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Sample records for selective isobar suppression

  1. The ILIAS project for selective isobar suppression by laser photodetachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Oliver; Andersson, Pontus; Hanstorp, Dag; Lahner, Johannes; Martschini, Martin; Pitters, Johanna; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Laser photodetachment is the process when the extra electron of a negative ion is removed by means of laser radiation. This can happen only if the photon energy is larger than the electron affinity of the ion. The process can be used in mass spectrometry to selectively suppress unwanted isobars, provided that the electron affinity of the unwanted isobar is lower than that of the isobar under investigation. At the Ion Laser InterAction Setup (ILIAS) at the University of Vienna laser photodetachment of negative atomic and molecular ions is studied and its applicability for selective isobar suppression in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is evaluated. The setup provides mass separated beams of negative ions with energies up to 30 keV. Negative ions are produced in a Middleton type cesium sputter ion source, mass selected and overlapped with a strong continuous wave laser beam. In order to extend the interaction time of ions and laser, the ion beam is decelerated to thermal energies in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole cooler. For an appropriate choice of the photon energy, unwanted isobars are neutralized while the isobar of interest is unaffected and remains negatively charged. A description of the ILIAS setup and results from the commissioning phase of the RFQ cooler are presented. Up to 8% ion beam transmission could be achieved after a recent redesign of the extraction system. Furthermore first results of photodetachment experiments of 63Cu- within the RFQ cooler are presented.

  2. Isobar Suppression by Photodetachment in a RF Quadrupole Ion Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Havener, A. C.; Havener, C. C.; Liang, F.; Beene, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    Selectively removing unwanted isobaric negative ions by electron photodetachment with a pulsed laser beam has been reported. However, the fraction of the negative ions removed was very small due to the short laser pulses used. Continuous wave (CW) lasers are desired for this application, but the photon flux available from CW lasers is too low. We have investigated a novel scheme for efficient suppression of isobar contaminants by photodetachment in a gas-filled RF-only quadrupole (RFQ) ion cooler. Simulation studies have shown that the RFQ ion cooler can significantly increase the laser-ion interaction time, thus, high efficiency of photodetachment is possible with commercially available CW lasers. A proof-of-principle experiment of Co^- and Ni^- ions is underway. A CW Nd:YAG laser beam at 1064 nm wavelength is used to selectively remove Co^- ions inside a RFQ ion cooler. A detailed description of the experimental setup and expected photodetachment efficiencies for Co^- and Ni^- ions will be given in this report. 1. D. Berkovits, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B52 (1990) 378-333.

  3. An ion guide laser ion source for isobar-suppressed rare isotope beams

    SciTech Connect

    Raeder, Sebastian Ames, Friedhelm; Bishop, Daryl; Bricault, Pierre; Kunz, Peter; Mjøs, Anders; Heggen, Henning; Institute of Applied Physics, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 7, 64289 Darmstadt ; Lassen, Jens Teigelhöfer, Andrea; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2

    2014-03-15

    Modern experiments at isotope separator on-line (ISOL) facilities like ISAC at TRIUMF often depend critically on the purity of the delivered rare isotope beams. Therefore, highly selective ion sources are essential. This article presents the development and successful on-line operation of an ion guide laser ion source (IG-LIS) for the production of ion beams free of isobaric contamination. Thermionic ions from the hot ISOL target are suppressed by an electrostatic potential barrier, while neutral radio nuclides effusing out are resonantly ionized by laser radiation within a quadrupole ion guide behind this barrier. The IG-LIS was developed through detailed thermal and ion optics simulation studies and off-line tests with stable isotopes. In a first on-line run with a SiC target a suppression of surface-ionized Na contaminants in the ion beam of up to six orders of magnitude was demonstrated.

  4. An ion guide laser ion source for isobar-suppressed rare isotope beams.

    PubMed

    Raeder, Sebastian; Heggen, Henning; Lassen, Jens; Ames, Friedhelm; Bishop, Daryl; Bricault, Pierre; Kunz, Peter; Mjøs, Anders; Teigelhöfer, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Modern experiments at isotope separator on-line (ISOL) facilities like ISAC at TRIUMF often depend critically on the purity of the delivered rare isotope beams. Therefore, highly selective ion sources are essential. This article presents the development and successful on-line operation of an ion guide laser ion source (IG-LIS) for the production of ion beams free of isobaric contamination. Thermionic ions from the hot ISOL target are suppressed by an electrostatic potential barrier, while neutral radio nuclides effusing out are resonantly ionized by laser radiation within a quadrupole ion guide behind this barrier. The IG-LIS was developed through detailed thermal and ion optics simulation studies and off-line tests with stable isotopes. In a first on-line run with a SiC target a suppression of surface-ionized Na contaminants in the ion beam of up to six orders of magnitude was demonstrated. PMID:24689577

  5. The laser ion source trap for highest isobaric selectivity in online exotic isotope productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwellnus, F.; Blaum, K.; Catherall, R.; Crepieux, B.; Fedosseev, V.; Gottwald, T.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marsh, B.; Mattolat, C.; Rothe, S.; Stora, T.; Wendt, K.

    2010-02-01

    The improvement in the performance of a conventional laser ion source in the laser ion source and trap (LIST) project is presented, which envisages installation of a repeller electrode and a linear Paul trap/ion guide structure. This approach promises highest isobaric purity and optimum temporal and spatial control of the radioactive ion beam produced at an online isotope separator facility. The functionality of the LIST was explored at the offline test separators of University of Mainz (UMz) and ISOLDE/CERN, using the UMz solid state laser system. Ionization efficiency and selectivity as well as time structure and transversal emittance of the produced ion beam was determined. Next step after complete characterization is the construction and installation of the radiation-hard final trap structure and its first online application.

  6. The laser ion source trap for highest isobaric selectivity in online exotic isotope production.

    PubMed

    Schwellnus, F; Blaum, K; Catherall, R; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V; Gottwald, T; Kluge, H-J; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Rothe, S; Stora, T; Wendt, K

    2010-02-01

    The improvement in the performance of a conventional laser ion source in the laser ion source and trap (LIST) project is presented, which envisages installation of a repeller electrode and a linear Paul trap/ion guide structure. This approach promises highest isobaric purity and optimum temporal and spatial control of the radioactive ion beam produced at an online isotope separator facility. The functionality of the LIST was explored at the offline test separators of University of Mainz (UMz) and ISOLDE/CERN, using the UMz solid state laser system. Ionization efficiency and selectivity as well as time structure and transversal emittance of the produced ion beam was determined. Next step after complete characterization is the construction and installation of the radiation-hard final trap structure and its first online application. PMID:20192370

  7. High precision Pu isotope ratios using MC-ICPMS equipped with collision-cell technology to suppress U isobaric interferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granet, M.; Isnard, H.; Nonell, A.; Quidelleur, S.; Chartier, F.

    2009-04-01

    The measurement of Pu isotope ratios is of prime interest in both the environmental and nuclear research fields. First, new chronometric tracers need to be developed in order to understand and quantify the mechanisms and time-scales controlling the landscape evolution since it gives informations on climatic variations. Additionally, the analysis of Pu isotopes after irradiation of 235U is required in the transmutation field in order to determine basic neutronic data such as cross sections and reaction rates. High precision isotope ratios measurements are usually performed with sector field mass spectrometers, either by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) or by Multiple Collection Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). One of the major drawbacks in analysing Pu isotopes is the occurrence of U isobaric interferences: 238U-238Pu and 238UH+-239Pu. Here we propose to suppress these interferences by adding reactive gases in the collision-reaction cell of the MC-ICP-MS (Isoprobe, GV Instruments, Manchester, UK). The difference of reactivity for U and Pu towards these gases allows the measurement of Pu isotopes with precision and accuracy similar to those obtained after a previous chemical separation of Pu from U using anion-exchange resin. This study thus confirms that collision-reaction cells are powerful tools to perform isotopic measurements of soils, river sediments or irradiated materials without former systematic chemical separations as U interferences are completely removed in situ. References Granet et al. (2008), Spectrochimica Acta Part B 63, 1309-1314. Moureau et al. (2008), JAAS 23, 1538-1544.

