Science.gov

Sample records for segmental jumping translocation

  1. Jumping translocation in a newborn boy with dup(4q) and severe hydrops fetalis

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, E.; Enden, A. van den; Vanhaesebrouck, P.; Speleman, F.

    1994-08-15

    We report on the unusual cytogenetic findings in a newborn boy with severe hydrops fetalis. He has a mosaic for 2 unbalanced chromosome rearrangements: a der(18)t(4;18)(q31;q23) and a der(18)t(4;18)(q31;p11). As a result, this patient had a duplication of 4q31-qter in cells, and was possibly monosomic for the distal ends of 18p and 18q, respectively in the 2 cell lines. Sine in both rearrangements the same chromosome 4 segment was translocated to 2 different chromosome regions, we consider the present finding as a peculiar type of jumping translocation. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Segmental and Kinetic Contributions in Vertical Jumps Performed with and without an Arm Swing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltner, Michael E.; Bishop, Elijah J.; Perez, Cassandra M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the contributions of the motions of the body segments to the vertical ground reaction force ([F.sub.z]), the joint torques produced by the leg muscles, and the time course of vertical velocity generation during a vertical jump, 15 men were videotaped performing countermovement vertical jumps from a force plate with and without an arm…

  3. [Identification of the 1RS-7DS.7DL wheat-rye small segment translocation lines].

    PubMed

    Jun, Li; Xinguo, Zhu; Hongshen, Wan; Qin, Wang; Zongxiang, Tang; Shulan, Fu; Zujun, Yang; Manyu, Yang; Wuyun, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L., RR) is a valuable genetic resource for the improvement of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD). Transferring alien rye genes into wheat by distant hybridization and automatic chromosome doubling is an important and efficient method to boost agronomic traits, disease resistance and widening the gene pool in wheat. In this study, an octoploid triticale CD-13 (AABBDDRR) was obtained via automatic chromosome doubling by crossing landrace Penganbaimaizi (T. aestivum L., AABBDD) and rye "Qinling rye" (S. cereale cv. Qinling, RR). GISH and FISH analyses indicated that CD-13 contained a 1RS-7DS.7DL wheat-rye small segment translocation chromosome. In order to transfer the 1RS-7DS small segment translocation into hexaploid wheat, 58 lines of the F5 inbred population from the cross CD-13 x Chuanmai 42 were screened for rye chromosome segments by GISH and FISH analyses. The results showed that 13 lines contained the 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation chromosome by reciprocal translocation between 1RS and 7DS. These translocation lines carrying 1RS small rye alien segment were tested for the translocation breakpoints and the presence of a storage protein locus Sec-1. The Sec-1 locus was absent in the line 811, a stable 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation line. The translocation breakpoint of 1RS-7DS.7DL of this line was located in the interval of IB267-IAG95 around the telomere of 1RS chromosome. Thousand-kernel weight of the line 811 was much higher than the parent CD-13, but not significantly different from Chuanmai 42. This indicated that 1RS-7DS.7DL small segment translocation had no negative effect on thousand-kernel weight in the genetic background of Chuanmai 42. The line with 1RS-7DS.7DL translocation chromosomes can be used as a new genetic material for further studies of valuable genes and their genetic effect on 1RS small segment. PMID:26351056

  4. Stop-and-move of a marginally hydrophobic segment translocating across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Yukiko; Yamagishi, Marifu; Imai, Kenta; Fujita, Hidenobu; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-09-01

    Many membrane proteins are cotranslationally integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via the protein-conducting channel, the so-called translocon. The hydrophobic transmembrane segment of the translocating nascent polypeptide chain stops at the translocon and then moves laterally into the membrane. Partitioning of the hydrophobic segment into the membrane is the primary determinant for membrane insertion. Here, we examined the behavior of a marginally hydrophobic segment at the translocon and found that its stop-translocation was greatly affected by the C-terminally attached ribosomes. The marginally hydrophobic segment first stops at the membrane and then moves into the lumen as long as the nascent chain is attached to translating ribosomes. When it is released from the ribosome by the termination codon, the marginally hydrophobic segment does not move. Puromycin or RNase treatment also suppressed movement. The movement was reversibly inhibited by high-salt conditions and irreversibly inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. There is an unstable state prior to the stable membrane insertion of the transmembrane segment. This characteristic state is maintained by the synthesizing ribosome. PMID:23747484

  5. Translocations of Chromosome End-Segments and Facultative Heterochromatin Promote Meiotic Ring Formation in Evening Primroses[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Golczyk, Hieronim; Massouh, Amid; Greiner, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Due to reciprocal chromosomal translocations, many species of Oenothera (evening primrose) form permanent multichromosomal meiotic rings. However, regular bivalent pairing is also observed. Chiasmata are restricted to chromosomal ends, which makes homologous recombination virtually undetectable. Genetic diversity is achieved by changing linkage relations of chromosomes in rings and bivalents via hybridization and reciprocal translocations. Although the structural prerequisite for this system is enigmatic, whole-arm translocations are widely assumed to be the mechanistic driving force. We demonstrate that this prerequisite is genome compartmentation into two epigenetically defined chromatin fractions. The first one facultatively condenses in cycling cells into chromocenters negative both for histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and for C-banding, and forms huge condensed middle chromosome regions on prophase chromosomes. Remarkably, it decondenses in differentiating cells. The second fraction is euchromatin confined to distal chromosome segments, positive for histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation and for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation. The end-segments are deprived of canonical telomeres but capped with constitutive heterochromatin. This genomic organization promotes translocation breakpoints between the two chromatin fractions, thus facilitating exchanges of end-segments. We challenge the whole-arm translocation hypothesis by demonstrating why reciprocal translocations of chromosomal end-segments should strongly promote meiotic rings and evolution toward permanent translocation heterozygosity. Reshuffled end-segments, each possessing a major crossover hot spot, can furthermore explain meiotic compatibility between genomes with different translocation histories. PMID:24681616

  6. Positive charges of translocating polypeptide chain retrieve an upstream marginal hydrophobic segment from the endoplasmic reticulum lumen to the translocon.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hidenobu; Kida, Yuichiro; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Morimoto, Fumiko; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2010-06-15

    Positively charged amino acid residues are well recognized topology determinants of membrane proteins. They contribute to the stop-translocation of a polypeptide translocating through the translocon and to determine the orientation of signal sequences penetrating the membrane. Here we analyzed the function of these positively charged residues during stop-translocation in vitro. Surprisingly, the positive charges facilitated membrane spanning of a marginally hydrophobic segment, even when separated from the hydrophobic segment by 70 residues. In this case, the hydrophobic segment was exposed to the lumen, and then the downstream positive charges triggered the segment to slide back into the membrane. The marginally hydrophobic segment spanned the membrane, but maintained access to the water environment. The positive charges not only fix the hydrophobic segment in the membrane at its flanking position, but also have a much more dynamic action than previously realized. PMID:20427573

  7. Characterization of thigh and shank segment angular velocity during jump landing tasks commonly used to evaluate risk for ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Ariel V; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2012-09-01

    The dynamic movements associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during jump landing suggest that limb segment angular velocity can provide important information for understanding the conditions that lead to an injury. Angular velocity measures could provide a quick and simple method of assessing injury risk without the constraints of a laboratory. The objective of this study was to assess the inter-subject variations and the sensitivity of the thigh and shank segment angular velocity in order to determine if these measures could be used to characterize jump landing mechanisms. Additionally, this study tested the correlation between angular velocity and the knee abduction moment. Thirty-six healthy participants (18 male) performed drop jumps with bilateral and unilateral landing. Thigh and shank angular velocities were measured by a wearable inertial-based system, and external knee moments were measured using a marker-based system. Discrete parameters were extracted from the data and compared between systems. For both jumping tasks, the angular velocity curves were well defined movement patterns with high inter-subject similarity in the sagittal plane and moderate to good similarity in the coronal and transverse planes. The angular velocity parameters were also able to detect differences between the two jumping tasks that were consistent across subjects. Furthermore, the coronal angular velocities were significantly correlated with the knee abduction moment (R of 0.28-0.51), which is a strong indicator of ACL injury risk. This study suggested that the thigh and shank angular velocities, which describe the angular dynamics of the movement, should be considered in future studies about ACL injury mechanisms. PMID:22938373

  8. NBCe1-A Transmembrane Segment 1 Lines the Ion Translocation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Azimov, Rustam; Kao, Liyo; Newman, Debra; Liu, Weixin; Abuladze, Natalia; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2009-03-27

    The electrogenic Na(+)/HCO(3)(-) cotransporter (NBCe1-A) transports sodium and bicarbonate across the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubule. In this study the structural requirement of transmembrane segment 1 (TM1) residues in mediating NBCe1-A transport was investigated. Twenty-five introduced cysteine mutants at positions Gln-424 to Gly-448 were tested for their sensitivity to the methanethiosulfonate reagents (2-sulfonatoethyl) methanethiosulfonate (MTSES), [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSET), and (2-aminoethyl) methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA). Two mutants, T442C and A435C, showed 100 and 70% sensitivity, respectively, to inhibition by all the three methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents, I441C had >50% sensitivity to MTSET and MTSEA, and A428C had 50% sensitivity to MTSEA inhibition. A helical wheel plot showed that mutants T442C, A435C, and A428C are clustered on one face of TM1 within a 100 degrees arc. Topology analysis of TM1 with biotin maleimide and 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) revealed Thr-442 marks the C-terminal end of TM1 and that extracellular FGGLLG stretch is in a small aqueous-accessible cavity. Functional studies indicated that Thr-442 resides in a narrow region of the ion translocation pore with strong delta(-) helical dipole influence. Analysis of the corresponding residue of NBCe1-A-Thr-442 in AE1 (Thr-422) shows it is functionally insensitive to MTSES and unlabeled with MTS-TAMRA, indicating that AE1-TM1 is oriented differently from NBCe1-A. In summary, we have identified residues Thr-442, Ala-435, and Ala-428 in TM1 lining the ion translocation pore of NBCe1-A. Our findings are suggestive of a delta(-) helical dipole at the C-terminal end of TM1 involving Thr-442 that plays a critical role in the function of the cotransporter. PMID:19158093

  9. Characterization of wheat - Psathyrostachys huashanica small segment translocation line with enhanced kernels per spike and stripe rust resistance.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hou-Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Juan; Xu, Li-Li; Qi, Wei-Liang; Tang, Yao; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Wei; Li, Dai-Yan; Zeng, Jian; Wang, Yi; Fan, Xing; Sha, Li-Na; Zhang, Hai-Qin; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Psathyrostachys huashanica Keng (2n = 2x = 14, NsNs), a distant wild relative of common wheat, possesses rich potentially valuable traits, such as disease resistance and more spikelets and kernels per spike, that could be useful for wheat genetic improvement. Development of wheat - P. huashanica translocation lines will facilitate its practical utilization in wheat breeding. In the present study, a wheat - P. huashanica small segmental translocation line, K-13-835-3, was isolated and characterized from the BC1F5 population of a cross between wheat - P. huashanica amphiploid PHW-SA and wheat cultivar CN16. Cytological studies showed that the mean chromosome configuration of K-13-835-3 at meiosis was 2n = 42 = 0.10 I + 19.43 II (ring) + 1.52 II (rod). GISH analyses indicated that chromosome composition of K-13-835-3 included 40 wheat chromosomes and a pair of wheat - P. huashanica translocation chromosomes. FISH results demonstrated that the small segment from an unidentified P. huashanica chromosome was translocated into wheat chromosome arm 5DS, proximal to the centromere region of 5DS. Compared with the cultivar wheat parent CN16, K-13-835-3 was highly resistant to stripe rust pathogens prevalent in China. Furthermore, spikelets and kernels per spike in K-13-835-3 were significantly higher than those of CN16 in two growing seasons. These results suggest that the desirable genes from P. huashanica were successfully transferred into CN16 background. This translocation line could be used as novel germplasm for high-yield and, eventually, resistant cultivar breeding. PMID:26961208

  10. Volcanism, jump and propagation on the Sheba ridge, eastern Gulf of Aden: segmentation evolution and implications for oceanic accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acremont, Elia; Leroy, Sylvie; Maia, Marcia; Gente, Pascal; Autin, Julia

    2010-02-01

    The rifting between Arabia and Somalia, which started around 35 Ma, was followed by oceanic accretion from at least 17.6 Ma leading to the formation of the present-day Gulf of Aden. Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic data from the Encens-Sheba cruise are used to constrain the structure and segmentation of the oceanic basin separating the conjugate continental margins in the eastern part of the Gulf of Aden between 51°E and 55.5°E. Data analysis reveals that the oceanic domain along this ridge section is divided into two distinct areas. The Eastern area is characterized by a shorter wavelength variation of the axial segmentation and an extremely thin oceanic crust. In the western segment, a thicker oceanic crust suggests a high melt supply. This supply is probably due to an off-axis melting anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge, 75 km east of the major Alula-Fartak transform fault. This suggests that the axial morphology is produced by a combination of factors, including spreading rate, melt supply and the edge effect of the Alula-Fartak transform fault, as well as the proximity of the continental margin. The oceanic domains have undergone two distinct phases of accretion since the onset of seafloor spreading, with a shift around 11 Ma. At that time, the ridge jumped southwards, in response to the melting anomaly. Propagating ridges were triggered by the melting activity, and propagated both eastward and westward. The influence of the melting anomaly on the ridges decreased, stopping their propagation since less than 9 Ma. From that time up to the present, the N025°E-trending Socotra transform fault developed in association with the formation of the N115°E-trending segment #2. In recent times, a counter-clockwise rotation of the stress field associated with kinematic changes could explain the structural morphology of the Alula-Fartak and Socotra-Hadbeen fracture zones.

  11. Inner Segment Remodeling and Mitochondrial Translocation in Cone Photoreceptors in Age-Related Macular Degeneration With Outer Retinal Tubulation

    PubMed Central

    Litts, Katie M.; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Freund, K. Bailey; Zhang, Yuhua; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify impressions of mitochondrial translocation in degenerating cones and to determine the nature of accumulated material in the subretinal space with apparent inner segment (IS)-like features by examining cone IS ultrastructure. Methods. Human donor eyes with advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were screened for outer retinal tubulation (ORT) in macula-wide, high-resolution digital sections. Degenerating cones inside ORT (ORT cones) and outside ORT (non-ORT cones) from AMD eyes and unaffected cones in age-matched control eyes were imaged using transmission electron microscopy. The distances of mitochondria to the external limiting membrane (ELM), cone IS length, and cone IS width at the ELM were measured. Results. Outer retinal tubulation and non-ORT cones lose outer segments (OS), followed by shortening of IS and mitochondria. In non-ORT cones, IS broaden. Outer retinal tubulation and non-ORT cone IS myoids become undetectable due to mitochondria redistribution toward the nucleus. Some ORT cones were found lacking IS and containing mitochondria in the outer fiber (between soma and ELM). Unlike long, thin IS mitochondria in control cones, ORT and non-ORT IS mitochondria are ovoid or reniform. Shed IS, some containing mitochondria, were found in the subretinal space. Conclusions. In AMD, macula cones exhibit loss of detectable myoid due to IS shortening in addition to OS loss, as described. Mitochondria shrink and translocate toward the nucleus. As reflectivity sources, translocating mitochondria may be detectable using in vivo imaging to monitor photoreceptor degeneration in retinal disorders. These results improve the knowledge basis for interpreting high-resolution clinical retinal imaging. PMID:25758815

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular identification of small-segment chromosome translocation lines from wheat-rye substitution lines to create wheat germplasm with beneficial traits

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei-Fu; Ding, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Li, Ji-Lin; Xiao, Zhi-Min; Xin, Wen-Li; Song, Qing-Jie; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intergeneric crop plant hybrid lines with small-segment chromosome translocations are very useful in plant genetic research and breeding. In this study, to create small-segment chromosome translocations with beneficial agronomic characters, the progeny of wheat-rye substitution lines 5R/5A and 6R/6A were selected from generations F2 to F5 for rye-specific characteristics. A PCR primer and specific simple sequence repeat marker for rye were used in F5 populations to detect rye chromatin and to amplify a specific chromosome band in six translocation lines (06-6-5, 06-6-6, 06-6-9, 6-26-1, 7-23, and 7-33). Fragment pSc119.1 cloned from 7-33 had 99% homology with the big ear gene sequence (GenBank AF512607.1) in wheat. The six lines were further characterized via pollen mother cell meiosis analysis for genetic stability, and chromosome C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization for rye chromatin. The results show that line 7-33 was still within the 5R/5A substitution lines and possessed the big ear gene. The other lines all contained small-segment rye chromosome translocations. The results indicated that substitution line hybridization is an effective method for creating small-segment chromosome translocations with useful agronomic traits. Trials for these six wheat-rye translocation lines are justified because they possess many important stably-inherited agronomic characters, including disease resistance and improved yield. PMID:26019483

  13. Duplication of segment 1p21 following paternal insertional translocation, ins(6;1)(q25;p13.3p22.1)

    PubMed Central

    Utkus, A.; Sorokina, I.; Kucinskas, V.; Rothlisberger, B.; Balmer, D.; Brecevic, L.; Schinzel, A.

    1999-01-01

    A moderately mentally retarded 3 year old boy showed minor anomalies including a prominent forehead and flat occiput, exophthalmos, large and prominent ears, high arched palate, umbilical hernia, sacral dimple, and irregular position of the toes. Cardiac sonography disclosed a chorda running through the left ventricle. Cytogenetic investigation of the family showed a balanced insertional translocation of segment 1p13→p22 into distal 6q in the father which had led, through unbalanced segregation, to duplication of 1p13.3→p22.1 in the proband. Familial duplication of such a small interstitial segment of 1p has not been reported previously, and the paucity of abnormal physical findings in the proband compared to previous patients with a similar aberration is remarkable. 


Keywords: chromosome duplication 1p; dual colour FISH; unbalanced insertional translocation PMID:9950373

  14. Duplication of segment 1p21 following paternal insertional translocation, ins(6;1)(q25;p13.3p22.1).

    PubMed

    Utkus, A; Sorokina, I; Kucinskas, V; Röthlisberger, B; Balmer, D; Brecevic, L; Schinzel, A

    1999-01-01

    A moderately mentally retarded 3 year old boy showed minor anomalies including a prominent forehead and flat occiput, exophthalmos, large and prominent ears, high arched palate, umbilical hernia, sacral dimple, and irregular position of the toes. Cardiac sonography disclosed a chorda running through the left ventricle. Cytogenetic investigation of the family showed a balanced insertional translocation of segment 1p13-->p22 into distal 6q in the father which had led, through unbalanced segregation, to duplication of 1p13.3-->p22.1 in the proband. Familial duplication of such a small interstitial segment of 1p has not been reported previously, and the paucity of abnormal physical findings in the proband compared to previous patients with a similar aberration is remarkable. PMID:9950373

  15. Jumping hoops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunjin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an elastic hoop as a model of the jumps of small insects. During a jump the initial elastic strain energy is converted to translational, gravitational, and vibrational energy, and is dissipated by interaction with the floor and the ambient air. We show that the strain energy is initially divided into translational, vibrational, and dissipation energies with a ratio that is constant regardless of the dimension, initial deflection, and the properties of a hoop. This novel result enables us to accurately predict the maximum jump height of a hoop with known initial conditions and drag coefficient without resorting to a numerical computation. Our model reduces the optimization of the hoop geometry for maximizing the jump height to a simple algebraic problem.

  16. Segments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a market taxonomy for higher education, including what it reveals about the structure of the market, the model's technical attributes, and its capacity to explain pricing behavior. Details the identification of the principle seams separating one market segment from another and how student aspirations help to organize the market, making…

  17. Reciprocal translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 26, describes reciprocal translocations of chromosomes: their occurrence, breakpoints, and multiple rearrangements. In addition, phenotypes of balanced and unbalanced translocation carriers and fetal death are discussed. Examples of translocation families are given. Meiosis and genetic risk in translocation carriers is presented. Finally, sperm chromosomes in meiotic segregation analysis is mentioned. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Supersonic Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    On October 14,2012, Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian sky-diver, set some new world records for his discipline. Jumping from a height of about 39 km, he reached a top speed of 1342 km/h, becoming the first human being to break the sound barrier in free fall. In order to understand some essential physics aspects of this remarkable feat, we wonder why…

  19. Epitaxial jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Taussig, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    By a combination of seeding and changing the growth medium new crystal forms may be obtained. The procedure is called an epitaxial jump. The seeds used in the seeding are from crystals of the same or related protein. For example, seeding followed by an increase in precipitant concentration has given higher diffracting crystals of the complex between tissue factor, factor VIIa and the inhibitor 5L15. For both an anti-steroid antibody fragment and human placental alkaline phosphatase a polymorph was obtained by changing a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) with one of a higher molecular weight. In the first case, in one direction and in the latter case, in the other direction. A change of conformation could also have contributed to this. A DsbA mutant illustrates how such changes, result in a different packing from that for the wild-type. Seeding from crystals of wild-type protein yields crystals which appear to be morphologically different from both the wild-type and mutant crystal forms.

  20. Simulations of Polymer Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, H.

    2008-07-01

    Transport of molecules across membranes is an essential mechanism for life processes. These molecules are often long, and the pores in the membranes are too narrow for the molecules to pass through as a single unit. In such circumstances, the molecules have to squeeze -- i.e., translocate -- themselves through the pores. DNA, RNA and proteins are such naturally occuring long molecules in a variety of biological processes. Understandably, the process of translocation has been an active topic of current research: not only because it is a cornerstone of many biological processes, but also due to its relevance for practical applications. Translocation is a complicated process in living organisms -- the presence of chaperone molecules, pH, chemical potential gradients, and assisting molecular motors strongly influence its dynamics. Consequently, the translocation process has been empirically studied in great variety in biological literature. Study of translocation as a biophysical process is more recent. Herein, the polymer is simplified to a sequentially connected string of N monomers as it passes through a narrow pore on a membrane. The quantities of interest are the typical time scale for the polymer to leave a confining cell (the ``escape of a polymer from a vesicle'' time scale), and the typical time scale the polymer spends in the pore (the ``dwell'' time scale) as a function of N and other parameters like membrane thickness, membrane adsorption, electrochemical potential gradient, etc. Our research is focused on computer simulations of translocation. Since our main interest is in the scaling properties, we use a highly simplified description of the translocation process. The polymer is described as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and its dynamics consists of single-monomer jumps from one lattice site to another neighboring one. Since we have a very efficient program to simulate such polymer dynamics, which we decribe in Chapter 2, we can perform long

  1. Continental rift jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles A.

    1983-05-01

    Continental rift jumps, analogous to jumps of oceanic spreading ridges, are here proposed to be common. Good examples exist in Iceland and Afar (both transitional from ridge to rift jumps), West Africa (Benue Trough and Cameroon Volcanic Line), and Kenya. Indeed, the Kenya rift appears to have jumped c. 100 km eastward c. 10 m.y. ago and is currently jumping further to the east. Possible jumps exist in the Baikal rift, the Limagne-Bresse rift pair, and parallel to ancient continental margins (e.g., the Triassic basins of the eastern U.S. to Baltimore Canyon and Georges Bank). Continental rifts jump distances that are approximately equal to local lithosphere thickness, suggesting that jumped rifts are controlled by lithosphere fracturing, but there appears to be no reason for the fracturing except migration of hot spots.

  2. Optimizing Thomson's jumping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjossem, Paul J. H.; Brost, Elizabeth C.

    2011-04-01

    The height to which rings will jump in a Thomson jumping ring apparatus is the central question posed by this popular lecture demonstration. We develop a simple time-averaged inductive-phase-lag model for the dependence of the jump height on the ring material, its mass, and temperature and apply it to measurements of the jump height for a set of rings made by slicing copper and aluminum alloy pipe into varying lengths. The data confirm a peak jump height that grows, narrows, and shifts to smaller optimal mass when the rings are cooled to 77 K. The model explains the ratio of the cooled/warm jump heights for a given ring, the reduction in optimal mass as the ring is cooled, and the shape of the mass resonance. The ring that jumps the highest is found to have a characteristic resistance equal to the inductive reactance of the set of rings.

  3. Robertsonian translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 27, describes the occurrence of Robertsonian translocations (RTs), which refer to the recombination of whole chromosome arms, in both monocentric and dicentric chromosomes. The nonrandom participation of acrocentric chromosomes in RTs is documented by various methods, including unbiased ascertainment and ascertainment through trisomy, infertility, unspecified mental retardation, and Prader-Willi syndrome. Causes of nonrandom participation of chromosomes in RTs is presented, as are the following topics: segregation in carriers of RTs and segregation in sperm cells of RT carriers, interchromosomal effects and conclusions. 48 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A cockroach that jumps.

