are related with the Ig Henin index and the results of the Emerson structural stability test. At the same time with the laboratory test, 10 water sampling surveys were carried out during the hydrological years 2004/05 and 2005/06, in two basins located in the humid region of NW Spain belonging to the Anllons River basin, one of the main basins of Galicia-Costa, that has been subject of detailed hydrological studies since 2000 (Rial, M., 2007 and Devesa, R., 2009) and had continuous records of streamflow. The selected subbasins have 57,62 and 50,05 square kilometres respectively, and presents significative geological differences; being one of them formed, mainly, by schists and a lower area with granites and, the other one formed mainly by gabbros. The suspended sediments in the samples were separated by centrifugation and weighted in the laboratory to study the possible relationship between soil losses in the rainfall simulations and the sediment fluxes in the river. The analysis revealed a good relationship between the sediments delivery to the streams and soil losses measured in the rainfall simulations.

  11. Standard Hydrogen Test Protocols for the NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This brochure summarizes the test protocols used in the NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Laboratory for the quantitative assessment of critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Researchers at the NREL Hydrogen Safety Sensor Test Laboratory developed a variety of test protocols to quantitatively assess critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Many are similar to, but typically more rigorous than, the test procedures mandated by ISO Standard 26142 (Hydrogen Detector for Stationary Applications). Specific protocols were developed for linear range, short-term stability, and the impact of fluctuations in temperature (T), pressure (P), relative humidity (RH), and chemical environment. Specialized tests (e.g., oxygen requirement) may also be performed. Hydrogen safety sensors selected for evaluation are subjected to a thorough regimen of test protocols, as described. Sensor testing is performed at NREL on custom-built sensor test fixtures. Environmental parameters such as T, P, RH, and gas composition are rigorously controlled and monitored. The NREL evaluations are performed on commercial hydrogen detectors, on emerging sensing technologies, and for end users to validate sensor performance for specific application needs. Test results and data are shared with the manufacturer or client via summary reports, teleconference phone calls, and, when appropriate, site visits to manufacturer facilities. Client representatives may also monitor NREL's operation while their technologies are being tested. Manufacturers may use test data to illustrate the analytical capability of their technologies and, more importantly, to guide future developments. NREL uses the data to assess technology gaps and deployment considerations. Per NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory policy, test results are treated as proprietary and are not shared with other manufacturers or other entities without permission. The data may be used by NREL in open publications

  12. A new standard cylindrical graphite-walled ionization chamber for dosimetry in 60Co beams at calibration laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    60Co sources are used mostly at dosimetry laboratories for calibration of ionization chambers utilized for radiotherapy dosimetry, mainly in those laboratories where there is no linear accelerator available. In this work, a new cylindrical ionization chamber was developed and characterized to be used as a reference dosimeter at the Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN. The characterization tests were performed according to the IEC 60731 standard, and all tests presented results within its recommended limits. Furthermore, the correction factors for the wall, stem, central collecting electrode, nonaxial uniformity and the mass-energy absorption coefficient were determined using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The air kerma rate determined with this new dosimeter was compared to the one obtained with the IPEN standard, presenting a difference of 1.5%. Therefore, the new ionization chamber prototype developed and characterized in this work presents potential use as a primary standard dosimeter at radiation metrology laboratories.

  13. Blood Cholesterol Measurement in Clinical Laboratories in the United States. Current Status. A Report from the Laboratory Standardization Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Precise and accurate cholesterol measurements are required to identify and treat individuals with high blood cholesterol levels. However, the current state of reliability of blood cholesterol measurements suggests that considerable inaccuracy in cholesterol testing exists. This report describes the Laboratory Standardization Panel findings on the…

  14. Compulsory Literacy and Numeracy Exit Standards for Senior Secondary Students: The Right Direction for Australia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Suzanne; Care, Esther; Griffin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    An overview of positive and negative potential effects of the setting of compulsory exit-level standards in literacy and numeracy for students completing their final years of schooling is presented. The overview rests on studies completed primarily outside Australia, reflecting the reality of such practices not having been implemented widely in…

  15. Critical Review of Commercial Secondary Lithium-Ion Battery Safety Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Harry P.; Chapin, Thomas, J.; Tabaddor, Mahmod

    2010-09-01

    The development of Li-ion cells with greater energy density has lead to safety concerns that must be carefully assessed as Li-ion cells power a wide range of products from consumer electronics to electric vehicles to space applications. Documented field failures and product recalls for Li-ion cells, mostly for consumer electronic products, highlight the risk of fire, smoke, and even explosion. These failures have been attributed to the occurrence of internal short circuits and the subsequent thermal runaway that can lead to fire and explosion. As packaging for some applications include a large number of cells, the risk of failure is likely to be magnified. To address concerns about the safety of battery powered products, safety standards have been developed. This paper provides a review of various international safety standards specific to lithium-ion cells. This paper shows that though the standards are harmonized on a host of abuse conditions, most lack a test simulating internal short circuits. This paper describes some efforts to introduce internal short circuit tests into safety standards.

  16. 25 CFR 36.24 - Standard IX-Secondary instructional program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 36.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Minimum... content areas: (1) Language arts (communication skills). (2) Sciences. (3) Mathematics. (4) Social...

  17. 25 CFR 36.24 - Standard IX-Secondary instructional program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 36.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Minimum... content areas: (1) Language arts (communication skills). (2) Sciences. (3) Mathematics. (4) Social...

  18. QUANTITATIVE STANDARDS FOR AUDIOVISUAL PERSONNEL, EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS (IN ELEMENTARY, SECONDARY, AND HIGHER EDUCATION).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COBUN, TED; AND OTHERS

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A STAGE IN A STUDY TO FORMULATE QUANTITATIVE GUIDELINES FOR THE AUDIO-VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS FIELD, BEING CONDUCTED BY DOCTORS GENE FARIS AND MENDEL SHERMAN UNDER A NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT CONTRACT. THE STANDARDS LISTED HERE HAVE BEEN OFFICIALLY APPROVED AND ADOPTED BY SEVERAL AGENCIES, INCLUDING THE DEPARTMENT OF…

  19. Critical review and rethinking of USEPA secondary standards for maintaining organoleptic quality of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Andrea M; Burlingame, Gary A

    2015-01-20

    Consumers assess their tap water primarily by its taste, odor, and appearance. Starting in 1979, USEPA promulgated Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels (SMCLs) as guidance for contaminants with organoleptic effects and also to maintain consumers’ confidence in tap water. This review assesses the basis for the 15 SMCLs (aluminum, chloride, color, copper, corrosivity, fluoride, foaming agents, iron, manganese, odor, pH, silver, sulfate, total dissolved solids, zinc) and summarizes advances in scientific knowledge since their promulgation. SMCLs for aluminum, color, pH, silver, sulfate, total dissolved solids, and zinc are appropriate at current values and remain consistent with sensory science literature. Recent advances in sensory and health sciences indicate that SMCLs for chloride, copper, fluoride, iron, and manganese are too high to minimize organoleptic effects. The SMCLs for corrosivity and foaming agents may be outdated. The SMCL for odor requires rethinking as the test does not correlate with consumer complaints. Since current stresses on source and treated waters include chemical spills, algal blooms, and increased salinization, organoleptic episodes that negatively impact consumer confidence and perception of tap water still occur and may increase. Thus, adherence to SMCLs can help maintain production of palatable water along with consumers’ confidence in their water providers. PMID:25517292

  20. Building a robust, scalable and standards-driven infrastructure for secondary use of EHR data: The SHARPn project

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Susan; Pathak, Jyotishman; Savova, Guergana; Oniki, Thomas A.; Westberg, Les; Beebe, Calvin E.; Tao, Cui; Parker, Craig G.; Haug, Peter J.; Huff, Stanley M.; Chute, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) Program, established by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology in 2010 supports research findings that remove barriers for increased adoption of health IT. The improvements envisioned by the SHARP Area 4 Consortium (SHARPn) will enable the use of the electronic health record (EHR) for secondary purposes, such as care process and outcomes improvement, biomedical research and epidemiologic monitoring of the nation’s health. One of the primary informatics problem areas in this endeavor is the standardization of disparate health data from the nation’s many health care organizations and providers. The SHARPn team is developing open source services and components to support the ubiquitous exchange, sharing and reuse or ‘liquidity’ of operational clinical data stored in electronic health records. One year into the design and development of the SHARPn framework, we demonstrated end to end data flow and a prototype SHARPn platform, using thousands of patient electronic records sourced from two large healthcare organizations: Mayo Clinic and Intermountain Healthcare. The platform was deployed to (1) receive source EHR data in several formats, (2) generate structured data from EHR narrative text, and (3) normalize the EHR data using common detailed clinical models and Consolidated Health Informatics standard terminologies, which were (4) accessed by a phenotyping service using normalized data specifications. The architecture of this prototype SHARPn platform is presented. The EHR data throughput demonstration showed success in normalizing native EHR data, both structured and narrative, from two independent organizations and EHR systems. Based on the demonstration, observed challenges for standardization of EHR data for interoperable secondary use are discussed. PMID:22326800

  1. Laboratory test descriptions for bovine respiratory disease diagnosis and their strengths and weaknesses: gold standards for diagnosis, do they exist?

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W; Confer, Anthony W

    2012-07-01

    The diagnosis of bovine respiratory diseases (BRD) poses significant challenges to the clinician as there are numerous infectious etiologies, operating singly or most often in combination. Clinical signs alone may not be diagnostic and the diagnostic laboratory is often used to assist the clinician. Recently many molecular-based tests have been taken from the research laboratory to the veterinary diagnostic laboratory. This review describes the "traditional tests" and several "molecular tests" and discusses the benefits and limitations of the tests and their interpretation. Clinicians should consult with their diagnostic laboratory regarding the interpretation of the test results. The rate of development and use of molecular diagnostic tests have outpaced validation, standardization, and standards for interpretation relative to their use in BRD diagnostics. PMID:23277642

  2. Laboratory test descriptions for bovine respiratory disease diagnosis and their strengths and weaknesses: Gold standards for diagnosis, do they exist?

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Robert W.; Confer, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of bovine respiratory diseases (BRD) poses significant challenges to the clinician as there are numerous infectious etiologies, operating singly or most often in combination. Clinical signs alone may not be diagnostic and the diagnostic laboratory is often used to assist the clinician. Recently many molecular-based tests have been taken from the research laboratory to the veterinary diagnostic laboratory. This review describes the “traditional tests” and several “molecular tests” and discusses the benefits and limitations of the tests and their interpretation. Clinicians should consult with their diagnostic laboratory regarding the interpretation of the test results. The rate of development and use of molecular diagnostic tests have outpaced validation, standardization, and standards for interpretation relative to their use in BRD diagnostics. PMID:23277642

  3. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  4. National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards agar dilution susceptibility testing of anaerobic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, W J

    1988-01-01

    One hundred nine recent clinical isolates of anaerobic gram-negative bacteria were tested in triplicate by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards agar dilution procedure for their susceptibility to 32 antimicrobial agents. All isolates were inhibited by imipenem, but there were significant numbers of strains resistant to other beta-lactam drugs, and therefore the in vitro response to these antimicrobial agents cannot be predicted. This was particularly true for the bile-resistant or Bacteroides fragilis group. beta-Lactamase production was detected in 82% of the bacteroides with the nitrocefin test. Clavulanic acid combined with amoxicillin and ticarcillin and sulbactam combined with ampicillin resulted in synergistic activity against all beta-lactamase-positive organisms. Ceftizoxime was the most active of the cephalosporins. Two percent of the isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol and metronidazole. Clindamycin resistance was detected in 38% of the B. fragilis group, which is a marked increase from the 4% detected 10 years ago at this institution. PMID:3364956

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Secondary Structure Determination of a Silk-Inspired, Self-Assembling Peptide: A Laboratory Exercise for Organic and Biochemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Tyler J.; Fry, Melany M.; Murphy, Amanda R.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory experiment gives upper-division organic or biochemistry undergraduate students a comprehensive look at the synthesis, chemical characterization, self-assembly, and secondary structure determination of small, N-acylated peptides inspired by the protein structure of silkworm silk. All experiments can be completed in one 4 h lab…

  6. Horse Manure and Other Fun Projects. Field Studies and Laboratory Experiences in Environmental Biology - A Book of Experimental Ideas for Secondary School Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert T., Ed.; Clark, Barbara G., Ed.

    This guide contains a collection of laboratory and field inquiries designed to promote ecological awareness, sensitivity, and understanding. The activities compiled by 28 teachers are for use in teaching biology at the secondary level. They are presented in a "recipe" form to make it possible for teachers without prior experience or training to…

  7. Laboratory Measurements on Charging of Individual Micron-Size Apollo-11 Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Observations made during Apollo missions, as well as theoretical models indicate that the lunar surface and dust grains are electrostatically charged, levitated and transported. Lunar dust grains are charged by UV photoelectric emissions on the lunar dayside and by the impact of the solar wind electrons on the nightside. The knowledge of charging properties of individual lunar dust grains is important for developing appropriate theoretical models and mitigating strategies. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size size lunar dust grains in particular by low energy electron impact. However, experimental results based on extensive laboratory measurements on the charging of individual 0.2-13 micron size lunar dust grains by the secondary electron emissions (SEE) have been presented in a recent publication. The SEE process of charging of micron-size dust grains, however, is found to be very complex phenomena with strong particle size dependence. In this paper we present some examples of the complex nature of the SEE properties of positively charged individual lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB), and show that they remain unaffected by the variation of the AC field employed in the above mentioned measurements.

  8. [Dietary fibers of secondary vegetable raw material for correction of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in laboratory animals].

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, L F

    2001-01-01

    Drop of consumption by the population of dietary fibers is one of the causes of increase of sickness rate by diabetes in particular, and violation of carbohydrate metabolism in general. The purpose of research is definition of a degree of effect of dietary fibers of by-products of grapes processing (grape seed-cakes and press cake of grape pyrenes in an mixture with sorbite) on a carbohydrate and lipide metabolism in laboratory animals. During examinations is detected, that the vegetable products based on dietary fibers do not have negative action on physical development of animals, their body weight. The parameters of an amount of reticulocytes, erythrocytes, lymphocytes, hematocrit were in normal range. In animal, receiving dietary fibers of secondary grape raw material in a ration, the concentration of a cholesterol in blood serum was lower on 2-3% (5.6-5.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/l) as against control (6.0 +/- 0.2 mmol/l). The basal level of a glucose has appeared equal for control: 6.1 +/- 0.5 mmol/l, and for others groups of rats, consuming a dietary fibers with sorbite from 5.6 +/- 0.4 up to 6.0 +/- 0.5 mmol/l. PMID:11517682

  9. Development of a Fan-Filter Unit Test Standard, LaboratoryValidations, and its Applications across Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2006-10-20

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is now finalizing the Phase 2 Research and Demonstration Project on characterizing 2-foot x 4-foot (61-cm x 122-cm) fan-filter units in the market using the first-ever standard laboratory test method developed at LBNL.[1][2][3] Fan-filter units deliver re-circulated air and provide particle filtration control for clean environments. Much of the energy in cleanrooms (and minienvironments) is consumed by 2-foot x 4-foot (61-cm x 122-cm) or 4-foot x 4-foot (122-cm x 122-cm) fan-filter units that are typically located in the ceiling (25-100% coverage) of cleanroom controlled environments. Thanks to funding support by the California Energy Commission's Industrial Program of the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program, and significant participation from manufacturers and users of fan-filter units from around the world, LBNL has developed and performed a series of standard laboratory tests and reporting on a variety of 2-foot x 4-foot (61-cm x 122-cm) fan-filter units (FFUs). Standard laboratory testing reports have been completed and reported back to anonymous individual participants in this project. To date, such reports on standard testing of FFU performance have provided rigorous and useful data for suppliers and end users to better understand, and more importantly, to quantitatively characterize performance of FFU products under a variety of operating conditions.[1] In the course of the project, the standard laboratory method previously developed at LBNL has been under continuous evaluation and update.[2][3] Based upon the updated standard, it becomes feasible for users and suppliers to characterize and evaluate energy performance of FFUs in a consistent way.