  8. A Radio Frequency Quadrupole Instrument for use with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Application to Low Kinetic Energy Reactive Isobar Suppression and Gas--Phase Anion Reaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliades, John Alexander

    A radio frequency (rf) quadrupole instrument, currently known as an Isobar Separator for Anions (ISA), has been integrated into an Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) system to facilitate anion--gas reactions before the tandem accelerator. An AMS Cs+ sputter source provided ≥ 15 keV ions that were decelerated in the prototype ISA to < 20 eV for reaction in a single collision cell and re-accelerated for AMS analysis. Reaction based isobar suppression capabilities were assessed for smaller AMS systems and a new technique for gas--phase reaction studies was developed. Isobar suppression of 36S-- and 12C3-- for 36Cl analysis, and YF3-- and ZrF3-- for 90Sr analysis were studied in NO2 with deceleration to ≤ 12 eV. Observed attenuation cross sections, sigma [x 10--15 cm2], were sigma(S-- + NO2) = 6.6, sigma(C3-- + NO2) = 4.2, sigma(YF3-- + NO 2) = 7.6, sigma(ZrF3-- + NO2) = 19. With 8 mTorr NO2, relative attenuations of S-- /Cl-- ˜ 10--6, C 3--/Cl-- ˜ 10--7 , YF3--/SrF3-- ˜ 5 x 10--5 and ZrF3-- /SrF3-- ˜ 4 x 10--6 were observed with Cl-- ˜ 30% and SrF 3-- > 90% transmission. Current isobar attenuation limits with ≤ 1.75 MV accelerator terminal voltage and ppm impurity levels were calculated to be 36S--/Cl-- ˜ 4 x 10--16, 12C3 --/Cl-- ˜ 1.2 x 10--16, 90YF3--/SrF3-- ˜ 10--15 and 90ZrF3 --/SrF3-- ˜ 10--16 . Using 1.75 MV, four 36Cl reference standards in the range 4 x 10--13 ≤ 36Cl/Cl ≤ 4 x 10 --11 were analyzed with 8 mTorr NO2. The measured 36Cl/Cl ratios plotted very well against the accepted values. A sample impurity content S/Cl ≤ 6 x 10--5 was measured and a background level of 36S--/Cl ≤ 9 x 10--15 was determined. Useful currents of a wide variety of anions are produced in AMS sputter sources and molecules can be identified relatively unambiguously by stripping fragments from tandem accelerators. Reactions involving YF3 --, ZrF3--, S-- and SO-- + NO2 in the ISA analyzed by AMS are described, and some interesting reactants are identified.

  9. Isobar Separator for Anions: Current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, Jean-François; Javahery, Gholamreza; Kieser, William; Zhao, Xiao-Lei; Litherland, Albert; Cousins, Lisa; Charles, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The Isobar Separator for Anions (ISA) is an emerging separation technique of isobars applied first to the selective removal of 36S from 36Cl, achieving a relative suppression ratio of 6 orders of magnitude. Using a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) column incorporating low energy gas cells, this innovative technique enables the use of a wide range of low energy ion-molecule reactions and collisional-induced dissociation processes for suppressing specific atomic of molecular anions with a high degree of selectivity. Other elemental pairs (analyte/isobar) successfully separated at AMS level include Ca/K, Sr/(Y, Zr), Cs/Ba, Hf/W and Pu/U. In view of these initial successes, an effort to develop a version of the ISA that can be used as a robust technique for routine AMS analysis has been undertaken. We will discuss the detailed layout of a practical ISA and the functional requirements that a combined ISA/AMS should meet. These concepts are currently being integrated in a pre-commercial ISA system that will be installed soon at the newly established A.E. Lalonde Laboratory in Ottawa, Canada.

  10. Isobar separator for radioactive nuclear beams project

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    In order to produce pure beams of radioactive products emanating from the production target/ion source system, both mass and isobar separation is required. A preliminary mass separation with a resolution {triangle}M/M of approximately 10{sup -3} will select the proper mass beam. An isobar separator is needed because the masses of adjacent isobars are usually quite close, especially for beams near stability. In general, a mass resolution of 5 x 10{sup -5} is needed for isobar separation in the A < 120 region, while a resolution of 3 x 10{sup -5} or better is needed for heavier masses. Magnets are used to obtain mass separation. However, in addition to having mass dispersion properties, magnets also have an equal energy dispersion. This means that an energy variation in the beam cannot be distinguished from a mass difference. This is important because ions emerge from the ion source having a small ({approximately} 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -4}) energy spread. In order to make the system respond only to mass differences, it must be made energy dispersion. This is normally accomplished by using a combination of electric and magnetic fields. The most convenient way of doing this is to use an electric deflection following the magnet separator. A preliminary isobar separator which achieves a mass resolution of 2.7 x 10{sup -5} is shown in Figure I-38. It uses two large 60{degrees} bending magnets to obtain a mass dispersion of 140 mm/%, and four electric dipoles with bending angles of 39{degrees} to cancel the energy dispersion. Sextupole and octupole correction elements are used to reduce the geometrical aberrations.

  11. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre. PMID:22274056

  12. Isobaric groundwater well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    1999-01-01

    A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

  13. Targeting prion-like protein doppel selectively suppresses tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hilal, Taslim A.; Chung, Seung Woo; Choi, Jeong Uk; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Sang Yoon; Ahsan, Fakhrul; Kim, In-San

    2016-01-01

    Controlled and site-specific regulation of growth factor signaling remains a major challenge for current antiangiogenic therapies, as these antiangiogenic agents target normal vasculature as well tumor vasculature. In this article, we identified the prion-like protein doppel as a potential therapeutic target for tumor angiogenesis. We investigated the interactions between doppel and VEGFR2 and evaluated whether blocking the doppel/VEGFR2 axis suppresses the process of angiogenesis. We discovered that tumor endothelial cells (TECs), but not normal ECs, express doppel; tumors from patients and mouse xenografts expressed doppel in their vasculatures. Induced doppel overexpression in ECs enhanced vascularization, whereas doppel constitutively colocalized and complexed with VEGFR2 in TECs. Doppel inhibition depleted VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, subsequently inducing the internalization and degradation of VEGFR2 and thereby attenuating VEGFR2 signaling. We also synthesized an orally active glycosaminoglycan (LHbisD4) that specifically binds with doppel. We determined that LHbisD4 concentrates over the tumor site and that genetic loss of doppel in TECs decreases LHbisD4 binding and targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, LHbisD4 eliminated VEGFR2 from the cell membrane, prevented VEGF binding in TECs, and suppressed tumor growth. Together, our results demonstrate that blocking doppel can control VEGF signaling in TECs and selectively inhibit tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26950422

  14. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  15. Selection of hydrate suppression methods for gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, S.D.; Covington, K.K.; Collie, J.T. III

    1999-07-01

    This paper will discuss and compare the methods used to suppress hydrate formation in natural gas streams. Included in the comparison will be regenerated systems using ethylene glycol and non-regenerated systems using methanol. A comparison will be made between the quantities of methanol and ethylene glycol required to achieve a given a suppression. A discussion of BTEX emissions resulting from the ethylene glycol regenerator along with the effect or process variables on these emissions is also given.

  16. Magnetotail dynamics under isobaric constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl; Janicke, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Using linear theory and nonlinear MHD simulations, we investigate the resistive and ideal MHD stability of two-dimensional plasma configurations under the isobaric constraint dP/dt = 0, which in ideal MHD is equivalent to conserving the pressure function P = P(A), where A denotes the magnetic flux. This constraint is satisfied for incompressible modes, such as Alfven waves, and for systems undergoing energy losses. The linear stability analysis leads to a Schroedinger equation, which can be investigated by standard quantum mechanics procedures. We present an application to a typical stretched magnetotail configuration. For a one-dimensional sheet equilibrium characteristic properties of tearing instability are rediscovered. However, the maximum growth rate scales with the 1/7 power of the resistivity, which implies much faster growth than for the standard tearing mode (assuming that the resistivity is small). The same basic eigen-mode is found also for weakly two-dimensional equilibria, even in the ideal MHD limit. In this case the growth rate scales with the 1/4 power of the normal magnetic field. The results of the linear stability analysis are confirmed qualitatively by nonlinear dynamic MHD simulations. These results suggest the interesting possibility that substorm onset, or the thinning in the late growth phase, is caused by the release of a thermodynamic constraint without the (immediate) necessity of releasing the ideal MHD constraint. In the nonlinear regime the resistive and ideal developments differ in that the ideal mode does not lead to neutral line formation without the further release of the ideal MHD constraint; instead a thin current sheet forms. The isobaric constraint is critically discussed. Under perhaps more realistic adiabatic conditions the ideal mode appears to be stable but could be driven by external perturbations and thus generate the thin current sheet in the late growth phase, before a nonideal instability sets in.

  17. Survey of Evaluated Isobaric Analog States

    SciTech Connect

    MacCormick, M.

    2014-06-15

    Isobaric analog states (IAS) can be used to estimate the masses of members belonging to the same isospin multiplet. Experimental and estimated IAS have been used frequently within the Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) in the past, but the associated set of evaluated masses have been published for the first time in AME2012 and NUBASE2012. In this paper the current trends of the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME) coefficients are shown. The T = 2 multiplet is used as a detailed illustration.

  18. Suppressed Conductance From Spin Selection Rules in F-CNT-F Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Nikolaus; Morgan-Wall, Tyler; Markovic, Nina

    Conductance through a quantum dot can be suppressed due to spin selection rules governing the hoping of an additional electron onto an already-occupied quantum dot. Measurements of this effect in a carbon nanotube quantum dot with ferromagnetic contacts will be presented. Suppressed conductance peaks are observed in the Coulomb diamond plots at zero field and explained using spin selection rules. The pattern of suppressed peaks is observed to change with applied magnetic field as the spin ground state of the occupied quantum dot changes. This work was supported by NSF DMR-1106167.