    PubMed

    Picker, Mike; Colville, Jonathan F; Burrows, Malcolm

    2012-06-23

    We report on a newly discovered cockroach (Saltoblattella montistabularis) from South Africa, which jumps and therefore differs from all other extant cockroaches that have a scuttling locomotion. In its natural shrubland habitat, jumping and hopping accounted for 71 per cent of locomotory activity. Jumps are powered by rapid and synchronous extension of the hind legs that are twice the length of the other legs and make up 10 per cent of the body weight. In high-speed images of the best jumps the body was accelerated in 10 ms to a take-off velocity of 2.1 m s(-1) so that the cockroach experienced the equivalent of 23 times gravity while leaping a forward distance of 48 times its body length. Such jumps required 38 µJ of energy, a power output of 3.4 mW and exerted a ground reaction force through both hind legs of 4 mN. The large hind legs have grooved femora into which the tibiae engage fully in advance of a jump, and have resilin, an elastic protein, at the femoro-tibial joint. The extensor tibiae muscles contracted for 224 ms before the hind legs moved, indicating that energy must be stored and then released suddenly in a catapult action to propel a jump. Overall, the jumping mechanisms and anatomical features show remarkable convergence with those of grasshoppers with whom they share their habitat and which they rival in jumping performance. PMID:22158737

  5. Jumping Good Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Jumping rope is an activity that can be fun and enjoyable for all students. It requires minimal activity space, can be performed individually or in small groups, and is an inexpensive way to engage students in a lifelong physical activity. Jumping rope is commonly used by coaches and athletes for training purposes to improve aerobic endurance,…

  6. Optimal Ski Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebilas, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Consider a skier who goes down a takeoff ramp, attains a speed "V", and jumps, attempting to land as far as possible down the hill below (Fig. 1). At the moment of takeoff the angle between the skier's velocity and the horizontal is [alpha]. What is the optimal angle [alpha] that makes the jump the longest possible for the fixed magnitude of the…

  7. Quantum walk with jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavička, H.; Potoček, V.; Kiss, T.; Lutz, E.; Jex, I.

    2011-09-01

    We analyze a special class of 1-D quantum walks (QWs) realized using optical multi-ports. We assume non-perfect multi-ports showing errors in the connectivity, i.e. with a small probability the multi-ports can connect not to their nearest neighbor but to another multi-port at a fixed distance - we call this a jump. We study two cases of QW with jumps where multiple displacements can emerge at one timestep. The first case assumes time-correlated jumps (static disorder). In the second case, we choose the positions of jumps randomly in time (dynamic disorder). The probability distributions of position of the QW walker in both instances differ significantly: dynamic disorder leads to a Gaussian-like distribution, while for static disorder we find two distinct behaviors depending on the parity of jump size. In the case of even-sized jumps, the distribution exhibits a three-peak profile around the position of the initial excitation, whereas the probability distribution in the odd case follows a Laplace-like discrete distribution modulated by additional (exponential) peaks for long times. Finally, our numerical results indicate that by an appropriate mapping a universal functional behavior of the variance of the long-time probability distribution can be revealed with respect to the scaled average of jump size.

  8. How coalescing droplets jump.

    PubMed

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sprittles, James; Nolan, Kevin; Mitchell, Robert; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-28

    Surface engineering at the nanoscale is a rapidly developing field that promises to impact a range of applications including energy production, water desalination, self-cleaning and anti-icing surfaces, thermal management of electronics, microfluidic platforms, and environmental pollution control. As the area advances, more detailed insights of dynamic wetting interactions on these surfaces are needed. In particular, the coalescence of two or more droplets on ultra-low adhesion surfaces leads to droplet jumping. Here we show, through detailed measurements of jumping droplets during water condensation coupled with numerical simulations of binary droplet coalescence, that this process is fundamentally inefficient with only a small fraction of the available excess surface energy (≲ 6%) convertible into translational kinetic energy. These findings clarify the role of internal fluid dynamics during the jumping droplet coalescence process and underpin the development of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of applications. PMID:25171210

  9. Jump for the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Increase bone strength and improve heart and other muscle endurance by performing jump training with a rope, both while stationary and moving. The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitemen...

  10. Suicide by Jumping.

    PubMed

    Beautrais, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Research on suicide by jumping is summarized. The incidence of suicide by this method varies but tends to be higher in cities, city states, or countries that have extensive high-rise housing. Most suicides by jumping occur from high-rise residential housing units. However, our knowledge about suicide by jumping tends to be limited to a small number of reports from sites, often bridges, which become well-known as places from which to take one's life. Media reports of newsworthy suicides from these sites appear to encourage imitative behavior. Prevention strategies have focused upon limiting suicides from iconic sites by surveillance, barriers, muted media reporting, and signage offering help and telephone hotlines. A small number of studies provides evidence that installing barriers at popular jumping sites reduces suicides from those sites. There are few reports of efforts to reduce suicides from high-rise residential buildings. PMID:26212196

  11. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  12. Egg Bungee Jump!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an egg bungee jumping activity. This activity introduces students to ways that engineers might apply calculations of failure to meet a challenge. Students are required to use common, everyday materials such as rubber bands, string, plastic bags, and eggs. They will apply technological problem solving, material…

  13. Jump into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Cohen, Ann; Meyer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Jump Into Action (JIA) is a school-based team-taught program to help fifth-grade students make healthy food choices and be more active. The JIA team (physical education teacher, classroom teacher, school nurse, and parent) work together to provide a supportive environment as students set goals to improve food choices and increase activity.…

  14. Walking and jumping spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    The Equisetum plants, more commonly called ``horsetail,'' emit 50-microns spores that are spherical in shape and present four hygroscopic arms. Under high humidity, the arms are retracted. But under lower humidity, less than 70%, the four arms deploy beautifully. With time-lapse image recordings, we show that under repeated cycles of dry and high humidity, the spores behave as random walkers, since they move by about their size in a different direction at every cycle. The process is apparently stochastic because of the complex shape of the arms and hysteretic friction of the arms on the ground. For some spores, a decrease in humidity level results in very fast jumps, the spores taking off at a typical velocity of a meter per second, as recorded on high-speed camera. With these jumps, they reach centimetric elevations, much larger than their size. The physical mechanism at the root of these ``Levy-flight'' jumps is still under investigation. The walking and jumping phenomena thus provide motility, which we believe is helpful for the understanding of the biological dispersion of the spores. It could also bring biomimetic inspiration to engineer new motile elastic structures.

  15. Egg Bungee Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tretter, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the spirit of the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996), many teachers attempt to have their students experience science in a constructivist, inquiry-oriented manner. The egg bungee jump activity will certainly support that mode of teaching, and has the added benefit of providing a concrete context within which students can explore…

  16. Jump with Jill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Jill Jayne, who was working as a registered nutritionist in the New York City public school system when she was assigned to a group of 25 urban students in an after-school program in East Harlem. In the spring of 2006, Jayne took her "Jump With Jill" show to the streets outside Central Park, collected tips in a tin pot and,…

  17. Jumping hoops on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunjin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    Small aquatic arthropods, such as water striders and fishing spiders, are able to jump off water to a height several times their body length. Inspired by the unique biological motility on water, we study a simple model using a flexible hoop to provide fundamental understanding and a mimicking principle of small jumpers on water. Behavior of a hoop on water, which is coated with superhydrophobic particles and initially bent into an ellipse from an equilibrium circular shape, is visualized with a high speed camera upon launching it into air by releasing its initial elastic strain energy. We observe that jumping of our hoops is dominated by the dynamic pressure of water rather than surface tension, and thus it corresponds to the dynamic condition experienced by fishing spiders. We calculate the reaction forces provided by water adopting the unsteady Bernoulli equation as well as the momentum loss into liquid inertia and viscous friction. Our analysis allows us to predict the jumping efficiency of the hoop on water in comparison to that on ground, and to discuss the evolutionary pressure rendering fishing spiders select such dynamic behavior.

  18. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  19. Particle jumps in structural glasses.

    PubMed

    Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Pastore, Raffaele; Coniglio, Antonio

    2016-01-14

    Particles in structural glasses rattle around temporary equilibrium positions, that seldom change through a process which is much faster than the relaxation time, known as particle jump. Since the relaxation of the system is due to the accumulation of many such jumps, it could be possible to connect the single particle short time motion to the macroscopic relaxation by understanding the features of the jump dynamics. Here we review recent results in this research direction, clarifying the features of particle jumps that have been understood and those that are still under investigation, and examining the role of particle jumps in different theories of the glass transition. PMID:26481331

  20. Driven Polymer Translocation into a Crosslinked Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sean, David; Slater, Gary

    2015-03-01

    In a typical polymer translocation setup, a thin membrane is used to separate two chambers and a polyelectrolyte is driven by an electric field to translocate from one side of the membrane to the other via a small nanopore. However, the high translocation rate that results from the forces required to drive this process makes optical and/or electrical analysis of the translocating polymer challenging. Using coarse-grained Langevin Dynamics simulations we investigate how the translocation process can be slowed down by placing a crosslinked gel on the trans-side of the membrane. Since the driving electric field is localized in the neighborhood of the nanopore, electrophoretic migration is only achieved by a ``pushing'' action from the polymer segment residing in the nanopore. For the case of a flexible polymer we find that the polymer fills the gel pores via multiple ``herniation'' processes, whereas for a semi-flexible chain in a tight gel there are no hernias and the polymer follows a smooth curvilinear path. Moreover, for the case of a semi-flexible polymer the gel makes the translocation process more uniform by reducing the acceleration at the end of the process.

  1. Exploring Lightning Jump Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chronis, Themis; Carey, Larry D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise; Calhoun, Kristin; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the characteristics of storms exhibiting an abrupt temporal increase in the total lightning flash rate (i.e., lightning jump, LJ). An automated storm tracking method is used to identify storm "clusters" and total lightning activity from three different lightning detection systems over Oklahoma, northern Alabama and Washington, D.C. On average and for different employed thresholds, the clusters that encompass at least one LJ (LJ1) last longer, relate to higher Maximum Expected Size of Hail, Vertical Integrated Liquid and lightning flash rates (area-normalized) than the clusters that did not exhibit any LJ (LJ0). The respective mean values for LJ1 (LJ0) clusters are 80 min (35 min), 14 mm (8 mm), 25 kg per square meter (18 kg per square meter) and 0.05 flash per min per square kilometer (0.01 flash per min per square kilometer). Furthermore, the LJ1 clusters are also characterized by slower decaying autocorrelation functions, a result that implies a less "random" behavior in the temporal flash rate evolution. In addition, the temporal occurrence of the last LJ provides an estimate of the time remaining to the storm's dissipation. Depending of the LJ strength (i.e., varying thresholds), these values typically range between 20-60 min, with stronger jumps indicating more time until storm decay. This study's results support the hypothesis that the LJ is a proxy for the storm's kinematic and microphysical state rather than a coincidental value.

  2. Thersites: a `jumping' Trojan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiganis, K.; Dvorak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we examine the dynamical evolution of the asteroid (1868) Thersites, a member of the Trojan belt. Thersites is librating around the Lagrangian point L_4, following, however, a chaotic orbit. The equations of motion for Thersites as well as for a distribution of neighboring initial conditions are integrated numerically for 50 million years in the Outer Solar System model (OSS), which consists of the Sun and the four giant planets. Our results indicate that the probability that this asteroid will eventually escape from the Trojan swarm is rather high. In fact, 20% from our initial distribution escaped within the integration time. Many of the remaining ones also show characteristic `jumps' in the orbital elements, especially the inclination. Secular resonances involving the nodes of the outer planets are found to be responsible for this chaotic behavior. The width of libration and eccentricity values that lead to grossly unstable orbits are calculated and compared with previously known results on the stability of the Trojans. Finally, a very interesting behavior has been observed for one of the escaping asteroids as he `jumped' from L_4 to L_5 where he remained performing a highly inclined libration for ~ 2 Myrs before escaping from the Trojan swarm. According to Homer, Thersites was not only the ugliest of all Greeks that took part in the Trojan war, but also had the most intolerable personality. His nasty habit of making fun of everybody cost him his life, as the last person for whom he spoke ironically about was Achilles, the mightiest warrior of all Greeks, who killed Thersites with just one punch!

  3. Kinematics of the long jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ajun; Zumerchik, John

    2000-03-01

    The long jump is one of the most natural events in track and field athletics. The jumper is allowed to run a 40-m runway at top speed and jump as far as possible from a takeoff board. It is an event in which the natural ability of the athlete plays a large role and technique is of secondary importance. The two most important factors in the long jump are speed and elevation.

  4. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  5. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  6. Physics and the Vertical Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offenbacher, Elmer L.

    1970-01-01

    The physics of vertical jumping is described as an interesting illustration for motivating students in a general physics course to master the kinematics and dynamics of one dimensional motion. The author suggests that mastery of the physical principles of the jump may promote understanding of certain biological phenomena, aspects of physical…

  7. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  8. Jump conditions in transonic equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.; Jardin, S. C.

    2013-04-15

    In the present paper, the numerical calculation of transonic equilibria, first introduced with the FLOW code in Guazzotto et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)], is critically reviewed. In particular, the necessity and effect of imposing explicit jump conditions at the transonic discontinuity are investigated. It is found that 'standard' (low-{beta}, large aspect ratio) transonic equilibria satisfy the correct jump condition with very good approximation even if the jump condition is not explicitly imposed. On the other hand, it is also found that high-{beta}, low aspect ratio equilibria require the correct jump condition to be explicitly imposed. Various numerical approaches are described to modify FLOW to include the jump condition. It is proved that the new methods converge to the correct solution even in extreme cases of very large {beta}, while they agree with the results obtained with the old implementation of FLOW in lower-{beta} equilibria.

  9. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jeremy D.; Bobbert, Maarten F.; van Soest, Arthur J.; Gribble, Paul L.; Kistemaker, Dinant A.

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas—which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles—constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of the skeletal

  10. Optimizing the Distribution of Leg Muscles for Vertical Jumping.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jeremy D; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, Arthur J; Gribble, Paul L; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2016-01-01

    A goal of biomechanics and motor control is to understand the design of the human musculoskeletal system. Here we investigated human functional morphology by making predictions about the muscle volume distribution that is optimal for a specific motor task. We examined a well-studied and relatively simple human movement, vertical jumping. We investigated how high a human could jump if muscle volume were optimized for jumping, and determined how the optimal parameters improve performance. We used a four-link inverted pendulum model of human vertical jumping actuated by Hill-type muscles, that well-approximates skilled human performance. We optimized muscle volume by allowing the cross-sectional area and muscle fiber optimum length to be changed for each muscle, while maintaining constant total muscle volume. We observed, perhaps surprisingly, that the reference model, based on human anthropometric data, is relatively good for vertical jumping; it achieves 90% of the jump height predicted by a model with muscles designed specifically for jumping. Alteration of cross-sectional areas-which determine the maximum force deliverable by the muscles-constitutes the majority of improvement to jump height. The optimal distribution results in large vastus, gastrocnemius and hamstrings muscles that deliver more work, while producing a kinematic pattern essentially identical to the reference model. Work output is increased by removing muscle from rectus femoris, which cannot do work on the skeleton given its moment arm at the hip and the joint excursions during push-off. The gluteus composes a disproportionate amount of muscle volume and jump height is improved by moving it to other muscles. This approach represents a way to test hypotheses about optimal human functional morphology. Future studies may extend this approach to address other morphological questions in ethological tasks such as locomotion, and feature other sets of parameters such as properties of the skeletal

  11. The circular internal hydraulic jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, S. A.; Kavcic, I.

    Circular hydraulic jumps are familiar in single layers. Here we report the discovery of similar jumps in two-layer flows. A thin jet of fluid impinging vertically onto a rigid horizontal plane surface submerged in a deep layer of less-dense miscible fluid spreads radially, and a near-circular internal jump forms within a few centimetres from the point of impact with the plane surface. A jump is similarly formed as a jet of relatively less-dense fluid rises to the surface of a deep layer of fluid, but it appears less stable or permanent in form. Several experiments are made to examine the case of a downward jet onto a horizontal plate, the base of a square or circular container. The inlet Reynolds numbers, Re, of the jet range from 112 to 1790. Initially jumps have an undular, laminar form with typically 2-4 stationary waves on the interface between the dense and less-dense layers but, as the depth of the dense layer beyond the jump increases, the transitions become more abrupt and turbulent, resulting in mixing between the two layers. During the transition to a turbulent regime, single and sometimes moving multiple cusps are observed around the periphery of jumps. A semi-empirical model is devised that relates the parameters of the laboratory experiment, i.e. flow rate, inlet nozzle radius, kinematic viscosity and reduced gravity, to the layer depth beyond the jump and the radius at which an undular jump occurs. The experiments imply that surface tension is not an essential ingredient in the formation of circular hydraulic jumps and demonstrate that stationary jumps can exist in stratified shear flows which can be represented as two discrete layers. No stationary circular undular jumps are found, however, in the case of a downward jet of dense fluid when the overlying, less-dense, fluid is stratified, but a stationary turbulent transition is observed. This has implications for the existence of stationary jumps in continuously stratified geophysical flows: results

  12. LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz, Erhan; Dogan, Muhammet; Koksal, Oguz Kagan

    2013-04-01

    The LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of tantalum have been calculated for the first time by the mass attenuation coefficients determined using narrow transmission geometry, primary source (241Am annular radioisotope source) and secondary source targets (Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Cu, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi). The obtained results have been compared with theoretical values. They are in good agreement with each other.

  13. Perform kicking with or without jumping: joint coordination and kinetic differences between Taekwondo back kicks and jumping back kicks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kuangyou B; Wang, Ying-Hsun; Kuo, Shih-Yu; Wang, Kuan-Mao; Huang, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated joint coordination differences between Taekwondo back kicks and jumping back kicks, and how jumping (in performing the latter) would alter engaging ground reaction forces (GRF) in executing kicking. Ten skilful athletes volunteered to perform both kinds of kicking within the shortest time for three successful trials. Three high-speed cameras and two force platforms were used for data collection, and the trial with the shortest execution time was selected for analysis. Movements were divided into the rotation and attack phases. With comparable execution time and maximum joint linear/angular speeds, back kicks and jumping back kicks differ mainly in larger GRF in the latter, and in greater target acceleration in the former probably because the support leg prevented athletes' rebounding after impact. In addition, more prominent antiphase and in-phase coordination between the shoulder segment and knee joint, and elongated rotation phase were found in jumping back kicks. Larger GRF values in jumping back kicks were generated for jump take-off rather than for a more powerful attack. In back kicks although the support leg remained ground contact, greatly decreased GRF in the attack phase suggested that the support leg mainly served as a rotation axis. PMID:25599144

  14. Trisomy 8 with a jumping addition in ANLL

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.S.; Bull, R.M.; Barr, L.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a case of ANLL with an unusual cytogenetic finding. The patient is a 73-year-old male whose bone marrow showed 100% blasts. Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry found the cells to be positive for CD15, CD33, CD34, CD38, and HLA-DR. All metaphases analyzed had trisomy 8 and an identical large amount of unidentified chromosomal material incorporated at the telomere of one of three chromosomes: 47,XY,add(20)(q13.3)[15]/47,XY,add(12)(q24.3)[3]/47,XY,add(3)(p26)[2]. This may be a jumping addition, a variation of a jumping translocation with an unknown donor, or maybe an HSR with variable sites of integration. FISH results are presented to attempt to answer the question.

  15. Light-Dependent Translocation of Arrestin in Rod Photoreceptors is Signaled Through a Phospholipase C Cascade and Requires ATP

    PubMed Central

    Orisme, Wilda; Li, Jian; Goldmann, Tobias; Bolch, Susan; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay

    2009-01-01

    Partitioning of cellular components is a critical mechanism by which cells can regulate their activity. In rod photoreceptors, light induces a large-scale translocation of arrestin from the inner segments to the outer segments. The purpose of this project is to elucidate the signaling pathway necessary to initiate arrestin translocation to the outer segments and the mechanism for arrestin translocation. Mouse retinal organotypic cultures and eyes from transgenic Xenopus tadpoles expressing a fusion of GFP and rod arrestin were treated with both activators and inhibitors of proteins in the phosphoinositide pathway. Confocal microscopy was used to image the effects of the pharmacological agents on arrestin translocation in rod photoreceptors. Retinas were also depleted of ATP using potassium cyanide to assess the requirement for ATP in arrestin translocation. In this study, we demonstrate that components of the G-protein-linked phospholipase C (PLC) pathway play a role in initiating arrestin translocation. Our results show that arrestin translocation can be stimulated by activators of PLC and protein kinase C (PKC), and by cholera toxin in the absence of light. Arrestin translocation to the outer segments is significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC and PKC. Importantly, we find that treatment with potassium cyanide inhibits arrestin translocation in response to light. Collectively, our results suggest that arrestin translocation is initiated by a G-protein-coupled cascade through PLC and PKC signaling. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that at least the initiation of arrestin translocation requires energy input. PMID:19887106

  16. Optimal control simulations reveal mechanisms by which arm movement improves standing long jump performance.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Blake M; Delp, Scott L

    2006-01-01

    Optimal control simulations of the standing long jump were developed to gain insight into the mechanisms of enhanced performance due to arm motion. The activations that maximize standing long jump distance of a joint torque actuated model were determined for jumps with free and restricted arm movement. The simulated jump distance was 40 cm greater when arm movement was free (2.00 m) than when it was restricted (1.60 m). The majority of the performance improvement in the free arm jump was due to the 15% increase (3.30 vs. 2.86 m/s) in the take-off velocity of the center of gravity. Some of the performance improvement in the free arm jump was attributable to the ability of the jumper to swing the arms backwards during the flight phase to alleviate excessive forward rotation and position the body segments properly for landing. In restricted arm jumps, the excessive forward rotation was avoided by "holding back" during the propulsive phase and reducing the activation levels of the ankle, knee, and hip joint torque actuators. In addition, swinging the arm segments allowed the lower body joint torque actuators to perform 26 J more work in the free arm jump. However, the most significant contribution to developing greater take-off velocity came from the additional 80 J work done by the shoulder actuator in the jump with free arm movement. PMID:15992805

  17. Translocation of reptating chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żurek, S.; Drzewiński, A.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    2011-05-01

    Voltage-driven translocation is modeled with the Rubinstein-Duke rules for hopping reptons in one- and two-dimensional lattices. The chain is driven through the pore by a bias potential promoting the transition of stored length in one direction. Coupling states give a semi-periodicity of the process that enables us to relate the properties to the stationary state of the master equation. The exact solution for short chains and Monte Carlo simulations for longer chains are used to calculate displacements, velocities and the translocation time.

  18. Problem-Elephant Translocation: Translocating the Problem and the Elephant?

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Prithiviraj; Leimgruber, Peter; Prasad, Tharaka; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the survival of endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Translocating “problem-elephants” is an important HEC mitigation and elephant conservation strategy across elephant range, with hundreds translocated annually. In the first comprehensive assessment of elephant translocation, we monitored 16 translocations in Sri Lanka with GPS collars. All translocated elephants were released into national parks. Two were killed within the parks where they were released, while all the others left those parks. Translocated elephants showed variable responses: “homers” returned to the capture site, “wanderers” ranged widely, and “settlers” established home ranges in new areas soon after release. Translocation caused wider propagation and intensification of HEC, and increased elephant mortality. We conclude that translocation defeats both HEC mitigation and elephant conservation goals. PMID:23236404

  19. Hydraulic jumps with upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Hydraulic jumps in flows with background shear are investigated, motivated by applications such as the flow over sills in Knight Inlet and the Pre-Bosphorus Channel. The full solution space and allowable solutions to several two-layer theories for hydraulic jumps with upstream shear are identified. The two-layer theories considered, including a recent theory by Borden et al. (JFM, 2012), are distinguished by how dissipation is partitioned between the layers. It is found that upstream shear with a faster and thinner lower layer causes an increase in bore speed, for a given jump height. Further, these two-layer solutions only exist for a limited range of upstream shear. 2D numerical simulations are conducted, guided by the two-layer theory solution space, and the results are compared to the theories. The simulations show the qualitative types of hydraulic transitions that occur, including undular bores, fully turbulent jumps, and conjugate state-like solutions; the type depends on the jump height and upstream shear for fixed upstream layer depths. Numerical simulations are used to investigate the mixing. Finally, a few 3D numerical simulations were made and are found to be consistent with the 2D results.