  10. Adrenal insufficiency in a woman secondary to standard-dose inhaled fluticasone propionate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Casey M; Spratt, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 55-year-old woman with asthma presented with adrenal insufficiency of unknown origin. She was referred to our Division of Reproductive Endocrinology to further evaluate an undetectable morning cortisol level discovered during the evaluation of a low serum DHEA-S level. She was asymptomatic other than having mild fatigue and weight gain. Her medication list included 220 μg of inhaled fluticasone propionate twice daily for asthma, which she was taking as prescribed. On presentation, the undetectable morning cortisol level was confirmed. A urinary measurement of fluticasone propionate 17β-carboxylic acid was markedly elevated. Fluticasone therapy was discontinued and salmeterol therapy initiated with supplemental hydrocortisone. Hydrocortisone therapy was discontinued after 2 months. A repeat urinary fluticasone measurement 4 months after the discontinuation of fluticasone therapy was undetectably low and morning cortisol level was normal at 18.0 μg/dl. Inhaled fluticasone is generally considered to be minimally systemically absorbed. This patient's only clinical evidence suggesting adrenal insufficiency was fatigue accompanying a low serum DHEA-S level. This case demonstrates that adrenal insufficiency can be caused by a routine dose of inhaled fluticasone. Missing this diagnosis could potentially result in adrenal crisis upon discontinuation of fluticasone therapy. Learning points Standard-dose inhaled fluticasone can cause adrenal insufficiency.Adrenal insufficiency should be considered in patients taking, or who have recently discontinued, inhaled fluticasone therapy and present with new onset of nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, depression, myalgia, arthralgia, unexplained weight loss, and nausea that are suggestive of adrenal insufficiency.Adrenal insufficiency should be considered in postoperative patients who exhibit signs of hypoadrenalism after fluticasone therapy has been withheld in the perioperative setting.Routine screening

  11. Student Perceptions of Chemistry Laboratory Learning Environments, Student-Teacher Interactions and Attitudes in Secondary School Gifted Education Classes in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Quek Choon; Wong, Angela F. L.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the chemistry laboratory classroom environment, teacher-student interactions and student attitudes towards chemistry among 497 gifted and non-gifted secondary-school students in Singapore. The data were collected using the 35-item Chemistry Laboratory Environment Inventory (CLEI), the 48-item Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) and the 30-item Questionnaire on Chemistry-Related Attitudes (QOCRA). Results supported the validity and reliability of the CLEI and QTI for this sample. Stream (gifted versus non-gifted) and gender differences were found in actual and preferred chemistry laboratory classroom environments and teacher-student interactions. Some statistically significant associations of modest magnitude were found between students' attitudes towards chemistry and both the laboratory classroom environment and the interpersonal behaviour of chemistry teachers. Suggestions for improving chemistry laboratory classroom environments and the teacher-student interactions for gifted students are provided.

  12. 75 FR 22150 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for Federal Agencies Correction In...

  13. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section 353.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  14. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section 353.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  15. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section 353.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  16. 7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health testing and seed crop phytosanitary inspection. 353.9 Section 353.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  17. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2014-06-01

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ˜1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  18. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study. PMID:24985636

  19. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  20. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  1. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TRAINING OF LABORATORY TECHNICIANS (G09)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the training for new laboratory technicians at the Harvard School of Public Health/Emory University Trace Metals Laboratory. The training is intended to provide a sound understanding of the tasks for which they are responsible so that they ...

  2. An Alternative Approach for Preparing and Standardizing Some Common Aqueous Reagents Used in an Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melaku, Samuel; Dabke, Rajeev B.

    2014-01-01

    A guide for instructors and laboratory assistants to prepare some common aqueous reagents used in an undergraduate laboratory is presented. Dilute reagents consisting of H[superscript +](aq), I[subscript 3][superscript-](aq), Ce[superscript 4+](aq), and Ag[superscript+](aq) were prepared by electrolytic oxidation of respective precursors.…

  3. Control of environmental and clock parameters in Time and Frequency Standards Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliomaeki, Kalevi; Mansten, Tapio

    1992-06-01

    The measurement of environmental parameters and frequencies of rubidium and precision crystal oscillators in two time and frequency laboratories are reported. The effects of ambient fluctuations to oscillator frequencies were studied using multiple linear regression. Laboratory temperature seems to be the most significant factor even in air conditioned rooms. Additional thermally controlled cabinets were built to reduce temperature effects.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy Amos

    2010-01-01

    Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program

  5. Part 1: Laboratory Culture of Centroptilum triangulifer (Ephemeroptera: BAETIDAE) Using a Standardized Diet of Three Diatoms.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of methods for assessing exposure and effects of waterborne toxicants on stream invertebrate species is important to elucidate environmentally relevant information. United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) laboratory protocols for invertebrate toxicity te...

  6. Safety Basis Requirements for Nonnuclear Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site-Specific Work Smart Standards Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Brereton, S; Failor, R; Hildum, S; Spagnolo, S; Van Warmerdam, C

    2003-02-24

    This standard establishes requirements that, when coupled with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) methods and other Work Smart Standards for assuring worker safety, assure that the impacts of nonnuclear operations authorized in LLNL facilities are well understood and controlled in a manner that protects the health of workers, the public, and the environment. All LLNL facilities shall be classified based on potential for adverse impact of operations to the health of co-located (i.e., nearby) workers and the public in accordance with this standard, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 830, Subpart B, and Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 420.2A. This standard provides information on: Objectives; Applicability; Safety analysis requirements; Control selection and maintenance; Documentation requirements; Safety basis review, approval, and renewal; and Safety basis implementation.

  7. From Topos to Oikos: The Standardization of Glass Containers as Epistemic Boundaries in Modern Laboratory Research (1850-1900).

    PubMed

    Espahangizi, Kijan

    2015-09-01

    Glass vessels such as flasks and test tubes play an ambiguous role in the historiography of modern laboratory research. In spite of the strong focus on the role of materiality in the last decades, the scientific glass vessel - while being symbolically omnipresent - has remained curiously neglected in regard to its materiality. The popular image or topos of the transparent, neutral, and quasi-immaterial glass container obstructs the view of the physico-chemical functionality of this constitutive inner boundary in modern laboratory environments and its material historicity. In order to understand how glass vessels were able to provide a stable epistemic containment of spatially enclosed experimental phenomena in the new laboratory ecologies emerging in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, I will focus on the history of the material standardization of laboratory glassware. I will follow the rise of a new awareness for measurement errors due to the chemical agency of experimental glass vessels, then I will sketch the emergence of a whole techno-scientific infrastructure for the improvement of glass container quality in late nineteenth-century Germany. In the last part of my argument, I will return to the laboratory by looking at the implementation of this glass reform that created a new oikos for the inner experimental milieus of modern laboratory research. PMID:26256505

  8. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared 11: Comparison of (alpha) Boo and 1 Ceres with a Laboratory Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, Fred C.; Cohen, Martin; Bregman, Jess D.; Wooden, Diane; Heere, Karen; Shirley, Eric L.

    1998-01-01

    Infrared spectra of two celestial objects frequently used as flux standards are calibrated against an absolute laboratory flux standard at a spectral resolving power of 100 to 200. The spectrum of the K1.5III star, alpha Boo, is measured from 3 microns to 30 microns and that of the C-type asteroid, 1 Ceres, from 5 microns to 30 microns. While these 'standard' spectra do not have the apparent precision of those based on calculated models, they do not require the assumptions involved in theoretical models of stars and asteroids. Specifically they provide a model-independent means of calibrating celestial flux in the spectral range from 12 microns to 30 microns where accurate absolute photometry is not available. The agreement found between the spectral shapes of alpha Boo and Ceres based on laboratory standards, and those based on observed ratios to alpha CMa (Sirius) and alpha Lyr (Vega), flux calibrated by theoretical modeling of these hot stars strengthens our confidence in the applicability of the stellar models as primary irradiance standards.

  9. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. 11; Comparison of (alpha) Bootis and 1 Ceres with a Laboratory Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, Fred C.; Cohen, Martin; Bregman, Jesse D.; Wooden, Diane H.; Heere, Karen; Shirley, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared spectra of two celestial objects frequently used as flux standards are calibrated against an absolute laboratory flux standard at a spectral resolving power of 100 to 200. The spectrum of the KI.5 III star alpha Boo is measured from 3 to 30 microns, and that of the C-type asteroid 1 Ceres from 5 to 30 microns. While these "standard" spectra do not have the apparent precision of those based on calculated models, they do not require the assumptions involved in theoretical models of stars and asteroids. Specifically, they provide a model-independent means of calibrating celestial flux in the spectral range from 12 to 30 microns, where accurate absolute photometry is not available. The agreement found between the spectral shapes of alpha Boo and Ceres based on laboratory standards and those based on observed ratios to alpha CMa (Sirius) and alpha Lyr (Vega), flux-calibrated by theoretical modeling of these hot stars, strengthens our confidence in the applicability of the stellar models as primary irradiance standards.

  10. Investigations of primary and secondary impact structures on the moon and laboratory experiments to study the ejecta of secondary particles. Ph.D. Thesis - Ruprecht Karl Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, B.

    1977-01-01

    Young lunar impact structures were investigated by using lunar orbiter, Apollo Metric and panorama photographs. Measurements on particularly homogeneous areas low in secondary craters made possible an expansion of primary crater distribution to small diameters. This is now sure for a range between 20m or = D or = 20km and this indicates that the size and velocity distribution of the impacting bodies in the last 3 billion years has been constant. A numerical approximation in the form of a 7th degree polynomial was obtained for the distribution.

  11. Secondary causes of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Vodnala, Deepthi; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D

    2012-09-15

    The causes of the lipid disorders in patients referred to specialty clinics for difficult-to-treat dyslipidemias are likely multifactorial. However, the importance of evaluating for secondary causes is unclear. The investigators performed a chart review of new patients referred to the University of Michigan Lipid Clinic from January 2004 to June 2011 (n = 824) to evaluate for the prevalence of several secondary causes of dyslipidemia. In addition to lipoproteins, new patients were assessed for secondary dyslipidemias by a standardized protocol consisting of laboratory testing, a nutritional evaluation, and medical history. These data were evaluated to determine the prevalence of several secondary causes of dyslipidemia. A total of 363 separate factors were identified in the 824 patients that were thought to be potential secondary causes of dyslipidemia. Because some patients (n = 83 [10%]) had multiple conditions, there were 230 (28% of the cohort) with ≥1 potential secondary dyslipidemias. The most common conditions were excessive alcohol intake (n = 82 [10%]), uncontrolled diabetes mellitus (n = 68 [8%]), and overt albuminuria. Although other causes occurred less frequently (each individually found in <5% of patients), altogether they were present in a substantial portion of patients (n = 102 [12%]). In conclusion, nearly 1/3 of patients referred to a specialty clinic had identifiable secondary conditions plausibly contributing to their dyslipidemia. Numerous disorders were identified, with diabetes mellitus and excessive alcohol being the most common. PMID:22658245

  12. Standard testing procedures for optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    This document will establish a working standard for testing optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair cables included in the Lab-wide telecommunications cabling system. The purpose of these standard testing procedures is to deliver to all Sandians a reliable, low-maintenance, state-of-the-art, ubiquitous telecommunications cabling infrastructure capable of satisfying all current and future telecommunication needs.

  13. Standard testing procedures for optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair at Sandia National Laboratories. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    This revision updates Sandia`s working standard for testing optical fiber and unshielded twisted pair cables included in the Lab-wide telecommunications cabling infrastructure. The purpose of these standard testing procedures is to deliver to all Sandians a reliable, low-maintenance, state-of-the-art, ubiquitous telecommunications cabling infrastructure capable of satisfying all current and future telecommunication needs.

  14. Multi-laboratory validation of a standard method for quantifying proanthocyanidins in cranberry powders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate an improved 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) colorimetric method using a commercially available standard (procyanidin A2), for the standard method for quantification of proanthocyanidins (PACs) in cranberry powders, in order to establish dosage guideli...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  19. Common Pressures, Same Results? Recent Reforms in Professional Standards and Competences in Teacher Education for Secondary Teachers in England, France and Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the introduction of professional standards and competences in initial teacher education for secondary teachers in England, France and Germany has provided the cornerstone of education reform in all three countries. The precise number and specific content of a measurable set of skills for teachers have offered challenges for…

  20. 40 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Interpretation of the 1-Hour Primary and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waiver of the ozone monitoring requirement would be handled under provisions of 40 CFR, part 58. Some... year unless the appropriate Regional Administrator has granted a waiver under the provisions of 40 CFR... and Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone H Appendix H to Part 50 Protection...

  1. Laboratory Measurements on Charging of Individual Micron-Size Apollo-11 Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-03-01

    We present some examples of the complex nature of secondary electron emissions from lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance, and show that the measurements are unaffected by the variation of the AC field employed in the experiments.

  2. A brave new animal for a brave new world: The British Laboratory Animals Bureau and the constitution of international standards of laboratory animal production and use, circa 1947-1968.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Robert G W

    2010-03-01

    In 1947 the Medical Research Council of Britain established the Laboratory Animals Bureau in order to develop national standards of animal production that would enable commercial producers better to provide for the needs of laboratory animal users. Under the directorship of William Lane-Petter, the bureau expanded well beyond this remit, pioneering a new discipline of "laboratory animal science" and becoming internationally known as a producer of pathogenically and genetically standardized laboratory animals. The work of this organization, later renamed the Laboratory Animals Centre, and of Lane-Petter did much to systematize worldwide standards for laboratory animal production and provision--for example, by prompting the formation of the International Committee on Laboratory Animals. This essay reconstructs how the bureau became an internationally recognized center of expertise and argues that standardization discourses within science are inherently internationalizing. It traces the dynamic co-constitution of standard laboratory animals alongside that of the identities of the users, producers, and regulators of laboratory animals. This process is shown to have brought into being a transnational community with shared conceptual understandings and material practices grounded in the materiality of the laboratory animal, conceived as an instrumental technology. PMID:20575490

  3. COMPARISON OF MIXED FLASK CULTURE AND STANDARDIZED LABORATORY MODEL ECOSYSTEMS FOR TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two microecosystem protocols, the Standardized Aquatic Microcosm (SAM) method (1982) and the Mixed Flask Culture (MFC) method (1981), were compared on the basis of their response to copper sulfate. These protocols differed in microcosm structure, age, and the variables monitored....

  4. Knowledge and practices of laboratory workers on standardized antimicrobial susceptibility testing and biosafety practices to prevent the spread of superbugs in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ghanchi, Najia K; Khan, Erum; Farooqi, Joveria Q; Fasih, Naima; Dojki, Maqboola; Hughes, Molly A

    2014-09-01

    A cross-sectional survey using structured questionnaire was conducted to assess practices of microbiological laboratories working with pathogens. Forty-eight laboratory workers (50%) agreed that laboratory methods to detect antimicrobial resistance are not standardized in Pakistan, and 6% of the laboratory workers were not aware of the standardization of antimicrobial susceptibility testing in Pakistan. Reported rates of awareness regarding the role of waste disposal, disinfection, and handwashing in limiting the spread of antimicrobial resistance were 75%, 42%, and 81%, respectively. Our results provide baseline data for planning programs to train, supervise, and improve the operational quality of microbiological laboratories nationwide to prevent the spread of superbugs. PMID:25179341

  5. Inter-laboratory evaluation of the ISO standard 11063 "Soil quality - Method to directly extract DNA from soil samples".

    PubMed

    Petric, I; Philippot, L; Abbate, C; Bispo, A; Chesnot, T; Hallin, S; Laval, K; Lebeau, T; Lemanceau, P; Leyval, C; Lindström, K; Pandard, P; Romero, E; Sarr, A; Schloter, M; Simonet, P; Smalla, K; Wilke, B-M; Martin-Laurent, F

    2011-03-01

    Extracting DNA directly from micro-organisms living in soil is a crucial step for the molecular analysis of soil microbial communities. However, the use of a plethora of different soil DNA extraction protocols, each with its own bias, makes accurate data comparison difficult. To overcome this problem, a method for soil DNA extraction was proposed to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 2006. This method was evaluated by 13 independent European laboratories actively participating in national and international ring tests. The reproducibility of the standardized method for molecular analyses was evaluated by comparing the amount of DNA extracted, as well as the abundance and genetic structure of the total bacterial community in the DNA extracted from 12 different soils by the 13 laboratories. High quality DNA was successfully extracted from all 12 soils, despite different physical and chemical characteristics and a range of origins from arable soils, through forests to industrial sites. Quantification of the 16S rRNA gene abundances by real time PCR and analysis of the total bacterial community structure by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (A-RISA) showed acceptable to good levels of reproducibility. Based on the results of both ring-tests, the method was unanimously approved by the ISO as an international standard method and the normative protocol will now be disseminated within the scientific community. Standardization of a soil DNA extraction method will improve data comparison, facilitating our understanding of soil microbial diversity and soil quality monitoring. PMID:21256879

  6. 7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... schedules of the laboratory testing fees for processed fruits and vegetables (7 CFR part 93), poultry and egg products (7 CFR part 94), and meat and meat products (7 CFR part 98) will be available for... costs other than the commodity inspection fees referred to in 7 CFR 52.42 through 52.46, 52.48...

  7. 7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... schedules of the laboratory testing fees for processed fruits and vegetables (7 CFR part 93), poultry and egg products (7 CFR part 94), and meat and meat products (7 CFR part 98) will be available for... costs other than the commodity inspection fees referred to in 7 CFR 52.42 through 52.46, 52.48...

  8. 7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... costs other than the commodity inspection fees referred to in 7 CFR 52.42 through 52.46, 52.48 through... schedules of the laboratory testing fees for processed fruits and vegetables (7 CFR part 93), poultry and egg products (7 CFR part 94), and meat and meat products (7 CFR part 98) will be available...