  19. S5FP: Spectrally Selective Suppression with Steady State Free Precession

    PubMed Central

    Derbyshire, J. A.; Herzka, D. A.; McVeigh, E. R.

    2007-01-01

    A method is presented that employs the inherent spectral selectivity of the Steady-State Free Precession (SSFP) pulse sequence to provide a spectral band of suppression. At TE = TR/2, SSFP partitions the magnetization into two phase-opposed spectral components. Z-storing one of these components simultaneously further excites the other, which is then suppressed by gradient crushing and RF spoiling. The Spectrally Selective Suppression with SSFP (S5FP) method is shown to provide significant attenuation of fat signals, while the water signals are essentially unaffected and provide the normal SSFP contrast. Fat suppression is achieved with relatively little temporal overhead (less than 10% reduction in temporal resolution). S5FP was validated using simulations, phantoms, and human studies. Published 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.† PMID:16155880

  20. Frequency selectivity of the human cochlea: Suppression tuning of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A; van Dijk, Pim

    2016-06-01

    Frequency selectivity is a key functional property of the inner ear and since hearing research began, the frequency resolution of the human ear has been a central question. In contrast to animal studies, which permit invasive recording of neural activity, human studies must rely on indirect methods to determine hearing selectivity. Psychophysical studies, which used masking of a tone by other sounds, indicate a modest frequency selectivity in humans. By contrast, estimates using the phase delays of stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAE) predict a remarkably high selectivity, unique among mammals. An alternative measure of cochlear frequency selectivity are suppression tuning curves of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). Several animal studies show that these measures are in excellent agreement with neural frequency selectivity. Here we contribute a large data set from normal-hearing young humans on suppression tuning curves (STC) of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). The frequency selectivities of human STC measured near threshold levels agree with the earlier, much lower, psychophysical estimates. They differ, however, from the typical patterns seen in animal auditory nerve data in that the selectivity is remarkably independent of frequency. In addition, SOAE are suppressed by higher-level tones in narrow frequency bands clearly above the main suppression frequencies. These narrow suppression bands suggest interactions between the suppressor tone and a cochlear standing wave corresponding to the SOAE frequency being suppressed. The data show that the relationship between pre-neural mechanical processing in the cochlea and neural coding at the hair-cell/auditory nerve synapse needs to be reconsidered. PMID:27139323

  1. Inclusive fitness effects can select for cancer suppression into old age

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joel S.; Aktipis, C. Athena

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection can favour health at youth or middle age (high reproductive value) over health at old age (low reproductive value). This means, all else being equal, selection for cancer suppression should dramatically drop after reproductive age. However, in species with significant parental investment, the capacity to enhance inclusive fitness may increase the reproductive value of older individuals or even those past reproductive age. Variation in parental investment levels could therefore contribute to variation in cancer susceptibility across species. In this article, we describe a simple model and framework for the evolution of cancer suppression with varying levels of parental investment and use this model to make testable predictions about variation in cancer suppression across species. This model can be extended to show that selection for cancer suppression is stronger in species with cooperative breeding systems and intergenerational transfers. We consider three cases that can select for cancer suppression into old age: (i) extended parental care that increases the survivorship of their offspring, (ii) grandparents contributing to higher fecundity of their children and (iii) cooperative breeding where helpers forgo reproduction or even survivorship to assist parents in having higher fecundity. PMID:26056358

  2. 5-Fluorouracil targets thymidylate synthase in the selective suppression of TH17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Peng, Liang; Zhang, Ruihua; Zheng, Zihan; Chen, Chun; Cheung, Ka Lung; Cui, Miao; Bian, Guanglin; Xu, Feihong; Chiang, David; Hu, Yuan; Chen, Ye; Lu, Geming; Yang, Jianjun; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Jianfei; Zhu, Hongfa; Chen, Shu-hsia; Liu, Kebin; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Sikora, Andrew G.; Li, Liwu; Jiang, Bo; Xiong, Huabao

    2016-01-01

    While it is well established that treatment of cancer patients with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) can result in immune suppression, the exact function of 5-FU in the modulation of immune cells has not been fully established. We found that low dose 5-FU selectively suppresses TH17 and TH1 cell differentiation without apparent effect on Treg, TH2, and significantly suppresses thymidylate synthase (TS) expression in TH17 and TH1 cells but has a lesser effect in tumor cells and macrophages. Interestingly, the basal expression of TS varies significantly between T helper phenotypes and knockdown of TS significantly impairs TH17 and TH1 cell differentiation without affecting the differentiation of either Treg or TH2 cells. Finally, low dose 5-FU is effective in ameliorating colitis development by suppressing TH17 and TH1 cell development in a T cell transfer colitis model. Taken together, the results highlight the importance of the anti-inflammatory functions of low dose 5-FU by selectively suppressing TH17 and TH1 immune responses. PMID:27027355

  3. Improvement of non-isobaric model for shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbod, Amir Hossein; Abolfazl Ghasemi, Seyed; Jafar Jafari, Mohammad; Rezaei, Somayeh; Sobhanian, Samad

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, improved relations of total fuel energy, fuel gain, hot-spot radius and total areal density in a non-isobaric model of fuel assembly have been derived and compared with the numerical results of [J. Schmitt, J.W. Bates, S.P. Obenschain, S.T. Zalesak, D.E. Fyfe, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042701 (2010); S. Atzeni, A. Marocchino, A. Schiavi, G. Schurtz, New J. Phys. 15, 045004 (2013)] and several simulations performed by MULTI-1D radiation hydrodynamic code for shock ignition scenario. Our calculations indicate that the approximations made by [M.D. Rosen, J.D. Lindl, A.R. Thiessen, LLNL Laser Program Annual Report, UCRL-50021-83, pp. 3-5 (1983); J. Schmitt, J.W. Bates, S.P. Obenschain, S.T. Zalesak, D.E. Fyfe, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042701 (2010)] for the calculation of burn-up fraction are not accurate enough to give results consistent with simulations. Therefore, we have introduced more appropriate approximations for the burn-up fraction and total areal density of the fuel that are in more agreement with simulation results of shock ignition. Meanwhile, it is shown that the related formulas of the non-isobaric model for total fuel energy, fuel gain and also hot-spot radius cannot determine the model parameters independently, but improved model choose a better selection and less restrictions on determination of the parameters for the non-isobaric model. Such derivations can be used in theoretical studies of the ignition conditions and burn-up fraction of the fuel in shock ignition scenario.

  4. Isospin purity in the A=42 isobars

    SciTech Connect

    Orce, J.N.; McKay, C.J.; Choudry, S.N.; Lesher, S.L.; Mynk, M.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Yates, S.W.; McEllistrem, M.T.; Petkov, P.

    2004-09-13

    The lifetime of the first 2{sub T=1}{sup +} state in 42Sc has been measured as 74(16) fs. This result gives a value for the isoscalar matrix element of M0=6.63(76). From the mirror nuclei, 42Ca and 42Ti, the isoscalar matrix element is given as 7.15(48) W.u., confirming isospin purity in the A=42 isobars.

  5. Probing Temperature from Intermediate Mass Fragment by Isobaric Yield Ratio in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mian; Wei, Hui-Ling; Ma, Chun-Wang

    2015-12-01

    A probe to extract the temperature (TIYR) from intermediate-mass fragment has been proposed using the isobaric yield ratio (IYR) difference based on the modified Fisher model. By analyzing the isobaric cross section in the measured 140A MeV 40,48Ca+9Be reactions, the TIYR can well fit the IYR difference for the large mass fragments. Because of the fragments are produced in different colliding regions, it is also suggested to select the fragments according to different mechanisms when using TIYR. Supported by Program for Science & Technology Innovation Talents in Universities of Henan Province under Grant No. 13HASTIT046

  6. Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Pao, K. F.; Fan, C. T.; Chang, T. H.; Chiu, C. C.; Chu, K. R.

    2007-09-15

    Selective suppression of high order axial modes of the gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) is investigated in theory and in experiment. The gyro-BWO interaction is much more efficient in a down-tapered interaction structure, while it is also more susceptible to the problem of axial mode competition in such a structure. Because higher order axial modes (at a higher oscillation frequency) penetrate deeper into the interaction structure, application of distributed wall loss at the downstream end of the interaction structure is shown to be effective for selective suppression of these modes with minor effects on the efficiency of the desired fundamental axial mode. A stable gyro-BWO operating in a single mode throughout the entire beam pulse is demonstrated on the basis of this principle. Theoretical and experimental results are found to be in good agreement.