  20. Oncogene Translocations and NHL

    Cancer.gov

    A colloboration with several large population-based cohorts to determine whether the prevalence or level of t14;18 is associated with risk of NHL and to investigate the clonal relationship between translocation-bearing cells and subsequent tumors

  1. The Jumps: Contemporary Theory, Technique and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilt, Fred, Ed.

    This collection of essays offers a cross section of modern theory and progress in the training of the four "jumping" events in track and field athletics--pole vault, high jump, long jump, and triple jump. It is written for athletic coaches in these specialties. Articles range from general and historical reviews of technique and training matters to…

  2. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  3. The Effect of Depth Jumps and Weight Training on Leg Strength and Vertical Jump.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clutch, David; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Two experiments examined the results of depth jumping programs to determine: (1) whether certain depth jumping routines, when combined with weight training, are better than others; and (2) the effect of depth jumping on athletes already in training. Results indicated that depth jumping is effective, but no more so than regular jumping routines.…

  4. Mesopause jumps at Antarctic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef; Höffner, Josef; Becker, Erich; Latteck, Ralph; Murphy, Damian

    2016-04-01

    Recent high resolution temperature measurements by resonance lidar at Davis (69°S) occasionally showed a sudden mesopause altitude increase by ˜5 km and an associated mesopause temperature decrease by ˜10 K. We present further observations which are closely related to this 'mesopause jump', namely the increase of mean height of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) observed by a VHF radar, very strong westward winds in the upper mesosphere measured by an MF radar, and relatively large eastward winds in the stratosphere taken from reanalysis. We compare to similar observations in the Northern Hemisphere, namely at ALOMAR (69°N) where such mesopause jumps have never been observed. We present a detailed explanation of mesopause jumps. They occur only when stratospheric winds are moderately eastward and mesospheric winds are very large (westward). Under these conditions, gravity waves with comparatively large eastward phase Speeds can pass the stratosphere and propagate to the lower thermosphere because their vertical wavelengths in the mesosphere are rather large which implies reduced dynamical stability. When finally breaking in the lower thermosphere, these waves drive an enhanced residual circulation that causes a cold and high-altitude mesopause. The conditions for a mesopause jump occur only in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and are associated with the late breakdown of the polar vortex. Mesopause jumps are primarily, but not only, observed prior and close to solstice. We also show that during the onset of PMSE in the SH, stratospheric zonal winds are still eastward (up to 30 m/s), and that the onset is not closely related to the Transition of the stratospheric circulation.

  5. Test-retest reliability of jump execution variables using mechanography: A comparison of jump protocols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanography during the vertical jump test allows for evaluation of force-time variables reflecting jump execution, which may enhance screening for functional deficits that reduce physical performance and determining mechanistic causes underlying performance changes. However, utility of jump mechan...

  6. International Toys in Space: Jump Rope

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cosmonaut Valery Korzun attempts jumping rope in microgravity. He decides to adapt the activity by taking out the "jumping part," but the act of spinning the rope around him still proves difficult....

  7. Strawberry Shortcake and Other Jumping Rope Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Polly K.; Taylor, Michaell K.

    Information, guidelines, and activities for jumping rope are given. A short history of jumping rope explains how it evolved from a spring ritual for men to a play activity involving mostly young girls. Physical and cultural reasons are given as to why jumping rope has been more a sport for girls than for boys. Research studies are noted which show…

  8. The Physics of Equestrian Show Jumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinner, Art

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the kinematics and dynamics of equestrian show jumping. For some time I have attended a series of show jumping events at Spruce Meadows, an international equestrian center near Calgary, Alberta, often referred to as the "Wimbledon of equestrian jumping." I have always had a desire to write an article such as this…

  9. Vertical jumping and signaled avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cándido, Antonio; Maldonado, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment intended to demonstrate that the vertical jumping response can be learned using a signaled-avoidance technique. A photoelectric cell system was used to record the response. Twenty female rats, divided equally into two groups, were exposed to intertrial intervals of either 15 or 40 s. Subjects had to achieve three successive criteria of acquisition: 3, 5, and 10 consecutive avoidance responses. Results showed that both groups learned the avoidance response, requiring increasingly larger numbers of trials as the acquisition criteria increased. No significant effect of intertrial interval was observed. PMID:16812559

  10. Covariant jump conditions in electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, Yakov

    2012-02-01

    A generally covariant four-dimensional representation of Maxwell's electrodynamics in a generic material medium can be achieved straightforwardly in the metric-free formulation of electromagnetism. In this setup, the electromagnetic phenomena are described by two tensor fields, which satisfy Maxwell's equations. A generic tensorial constitutive relation between these fields is an independent ingredient of the theory. By use of different constitutive relations (local and non-local, linear and non-linear, etc.), a wide area of applications can be covered. In the current paper, we present the jump conditions for the fields and for the energy-momentum tensor on an arbitrarily moving surface between two media. From the differential and integral Maxwell equations, we derive the covariant boundary conditions, which are independent of any metric and connection. These conditions include the covariantly defined surface current and are applicable to an arbitrarily moving smooth curved boundary surface. As an application of the presented jump formulas, we derive a Lorentzian type metric as a condition for existence of the wave front in isotropic media. This result holds for ordinary materials as well as for metamaterials with negative material constants.

  11. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Galhotra, Virat; Sheikh, Soheyl; Jindal, Sanjeev; Singla, Anshu

    2014-07-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is a rare disorder, characterized by neurofibromas or cafι-au-lait macules limited to one region of the body. Its occurrence on the face is extremely rare and only few cases of segmental neurofibromatosis over the face have been described so far. We present a case of segmental neurofibromatosis involving the buccal mucosa, tongue, cheek, ear, and neck on the right side of the face. PMID:25565748

  12. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  13. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution. PMID:27394120

  14. Quantum jumps and entropy production

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2003-09-01

    The irreversible motion of an open quantum system can be represented through an ensemble of state vectors following a stochastic dynamics with piecewise deterministic paths. It is shown that this representation leads to a natural definition of the rate of quantum entropy production. The entropy production rate is expressed in terms of the von Neumann entropy and of the numbers of quantum jumps corresponding to the various decay channels of the open system. The proof of the positivity and of the convexity of the entropy production rate is given. Monte Carlo simulations of the stochastic dynamics of a driven qubit and of a {lambda} configuration involving a dark state are performed in order to illustrate the general theory.

  15. Genomic Comparison of Translocating and Non-Translocating Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Nathan L.; Katouli, Mohammad; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of E. coli across the gut epithelium can result in fatal sepsis in post-surgical patients. In vitro and in vivo experiments have identified the existence of a novel pathotype of translocating E. coli (TEC) that employs an unknown mechanism for translocating across epithelial cells to the mesenteric lymph nodes and the blood stream in both humans and animal models. In this study the genomes of four TEC strains isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes of a fatal case of hospitalised patient (HMLN-1), blood of pigs after experimental shock (PC-1) and after non-lethal haemorrhage in rats (KIC-1 and KIC-2) were sequenced in order to identify the genes associated with their adhesion and/or translocation. To facilitate the comparison, the genomes of a non-adhering, non-translocating E. coli (46–4) and adhering but non-translocating E. coli (73–89) were also sequenced and compared. Whole genome comparison revealed that three (HMLN-1, PC-1 and KIC-2) of the four TEC strains carried a genomic island that encodes a Type 6 Secretion System that may contribute to adhesion of the bacteria to gut epithelial cells. The human TEC strain HMLN-1 also carried the invasion ibeA gene, which was absent in the animal TEC strains and is likely to be associated with host-specific translocation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four TEC strains were distributed amongst three distinct E. coli phylogroups, which was supported by the presence of phylogroup specific fimbriae gene clusters. The genomic comparison has identified potential genes that can be targeted with knock-out experiments to further characterise the mechanisms of E. coli translocation. PMID:26317913

  16. Effects of spine flexion and erector spinae maximal force on vertical squat jump height: a computational simulation study.

    PubMed

    Blache, Yoann; Monteil, Karine

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the single and combined effects of initial spine flexion and maximal isometric force of the erector spinae on maximal vertical jump height during maximal squat jumping. Seven initial flexions of the 'thorax-head-arm' segment (between 20.1° and 71.6°) and five maximal isometric forces of the erector spinae (between 5600 and 8600 N) were tested. Thus, 35 squat jumps were simulated using a 2D simulation model of the musculoskeletal system. Vertical jump height varied at most about 0.094 and 0.021 m when the initial flexion of the 'thorax-head-arm' segment and the maximal force of the erector spinae were, respectively, maximal. These results were explained for the most part by the variation of total muscle work. The latter was mainly influenced by the work produced by the erector spinae which increased at most about 57 and 110 J when the initial flexion of the 'thorax-head-arm' segment and the maximal force of the erector spinae were, respectively, maximal. It was concluded that the increase in the initial flexion of the 'thorax-head-arm' segment and in the maximal isometric force of the erector spinae enables an increase in maximal vertical jump height during maximal squat jumping. PMID:25895521

  17. Neuromechanical simulation of the locust jump.

    PubMed

    Cofer, D; Cymbalyuk, G; Heitler, W J; Edwards, D H

    2010-04-01

    The neural circuitry and biomechanics of kicking in locusts have been studied to understand their roles in the control of both kicking and jumping. It has been hypothesized that the same neural circuit and biomechanics governed both behaviors but this hypothesis was not testable with current technology. We built a neuromechanical model to test this and to gain a better understanding of the role of the semi-lunar process (SLP) in jump dynamics. The jumping and kicking behaviors of the model were tested by comparing them with a variety of published data, and were found to reproduce the results from live animals. This confirmed that the kick neural circuitry can produce the jump behavior. The SLP is a set of highly sclerotized bands of cuticle that can be bent to store energy for use during kicking and jumping. It has not been possible to directly test the effects of the SLP on jump performance because it is an integral part of the joint, and attempts to remove its influence prevent the locust from being able to jump. Simulations demonstrated that the SLP can significantly increase jump distance, power, total energy and duration of the jump impulse. In addition, the geometry of the joint enables the SLP force to assist leg flexion when the leg is flexed, and to assist extension once the leg has begun to extend. PMID:20228342

  18. A power function profile of a ski jumping in-run hill.

    PubMed

    Zanevskyy, Ihor

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to find a function of the curvilinear segment profile which could make possible to avoid an instantaneous increasing of a curvature and to replace a circle arc segment on the in-run of a ski jump without any correction of the angles of inclination and the length of the straight-line segments. The methods of analytical geometry and trigonometry were used to calculate an optimal in-run hill profile. There were two fundamental conditions of the model: smooth borders between a curvilinear segment and straight-line segments of an in-run hill and concave of the curvilinear segment. Within the framework of this model, the problem has been solved with a reasonable precision. Four functions of a curvilinear segment profile of the in-run hill were investigated: circle arc, inclined quadratic parabola, inclined cubic parabola, and power function. The application of a power function to the in-run profile satisfies equal conditions for replacing a circle arc segment. Geometrical parameters of 38 modern ski jumps were investigated using the methods proposed. PMID:22339056

  19. Production and Identification of Wheat-Agropyron cristatum 2P Translocation Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanhuan; Lv, Mingjie; Song, Liqiang; Zhang, Jinpeng; Gao, Ainong; Li, Lihui; Liu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 28, PPPP), a wild relative of common wheat, possesses many potentially valuable traits that can be transferred to common wheat through breeding programs. The wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition and translocation lines can be used as bridge materials to introduce alien chromosomal segments to wheat. Wheat-A. cristatum 2P disomic addition line II-9-3 was highly resistant to powdery mildew and leaf rust, which was reported in our previous study. However, some translocation lines induced from II-9-3 have not been reported. In this study, some translocation lines were induced from II-9-3 by 60Co-γ irradiation and gametocidal chromosome 2C and then identified by cytological methods. Forty-nine wheat-A. cristatum translocation lines were obtained and various translcoation types were identified by GISH (genomic in situ hybridization), such as whole-arm, segmental and intercalary translocations. Dual-color FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) was applied to identify the wheat chromosomes involved in the translocations, and the results showed that A. cristatum 2P chromosome segments were translocated to the different wheat chromosomes, including 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 3B, 5B, 7B, 1D, 4D and 6D. Many different types of wheat-A. cristatum alien translocation lines would be valuable for not only identifying and cloning A. cristatum 2P-related genes and understanding the genetics and breeding effects of the translocation between A. cristatum chromosome 2P and wheat chromosomes, but also providing new germplasm resources for the wheat genetic improvement. PMID:26731742

  20. Production and Identification of Wheat-Agropyron cristatum 2P Translocation Lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanhuan; Lv, Mingjie; Song, Liqiang; Zhang, Jinpeng; Gao, Ainong; Li, Lihui; Liu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 28, PPPP), a wild relative of common wheat, possesses many potentially valuable traits that can be transferred to common wheat through breeding programs. The wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition and translocation lines can be used as bridge materials to introduce alien chromosomal segments to wheat. Wheat-A. cristatum 2P disomic addition line II-9-3 was highly resistant to powdery mildew and leaf rust, which was reported in our previous study. However, some translocation lines induced from II-9-3 have not been reported. In this study, some translocation lines were induced from II-9-3 by 60Co-γ irradiation and gametocidal chromosome 2C and then identified by cytological methods. Forty-nine wheat-A. cristatum translocation lines were obtained and various translcoation types were identified by GISH (genomic in situ hybridization), such as whole-arm, segmental and intercalary translocations. Dual-color FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) was applied to identify the wheat chromosomes involved in the translocations, and the results showed that A. cristatum 2P chromosome segments were translocated to the different wheat chromosomes, including 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 3B, 5B, 7B, 1D, 4D and 6D. Many different types of wheat-A. cristatum alien translocation lines would be valuable for not only identifying and cloning A. cristatum 2P-related genes and understanding the genetics and breeding effects of the translocation between A. cristatum chromosome 2P and wheat chromosomes, but also providing new germplasm resources for the wheat genetic improvement. PMID:26731742

  1. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Toy, Brian

    2003-10-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is a rare variant of neurofibromatosis in which skin lesions are confined to a circumscribed body segment. A case of a 72-year-old woman with this condition is presented. Clinical features and genetic evidence are reviewed. PMID:14594599

  2. Active Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary. We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach. PMID:20686671

  3. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  4. Positive charges on the translocating polypeptide chain arrest movement through the translocon.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hidenobu; Yamagishi, Marifu; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2011-12-15

    Polypeptide chains synthesized by membrane-bound ribosomes are translocated through, and integrated into, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by means of the protein translocation channel, the translocon. Positive charges on the nascent chain determine the orientation of the hydrophobic segment as it is inserted into the translocon and enhance the stop-translocation of translocating hydrophobic segments. Here we show that positive charges temporarily arrested ongoing polypeptide chain movement through the ER translocon by electrostatic interaction, even in the absence of a hydrophobic segment. The C-terminus of the polypeptide chain was elongated during the arrest, and then the full-length polypeptide chain moved through the translocon. The translocation-arrested polypeptide was not anchored to the membrane and the charges were on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. The arrest effect was prevented by negatively charged residues inserted into the positive-charge cluster, and it was also suppressed by high salt conditions. We propose that positive charges are independent translocation regulators that are more active than previously believed. PMID:22223880

  5. Structural insights into ribosome translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-09-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF-G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF-2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single-molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the 'head' domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward- and back-swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF-G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF-G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620-636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  6. Jumping to conclusions in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon L; Averbeck, Bruno B; Furl, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder associated with a variety of symptoms, including hallucinations, delusions, social withdrawal, and cognitive dysfunction. Impairments on decision-making tasks are routinely reported: evidence points to a particular deficit in learning from and revising behavior following feedback. In addition, patients tend to make hasty decisions when probabilistic judgments are required. This is known as “jumping to conclusions” (JTC) and has typically been demonstrated by presenting participants with colored beads drawn from one of two “urns” until they claim to be sure which urn the beads are being drawn from (the proportions of colors vary in each urn). Patients tend to make early decisions on this task, and there is evidence to suggest that a hasty decision-making style might be linked to delusion formation and thus be of clinical relevance. Various accounts have been proposed regarding what underlies this behavior. In this review, we briefly introduce the disorder and the decision-making deficits associated with it. We then explore the evidence for each account of JTC in the context of a wider decision-making deficit and then go on to summarize work exploring JTC in healthy controls using pharmacological manipulations and functional imaging. Finally, we assess whether JTC might have a role in therapy. PMID:26170674

  7. Rope Jumping: A Preliminary Developmental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickstrom, Ralph L.

    The basic movement pattern used in skilled individual rope jumping performance was determined and used as a model against which to evaluate the rope jumping form used by children at various levels of skills development. The techniques of adults and nursery school children were filmed and analyzed. The specific causes of unsuccessful attempts were…

  8. The Phase Shift in the Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2008-01-01

    The popular physics demonstration experiment known as Thomson's Jumping Ring (JR) has been variously explained as a simple example of Lenz's law, or as the result of a phase shift of the ring current relative to the induced emf. The failure of the first-quadrant Lenz's law explanation is shown by the time the ring takes to jump and by levitation.…

  9. The Locust Jump: An Integrated Laboratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon

    2005-01-01

    The locust is well known for its ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. This class sets out a series of investigations into the mechanisms underlying the jump enabling students to bring together information from biomechanics, muscle physiology, and anatomy. The nature of the investigation allows it to be undertaken at a number of…

  10. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  11. Natural and systematic polar motion jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapanov, Y.; Vondrak, J.; Ron, C.; Pachalieva, R.

    2014-12-01

    Polar motion consists mainly of two harmonic oscillations with variable phases and amplitudes and small irregular variations. The small irregular variations may be due to various geophysical excitations and observation inaccuracy (mostly in the first half of the last century). A part of irregular polar motion variations consists of fast jumps of the mean values of polar motion coordinates. The direct determination of the polar motion jumps is difficult, because the jump values are very small relative to the seasonal and Chandler amplitudes. A useful high sensitive method of data jumps determination is proposed. The method consists of data integration and piecewise linear or parabolic trends determina- tion. This method is applied to determine the natural and systematic polar motion jumps existing in pole coordinates from the solutions OA10 for the period 1899.7ñ1962.0 and C04 for the period 1962.0- 2013.5. Only a few of the determined polar motion jumps can be interpreted as systematic biases due to observational errors. The major part of the detected polar motion jumps occurs almost regularly near the epochs of minimum amplitude (due to the beat of seasonal and Chandler wobbles), so the natural origin of these jumps is supposed.

  12. Control of tumbling during the locust jump

    PubMed Central

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Heitler, William J.; Edwards, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    Locust can jump precisely to a target, yet they can also tumble during the trajectory. We propose two mechanisms that would allow the locust to control tumbling during the jump. The first is that prior to the jump, locusts adjust the pitch of their body to move the center of mass closer to the intended thrust vector. The second is that contraction of the dorsolongitudinal muscles during the jump will produce torques that counter the torque produced by thrust. We found that locusts increased their take-off angle as the initial body pitch increased, and that little tumbling occurred for jumps that observed this relationship. Simulations of locust jumping demonstrated that a pitch versus take-off angle relationship that minimized tumbling in simulated jumps was similar to the relationship observed in live locusts. Locusts were strongly biased to pitch head-upward, and performed dorsiflexions far more often than ventral flexions. The direction and magnitude of tumbling could be controlled in simulations by adjusting the tension in the dorsolongitudinal muscles. These mechanisms allowed the simulations to match the data from the live animals. Control of tumbling was also found to influence the control of jump elevation. The bias to pitch head-upwards may have an evolutionary advantage when evading a predator and so make control of tumbling important for the locust. PMID:20833932

  13. 25 CFR 11.437 - Bail jumping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bail jumping. 11.437 Section 11.437 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.437 Bail jumping. A person set at liberty by court order, with or without bail,...

  14. 25 CFR 11.437 - Bail jumping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bail jumping. 11.437 Section 11.437 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.437 Bail jumping. A person set at liberty by court order, with or without bail,...

  15. Control of tumbling during the locust jump.

    PubMed

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Heitler, William J; Edwards, Donald H

    2010-10-01

    Locust can jump precisely to a target, yet they can also tumble during the trajectory. We propose two mechanisms that would allow the locust to control tumbling during the jump. The first is that prior to the jump, locusts adjust the pitch of their body to move the center of mass closer to the intended thrust vector. The second is that contraction of the dorsolongitudinal muscles during the jump will produce torques that counter the torque produced by thrust. We found that locusts increased their take-off angle as the initial body pitch increased, and that little tumbling occurred for jumps that observed this relationship. Simulations of locust jumping demonstrated that a pitch versus take-off angle relationship that minimized tumbling in simulated jumps was similar to the relationship observed in live locusts. Locusts were strongly biased to pitch head-upward, and performed dorsiflexions far more often than ventral flexions. The direction and magnitude of tumbling could be controlled in simulations by adjusting the tension in the dorsolongitudinal muscles. These mechanisms allowed the simulations to match the data from the live animals. Control of tumbling was also found to influence the control of jump elevation. The bias to pitch head-upwards may have an evolutionary advantage when evading a predator and so make control of tumbling important for the locust. PMID:20833932

  16. Computer simulation of viral-assembly and translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti Prakash

    We investigated four different problems using coarse grained computational models : self-assembly of single stranded (ss) DNA virus, ejection dynamics of double stranded(ds) DNA from phages, translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore, and segmental dynamics of a polymer translocating through a synthetic nanopore. In the first part of the project, we investigated the self-assembly of a virus with and without its genome. A coarse-grained model was proposed for the viral subunit proteins and its genome (ssDNA). Langevin dynamics simulation, and replica exchange method were used to determine the kinetics and energetics of the self-assembly process, respectively. The self-assembly follows a nucleation-growth kind of mechanism. The ssDNA plays a crucial role in the self-assembly by acting as a template and enhancing the local concentration of the subunits. The presence of the genome does not changes the mechanism of the self-assembly but it reduces the nucleation time and enhances the growth rate by almost an order of magnitude. The second part of the project involves the investigation of the dynamics of the ejection of dsDNA from phages. A coarse-grained model was used for the phage and dsDNA. Langevin dynamics simulation was used to investigate the kinetics of the ejection. The ejection is a stochastic process and a slow intermediate rate kinetics was observed for most ejection trajectories. We discovered that the jamming of the DNA at the pore mouth at high packing fraction and for a disordered system is the reason for the intermediate slow kinetics. The third part of the project involves translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore. MspA protein pore has the potential for genome sequencing because of its ability to clearly distinguish the four different nucleotides based on their blockade current, but it is a challenge to use this pore for any practical application because of the very fast traslocation time. We resolved the state of DNA translocation

  17. A review on the basketball jump shot.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Victor H A; Rodacki, André L F; Satern, Miriam N

    2015-06-01

    The ability to shoot an effective jump shot in the sport of basketball is critical to a player's success. In an attempt to better understand the aspects related to expert performance, researchers have investigated successful free throws and jump shots of various basketball players and identified movement variables that contribute to their success. The purpose of this study was to complete a systematic review of the scientific literature on the basketball free throw and jump shot for the purpose of revealing the critical components of shooting that coaches, teachers, and players should focus on when teaching, learning, practising, and performing a jump shot. The results of this review are presented in three sections: (a) variables that affect ball trajectory, (b) phases of the jump shot, and PMID:26102462

  18. Downside risk of wildlife translocation.

    PubMed

    Chipman, R; Slate, D; Rupprecht, C; Mendoza, M

    2008-01-01

    Translocation has been used successfully by wildlife professionals to enhance or reintroduce populations of rare or extirpated wildlife, provide hunting or wildlife viewing opportunities, farm wild game, and reduce local human-wildlife conflicts. However, accidental and intentional translocations may have multiple unintended negative consequences, including increased stress and mortality of relocated animals, negative impacts on resident animals at release sites, increased conflicts with human interests, and the spread of diseases. Many wildlife professionals now question the practice of translocation, particularly in light of the need to contain or eliminate high profile, economically important wildlife diseases and because using this technique may jeopardize international wildlife disease management initiatives to control rabies in raccoons, coyotes, and foxes in North America. Incidents have been documented where specific rabies variants (Texas gray fox, canine variant in coyotes, and raccoon) have been moved well beyond their current range as a result of translocation, including the emergence of raccoon rabies in the eastern United States. Here, we review and discuss the substantial challenges of curtailing translocation in the USA, focusing on movement of animals by the public, nuisance wildlife control operators, and wildlife rehabilitators. PMID:18634483

  19. Biomechanics of jumping in the flea.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Gregory P; Burrows, Malcolm

    2011-03-01

    It has long been established that fleas jump by storing and releasing energy in a cuticular spring, but it is not known how forces from that spring are transmitted to the ground. One hypothesis is that the recoil of the spring pushes the trochanter onto the ground, thereby generating the jump. A second hypothesis is that the recoil of the spring acts through a lever system to push the tibia and tarsus onto the ground. To decide which of these two hypotheses is correct, we built a kinetic model to simulate the different possible velocities and accelerations produced by each proposed process and compared those simulations with the kinematics measured from high-speed images of natural jumping. The in vivo velocity and acceleration kinematics are consistent with the model that directs ground forces through the tibia and tarsus. Moreover, in some natural jumps there was no contact between the trochanter and the ground. There were also no observable differences between the kinematics of jumps that began with the trochanter on the ground and jumps that did not. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the tibia and tarsus have spines appropriate for applying forces to the ground, whereas no such structures were seen on the trochanter. Based on these observations, we discount the hypothesis that fleas use their trochantera to apply forces to the ground and conclude that fleas jump by applying forces to the ground through the end of the tibiae. PMID:21307071

  20. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squats, Drop Jumps and Imitation Jumps of Ski Jumpers

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Carole A.; Keller, Melanie; Ammann, Fabian; Hübner, Klaus; Lindorfer, Julia; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pauli, CA, Keller, M, Ammann, F, Hübner, K, Lindorfer, J, Taylor, WR, and Lorenzetti, S. Kinematics and kinetics of squats, drop jumps and imitation jumps of ski jumpers. J Strength Cond Res 30(3): 643–652, 2016—Squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps are commonly used training exercises in ski jumping to enhance maximum force, explosive force, and sport-specific skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinetics and kinematics of training exercises in ski jumping and to find objective parameters in training exercises that most correlate with the competition performance of ski jumpers. To this end, barbell squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps were measured in a laboratory environment for 10 elite ski jumpers. Force and motion data were captured, and the influence of maximum vertical force, force difference, vertical take-off velocity, knee moments, knee joint power, and a knee valgus/varus index was evaluated and correlated with their season jump performance. The results indicate that, especially for the imitation jumps, a good correlation exists between the vertical take-off velocity and the personal jump performance on the hill (R = 0.718). Importantly, however, the more the athletes tended toward a valgus knee alignment during the measured movements, the worse their performance (R = 0.729 imitation jumps; R = 0.685 squats). Although an evaluation of the athletes' lower limb alignment during competitive jumping on the hill is still required, these preliminary data suggest that performance training should additionally concentrate on improving knee alignment to increase ski jumping performance. PMID:26418370

  1. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  2. Condensation-induced jumping water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narhe, R. D.; Khandkar, M. D.; Shelke, P. B.; Limaye, A. V.; Beysens, D. A.