  9. 7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... costs other than the commodity inspection fees referred to in 7 CFR 52.42 through 52.46, 52.48 through... schedules of the laboratory testing fees for processed fruits and vegetables (7 CFR part 93), poultry and egg products (7 CFR part 94), and meat and meat products (7 CFR part 98) will be available...

  10. 7 CFR 91.37 - Standard hourly fee rate for laboratory testing, analysis, and other services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... costs other than the commodity inspection fees referred to in 7 CFR 52.42 through 52.46, 52.48 through... schedules of the laboratory testing fees for processed fruits and vegetables (7 CFR part 93), poultry and egg products (7 CFR part 94), and meat and meat products (7 CFR part 98) will be available...

  11. Estimation of Wildlife Hazard Levels Using Interspecies Correlation Models and Standard Laboratory Rodent Toxicity Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity data from laboratory rodents are widely available and frequently used in human health assessments as an animal model. We explore the possibility of using single rodent acute toxicity values to predict chemical toxicity to a diversity of wildlife species and to estimate ...

  12. Cellular Cultivation: Growing HeLa Cells Using Standard High School Laboratory Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woloschak, Gayle; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes experiments to culture cells in a laboratory that provide students with hands-on experience in manipulating cells and a chance to observe cell growth characteristics first hand. Exposes students to sterile technique, cell culture, cell growth concepts, and eukaryotic cell structure. (JRH)

  13. Allied Health Occupations II. Medical Laboratory Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by medical laboratory technicians and technologists. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the value of…

  14. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid wastes when used as fuels or ingredients in...) SOLID WASTES SOLID WASTES USED AS FUELS OR INGREDIENTS IN COMBUSTION UNITS Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Wastes When Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion...

  15. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid wastes when used as fuels or ingredients in...) SOLID WASTES SOLID WASTES USED AS FUELS OR INGREDIENTS IN COMBUSTION UNITS Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Wastes When Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion...

  16. 40 CFR 241.3 - Standards and procedures for identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... identification of non-hazardous secondary materials that are solid wastes when used as fuels or ingredients in...) SOLID WASTES SOLID WASTES USED AS FUELS OR INGREDIENTS IN COMBUSTION UNITS Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Wastes When Used as Fuels or Ingredients in Combustion...

  17. Effects of the use of the Calculator-Based Laboratory Device on the attitudes of students towards laboratory work in secondary physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Michael Herman

    Students exist in a technology-saturated milieu, and with this in mind, it was desirable to determine whether use of a technology specifically designed for use in the conduct of physical science laboratory work would affect student attitudes towards that laboratory work. This study employed a specific device, the Calculator-Based Laboratory device (CBL), a product of the Vernier Corporation in conjunction with Texas Instruments. Students in a high school setting in west central Georgia were the subjects in this study. Thirty-two students in two physics classes participated, with fifteen of the students in one class and seventeen in another class. The students were in non-AP Physics classes. These were intact groups of students who were taught topics in motion during the course of the study. The study was carried out for six weeks, with one physics class using the CBL for the entire time (five laboratories) and the other class for only three weeks (three laboratories). All experiments were from the mechanics sections of physics, involving one- and two-dimensional motion. Graphical output was studied and produced and interpretation of physical phenomena was made from that output. Content related to laboratory work was also studied as appropriate in both classes, with both classes covering the same content. A pre- and post-survey of attitudes was carried out utilizing an attitude survey developed by the author. Two students who graduated were interviewed three months later to further examine their impressions of the laboratory work with and without the CBL, one from the full-treatment CBL class and one from the partial-treatment CBL class. Their comments and interpretations were included in the study. It was found that there was a significant, positive change in attitudes on the part of the students towards using the device and towards laboratory work in Physics. Of no significance was the class in which the student was enrolled. This supports earlier findings in the

  18. COMPARISON OF MIXED FLASK CULTURE AND STANDARDIZED LABORATORY MODEL ECOSYSTEMS FOR TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two microecosystem protocols, the Standardized Aquatic Microcosm (SAM) method developed by Dr. Frieda Taub and associates (1982) and the Mixed Flask Culture (MFC) method of Dr. John Leffler (1981), were compared on the basis of their response to copper sulfate. These protocols di...

  19. 76 FR 25376 - Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories Standard; Extension of the Office of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 5-2010 (75 FR... by developing a written Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) that describes: Standard operating procedures for..., semi- annually, on occasion Estimated Total Burden Hours: 293,706 Estimated Cost (Operation...

  20. 40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the CAA, it shall be a violation of this section and a violation of this rule (40 CFR part 79, subpart... under 40 CFR part 79 and may require the sponsor to develop data in accordance with the requirements of...) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing. 79.60 Section 79.60 Protection of...

  1. 40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the CAA, it shall be a violation of this section and a violation of this rule (40 CFR part 79, subpart... under 40 CFR part 79 and may require the sponsor to develop data in accordance with the requirements of...) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing. 79.60 Section 79.60 Protection of...

  2. Utilization of an automated multimeter calibration system by the Rocky Flats Standards Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickoff, B.; Stand, R. S.; Brown, G. R., Jr.; Riordan, G. A.; Delaney, I. C.

    1982-09-01

    The time required to calibrate multimeters was reduced by 75%. Using the calibration system and programmed tape, a Fluke 8050A is calibrated in less than 1/2 hour compared to approximately 2 hours using conventional methods and standards. Most possible sources of human error introduced by recording the setting of instruments and errors from repetitive computations were eliminated.

  3. Characterization of secondary solid waste anticipated from the treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that new liquid waste streams, generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6, can be treated adequately by existing wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) without producing hazardous secondary solid wastes. Previous bench-scale treatable studies indicated that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants although additional study was required in order to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment A 0.5-L/min pilot plant was designed and constructed to accurately simulate the treatment capabilities of ORNL fill-scale (490 L/min) treatment facilities-the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). This new test system was able to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for US Environmental Protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system was operated for a 45-d test period with a minimum of problems and downtime. The pilot plant operating data verified that the WAG 6 trench waters can be treated at the PWTP and NRWTP to meet the discharge limits. The results of TCLP testing indicate that none of the secondary solid wastes will be considered hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  4. Characterization of secondary solid waste anticipated from the treatment of trench water from Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, T.E.; Taylor, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that new liquid waste streams, generated as a consequence of closure activities at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6, can be treated adequately by existing wastewater treatment facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) without producing hazardous secondary solid wastes. Previous bench-scale treatable studies indicated that ORNL treatment operations will adequately remove the contaminants although additional study was required in order to characterize the secondary waste materials produced as a result of the treatment A 0.5-L/min pilot plant was designed and constructed to accurately simulate the treatment capabilities of ORNL fill-scale (490 L/min) treatment facilities-the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) and Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). This new test system was able to produce secondary wastes in the quantities necessary for US Environmental Protection Agency toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. The test system was operated for a 45-d test period with a minimum of problems and downtime. The pilot plant operating data verified that the WAG 6 trench waters can be treated at the PWTP and NRWTP to meet the discharge limits. The results of TCLP testing indicate that none of the secondary solid wastes will be considered hazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  5. Isolation gowns in health care settings: Laboratory studies, regulations and standards, and potential barriers of gown selection and use

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc Balci, F. Selcen

    2016-01-01

    Although they play an important role in infection prevention and control, textile materials and personal protective equipment (PPE) used in health care settings are known to be one of the sources of cross-infection. Gowns are recommended to prevent transmission of infectious diseases in certain settings; however, laboratory and field studies have produced mixed results of their efficacy. PPE used in health care is regulated as either class I (low risk) or class II (intermediate risk) devices in the United States. Many organizations have published guidelines for the use of PPE, including isolation gowns, in health care settings. In addition, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation published a guidance document on the selection of gowns and a classification standard on liquid barrier performance for both surgical and isolation gowns. However, there is currently no existing standard specific to isolation gowns that considers not only the barrier resistance but also a wide array of end user desired attributes. As a result, infection preventionists and purchasing agents face several difficulties in the selection process, and end users have limited or no information on the levels of protection provided by isolation gowns. Lack of knowledge about the performance of protective clothing used in health care became more apparent during the 2014 Ebola epidemic. This article reviews laboratory studies, regulations, guidelines and standards pertaining to isolation gowns, characterization problems, and other potential barriers of isolation gown selection and use. PMID:26391468

  6. Isolation gowns in health care settings: Laboratory studies, regulations and standards, and potential barriers of gown selection and use.

    PubMed

    Kilinc Balci, F Selcen

    2016-01-01

    Although they play an important role in infection prevention and control, textile materials and personal protective equipment (PPE) used in health care settings are known to be one of the sources of cross-infection. Gowns are recommended to prevent transmission of infectious diseases in certain settings; however, laboratory and field studies have produced mixed results of their efficacy. PPE used in health care is regulated as either class I (low risk) or class II (intermediate risk) devices in the United States. Many organizations have published guidelines for the use of PPE, including isolation gowns, in health care settings. In addition, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation published a guidance document on the selection of gowns and a classification standard on liquid barrier performance for both surgical and isolation gowns. However, there is currently no existing standard specific to isolation gowns that considers not only the barrier resistance but also a wide array of end user desired attributes. As a result, infection preventionists and purchasing agents face several difficulties in the selection process, and end users have limited or no information on the levels of protection provided by isolation gowns. Lack of knowledge about the performance of protective clothing used in health care became more apparent during the 2014 Ebola epidemic. This article reviews laboratory studies, regulations, guidelines and standards pertaining to isolation gowns, characterization problems, and other potential barriers of isolation gown selection and use. PMID:26391468

  7. Overview of groundwater and surface water standards pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lundahl, A.L.; Williams, S.; Grizzle, B.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an overview of groundwater- and surface water-related laws, regulations, agreements, guidance documents, Executive Orders, and DOE orders pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This document is a summary and is intended to help readers understand which regulatory requirements may apply to their particular circumstances. However, the document is not intended to be used in lieu of applicable regulations. Unless otherwise noted, the information in this report reflects a summary and evaluation completed July 1, 1995. This document is considered a Living Document, and updates on changing laws and regulations will be provided.

  8. Quantification of Soil Physical Properties by Using X-Ray Computerized Tomography (CT) and Standard Laboratory (STD) Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Ambert Sanchez

    2003-12-12

    The implementation of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) on agricultural soils has been used in this research to quantify soil physical properties to be compared with standard laboratory (STD) methods. The overall research objective was to more accurately quantify soil physical properties for long-term management systems. Two field studies were conducted at Iowa State University's Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua, IA using two different soil management strategies. The first field study was conducted in 1999 using continuous corn crop rotation for soil under chisel plow with no-till treatments. The second study was conducted in 2001 and on soybean crop rotation for the same soil but under chisel plow and no-till practices with wheel track and no-wheel track compaction treatments induced by a tractor-manure wagon. In addition, saturated hydraulic (K{sub s}) conductivity and the convection-dispersion (CDE) model were also applied using long-term soil management systems only during 2001. The results obtained for the 1999 field study revealed no significant differences between treatments and laboratory methods, but significant differences were found at deeper depths of the soil column for tillage treatments. The results for standard laboratory procedure versus CT method showed significant differences at deeper depths for the chisel plow treatment and at the second lower depth for no-till treatment for both laboratory methods. The macroporosity distribution experiment showed significant differences at the two lower depths between tillage practices. Bulk density and percent porosity had significant differences at the two lower depths of the soil column. The results obtained for the 2001 field study showed no significant differences between tillage practices and compaction practices for both laboratory methods, but significant differences between tillage practices with wheel track and no-wheel compaction treatments were found along the soil profile for

  9. The Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core State Standards, and English Learners: Using the SSTELLA Framework to Prepare Secondary Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolbert, Sara; Stoddart, Trish; Lyon, Edward G.; Solis, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on a critical issue in STEM education: preparing novice secondary school teachers to provide effective science instruction to the rapidly growing population of students from language minority groups who traditionally have been underserved in STEM education and who are underrepresented in STEM degrees and careers (National…

  10. A standardized laboratory and surgical method for in vitro culture isolation and expansion of primary human Tenon's fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Elena; Scafetta, Gaia; Napoletano, Chiara; Puca, Rosa; Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Ragona, Giuseppe; Iorio, Olga; Frati, Giacomo

    2013-06-01

    Good manufacturing practices guidelines require safer and standardized cell substrates especially for those cell therapy products to treat ocular diseases where fibroblasts are used as feeder layers. However, if these are unavailable for stem cells culturing, murine fibroblasts are regularly used, raising critical issues as accidentally transplanting xenogenous graft and adversely affecting stem cell clinical trials. Moreover, human fibroblasts play a significant role in testing novel ophthalmologic drugs. Accordingly, we developed a standardized laboratory and surgical approach to isolate normal and undamaged Tenon's fibroblasts to implement the setting up of banks for both stem cells-based ocular cell therapy and in vitro drug testing. A 2-3 cm(2) undamaged Tenon's biopsy was surgically obtained from 28 patients without mutually correlated ocular diseases. Nineteen dermal biopsies were used as control. Fibroblasts were isolated with or without collagenase, cultured in autologous, fetal bovine or AB serum, tested for viability by trypan blue, vimentin expression and standardized until passage 6. Successful Tenon's fibroblasts isolation was age dependent (P = 0.001) but not sex, pathology or surgery related. A significant rate of successful cultures were obtained when biopsies were not digested by collagenase (P = 0.013). Moreover, cultures in autologous or fetal bovine serum had comparable proliferative properties (P = 0.77; P = 0.82). Through our surgical and laboratory standardized procedure, we elucidated for the first time key points of this human primary culture system, the role of the autologous serum, comparing Tenon's and dermal fibroblasts. Our protocol may be clinically useful to reduce the risk above mentioned and may be potentially more effective for ophthalmological clinical purposes. PMID:22820760

  11. [SICI-GISE position paper on standards and guidelines for diagnostic and catheterization laboratories].

    PubMed

    Piccaluga, Emanuela; Marchese, Alfredo; Varbella, Ferdinando; Sardella, Gennaro; Danzi, Gian Battista; Salvi, Alessandro; Cremonesi, Alberto; Merelli, Antonella; Ciarma, Lorenzo; Magro, Beatrice; Bedogni, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    In the last few years, the activity of cath labs has undergone some notable changes, at present largely focusing on diagnosis and invasive therapy of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. Technological and pharmacological advances have allowed for procedures to be performed in patients who are increasingly complex, and cath labs have become the preferred venue for endovascular treatment of coronary artery disease, in particular acute coronary syndrome, as well as the treatment of structural heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. This position paper is an update of the 1996 and 2008 versions, given the present level of experience and the situation in Italy. It aims to provide the quality standards required to maintain adequate conditions of know-how and safety, as well as the structural and organizational requirements that are fundamental to obtain the best possible use of human and technological resources. Position papers should be a stimulus and guide for operators in the field as well as for those who govern health policies. This should allow for an improved and more rational allocation of cath labs in Italy, based on the real need for procedures and an optimal distribution and organization of the cardiovascular emergency networks while respecting the minimum standards of care. PMID:26444219

  12. Investigation of a 0.6 hub-tip radius-ratio transonic turbine designed for secondary-flow study I : design and experimental performance of standard turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohlik, Harold E; Wintucky, William T; Scibbe, Herbert W

    1957-01-01

    Detailed design information including overall performance parameters, velocity diagrams, and blade surface velocities is presented. Experimental performance includes maps based on rating as well as total-pressure ratios showing the effect of exit whirl. Also included are results of surveys at the stator exit and downstream of the rotor at design speed and specific work. This information will be used as a standard for comparison with subsequent secondary-flow work.

  13. Laboratory-based standards for interpreting X-ray spectra from celestial sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory V.

    2014-08-01

    High sensitivity, high resolution instrumentation flown on the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku X-ray observatories have provided X-ray astrophysicists with relatively straightforward access to powerful line diagnostics that tightly constrain the physical parameters of celestial sources. Accurate measurements of transition energies, line shapes, and intensities provide, for example, quantitative measures of velocity fields, electron densities, and temperatures. X-ray measurements probe sources unattainable by any other wavelength bands, such as the regions of accretion disks near black holes, and the hot intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies. Thus, X-ray astronomy in the age of Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku provides important information necessary to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars, the phenomena near black holes, and the evolution of the universe as a whole. Beginning in 2015 with the launch of the Astro-H X-ray Observatory, high throughput, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of extended sources in the Fe K band will be available for the first time, making it possible to unravel the mysteries of some of the most energetic objects in our Universe. Accurate, unambiguous interpretation of high quality, high resolution spectra from these premier observatories requires laboratory-tested spectral models. Starting over twenty years ago, the electron beam ion trap facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced a plethora of highly accurate data to satisfy this requirement, and has also addressed specific problems found to be beyond any modeling capability. As part of this work, a variety of new measurement techniques and instruments, including the NASA/GSFC ECS calorimeter, have been developed. More recently, the portable FLASH-EBIT, built and maintained at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics and coupled to third and fourth generation light sources has opened new measurement regimes, i.e., the ability to probe the

  14. Ecological risk assessment of substances with suspected estrogenic activity using standard laboratory fish tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gimeno, S.; Bowmer, C.T.