  7. Selective suppression of carrier-driven photochemical etching: Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Myers, D.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Biefeld, R.M.; Klem, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Carrier-driven photochemical etching of semiconductors can be selectively suppressed by altering the near-surface region to enhance carrier recombination, thereby reducing the supply of carriers that drive the surface etching reaction. Two methods for enhancing recombination and decreasing the etch rate at a given phonon flux include ion implantation and localized Zn diffusion. Raman spectroscopy can be employed to determine whether sufficient alterations of electronic properties has occurred to suppress etching. Carrier-driven photochemical reactions, which require direct participation of free carriers for the chemical reaction to proceed, can be selectively suppressed by increasing the minority carrier recombination rate, thereby reducing the supply of carriers that drive the surface etching reaction. Two methods for enhancing recombination and decreasing the etching quantum yield, which is the number of atoms removed per incident photon, include ion implantation and localized Zn diffusion. For ion implantation, recombination- promoting defect concentrations depend on ion species, fluence, and annealing both during and after the implantation process. Other recombination processes related to carrier scattering from ionized impurities from in-diffusion of dopants or following implant activation can control etching. Raman spectroscopy can be employed to detect changes in electronic properties that correlate with etching suppression. Changes that occur in the LO-phonon lineshape, such as those associated with phonon confinement and ionized impurity scattering, can be diagnostic of the carrier-driven etching behavior following a specific treatment. We have demonstrated two applications of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic for suppression of the carrier-driven photochemical etching of GaAs. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Voluntary strategy suppresses the positive impact of preferential selection in prisoner’s dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Lin, Pei-jie; Chen, Ya-shan

    2014-11-01

    Impact of aspiration is ubiquitous in social and biological disciplines. In this work, we try to explore the impact of such a trait on voluntary prisoners’ dilemma game via a selection parameter w. w=0 returns the traditional version of random selection. For positive w, the opponent of high payoff will be selected; while negative w means that the partner of low payoff will be chosen. We find that for positive w, cooperation will be greatly promoted in the interval of small b, at variance cooperation is inhibited with large b. For negative w, cooperation is fully restrained, irrespective of b value. It is found that the positive impact of preferential selection is suppressed by the voluntary strategy in prisoner’s dilemma. These observations can be supported by the spatial patterns. Our work may shed light on the emergence and persistence of cooperation with voluntary participation in social dilemma.

  9. Selective Memories: Infants' Encoding Is Enhanced in Selection via Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markant, Julie; Amso, Dima

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the hypothesis that inhibitory visual selection mechanisms play a vital role in memory by limiting distractor interference during item encoding. In Experiment 1a we used a modified spatial cueing task in which 9-month-old infants encoded multiple category exemplars in the contexts of an attention orienting mechanism…

  10. The nest site lottery: how selectively neutral density dependent growth suppression induces frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Argasinski, K; Broom, M

    2013-12-01

    Modern developments in population dynamics emphasize the role of the turnover of individuals. In the new approaches stable population size is a dynamic equilibrium between different mortality and fecundity factors instead of an arbitrary fixed carrying capacity. The latest replicator dynamics models assume that regulation of the population size acts through feedback driven by density dependent juvenile mortality. Here, we consider a simplified model to extract the properties of this approach. We show that at the stable population size, the structure of the frequency dependent evolutionary game emerges. Turnover of individuals induces a lottery mechanism where for each nest site released by a dead adult individual a single newborn is drawn from the pool of newborn candidates. This frequency dependent selection leads towards the strategy maximizing the number of newborns per adult death. However, multiple strategies can maximize this value. Among them, the strategy with the greatest mortality (which implies the greatest instantaneous growth rate) is selected. This result is important for the discussion about universal fitness measures and which parameters are maximized by natural selection. This is related to the fitness measures R0 and r, because the number of newborns per single dead individual equals the lifetime production of newborn R0 in models without aging. We thus have a two-stage procedure, instead of a single fitness measure, which is a combination of R0 and r. According to the nest site lottery mechanism, at stable population size, selection favors strategies with the greatest r, i.e. those with the highest turnover, from those with the greatest R0. PMID:24071631

  11. Noisy Speech Recognition Based on Integration/Selection of Multiple Noise Suppression Methods Using Noise GMMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaoka, Norihide; Hamaguchi, Souta; Nakagawa, Seiichi

    To achieve high recognition performance for a wide variety of noise and for a wide range of signal-to-noise ratio, this paper presents methods for integration of four noise reduction algorithms: spectral subtraction with smoothing of time direction, temporal domain SVD-based speech enhancement, GMM-based speech estimation and KLT-based comb-filtering. In this paper, we proposed two types of combination methods of noise suppression algorithms: selection of front-end processor and combination of results from multiple recognition processes. Recognition results on the CENSREC-1 task showed the effectiveness of our proposed methods.kn-abstract=

  12. Intercellular Redistribution of cAMP Underlies Selective Suppression of Cancer Cell Growth by Connexin26

    PubMed Central

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Mathis, Sandra A.; Zucker, Shoshanna N.; Nicholson, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Connexins (Cx), which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s) still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations. PMID:24312655

  13. Intercellular redistribution of cAMP underlies selective suppression of cancer cell growth by connexin26.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Anjana; Kalmykov, Edward A; Polusani, Srikanth R; Mathis, Sandra A; Zucker, Shoshanna N; Nicholson, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Connexins (Cx), which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s) still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations. PMID:24312655

  14. High-Resolution Enabled 12-Plex DiLeu Isobaric Tags for Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex isobaric tags (e.g., tandem mass tags (TMT) and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)) are a valuable tool for high-throughput mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics. We have developed our own multiplex isobaric tags, DiLeu, that feature quantitative performance on par with commercial offerings but can be readily synthesized in-house as a cost-effective alternative. In this work, we achieve a 3-fold increase in the multiplexing capacity of the DiLeu reagent without increasing structural complexity by exploiting mass defects that arise from selective incorporation of 13C, 15N, and 2H stable isotopes in the reporter group. The inclusion of eight new reporter isotopologues that differ in mass from the existing four reporters by intervals of 6 mDa yields a 12-plex isobaric set that preserves the synthetic simplicity and quantitative performance of the original implementation. We show that the new reporter variants can be baseline-resolved in high-resolution higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) spectra, and we demonstrate accurate 12-plex quantitation of a DiLeu-labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae lysate digest via high-resolution nano liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC–MS2) analysis on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. PMID:25405479

  15. Delta-Isobar magnetic form factor in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Vladimir

    1993-01-01

    We consider the QCD sum rules approach for Delta-isobar magnetic form factor in the infra-red region $0isobar magnetic moment.

  16. Ubiquitylation of Autophagy Receptor Optineurin by HACE1 Activates Selective Autophagy for Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengzhao; Chen, Peng; Gao, Hong; Gu, Yu; Yang, Jiao; Peng, Hong; Xu, Xingxing; Wang, Haifeng; Yang, Meiqiang; Liu, Xiaoying; Fan, Libin; Chen, Shiyao; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Yihong; Ruan, Kangchen; Cheng, Shuqun; Komatsu, Masaaki; White, Eileen; Li, Lin; Ji, Hongbin; Finley, Daniel; Hu, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    Summary In selective autophagy, receptors are central for cargo selection and delivery. However, it remains yet unclear whether and how multiple autophagy receptors might form complex and function concertedly to control autophagy. Optineurin (OPTN), implicated genetically in glaucoma and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was a recently identified autophagy receptor. Here we report that tumor suppressor HACE1, a ubiquitin ligase, ubiquitylates OPTN and promotes its interaction with p62/SQSTM1 to form the autophagy receptor complex, thus accelerating autophagic flux. Interestingly, the K48-linked polyubiquitin chains that HACE1 conjugates onto OPTN might predominantly target OPTN for autophagic degradation. By demonstrating that the HACE1-OPTN axis synergistically suppresses growth and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells, our findings may open an avenue for developing autophagy-targeted therapeutic intervention into cancer. PMID:25026213

  17. Suppression of Experimental Arthritis and Associated Bone Loss by a Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Annica; Bernardi, Angelina I; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Stubelius, Alexandra; Grahnemo, Louise; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the systemic inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), decreased estradiol levels in postmenopausal RA patients further accelerate bone loss in these patients. The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), an estrogen combined with a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is a new hormone replacement therapy option. The first approved TSEC, containing conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene (BZA), reduces menopausal symptoms and prevents osteoporosis with an improved safety profile compared with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that estrogens strongly inhibit experimental arthritis whereas BZA is mildly suppressive. In this study the antiarthritic potential of combined BZA and estradiol is explored for the first time. Female ovariectomized DBA/1 mice were subjected to collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental postmenopausal RA model, and treated with BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2), combined BZA and E2 (BZA/E2), or vehicle. BZA/E2 suppressed arthritis severity and frequency, synovitis, and joint destruction, equally efficient as E2 alone. Unwanted estrogenic proliferative effects on the endometrium were blocked by the addition of BZA, determined by collecting uterine weights. Bone mineral density was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and all treatments protected collagen-induced arthritis mice from both trabecular and cortical bone loss. Moreover, BZA/E2, but not E2 alone, inhibited preosteoclast formation and reduced serum anticollagen type II antibodies. In conclusion, a TSEC, herein combined BZA/E2, suppresses experimental arthritis and prevents associated bone loss as efficiently as E2 alone but with minimal uterine effects, highlighting the need for clinical trials that evaluate the addition of a TSEC to conventional postmenopausal RA treatment. PMID:26745543

  18. Target effects in isobaric yield ratio differences between projectile fragmentation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Zhang, Yan-Li; Qiao, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Shan-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) between reactions is know to be sensitive to the density difference between projectiles in heavy-ion collisions around the Fermi energy. Purpose: The target effects in the isobaric yield ratio (IYR) and the IBD results have been studied. Methods: The amount of isotopes in the 140 A MeV 48 ,40Ca +181Ta /9Be and 58 ,64Ni +181Ta /9Be reactions have been previously measured with high accuracy. The IYR and IBD results have been obtained from these reactions to study the effects of the light 9Be and heavy 181Ta targets. A ratio (rΔ μ) between the IBD results for the reactions with Ta and Be targets is defined to quantitatively show the target dependence of the IBD results. Results The IYRs for reactions with symmetric projectiles are more easily affected than those for reactions with neutron-rich projectiles. The IBD results are suppressed by using the 181Ta target to different degrees. Conclusions: The IYR and IBD results are influenced by the target used. The IBD for the I =1 isobaric chain is suggested as a probe to study the difference between the neutron and proton densities of the reaction systems.