    2009-09-01

    Water droplets can jump during vapor condensation on solid benzene near its melting point. This phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kind of micro scale steam engine, is studied experimentally and numerically. The latent heat of condensation transferred at the drop three phase contact line melts the substrate during a time proportional to R (the drop radius). The wetting conditions change and a spontaneous jump of the drop results in random direction over length ˜1.5R , a phenomenon that increases the coalescence events and accelerates the growth. Once properly rescaled by the jump length scale, the growth dynamics is, however, similar to that on a solid surface.

  3. Condensation-induced jumping water drops.

    PubMed

    Narhe, R D; Khandkar, M D; Shelke, P B; Limaye, A V; Beysens, D A

    2009-09-01

    Water droplets can jump during vapor condensation on solid benzene near its melting point. This phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kind of micro scale steam engine, is studied experimentally and numerically. The latent heat of condensation transferred at the drop three phase contact line melts the substrate during a time proportional to R (the drop radius). The wetting conditions change and a spontaneous jump of the drop results in random direction over length approximately 1.5R , a phenomenon that increases the coalescence events and accelerates the growth. Once properly rescaled by the jump length scale, the growth dynamics is, however, similar to that on a solid surface. PMID:19905120

  4. The mechanics of ribosomal translocation.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, John; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2015-07-01

    The ribosome translates the sequence of codons of an mRNA into the corresponding sequence of amino acids as it moves along the mRNA with a codon-step width of about 10 Å. The movement of the million-dalton complex ribosome is triggered by the universal elongation factor G (EF2 in archaea and eukaryotes) and is termed translocation. Unraveling the molecular details of translocation is one of the most challenging tasks of current ribosome research. In the last two years, enormous progress has been obtained by highly-resolved X-ray and cryo-electron microscopic structures as well as by sophisticated biochemical approaches concerning the trigger and control of the movement of the tRNA2·mRNA complex inside the ribosome during translocation. This review inspects and surveys these achievements. PMID:25514765

  5. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Corey, Robin A; Allen, William J; Collinson, Ian

    2016-06-15

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process-commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  6. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Robin A.; Allen, William J.; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process–commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  7. Partners with reciprocal translocations: genetic counseling for the 'double translocation'.

    PubMed

    Cook, L; Hartsfield, J K; Vance, G H

    1998-05-01

    SV at age 2 years presented with multiple congenital anomalies including an absent left kidney, anal stenosis, vertebral abnormalities, partial sacral agenesis, microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features, growth deficiency, and developmental delay. She was found to have a complex chromosomal rearrangement derived from balanced translocations in each parent. PMID:9660061

  8. Jumping without using legs: the jump of the click-beetles (Elateridae) is morphologically constrained.

    PubMed

    Ribak, Gal; Weihs, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    To return to their feet, inverted click-beetles (Elateridae) jump without using their legs. When a beetle is resting on its dorsal side, a hinge mechanism is locked to store elastic energy in the body and releases it abruptly to launch the beetle into the air. While the functional morphology of the jumping mechanism is well known, the level of control that the beetle has over this jumping technique and the mechanical constraints governing the jumps are not entirely clear. Here we show that while body rotations in air are highly variable, the jumps are morphologically constrained to a constant "takeoff" angle (79.9°±1.56°, n = 9 beetles) that directs 98% of the jumping force vertically against gravity. A physical-mathematical model of the jumping action, combined with measurements from live beetle, imply that the beetle may control the speed at takeoff but not the jumping angle. In addition, the model shows that very subtle changes in the exact point of contact with the ground can explain the vigorous rotations of the body seen while the beetle is airborne. These findings suggest that the evolution of this unique non-legged jumping mechanism resulted in a jumping technique that is capable of launching the body high into the air but it is too constrained and unstable to allow control of body orientation at landing. PMID:21698194

  9. Injuries At Indoor Trampoline Parks Jump

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160460.html Injuries at Indoor Trampoline Parks Jump Researchers say finding shows need for safety ... News) -- A wave of injuries at indoor trampoline parks has prompted a call for design and safety ...

  10. PERFORMANCE OF THE AGS TRANSITION JUMP SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; VAN ASSELT,W.K.

    1999-03-29

    The transition jump system has been indispensable to the high intensity proton operation of the AGS complex. Nevertheless, transition crossing remains one of the major hurdles as the accelerator complex intensity is pushed upward. To enhance the performance of the system ''quadrupole pumping'' in the Booster is used to minimize the necessary longitudinal dilution of the beam on the AGS injection porch. During the transition jump sextupole correctors at strategic locations are pulsed to minimize the effects of the chromatic non-linearity of the jump system. The available instrumentation for diagnosing the performance of the system will be described, along with installed hardware to counter the non-linear effects of the transition jump system.

  11. Segmented combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halila, Ely E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A combustor liner segment includes a panel having four sidewalls forming a rectangular outer perimeter. A plurality of integral supporting lugs are disposed substantially perpendicularly to the panel and extend from respective ones of the four sidewalls. A plurality of integral bosses are disposed substantially perpendicularly to the panel and extend from respective ones of the four sidewalls, with the bosses being shorter than the lugs. In one embodiment, the lugs extend through supporting holes in an annular frame for mounting the liner segments thereto, with the bosses abutting the frame for maintaining a predetermined spacing therefrom.

  12. Jumping mechanisms in dictyopharid planthoppers (Hemiptera, Dicytyopharidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    The jumping performance of four species of hemipterans belonging to the family Dictyopharidae, from Europe, South Africa and Australia, were analysed from high-speed images. The body shape in all was characterised by an elongated and tapering head that gave a streamlined appearance. The body size ranged from 6 to 9 mm in length and from 6 to 23 mg in mass. The hind legs were 80-90% of body length and 30-50% longer than the front legs, except in one species in which the front legs were particularly large so that all legs were of similar length. Jumping was propelled by rapid and simultaneous depression of the trochantera of both hind legs, powered by large muscles in the thorax, and was accompanied by extension of the tibiae. In the best jumps, defined as those with the fastest take-off velocity, Engela minuta accelerated in 1.2 ms to a take-off velocity of 5.8 m s(-1), which is the fastest achieved by any insect described to date. During such a jump, E. minuta experienced an acceleration of 4830 m s(-2) or 490 g, while other species in the same family experienced 225-375 g. The best jumps in all species required an energy expenditure of 76-225 μJ, a power output of 12-80 mW and exerted a force of 12-29 mN. The required power output per mass of jumping muscle ranged from 28,000 to 140,200 W kg(-1) muscle and thus greatly exceeded the maximum active contractile limit of normal muscle. To achieve such a jumping performance, these insects must be using a power amplification mechanism in a catapult-like action. It is suggested that their streamlined body shape improves jumping performance by reducing drag, which, for a small insect, can substantially affect forward momentum. PMID:24198256

  13. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:18043394

  14. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of novel wheat-Thinopyrum bessarabicum recombinant lines carrying intercalary translocations.

    PubMed

    Patokar, Chetan; Sepsi, Adel; Schwarzacher, Trude; Kishii, Masahiro; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2016-03-01

    Thinopyrum bessarabicum (2n = 2x = 14, JJ or E(b)E(b)) is a valuable source of genes for bread wheat (2n = 6x = 42) improvement because of its salinity tolerance and disease resistance. Development of wheat-Th. bessarabicum translocation lines by backcrossing the amphiploid in the absence of the Ph1 gene (allowing intergenomic recombination) can assist its utilization in wheat improvement. In this study, six novel wheat-Th. bessarabicum translocation lines involving different chromosome segments (T4BS.4BL-4JL, T6BS.6BL-6JL, T5AS.5AL-5JL, T5DL.5DS-5JS, T2BS.2BL-2JL, and the whole arm translocation T1JS.1AL) were identified and characterized using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). No background translocations between wheat genomes were observed. The involvement of five of the seven chromosomes and small terminal segments of Th. bessarabicum chromosome arm were important, contributing to both reduced linkage drag of the derived lines by minimizing agronomically deleterious genes from the alien species and high stability including transmission of the alien segment. All three wheat genomes were involved in the translocations with the alien chromosome, and GISH showed the Th. bessarabicum genome was more closely related to the D genome in wheat. All the introgression lines were disomic, stable, and with good morphological characters. PMID:26238987

  15. Velocity-jump models with crowding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treloar, Katrina K.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.

    2011-12-01

    Velocity-jump processes are discrete random-walk models that have many applications including the study of biological and ecological collective motion. In particular, velocity-jump models are often used to represent a type of persistent motion, known as a run and tumble, that is exhibited by some isolated bacteria cells. All previous velocity-jump processes are noninteracting, which means that crowding effects and agent-to-agent interactions are neglected. By neglecting these agent-to-agent interactions, traditional velocity-jump models are only applicable to very dilute systems. Our work is motivated by the fact that many applications in cell biology, such as wound healing, cancer invasion, and development, often involve tissues that are densely packed with cells where cell-to-cell contact and crowding effects can be important. To describe these kinds of high-cell-density problems using a velocity-jump process we introduce three different classes of crowding interactions into a one-dimensional model. Simulation data and averaging arguments lead to a suite of continuum descriptions of the interacting velocity-jump processes. We show that the resulting systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations predict the mean behavior of the stochastic simulations very well.

  16. Novel t(1;3)(q21,p21) translocation in a basal cell adenocarcinoma of the parotid gland: potential association with tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Karan; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Myers, Jeffery N; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2016-08-01

    We report a rare translocation involving chromosomes 1q23 and 3p21 regions in a basaloid salivary carcinoma. Our case together with a previously reported instance of translocation involving chromosome 1q 21-24 region defines a specific chromosomal segment that may house a gene associated with the development of a subset of basaloid salivary tumors. PMID:27085552

  17. Bacterial translocation in experimental uremia.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Duarte, Joãn Bosco; de Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Mariana; Nochi, Rubens Jardim

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not experimental uremia would induce bacterial translocation. Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into two groups: uremic (n = 20) and control (n = 20). Under anesthesia, the upper and lower left renal poles and the marginal lateral parenchyma were excised in uremic group. Seven days later, in a second operation, the liver, spleen and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were excised and cultured. Blood samples were sent for biochemical analysis (BUN, creatinine, sodium and potassium) and cultured. Specimens of the jejunum (1 cm below the Treitz angle) and ileum (1 cm above the ileocecal valve) were collected and sent for histological examination and scored for the degree of inflammation of the mucosa using a classification proposed by Chiu et al. in 1970. Uremic rats presented higher BUN, creatinine and potassium than controls. Bacterial translocation was more frequent in uremic than in control animals (8/20 (40%) vs. 1/20 (5%); p = 0.02). Translocation in uremic rats was observed mainly at the MLN (all eight cases). Both at the jejunum (uremic = 3 [0-5] vs. control = 2 [0-4]; p = 0.04) and the ileum (uremic - 2 [0-5] vs. control = 0 [0-3]; p = 0.01), inflammation score was higher in uremic rats than in controls. The intestinal mucosa barrier is impaired and bacterial translocation occurs in experimental uremia. PMID:15497213

  18. Motor Control of Landing from a Jump in Simulated Hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Clément N; Theisen, Daniel; Willems, Patrick A; Schepens, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, when landing from a counter-movement jump, muscles contract before touchdown to anticipate imminent collision with the ground and place the limbs in a proper position. This study assesses how the control of landing is modified when gravity is increased above 1 g. Hypergravity was simulated in two different ways: (1) by generating centrifugal forces during turns of an aircraft (A300) and (2) by pulling the subject downwards in the laboratory with a Subject Loading System (SLS). Eight subjects were asked to perform counter-movement jumps at 1 g on Earth and at 3 hypergravity levels (1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 g) both in A300 and with SLS. External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments and muscular activity of 6 lower limb muscles were recorded. Our results show that both in A300 and with SLS, as in 1 g: (1) the anticipation phase is present; (2) during the loading phase (from touchdown until the peak of vertical ground reaction force), lower limb muscles act like a stiff spring, whereas during the second part (from the peak of vertical ground reaction force until the return to the standing position), they act like a compliant spring associated with a damper. (3) With increasing gravity, the preparatory adjustments and the loading phase are modified whereas the second part does not change drastically. (4) The modifications are similar in A300 and with SLS, however the effect of hypergravity is accentuated in A300, probably due to altered sensory inputs. This observation suggests that otolithic information plays an important role in the control of the landing from a jump. PMID:26505472

  19. Motor Control of Landing from a Jump in Simulated Hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Gambelli, Clément N.; Theisen, Daniel; Willems, Patrick A.; Schepens, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, when landing from a counter-movement jump, muscles contract before touchdown to anticipate imminent collision with the ground and place the limbs in a proper position. This study assesses how the control of landing is modified when gravity is increased above 1 g. Hypergravity was simulated in two different ways: (1) by generating centrifugal forces during turns of an aircraft (A300) and (2) by pulling the subject downwards in the laboratory with a Subject Loading System (SLS). Eight subjects were asked to perform counter-movement jumps at 1 g on Earth and at 3 hypergravity levels (1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 g) both in A300 and with SLS. External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments and muscular activity of 6 lower limb muscles were recorded. Our results show that both in A300 and with SLS, as in 1 g: (1) the anticipation phase is present; (2) during the loading phase (from touchdown until the peak of vertical ground reaction force), lower limb muscles act like a stiff spring, whereas during the second part (from the peak of vertical ground reaction force until the return to the standing position), they act like a compliant spring associated with a damper. (3) With increasing gravity, the preparatory adjustments and the loading phase are modified whereas the second part does not change drastically. (4) The modifications are similar in A300 and with SLS, however the effect of hypergravity is accentuated in A300, probably due to altered sensory inputs. This observation suggests that otolithic information plays an important role in the control of the landing from a jump. PMID:26505472

  20. The influence of musical cadence into aquatic jumping jacks kinematics.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mário J; Oliveira, Cristiana; Teixeira, Genoveva; Marinho, Daniel A; Silva, António J; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between the head-out aquatic exercise "Jumping jacks" kinematics and the musical cadence in healthy and fit subjects. Five young women, with at least one year of experience conducting head- out aquatic programs were videotaped in the frontal plane, with a pair of cameras providing a double projection (above and below the water surface). Subjects performed an incremental protocol of five bouts (120 b·min(-1), 135 b·min(-1), 150 b·min(-1), 165 b·min(-1) and 180 b·min(-1)) with 16 full cycles of the "Jumping jacks" exercise. Data processing and calculation of upper limbs' (i.e. hands), lower limbs' (i.e. feet) and center of mass' 2D linear velocity and displacement were computed with the software Ariel Performance Analysis System and applying the 2D-DLT algorithm. Subjects decreased the cycle period during the incremental protocol. Significant and negative relationships with the musical cadence were verified for the center of mass and upper limbs vertical displacement. On the other hand, for the lower limbs lateral velocity, a significant and positive relationship was observed. It is concluded that expert and fit subjects increase the lower limb's velocity to maintain the range of motion, while the upper limb's displacement is reduced to coupe the music cadence. Key pointsWhile performing the Jumping Jacks, expert and fit subjects increase their lower limbs segmental velocity to maintain the range of motion.The upper limbs displacement is reduced to maintain the music cadence.Expert and fit subjects present similar response for alternating or simultaneously head-out aquatic exercises when increasing the music cadence. PMID:24149548

  1. Determination of LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of wolfram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz, Erhan; Saritas, Nuriye

    2014-04-01

    The LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of wolfram have been measured by two different methods. In the first method the mass attenuation coefficients have been obtained by narrow beam transmission geometry to calculate the LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor. In the latter these parameters have been derived from the LIII subshell X-ray production and the photoionization cross sections of the LIII subshell and higher subshells determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique and narrow beam transmission geometry, respectively. The results obtained by both methods have been compared with theoretical and experimental values. They are in good agreement with each other.

  2. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety. PMID:26506396

  3. Collophore may help direct springtail jump

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The collophore of specimens of Entomobrya multifasciata (Tullberg 1871) is composed of four segments. The third segment telescopes in and out of the second and the fourth is an eversible vesicle that is entirely enclosed in the third when not deployed. The four segments are each likely serial homolo...

  4. Driven polymer translocation in good and bad solvent: Effects of hydrodynamics and tension propagation.

    PubMed

    Moisio, J E; Piili, J; Linna, R P

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the driven polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore in the presence and absence of hydrodynamics both in good and bad solvent. We present our results on tension propagating along the polymer segment on the cis side that is measured for the first time using our method that works also in the presence of hydrodynamics. For simulations we use stochastic rotation dynamics, also called multiparticle collision dynamics. We find that in the good solvent the tension propagates very similarly whether hydrodynamics is included or not. Only the tensed segment is by a constant factor shorter in the presence of hydrodynamics. The shorter tensed segment and the hydrodynamic interactions contribute to a smaller friction for the translocating polymer when hydrodynamics is included, which shows as smaller waiting times and a smaller exponent in the scaling of the translocation time with the polymer length. In the bad solvent hydrodynamics has a minimal effect on polymer translocation, in contrast to the good solvent, where it speeds up translocation. We find that under bad-solvent conditions tension does not spread appreciably along the polymer. Consequently, translocation time does not scale with the polymer length. By measuring the effective friction in a setup where a polymer in free solvent is pulled by a constant force at the end, we find that hydrodynamics does speed up collective polymer motion in the bad solvent even more effectively than in the good solvent. However, hydrodynamics has a negligible effect on the motion of individual monomers within the highly correlated globular conformation on the cis side and hence on the entire driven translocation under bad-solvent conditions. PMID:27627352

  5. Understanding Vertical Jump Potentiation: A Deterministic Model.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Lamont, Hugh S; Moir, Gavin L

    2016-06-01

    This review article discusses previous postactivation potentiation (PAP) literature and provides a deterministic model for vertical jump (i.e., squat jump, countermovement jump, and drop/depth jump) potentiation. There are a number of factors that must be considered when designing an effective strength-power potentiation complex (SPPC) focused on vertical jump potentiation. Sport scientists and practitioners must consider the characteristics of the subject being tested and the design of the SPPC itself. Subject characteristics that must be considered when designing an SPPC focused on vertical jump potentiation include the individual's relative strength, sex, muscle characteristics, neuromuscular characteristics, current fatigue state, and training background. Aspects of the SPPC that must be considered for vertical jump potentiation include the potentiating exercise, level and rate of muscle activation, volume load completed, the ballistic or non-ballistic nature of the potentiating exercise, and the rest interval(s) used following the potentiating exercise. Sport scientists and practitioners should design and seek SPPCs that are practical in nature regarding the equipment needed and the rest interval required for a potentiated performance. If practitioners would like to incorporate PAP as a training tool, they must take the athlete training time restrictions into account as a number of previous SPPCs have been shown to require long rest periods before potentiation can be realized. Thus, practitioners should seek SPPCs that may be effectively implemented in training and that do not require excessive rest intervals that may take away from valuable training time. Practitioners may decrease the necessary time needed to realize potentiation by improving their subject's relative strength. PMID:26712510

  6. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This paper documents the dynamics of Australian thoroughbred jump racing in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with the aim of informing debate about risks to horses and the future of this activity. We conclude that the safety of Australian jump racing has improved in recent years but that steeplechases are considerably riskier for horses than hurdle races. Abstract Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety. PMID:26506396

  7. [Segmental neurofibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Zulaica, A; Peteiro, C; Pereiro, M; Pereiro Ferreiros, M; Quintas, C; Toribio, J

    1989-01-01

    Four cases of segmental neurofibromatosis (SNF) are reported. It is a rare entity considered to be a localized variant of neurofibromatosis (NF)-Riccardi's type V. Two cases are male and two female. The lesions are located to the head in a patient and the other three cases in the trunk. No family history nor transmission to progeny were manifested. The rest of the organs are undamaged. PMID:2502696

  8. The Physics of Equestrian Show Jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Art

    2014-04-01

    This article discusses the kinematics and dynamics of equestrian show jumping. For some time I have attended a series of show jumping events at Spruce Meadows, an international equestrian center near Calgary, Alberta, often referred to as the "Wimbledon of equestrian jumping." I have always had a desire to write an article such as this one, but when I searched the Internet for information and looked at YouTube presentations, I could only find simplistic references to Newton's laws and the conservation of mechanical energy principle. Nowhere could I find detailed calculations. On the other hand, there were several biomechanical articles with empirical reports of the results of kinetic and dynamic investigations of show jumping using high-speed digital cameras and force plates. They summarize their results in tables that give information about the motion of a horse jumping over high fences (1.40 m) and the magnitudes of the forces encountered when landing. However, they do not describe the physics of these results.

  9. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m. PMID:26602094

  10. Critical Jump Distance for Propagating Earthquake Ruptures Across Step-Overs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıkılmaz, M. B.; Turcotte, D. L.; Heien, E. M.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-08-01

    The geometry of a strike-slip fault system is an important component that influences the kinematics and interactions of the various faults within the system. Discontinuities and bends in the fault geometry not only determine the types of structures and the physiography that we observe along the fault system but also have a significant influence on the propagation of earthquake ruptures. A precise knowledge of the fault geometry, especially how it is segmented and other physical parameters, is essential for seismic hazard analysis. It is known that earthquake ruptures sometimes propagate over multiple faults by jumping from one segment to the next. A fault jump is a sudden dynamic coalescence of two faults separated by a step-over. Field observations suggest that a step-over width of 5 km is an appropriate maximum jump distance. Our study shows that between 2.5 and 6.5 km of step-over width, the probability of fault jump, for both releasing and restraining step-overs, decreases significantly from 100 to <10 %.