    1999-07-01

    The assessment of risks to the aquatic environment in the European Union is generally based on a comparison of Predicted Environmental Concentrations (PEC) with Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNEC) for surrogate, or representative, organisms of the receiving waters. Such risk assessments are required for new and priority existing chemicals, pesticides, and, in the near future, biocides; they are dependent on robust in vivo test data. Current strategies for ecological risk assessment were not designed to assess the risk of endocrine disrupters. The selection of suitable fish species and practical in vivo end points for determining endocrine disruption in fish are discussed, including the adaptation of some existing guidelines. This paper is partly based on a series of experiments conducted at the laboratory to look at the effects of a model alkylphenol (4-tert-pentylphenol), an industrial chemical intermediate, acting as a pseudo-estrogen on an all-male population of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio. Exposure to the test substance occurred at critical life stages for endocrine disruption. Biochemical parameters as well as histological parameters were applied, and their suitability to be used in ecological risk assessment is discussed.

  15. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  16. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  17. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  18. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of the national primary annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of nitrogen is 53 parts per billion...

  19. Validation of simple and inexpensive algometry using sphygmomanometer cuff and neuromuscular junction monitor with standardized laboratory algometer

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Wudaru, Sreedhar Reddy; Khambam, Sunil Kumar Reddy; Chandra, Shobha Jagadish; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The availability, ergonomics and economics prohibit the routine use of algometers in clinical practice and research by the anesthesiologists. A simple bedside technique of quantitative pain measurement would enable the routine use of algometry. We proposed to validate simple pain provocation using sphygmomanometer cuff and the electric stimulation of neuromuscular junction monitor (TOF-guard, Organon Teknika) to measure pain against a standardized laboratory pressure algometer. Material and Methods: Pain detection threshold (Pdt) and pain tolerance threshold (Ptt) were measured in forty healthy volunteers of both genders, using the above three techniques. All measurements were repeated three times. The co-efficient of inter-rater reliability (or consistency) between three independent measurements obtained from each of the techniques was determined by Cronbach's co-efficient alpha (α C). The correlation between the mean Pdt and Ptt values recorded by standardized algometer and the sphygmomanometer technique and nerve stimulator technique was performed using Pearson Correlation. An r >0.5 and a two-tailed significance of <0.05 were considered as good correlation between the standardized algometer and the tested techniques. Results: There was a good inter-rater reliability (α C > 0.7) for the three techniques. There was a good correlation with r >0.65 (P < 0.001) between the measurements of standardized pressure algometer and the two techniques being tested as alternatives for algometer to measure pain. Conclusion: The sphygmomanometer cuff technique and electrical stimulation with the peripheral nerve stimulator to measure pain threshold and tolerance provide a simple, efficient, repeatable measure of pain intensity and can be used as suitable alternatives to standard algometers. PMID:27006546

  20. IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSPORTATION TASK REPORT ON ACHIEVING MODERATOR EXCLUSION AND SUPPORTING STANDARDIZED TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    Following the defunding of the Yucca Mountain Project, it is reasonable to assume that commercial used fuel will remain in storage for the foreseeable future. This report proposes supplementing the ongoing research and development work related to potential degradation of used fuel, baskets, poisons, and storage canisters during an extended period of storage with a parallel path. This parallel path can assure criticality safety during transportation by implementing a concept that achieves moderator exclusion (no in-leakage of moderator into the used fuel cavity). Using updated risk assessment insights for additional technical justification and relying upon a component inside of the transportation cask that provides a watertight function, a strong argument can be made that moderator intrusion is not credible and should not be a required assumption for criticality evaluations during normal conditions of transportation. A demonstrating testing program supporting a detailed analytical effort as well as updated risk assessment insights can provide the basis for moderator exclusion during hypothetical accident conditions. This report also discusses how this engineered concept can support the goal of standardized transportation.

  1. An Examination of the Influence of Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities and Success on Standards Based Achievement Tests in a Suburban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilardi, Virginia A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether there is a difference in high school students' achievement and retention on standardized tests between students who participate in inquiry-based laboratory activities and those that participate in traditional style laboratory activities. Additionally, student and teacher opinions of…

  2. 1996 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,`` each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1996. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contact concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For calendar year 1996, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 3.14E-02 mrem (3.14E-07 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  3. Design of a medical and laboratory equipment management program for the new standards certification achievement in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Franco-Clark, D; Pimentel-Aguilar, A B; Rodriguez-Vera, R

    2010-01-01

    Certification for healthcare institutions in Mexico is ruled by 2009 standards homologated with the Joint Commission International criteria. Nowadays, healthcare requires of medical equipment and devices, so it has become necessary to implement guidelines for its adequate management in order to reach the highest level of quality and safety at the lowest cost. The objective of this work was to develop a Medical and Laboratory Equipment Management Program, oriented to the improvement of quality, effectiveness and efficiency of the technological resources in order to meet the certification requirements. The result of this work allows to have an auto evaluation tool that focuses the efforts of the National Institute for Respiratory Diseases to the achievement of the new requirements established for the certification. PMID:21096126

  4. 1997 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) -- Radionuclides annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities, each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1997. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the INEEL facilities and a brief description of the radioactive materials and processes at the facilities. Section 2 identifies radioactive air effluent release points and diffuse sources at the INEEL and actual releases during 1997. Section 2 also describes the effluent control systems for each potential release point. Section 3 provides the methodology and EDE calculations for 1997 INEEL radioactive emissions.

  5. Gateway to the Future. Skill Standards for the Bioscience Industry for Technical Workers in Pharmaceutical Companies, Biotechnology Companies, and Clinical Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The Bioscience Industry Skills Standards Project (BISSP) is developing national, voluntary skill standards for technical jobs in biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and clinical laboratories in hospitals, universities, government, and independent settings. Research with employees and educators has pinpointed three issues underscoring the…

  6. Statistical Methods for Establishing Quality Control Ranges for Antibacterial Agents in Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Susceptibility Testing▿

    PubMed Central

    Turnidge, John; Bordash, Gerry

    2007-01-01

    Quality control (QC) ranges for antimicrobial agents against QC strains for both dilution and disk diffusion testing are currently set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), using data gathered in predefined structured multilaboratory studies, so-called tier 2 studies. The ranges are finally selected by the relevant CLSI subcommittee, based largely on visual inspection and a few simple rules. We have developed statistical methods for analyzing the data from tier 2 studies and applied them to QC strain-antimicrobial agent combinations from 178 dilution testing data sets and 48 disk diffusion data sets, including a method for identifying possible outlier data from individual laboratories. The methods are based on the fact that dilution testing MIC data were log normally distributed and disk diffusion zone diameter data were normally distributed. For dilution testing, compared to QC ranges actually set by CLSI, calculated ranges were identical in 68% of cases, narrower in 7% of cases, and wider in 14% of cases. For disk diffusion testing, calculated ranges were identical to CLSI ranges in 33% of cases, narrower in 8% of cases, and 1 to 2 mm wider in 58% of cases. Possible outliers were detected in 8% of diffusion test data but none of the disk diffusion data. Application of statistical techniques to the analysis of QC tier 2 data and the setting of QC ranges is relatively simple to perform on spreadsheets, and the output enhances the current CLSI methods for setting of QC ranges. PMID:17438045

  7. Laboratory studies on formation and minimisation of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and -furans (PCDD/F) in secondary aluminium process.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Dieter; Klobasa, Oliver; Pandelova, Marchela; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2012-05-01

    The objectives of this work were to study the formation mechanisms of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) in thermal aluminium recycling processes by use of laboratory experiments. The pattern of isomers of PCDD/F indicates that de novo synthesis is important in aluminium smeltery. The mechanisms of PCDD/F formation in aluminium smelting are similar to that of various incineration processes of waste material. The results of bioanalysis (EROD-test) confirms the existence of de novo synthesis of PCDD/F, but points out to the existence to some additional, toxic compounds of unknown structure. To reduce the amount of PCDD/F the input of carbon at the metal should be reduced; in addition the metal smeltery plants should be cleaned from fly ash particles. It is suggested to use good primary methods in the technical plants like constant feeding of the metal into the oven will minimise PCDD/F concentration. The biological EROD-bioassay is a good tool to estimate PCDD/F-TEQ values also for this technical process simulated in the laboratory. PMID:22137557

  8. Adaptive secondary mirror for the 6.5-m conversion of the Multiple Mirror Telescope: first laboratory testing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusa, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Biliotti, Valdemaro; del Vecchio, Ciro; Salinari, Piero; Stefanini, Paolo; Mantegazza, Paolo; Biasi, Roberto; Andrighettoni, Mario; Franchini, Claudio; Gallieni, Daniele

    1999-09-01

    We present the first results of test performed on a reduced size adaptive secondary prototype named P36. The full size unit, named MMT336, is ready to be assembled and it is planned to install it at the 6.5m conversion of the Multiple Mirror Telescope by the end of this year. The design of the final unit consists of: a convex thin deformable mirror whose figure is controlled by 336 electro-magnetic force actuators, a thick reference shell and a third aluminum shell used for actuator support and cooling. The force actuator response function is adjusted using both open and closed loop compensation to obtain an equivalent position actuator thanks to nearly co-located capacitive position sensors. The digital real-time control and the unit monitoring is done using custom-made electronics based on DSPs. The preliminary dynamical test aimed at identifying the P36 mirror response function to obtain a proper dynamics compensation were successful. In fact two main results have been obtained: 1) an accurate identification of the feedforward matrix used to control the mirror 2) settling time of approximately 0.5 ms, well within the specifications. We also complement these lab results with results obtained from simulations of the full size mirror dynamics.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Quality Assurance Project Plan for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs), Subpart H

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.; Biermann, A

    2000-06-27

    As a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility whose operations involve the use of radionuclides, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is subject to the requirements of 40 CFR 61, the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Subpart H of this Regulation establishes standards for exposure of the public to radionuclides (other than radon) released from DOE Facilities (Federal Register, 1989). These regulations limit the emission of radionuclides to ambient air from DOE facilities (see Section 2.0). Under the NESHAPs Subpart H Regulation (hereafter referred to as NESHAPs), DOE facilities are also required to establish a quality assurance program for radionuclide emission measurements; specific requirements for preparation of a Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) are given in Appendix B, Method 114 of 40 CFR 61. Throughout this QAPP, the specific Quality Assurance Method elements of 40 CFR 61 Subpart H addressed by a given section are identified. In addition, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) (US EPA, 1994a) published draft requirements for QAPP's prepared in support of programs that develop environmental data. We have incorporated many of the technical elements specified in that document into this QAPP, specifically those identified as relating to measurement and data acquisition; assessment and oversight; and data validation and usability. This QAPP will be evaluated on an annual basis, and updated as appropriate.

  10. Acute and repeated doses (28 days) oral toxicity study of glycosides based standardized fenugreek seed extract in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Kandhare, Amit D; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Mohan, V; Thakurdesai, Prasad A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to study acute and subacute (28-days repeated dose) oral toxicity effect of glycosides based standardized fenugreek seed extract (SFSE-G) in vivo. SFSE-G was prepared by resin-based chromatography and standardized to glycosides namely trigoneoside Ib (76%) and vicenin 1 (15%). The acute oral toxicity (AOT) and subacute toxicity studies were performed in Swiss albino mice (5 mice/sex/group) as per OECD 425 (up-and-down procedure) and OCED 407 guidelines respectively. Acute oral administration of 5000mg/kg of SFSE-G showed 40% mortality with no mortality in lower dosages. The subacute oral administration of SFSE-G did not show observational or toxicological effects on the body or organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmic effects, locomotor activity, hematology, blood biochemistry, urinalysis, or histopathology at dose 250mg/kg. However, SFSE-G (1000mg/kg) showed mortality and minor alterations to body weight, relative liver weights, hematology and blood chemistry parameters related to treatment but it was within normal laboratory ranges. In conclusion, SFSE-G showed median lethal dose (LD50) more than 4350mg/kg and no-observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) of 250mg/kg for both sexes during AOT and sub-acute toxicity study, respectively. PMID:25979642

  11. 75 FR 61486 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft (75 FR 57463, September... an atmospheric chemistry perspective as well as from an environmental effects perspective,...

  12. Bioinformatics in the secondary science classroom: A study of state content standards and students' perceptions of, and performance in, bioinformatics lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wefer, Stephen H.

    The proliferation of bioinformatics in modern Biology marks a new revolution in science, which promises to influence science education at all levels. This thesis examined state standards for content that articulated bioinformatics, and explored secondary students' affective and cognitive perceptions of, and performance in, a bioinformatics mini-unit. The results are presented as three studies. The first study analyzed secondary science standards of 49 U.S States (Iowa has no science framework) and the District of Columbia for content related to bioinformatics at the introductory high school biology level. The bionformatics content of each state's Biology standards were categorized into nine areas and the prevalence of each area documented. The nine areas were: The Human Genome Project, Forensics, Evolution, Classification, Nucleotide Variations, Medicine, Computer Use, Agriculture/Food Technology, and Science Technology and Society/Socioscientific Issues (STS/SSI). Findings indicated a generally low representation of bioinformatics related content, which varied substantially across the different areas. Recommendations are made for reworking existing standards to incorporate bioinformatics and to facilitate the goal of promoting science literacy in this emerging new field among secondary school students. The second study examined thirty-two students' affective responses to, and content mastery of, a two-week bioinformatics mini-unit. The findings indicate that the students generally were positive relative to their interest level, the usefulness of the lessons, the difficulty level of the lessons, likeliness to engage in additional bioinformatics, and were overall successful on the assessments. A discussion of the results and significance is followed by suggestions for future research and implementation for transferability. The third study presents a case study of individual differences among ten secondary school students, whose cognitive and affective percepts were

  13. Secondary analysis of anthropometric data from a South African national food consumption survey, using different growth reference standards.

    PubMed

    Bosman, L; Herselman, M G; Kruger, H S; Labadarios, D

    2011-11-01

    The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) references were used to analyse anthropometric data from the 1999 National Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) of South Africa. Since then, however, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2000 reference and the World Health Organization (WHO) 2006 standards were released. It was anticipated that these reference and standards may lead to differences in the previous estimates of stunting, wasting, underweight and obesity in the study population. The aim was to compare the anthropometric status of children using the 1977 NCHS, the 2000 CDC growth references and the 2006 WHO standards. All children 12-60 months of age with a complete set of anthropometric data were included in the analyses. Data for 1,512 children were analysed with SAS 9.1 for Windows. A Z-score was calculated for each child for weight-for-age (W/A), weight-for-length/height (W/H), length/height-for-age (H/A) and body mass index (BMI)-for-age, using each of the three reference or standards for comparison. The prevalence of stunting, obesity and overweight were significantly higher and the prevalence of underweight and wasting were lower when using the WHO standards compared to the NCHS and the CDC references. The higher than previously established prevalence of stunting at 20.1% and combined overweight/obesity at 30% poses a challenge to South African policy makers to implement nutrition programmes to decrease the prevalence of both stunting and overweight. The 2006 WHO growth standard should be the standard used for assessment of growth of infants and children younger than 5 years in developing countries. PMID:20859760

  14. Industrial Education. Vocational Education Program Courses Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This document contains the Florida program course standards for 151 courses in industrial education. For each course, the following information is provided: program title, effective date of standards, code number, whether secondary or postsecondary, credits, educational level, certification coverage, major concepts/content, laboratory activities,…

  15. 76 FR 48073 - Public Hearing for Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... airport security procedures. After passing through the equipment, all persons must sign in at the guard... the notice of proposed rulemaking published in the Federal Register on August 1, 2011, (76 FR 46084....epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/no2so2sec/cr_fr.html . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you would...

  16. An Examination of Intervention Research with Secondary Students with EBD in Light of Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Candace A.; Maccini, Paula; Wright, Kenneth; Miller, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In this review, the authors offer a critical analysis of published interventions for improving mathematics performance among middle and high school students with EBD in light of the Common Core State Standards. An exhaustive review of literature from 1975 to December 2012 yielded 20 articles that met criteria for inclusion. The authors analyzed…

  17. Preservice Secondary Teachers' Conceptions from a Mathematical Modeling Activity and Connections to the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohlmann, Micah; Maiorca, Cathrine; Olson, Travis A.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is an essential integrated piece of the Common Core State Standards. However, researchers have shown that mathematical modeling activities can be difficult for teachers to implement. Teachers are more likely to implement mathematical modeling activities if they have their own successful experiences with such activities. This…

  18. The Impact of Curriculum Changes and Implementation of Secondary Mathematics Georgia Performance Standards on Teacher Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John Phillip

    2012-01-01

    Teachers generally experience a decline in self-efficacy levels during a curriculum change, and Georgia converted from a Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) to Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) the last several years. Middle and high school math teachers experienced an annual tiered rollout of the mathematics curriculum, and this qualitative study was…

  19. 76 FR 59599 - Extension of Comment Period for Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ..., 2011, (76 FR 46084) and is available on the following Web site: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/no2so2sec/cr_fr.html . How can I get copies of this document and other related information? The EPA has... Federal Register on August 1, 2011, (76 FR 46084) for detailed information on accessing...