  19. Selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription in non-tumorigenic cells by 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Dürst, M; zur Hausen, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV 18) is selectively suppressed in non-tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast or HeLa x keratinocyte cell hybrids by 5-azacytidine. In contrast, viral gene expression is not influenced by 5-azacytidine in both tumorigenic hybrid segregants and in the parental HeLa cells. The suppression mechanism seems to operate at the level of initiation of transcription since nuclear run-on experiments show the absence of elongated nascent viral RNA, whereas the transcription of cellular reference genes remains unaffected. Down-regulation of HPV 18 mRNA correlates directly with cessation of cellular growth and can be abolished using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore human keratinocytes immortalized by HPV 16 but still retaining the non-tumorigenic phenotype reveal the same inhibitory effect on viral transcription after treatment with 5-azacytidine. These results support a model of a postulated intracellular control mechanism, directed against papillomavirus transcription, which can be induced by 5-azacytidine and appears to correlate with the presence of specific chromosomes in non-tumorigenic cells. Images PMID:2457495

  20. Resonance ionization mass spectrometric study of the promethium/samarium isobaric pair

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Young, J.P.; Smith, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Samarium daughters are problematic in isotope ratio measurements of promethium because they are isobaric. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was utilized to circumvent this problem. An ionization selectivity factor of at least 1000:1 has been measured for promethium over samarium at 584.6 nm. Resonance ionization spectra have been recorded for both elements over the 528-560 and 580-614 nm wavelength ranges.

  1. A channel-selection criterion for suppressing reverberation in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C

    2011-05-01

    Little is known about the extent to which reverberation affects speech intelligibility by cochlear implant (CI) listeners. Experiment 1 assessed CI users' performance using Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) sentences corrupted with varying degrees of reverberation. Reverberation times of 0.30, 0.60, 0.80, and 1.0 s were used. Results indicated that for all subjects tested, speech intelligibility decreased exponentially with an increase in reverberation time. A decaying-exponential model provided an excellent fit to the data. Experiment 2 evaluated (offline) a speech coding strategy for reverberation suppression using a channel-selection criterion based on the signal-to-reverberant ratio (SRR) of individual frequency channels. The SRR reflects implicitly the ratio of the energies of the signal originating from the early (and direct) reflections and the signal originating from the late reflections. Channels with SRR larger than a preset threshold were selected, while channels with SRR smaller than the threshold were zeroed out. Results in a highly reverberant scenario indicated that the proposed strategy led to substantial gains (over 60 percentage points) in speech intelligibility over the subjects' daily strategy. Further analysis indicated that the proposed channel-selection criterion reduces the temporal envelope smearing effects introduced by reverberation and also diminishes the self-masking effects responsible for flattened formants. PMID:21568424

  2. Isobaric Labeling-Based Relative Quantification in Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays a key role in relative quantitative comparisons of proteins in order to understand their functional role in biological systems upon perturbation. In this review, we review studies that examine different aspects of isobaric labeling-based relative quantification for shotgun proteomic analysis. In particular, we focus on different types of isobaric reagents and their reaction chemistry (e.g., amine-, carbonyl-, and sulfhydryl-reactive). Various factors, such as ratio compression, reporter ion dynamic range, and others, cause an underestimation of changes in relative abundance of proteins across samples, undermining the ability of the isobaric labeling approach to be truly quantitative. These factors that affect quantification and the suggested combinations of experimental design and optimal data acquisition methods to increase the precision and accuracy of the measurements will be discussed. Finally, the extended application of isobaric labeling-based approach in hyperplexing strategy, targeted quantification, and phosphopeptide analysis are also examined. PMID:25337643

  3. Selection of motor programs for suppressing food intake and inducing locomotion in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, Andreas; Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Peters, Marc; Zeymer, Malou; Spieß, Roland; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Pankratz, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitter-expressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and electrophysiological experiments, activation of 20 neurons in the brain expressing the neuropeptide hugin, a homolog of mammalian neuromedin U, simultaneously suppressed the motor program for food intake while inducing the motor program for locomotion. Decreasing hugin neuropeptide levels in the neurons by RNAi prevented this action. Reducing the level of hugin neuronal activity alone did not have any effect on feeding or locomotion motor programs. Furthermore, use of promoter-specific constructs that labeled subsets of hugin neurons demonstrated that initiation of locomotion can be separated from modulation of its motor pattern. These results provide insights into a neural mechanism of how opposing motor programs can be selected in order to coordinate feeding and locomotive behaviors. PMID:24960360

  4. Selective electrochemical reactivity of rutile VO2 towards the suppression of metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujay; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Horrocks, Gregory; Kilcoyne, Colin; Marley, Peter M.; Stabile, Adam A.; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Zhang, Peihong; Sambandamurthy, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate through electrolyte gating measurements of a single nanobeam that the rultile phase of VO2 is electrochemically more reactive than the monoclinic phase. Our results show that the complete suppression of the metal-insulator transition and stabilization of the metallic phase is possible when gate voltage is applied in the rutile metallic phase. The results are discussed based on the formation of oxygen vacancies wherein accommodation of a high concentration of vacancies in the rutile phase selectively stabilizes it by disrupting dimerization of adjacent V-V pairs required for a transition to the monoclinic phase. The creation of oxygen vacancies is proposed to proceed through the oxidation of the electrolyte. Raman spectroscopy data suggest surface metallization upon electrolyte gating with an initial coexistence of insulating monoclinic and metallic domains. The selective electrochemical reactivity of the rutile phase and the resulting defect-induced stabilization of this phase across a vastly expanded temperature window suggest a facile defect engineering route to tune electronic phase transitions.

  5. Selection of Motor Programs for Suppressing Food Intake and Inducing Locomotion in the Drosophila Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schoofs, Andreas; Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Peters, Marc; Zeymer, Malou; Spieß, Roland; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Pankratz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Central mechanisms by which specific motor programs are selected to achieve meaningful behaviors are not well understood. Using electrophysiological recordings from pharyngeal nerves upon central activation of neurotransmitter-expressing cells, we show that distinct neuronal ensembles can regulate different feeding motor programs. In behavioral and electrophysiological experiments, activation of 20 neurons in the brain expressing the neuropeptide hugin, a homolog of mammalian neuromedin U, simultaneously suppressed the motor program for food intake while inducing the motor program for locomotion. Decreasing hugin neuropeptide levels in the neurons by RNAi prevented this action. Reducing the level of hugin neuronal activity alone did not have any effect on feeding or locomotion motor programs. Furthermore, use of promoter-specific constructs that labeled subsets of hugin neurons demonstrated that initiation of locomotion can be separated from modulation of its motor pattern. These results provide insights into a neural mechanism of how opposing motor programs can be selected in order to coordinate feeding and locomotive behaviors. PMID:24960360

  6. Suppression of cancer-initiating cells and selection of adipose-derived stem cells cultured on biomaterials having specific nanosegments.