  11. Determination of the Best Pre-Jump Height for Improvement of Two-Legged Vertical Jump

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mahsa; Zolaktaf, Vahid; Marandi, Sayyed M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Athletic performance in many sports depends on two-legged vertical jump. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of different pre-jump height exercises on two-legged vertical jump and to determine the best pre-jump height(s). Methods: Subjects included 35 females and 42 males. By matched randomized sampling, subjects of each sex were assigned into four groups, namely, control, 10-cm hurdle, 20-cm hurdle, and 30-cm hurdle. They participated in the same training program for 6 weeks. Statistical analyses were based on one-way and repeated-measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Analysis of the data showed that practice over hurdles of 10 cm was better than no hurdle and hurdles of >10 cm. Also, jump attempts over hurdles were efficient for trained athletes, but not for untrained athletes. For both sexes, the rate of spike improvement was much better in the experimental groups than in the control groups; it was independent from the rate of progress in jump, which was relatively less evident. Conclusions: It is likely that rather than increasing jump height, training over hurdle enabled the players to use a higher percent of their jump potentials. PMID:23717758

  12. Increase in Jumping Height Associated with Maximal Effort Vertical Depth Jumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, John F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess if there existed a statistically significant increase in jumping performance when dropping from different heights, 32 males, aged 19 to 26, performed a series of maximal effort vertical jumps after dropping from eight heights onto a force plate. Results are analyzed. (Author/MT)

  13. Comparing Fast Pressure Jump and Temperature Jump Protein Folding Experiments and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The unimolecular folding reaction of small proteins is now amenable to a very direct mechanistic comparison between experiment and simulation. We present such a comparison of microsecond pressure and temperature jump refolding kinetics of the engineered WW domain FiP35, a model system for beta sheet folding. Both perturbations produce experimentally a faster and a slower kinetic phase, the “slow” microsecond phase being activated. The fast phase shows differences between perturbation methods and is closer to the downhill limit by temperature jump, but closer to the transiently populated intermediate limit by pressure jump. These observations make more demands on simulations of the folding process than just a rough comparison of time scales. To complement experiments, we calculated several pressure jump and temperature jump all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories in explicit solvent, where FiP35 folded in five of the six simulations. We analyzed our pressure jump simulations by kinetic modeling and found that the pressure jump experiments and MD simulations are most consistent with a 4-state kinetic mechanism. Together, our experimental and computational data highlight FiP35’s position at the boundary where activated intermediates and downhill folding meet, and we show that this model protein is an excellent candidate for further pressure jump molecular dynamics studies to compare experiment and modeling at the folding mechanism level. PMID:25988868

  14. Double aneuploidy: partial trisomy 21 and XO/XXX in a family with 12/21 translocation.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tyrkus, M; Woolley, P V

    1978-09-01

    A female patient with mild mental retardation with spatial perceptual difficulties, microcephaly, depressed nasal root, receding chin, webbed neck, low hairline, shield chest, cubitus valgus, scoliosis and dermatoglyphic findings not characteristic of Down's syndrome is reported. In addition to X/XXX, she had a partial trisomy 21 of the short arm-centromere-proximal long arm segment due to maternal t(12;21) translocation. Two phenotypically normal siblings carried the balanced translocation. PMID:315194

  15. Popcorn: critical temperature, jump and sound.

    PubMed

    Virot, Emmanuel; Ponomarenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Popcorn bursts open, jumps and emits a 'pop' sound in some hundredths of a second. The physical origin of these three observations remains unclear in the literature. We show that the critical temperature 180°C at which almost all of popcorn pops is consistent with an elementary pressure vessel scenario. We observe that popcorn jumps with a 'leg' of starch which is compressed on the ground. As a result, popcorn is midway between two categories of moving systems: explosive plants using fracture mechanisms and jumping animals using muscles. By synchronizing video recordings with acoustic recordings, we propose that the familiar 'pop' sound of the popcorn is caused by the release of water vapour. PMID:25673298

  16. Jumping of water striders on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunjin; Son, Jaehak; Jablonski, Piotr; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-11-01

    Small insects such as water striders, springtails, fishing spiders freely move on water by adopting various modes of locomotion, such as rowing, galloping, jumping and meniscus-climbing. As the physics of jumping have not yet been fully understood among those ways of semi-aquatic propulsion, here we present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamics of water striders leaping off water. We first image and analyze the trajectories of the legs and body of jumping water striders of three different species with a high-speed camera. We then theoretically compute the forces acting on the body by considering the capillary interaction between the flexible legs and deforming water meniscus. Our theory enables us to predict the maximum take-off speed for given leg lengths. The experimental measurements suggest that the water striders drive their legs near the optimal speed to gain the maximum take-off speed.

  17. Popcorn: critical temperature, jump and sound

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emmanuel; Ponomarenko, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Popcorn bursts open, jumps and emits a ‘pop’ sound in some hundredths of a second. The physical origin of these three observations remains unclear in the literature. We show that the critical temperature 180°C at which almost all of popcorn pops is consistent with an elementary pressure vessel scenario. We observe that popcorn jumps with a ‘leg’ of starch which is compressed on the ground. As a result, popcorn is midway between two categories of moving systems: explosive plants using fracture mechanisms and jumping animals using muscles. By synchronizing video recordings with acoustic recordings, we propose that the familiar ‘pop’ sound of the popcorn is caused by the release of water vapour. PMID:25673298

  18. Jumping, snapping and popping at nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haviland, David

    2015-03-01

    The 'jump-to-contact' instability is well known in Atomic Force Microscopy. When a tip attached to a soft cantilever approaches a surface, the large attractive force gradient disrupts the quasi-static force balance and the tip snaps in to contact with the surface. Less appreciated is the converse instability, where a soft liquid-like polymer surface jumps to meet the tip. This nano-scale pop is inaudible, but it does leave a distinctive signature if one carefully monitors the cantilever's steady state dynamics when driven with multiple tones. The nonlinear tip-surface interaction causes intermodulation, or frequency mixing of the drive tones. When many intermodulation products are measured close to the cantilever resonance the spectrum can be transformed to reveal the in-phase and quadrature forces acting on the tip, as a function of oscillation amplitude. We present experimental measurements and theoretical modelling that reveal this surface-jump-to-tip instability.

  19. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    PubMed

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole. PMID:19143783

  20. BIOMECHANICS. Jumping on water: Surface tension-dominated jumping of water striders and robotic insects.

    PubMed

    Koh, Je-Sung; Yang, Eunjin; Jung, Gwang-Pil; Jung, Sun-Pill; Son, Jae Hak; Lee, Sang-Im; Jablonski, Piotr G; Wood, Robert J; Kim, Ho-Young; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2015-07-31

    Jumping on water is a unique locomotion mode found in semi-aquatic arthropods, such as water striders. To reproduce this feat in a surface tension-dominant jumping robot, we elucidated the hydrodynamics involved and applied them to develop a bio-inspired impulsive mechanism that maximizes momentum transfer to water. We found that water striders rotate the curved tips of their legs inward at a relatively low descending velocity with a force just below that required to break the water surface (144 millinewtons/meter). We built a 68-milligram at-scale jumping robotic insect and verified that it jumps on water with maximum momentum transfer. The results suggest an understanding of the hydrodynamic phenomena used by semi-aquatic arthropods during water jumping and prescribe a method for reproducing these capabilities in artificial systems. PMID:26228144

  1. Linkage map construction involving a reciprocal translocation.

    PubMed

    Farré, A; Benito, I Lacasa; Cistué, L; de Jong, J H; Romagosa, I; Jansen, J

    2011-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel statistical-genetic approach for the construction of linkage maps in populations obtained from reciprocal translocation heterozygotes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Using standard linkage analysis, translocations usually lead to 'pseudo-linkage': the mixing up of markers from the chromosomes involved in the translocation into a single linkage group. Close to the translocation breakpoints recombination is severely suppressed and, as a consequence, ordering markers in those regions is not feasible. The novel strategy presented in this paper is based on (1) disentangling the "pseudo-linkage" using principal coordinate analysis, (2) separating individuals into translocated types and normal types and (3) separating markers into those close to and those more distant from the translocation breakpoints. The methods make use of a consensus map of the species involved. The final product consists of integrated linkage maps of the distal parts of the chromosomes involved in the translocation. PMID:21153624

  2. Recent Advancements in Lightning Jump Algorithm Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past year, the primary objectives were to show the usefulness of total lightning as compared to traditional cloud-to-ground (CG) networks, test the lightning jump algorithm configurations in other regions of the country, increase the number of thunderstorms within our thunderstorm database, and to pinpoint environments that could prove difficult for any lightning jump configuration. A total of 561 thunderstorms have been examined in the past year (409 non-severe, 152 severe) from four regions of the country (North Alabama, Washington D.C., High Plains of CO/KS, and Oklahoma). Results continue to indicate that the 2 lightning jump algorithm configuration holds the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, with a probability of detection (POD) at 81%, a false alarm rate (FAR) of 45%, a critical success index (CSI) of 49% and a Heidke Skill Score (HSS) of 0.66. The second best performing algorithm configuration was the Threshold 4 algorithm, which had a POD of 72%, FAR of 51%, a CSI of 41% and an HSS of 0.58. Because a more complex algorithm configuration shows the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, accurate thunderstorm cell tracking work must be undertaken to track lightning trends on an individual thunderstorm basis over time. While these numbers for the 2 configuration are impressive, the algorithm does have its weaknesses. Specifically, low-topped and tropical cyclone thunderstorm environments are present issues for the 2 lightning jump algorithm, because of the suppressed vertical depth impact on overall flash counts (i.e., a relative dearth in lightning). For example, in a sample of 120 thunderstorms from northern Alabama that contained 72 missed events by the 2 algorithm 36% of the misses were associated with these two environments (17 storms).

  3. How do elite ski jumpers handle the dynamic conditions in imitation jumps?

    PubMed

    Ettema, Gertjan; Hooiveld, Jo; Braaten, Steinar; Bobbert, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of boundary conditions in imitation ski jumping on movement dynamics and coordination. We compared imitation ski jumps with--and without--the possibility to generate shear propulsion forces. Six elite ski jumpers performed imitation jumps by jumping from a fixed surface and from a rolling platform. The ground reaction force vector, kinematics of body segments, and EMG of eight lower limb muscles were recorded. Net joint dynamics were calculated using inverse dynamics. The two imitation jumps differed considerably from each other with regard to the dynamics (moments, forces), whereas the kinematics were very similar. Knee power was higher and hip power was lower on the rolling platform than on the fixed surface. Mean EMG levels were very similar for both conditions, but differences in the development of muscle activity were indicated for seven of eight muscles. These differences are reflected in a subtle difference of the alignment of ground reaction force with centre of mass: the ground reaction force runs continuously close to but behind the centre of mass on the rolling platform and fluctuates around it on the fixed surface. This likely reflects a different strategy for controlling angular momentum. PMID:26368027

  4. Humans make near-optimal adjustments of control to initial body configuration in vertical squat jumping.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Richard Casius, L J; Kistemaker, Dinant A

    2013-05-01

    We investigated adjustments of control to initial posture in squat jumping. Eleven male subjects jumped from three initial postures: preferred initial posture (PP), a posture in which the trunk was rotated 18° more backward (BP) and a posture in which it was rotated 15° more forward (FP) than in PP. Kinematics, ground reaction forces and electromyograms (EMG) were collected. EMG was rectified and smoothed to obtain smoothed rectified EMG (srEMG). Subjects showed adjustments in srEMG histories, most conspicuously a shift in srEMG-onset of rectus femoris (REC): from early in BP to late in FP. Jumps from the subjects' initial postures were simulated with a musculoskeletal model comprising four segments and six Hill-type muscles, which had muscle stimulation (STIM) over time as input. STIM of each muscle changed from initial to maximal at STIM-onset, and STIM-onsets were optimized using jump height as criterion. Optimal simulated jumps from BP, PP and FP were similar to jumps of the subjects. Optimal solutions primarily differed in STIM-onset of REC: from early in BP to late in FP. Because the subjects' adjustments in srEMG-onsets were similar to adjustments of the model's optimal STIM-onsets, it was concluded that the former were near-optimal. With the model we also showed that near-maximum jumps from BP, PP and FP could be achieved when STIM-onset of REC depended on initial hip joint angle and STIM-onsets of the other muscles were posture-independent. A control theory that relies on a mapping from initial posture to STIM-onsets seems a parsimonious alternative to theories relying on internal optimal control models. PMID:23384608

  5. Jumping in frogs: assessing the design of the skeletal system by anatomically realistic modeling and forward dynamic simulation.

    PubMed

    Kargo, William J; Nelson, Frank; Rome, Lawrence C

    2002-06-01

    Comparative musculoskeletal modeling represents a tool to understand better how motor system parameters are fine-tuned for specific behaviors. Frog jumping is a behavior in which the physical properties of the body and musculotendon actuators may have evolved specifically to extend the limits of performance. Little is known about how the joints of the frog contribute to and limit jumping performance. To address these issues, we developed a skeletal model of the frog Rana pipiens that contained realistic bones, joints and body-segment properties. We performed forward dynamic simulations of jumping to determine the minimal number of joint degrees of freedom required to produce maximal-distance jumps and to produce jumps of varied take-off angles. The forward dynamics of the models was driven with joint torque patterns determined from inverse dynamic analysis of jumping in experimental frogs. When the joints were constrained to rotate in the extension-flexion plane, the simulations produced short jumps with a fixed angle of take-off. We found that, to produce maximal-distance jumping, the skeletal system of the frog must minimally include a gimbal joint at the hip (three rotational degrees of freedom), a universal Hooke's joint at the knee (two rotational degrees of freedom) and pin joints at the ankle, tarsometatarsal, metatarsophalangeal and iliosacral joints (one rotational degree of freedom). One of the knee degrees of freedom represented a unique kinematic mechanism (internal rotation about the long axis of the tibiofibula) and played a crucial role in bringing the feet under the body so that maximal jump distances could be attained. Finally, the out-of-plane degrees of freedom were found to be essential to enable the frog to alter the angle of take-off and thereby permit flexible neuromotor control. The results of this study form a foundation upon which additional model subsystems (e.g. musculotendon and neural) can be added to test the integrative action of the

  6. A sugar chain at a specific position in the nascent polypeptide chain induces forward movement during translocation through the translocon.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Marifu; Fujita, Hidenobu; Morimoto, Fumiko; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2011-05-01

    Nascent polypeptide chains synthesized by membrane bound ribosomes are cotranslationally translocated through and integrated into the endoplasmic reticulum translocon. Hydrophobic segments and positive charges on the chain are critical to halt the ongoing translocation. A marginally hydrophobic segment, which cannot be inserted into the membrane by itself, can be a transmembrane segment depending on its downstream positive charges. In certain conditions, positive charges even 60 residues downstream cause the marginally hydrophobic segment to span the membrane by inducing the segment to slide back from the lumen. Here we systematically examined the effect of a core sugar chain on the fate of a marginally hydrophobic segment using a cell-free translation and translocation system. A sugar chain added within 12 residues upstream of the marginally hydrophobic segment prevents the sliding back and promotes forward movement of the polypeptide chain. The sugar chain apparently functions as a ratchet to keep the polypeptide chain in the lumen. We propose that the sugar chain is a third topology determinant of membrane proteins, in addition to a hydrophobic segment and positive charges of the nascent chain. PMID:21278156

  7. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Sobjanek, Michał; Dobosz-Kawałko, Magdalena; Michajłowski, Igor; Pęksa, Rafał; Nowicki, Roman

    2014-12-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis or type V neurofibromatosis is a rare genodermatosis characterized by neurofibromas, café-au-lait spots and neurofibromas limited to a circumscribed body region. The disease may be associated with systemic involvement and malignancies. The disorder has not been reported yet in the Polish medical literature. A 63-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 20-year history of multiple, flesh colored, dome-shaped, soft to firm nodules situated in the right lumbar region. A histopathologic evaluation of three excised tumors revealed neurofibromas. No neurological and ophthalmologic symptoms of neurofibromatosis were diagnosed. PMID:25610358

  8. Segmental neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Adigun, Chris G; Stein, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented for evaluation and excision of non-tender, fleshy nodules that were arranged in a dermatomal distribution from the left side of the chest to the left axilla. A biopsy specimen of a nodule was consistent with a neurofibroma. Owing to the lack of other cutaneous findings, the lack of a family history of neurofibromatosis, and the dermatomal distribution of the neurofibromas, this patient met the criteria for a diagnosis of segmental neurofibromatosis (SNF) according to Riccardi's definition of SNF and classification of neurofibromatosis. Because the patient has no complications of neurofibromatosis 1 no medical treatment is required. PMID:22031651

  9. Segmental neurofibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobosz-Kawałko, Magdalena; Michajłowski, Igor; Pęksa, Rafał; Nowicki, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis or type V neurofibromatosis is a rare genodermatosis characterized by neurofibromas, café-au-lait spots and neurofibromas limited to a circumscribed body region. The disease may be associated with systemic involvement and malignancies. The disorder has not been reported yet in the Polish medical literature. A 63-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 20-year history of multiple, flesh colored, dome-shaped, soft to firm nodules situated in the right lumbar region. A histopathologic evaluation of three excised tumors revealed neurofibromas. No neurological and ophthalmologic symptoms of neurofibromatosis were diagnosed. PMID:25610358

  10. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-04-01

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs. PMID:25811417

  11. The epidemiology of injury in bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and skydiving.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge regarding epidemiology of injury is of benefit to injury prevention of activities associated with high risk. As relatively 'young' activities, the investigation of injuries and deaths related in extreme sports such as bungee jumping and BASE jumping is relatively sparse. Studies evaluating risk in civilian and military skydiving activities have been reported over the past decades, but technique and equipment has changed. Risk with bungee jumping is only sporadically reported in the literature, most often in connection with eye injuries, but also rare events of serious, life-threatening injuries and even death. BASE is an acronym for Building, Antenna, Span, Earth, which represents the fixed objects from which jumps are made. Estimated risk in BASE jumping for any injury (independent of severity grade) is 0.4-0.5%, which as 5- to 8-fold higher than skydiving. Typically, men outnumber women in a ratio of 10:1 in both injuries and case fatality rates. Age is frequently reported to range from 30 to 40 years. Notably, differences in training and environmental locations exist between recreational skydiving and BASE jumping. As BASE jumps are made from lower altitudes than skydives, jumpers generally fall at lower speeds, have far less aerodynamic control, and may lose flying stability. Yet, typical injuries include a bruised or sprained ankle during landing. Protective gear including helmet and pads may help to prevent such injuries, while more complex knowledge of human factors, environment and training are needed to prevent fatal injuries. PMID:22824842

  12. Fast Regulation of Vertical Squat Jump during Push-Off in Skilled Jumpers

    PubMed Central

    Fargier, Patrick; Massarelli, Raphael; Rabahi, Tahar; Gemignani, Angelo; Fargier, Emile

    2016-01-01

    The height of a maximum Vertical Squat Jump (VSJ) reflects the useful power produced by a jumper during the push-off phase. In turn this partly depends on the coordination of the jumper's segmental rotations at each instant. The physical system constituted by the jumper has been shown to be very sensitive to perturbations and furthermore the movement is realized in a very short time (ca. 300 ms), compared to the timing of known feedback loops. However, the dynamics of the segmental coordination and its efficiency in relation to energetics at each instant of the push-off phase still remained to be clarified. Their study was the main purpose of the present research. Eight young adult volunteers (males) performed maximal VSJ. They were skilled in jumping according to their sport activities (track and field or volleyball). A video analysis on the kinematics of the jump determined the influence of the jumpers' segments rotation on the vertical velocity and acceleration of the body mass center (MC). The efficiency in the production of useful power at the jumpers' MC level, by the rotation of the segments, was measured in consequence. The results showed a great variability in the segmental movements of the eight jumpers, but homogeneity in the overall evolution of these movements with three consecutive types of coordination in the second part of the push-off (lasting roughly 0.16 s). Further analyses gave insights on the regulation of the push-off, suggesting that very fast regulation(s) of the VSJ may be supported by: (a) the adaptation of the motor cerebral programming to the jumper's physical characteristics; (b) the control of the initial posture; and (c) the jumper's perception of the position of his MC relative to the ground reaction force, during push-off, to reduce energetic losses. PMID:27486404

  13. Fast Regulation of Vertical Squat Jump during Push-Off in Skilled Jumpers.

    PubMed

    Fargier, Patrick; Massarelli, Raphael; Rabahi, Tahar; Gemignani, Angelo; Fargier, Emile

    2016-01-01

    The height of a maximum Vertical Squat Jump (VSJ) reflects the useful power produced by a jumper during the push-off phase. In turn this partly depends on the coordination of the jumper's segmental rotations at each instant. The physical system constituted by the jumper has been shown to be very sensitive to perturbations and furthermore the movement is realized in a very short time (ca. 300 ms), compared to the timing of known feedback loops. However, the dynamics of the segmental coordination and its efficiency in relation to energetics at each instant of the push-off phase still remained to be clarified. Their study was the main purpose of the present research. Eight young adult volunteers (males) performed maximal VSJ. They were skilled in jumping according to their sport activities (track and field or volleyball). A video analysis on the kinematics of the jump determined the influence of the jumpers' segments rotation on the vertical velocity and acceleration of the body mass center (MC). The efficiency in the production of useful power at the jumpers' MC level, by the rotation of the segments, was measured in consequence. The results showed a great variability in the segmental movements of the eight jumpers, but homogeneity in the overall evolution of these movements with three consecutive types of coordination in the second part of the push-off (lasting roughly 0.16 s). Further analyses gave insights on the regulation of the push-off, suggesting that very fast regulation(s) of the VSJ may be supported by: (a) the adaptation of the motor cerebral programming to the jumper's physical characteristics; (b) the control of the initial posture; and PMID:27486404

  14. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development. PMID:25040040

  15. Jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Micro- and nanoscale wetting phenomena have been an active area of research due to its potential for improving engineered system performance involving phase change. With the recent advancements in micro/nanofabrication techniques, structured surfaces can now be designed to allow condensing coalesced droplets to spontaneously jump off the surface due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. In addition to being removed at micrometric length scales (˜10 μm), jumping water droplets also attain a positive electrostatic charge (˜10-100 fC) from the hydrophobic coating/condensate interaction. In this work, we take advantage of this droplet charging to demonstrate jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting. The charged droplets jump between superhydrophobic copper oxide and hydrophilic copper surfaces to create an electrostatic potential and generate power during formation of atmospheric dew. We demonstrated power densities of ˜15 pW/cm2, which, in the near term, can be improved to ˜1 μW/cm2. This work demonstrates a surface engineered platform that promises to be low cost and scalable for atmospheric energy harvesting and electric power generation.

  16. Safety assessment of jumps in ski racing.

    PubMed

    Schindelwig, K; Reichl, W; Kaps, P; Mössner, M; Nachbauer, W

    2015-12-01

    The influence of important parameters on the flight trajectory for jumps in downhill World Cup races was investigated. To quantify the impact injury risk at landing, the parameter equivalent landing height (ELH) was introduced, which considered a variable slope inclination during the landing movement. Altogether, 145 runs at four different jumps in World Cup races and trainings were recorded and analyzed. A simulation model was developed to predict the flight phase of the skier. Drag and lift areas were selected by parameter identification to fit the simulation trajectory to the two-dimensional data from the video analysis. The maximum values of the ELH which can be absorbed with muscle force was taken from the study of Minetti et al. for elite female and male ski racers. A sensitivity analysis based on the four jumps showed that ELH is mainly influenced by takeoff angle, takeoff speed, and the steepness of the landing surface. With the help of the developed simulation software, it should be possible to predict the ELH for jumps in advance. In case of an excessive ELH, improvements can be made by changing the takeoff inclination or the approach speed. PMID:25123506

  17. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  18. The walk and jump of Equisetum spores.