  20. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  1. Non-matrix Matched Glass Disk Calibration Standards Improve XRF Micronutrient Analysis of Wheat Grain across Five Laboratories in India.

    PubMed

    Guild, Georgia E; Stangoulis, James C R

    2016-01-01

    Within the HarvestPlus program there are many collaborators currently using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy to measure Fe and Zn in their target crops. In India, five HarvestPlus wheat collaborators have laboratories that conduct this analysis and their throughput has increased significantly. The benefits of using XRF are its ease of use, minimal sample preparation and high throughput analysis. The lack of commercially available calibration standards has led to a need for alternative calibration arrangements for many of the instruments. Consequently, the majority of instruments have either been installed with an electronic transfer of an original grain calibration set developed by a preferred lab, or a locally supplied calibration. Unfortunately, neither of these methods has been entirely successful. The electronic transfer is unable to account for small variations between the instruments, whereas the use of a locally provided calibration set is heavily reliant on the accuracy of the reference analysis method, which is particularly difficult to achieve when analyzing low levels of micronutrient. Consequently, we have developed a calibration method that uses non-matrix matched glass disks. Here we present the validation of this method and show this calibration approach can improve the reproducibility and accuracy of whole grain wheat analysis on 5 different XRF instruments across the HarvestPlus breeding program. PMID:27375644

  2. Non-matrix Matched Glass Disk Calibration Standards Improve XRF Micronutrient Analysis of Wheat Grain across Five Laboratories in India

    PubMed Central

    Guild, Georgia E.; Stangoulis, James C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Within the HarvestPlus program there are many collaborators currently using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy to measure Fe and Zn in their target crops. In India, five HarvestPlus wheat collaborators have laboratories that conduct this analysis and their throughput has increased significantly. The benefits of using XRF are its ease of use, minimal sample preparation and high throughput analysis. The lack of commercially available calibration standards has led to a need for alternative calibration arrangements for many of the instruments. Consequently, the majority of instruments have either been installed with an electronic transfer of an original grain calibration set developed by a preferred lab, or a locally supplied calibration. Unfortunately, neither of these methods has been entirely successful. The electronic transfer is unable to account for small variations between the instruments, whereas the use of a locally provided calibration set is heavily reliant on the accuracy of the reference analysis method, which is particularly difficult to achieve when analyzing low levels of micronutrient. Consequently, we have developed a calibration method that uses non-matrix matched glass disks. Here we present the validation of this method and show this calibration approach can improve the reproducibility and accuracy of whole grain wheat analysis on 5 different XRF instruments across the HarvestPlus breeding program. PMID:27375644

  3. Laboratory studies of oxidation of primary emissions: Oxidation of organic molecular markers and secondary organic aerosol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, Emily A.

    Particulate matter (PM) is solid particles and liquid droplets of complex composition suspended in the atmosphere. In 1997, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for PM was modified to include new standards for fine particulate (particles smaller than 2.5mum, PM2.5) because of their association with adverse health effects, mortality and visibility reduction. Fine PM may also have large impacts on the global climate. Chemically, fine particulate is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic material, from both natural and anthropogenic sources. A large fraction of PM2.5 is organic. The first objective was to investigate heterogeneous oxidation of condensed-phase molecular markers for two major organic source categories, meat-cooking emissions and motor vehicle exhaust. Effective reaction rate constants of key molecular markers were measured over a range of atmospherically relevant experimental conditions, including a range of concentrations and relative humidities, and with SOA condensed on the particles. Aerosolized meat grease was reacted with ozone to investigate the oxidation of molecular markers for meat-cooking emissions. Aerosolized motor oil, which is chemically similar to vehicle exhaust aerosol and contains the molecular markers used in source apportionment, was reacted with the hydroxyl radical (OH) to investigate oxidation of motor vehicle molecular markers. All molecular markers of interest - oleic acid, palmitoleic acid, and cholesterol for meat-cooking emissions, and hopanes and steranes for vehicle exhaust - reacted at rates that are significant for time scales on the order of days assuming typical summertime oxidant concentrations. Experimental conditions influenced the reaction rate constants. For both systems, experiments conducted at high relative humidity (RH) had smaller reaction rate constants than those at low RH. SOA coating slowed the reaction rate constants for meat-cooking markers, but had no effect on the oxidation of

  4. Estimating seroprevalence of vaccine-preventable infections: is it worth standardizing the serological outcomes to adjust for different assays and laboratories?

    PubMed

    Kafatos, G; Andrews, N; McConway, K J; Anastassopoulou, C; Barbara, C; De Ory, F; Johansen, K; Mossong, J; Prosenc, K; Vranckx, R; Nardone, A; Pebody, R; Farrington, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the European Sero-Epidemiology Network 2 (ESEN2) project was to estimate age-specific seroprevalence for a number of vaccine-preventable diseases in Europe. To achieve this serosurveys were collected by 22 national laboratories. To adjust for a variety of laboratory methods and assays, all quantitative results were transformed to a reference laboratory's units and were then classified as positive or negative to obtain age-specific seroprevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the value of standardization by comparing the crude and standardized seroprevalence estimates. Seroprevalence was estimated for measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, varicella zoster and hepatitis A virus (HAV) and compared before and after serological results had been standardized. The results showed that if no such adjustment had taken place, seroprevalence would have differed by an average of 3·2% (95% bootstrap interval 2·9-3·6) although this percentage varied substantially by antigen. These differences were as high as 16% for some serosurveys (HAV) which means that standardization could have a considerable impact on seroprevalence estimates and should be considered when comparing serosurveys performed in different laboratories using different assay methods. PMID:25420586

  5. Improved standardization and potential for shortened time to results with BD Kiestra™ total laboratory automation of early urine cultures: A prospective comparison with manual processing.

    PubMed

    Graham, Maryza; Tilson, Leanne; Streitberg, Richard; Hamblin, John; Korman, Tony M

    2016-09-01

    We compared the results of 505 urine specimens prospectively processed by both conventional manual processing (MP) with 16-24h incubation to BD Kiestra™ Total Laboratory Automation (TLA) system with a shortened incubation of 14h: 97% of culture results were clinically concordant. TLA processing was associated with improved standardization of time of first culture reading and total incubation time. PMID:27422083

  6. Enhanced cell affinity of chitosan membranes mediated by superficial cross-linking: a straightforward method attainable by standard laboratory procedures.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Velázquez, Eustolia; Silva, Maite; Taboada, Pablo; Mano, João F; Suárez-Quintanilla, David; Alatorre-Meda, Manuel

    2014-01-13

    It is well accepted that the surface modification of biomaterials can improve their biocompatibility. In this context, techniques like ion etching, plasma-mediated chemical functionalization, electrospinning, and contact microprinting have successfully been employed to promote the cell adhesion and proliferation of chitosan (CH) substrates. However, they prove to be time-consuming, highly dependent on environmental conditions, and/or limited to the use of expensive materials and sophisticated instruments not accessible to standard laboratories, hindering to a high extent their straightforward application. Filling this gap, this paper proposes the superficial cross-linking of CH as a much simpler and accessible means to modify its superficial properties in order to enhance its cellular affinity. CH membranes were prepared by solvent casting followed by a cross-linking step mediated by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of glutaraldehyde (GA). The membranes were characterized against non- and solution cross-linked membranes in terms of their mechanical/surface properties and biological performance. Among others, the CVD membranes proved (i) to be more mechanically stable against cell culture and sterilization than membranes cross-linked in solution and (ii) to prompt the adherence and sustained proliferation of healthy cells to levels even superior to commercial tissue culture plates (TCPs). Accordingly, the CVD cross-linking approach was demonstrated to be a simple and cost-effective alternative to the aforementioned conventional methods. Interestingly, this concept can also be applied to other biomaterials as long as GA (or other volatile components alike) can be employed as a cross-linker, making possible the cross-linking reaction at mild experimental conditions, neither requiring sophisticated lab implements nor using any potentially harmful procedure. PMID:24328099

  7. Rosetta/COSIMA: Laboratory time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectra of PAHs for in-situ detection in the cometary solid organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardyn, A.; Briois, C.; Cottin, H.; Fray, N.; LeRoy, L.; Thirkell, L.; Hilchenbach, M.

    2014-07-01

    ESA's spacecraft called ROSETTA will reach the comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko in August 2014. During the escort phase of the mission, beginning after the lander (Philae) is released, the COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyzer (COSIMA) [1] carried on board will collect and analyse dust grains in the cometary coma. COSIMA is a time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer (TOF-SIMS) with a high mass resolution m/Δ m of 1400 at mass m=100 amu (from FWHM) and mass range from 1 to 3500 amu. The investigations performed by COSIMA on solid cometary grains are aimed to analyze in situ their molecular, elemental, and isotopic composition. The spectra obtained with COSIMA, will be a combination of mass peaks of mineral and organic elements. The organics are expected to be minor peaks, making their identification not simple. To prepare for the future COSIMA spectra interpretation, the COSIMA team members have started to establish a library database of standardized mass spectra [2,3]. High statistics of positive and negative spectra of the samples were then taken in order to get molecular structure information. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic macromolecules that could survive harsh radiation environment. They are suspected to be responsible for unidentified infrared bands observed in diverse astrophysical environments. Many attempts were made to demonstrate the presence of PAHs in comets. Tentative attributions of fluorescence emission bands have been made of spectra taken during the Vega-2 mission [4,5], and recently on Stardust samples returned [6]. In this work, we have used the COSIMA prototype based in Orléans to analyze PAHs and alkanes molecules deposition on gold targets.

  8. 76 FR 38550 - Technical Standard DOE-STD-1095-2011, Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation for External...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... promulgated 10 CFR part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection, (58 FR 65458), which included a requirement... Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory PNL-4515, Criteria for...

  9. Investigating the impact of course-taking on the standardized test performance of secondary science students in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Bryan Scott

    2007-12-01

    The latest reform efforts in American education have called for the improvement of science education and greater accountability for results. Standardization of schools, curriculum, and testing has emerged as the preferred method of addressing the increasing pressures of accountability systems designed to ensure student achievement. Increasing course-taking requirements has been a popular response intended to maximize student potential. Texas, like other states, has pursued that course. Texas students must take a minimum of two science courses to graduate; most, however, take three. Students must also pass a science assessment in the eleventh grade, which is similar to a test taken in the tenth grade, and measures mastery of objectives covered primarily in the ninth- and tenth-grades, meaning the instruction most students receive in the eleventh grade amounts to enrichment instruction. This study was designed to investigate the impact of completing an extra science course on student achievement in terms of improvement on these tests. The results of the study were derived from descriptive analysis and a one-way ANOVA performed on a random sample of over 16,000 students. Based on the ANOVA, there was a significant effect of increased science instruction on mean pre-test/post-test score change (F(2,16530) = 44.903, p=.000). The descriptive analysis concluded that more students who completed a science class increased their scores than those who did not complete a class. Overall, however, the study points to a need for future research to uncover additional factors that influence student achievement.

  10. An inter-laboratory comparison study of the ANSI/BIFMA standard test method M7.1 for furniture

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five laboratories using five different test chambers participated in the study to quantify within- and between-laboratory variability in the measurement of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new commercial furniture test items following ANSI/BIFMA M7.1. Test item...

  11. Development of standardized laboratory methods and quality processes for a phase III study of the RTS, S/AS01 candidate malaria vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A pivotal phase III study of the RTS,S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine is ongoing in several research centres across Africa. The development and establishment of quality systems was a requirement for trial conduct to meet international regulatory standards, as well as providing an important capacity strengthening opportunity for study centres. Methods Standardized laboratory methods and quality assurance processes were implemented at each of the study centres, facilitated by funding partners. Results A robust protocol for determination of parasite density based on actual blood cell counts was set up in accordance with World Health Organization recommendations. Automated equipment including haematology and biochemistry analyzers were put in place with standard methods for bedside testing of glycaemia, base excess and lactacidaemia. Facilities for X-rays and basic microbiology testing were also provided or upgraded alongside health care infrastructure in some centres. External quality assurance assessment of all major laboratory methods was established and method qualification by each laboratory demonstrated. The resulting capacity strengthening has ensured laboratory evaluations are conducted locally to the high standards required in clinical trials. Conclusion Major efforts by study centres, together with support from collaborating parties, have allowed standardized methods and robust quality assurance processes to be put in place for the phase III evaluation of the RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine. Extensive training programmes, coupled with continuous commitment from research centre staff, have been the key elements behind the successful implementation of quality processes. It is expected these activities will culminate in healthcare benefits for the subjects and communities participating in these trials. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00866619 PMID:21816032

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR STANDARD PROTOCOL FOR CLEANING LABORATORY AND FIELD SAMPLING APPARATUS (UA-L-5.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the standard approach used for cleaning glassware and plasticware during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "Border" study. Keywords: lab; equipment; cleaning.

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) is a federal interagency...

  13. Do English NHS Microbiology laboratories offer adequate services for the diagnosis of UTI in children? Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) Audit of Standard Operational Procedures.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Verlander, Neville Q; Moore, Philippa C L; Larcombe, James; Dudley, Jan; Banerjee, Jaydip; Jadresic, Lyda

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute of Care Excellence (NICE) 2007 guidance CG54, on urinary tract infection (UTI) in children, states that clinicians should use urgent microscopy and culture as the preferred method for diagnosing UTI in the hospital setting for severe illness in children under 3 years old and from the GP setting in children under 3 years old with intermediate risk of severe illness. NICE also recommends that all 'infants and children with atypical UTI (including non-Escherichia coli infections) should have renal imaging after a first infection'. We surveyed all microbiology laboratories in England with Clinical Pathology Accreditation to determine standard operating procedures (SOPs) for urgent microscopy, culture and reporting of children's urine and to ascertain whether the SOPs facilitate compliance with NICE guidance. We undertook a computer search in six microbiology laboratories in south-west England to determine urine submissions and urine reports in children under 3 years. Seventy-three per cent of laboratories (110/150) participated. Enterobacteriaceae that were not E. coli were reported only as coliforms (rather than non-E. coli coliforms) by 61% (67/110) of laboratories. Eighty-eight per cent of laboratories (97/110) provided urgent microscopy for hospital and 54% for general practice (GP) paediatric urines; 61% of laboratories (confidence interval 52-70%) cultured 1 μl volume of urine, which equates to one colony if the bacterial load is 106 c.f.u. l(-1). Only 22% (24/110) of laboratories reported non-E. coli coliforms and provided urgent microscopy for both hospital and GP childhood urines; only three laboratories also cultured a 5 μl volume of urine. Only one of six laboratories in our submission audit had a significant increase in urine submissions and urines reported from children less than 3 years old between the predicted pre-2007 level in the absence of guidance and the 2008 level following publication of the NICE guidance. Less than a

  14. (Depth-dose curves of the beta reference fields (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2.

    PubMed

    Brunzendorf, Jens

    2012-08-01

    The most common reference fields in beta dosimetry are the ISO 6980 series 1 radiation fields produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2 and its predecessor BSS. These reference fields require sealed beta radiation sources ((147)Pm, (85)Kr or (90)Sr/(90)Y) in combination with a source-specific beam-flattening filter, and are defined only at a given distance from the source. Every radiation sources shipped with the BSS2 is sold with a calibration certificate of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The calibration workflow also comprises regular depth-dose measurements. This work publishes complete depth-dose curves of the series 1 sources (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y in ICRU tissue up to a depth of 11 mm,when all electrons are stopped. For this purpose, the individual depth-dose curves of all BSS2 sources calibrated so far have been determined, i.e. the complete datasets of all BSS2 beta sources have been re-evaluated. It includes 191 depth-dose curves of 116 different sources comprising more than 2200 data points in total. Appropriate analytical representations of the nuclide-specific depth-dose curves are provided for the first time. PMID:22267274

  15. A Statistical Review of DWPF Laboratory Data Including Measurements of the ARG-1 Standard for Batches 94 - 263.

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS, EDWARDS

    2004-11-30

    Measurements of calibration and bench standards as well as samples of ARG-1 that were performed by the DWPF Lab during the processing of batches 94 through 263 were provided to SCS for review. Three datasets, one associated with each of three preparation methods (Cold Chem, Mixed Acid, and Fusion) were included in the review. The review conducted covered several areas of investigation. Biases in these measurements relative to the reference values for the standards including ARG-1 were estimated and found to be of no practical concern. Percent relative standard deviations for these data also were determined. Sources of variation in the measurements (i.e., batch-to-batch and within process batch) were estimated and compared. An investigation into evidence of instrument drift during a group of measurements representing a prototypical block was conducted for each preparation method using pairs of calibration and bench standards. No evidence of instrument drift at levels of practical concern was seen in these data. Also, the replicates of calibration standards at the beginning of each analytical block were found to be unnecessary. The uncertainties of the measurements, which incorporated biases and precision errors, were computed for the calibration standards, bench standards, and ARG-1. The limits for these uncertainties were compared to the current, LIMS operating limits for the errors in the measurements of these standards. These comparisons may provide opportunities for revising the LIMS limits. Comparisons between MFT and SME results were made for both the Mixed Acid and the Fusion prep methods. There was no evidence of differences (in either bias or precision) between the results for these two tanks for either of the two prep methods.