    PubMed

    Kao, Ta-Chun; Lee, Henry Hsin-Chung; Higuchi, Akon; Ling, Qing-Dong; Yu, Wan-Chun; Chou, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Pin-Yu; Suresh Kumar, S; Chang, Yu; Hung Chen, Yung; Chang, Yung; Chen, Da-Chung; Hsu, Shih-Tien

    2014-04-01

    Cancer-initiating cells [cancer stem cells (CSCs)] in colon cancer cells can be selectively suppressed when they are cultured on Pluronic (nanosegment)-grafted dishes, whereas CSCs are maintained on conventional tissue culture dishes and extracellular matrix-coated dishes. CSCs persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumorigenic clones. The purification or depletion (suppression) of CSCs should be useful for analyzing CSC characteristics and for clinical application. CSCs can be selectively suppressed from colon cancer cells containing adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on Pluronic-grafted dishes, while ADSCs remain on the dishes. ADSCs on Pluronic-grafted dishes after the suppression of the CSCs can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, and neuronal cells. The CSCs and ADSCs exhibited different characteristics. The selection of ADSCs was possible on Pluronic-grafted dishes that suppressed the CSCs from the fat tissues of cancer patients (i.e., cell-sorting dishes), which was explained by specific biomedical characteristics of Pluronic. PMID:24039170

  7. An exotic invasive plant selects for increased competitive tolerance, but not competitive suppression, in a native grass.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Rebecca A; Callaway, Ragan M; Atwater, Daniel Z

    2016-06-01

    Exotic invasive plants can exert strong selective pressure for increased competitive ability in native plants. There are two fundamental components of competitive ability: suppression and tolerance, and the current paradigm that these components have equal influences on a species' overall competitive ability has been recently questioned. If these components do not have equal influences on overall ability, then selection on competitive tolerance and suppression may be disproportionate. We used naturally invaded communities to study the effects of selection caused by an invasive forb, Centaurea stoebe, on a native grass, Pseudoroegneria spicata. P. spicata plants were harvested from within dense C. stoebe patches and from nearby uninvaded areas, divided clonally into replicates, then transplanted into a common garden where they grew alone or competed with C. stoebe. We found that P. spicata plants collected from within C. stoebe patches were significantly more tolerant of competition with C. stoebe than P. spicata plants collected from uninvaded areas, but plants from inside invaded patches were not superior at suppressing C. stoebe. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that strong competitors may select for tolerance to competition more than for the ability to suppress neighbors. This has important implications for how native plant communities may respond to invasion over time, and how invasive and native species may ultimately coexist. PMID:26897605

  8. Selective suppression of cytokine secretion in whole blood cell cultures of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, H.; Schindel, M.; Frikart, L.; Cerottini, J. P.; Yilmaz, A.; Givel, J. C.; Fischer, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the secretion of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-gamma, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-2 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in whole blood cell cultures (WBCCs) of colorectal cancer patients upon mitogen stimulation. Whereas the values for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha remained virtually unchanged in comparison with healthy control subjects, WBCCs of colorectal cancer patients secreted significantly lower amounts of IFN-alpha (P < 0.005), IFN-gamma (P < 0.0001), IL-1alpha (P < 0.0001) and IL-2 (P < 0.05). This reduction correlated with the progression of the disease. The total leucocyte and monocyte population were almost identical in both groups. In contrast, a dramatic depletion of lymphocytes was observed in colorectal cancer patients, which affected both lymphocyte counts (P < 0.0005) and their distribution (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest a selective suppression of cytokines in colorectal cancer patients that is related to tumour burden. Several mechanisms might account for this phenomenon, one of which might be lymphocyte depletion. PMID:9792144

  9. Activated Drosophila Ras1 is selectively suppressed by isoprenyl transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffmann, R C; Qian, Y; Vogt, A; Sebti, S M; Hamilton, A D; Carthew, R W

    1995-01-01

    Ras CAAX (C = cysteine, A = aliphatic amino acid, and X = any amino acid) peptidomimetic inhibitors of farnesyl protein transferase suppress Ras-dependent cell transformation by preventing farnesylation of the Ras oncoprotein. These compounds are potential anticancer agents for tumors associated with Ras mutations. The peptidomimetic FTI-254 was tested for Ras1-inhibiting activity in whole animals by injection of activated Ras1val12 Drosophila larvae. FTI-254 decreased the ability of Ras1val12 to form supernumerary R7 photoreceptor cells in the compound eye of transformed flies. In contrast, it had no effect on the related supernumerary R7 phenotypes of flies transformed with either the activated sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase, Raf kinase, or a chimeric Ras1val12 protein that is membrane associated through myristylation instead of isoprenylation. Therefore, FTI-254 acts as an isoprenylation inhibitor to selectively inhibit Ras1val12 signaling activity in a whole-animal model system. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7479910

  10. Selection of genetically diverse trichoderma spp. isolates for suppression of phytophthora capsici on bell pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally compatible control measures are needed for suppression of Phytophthora capsici on pepper. Twenty-four isolates of Trichoderma were screened for suppression of this pathogen on bell pepper in greenhouse pot assays. Of these twenty-four isolates, GL12, GL13, and Th23 provided signifi...

  11. Removal of the samarium isobaric interference from promethium mass analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Young, J.P.; Smith, D.H.

    1988-02-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) is used to eliminate isobaric interference when determining the isotopic abundances of an element. In this application, RIMS is applied to the determination of promethium with the removal of samarium interference. In particular, promethium-147 is separated form samarium-147 and samarium-152.

  12. Select phytochemicals suppress human T-lymphocytes and mouse splenocytes suggesting their use in autoimmunity and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hushmendy, Shazaan; Jayakumar, Lalithapriya; Hahn, Amy B.; Bhoiwala, Devang; Bhoiwala, Dipti L.; Crawford, Dana R.

    2009-01-01

    We have considered a novel “rational” gene targeting approach for treating pathologies whose genetic bases are defined using select phytochemicals. We reason that one such potential application of this approach would be conditions requiring immunosuppression such as autoimmune disease and transplantation, where the genetic target is clearly defined; i.e., interleukin-2 and associated T-cell activation. Therefore, we hypothesized that select phytochemicals can suppress T-lymphocyte proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The immunosuppressive effects of berry extract, curcumin, quercetin, sulforaphane, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), resveratrol, α-tocopherol, vitamin C and sucrose were tested on anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28-activated primary human T-lymphocytes in culture. Curcumin, sulforaphane, quercetin, berry extract and EGCG all significantly inhibited T-cell proliferation, and this effect was not due to toxicity. IL-2 production was also reduced by these agents, implicating this important T-cell cytokine in proliferation suppression. Except for berry extract, these same agents also inhibited mouse splenic T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. Subsequent in vivo studies revealed that quercetin (but not sulforaphane) modestly suppressed mouse splenocyte proliferation following supplementation of BALB/c mice diets. This effect was especially prominent if corrected for the loss of supplement “recall” as observed in cultured T-cells. These results suggest the potential use of these select phytochemicals for treating autoimmune and transplant patients, and support our strategy of using select phytochemicals to treat genetically-defined pathologies, an approach that we believe is simple, healthy, and cost-effective. PMID:19761891

  13. Narrow-band injection seeding of a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser: Selection and suppression of longitudinal modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nong, Hanond Markmann, Sergej; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan; Pal, Shovon; Mohandas, Reshma A.; Dean, Paul; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2014-09-15

    A periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal with multiple poling periods is used to generate tunable narrow-bandwidth THz pulses for injection seeding a quantum cascade laser (QCL). We demonstrate that longitudinal modes of the quantum cascade laser close to the gain maximum can be selected or suppressed according to the seed spectrum. The QCL emission spectra obtained by electro-optic sampling from the quantum cascade laser, in the most favorable case, shows high selectivity and amplification of the longitudinal modes that overlap the frequency of the narrow-band seed. Proper selection of the narrow-band THz seed from the PPLN crystal discretely tunes the longitudinal mode emission of the quantum cascade laser. Moreover, the THz wave build-up within the laser cavity is studied as a function of the round-trip time. When the seed frequency is outside the maximum of the gain spectrum the laser emission shifts to the preferential longitudinal mode.

  14. Sampling the isothermal-isobaric ensemble by Langevin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xingyu; Fang, Jun; Wang, Han

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method of conducting fully flexible-cell molecular dynamics simulation in isothermal-isobaric ensemble based on Langevin equations of motion. The stochastic coupling to all particle and cell degrees of freedoms is introduced in a correct way, in the sense that the stationary configurational distribution is proved to be consistent with that of the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. In order to apply the proposed method in computer simulations, a second order symmetric numerical integration scheme is developed by Trotter's splitting of the single-step propagator. Moreover, a practical guide of choosing working parameters is suggested for user specified thermo- and baro-coupling time scales. The method and software implementation are carefully validated by a numerical example.

  15. Isobaric yield ratio difference and Shannon information entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling; Wang, Shan-Shan; Ma, Yu-Gang; Wada, Ryoichi; Zhang, Yan-Li

    2015-03-01

    The Shannon information entropy theory is used to explain the recently proposed isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probe which aims to determine the nuclear symmetry energy. Theoretically, the difference between the Shannon uncertainties carried by isobars in two different reactions (ΔIn21), is found to be equivalent to the difference between the chemical potentials of protons and neutrons of the reactions [the IBD probe, IB- Δ(βμ)21, with β the reverse temperature]. From the viewpoints of Shannon information entropy, the physical meaning of the above chemical potential difference is interpreted by ΔIn21 as denoting the nuclear symmetry energy or density difference between neutrons and protons in reactions more concisely than from the statistical ablation-abrasion model.