    PubMed

    Marmottant, Philippe; Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Bienaimé, Diane

    2013-11-01

    Equisetum plants (horsetails) reproduce by producing tiny spherical spores that are typically 50 µm in diameter. The spores have four elaters, which are flexible ribbon-like appendages that are initially wrapped around the main spore body and that deploy upon drying or fold back in humid air. If elaters are believed to help dispersal, the exact mechanism for spore motion remains unclear in the literature. In this manuscript, we present observations of the 'walks' and 'jumps' of Equisetum spores, which are novel types of spore locomotion mechanisms compared to the ones of other spores. Walks are driven by humidity cycles, each cycle inducing a small step in a random direction. The dispersal range from the walk is limited, but the walk provides key steps to either exit the sporangium or to reorient and refold. Jumps occur when the spores suddenly thrust themselves after being tightly folded. They result in a very efficient dispersal: even spores jumping from the ground can catch the wind again, whereas non-jumping spores stay on the ground. The understanding of these movements, which are solely driven by humidity variations, conveys biomimetic inspiration for a new class of self-propelled objects. PMID:24026816

  19. Jumping the Alligators in the Ditch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Rims

    Poor black young people in rural Mississippi contemplate their schooling with the same feelings as their friends who dare to jump the local ditches filled with alligators: the odds are against escaping the alligators, and the advantages of getting to the far side are not very apparent. Living in conditions of extreme poverty, these young people…

  20. Jumping Genes: The Transposable DNAs of Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Claire M.; Berg, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Transposons are transposable elements that carry genes for antibiotic resistance. Provides background information on the structure and organization of these "jumping genes" in bacteria. Also describes the use of transposons in tagging genes and lists pertinent references and resource materials. (DH)

  1. Understanding the Physics of Bungee Jumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre; Uylings, Peter; Kedzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often…

  2. Kinematic, Dynamic and EMG Analysis of Drop Jumps in Female Elite Triple Jump Athletes.

    PubMed

    Čoh, Milan; Matjačić, Zlatko; Peharec, Stanislav; Bačić, Petar; Rausavjević, Nikola; Maćkala, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was a biodynamic analysis of the kinematic, dynamic and EMG parameters of two types of drop jumps (heights of 25 cm and 45 cm). The sample of measured subjects included four female elite triple jump athletes, with their best results varying from 13.33 to 15.06 meters. The kinematic and dynamic parameters were calculated with the use of a bipedal tensiometric force plate, which was synchronized with nine CCD cameras. A 16-channel electromyography (BTS Pocket, Myolab) was used to analyze the EMG activation of the following muscles: m. erector spinae, m. gluteus, m. rectus femoris, m. vastus medialis, m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps femoris, m. soleus and m. gastrocnemius medialis. In the drop jump from a 25 cm height, the measured subjects achieved the following results: height of jump 43.37 ± 5.39 cm and ground reaction force 2770 ± 411 N. In comparison, results for the drop jump from a 45 cm height were: height of jump 45.22 ± 4.65 cm and ground reaction force 2947 ± 366 N. Vertical velocity of the take-off in the 25 cm drop jump was 2.77 ± 0.19 ms(-1) and in the 45 cm drop jump it was 2.86 ± 0.15 ms(-1). Observation of the EMG activation revealed the proximal to distal principle of muscle activation at work in both types of drop jumps. In the first phase of the concentric phase the most active muscles were m. gluteus maximus and m. rectus femoris. The greatest activity of m. gastrocnemius medialis and m. soleus was noticed in the last third of the take-off action. Significantly high EMG activation of m. vastus medialis and m. vastus lateralis was already shown in the flight phase prior to the feet making contact with the ground. PMID:26434025

  3. Autoregulating Jump Performance to Induce Functional Overreaching.

    PubMed

    Claudino, João G; Cronin, John B; Mezêncio, Bruno; Pinho, João P; Pereira, Conrado; Mochizuki, Luis; Amadio, Alberto C; Serrão, Julio C

    2016-08-01

    Claudino, JG, Cronin, JB, Mezêncio, B, Pinho, JP, Pereira, C, Mochizuki, L, Amadio, AC, and Serrão, JC. Autoregulating jump performance to induce functional overreaching. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2242-2249, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine whether autoregulating jump performance using the minimal individual difference (MID) associated with countermovement jump (CMJ) height could be used to regulate and monitor a training phase that elicited functional overreaching and tapering in team sport athletes. The participants were familiarized with the jump and then the CMJ height reliability was quantified to determine the MID. Countermovement jump height was assessed in the pretesting session (T0), at the end of 4 weeks of intensified training (T1), and after 2 weeks of tapering (T2). Eighteen national level U17 male futsal players were randomly allocated into the regulated group (RG; n = 9) and the control group (CG; n = 9). The RG performed 6 weeks of training with the training load regulated by mean height of CMJ with MID, whereas the CG performed the preplanned training. The differences between groups and across time points were compared by a 2-way analysis of variance. In the RG, the MID loading was increased in weeks 3 and 4 (8.2 and 14.5%, respectively; p < 0.001) compared with the preplanned loading of the CG during the overreaching phase. In the jump results, the RG significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced CMJ height during T1 (effect size [ES] = -0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.58 to -0.02); however, there were no significant changes in the CG jump height at T1 and T2. At T2, the RG significantly increased CMJ height above baseline (ES = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.51). Researchers and practitioners could use this autoregulating method to regulate and monitor training load to achieve functional overreaching in youth futsal players. PMID:26808857

  4. Hormonal responses in strenuous jumping effort.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Tihanyl, J; Rivalta, L; Parlato, G; Tranquilli, C; Pulvirenti, G; Foti, C; Viru, M; Viru, A

    1996-02-01

    In order to test the possibility for rapid responses of blood hormone levels in short-term supramaximal exercises, serum concentrations of corticotropin (ACTH), cortisol (C), total testosterone (tT), free testosterone (fT), growth hormone (GH), thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), prolactin (PRL), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were determined by RIA procedures in blood samples obtained before and immediately after a 60-s period of consecutive vertical jumps (Bosco test). The study subjects were 16 Italian professional soccer players. Immediately after exercise, significant increases (p < 0.05) were found in the concentrations of ACTH (by 39%), C (by 14%), TSH (by 20%), fT3 (by 28%), fT4 (by 30%), tT (by 12%), fT (by 13%), and SHBG (by 21%). Significant changes were not detected in the blood levels of GH, IGF-I and PRL. Most pronounced testosterone responses were typical for persons of high jumping performance (the increase of serum tT correlated with average power output, r = 0.61 and jumping height, r = 0.66). The larger the drop in power output during 60-s jumping, the higher was the thyroid response: the difference in jumping height between the first and last 15-s period correlated with increases in TSH (r = 0.52) and in fT4, (r = 0.55). In conclusion, the obtained results indicate that in intense exercise, causing the rapid development of fatigue, rapid increases in serum levels of hormones of the pituitary-adrenocortical, pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-thyroid systems occur. PMID:8743723

  5. Jumping mechanisms and strategies in moths (Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Dorosenko, Marina

    2015-06-01

    To test whether jumping launches moths into the air, take-off by 58 species, ranging in mass from 0.1 to 220 mg, was captured in videos at 1000 frames s(-1). Three strategies for jumping were identified. First, rapid movements of both middle and hind legs provided propulsion while the wings remained closed. Second, middle and hind legs again provided propulsion but the wings now opened and flapped after take-off. Third, wing and leg movements both began before take-off and led to an earlier transition to powered flight. The middle and hind legs were of similar lengths and were between 10 and 130% longer than the front legs. The rapid depression of the trochantera and extension of the middle tibiae began some 3 ms before similar movements of the hind legs, but their tarsi lost contact with the ground before take-off. Acceleration times ranged from 10 ms in the lightest moths to 25 ms in the heaviest ones. Peak take-off velocities varied from 0.6 to 0.9 m s(-1) in all moths, with the fastest jump achieving a velocity of 1.2 m s(-1). The energy required to generate the fastest jumps was 1.1 µJ in lighter moths but rose to 62.1 µJ in heavier ones. Mean accelerations ranged from 26 to 90 m s(-2) and a maximum force of 9 G: was experienced. The highest power output was within the capability of normal muscle so that jumps were powered by direct contractions of muscles without catapult mechanisms or energy storage. PMID:25883381

  6. Deconvoluting chain heterogeneity from driven translocation through a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2015-02-01

    We study translocation dynamics of a driven compressible semi-flexible chain consisting of alternate blocks of stiff (S) and flexible (F) segments of size m and n, respectively, for different chain length N in two dimensions (2D). The free parameters in the model are the bending rigidity κb which controls the three-body interaction term, the elastic constant kF in the FENE (bond) potential between successive monomers, as well as the segmental lengths m and n and the repeat unit p (N=m_pn_p) and the solvent viscosity γ. We demonstrate that due to the change in entropic barrier and the inhomogeneous viscous drag on the chain backbone a variety of scenarios are possible, amply manifested in the waiting time distribution of the translocating chain. This information can be deconvoluted to extract the mechanical properties of the chain at various length scales and thus can be used to nanopore based methods to probe bio-molecules, such as DNA, RNA and proteins.

  7. Surface-adsorption-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore: Effects of the adsorption strength and the surface corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoyu; Yu, Wancheng; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-08-01

    The surface corrugation plays an important role in single polymer diffusion on attractive surfaces. However, its effect on dynamics of surface adsorption-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore is not clear. Using three-dimensional Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the dynamics of a flexible polymer chain translocation through a nanopore induced by the selective adsorption of translocated segments onto the trans side of the membrane. The translocation probability Pt r a n s increases monotonically, while the mean translocation time τ has a minimum as a function of the adsorption strength ɛ , which are explained from the perspective of the effective driving force for the translocation. With the surface being smoother, τ as well as the scaling exponent α of τ with the chain length N decreases. Finally, we show that the distributions of the translocation time are non-Gaussian even for strong adsorption at a moderate surface corrugation. A nearly Gaussian distribution of the translocation time is observed only for the smoothest surface we studied.

  8. Translocation (Y;12) in lipoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cher-Wei; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrian; Johannessen, Catherine; Hornick, Jason L; Dal Cin, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm in adults, and have been extensively characterized at the cytogenetic level. Chromosomal aberrations have been observed in the majority of lipomas, two-thirds of which involve chromosomal region 12q14.3. To date, structural rearrangements have been reported affecting every chromosome except chromosome Y. Here we report a case of a lipoma that shows a novel apparently balanced translocation involving chromosomes Y and 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a break-apart HMGA2 in-house probe set detected a single signal on the normal chromosome 12 but not on either the derivative chromosome Y or 12, indicating a cryptic loss of 12q14.3, where HMGA2 is mapped. Immunohistochemical studies, however, revealed overexpression of HMGA2 with nuclear expression in the majority of tumor cells, whereas MDM2 and CDK4 were negative. The overexpression of HMGA2 may be caused by a cryptic chromosomal aberration affecting either the cytogenetically unaltered HMGA2 allele or HMGA2 regulators elsewhere. The current case broadens our knowledge about the translocation partners of HMGA2 in lipomas and highlights the biological complexity in regulating HMGA2 expression. PMID:21356192

  9. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  10. In Situ Temperature Jump Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Chan-Gyu; Casey, Andrew; Turner, Christopher J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization is combined with temperature jump methods to develop a new 2D 13C- 13C NMR experiment that yields a factor or 100-170 increase insensitivity. The polaization step is performed at ∼100 K and the sample is subsequently melted with a 10.6 mm laser pulse to yield a sample with highly polarized 13C spins. 13C detected 2D 13C- 13C spectroscopy is performed in the usual manner. PMID:18942782

  11. Entropy jump across an inviscid shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.; Iollo, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    The shock jump conditions for the Euler equations in their primitive form are derived by using generalized functions. The shock profiles for specific volume, speed, and pressure are shown to be the same, however density has a different shock profile. Careful study of the equations that govern the entropy shows that the inviscid entropy profile has a local maximum within the shock layer. We demonstrate that because of this phenomenon, the entropy, propagation equation cannot be used as a conservation law.

  12. Field measurements in unwadeable natural hydraulic jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, B.; Pasternack, G.

    2003-04-01

    Recent research in fluvial geomorphology has emphasized the development and application of digital terrain models to better understand process-form relations. However, field measurements in mountain channels have largely been restricted to low velocity or ephemeral flow conditions. To address this problem, a new high-resolution mechanical surveying system was developed at UC Davis and used to measure the 3D bed and water surface topographies of an unwadeable plunging hydraulic jump in the Cache Creek basin, CA. Labeled as the River Truss, the system is capable of making high-resolution form and process measurements over a 30 to 115 m2 area. Bed and water surface DTMs were derived from the field data using AutoCAD. River Truss precision was assessed by DTM differencing the hydraulic jump bed surface topography with a DTM developed from tacheometric survey at low base flows. Bed surface DTMs indicate significant spatial complexity of the underlying bed step in the supercritical flow region and significant downstream bed scour. Water surface DTMs indicate 3D complexity of the plunging flow surface and divergence from 1D free-fall theory. Further study will emphasize the development and deployment of process-based instrumentation such that the complex turbulent air-water flow dynamics associated with natural hydraulic jumps may be better understood. Also, a second generation River Truss that has a larger coverage area and automated data collection has been designed and is now being built.

  13. DNA translocation through graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Christopher A; Healy, Ken; Wanunu, Meni; Ray, Vishva; Peterman, Neil; Bartel, John; Fischbein, Michael D; Venta, Kimberly; Luo, Zhengtang; Johnson, A T Charlie; Drndić, Marija

    2010-08-11

    We report on DNA translocations through nanopores created in graphene membranes. Devices consist of 1-5 nm thick graphene membranes with electron-beam sculpted nanopores from 5 to 10 nm in diameter. Due to the thin nature of the graphene membranes, we observe larger blocked currents than for traditional solid-state nanopores. However, ionic current noise levels are several orders of magnitude larger than those for silicon nitride nanopores. These fluctuations are reduced with the atomic-layer deposition of 5 nm of titanium dioxide over the device. Unlike traditional solid-state nanopore materials that are insulating, graphene is an excellent electrical conductor. Use of graphene as a membrane material opens the door to a new class of nanopore devices in which electronic sensing and control are performed directly at the pore. PMID:20698604

  14. Phosphorus Compounds in Translocating Phloem

    PubMed Central

    Bieleski, R. L.

    1969-01-01

    Phosphate-32P was introduced into a turnip leaf, and 3 hr later, the vascular bundles were stripped from the petiole and their phosphate ester pattern was studied. The pattern did not alter along their length and was like that of other tissues. Pumpkin leaves were painted with phosphate-32P; and later, the petioles were cut, the sieve tube exudates were collected and their phosphate ester patterns were studied. Exudates collected after 10 min had a high proportion of their 32P present in Pi and nucleoside triphosphates, while exudates collected after long translocation times (4-22 hr) had a lower proportion in these, and a higher proportion in hexose monophosphates and UDP glucose. In general, the ester patterns were like those of other tissues. The results indicate that sieve tubes are metabolically active, and that Pi is the primary form in which phosphorus moves in the phloem. Images PMID:16657091

  15. Determinants of the abilities to jump higher and shorten the contact time in a running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball.

    PubMed

    Miura, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Zushi, Koji

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain useful information for developing training techniques for the running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball (lay-up shot jump). The ability to perform the lay-up shot jump and various basic jumps was measured by testing 19 male basketball players. The basic jumps consisted of the 1-legged repeated rebound jump, the 2-legged repeated rebound jump, and the countermovement jump. Jumping height, contact time, and jumping index (jumping height/contact time) were measured and calculated using a contact mat/computer system that recorded the contact and air times. The jumping index indicates power. No significant correlation existed between the jumping height and contact time of the lay-up shot jump, the 2 components of the lay-up shot jump index. As a result, jumping height and contact time were found to be mutually independent abilities. The relationships in contact time between the lay-up shot jump to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the 2-legged repeated rebound jump were correlated on the same significance levels (p < 0.05). A significant correlation for jumping height existed between the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the lay-up shot jump (p < 0.05), although none existed for jumping height between the lay-up shot jump and both the 2-legged repeated rebound jump and countermovement jump. The lay-up shot index correlated more strongly to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump index (p < 0.01) when compared to the 2-legged repeated rebound jump index (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the 1-legged repeated rebound jump is effective in improving both contact time and jumping height in the lay-up shot jump. PMID:19996782

  16. Vertical Jump and Leg Power Norms for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, David D.; Peterson, D. Fred

    2004-01-01

    Medical students and their spouses (N = 724) served as participants to create norm-referenced vertical jump values for active, healthy people ages 21-30. All tests were conducted and measured by the same individual during a campus fitness evaluation using a Vertec[TM] apparatus. Jump height was measured to the nearest 0.5 in. Mean jump height was…

  17. Costs and benefits of larval jumping behaviour of Bathyplectes anurus.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Yoriko; Tani, Soichiro; Fukuda, Katsuto; Iwase, Shun-ichiro; Sugawara, Yuma; Tuda, Midori; Takagi, Masami

    2016-02-01

    Bathyplectes anurus, a parasitoid of the alfalfa weevils, forms a cocoon in the late larval stage and exhibits jumping behaviour. Adaptive significance and costs of the cocoon jumping have not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesised that jumping has the fitness benefits of enabling habitat selection by avoiding unfavourable environments. We conducted laboratory experiments, which demonstrated that jumping frequencies increased in the presence of light, with greater magnitudes of temperature increase and at lower relative humidity. In addition, when B. anurus individuals were allowed to freely jump in an arena with a light gradient, more cocoons were found in the shady area, suggesting microhabitat selection. In a field experiment, mortality of cocoons placed in the sun was significantly higher than for cocoons placed in the shade. B. anurus cocoons respond to environmental stress by jumping, resulting in habitat selection. In the presence of potential predators (ants), jumping frequencies were higher than in the control (no ant) arenas, though jumping frequencies decreased after direct contact with the predators. Body mass of B. anurus cocoons induced to jump significantly decreased over time than cocoons that did not jump, suggesting a cost to jumping. We discuss the benefits and costs of jumping behaviour and potential evolutionary advantages of this peculiar trait, which is present in a limited number of species. PMID:26687130

  18. Costs and benefits of larval jumping behaviour of Bathyplectes anurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Yoriko; Tani, Soichiro; Fukuda, Katsuto; Iwase, Shun-ichiro; Sugawara, Yuma; Tuda, Midori; Takagi, Masami

    2016-02-01

    Bathyplectes anurus, a parasitoid of the alfalfa weevils, forms a cocoon in the late larval stage and exhibits jumping behaviour. Adaptive significance and costs of the cocoon jumping have not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesised that jumping has the fitness benefits of enabling habitat selection by avoiding unfavourable environments. We conducted laboratory experiments, which demonstrated that jumping frequencies increased in the presence of light, with greater magnitudes of temperature increase and at lower relative humidity. In addition, when B. anurus individuals were allowed to freely jump in an arena with a light gradient, more cocoons were found in the shady area, suggesting microhabitat selection. In a field experiment, mortality of cocoons placed in the sun was significantly higher than for cocoons placed in the shade. B. anurus cocoons respond to environmental stress by jumping, resulting in habitat selection. In the presence of potential predators (ants), jumping frequencies were higher than in the control (no ant) arenas, though jumping frequencies decreased after direct contact with the predators. Body mass of B. anurus cocoons induced to jump significantly decreased over time than cocoons that did not jump, suggesting a cost to jumping. We discuss the benefits and costs of jumping behaviour and potential evolutionary advantages of this peculiar trait, which is present in a limited number of species.

  19. An efficient interpolation technique for jump proposals in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations

    PubMed Central

    Farr, W. M.; Mandel, I.; Stevens, D.

    2015-01-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed dataset is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty and it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot efficiently explore both parameter spaces at once. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here, we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose intermodel jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in modest dimensionality. We show that our technique leads to improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it to other proposals in the literature to improve the convergence of RJMCMCs. We also demonstrate the use of the same interpolation technique as a way to construct efficient ‘global’ proposal distributions for single-model MCMCs without prior knowledge of the structure of the posterior distribution, and discuss improvements that permit the method to be used in higher dimensional spaces efficiently. PMID:26543580

  20. An efficient interpolation technique for jump proposals in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Farr, W M; Mandel, I; Stevens, D

    2015-06-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed dataset is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty and it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot efficiently explore both parameter spaces at once. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here, we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose intermodel jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in modest dimensionality. We show that our technique leads to improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it to other proposals in the literature to improve the convergence of RJMCMCs. We also demonstrate the use of the same interpolation technique as a way to construct efficient 'global' proposal distributions for single-model MCMCs without prior knowledge of the structure of the posterior distribution, and discuss improvements that permit the method to be used in higher dimensional spaces efficiently. PMID:26543580

  1. Force generation and temperature-jump and length-jump tension transients in muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Davis, J S; Rodgers, M E

    1995-05-01

    Muscle tension rises with increasing temperature. The kinetics that govern the tension rise of maximally Ca(2+)-activated, skinned rabbit psoas fibers over a temperature range of 0-30 degrees C was characterized in laser temperature-jump experiments. The kinetic response is simple and can be readily interpreted in terms of a basic three-step mechanism of contraction, which includes a temperature-sensitive rapid preequilibrium(a) linked to a temperature-insensitive rate-limiting step and followed by a temperature-sensitive tension-generating step. These data and mechanism are compared and contrasted with the more complex length-jump Huxley-Simmons phases in which all states that generate tension or bear tension are perturbed. The rate of the Huxley-Simmons phase 4 is temperature sensitive at low temperatures but plateaus at high temperatures, indicating a change in rate-limiting step from a temperature-sensitive (phase 4a) to a temperature-insensitive reaction (phase 4b); the latter appears to correlate with the slow, temperature-insensitive temperature-jump relaxation. Phase 3 is absent in the temperature-jump, which excludes it from tension generation. We confirm that de novo tension generation occurs as an order-disorder transition during phase 2slow and the equivalent, temperature-sensitive temperature-jump relaxation. PMID:7612845

  2. Deriving appropriate boundary conditions, and accelerating position-jump simulations, of diffusion using non-local jumping.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P R; Baker, R E; Yates, C A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we explore lattice-based position-jump models of diffusion, and the implications of introducing non-local jumping; particles can jump to a range of nearby boxes rather than only to their nearest neighbours. We begin by deriving conditions for equivalence with traditional local jumping models in the continuum limit. We then generalize a previously postulated implementation of the Robin boundary condition for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length, and present a novel implementation of flux boundary conditions, again generalized for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length. In both these cases we validate our results using stochastic simulation. We then proceed to consider two variations on the basic diffusion model: a hybrid local/non-local scheme suitable for models involving sharp concentration gradients, and the implementation of biased jumping. In all cases we show that non-local jumping can deliver substantial time savings for stochastic simulations. PMID:25514045

  3. Deriving appropriate boundary conditions, and accelerating position-jump simulations, of diffusion using non-local jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. R.; Baker, R. E.; Yates, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we explore lattice-based position-jump models of diffusion, and the implications of introducing non-local jumping; particles can jump to a range of nearby boxes rather than only to their nearest neighbours. We begin by deriving conditions for equivalence with traditional local jumping models in the continuum limit. We then generalize a previously postulated implementation of the Robin boundary condition for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length, and present a novel implementation of flux boundary conditions, again generalized for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length. In both these cases we validate our results using stochastic simulation. We then proceed to consider two variations on the basic diffusion model: a hybrid local/non-local scheme suitable for models involving sharp concentration gradients, and the implementation of biased jumping. In all cases we show that non-local jumping can deliver substantial time savings for stochastic simulations.

  4. Finding Jumps in Otherwise Smooth Curves: Identifying Critical Events in Political Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ratkovic, Marc T.

    2010-01-01

    Many social processes are stable and smooth in general, with discrete jumps. We develop a sequential segmentation spline method that can identify both the location and the number of discontinuities in a series of observations with a time component, while fitting a smooth spline between jumps, using a modified Bayesian Information Criterion statistic as a stopping rule. We explore the method in a large-n, unbalanced panel setting with George W. Bush’s approval data, a small-n time series with median DW-NOMINATE scores for each Congress over time, and a series of simulations. We compare the method to several extant smoothers, and the method performs favorably in terms of visual inspection, residual properties, and event detection. Finally, we discuss extensions of the method. PMID:20721311

  5. Association between traditional standing vertical jumps and a soccer-specific vertical jump.

    PubMed

    Requena, Bernardo; Garcia, Inmaculada; Requena, Francisco; Bressel, Eadric; Saez-Saez de Villarreal, Eduardo; Cronin, John

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationships between a soccer-specific vertical jump (ssVJ) test, that included common elements of a soccer VJ (e.g. run-up and intention to head), and three traditional VJ tests using elite soccer players. A secondary purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the VJs used in the analysis. A randomised order and counterbalanced design was used to assess the relationships between these VJs [countermovement jump (CMJ), drop jump for height (DJh), drop jump for maximum height and minimum ground contact time (DJh/t) and the ssVJ]. Take-off velocity, contact time and flight time were the dependent variables of interest and compared between jumps. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as measures of inter-session reliability. All VJ tests were found to have high ICCs (0.89-0.99) and acceptable within-subject CVs (<7.5%). All the ssVJ dependent variables were not significantly related (r<0.44) with similar variables from the CMJ and DJh tests and only moderately related (r=~0.49) with the DJh/t test variables. In addition, the DJh/t variables were not significantly correlated (r<0.47) with DJh and CMJ test variables. In conclusion, it would seem that the proposed ssVJ test and CMJ or DJh tests assess different leg qualities and thought should be given before using them interchangeably to assess or develop the same performance measures (i.e. velocity at take-off or jump height). PMID:24444234

  6. Simple jumping process with memory: Transport equation and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamińska, A.; Srokowski, T.

    2004-06-01

    We present a stochastic jumping process, defined in terms of jump-size probability density and jumping rate, which is a generalization of the well-known kangaroo process. The definition takes into account two process values: after and before the jump. Therefore, the process is able to preserve memory about its previous values. It possesses a simple stationary limit. Its master equation is interpreted as the kinetic equation with variable collision rate. The process can be easily applied to model systems which relax to distributions other than Maxwellian. The case of a constant jumping rate corresponds to the diffusion process, either normal or ballistic.