  16. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was

  17. Safety Basis Requirements for Nonnuclear Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site-Specific Work Smart Standard Revision 3 December 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, D; Brereton, S; Failor, R; Hildum, J; Ingram, C; Spagnolo, S; van Warmerdam, C

    2007-06-07

    This standard establishes requirements that, when coupled with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) methods and other Work Smart Standards for assuring worker safety, assure that the impacts of nonnuclear operations authorized in LLNL facilities are well understood and controlled in a manner that protects the health of workers, the public, and the environment. All LLNL facilities shall be classified based on potential for adverse impact of operations to the health of co-located (i.e., nearby) workers and the public in accordance with this standard, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) 830, Subpart B, and Department of Energy Order (DOE O) 420.2A.

  18. 1995 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs): Radionuclides. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities), each DOE facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at INEL for CY 1995. For that year, airborne radionuclide emissions from INEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 1.80E-02 mrem (1.80E-07 Sievert), well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  19. Final report on key comparison CCAUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avison, Janine; Barham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This document and the accompanying spreadsheets constitute the final report for key comparison CCAUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Twelve national measurement institutes took part in the key comparison and the National Physical Laboratory piloted the project. Two laboratory standard microphones IEC type LS1P were circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected throughout the project. One of the microphones was subsequently deemed to have compromised stability for the purpose of deriving a reference value. Consequently the key comparison reference value (KCRV) has been made based on the weighted mean results for sensitivity level and for sensitivity phase from just one of the microphones. Corresponding degrees of equivalence (DoEs) have also been calculated and are presented. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Laboratory Frame Analysis of e+e-→μ+μ- Scattering in the Noncommutative Standard Model at Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prasanta Kumar; Prakash, Abhishodh

    2012-09-01

    We study the muon pair production e+e-→μ+μ- in the framework of the nonminimal noncommutative standard model (NCSM) to the second-order of the noncommutative (NC) parameter Θμν at linear collider. The {O}(Θ 2) momentum-dependent NC interaction significantly modifies the cross-section and angular distributions which are different from the standard model. After including the effects of earth's rotation we analyze the time-averaged and time-dependent observables in detail. The time-averaged azimuthal distribution of the cross-section shows significant departure from the standard model which can be tested at the upcoming linear collider. We find strong dependence of total cross-section (time-averaged) and their distributions on the orientation and the magnitude of the NC electric vector (ΘE). Assuming that the future linear collider data will differ from the standard model result by 5%, we obtain Λ≥615 GeV and Λ≥946 GeV corresponding to the machine energy Ecom = 1000 GeV and 1500 GeV.

  1. Standardization of protocols to test wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) for reaction to blast in a biocontainment laboratory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth medium, spore age, and inoculum density are essential factors for determining host responses to a plant pathogen. The standardization of these factors is important to obtain adequate and reproducible disease assessments. We are testing US wheat cultivars for reaction to the exotic disease bla...

  2. Protocol standards and implementation within the digital engineering laboratory computer network (DELNET) using the universal network interface device (UNID). Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phister, P. W., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    Development of the Air Force Institute of Technology's Digital Engineering Laboratory Network (DELNET) was continued with the development of an initial draft of a protocol standard for all seven layers as specified by the International Standards Organization's (ISO) Reference Model for Open Systems Interconnections. This effort centered on the restructuring of the Network Layer to perform Datagram routing and to conform to the developed protocol standards and actual software module development of the upper four protocol layers residing within the DELNET Monitor (Zilog MCZ 1/25 Computer System). Within the guidelines of the ISO Reference Model the Transport Layer was developed utilizing the Internet Header Format (IHF) combined with the Transport Control Protocol (TCP) to create a 128-byte Datagram. Also a limited Application Layer was created to pass the Gettysburg Address through the DELNET. This study formulated a first draft for the DELNET Protocol Standard and designed, implemented, and tested the Network, Transport, and Application Layers to conform to these protocol standards.

  3. Low energy tests of the standard model: the 12 GeV parity violation program at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna S. Kumar

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the current status and prospects of an experimental program of parity-violating asymmetry measurements in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized fixed targets. In particular, we focus on those measurements where judicious choices of target species and kinematics allows the theoretical predictions to be made purely in terms of fundamental electroweak couplings with little theoretical uncertainty. If such asymmetries are measured with sufficient precision, they are sensitive to new physics at the TeV scale. After reviewing recent results, two new experimental initiatives called MOLLER and SoLID being designed for the Jefferson Laboratory 12 GeV upgrade are discussed.

  4. NVLAP activities at Department of Defense calibration laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    There are 367 active radiological instrument calibration laboratories within the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Each of the four services in DoD manages, operates, and certifies the technical proficiency and competency of those laboratories under their cognizance. Each service has designated secondary calibration laboratories to trace all calibration source standards to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Individual service radiological calibration programs and capabilities, present and future, are described, as well as the measurement quality assurance (MQA) processes for their traceability. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) programs for dosimetry systems are briefly summarized. Planned NVLAP accreditation of secondary laboratories is discussed in the context of current technical challenges and future efforts.

  5. Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Scott B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

  6. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

  7. Apportionment of ambient primary and secondary fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory particulate matter characterization site using positive matrix factorization and a potential source contributions function analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Donald V. Martello; Natalie J. Pekney; Richard R. Anderson

    2008-03-15

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory particulate matter characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5 organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5 were the secondary transported material, local secondary material, diesel combustion emissions, and gasoline combustion emissions. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A radon 222 traceability chain from primary standard to field detectors.

    PubMed

    Picolo, J L; Pressyanov, D; Blanchis, P; Barbier, M; Michielsen, N; Grassin, D; Voisin, V; Turek, K

    2000-03-01

    The development of a primary standard from a method for measuring the absolute activity of 222Rn has also made it possible to establish secondary standards. Detailed procedures to obtain these secondary standards are given. These standards are, in particular, adapted to the requirements of laboratories that have developed equipment for the calibration and comparison of instruments measuring the concentration of radon and its daughters. An example of the implementation of these new resources applied to the qualification of field detectors is given. The propagation of measurement uncertainties at each level (primary, secondary, test radon chamber) is described. PMID:10724386

  9. Preparation, Purification, and Secondary Structure Determination of Bacillus Circulans Xylanase. A Molecular Laboratory Incorporating Aspects of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Sal; Gentile, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A project module designed for biochemistry or cellular and molecular biology student which involves determining the secondary structure of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under conditions that compromise its stabilizing intramolecular forces is described. The lab model enhanced students knowledge of the…

  10. Standardized laboratory tests with 21 species of temperate and tropical sepsid flies confirm their suitability as bioassays of pharmaceutical residues (ivermectin) in cattle dung.

    PubMed

    Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Schäfer, Martin A; Scheffczyk, Adam; Römbke, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Veterinary pharmaceuticals excreted in the dung of treated livestock can have strong non-target effects on the dung organism community. We report results of ecotoxicological tests with ivermectin for 21 species of temperate (Europe, North America) and tropical (Asia, Central America) black scavenger flies (Diptera: Sepsidae), using standardized methods developed previously for the yellow dung fly and the face fly. Our study documents great variation in ivermectin sensitivity of more than two orders of magnitude among species and even populations within species: estimated lethal effect concentrations LC(50) (at which 50% of the flies died) ranged from 0.05 to 18.55 μg/kg dung fresh weight (equivalent to 0.33-132.22 μg/kg dung dry weight). We also show that controlled laboratory tests can--within reasonable limits-be extended to the field or to laboratory settings without climate control, as obtained LC(50) were roughly similar. In addition to lethal effects, our study revealed relevant sub-lethal effects at lower ivermectin concentrations in terms of prolonged development, smaller body size and reduced juvenile growth rate. Finally, oviposition choice experiments showed that females generally do not discriminate against dung containing ivermectin residues. We conclude that sepsid flies are well suited test organisms for pharmaceutical residues in the dung of livestock due to their ease and speed of rearing and handling, particularly in the tropics, where high-tech laboratory equipment is often not available. PMID:23260241

  11. Apportionment of ambient primary and secondary fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory particulate matter characterization site using positive matrix factorization and a potential source contributions function analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martello, Donald V.; Pekney, Natalie J.; Anderson, Richard R.; Davidson, Cliff I.; Hopke, Philip K.; Kim, Eugene; Christensen, William F.; Mangelson, Nolan F.; Eatough, Delbert J.

    2008-03-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5, organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5, were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from

  12. Apportionment of Ambient Primary and Secondary Fine Particulate Matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory Particulate Matter Characterization Site Using Positive Matrix Factorization and a Potential Source Contributions Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martello, Donald; Pekney, Natalie; Anderson, Richard; Davidson, Cliff; Hopke, Philip; Kim, Eugene; Christensen, William; Mangelson, Nolan; Eatough, Delbert

    2008-03-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5, organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5, were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from

  13. Apportionment of ambient primary and secondary fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory particulate matter characterization site using positive matrix factorization and a potential source contributions function analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martello, D.V.; Pekney, N.J.; Anderson, R.R.; Davidson, C.I.; Hopke, P.K.; Kim, E.; Christensen, W.F.; Mangelson, N.F.; Eatough, D.J.

    2008-03-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5 organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5 were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from

  14. The Use of Microcomputer Based Laboratories in Chemistry Secondary Education: Present State of the Art and Ideas for Research-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortosa, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    In microcomputer based laboratories (MBL) and data loggers, one or more sensors are connected to an interphase and this to a computer. This equipment allows visualization in real time of the variables of an experiment and provides the possibility of measuring magnitudes which are difficult to measure with traditional equipment. Research shows that…

  15. Exploring the Relationship between Access Technology and Standardized Test Scores for Youths with Visual Impairments: Secondary Analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, Amy L.; Emerson, Robert Wall; Curtis, Amy B.; Fogarty, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 that explored the predictive association between training in access technology and performance on the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Academic Achievement: III. The results indicated that the use of access technology had a limited predictive…

  16. The Optics and Alignment of the Divergent Beam Laboratory X-ray Powder Diffractometer and its Calibration Using NIST Standard Reference Materials.

    PubMed

    Cline, James P; Mendenhall, Marcus H; Black, David; Windover, Donald; Henins, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer is one of the primary analytical tools in materials science. It is applicable to nearly any crystalline material, and with advanced data analysis methods, it can provide a wealth of information concerning sample character. Data from these machines, however, are beset by a complex aberration function that can be addressed through calibration with the use of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). Laboratory diffractometers can be set up in a range of optical geometries; considered herein are those of Bragg-Brentano divergent beam configuration using both incident and diffracted beam monochromators. We review the origin of the various aberrations affecting instruments of this geometry and the methods developed at NIST to align these machines in a first principles context. Data analysis methods are considered as being in two distinct categories: those that use empirical methods to parameterize the nature of the data for subsequent analysis, and those that use model functions to link the observation directly to a specific aspect of the experiment. We consider a multifaceted approach to instrument calibration using both the empirical and model based data analysis methods. The particular benefits of the fundamental parameters approach are reviewed. PMID:26958446

  17. The Optics and Alignment of the Divergent Beam Laboratory X-ray Powder Diffractometer and its Calibration Using NIST Standard Reference Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cline, James P.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Black, David; Windover, Donald; Henins, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer is one of the primary analytical tools in materials science. It is applicable to nearly any crystalline material, and with advanced data analysis methods, it can provide a wealth of information concerning sample character. Data from these machines, however, are beset by a complex aberration function that can be addressed through calibration with the use of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). Laboratory diffractometers can be set up in a range of optical geometries; considered herein are those of Bragg-Brentano divergent beam configuration using both incident and diffracted beam monochromators. We review the origin of the various aberrations affecting instruments of this geometry and the methods developed at NIST to align these machines in a first principles context. Data analysis methods are considered as being in two distinct categories: those that use empirical methods to parameterize the nature of the data for subsequent analysis, and those that use model functions to link the observation directly to a specific aspect of the experiment. We consider a multifaceted approach to instrument calibration using both the empirical and model based data analysis methods. The particular benefits of the fundamental parameters approach are reviewed. PMID:26958446

  18. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cornes, Michael P; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée; Grankvist, Kjell; Guimarães, João T; Ibarz, Mercedes; Kovalevskaya, Svetlana; Kristensen, Gunn Bb; Lippi, Giuseppe; Nybo, Mads; Sprongl, Ludek; Sumarac, Zorica; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2016-09-01

    Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) was established to lead in standardization and harmonization of preanalytical policies and practices at a European level. One of the key activities of the WG-PRE is the organization of the biennial EFLM-BD conference on the preanalytical phase to provide a forum for National Societies (NS) to discuss their issues. Since 2012, a year after the first Preanalytical phase conference, there has been a rapid growth in the number of NS with a working group engaged in preanalytical phase activities and there are now at least 19 countries that have one. As a result of discussions with NS at the third conference held in March 2015 five key areas were identified as requiring harmonisation. These were test ordering, sample transport and storage, patient preparation, sampling procedures and management of unsuitable specimens. The article below summarises the work that has and will be done in these areas. The goal of this initiative is to ensure the EFLM WG-PRE produces work that meets the needs of the European laboratory medicine community. Progress made in the identified areas will be updated at the next preanalytical phase conference and show that we have produced guidance that has enhanced standardisation in the preanalytical phase and improved patient safety throughout Europe. PMID:27141012

  19. Secondary parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinsonism - secondary; Atypical Parkinson disease ... to be less responsive to medical therapy than Parkinson disease. ... Unlike Parkinson disease, some types of secondary parkinsonism may stabilize or even improve if the underlying cause is treated. ...

  20. Secondary parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinsonism - secondary; Atypical Parkinson disease ... to be less responsive to medical therapy than Parkinson disease. ... Unlike Parkinson disease, some types of secondary parkinsonism may stabilize or even improve if the underlying cause is treated. Brain ...

  1. Preparation, Practice, and Performance: An Empirical Examination of the Impact of Standards-Based Instruction on Secondary Students' Math and Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    For almost two decades proponents of educational reform have advocated the use of standards-based education in maths and science classrooms for improving teacher practices, increasing student learning, and raising the quality of maths and science instruction. This study empirically examined the impact of specific standards-based teacher…

  2. Measuring maximum and standard metabolic rates using intermittent-flow respirometry: a student laboratory investigation of aerobic metabolic scope and environmental hypoxia in aquatic breathers.

    PubMed

    Rosewarne, P J; Wilson, J M; Svendsen, J C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic rate is one of the most widely measured physiological traits in animals and may be influenced by both endogenous (e.g. body mass) and exogenous factors (e.g. oxygen availability and temperature). Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) are two fundamental physiological variables providing the floor and ceiling in aerobic energy metabolism. The total amount of energy available between these two variables constitutes the aerobic metabolic scope (AMS). A laboratory exercise aimed at an undergraduate level physiology class, which details the appropriate data acquisition methods and calculations to measure oxygen consumption rates in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, is presented here. Specifically, the teaching exercise employs intermittent flow respirometry to measure SMR and MMR, derives AMS from the measurements and demonstrates how AMS is affected by environmental oxygen. Students' results typically reveal a decline in AMS in response to environmental hypoxia. The same techniques can be applied to investigate the influence of other key factors on metabolic rate (e.g. temperature and body mass). Discussion of the results develops students' understanding of the mechanisms underlying these fundamental physiological traits and the influence of exogenous factors. More generally, the teaching exercise outlines essential laboratory concepts in addition to metabolic rate calculations, data acquisition and unit conversions that enhance competency in quantitative analysis and reasoning. Finally, the described procedures are generally applicable to other fish species or aquatic breathers such as crustaceans (e.g. crayfish) and provide an alternative to using higher (or more derived) animals to investigate questions related to metabolic physiology. PMID:26768978

  3. Adaptive secondary mirror for the 6.5-m conversion of the Multiple Mirror Telescope: latest laboratory test results of the P36 prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Armando; Brusa, Guido; Biliotti, Valdemaro; Del Vecchio, Ciro; Salinari, Piero; Stefanini, Paolo; Mantegazza, Paolo; Biasi, Roberto; Andrighettoni, Mario; Franchini, Claudio; Gallieni, Daniele; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; McGuire, Patrick C.; Miller, Stephen M.; Martin, Hubert M.