  16. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to β - α determined by the isoscaling (α (β) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  17. Reference pressure changes and available potential energy in isobaric coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation of the available potential energy (APE) equation in isobaric coordinates which alleviates the need for computing temporal derivatives of reference pressure and describes how work done relates to changes in the APE of a limited region is presented. The APE budget equation possesses terms analogous to those in Johnson's (1970) isentropic version. It is shown that APE changes result from either mechanical work inside the domain or an exchange of energy via boundary processes with the surrounding environment.

  18. Antitumor activity of YM155, a selective survivin suppressant, in combination with cisplatin in hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaosu; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Yanling; Wang, Jiaqi; Liu, Yingchun

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is a chemotherapeutic drug that is often used for the treatment of hepatoblastoma. However, many patients acquire resistance to therapeutic agents leading to local and distant treatment failure. It has been shown that suppression survivin contributed to the inhibition of tumor growth and enhanced chemotherapeutic sensitivity in several types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine whether treatment with sepantronium bromide (YM155), a novel small molecule inhibitor of survivin, enhanced the sensitivity of CDDP to hepatoblastoma cells, leading to the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. In vitro and in vivo models were used to examine the anticancer efficacy of YM155, either as a monotherapy or in combination with CDDP to identify more effective therapeutics against hepatoblastoma. The results showed that survivin expression was upregulated in hepatoblastoma tissues and cell lines, and that YM155 inhibited survivin expression in hepatoblastoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. YM155 enhanced sensitivity of CDDP to human HepG2 and HuH-6 hepatoblastoma cells. The YM155 combination with CDDP in hepatoblastoma cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and formation, and induced cell apoptosis than either agent alone. In a mouse xenograft model, YM155 combined with CDDP significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to the monotherapy. Taken together, these findings suggested that the combination of YM155 and CDDP is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of hepatoblastoma. PMID:25955434

  19. Selective Mitochondrial Uptake of MKT-077 Can Suppress Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Survival In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Starenki, Dmytro

    2015-01-01

    Background Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine tumor mainly caused by mutations in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene. Not all patients with progressive MTC respond to current therapy inhibiting RET, demanding additional therapeutic strategies. We recently demonstrated that disrupting mitochondrial metabolism using a mitochondria-targeted agent or by depleting a mitochondrial chaperone effectively suppressed human MTC cells in culture and in mouse xenografts by inducing apoptosis and RET downregulation. These observations led us to hypothesize that mitochondria are potential therapeutic targets for MTC. This study further tests this hypothesis using1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden)]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride (MKT-077), a water-soluble rhodocyanine dye analogue, which can selectively accumulate in mitochondria. Methods The effects of MKT-077 on cell proliferation, survival, expression of RET and tumor protein 53 (TP53), and mitochondrial activity were determined in the human MTC lines in culture and in mouse xenografts. Results MKT-077 induced cell cycle arrest in TT and MZ-CRC-1. Intriguingly, MKT-077 also induced RET downregulation and strong cell death responses in TT cells, but not in MZ-CRC-1 cells. This discrepancy was mainly due to the difference between the capacities of these cell lines to retain MKT-077 in mitochondria. The cytotoxicity of MKT-077 in TT cells was mainly attributed to oxidative stress while being independent of TP53. MKT-077 also effectively suppressed tumor growth of TT xenografts. Conclusion MKT-077 can suppress cell survival of certain MTC subtypes by accumulating in mitochondria and interfering with mitochondrial activity although it can also suppress cell proliferation via other mechanisms. These results consistently support the hypothesis that mitochondrial targeting has therapeutic potential for MTC. PMID:26485469

  20. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. PMID:26253462

  1. Piperlongumine selectively suppresses ABC-DLBCL through inhibition of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Mingshan; Shen, Yangling; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Zhiling; Wu, Qingyun; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xuejiao; and others

    2015-07-10

    Constitutive NF-κB activation is required for survival of activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). However, current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identified a novel inhibitor, piperlongumine, features direct binding to NF-κB p65 subunit and suppression of p65 nuclear import. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Moreover, mutation of Cys{sup 38} to Ser in p65 abolished this effect of piperlongumine on inhibition of p65 nuclear import. Furthermore, we show that piperlongumine selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cells. Most notably, it has been reported that piperlongumine did not affect normal cells even at high doses and was nontoxic to animals. Hence, our current study provides new insight into piperlongumine's mechanism of action and novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy. - Highlights: • Current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. • Piperlongumine inhibits NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import via directly binding to p65. • Piperlongumine selectively inhibits proliferation of ABC-DLBCL cells. • This study provides a novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy.

  2. The MR-TOF-MS isobar separator for the TITAN facility at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesch, Christian; Dickel, Timo; Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Short, Devin; Ayet San Andres, Samuel; Dilling, Jens; Geissel, Hans; Greiner, Florian; Lang, Johannes; Leach, Kyle G.; Lippert, Wayne; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Yavor, Mikhail I.

    2015-11-01

    At TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear Science (TITAN) a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) will extend TITAN's capabilities and facilitate mass measurements and in-trap decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei that so far have not been possible due to strong isobaric contamination. This MR-TOF-MS will also enable mass measurements of very short-lived nuclides (half-life > 1 ms) that are produced in very low quantities (a few detected ions overall). In order to allow the installation of an MR-TOF-MS in the restricted space on the platform, on which the TITAN facility is located, novel mass spectrometric methods have been developed. Transport, cooling and distribution of the ions inside the device is done using a buffer gas-filled RFQ-based ion beam switchyard. Mass selection is achieved using a dynamic retrapping technique after time-of-flight analysis in an electrostatic isochronous reflector system. Only due to the combination of these novel methods the realization of an MR-TOF-MS based isobar separator at TITAN has become possible. The device has been built, commissioned off-line and is currently under installation at TITAN.

  3. Selective strong-field enhancement and suppression of ionization with short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, N. A.; Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Paulus, G. G.; Bauer, D.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate robust selective excitation and attenuation of atomic Rydberg level populations in sodium vapor (Na i) using intense laser pulses in the strong-field limit (>1012W /c m2 ). Coherent control of the atomic population and related ionization channels is realized for intensities above the over-the-barrier ionization intensity. Moreover, atomic excitation selectivity and high ionization yield are simultaneously achieved without the need to tailor the spectral phase of the laser. A qualitative model confirms that this strong-field coherent control arises through the manifestation of a Freeman resonance.

  4. Shuttle suppression in room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries using ion selective polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, I; Kohl, M; Althues, H; Kaskel, S

    2014-03-25

    A sodiated Nafion-coating on a porous polypropylene backbone was used as a cation selective separator for room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries. The capacity of the cells after 20 cycles could be enhanced by 75% to 350 mA h g(sulfur)(-1) using the new separator. PMID:24522659

  5. P50 Suppression in Children with Selective Mutism: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Yael; Feinholz, Maya; Arie, Miri; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that children with selective mutism (SM) display significant aberrations in auditory efferent activity at the brainstem level that may underlie inefficient auditory processing during vocalization, and lead to speech avoidance. The objective of the present study was to explore auditory filtering processes at the cortical level in…

  6. Neural repetition suppression: evidence for perceptual expectation in object-selective regions

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhauser, Lisa; Bergmann, Jürgen; Crone, Julia; Kronbichler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    It is an established finding that neuronal activity is decreased for repeated stimuli. Recent studies revealed that repetition suppression (RS) effects are altered by manipulating the probability with which stimuli are repeated. RS for faces is more pronounced when the probability of repetition is high than when it is low. This response pattern is interpreted with reference to the predictive coding (PC) account, which assumes that RS is influenced by top-down expectations. Recent findings challenge the generality of PC accounts of RS by showing repetition probability does not modulate RS for other visual stimuli than faces. However, a number of findings on visual processing are in line with PC. Thus, the influence of repetition probability on RS effects during object processing requires careful reinvestigations. In the present fMRI study, object pictures were presented in a high (75%) or low (25%) repetition probability context. We found increased RS in the high-probability context compared to the low-probability context in the left lateral occipital complex (LOC). The dorsal-caudal and the ventral-anterior subdivisions of the LOC revealed similar neuronal responses. These results indicate that repetition probability effects can be found for other visual objects than faces and provide evidence in favor of the PC account. PMID:24860461

  7. Systematic Comparison of Label-Free, Metabolic Labeling, and Isobaric Chemical Labeling for Quantitative Proteomics on LTQ Orbitrap Velos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhou; Adams, Rachel M; Chourey, Karuna; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Pan, Chongle

    2012-01-01

    A variety of quantitative proteomics methods have been developed, including label-free, metabolic labeling, and isobaric chemical labeling using iTRAQ or TMT. Here, these methods were compared in terms of the depth of proteome coverage, quantification accuracy, precision, and reproducibility using a high-performance hybrid mass spectrometer, LTQ Orbitrap Velos. Our results show that (1) the spectral counting method provides the deepest proteome coverage for identification, but its quantification performance is worse than labeling-based approaches, especially the quantification reproducibility; (2) metabolic labeling and isobaric chemical labeling are capable of accurate, precise, and reproducible quantification and provide deep proteome coverage for quantification. Isobaric chemical labeling surpasses metabolic labeling in terms of quantification precision and reproducibility; (3) iTRAQ and TMT perform similarly in all aspects compared in the current study using a CID-HCD dual scan configuration. Based on the unique advantages of each method, we provide guidance for selection of the appropriate method for a quantitative proteomics study.