  7. Jumping performance of planthoppers (Hemiptera, Issidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2009-09-01

    The structure of the hind limbs and the kinematics of their movements that propel jumping in planthopper insects (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Fulgoroidea, Issidae) were analysed. The propulsion for a jump was delivered by rapid movements of the hind legs that both move in the same plane beneath the body and parallel to its longitudinal axis, as revealed in high-speed sequences of images captured at rates up to 7500 images s(-1). The first and key movement was the depression of both trochantera about their coxae, powered by large depressor muscles in the thorax, accompanied by rapid extension of the tibiae about their femora. The initial movements of the two trochantera of the hind legs were synchronised to within 0.03 ms. The hind legs are only 20% longer than the front and middle legs, represent 65% of the body length, and have a ratio of 1.8 relative to the cube root of the body mass. The two hind coxae have a different structure to those in frog- and leafhoppers. They are fused at the mid-line, covered ventrally by transparent cuticle, and each is fixed laterally to a part of the internal skeleton called the pleural arch that extends to the articulation of a hind wing. A small and pointed, ventral coxal protrusion covered in microtrichia engages with a raised, smooth, white patch on a dorsal femur when a hind leg is levated (cocked) in preparation for a jump. In the best jumps by a male Issus, the body was accelerated in 0.8 ms to a take-off velocity of 5.5 m s(-1), was subjected to a force of 719 g and was displaced a horizontal distance of 1.1 m. This performance required an energy output of 303 microJ, a power output of 388 mW and exerted a force of 141 mN, or more than 700 times its body mass. This performance implies that a catapult mechanism must be used, and that Issus ranks alongside the froghopper Philaenus as one of the best insect jumpers. PMID:19684220

  8. Katabatic jumps over Martian polar terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Smith, Isaac; Holt, Jack

    2015-04-01

    Recent observational and modeling studies have shed light on the key role of mesoscale phenomena in driving the Martian climate and giving rise to remarkable signatures in the temperature, wind, pressure, and aerosol fields of the Martian atmosphere. At the mesoscale, Mars appears as an intense and exotic counterpart to the Earth, mainly as a result of pronounced diurnal and regional contrasts of surface temperature, and the much thinner atmosphere. While observations of clear-cut katabatic events are difficult on Earth, except over vast ice sheets, those intense downslope circulations are widespread on Mars owing to near-surface radiative cooling and uneven topography. Their intensity and regularity can be witnessed through numerous aeolian signatures on the surface, and distinctive thermal signatures in the steepest craters and volcanoes. Several observations (radar observations, frost streaks, spectral analysis of ices, ...) concur to show that aeolian processes play a key role in glacial processes in Martian polar regions over geological timescales. A spectacular manifestation of this resides in elongated clouds that forms at the bottom of polar spiral troughs, which dominates the polar landscape both in the North and South. An analogy with the terrestrial "wall-of-snow" over e.g. Antarctica slopes or coastlines posits that those clouds are caused by local katabatic jumps, also named Loewe phenomena, which can be deemed similar to first order to hydraulic jumps in open channel flow. With mesoscale modeling in polar regions using 5 nested domains operating a model downscaling from horizontal resolutions of about twenty kilometers to 200 meters, we were able 1. to predict the near-surface wind structure over the whole Martian polar caps, with interactions between katabatic acceleration, Coriolis deflection, transient phenomena, and thermally-forced circulations by the ice / bare soil contrast and 2. to show that katabatic jumps form at the bottom of polar troughs

  9. Biomechanical analysis of the jump shot in basketball.

    PubMed

    Struzik, Artur; Pietraszewski, Bogdan; Zawadzki, Jerzy

    2014-09-29

    Basketball players usually score points during the game using the jump shot. For this reason, the jump shot is considered to be the most important element of technique in basketball and requires a high level of performance. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of the lower limbs during a jump shot without the ball and a countermovement jump without an arm swing. The differences between variables provide information about the potential that an athlete can utilise during a game when performing a jump shot. The study was conducted among 20 second-league basketball players by means of a Kistler force plate and the BTS SMART system for motion analysis. The variables measured included the take-off time, mean power, peak power, relative mean power, jump height, maximum landing force and calculated impact ratio. Surprisingly, more advantageous variables were found for the jump shot. This finding suggests a very high performance level in the jump shot in the studied group and a maximum utilisation of their motor abilities. Both types of jumps were characterised by high mean and peak power values and average heights. The high forces at landing, which result in considerable impact ratios, may have prompted the studied group to land softly. Use of the countermovement jump without an arm swing is recommended to assess and predict the progression of player's jumping ability. PMID:25414741

  10. Asymmetric seafloor spreading and short ridge jumps in the Australian-Antarctic discordance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Karen M.; Stock, Joann M.

    1995-08-01

    The crenulated geometry of the Southeast Indian ridge within the Australian-Antarctic discordance is formed by numerous spreading ridge segments that are offset, alternately to the north and south, by transform faults. Suggested causes for these offsets, which largely developed since ~ 20 Ma, include asymmetric seafloor spreading, ridge jumps, and propagating rifts that have transferred seafloor from one flank of the spreading ridge to the other. Each of these processes has operated at different times in different locations of the discordance; here we document an instance where a small (~ 20 km), young (< 0.2 Ma), southward ridge jump has contributed to the observed asymmetry. When aeromagnetic anomalies from the Project Investigator-1 survey are superposed on gravity anomalies computed from Geosat GM and ERM data, we find that in segment B4 of the discordance (between 125° and 126° E), the roughly east-west-trending gravity low, correlated with the axial valley, is 20 25 km south of the ridge axis position inferred from the center of magnetic anomaly 1. Elsewhere in the discordance, the inferred locations of the ridge axis from magnetics and gravity are in excellent agreement. Ship track data confirm these observations: portions of Moana Wave track crossing the ridge in B4 show that a topographic valley correlated with the gravity anomaly low lies south of the center of magnetic anomaly 1; while other ship track data that cross the spreading ridge in segments B3 and B5 demonstrate good agreement between the axial valley, the gravity anomaly low, and the central magnetic anomaly. Based on these observations, we speculate that the ridge axis in B4 has recently jumped to the south, from a ridge location closer to the center of the young normally magnetized crust, to that of the gravity anomaly low. The position of the gravity low essentially at the edge of normally magnetized crust requires a very recent (< 0.2 Ma) arrival of the ridge in this new location. Because

  11. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André; Uylings, Peter; Kędzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often considered a free fall, but when the mass of the bungee rope is taken into account, the bungee jumper reaches acceleration greater than g. This result is contrary to the usual experience with free falling objects and therefore hard to believe for many a person, even an experienced physicist. It is often a starting point for heated discussions about the quality of the experiments and the physics knowledge of the experimentalist, or it may even prompt complaints about the quality of current physics education. But experiments do reveal the truth and students can do them supported by information and communication technology (ICT) tools. We report on a research project done by secondary school students and use their work to discuss how measurements with sensors, video analysis of self-recorded high-speed video clips and computer modelling allow study of the physics of bungee jumping.

  12. A jumping cylinder on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, R. W.; Hernández-Gómez, J. J.; Marquina, V.

    2012-09-01

    The problem of a cylinder of mass m and radius r, with its centre of mass out of the cylinder’s axis, rolling on an inclined plane that makes an angle α with respect to the horizontal, is analysed. The equation of motion is partially solved to obtain the site where the cylinder loses contact with the inclined plane (jumps). Several simplifications are made: the analysed system consists of an homogeneous disc with a one-dimensional straight line mass parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r of the centre of the cylinder. To compare our results with experimental data, we use a styrofoam cylinder to which a long brass rod is embedded parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r from it, so the centre of mass lies at a distance d from the centre of the cylinder. Then the disc rolls without slipping on a long wooden ramp inclined at 15°, 30° and 45° with respect to the horizontal. To determine the jumping site, the movements are recorded with a high-speed video camera (Casio EX ZR100) at 240 and 480 frames per second. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  13. A jumping cylinder in an incline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Raul W.; Hernandez, Jorge; Marquina, Vivianne

    2012-02-01

    The problem of a cylinder of mass m and radius r, with its center of mass out of the cylinder axis, rolling in an incline that makes an angle α respect to the horizontal is analyzed. The equation of motion is solved to obtain the site where the cylinder loses contact with the incline (jumps). Several simplifications are made: the analyzed system consists of an homogeneous disc with a one dimensional straight line of mass parallel to the disc axis at a distance d < r of the center of the cylinder. To compare our results with experimental data, we use a Styrofoam cylinder of radius r = 10.0 ± 0.05 cm, high h = 5.55 ± 0.05 cm and a mass m1 = 24.45 ± 0.05 g, to which a 9.50 ± 0.01 mm diameter and 5.10 ± 0.001 cm long brass road of mass m2 = 30.75 ± 0.05 g was imbibed parallel to the disc axis at a distance of 5.40 ± 0.05 cm from it. Then the disc rolls on a 3.20 m long wooden ramp inclined at 30 and 45 respect to the horizontal. To determine the jumping site, the movements were recorded with a high-speed video camera (Casio EX ZR100) at 400 frames per second. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  14. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.

  15. Validation and influence of anthropometric and kinematic models of obese teenagers in vertical jump performance and mechanical internal energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Achard de Leluardière, F; Hajri, L N; Lacouture, P; Duboy, J; Frelut, M L; Peres, G

    2006-02-01

    There may be concerns about the validity of kinetic models when studying locomotion in obese subjects (OS). The aim of the present study was to improve and validate a relevant representation of obese subject from four kinetic models. Fourteen teenagers with severe primary obesity (BMI = 40 +/- 5.2 kg/m(2)), were studied during jumping. The jumps were filmed by six cameras (synchronized, 50 Hz), associated with a force-plate (1,000 Hz). All the tested models were valid; the linear mechanical analysis of the jumps gave similar results (p > 0.05); but there were significantly different segment inertias when considering the subjects' abdomen (p < 0.01), which was associated with a significantly higher mechanical internal energy expenditure (p < 0.01) than that estimated from Dempster's and Hanavan's model, by about 40 and 30%. The validation of a modelling specifically for obese subjects will enable a better understanding of their locomotion. PMID:16399510

  16. Potential for Non-Contact ACL Injury Between Step-Close-Jump and Hop-Jump Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-I; Gu, Chin-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ling; Chang, Mu-San

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury. Key points The different landing techniques required for these two stop-jump tasks do not necessarily affect the jump height. Hop-jump decreased the hip joint angular velocity at initial foot contact with ground, which could lead to an increasing peak posterior GRF during the landing phase. Hop-jump decreased hip and knee joint angular flexion displacement during the landing, which could increase the peak vertical loading rate during the landing phase. PMID:24149397

  17. Jumping robots: a biomimetic solution to locomotion across rough terrain.

    PubMed

    Armour, Rhodri; Paskins, Keith; Bowyer, Adrian; Vincent, Julian; Megill, William; Bomphrey, Richard

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces jumping robots as a means to traverse rough terrain; such terrain can pose problems for traditional wheeled, tracked and legged designs. The diversity of jumping mechanisms found in nature is explored to support the theory that jumping is a desirable ability for a robot locomotion system to incorporate, and then the size-related constraints are determined from first principles. A series of existing jumping robots are presented and their performance summarized. The authors present two new biologically inspired jumping robots, Jollbot and Glumper, both of which incorporate additional locomotion techniques of rolling and gliding respectively. Jollbot consists of metal hoop springs forming a 300 mm diameter sphere, and when jumping it raises its centre of gravity by 0.22 m and clears a height of 0.18 m. Glumper is of octahedral shape, with four 'legs' that each comprise two 500 mm lengths of CFRP tube articulating around torsion spring 'knees'. It is able to raise its centre of gravity by 1.60 m and clears a height of 1.17 m. The jumping performance of the jumping robot designs presented is discussed and compared against some specialized jumping animals. Specific power output is thought to be the performance-limiting factor for a jumping robot, which requires the maximization of the amount of energy that can be stored together with a minimization of mass. It is demonstrated that this can be achieved through optimization and careful materials selection. PMID:17848786

  18. Intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Lucas H.; Noller, Harry F.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of tRNA and mRNA during protein synthesis is believed to be coupled to structural changes in the ribosome. The “ratchet model,” based on cryo-EM reconstructions of ribosome complexes, invokes relative movement of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits in this process; however, evidence that directly demonstrates a requirement for intersubunit movement during translocation is lacking. To address this problem, we created an intersubunit disulfide cross-link to restrict potential movement. The cross-linked ribosomes were unable to carry out polypeptide synthesis; this inhibition was completely reversed upon reduction of the disulfide bridge. In vitro assays showed that the cross-linked ribosomes were specifically blocked in elongation factor G-dependent translocation. These findings show that intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation, accounting for the universal two-subunit architecture of ribosomes. PMID:17360328

  19. Diagnostic studies of ensemble forecast "jumps"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Linus; Hewson, Tim; Ferranti, Laura; Rodwell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    During 2015 we saw exceptional consistency in successive seasonal forecasts produced at ECMWF, for the winter period 2015/16, right across the globe. This winter was characterised by a well-predicted and unusually strong El Nino, and some have ascribed the consistency to that. For most of December this consistency was mirrored in the (separate) ECMWF monthly forecast system, which correctly predicted anomalously strong (mild) zonal flow, over the North Atlantic and western Eurasia, even in forecasts for weeks 3 and 4. In monthly forecasts in general these weeks are often devoid of strong signals. However in late December and early January strong signals, even in week 2, proved to be incorrect, most notably over the North Atlantic and Eurasian sectors. Indeed on at least two occasions the outcome was beyond the ensemble forecast range over Scandinavia. In one of these conditions flipped from extreme mild to extreme cold as a high latitude block developed. Temperature prediction is very important to many customers, notably those dealing with renewable energy, because cold weather causes increased demand but also tends to coincide with reduced wind power production. So understandably jumps can cause consternation amongst some customer groups, and are very difficult to handle operationally. This presentation will discuss the results of initial diagnostic investigations into what caused the "ensemble jumps", particularly at the week two lead, though reference will also be made to a related shorter range (day 3) jump that was important for flooding over the UK. Initial results suggest that an inability of the ECMWF model to correctly represent convective outbreaks over North America (that for winter-time were quite extreme) played an important role. Significantly, during this period, an unusually large amount of upper air data over North America was rejected or ascribed low weight. These results bear similarities to previous diagnostic studies at ECMWF, wherein major

  20. What Drives the Translocation of Proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Peskin, Charles S.; Oster, George F.

    1992-05-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems.

  1. Stress and translocation: alterations in the stress physiology of translocated birds

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Molly J.; Delehanty, David J.; Romero, L. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Translocation and reintroduction have become major conservation actions in attempts to create self-sustaining wild populations of threatened species. However, avian translocations have a high failure rate and causes for failure are poorly understood. While ‘stress’ is often cited as an important factor in translocation failure, empirical evidence of physiological stress is lacking. Here we show that experimental translocation leads to changes in the physiological stress response in chukar partridge, Alectoris chukar. We found that capture alone significantly decreased the acute glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT) response, but adding exposure to captivity and transport further altered the stress response axis (the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis) as evident from a decreased sensitivity of the negative feedback system. Animals that were exposed to the entire translocation procedure, in addition to the reduced acute stress response and disrupted negative feedback, had significantly lower baseline CORT concentrations and significantly reduced body weight. These data indicate that translocation alters stress physiology and that chronic stress is potentially a major factor in translocation failure. Under current practices, the restoration of threatened species through translocation may unwittingly depend on the success of chronically stressed individuals. This conclusion emphasizes the need for understanding and alleviating translocation-induced chronic stress in order to use most effectively this important conservation tool. PMID:19324794

  2. Stress and translocation: alterations in the stress physiology of translocated birds.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Molly J; Delehanty, David J; Romero, L Michael

    2009-06-01

    Translocation and reintroduction have become major conservation actions in attempts to create self-sustaining wild populations of threatened species. However, avian translocations have a high failure rate and causes for failure are poorly understood. While 'stress' is often cited as an important factor in translocation failure, empirical evidence of physiological stress is lacking. Here we show that experimental translocation leads to changes in the physiological stress response in chukar partridge, Alectoris chukar. We found that capture alone significantly decreased the acute glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT) response, but adding exposure to captivity and transport further altered the stress response axis (the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) as evident from a decreased sensitivity of the negative feedback system. Animals that were exposed to the entire translocation procedure, in addition to the reduced acute stress response and disrupted negative feedback, had significantly lower baseline CORT concentrations and significantly reduced body weight. These data indicate that translocation alters stress physiology and that chronic stress is potentially a major factor in translocation failure. Under current practices, the restoration of threatened species through translocation may unwittingly depend on the success of chronically stressed individuals. This conclusion emphasizes the need for understanding and alleviating translocation-induced chronic stress in order to use most effectively this important conservation tool. PMID:19324794

  3. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hogenbirk, Marc A.; Heideman, Marinus R.; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  4. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. PMID:22374876

  5. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogenbirk, Marc A; Heideman, Marinus R; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-06-28

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  6. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Dreiseikelmann, B

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal gene transfer and transkingdom sex. Analyses of genes and gene products involved in DNA transfer suggest that DNA is transferred through a protein channel spanning the bacterial envelope. No common model exists for DNA translocation during phage infection. Perhaps various mechanisms are necessary as a result of the different morphologies of bacteriophages. The DNA translocation processes during conjugation, T-DNA transfer, and transformation are more consistent and may even be compared to the excretion of some proteins. On the basis of analogies and homologies between the proteins involved in DNA translocation and protein secretion, a common basic model for these processes is presented. PMID:7968916

  7. Neurons controlling jumping in froghopper insects.

    PubMed

    Bräunig, Peter; Burrows, Malcolm

    2008-03-01

    The neurons innervating muscles that deliver the enormous power enabling froghopper insects to excel at jumping were revealed by backfilling the nerves from those muscles. The huge trochanteral depressor muscle (M133) of a hind leg consists of four parts. The two largest parts (M133b,c) occupy most of the metathorax and are innervated by the same two motor neurons that have small, laterally placed somata in the metathoracic ganglion and axons in nerve N3C(2). They are also supplied by three dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with the largest diameter somata in the central nervous system. A small metathoracic part of the muscle (M133d) is supplied by two motor neurons with lateral somata and by common inhibitory motor neuron CI(1), all with axons in nerve N3C(3) The motor neuron with the larger soma has a thick primary neurite that projects across the midline of the ganglion so that its branches overlap those of its symmetrical counterpart,innervating the same muscle of the other hind leg. The fourth coxal part of the muscle (M133a) is innervated by two motor neurons (one with a ventral and the other with a dorsal and lateral soma), by CI(1), and by a DUM neuron with a small soma. All have axons in nerve N5A. The two trochanteral levator muscles of a hind leg are contained within the coxa and are separately innervated by nerves N3B and N4, respectively. The properties of the different motor neurons are discussed in the context of the neural patterns that generate jumping. PMID:18095320

  8. Generator estimation of Markov jump processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzner, P.; Dittmer, E.; Jahnke, T.; Schütte, Ch.

    2007-11-01

    Estimating the generator of a continuous-time Markov jump process based on incomplete data is a problem which arises in various applications ranging from machine learning to molecular dynamics. Several methods have been devised for this purpose: a quadratic programming approach (cf. [D.T. Crommelin, E. Vanden-Eijnden, Fitting timeseries by continuous-time Markov chains: a quadratic programming approach, J. Comp. Phys. 217 (2006) 782-805]), a resolvent method (cf. [T. Müller, Modellierung von Proteinevolution, PhD thesis, Heidelberg, 2001]), and various implementations of an expectation-maximization algorithm ([S. Asmussen, O. Nerman, M. Olsson, Fitting phase-type distributions via the EM algorithm, Scand. J. Stat. 23 (1996) 419-441; I. Holmes, G.M. Rubin, An expectation maximization algorithm for training hidden substitution models, J. Mol. Biol. 317 (2002) 753-764; U. Nodelman, C.R. Shelton, D. Koller, Expectation maximization and complex duration distributions for continuous time Bayesian networks, in: Proceedings of the twenty-first conference on uncertainty in AI (UAI), 2005, pp. 421-430; M. Bladt, M. Sørensen, Statistical inference for discretely observed Markov jump processes, J.R. Statist. Soc. B 67 (2005) 395-410]). Some of these methods, however, seem to be known only in a particular research community, and have later been reinvented in a different context. The purpose of this paper is to compile a catalogue of existing approaches, to compare the strengths and weaknesses, and to test their performance in a series of numerical examples. These examples include carefully chosen model problems and an application to a time series from molecular dynamics.

  9. Predator Mimicry: Metalmark Moths Mimic Their Jumping Spider Predators

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Jadranka; Wagner, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Cases of mimicry provide many of the nature's most convincing examples of natural selection. Here we report evidence for a case of predator mimicry in which metalmark moths in the genus Brenthia mimic jumping spiders, one of their predators. In controlled trials, Brenthia had higher survival rates than other similarly sized moths in the presence of jumping spiders and jumping spiders responded to Brenthia with territorial displays, indicating that Brenthia were sometimes mistaken for jumping spiders, and not recognized as prey. Our experimental results and a review of wing patterns of other insects indicate that jumping spider mimicry is more widespread than heretofore appreciated, and that jumping spiders are probably an important selective pressure shaping the evolution of diurnal insects that perch on vegetation. PMID:17183674

  10. Evaluation of Metabolic Stress between Jumping at Different Cadences on the Digi-Jump Machine

    PubMed Central

    LYONS, THOMAS S.; NAVALTA, JAMES W.; CALLAHAN, ZACHARY J.

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that healthy adults achieve a minimum of thirty minutes of moderate intensity aerobic exercise five days per week. While cycling, walking, and jogging are commonly observed methods of achieving these recommendations, another option may be repetitive jumping. The purpose of this study was to examine the metabolic responses between repetitive jumping at a cadence of 120 jumps per minute (JPMs) vs. 100 JPMs when utilizing the Digi-Jump machine. Twenty-eight subjects completed two jumping trials, one at 120 JPMs and one at 100 JPMs. Subjects jumped until volitional exhaustion, or for a maximum of fifteen minutes. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed each minute of each exercise trial. RPE was differentiated, in that subjects reported perceived exertion of their total body, their upper-leg, and their lower leg. Results of this study indicated that there was no significant difference between the two trials for VO2, HR, or total body RPE. Differences were reported between trials for peak and average RER, with the 120 JPM trial eliciting a lower RER for both (peak: 1.08 ± .087 vs. 1.17 ± .1 p=.000; average: .99 ± .076 vs. 1.04 ± .098 p=.002), peak upper leg RPE (120: 15.29 ± 3.89 vs. 100: 16.75 ± 2.52 p=.022), and average lower leg RPE (120: 15.04 ± 2.55 vs. 100: 13.94 ± 2.02 p=.019). Also, there was a significant difference in exercise duration between the trials, with subjects able to exercise longer during the 120 JPM trial (12.4 ± 3.42 mins vs. 9.68 ± 4.31 mins p=.000). These data indicate that while the physiological stress may not be different between the two trials as indicated by VO2 and HR, the 120 JPM trial appears less strenuous as evidenced by RER values and by subjects’ ability to exercise longer at that cadence. PMID:27182351

  11. Pricing turbo warrants under mixed-exponential jump diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianfeng; Xu, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    Turbo warrant is a special type of barrier options in which the rebate is calculated as another exotic option. In this paper, using Laplace transforms we obtain the valuation of turbo warrant under the mixed-exponential jump diffusion model, which is able to approximate any jump size distribution. The numerical Laplace inversion examples verify that the analytical solutions are accurate. The results of simulation confirm the argument that jump risk should not be ignored in the valuation of turbo warrants.

  12. Hydrodynamics of jumping for prey capture in Archer fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, A. H.; Shih, A. M.

    2010-11-01

    The prey capture behavior by jumping Archer fish (Toxotes microlepisis) was investigated using high speed imaging and particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Archer fish are renowned for their ability to spit jets of water at insects and also to jump out of the water to capture their prey. Our investigations reveal that the fish typically fail to reach their prey by jumping when the bait is placed at a height above 3.5 body lengths. After jumping and failing, the fish do not typically jump again, only spit. For our experiments bait was placed between 0.5 and 3.5 body lengths (BL) above the free surface, within reach of jumping, and thus the fish rarely spit unless they missed first by jumping. It is observed that the fish typically position their bodies under the bait with a slight angle, hover momentarily, snap in their pectoral fins, and then flap their tail in an "S-start"-type maneuver with a fixed number of cycles, which increases as a function of bait height. High speed imaging, including time-resolved PIV, was used to capture the kinematics of the jumping behavior and compare the fluid impulse generated during the fast start, jump maneuver with the total change in momentum of the fish body. Maximum acceleration was observed in the early stages of the jump maneuver and was often on the order of 5 to 15 times gravity. Correlations between the maximum energy, power in, number of tail beats, jump height and overall jumping kinematics will be discussed.

  13. Automatic Segmentation of Mechanically Inhomogeneous Tissues Based on Deformation Gradient Jump.

    PubMed

    Witzenburg, Colleen M; Dhume, Rohit Y; Lake, Spencer P; Barocas, Victor H

    2016-01-01

    Variations in properties, active behavior, injury, scarring, and/or disease can all cause a tissue's mechanical behavior to be heterogeneous. Advances in imaging technology allow for accurate full-field displacement tracking of both in vitro and in vivo deformation from an applied load. While detailed strain fields provide some insight into tissue behavior, material properties are usually determined by fitting stress-strain behavior with a constitutive equation. However, the determination of the mechanical behavior of heterogeneous soft tissue requires a spatially varying constitutive equation (i.e., one in which the material parameters vary with position). We present an approach that computationally dissects the sample domain into many homogeneous subdomains, wherein subdomain boundaries are formed by applying a betweenness based graphical analysis to the deformation gradient field to identify locations with large discontinuities. This novel partitioning technique successfully determined the shape, size and location of regions with locally similar material properties for: (1) a series of simulated soft tissue samples prescribed with both abrupt and gradual changes in anisotropy strength, prescribed fiber alignment, stiffness, and nonlinearity, (2) tissue analogs (PDMS and collagen gels) which were tested biaxially and speckle tracked (3) and soft tissues which exhibited a natural variation in properties (cadaveric supraspinatus tendon), a pathologic variation in properties (thoracic aorta containing transmural plaque), and active behavior (contracting cardiac sheet). The routine enables the dissection of samples computationally rather than physically, allowing for the study of small tissues specimens with unknown and irregular inhomogeneity. PMID:26168433

  14. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  15. Relative Intensity Influences the Degree of Correspondence of Jump Squats and Push Jerks to Countermovement Jumps.