    2000-07-01

    The 336-actuator adaptive secondary unit (MMT336) for the new MMT is being assembled in Italy and will be delivered in June 2000 for the acceptance test at Steward Observatory (Tucson, AZ). The latest results obtained on a reduced-size (36 actuators) prototype called P36 are reported, confirming a settling time less than 1 ms measured in previous tests. The flattening procedure has been successfully tested on the P36 unit, reducing the initial surface error of 1.1 micrometer down to 43 nm rms. Moreover the dynamical tests on the P36 unit show that the system is able to attenuate the atmospheric-induced error from 466 nm to 31 nm rms. This in the case of median seeing condition at MMT (0.75 arcsec) a high wind speed (48 m/s) and a 1 kHz command rate per actuator. Finally, in the same conditions the atmospheric error is effectively attenuated up to a frequency of 100 Hz (OdB attenuation level).

  4. Validation of the MycAssay Pneumocystis kit for detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens by comparison to a laboratory standard of direct immunofluorescence microscopy, real-time PCR, or conventional PCR.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Lisa R; Wengenack, Nancy L; Richardson, Susan E

    2012-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients as well as those with non-HIV immunosuppressive diseases. To aid diagnosis, the commercial MycAssay Pneumocystis real-time PCR assay (Myconostica, Ltd., Manchester, United Kingdom) targeting the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU) has been developed to detect P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Here, we validated this assay against a laboratory standard of direct immunofluorescence microscopy, a cdc2 real-time PCR assay, or conventional PCR and sequencing of mtLSU. While more sensitive than any of these three assays analyzed individually, the MycAssay Pneumocystis assay demonstrated 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, a 100% negative predictive value, and a 100% positive predictive value for detecting the presence of P. jirovecii in BAL specimens compared to the laboratory standard. Of note, two samples with positive cycle threshold (C(T)) values according to the MycAssay Pneumocystis assay lacked exponential amplification curves and thus were deemed negative. Also negative according to the laboratory standard, these samples highlight the importance of examining the amplification curves, in addition to noting the C(T) values, when interpreting positive results. Comparison of the MycAssay Pneumocystis assay to a laboratory standard establishes this assay to be a highly sensitive and specific method for the detection of P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens. The approach may also be useful for the clinical laboratory validation of other sensitive real-time PCR assays. PMID:22422855

  5. Clinical Usefulness of the 2010 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Revised Breakpoints for Cephalosporin Use in the Treatment of Bacteremia Caused by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Nam Su; Chung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of the revised 2010 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints for Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. Of 2,623 patients with bacteremia caused by E. coli or Klebsiella spp., 573 who had been treated appropriately with cephalosporin based on the CLSI 2009 guidelines were enrolled. There were no differences in the rates of treatment failure or mortality between the appropriately and inappropriately treated groups according to the CLSI 2010 guidelines. Additionally, in the matched case-control analysis, the treatment failure rate was higher in bacteremic patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing but cephalosporin-susceptible organisms than in those with ESBL-nonproducing isolates when patients with urinary tract infections were excluded (44% and 0%, resp., P = 0.026). In patients with bacteremia caused by E. coli or Klebsiella spp., the revised CLSI 2010 guidelines did not lead to poorer outcomes. However, ESBL production appeared to be associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with bacteremia from sources other than the urinary tract. PMID:25793209

  6. Report on key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolska, D.; Kosterov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report for regional key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Two laboratories—Central Office of Measures (GUM)—the national metrology institute for Poland and the State Enterprise Scientific-Research Institute for Metrology of Measurement and Control Systems (DP NDI Systema)— the designated institute for acoustics in Ukraine took part in this comparison with the GUM as a pilot. One travelling type LS1P microphone was circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected. The results of the DP NDI Systema obtained in this comparison were linked to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison through the joint participation of the GUM. The degrees of equivalence were computed for DP NDI Systema with respect to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. [Secondary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is a common disease and a crucial predisposing factor of cardiovascular diseases. Approximately 10% of hypertensive patients are secondary hypertension, a pathogenetic factor of which can be identified. Secondary hypertension consists of endocrine, renal, and other diseases. Primary aldosteronism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism result in endocrine hypertension. Renal parenchymal hypertension and renovascular hypertension result in renal hypertension. Other diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are also very prevalent in secondary hypertension. It is very crucial to find and treat secondary hypertension at earlier stages since most secondary hypertension is curable or can be dramatically improved by specific treatment. One should keep in mind that screening of secondary hypertension should be done at least once in a daily clinical practice. PMID:26619670

  8. [Secondary diabetes].

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Takashi; Yanase, Toshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Secondary diabetes is diabetes that results as a consequence of another medication, endocrine disease or hereditary disease. Secondary diabetes is very broad and diverted category among diabetes. Clinically, pancreatic diabetes is one of the most popular secondary diabetes, which provides insulin deficiency following pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Among endocrine diseases, Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly are typical endocrine disorders causing secondary diabetes. They mainly induce insulin resistance in early stage, however, insulin deficiency is also observed in advanced stage. Steroid is the most popular drug-induced secondary diabetes. Importantly, not only oral administered steroid but also cutaneous and inhalation steroid could induce hyperglycemia. Major hereditary diabetes are MODY and mitochondrial diabetes. Concerning secondary diabetes, careful medical examination is required. PMID:26666145

  9. An Examination of Secondary School Teachers' Technology Integration Recommended by ISTE's National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers and School Principal Support for Teacher Technology Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The National Educational Technology Standards for teachers (NETS-T) was adopted by New York State, and was critical to the development of students entering a global society. This study examines teachers' use of digital tools to promote student learning and reflection, promote digital citizenship, communicate and collaborate with parents and…

  10. Determination of Unknown Concentrations of Sodium Acetate Using the Method of Standard Addition and Proton NMR: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajabzadeh, Massy

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment, students learn how to find the unknown concentration of sodium acetate using both the graphical treatment of standard addition and the standard addition equation. In the graphical treatment of standard addition, the peak area of the methyl peak in each of the sodium acetate standard solutions is found by integration using…

  11. ASTM Photovoltaic Performance Standards: Their Use at the National Renewable Energy Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.

    2007-07-01

    The performance of photovoltaic devices is typically rated in terms of their peak power with respect to a specific spectrum, total irradiance and temperature. The PV Cell and Module Performance Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., has been measuring the performance of cells and modules for the U.S. terrestrial PV community since 1980. NREL typically calibrates 200 cells and modules per month. The laboratory follows the procedures described in ASTM International standards for calibrating its primary reference cells (E 1125), spectral responsivity measurements (E 1021), secondary reference cells (E 948), secondary modules (E 1036), concentrator modules (E 2527), and multi-junction cells and modules (E 2236).

  12. The Causal Effect of Student Mobility on Standardized Test Performance: A Case Study with Possible Implications for Accountability Mandates within the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

    PubMed

    Selya, Arielle S; Engel-Rebitzer, Eden; Dierker, Lisa; Stephen, Eric; Rose, Jennifer; Coffman, Donna L; Otis, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a limited case study examining the causal inference of student mobility on standardized test performance, within one middle-class high school in suburban Connecticut. Administrative data were used from a district public high school enrolling 319 10th graders in 2010. Propensity score methods were used to estimate the causal effect of student mobility on Math, Science, Reading, and Writing portions of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test (CAPT), after matching mobile vs. stable students on gender, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free/reduced lunches, and special education status. Analyses showed that mobility was associated with lower performance in the CAPT Writing exam. Follow-up analyses revealed that this trend was only significant among those who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches, but not among eligible students. Additionally, mobile students who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches had lower performance in the CAPT Science exam according to some analyses. Large numbers of students transferring into a school district may adversely affect standardized test performance. This is especially relevant for policies that affect student mobility in schools, given the accountability measures in the No Child Left Behind that are currently being re-considered in the recent Every Student Succeeds Act. PMID:27486427

  13. The Causal Effect of Student Mobility on Standardized Test Performance: A Case Study with Possible Implications for Accountability Mandates within the Elementary and Secondary Education Act

    PubMed Central

    Selya, Arielle S.; Engel-Rebitzer, Eden; Dierker, Lisa; Stephen, Eric; Rose, Jennifer; Coffman, Donna L.; Otis, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a limited case study examining the causal inference of student mobility on standardized test performance, within one middle-class high school in suburban Connecticut. Administrative data were used from a district public high school enrolling 319 10th graders in 2010. Propensity score methods were used to estimate the causal effect of student mobility on Math, Science, Reading, and Writing portions of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test (CAPT), after matching mobile vs. stable students on gender, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free/reduced lunches, and special education status. Analyses showed that mobility was associated with lower performance in the CAPT Writing exam. Follow-up analyses revealed that this trend was only significant among those who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches, but not among eligible students. Additionally, mobile students who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches had lower performance in the CAPT Science exam according to some analyses. Large numbers of students transferring into a school district may adversely affect standardized test performance. This is especially relevant for policies that affect student mobility in schools, given the accountability measures in the No Child Left Behind that are currently being re-considered in the recent Every Student Succeeds Act. PMID:27486427

  14. Flexible scope for ISO 15189 accreditation: a guidance prepared by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group Accreditation and ISO/CEN standards (WG-A/ISO).

    PubMed

    Thelen, Marc H M; Vanstapel, Florent J L A; Kroupis, Christos; Vukasovic, Ines; Boursier, Guilaime; Barrett, Edward; Bernabeu Andreu, Francisco; Brguljan, Pika Meško; Brugnoni, Duilio; Lohmander, Maria; Sprongl, Ludek; Vodnik, Tatjana; Ghita, Irina; Vaubourdolle, Michel; Huisman, Willem

    2015-07-01

    The recent revision of ISO15189 has further strengthened its position as the standard for accreditation for medical laboratories. Both for laboratories and their customers it is important that the scope of such accreditation is clear. Therefore the European co-operation for accreditation (EA) demands that the national bodies responsible for accreditation describe the scope of every laboratory accreditation in a way that leaves no room for doubt about the range of competence of the particular laboratories. According to EA recommendations scopes may be fixed, mentioning every single test that is part of the accreditation, or flexible, mentioning all combinations of medical field, examination type and materials for which the laboratory is competent. Up to now national accreditation bodies perpetuate use of fixed scopes, partly by inertia, partly out of fear that a too flexible scope may lead to over-valuation of the competence of laboratories, most countries only use fixed scopes. The EA however promotes use of flexible scopes, since this allows for more readily innovation, which contributes to quality in laboratory medicine. In this position paper, the Working Group Accreditation and ISO/CEN Standards belonging to the Quality and Regulation Committee of the EFLM recommends using an approach that has led to successful introduction of the flexible scope for ISO15189 accreditation as intended in EA-4/17 in The Netherlands. The approach is risk-based, discipline and competence-based, and focuses on defining a uniform terminology transferable across the borders of scientific disciplines, laboratories and countries. PMID:26055950

  15. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR LABORATORY ASSISTANT TRAINING PLAN--GENERAL (UA-T-6.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the training sequence of incoming student laboratory assistants. The procedure is designed to provide them with an overview of the project in terms of project goals, structure, and laboratory needs. This overview familiarizes the student l...

  16. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR BATCHING OF LABORATORY DATA (UA-C-7.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the steps involved in batching the physical laboratory data forms generated by the Arizona Border Study and slated for data entry. It applies to all physical laboratory data forms entered for this study. This procedure was followed to ensu...

  17. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR LABORATORY ASSISTANT TRAINING PLAN--GENERAL (UA-T-6.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the training sequence of incoming student laboratory assistants. The procedure is designed to provide them with an overview of the project in terms of project goals, structure, and laboratory needs. This overview familiarizes the student l...

  18. Effects of contaminated soils from a former iron mine (Ait Amar, Morocco) on enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer) in standard laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Madani, Safoura; Coors, Anja; Haddioui, Abdelmajid; Ksibi, Mohamed; Pereira, Ruth; Paulo Sousa, José; Römbke, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Mining activity is an important economic activity in several North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and North African countries. Within their territory derelict or active mining explorations represent risks to surrounding ecosystems, but engineered-based remediation processes are usually too expensive to be an option for the reclamation of these areas. A project funded by NATO was performed, with the aim of finding a more eco-friendly solution for reclamation of these areas. As part of an overall risk assessment, the risk of contaminated soils to selected soil organisms was evaluated. The main question addressed was: Does the metal-contaminated soils from a former iron mine located at Ait Amar (Morocco),which was abandoned in the mid-Sixties, affect the reproduction of enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer)? Soil samples were taken at 20 plots along four transects covering the mine area and at a reference site about 15km away from the mine. The soils were characterized pedologically and chemically, which showed a heterogeneous pattern of metal contamination (mainly cadmium, copper, and chromium, sometimes at concentrations higher than European soil trigger values). The reproduction of enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer) was studied using standard laboratory tests according to OECD guidelines 220 (2004) and 226 (2008). The number of juveniles of E. bigeminus was reduced at several plots with high concentrations of Cd or Cu (the latter in combination with low pH values). There was nearly no effect of the metal contaminated soils on the reproduction of H. aculeifer. The overall lack of toxicity at the majority of the studied plots is probably caused by the low availability of the metals in these soils unless soil pH was very low. Different exposure pathways are likely responsible for the different reaction of mites and enchytraeids (hard-bodied versus soft-bodied organisms). The

  19. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from blood cultures, set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Nakata, Chiyo; Munakata, Machiko; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2007-02-01

    A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility to and efficacy of various kinds of antimicrobial agents against 179 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were isolated from blood cultures at Kansai Medical University Hospital from 1990 through 2004. The annual detection rate was highest in 1994, at 22 strains (6.5%). There were 9 multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.0%). Among 14 antimicrobial agents tested for measurements, ciprofloxacin (CPFX) showed the best minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 value, of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by pazufloxacin (PZFX) and biapenem (BIPM), each at 0.5 microg/ml. When the period of 15 years was divided into three stages, the MIC50 value for each antimicrobial agent was highest in the middle stage (1995 to 1999). Assuming that the percentage of sensitive strains according to the breakpoints set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) represents the antimicrobial susceptibility rate, amikacin (AMK) showed the best value, of 85.5%. According to the sepsis breakpoint set by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), the efficacy of CPFX showed the highest rate (77.1%) of all the antimicrobial agents tested. Among beta-lactams, BIPM showed the highest efficacy rate, of 67.0%. When the efficacy rates were compared with each other, the difference in efficacy rate between the breakpoint set by the CLSI and the sepsis breakpoint set by the JSC was large for beta-lactams. Comparisons made based on the CLSI criteria showed no difference in cross-resistance rates between CPFX, meropenem (MEPM), and BIPM. However, when comparisons were made using the JSC sepsis breakpoint, MEPM showed a cross-resistance rate of 87.8%, while the rate for BIPM was lower, at 56.1%, with the chi2 test showing a significant difference, at P = 0.0014. In accordance with the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics theory that has been advocated, breakpoints which are more suitable for the clinical setting in Japan should

  20. Secondary Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of their name, "secondary" products are essential for plant survival. They are required for basic cell functions as well as communicating the plant's presence to the surrounding environment and defense against pests as defined in the broad sense (i.e., diseases, nematodes, insects and plan...

  1. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR GENERAL LABORATORY TRAINING PLAN (BCO-T-1.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the training sequence followed by each member of the technical staff at Battelle who participates in the project. The procedure is designed to provide them with an overview of the project in terms of project goals, structure, and laboratory requirements. This...

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR FLOW AND CUSTODY OF UA LABORATORY DATA (UA-C-8.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the flow and custody of laboratory data generated by NHEXAS Arizona through data processing and delivery to the project data manager for creation of the master database. This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during...

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR GENERAL LABORATORY TRAINING PLAN--BATTELLE (BCO-T-1.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the training sequence followed by each member of the technical staff at Battelle who participates in the NHEXAS project. The procedure is designed to provide them with an overview of the project in terms of project goals, structure, and laboratory requirements...

  4. Secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-06-01

    Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is -2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  5. Secondary osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is –2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  6. Focus & Higher Standards for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Baccalaureate North America, Inc., New York, NY.

    The International Baccalaureate (IB) program, in which students in the last 2 years of high school can earn a diploma recognized for university admission throughout the world and for course credit at colleges and universities in Canada and the United States, is described. Information about the program is provided in the following areas: (1)…

  7. 42 CFR 493.1101 - Standard: Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Facility Administration for Nonwaived Testing § 493.1101 Standard: Facilities. (a) The laboratory must be constructed, arranged, and maintained to..., amplification and product detection, and, as applicable, reagent preparation. (b) The laboratory must...

  8. 76 FR 9578 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... Additional Information: Nancy Anderson, Chief, Laboratory Practice Standards Branch, Division of Laboratory Science and Standards, Laboratory Science, Policy and Practice Program Office, Office of...