    PubMed

    Cushion, Emily J; Goodwin, Jon E; Cleather, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    Cushion, EJ, Goodwin, JE, and Cleather, DJ. Relative intensity influences the degree of correspondence of jump squats and push jerks to countermovement jumps. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1255-1264, 2016-The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical similarity between push jerk (PJ) and jump squat (JS) to countermovement jump (CMJ) and further understand the effect increasing external load may have on this relationship. Eight physically trained men (age 22 ± 3; height 176 ± 7 kg; weight 83 ± 8 kg) performed an unloaded CMJ followed by JS under a range of loads (10, 25, 35, and 50% 1RM back squat) and PJ (30, 50, 65, and 75% 1RM push jerk). A portable force platform and high-speed camera both collecting at 250 Hz were used to establish joint moments and impulse during the propulsive phase of the movements. A standard inverse dynamics model was used to determine joint moment and impulse at the hip, knee, and ankle. Significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05) were shown between CMJ knee joint moment and JS knee joint moment at 25% load and PJ knee joint moment at 30 and 50% load. Significant correlations were also observed between CMJ knee joint impulse and JS knee joint impulse at 10% load and PJ knee joint moment at 30 and 65% load. Significant correlation was also observed between CMJ hip joint impulse and PJ hip joint impulse at 30% load. No significant joint × load interaction was shown as load increased for either PJ or JS. Results from the study suggest partial correspondence between PJ and JS to CMJ, where a greater mechanical similarity was observed between the PJ and CMJ. This interaction is load and joint dependent where lower relative loads showed greatest mechanical similarity. Therefore using lower relative loads when programming may provide a greater transfer of training effect. PMID:26439777

  16. Molecular studies of free and translocation trisomy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Lefort, G.

    1994-09-01

    Twenty cases of trisomy 13 were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra chromosome. Six cases had translocation trisomy: two de novo rob(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;13q)r(13). Eighteen of nineteen informative patients were consistant with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in any of the three t(13q;13q) cases indicate that all were most likely isochromosomes of post-meiotic origin. In addition, two free trisomy cases were compatible with a somatic origin. Two mosaic free trisomy-13 cases, however, were both consistent with a maternal meiotic origin. The patient with a paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13;14) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. One balanced (non-trisomic) case with a non-mosaic 45,-13,-13,+t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologs, as has been found for all homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. It is therefore also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. We cannot therefore infer anything about the origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the two cases with de novo t(13q;14q) plus a maternally derived trisomy 13.

  17. Microbiology of bacterial translocation in humans

    PubMed Central

    O'Boyle, C; MacFie, J; Mitchell, C; Johnstone, D; Sagar, P; Sedman, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gut translocation of bacteria has been shown in both animal and human studies. Evidence from animal studies that links bacterial translocation to the development of postoperative sepsis and multiple organ failure has yet to be confirmed in humans. 
Aims—To examine the spectrum of bacteria involved in translocation in surgical patients undergoing laparotomy and to determine the relation between nodal migration of bacteria and the development of postoperative septic complications. 
Methods—Mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), serosal scrapings, and peripheral blood from 448 surgical patients undergoing laparotomy were analysed using standard microbiological techniques. 
Results—Bacterial translocation was identified in 69 patients (15.4%). The most common organism identified was Escherichia coli (54%). Both enteric bacteria, typical of indigenous intestinal flora, and non-enteric bacteria were isolated. Postoperative septic complications developed in 104 patients (23%). Enteric organisms were responsible in 74% of patients. Forty one per cent of patients who had evidence of bacterial translocation developed sepsis compared with 14% in whom no organisms were cultured (p<0.001). Septic morbidity was more frequent when a greater diversity of bacteria resided within the MLN, but this was not statistically significant. 
Conclusion—Bacterial translocation is associated with a significant increase in the development of postoperative sepsis in surgical patients. The organisms responsible for septic morbidity are similar in spectrum to those observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes. These data strongly support the gut origin hypothesis of sepsis in humans. 

 Keywords: bacterial translocation; mesenteric lymph nodes; serosal scrapings; enteric bacteria; postoperative sepsis PMID:9505882

  18. Exploiting knowledge of jump-up and jump-down frequencies to determine the parameters of a Duffing oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlan, Roszaidi; Brennan, Michael J.; Kovacic, Ivana; Mace, Brian R.; Burrow, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    This work concerns the application of certain non-linear phenomena - jump frequencies in a base-excited Duffing oscillator - to the estimation of the parameters of the system. First, approximate analytical expressions are derived for the relationships between the jump-up and jump-down frequencies, the damping ratio and the cubic stiffness coefficient. Then, experimental results, together with the results of numerical simulations, are presented to show how knowledge of these frequencies can be exploited.

  19. Jump dynamics due to jump datum of compressible viscous Navier-Stokes flows in a bounded plane domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Jae Ryong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, when the initial density has a jump across an interior curve in a bounded domain, we show unique existence, piecewise regularity and jump discontinuity dynamics for the density and the velocity vector governed by the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible viscous barotropic flows. A critical difficulty is in controlling the gradient of the pressure across the jump curve. This is resolved by constructing a vector function associated with the pressure jump value on the convecting curve and extending it to the whole domain.

  20. Bilateral asymmetries in max effort single-leg vertical jumps.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Thomas M; Lawson, Brooke R; Reiser, Raoul F

    2005-01-01

    While asymmetries in the lower extremity during jumping may have implications during rehabilitation, it is not clear if healthy subjects should be expected to jump equivalently on each leg. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if asymmetries exist in maximal effort single-leg vertical jumps. After obtaining university-approved informed consent, 13 men and 12 women with competitive volleyball playing experience and no injuries of the lower-extremity that would predispose them to asymmetries participated. After thorough warm-up, five maximal effort vertical jumps with countermovement were performed on each leg (random order) with ground reaction forces and lower extremity kinematics recorded. The best three jumps from each leg were analyzed, assigning the leg with the highest jump height average as the dominant side. Asymmetry was assessed by determining statistical significance in the dominant versus non-dominant sides (p < 0.05). A significant interaction existed between side and gender for thigh length and peak vertical ground reaction force. Women had a significantly shorter thigh and men a greater peak vertical ground reaction force on their dominant side. All other parameters were assessed as whole group. Jumps were significantly greater off the dominant leg (2.8 cm on average). No other differences between sides were observed. Significant differences in magnitude (p < 0.05) existed between the men and women in jump height, several anthropometric parameters, minimum ankle and hip angles, and vertical ground reaction forces (peak and average). In conclusion, though a person may jump slightly higher on one leg relative to the other, and women may jump slightly differently than men, the magnitude of the difference should be relatively small and due to the multi-factorial nature of jump performance, individual parameters related to performance may not be consistently different. PMID:15850125

  1. Hofmeister effect of anions on calcium translocation by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Peruzzi, Niccolò; Ninham, Barry W.; Dei, Luigi; Nostro, Pierandrea Lo

    2015-10-01

    The occurrence of Hofmeister (specific ion) effects in various membrane-related physiological processes is well documented. For example the effect of anions on the transport activity of the ion pump Na+, K+-ATPase has been investigated. Here we report on specific anion effects on the ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Current measurements following ATP concentration jumps on SERCA-containing vesicles adsorbed on solid supported membranes were carried out in the presence of different potassium salts. We found that monovalent anions strongly interfere with ATP-induced Ca2+ translocation by SERCA, according to their increasing chaotropicity in the Hofmeister series. On the contrary, a significant increase in Ca2+ translocation was observed in the presence of sulphate. We suggest that the anions can affect the conformational transition between the phosphorylated intermediates E1P and E2P of the SERCA cycle. In particular, the stabilization of the E1P conformation by chaotropic anions seems to be related to their adsorption at the enzyme/water and/or at the membrane/water interface, while the more kosmotropic species affect SERCA conformation and functionality by modifying the hydration layers of the enzyme.

  2. Biomechanical analysis of squat jump and countermovement jump from varying starting positions.

    PubMed

    Mackala, Krzysztof; Stodółka, Jacek; Siemienski, Adam; Coh, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 2 strategies, defined by foot placement during the initiation of the take-off on performance in vertical jumps. The additional area of interest in this experiment was whether technique of the take-off phase might be an exploratory factor that has different electromyogram (EMG) muscle activity during squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) performed starting from the standard position, with parallel foot placement, and from the experimental one, with straddle foot placement. Six well-experienced male 100-400 m sprinters, who were members of the Polish youth and senior national team (mean values: age 21.6 years, best performance: 100 m in 10.54 seconds and 400 m in 45.54 seconds), performed vertical SJ and vertical CMJ from 2 initial positions with different foot placement. To collect all selected kinematic and kinetic data, the video recording system BTS Vixta was used in conjunction with force platforms (Kistler model 9286B). The latest system for 3D motion analysis, BTS SMART, based on the passive IR reflective markers was also applied. Electromyograms of 6 lower limb muscles were collected using a Noraxon EMG device. The CMJ was on average 7 cm higher than the SJ (CMJ, 85 cm and SJ, 78 cm), which amounts to 8.97%. This was not because of the increase of center of gravity (COG) velocity at take-off because velocities of center of gravity (COG) projection were almost equal (SJ, 2.93 m·scompared with CMJ, 2.99 m·s). No significant differences of both magnitude and rate of development of the muscle torques and powers between jumps were found, but when we analyzed the problem with division into single legs (right and left) and with division into different jumps (SJ and CMJ), the differences were evident. The profiles of EMG activity of selected muscles showed some differences between SJ and CMJ. The vertical SJ and CMJ performance measurement may be of value to coaches and conditioning specialists who

  3. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M

    2016-04-14

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly. PMID:27083746

  4. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  5. [Bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Rose, I; Vakilzadeh, F

    1991-12-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is a rare type of neurofibromatosis. We report a case of bilateral manifestation, review the literature on this extremely uncommon variant, and discuss the possible causative mechanisms and the genetic risk of segmental neurofibromatosis. PMID:1765491

  6. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  7. Sipunculans and segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kristof, Alen; Brinkmann, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Comparative molecular, developmental and morphogenetic analyses show that the three major segmented animal groups—Lophotrochozoa, Ecdysozoa and Vertebrata—use a wide range of ontogenetic pathways to establish metameric body organization. Even in the life history of a single specimen, different mechanisms may act on the level of gene expression, cell proliferation, tissue differentiation and organ system formation in individual segments. Accordingly, in some polychaete annelids the first three pairs of segmental peripheral neurons arise synchronously, while the metameric commissures of the ventral nervous system form in anterior-posterior progression. Contrary to traditional belief, loss of segmentation may have occurred more often than commonly assumed, as exemplified in the sipunculans, which show remnants of segmentation in larval stages but are unsegmented as adults. The developmental plasticity and potential evolutionary lability of segmentation nourishes the controversy of a segmented bilaterian ancestor versus multiple independent evolution of segmentation in respective metazoan lineages. PMID:19513266

  8. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  9. Motor control of landing from a countermovement jump in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, C N; Theisen, D; Willems, P A; Schepens, B

    2016-05-15

    Landing from a jump implies proper positioning of the lower limb segments and the generation of an adequate muscular force to cope with the imminent collision with the ground. This study assesses how a hypogravitational environment affects the control of landing after a countermovement jump (CMJ). Eight participants performed submaximal CMJs on Earth (1-g condition) and in a weightlessness environment with simulated gravity conditions generated by a pull-down force (1-, 0.6-, 0.4-, and 0.2-g0 conditions). External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments, and muscular activity of six lower limb muscles were recorded. 1) All subjects were able to jump and stabilize their landing in all experimental conditions, except one subject in 0.2-g0 condition. 2) The mechanical behavior of lower limb muscles switches during landing from a stiff spring to a compliant spring associated with a damper. This is true whatever the environment, on Earth as well as in environments where sensory inputs are altered. 3) The motor control of landing in simulated 1 g0 reveals an increased "safety margin" strategy, illustrated by increased stiffness and damping coefficient compared with landing on Earth. 4) The motor command is adjusted to the task constraints: muscular activity of lower limb extensors and flexors, stiffness and damping coefficient decrease according to the decreased gravity level. Our results show that even if in daily living gravity can be perceived as a constant factor, subjects can cope with altered sensory signals, taking advantage of the remaining information (visual and/or decreased proprioceptive inputs). PMID:26846555

  10. Vortex jump behavior in coupled nanomagnetic heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Phatak, C.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Heinonen, O.

    2014-11-24

    The spin configuration and magnetic behavior in patterned nanostructures can be controlled by manipulating the interplay between the competing energy terms. This in turn requires fundamental knowledge of the magnetic interactions at the local nanometer scale. Here, we report on the spin structure and magnetization behavior of patterned discs containing exchange coupled ferromagnetic layers with additional exchange bias to an antiferromagnetic layer. The magnetization reversal was explored by direct local visualization of the domain behavior using in-situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, from which quantitative magnetic induction maps were reconstructed. The roles of the main competing energy terms were elucidated and the reversal mechanism was identified as a coupled phenomenon of incoherent rotation in the exchange-biased layer and localized vortex nucleation and discontinuous propagation in the free layer, including an anomalous jump in the trajectory. The observations were supported by micromagnetic simulations and modeled phase shift simulations. The work presented here provides fundamental insights into opportunities for macroscopic control of the energy landscape of magnetic heterostructures for functional applications.

  11. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  12. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials. PMID:26880700

  13. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials. PMID:26880700

  14. Possible and Impossible Segments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rachel; Pullum, Geoffrey K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relationship between phonetic possibility and phonological permissibility of segment types. Specific focus is on whether there are any phonetically impossible segments phonologically permissible, and whether there are any phonetically possible segments phonologically impermissable. Examines the case of nasality spreading in Sudanese…

  15. How Can We Tell if Frogs Jump Further?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Tom, Brian D. M.

    2011-01-01

    How effective is training frogs to jump? This is perhaps the most frequent question in biology that is subjected to statistical analysis: does a treatment make a difference? One can examine whether there is indeed a training effect, by first assuming the opposite. That is, the authors assume that training has no effect on the mean distance jumped.…

  16. Lift-off dynamics in a simple jumping robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Lesov, Alex; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2013-03-01

    Jumping is an important behavior utilized by animals to escape predation, hunt, reach higher ground, and as a primary mode of locomotion. Many mathematical and physical robot models use numerous parameters and multi-link legs to accurately model jumping dynamics. However, a simple robot model can reveal important principles of high performance jumping. We study vertical jumping in a simple robot comprising an actuated mass-spring arrangement. The actuator frequency and phase are systematically varied to find optimal performance. Optimal jumps occur above and below (but not at) the robot's resonant frequency f0. Two distinct jumping modes emerge: a simple jump which is optimal above f0 is achievable with a squat maneuver, and a peculiar stutter jump which is optimal below f0 is generated with a counter-movement. A simple dynamical model reveals how optimal lift-off results from non-resonant transient dynamics. An expanded explanation of this work is provided at http://crablab.gatech.edu/pages/jumpingrobot/index.html This work was supported by the GEM Consortium, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, ARL MAST CTA, and NSF PoLS.

  17. A Safe and Effective Modification of Thomson's Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waschke, Felix; Strunz, Andreas; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The electrical circuit of the jumping ring experiment based on discharging a capacitor is optimized. The setup is scoop proof at 46 V and yet the ring jumps more than 9 m high. The setup is suitable for both lectures and student laboratory work in higher education. (Contains 1 table, 8 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  18. Knee Muscular Control During Jump Landing in Multidirections

    PubMed Central

    Sinsurin, Komsak; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Jalayondeja, Wattana; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    Background Jump landing is a complex movement in sports. While competing and practicing, athletes frequently perform multi-planar jump landing. Anticipatory muscle activity could influence the amount of knee flexion and prepare the knee for dynamic weight bearing such as landing tasks. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine knee muscle function and knee flexion excursion as athletes naturally performed multi-direction jump landing. Materials and Methods Eighteen male athletes performed the jump-landing test in four directions: forward (0°), 30° diagonal, 60° diagonal, and lateral (90°). Muscles tested were vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF). A ViconTM 612 workstation collected the kinematic data. An electromyography was synchronized with the ViconTM Motion system to quantify dynamic muscle function. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results Jump-landing direction significantly influenced (P < 0.05) muscle activities of VL, RF, and ST and knee flexion excursion. Jumpers landed with a trend of decreasing knee flexion excursion and ST muscle activity 100 ms before foot contact progressively from forward to lateral directions of jump landing. Conclusions A higher risk of knee injury might occur during lateral jump landing than forward and diagonal directions. Athletes should have more practice in jump landing in lateral direction to avoid injury. Landing technique with high knee flexion in multi-directions should be taught to jumpers for knee injury prevention. PMID:27625758

  19. Could the deep squat jump predict weightlifting performance?

    PubMed

    Vizcaya, Francisco J; Viana, Oscar; del Olmo, Miguel Fernandez; Acero, Rafael Martin

    2009-05-01

    This research was carried out with the aim of describing the deep squat jump (DSJ) and comparing it with the squat (SJ) and countermovement (CMJ) jumps, to introduce it as a strength testing tool in the monitoring and control of training in strength and power sports. Forty-eight male subjects (21 weightlifters, 12 triathletes, and 15 physical education students) performed 3 trials of DSJ, SJ, and CMJ with a 1-minute rest among them. For the weightlifters, snatch and clean and jerk results during the Spanish Championship 2004 and the 35th EU Championships 2007 were collected to study the relationship among vertical jumps and weightlifters' performance. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences between groups in the vertical jumps, with the highest jumps for the weightlifters and the lowest for the triathletes. An ANOVA for repeated measures (type of jump) showed better results for DSJ and CMJ than SJ in all groups. A linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between weightlifting and vertical jump performances. Correlations among the weightlifting performance and the vertical jumps were also calculated and determined using Pearson r. Results have shown that both CMJ and DSJ are strongly correlated with weightlifting ability. Therefore, both measures can be useful for coaches as a strength testing tool in the monitoring and control of training in weightlifting. PMID:19387408

  20. A unified model for the long and high jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helene, O.; Yamashita, M. T.

    2005-10-01

    A simple model based on the maximum energy that an athlete can produce in a small time interval is used to describe the high and long jump. Conservation of angular momentum is used to explain why an athlete should run horizontally to perform a vertical jump. Our results agree with world records.

  1. Velocity of DNA during translocation through a solid-state nanopore.

    PubMed

    Plesa, Calin; van Loo, Nick; Ketterer, Philip; Dietz, Hendrik; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-14

    While understanding translocation of DNA through a solid-state nanopore is vital for exploiting its potential for sensing and sequencing at the single-molecule level, surprisingly little is known about the dynamics of the propagation of DNA through the nanopore. Here we use linear double-stranded DNA molecules, assembled by the DNA origami technique, with markers at known positions in order to determine for the first time the local velocity of different segments along the length of the molecule. We observe large intramolecular velocity fluctuations, likely related to changes in the drag force as the DNA blob unfolds. Furthermore, we observe an increase in the local translocation velocity toward the end of the translocation process, consistent with a speeding up due to unfolding of the last part of the DNA blob. We use the velocity profile to estimate the uncertainty in determining the position of a feature along the DNA given its temporal location and demonstrate the error introduced by assuming a constant translocation velocity. PMID:25496458

  2. FISH analysis with locus-specific probes in sperm from two translocation carrier men.

    PubMed

    Durak, B; Ozön, Y H; Ozdemir, M; Artan, S; Basaran, N; Basaran, S; Ozkinay, C

    1999-08-01

    Meiotic segregation of normal and derivative chromosomes was analysed in sperm samples from two balanced reciprocal translocation carrier men by use of dual-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique. The translocations were t(4;8)(p15;p12) and t(15;22)(q(23:q13.2), and the digoxigenin-labelled FISH probes were specific to either the translocated or centric segments of the chromosomes involved in the translocations. A total of 1000 spermatozoa for each probe were analysed and the modes of segregation were described on the basis of signals in each sperm cell. The mean frequency of alternate and/or adjacent-1 (adj-1) segregation types was 69.47%, whereas they were 30.51 and 78.70% for the adjacent-2 (adj-2) and alternate/adj-2 segregation types, respectively. This study illustrated that FISH is a valuable technique for analysing the meiotic segregation products of the heterozygotes in respect to aneuploidy risk. PMID:10517249

  3. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    We study the translocation of a flexible polymer in a confined geometry subjected to a time-periodic external drive to explore stochastic resonance. We describe the equilibrium translocation process in terms of a Fokker-Planck description and use a discrete two-state model to describe the effect of the external driving force on the translocation dynamics. We observe that no stochastic resonance is possible if the associated free-energy barrier is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain experiences a stochastic resonance effect only in presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interaction. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  4. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  5. Nonstandard jump functions for radially symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals, and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function

  6. Implementation of jump-diffusion algorithms for understanding FLIR scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanterman, Aaron D.; Miller, Michael I.; Snyder, Donald L.

    1995-07-01

    Our pattern theoretic approach to the automated understanding of forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images brings the traditionally separate endeavors of detection, tracking, and recognition together into a unified jump-diffusion process. New objects are detected and object types are recognized through discrete jump moves. Between jumps, the location and orientation of objects are estimated via continuous diffusions. An hypothesized scene, simulated from the emissive characteristics of the hypothesized scene elements, is compared with the collected data by a likelihood function based on sensor statistics. This likelihood is combined with a prior distribution defined over the set of possible scenes to form a posterior distribution. The jump-diffusion process empirically generates the posterior distribution. Both the diffusion and jump operations involve the simulation of a scene produced by a hypothesized configuration. Scene simulation is most effectively accomplished by pipelined rendering engines such as silicon graphics. We demonstrate the execution of our algorithm on a silicon graphics onyx/reality engine.

  7. Nonstandard jump functions for radically symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Tucker, Don H; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function.

  8. Analyzing disease risks associated with translocations.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Anthony W; Vaughan-Higgins, Rebecca J

    2012-06-01

    Translocations of species are expected to be used increasingly to counter the undesirable effects of anthropogenic changes to ecosystems, including loss of species. Methods to assess the risk of disease associated with translocations have been compiled in a comprehensive manual of disease-risk analysis for movement of domestic animals. We used this manual to devise a qualitative method for assessing the probability of the occurrence of disease in wild animals associated with translocations. We adapted the method such that we considered a parasite (any agent of infectious or noninfectious disease) a hazard if it or the host had crossed an ecological or geographical barrier and was novel to the host. We included in our analyses hazards present throughout the translocation pathway derived from the interactions between host immunity and the parasite, the effect of parasites on populations, the effect of noninfectious disease agents, and the effect of stressors on host-parasite interactions. We used the reintroduction of Eurasian Cranes (Grus grus) to England to demonstrate our method. Of the 24 hazards identified, 1 was classified as high risk (coccidia) and 5 were medium risk (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, Mycobacterium avium, Aspergillus fumigatus, tracheal worms [Syngamus sp. and Cyathostoma sp.], and Tetrameres spp.). Seventeen other hazards were considered low or very low risk. In the absence of better information on the number, identity, distribution, and pathogenicity of parasites of wild animals, there is uncertainty in the risk of disease to translocated animals and recipient populations. Surveys of parasites in source and destination populations and detailed health monitoring after release will improve the information available for future analyses of disease risk. We believe our method can be adapted to assess the risks of disease in other translocated populations. PMID:22533691

  9. Orientational Jumps in (Acetamide + Electrolyte) Deep Eutectics: Anion Dependence.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit; Mukherjee, Biswaroop

    2015-08-27

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate orientation jumps of acetamide molecules in three different ionic deep eutectics made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and lithium salts of bromide (Br(–)), nitrate (NO3(–)) and perchlorate (ClO4(–)) at approximately 80:20 mole ratio and 303 K. Orientational jumps have been dissected into acetamide–acetamide and acetamide–ion catagories. Simulated jump characteristics register a considerable dependence on the anion identity. For example, large angle jumps are relatively less frequent in the presence of NO3(–) than in the presence of the other two anions. Distribution of jump angles for rotation of acetamide molecules hydrogen bonded (H-bonded) to anions has been found to be bimodal in the presence of Br(–) and is qualitatively different from the other two cases. Estimated energy barrier for orientation jumps of these acetamide molecules (H-bonded to anions) differ by a factor of ∼2 between NO3(–) and ClO4(–), the barrier height for the latter being lower and ∼0.5kBT. Relative radial and angular displacements during jumps describe the sequence ClO(4)– > NO3(–) > Br(–) and follow a reverse viscosity trend. Jump barrier for acetamide–acetamide pairs reflects weak dependence on anion identity and remains closer to the magnitude (∼0.7kBT) found for orientation jumps in molten acetamide. Jump time distributions exhibit a power law dependence of the type, P(tjump) ∝ A(tjump/τ)(−β), with both β and τ showing substantial anion dependence. The latter suggests the presence of dynamic heterogeneity in these systems and supports earlier conclusions from time-resolved fluorescence measurements. PMID:26131593

  10. Effects of Isometric Scaling on Vertical Jumping Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli’s law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations. PMID:23936494