  9. 76 FR 39879 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical and laboratory practice of proposed revisions to the standards; and the modification of the standards...

  10. New compounds will help coal operators comply with BELT standards

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-15

    US coal producers will soon have a new set of conveyor belting standards, which are currently proposed as a rulemaking by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), to bring higher levels of resistance to propagation of fire by a secondary source. The new test being put into effect is known as a Belt Evaluation Laboratory Test (BELT). The article, submitted by Fenner Dunlop, discusses the company's testing procedures and the development of conveyors to comply with regulations. 2 photos.

  11. Appraisal of within- and between-laboratory reproducibility of non-radioisotopic local lymph node assay using flow cytometry, LLNA:BrdU-FCM: comparison of OECD TG429 performance standard and statistical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyeri; Na, Jihye; Jang, Won-Hee; Jung, Mi-Sook; Jeon, Jun-Young; Heo, Yong; Yeo, Kyung-Wook; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Kyung-Min; Bae, SeungJin

    2015-05-01

    Mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA, OECD TG429) is an alternative test replacing conventional guinea pig tests (OECD TG406) for the skin sensitization test but the use of a radioisotopic agent, (3)H-thymidine, deters its active dissemination. New non-radioisotopic LLNA, LLNA:BrdU-FCM employs a non-radioisotopic analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and flow cytometry. For an analogous method, OECD TG429 performance standard (PS) advises that two reference compounds be tested repeatedly and ECt(threshold) values obtained must fall within acceptable ranges to prove within- and between-laboratory reproducibility. However, this criteria is somewhat arbitrary and sample size of ECt is less than 5, raising concerns about insufficient reliability. Here, we explored various statistical methods to evaluate the reproducibility of LLNA:BrdU-FCM with stimulation index (SI), the raw data for ECt calculation, produced from 3 laboratories. Descriptive statistics along with graphical representation of SI was presented. For inferential statistics, parametric and non-parametric methods were applied to test the reproducibility of SI of a concurrent positive control and the robustness of results were investigated. Descriptive statistics and graphical representation of SI alone could illustrate the within- and between-laboratory reproducibility. Inferential statistics employing parametric and nonparametric methods drew similar conclusion. While all labs passed within- and between-laboratory reproducibility criteria given by OECD TG429 PS based on ECt values, statistical evaluation based on SI values showed that only two labs succeeded in achieving within-laboratory reproducibility. For those two labs that satisfied the within-lab reproducibility, between-laboratory reproducibility could be also attained based on inferential as well as descriptive statistics. PMID:25732604

  12. Emerging Trends in Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picus, Larry; Cohen, Carolyn

    In 4 stages, this paper, prepared by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL), examines trends in secondary education: a review of 11 major studies from the 1970's; responses from 320 Northwest high school principals to survey questionnaires; a telephone survey of 21 local, state, regional, and national observers of youth employment…

  13. Toward Awakening Cryptic Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters in Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Yun; Sanchez, James F.; Wang, Clay C.C.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    Mining for novel natural compounds is of eminent importance owing to the continuous need for new pharmaceuticals. Filamentous fungi are historically known to harbor the genetic capacity for an arsenal of natural compounds, both beneficial and detrimental to humans. The majority of these metabolites are still cryptic or silent under standard laboratory culture conditions. Mining for these cryptic natural products can be an excellent source for identifying new compound classes. Capitalizing on the current knowledge on how secondary metabolite gene clusters are regulated has allowed the research community to unlock many hidden fungal treasures, as described in this chapter. PMID:23084945

  14. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  15. Secondary aerosol production from agricultural gas precursors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of air quality indicate that agricultural emissions may impact particulate mass concentrations through both primary and secondary processes. Increasing evidence from both laboratory and field work suggests that not only does ammonia produce secondary particulate matter, but some volatile org...

  16. 78 FR 6330 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory medicine practice and specific... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... laboratory services; revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the...

  17. 77 FR 41188 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory medicine practice and specific... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory...-centeredness of laboratory services; revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are...

  18. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  19. RADCAL Operations Manual Radiation Calibration Laboratory Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) in its Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments. Operations of the HPRR were terminated in 1987 and the reactor was moved to storage at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; however, RADCAL will continue to be operated in accordance with the guidelines of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Secondary Calibration Laboratory program and will meet all requirements for testing dosimeters under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). This manual is to serve as the primary instruction and operation manual for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's RADCAL facility. Its purpose is to (1) provide operating protocols for the RADCAL facility, (2) outline the organizational structure, (3) define the Quality Assurance Action Plan, and (4) describe all the procedures, operations, and responsibilities for the safe and proper operation of all routine aspects of the calibration facility.

  20. National and international standards and calibration of thermoluminescence dosimetry systems.

    PubMed

    Soares, C G

    2002-01-01

    Radiation protection for radiation workers, the public, and the environment is of international concern. The use of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) is an acceptable method for dose recording in most countries. For reasons of consistency and data gathering (research) it is important that a Sievert (Sv) in one part of the world equals an Sv on the other side of the globe. To this end, much work has gone into the development of standards and calibration practices for TLD systems so that they compare not only with similar systems, but also with other forms of radiation measurement. While most national laboratories provide calibration services for these systems some, as in the United States, depend on services of secondary calibration laboratories that are traceable to the national laboratories through accreditation programmes. The purpose of this paper is to explain how TLD measurements are traceable to their respective national standards for both personnel and environmental dosimetry. PMID:12382728

  1. Identification of Medically Actionable Secondary Findings in the 1000 Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Olfson, Emily; Cottrell, Catherine E.; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Heusel, Jonathan W.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Chen, Li-Shiun; Hartz, Sarah; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Saccone, Nancy L.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommends that clinical sequencing laboratories return secondary findings in 56 genes associated with medically actionable conditions. Our goal was to apply a systematic, stringent approach consistent with clinical standards to estimate the prevalence of pathogenic variants associated with such conditions using a diverse sequencing reference sample. Candidate variants in the 56 ACMG genes were selected from Phase 1 of the 1000 Genomes dataset, which contains sequencing information on 1,092 unrelated individuals from across the world. These variants were filtered using the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) Professional version and defined parameters, appraised through literature review, and examined by a clinical laboratory specialist and expert physician. Over 70,000 genetic variants were extracted from the 56 genes, and filtering identified 237 variants annotated as disease causing by HGMD Professional. Literature review and expert evaluation determined that 7 of these variants were pathogenic or likely pathogenic. Furthermore, 5 additional truncating variants not listed as disease causing in HGMD Professional were identified as likely pathogenic. These 12 secondary findings are associated with diseases that could inform medical follow-up, including cancer predisposition syndromes, cardiac conditions, and familial hypercholesterolemia. The majority of the identified medically actionable findings were in individuals from the European (5/379) and Americas (4/181) ancestry groups, with fewer findings in Asian (2/286) and African (1/246) ancestry groups. Our results suggest that medically relevant secondary findings can be identified in approximately 1% (12/1092) of individuals in a diverse reference sample. As clinical sequencing laboratories continue to implement the ACMG recommendations, our results highlight that at least a small number of potentially important secondary findings can be selected for

  2. The University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Community OutReach Development Summer Science Institute Program: A 3-Yr Laboratory Research Experience for Inner-City Secondary-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemann, Marilyn A.; Miller, Michael L.; Davis, Thelma

    2004-01-01

    This article describes and assesses the effectiveness of a 3-yr, laboratory-based summer science program to improve the academic performance of inner-city high school students. The program was designed to gradually introduce such students to increasingly more rigorous laboratory experiences in an attempt to interest them in and model what "real"…

  3. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  4. Comparison of a spectrophotometric microdilution method with RPMI-2% glucose with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards reference macrodilution method M27-P for in vitro susceptibility testing of amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tudela, J L; Berenguer, J; Martínez-Suárez, J V; Sanchez, R

    1996-01-01

    The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has proposed a reference broth macrodilution method for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts (the M27-P method). This method is cumbersome and time-consuming and includes MIC endpoint determination by visual and subjective inspection of growth inhibition after 48 h of incubation. An alternative microdilution procedure was compared with the M27-P method for determination of the amphotericin B, flucytosine, and fluconazole susceptibilities of 8 American Type Culture Collection strains (6 of them were quality control or reference strains) and 50 clinical isolates of candida albicans. This microdilution method uses as culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 18 g of glucose per liter (RPMI-2% glucose). Preparation of drugs, basal medium, and inocula was done by following the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The MIC endpoint was calculated objectively from the turbidimetric data read at 24 h. Increased growth of C. albicans in RPMI-2% glucose and its spectrophotometric reading allowed for the rapid (24 h) and objective calculation of MIC endpoints compared with previous microdilution methods with standard RPMI 1640. Nevertheless, good agreement was shown between the M27-P method and this microdilution test. The MICs obtained for the quality control or reference strains by the microdilution method were in the ranges published for those strains. For clinical isolates, the percentages of agreement were 100% for amphotericin B and fluconazole and 98.1% for flucytosine. These data suggest that this microdilution method may serve as a less subjective and more rapid alternative to the M27-P method for antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts. PMID:8878570

  5. Lunar and Asteroid Composition Using a Remote Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Funsten, H. O.; Barraclough, B. L.; Mccomas, D. J.; Nordholt, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory experiments simulating solar wind sputtering of lunar surface materials have shown that solar wind protons sputter secondary ions in sufficient numbers to be measured from low-altitude lunar orbit. Secondary ions of Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Mn, Ti, and Fe have been observed sputtered from sample simulants of mare and highland soils. While solar wind ions are hundreds of times less efficient than those used in standard secondary ion mass spectrometry, secondary ion fluxes expected at the Moon under normal solar wind conditions range from approximately 10 to greater than 10(exp 4) ions cm(sup -2)s(sup -1), depending on species. These secondary ion fluxes depend both on concentration in the soil and on probability of ionization; yields of easily ionized elements such as K and Na are relatively much greater than those for the more electronegative elements and compounds. Once these ions leave the surface, they are subject to acceleration by local electric and magnetic fields. For typical solar wind conditions, secondary ions can be accelerated to an orbital observing location. The same is true for atmospheric atoms and molecules that are photoionized by solar EUV. The instrument to detect, identify, and map secondary ions sputtered from the lunar surface and photoions arising from the tenuous atmosphere is discussed.

  6. Minimum Competency in Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Landsheere, Viviane

    1987-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the movement toward minimum competency in secondary education. Addresses the problem of defining minimum competency and the dangers of imposed standardization. Identifies three conceptualizations of minimum competency as: (1) the narrowly educational standpoint, (2) the concern with functional literacy, and (3) a more…

  7. Inter-laboratory comparison on the size and stability of monodisperse and bimodal synthetic reference particles for standardization of extracellular vesicle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, Anaïs; Meli, Felix; van der Pol, Edwin; Yuana, Yuana; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Cizmar, Petr; Buhr, Egbert; Pétry, Jasmine; Sebaihi, Noham; de Boeck, Bert; Fokkema, Vincent; Bergmans, Rob; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2016-03-01

    In future, measurements of extracellular vesicles in body fluids could become a standard diagnostic tool in medicine. For this purpose, reliable and traceable methods, which can be easily applied in hospitals, have to be established. Within the European Metrological Research Project (EMRP) ‘Metrological characterization of micro-vesicles from body fluids as non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers’ (www.metves.eu), various nanoparticle reference materials were developed and characterized. We present results of an international comparison among four national metrology institutes and a university hospital. The size distributions of five monodisperse and two bimodal spherical particle samples with diameters ranging from 50 nm to 315 nm made out of silica and polystyrene were compared. Furthermore, the stability of the samples was verified over a period of 18 months. While monodisperse reference particle samples above a certain size level lead to good agreements of the size measurements among the different methods, small and bimodal samples show the limitations of current ‘clinical’ methods. All samples proved to be stable within the uncertainty of the applied methods.

  8. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1997-03-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  9. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-09-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  10. Lunar surface composition and solar wind-induced secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Funsten, H.O. III; Barraclough, B.L.; McComas, D.J.; Paffett, M.T.; Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G. )

    1991-11-01

    The Moon has no strong global magnetic field and only a tenuous atmosphere, so solar wind ions ({approximately}95% H{sup +}, 5% He{sup ++}) directly bombard the lunar surface, sputtering atoms and secondary ions from the exposed grains of the regolith. The secondary ions potentially provide surface composition information through secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a standard laboratory surface composition analysis technique. In this paper the authors report the results of laboratory SIMS experiments on lunar soil simulants using solar wind-like ions. They find that H{sup +} and He{sup ++}, while not efficient sputterers, nevertheless produce significant fluxes of secondary lunar ions, including Na{sup +}, Mg{sup +}, Al{sup +}, Si{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup +}, Ti{sup +}, Mn{sup +} and Fe{sup +}. They predict that lunar surface secondary-ion fluxes range between {approximately}10 and 10{sup 4} ions cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, depending on the species.

  11. Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, Joseph H.

    2009-01-29

    Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making plans to dispose of 54 million gallons of radioactive tank wastes at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The high-level wastes and low-activity wastes will be vitrified and placed in permanent disposal sites. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents, and these need to be processed and disposed of also. The Department of Energy Office of Waste Processing sponsored a meeting to develop a roadmap to outline the steps necessary to design the secondary waste forms. Representatives from DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Oregon Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, technical experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, and private consultants convened in Richland, Washington, during the week of July 21-23, 2008, to participate in a workshop to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with the treatment and disposal of the secondary wastes and to develop a roadmap for addressing those risks and uncertainties. This report describes the results of the roadmap meeting in Richland. Processing of the tank wastes will generate secondary wastes, including routine solid wastes and liquid process effluents. The secondary waste roadmap workshop focused on the waste streams that contained the largest fractions of the 129I and 99Tc that the Integrated Disposal Facility risk assessment analyses were showing to have the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater. Thus, the roadmapping effort was to focus on the scrubber/off-gas treatment liquids with 99Tc to be sent to the Effluent Treatment Facility for treatment and solidification and the silver mordenite and carbon beds with the captured 129I to be packaged and sent to the IDF. At the highest level, the secondary waste roadmap includes elements addressing regulatory and

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Three Commercial Quantitative Cytomegalovirus Standards by Use of Digital and Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z.; Sam, S. S.; Sun, Y.; Tang, L.; Pounds, S.; Caliendo, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of the 1st WHO International Standard for human cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the introduction of commercially produced secondary standards have raised hopes of improved agreement among laboratories performing quantitative PCR for CMV. However, data to evaluate the trueness and uniformity of secondary standards and the consistency of results achieved when these materials are run on various assays are lacking. Three concentrations of each of the three commercially prepared secondary CMV standards were tested in quadruplicate by three real-time and two digital PCR methods. The mean results were compared in a pairwise fashion with nominal values provided by each manufacturer. The agreement of results among all methods for each sample and for like concentrations of each standard was also assessed. The relationship between the nominal values of standards and the measured values varied, depending upon the assay used and the manufacturer of the standards, with the degree of bias ranging from +0.6 to −1.0 log10 IU/ml. The mean digital PCR result differed significantly among the secondary standards, as did the results of the real-time PCRs, particularly when plotted against nominal log10 IU values. Commercially available quantitative secondary CMV standards produce variable results when tested by different real-time and digital PCR assays, with various magnitudes of bias compared to nominal values. These findings suggest that the use of such materials may not achieve the intended uniformity among laboratories measuring CMV viral load, as envisioned by adaptation of the WHO standard. PMID:25694529

  13. Comparison of the Sensititre YeastOne® dilution method with the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A3 microbroth dilution reference method for determining MIC of eight antifungal agents on 102 yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Bertout, S; Dunyach, C; Drakulovski, P; Reynes, J; Mallié, M

    2011-02-01

    The Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute ([CLSI] formerly NCCLS) reference broth microdilution testing method (protocol M27-A3) was compared with a commercially available methods (Sensititre YeastOne(®)) by testing two quality control strains and 102 isolates of Candida sp. and Cryptococcus sp. against fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, flucytosin, amphotericin B and caspofungin. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) endpoints were determined after 24h of incubation for Sensititre YeastOne(®) and after 24 and 48 h for CLSI microdilution method. Essential agreements between methods vary from 70.6 to 92.2%. Categorical agreements vary from 94.1% for 5FC to 72.6% for AMB. Sensititre YeastOne(®) reading appears to be useful for avoiding very major errors and this confirms the interest of this method for evaluating new antifungals activity in vitro. PMID:20843616

  14. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  19. Standardization versus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Examines differences between old state-designed norm-referenced tests and new tests aligned with the curriculum. Concludes that new state tests are very similar to old ones. Discusses impact of new high-stakes standardized tests on students and teachers. Argues the new wave of standardized testing is not the answer to improving student…

  20. New Federal Air Quality Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stopinski, O. W.

    The report discusses the current procedures for establishing air quality standards, the bases for standards, and, finally, proposed and final National Primary and Secondary Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, photochemical oxidants, and nitrogen dioxide. (Author/RH)