  8. Suppressed N2O formation during NH3 selective catalytic reduction using vanadium on zeolitic microporous TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Song, Inhak; Youn, Seunghee; Kim, Do Heui; Cho, Sung June

    2015-08-01

    Emission of N2O from mobile and off-road engine is now being currently regulated because of its high impact compared to that of CO2, thereby implying that N2O formation from the exhaust gas after-treatment system should be suppressed. Selective catalytic reduction using vanadium supported TiO2 catalyst in mobile and off-road engine has been considered to be major source for N2O emission in the system. Here we have demonstrated that vanadium catalyst supported on zeolitic microporous TiO2 obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of bulk TiO2 at 400 K in the presence of LiOH suppresses significantly the N2O emission compared to conventional VOx/TiO2 catalyst, while maintaining the excellent NOx reduction, which was ascribed to the location of VOx domain in the micropore of TiO2, resulting in the strong metal support interaction. The use of zeolitic microporous TiO2 provides a new way of preparing SCR catalyst with a high thermal stability and superior catalytic performance. It can be also extended further to the other catalytic system employing TiO2-based substrate.

  9. Suppressed N2O formation during NH3 selective catalytic reduction using vanadium on zeolitic microporous TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Song, Inhak; Youn, Seunghee; Kim, Do Heui; Cho, Sung June

    2015-01-01

    Emission of N2O from mobile and off-road engine is now being currently regulated because of its high impact compared to that of CO2, thereby implying that N2O formation from the exhaust gas after-treatment system should be suppressed. Selective catalytic reduction using vanadium supported TiO2 catalyst in mobile and off-road engine has been considered to be major source for N2O emission in the system. Here we have demonstrated that vanadium catalyst supported on zeolitic microporous TiO2 obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of bulk TiO2 at 400 K in the presence of LiOH suppresses significantly the N2O emission compared to conventional VOx/TiO2 catalyst, while maintaining the excellent NOx reduction, which was ascribed to the location of VOx domain in the micropore of TiO2, resulting in the strong metal support interaction. The use of zeolitic microporous TiO2 provides a new way of preparing SCR catalyst with a high thermal stability and superior catalytic performance. It can be also extended further to the other catalytic system employing TiO2-based substrate. PMID:26235671

  10. Piperlongumine selectively suppresses ABC-DLBCL through inhibition of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mingshan; Shen, Yangling; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Fu, Chunling; Yan, Zhiling; Wu, Qingyun; Cao, Jiang; Sang, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xuejiao; Xu, Kailin

    2015-07-10

    Constitutive NF-κB activation is required for survival of activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). However, current NF-κB targeting strategies lack cancer cell specificity. Here, we identified a novel inhibitor, piperlongumine, features direct binding to NF-κB p65 subunit and suppression of p65 nuclear import. This was accompanied by NF-κB reporter activity suppression and NF-κB target gene downregulation. Moreover, mutation of Cys(38) to Ser in p65 abolished this effect of piperlongumine on inhibition of p65 nuclear import. Furthermore, we show that piperlongumine selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cells. Most notably, it has been reported that piperlongumine did not affect normal cells even at high doses and was nontoxic to animals. Hence, our current study provides new insight into piperlongumine's mechanism of action and novel approach to ABC-DLBCL target therapy. PMID:25979358

  11. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Ling-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-Te; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, “Chen Pi.” Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4H/PDE4L) ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation. PMID:22454667

  12. Isobaric Labeling and Data Normalization without Requiring Protein Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Phillip D.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Yeung, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01

    Isobaric multiplexed quantitative proteomics can complement high-resolution sample isolation techniques. Here, we report a simple workflow exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI)-MW deconvolution (EMMOL) for normalizing isobaric reporter ratios within and between experiments, where small or unknown amounts of protein are used. EMMOL deconvolutes the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) data to yield the quantity of each protein of each sample in the pool, a new approach that enables the comparison of many samples without including a channel of reference standard. Moreover, EMMOL allows using a sufficient quantity of control sample to facilitate the peptide fractionation (isoelectric-focusing was used in this report), and mass spectrometry MS/MS sequencing yet relies on the broad dynamic range of iTRAQ quantitation to compare relative protein abundance. We demonstrated EMMOL by comparing four pooled samples with 20-fold range differences in protein abundance and performed data normalization without using prior knowledge of the amounts of proteins in each sample, simulating an iTRAQ experiment without protein quantitation prior to labeling. We used emPAI,1 the target protein MW, and the iTRAQ reporter ratios to calculate the amount of each protein in each of the four channels. Importantly, the EMMOL-delineated proteomes from separate iTRAQ experiments can be assorted for comparison without using a reference sample. We observed no compression of expression in iTRAQ ratios over a 20-fold range for all protein abundances. To complement this ability to analyze minute samples, we report an optimized iTRAQ labeling protocol for using 5 μg protein as the starting material. PMID:22468137

  13. Development of novel DIF-1 derivatives that selectively suppress innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Hai; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Kubohara, Yuzuru; Takahashi, Katsunori; Katou, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-08-01

    The multiple pharmacological activities of differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum led us to examine the use of DIF-1 as a 'drug template' to develop promising seed compounds for drug discovery. DIF-1 and its derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their regulatory activities in innate immune responses. We found two new derivatives (4d and 5e) with highly selective inhibitory activities against production of the antimicrobial peptide attacin in Drosophila S2 cells and against production of interleukin-2 in Jurkat cells. PMID:26122773

  14. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Ikeda, S.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is 96Ru + 96Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  15. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions. PMID:26931981

  16. Test of isospin purity in the A=42 isobaric analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Orce, J.N.; McKay, C.J.; Choudry, S.N.; Lesher, S.R.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; McEllistrem, M.T.; Petkov, P.; Mynk, M.; Yates, S.W.

    2004-07-01

    A careful measurement of the lifetime of the first 2{sub T=1}{sup +} state in {sup 42}Sc has allowed an accurate experimental test of isospin purity in the A=42 isobaric analogs by using the isospin formalism. A lifetime of 69 (18) fs has been determined, giving an isoscalar matrix element of 6.8 (8) W.u. Previous measurements of the lifetimes in the mirror nuclei {sup 42}Ca and {sup 42}Ti provided an isoscalar matrix element of 7.1 (5) W.u. which is very close to the presently measured value for {sup 42}Sc.

  17. CBP30, a selective CBP/p300 bromodomain inhibitor, suppresses human Th17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Hammitzsch, Ariane; Tallant, Cynthia; Fedorov, Oleg; O’Mahony, Alison; Brennan, Paul E.; Hay, Duncan A.; Martinez, Fernando O.; Al-Mossawi, M. Hussein; de Wit, Jelle; Vecellio, Matteo; Wells, Christopher; Wordsworth, Paul; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Bowness, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Th17 responses are critical to a variety of human autoimmune diseases, and therapeutic targeting with monoclonal antibodies against IL-17 and IL-23 has shown considerable promise. Here, we report data to support selective bromodomain blockade of the transcriptional coactivators CBP (CREB binding protein) and p300 as an alternative approach to inhibit human Th17 responses. We show that CBP30 has marked molecular specificity for the bromodomains of CBP and p300, compared with 43 other bromodomains. In unbiased cellular testing on a diverse panel of cultured primary human cells, CBP30 reduced immune cell production of IL-17A and other proinflammatory cytokines. CBP30 also inhibited IL-17A secretion by Th17 cells from healthy donors and patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Transcriptional profiling of human T cells after CBP30 treatment showed a much more restricted effect on gene expression than that observed with the pan-BET (bromo and extraterminal domain protein family) bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. This selective targeting of the CBP/p300 bromodomain by CBP30 will potentially lead to fewer side effects than with the broadly acting epigenetic inhibitors currently in clinical trials. PMID:26261308

  18. Active suppression of nonlinear composite beam vibrations by selected control algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warminski, Jerzy; Bochenski, Marcin; Jarzyna, Wojciech; Filipek, Piotr; Augustyniak, Michal

    2011-05-01

    This paper is focused on application of different control algorithms for a flexible, geometrically nonlinear beam-like structure with Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) actuator. Based on the mathematical model of a geometrically nonlinear beam, analytical solutions for Nonlinear Saturation Controller (NSC) are obtained using Multiple Scale Method. Effectiveness of different control strategies is evaluated by numerical simulations in Matlab-Simulink software. Then, the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) controller and selected control algorithms are implemented to the physical system to compare numerical and experimental results. Detailed analysis for the NSC system is carried out, especially for high level of amplitude and wide range of frequencies of excitation. Finally, the efficiency of the considered controllers is tested experimentally for a more complex autoparametric " L-shape" beam system.

  19. A CB2-Selective Cannabinoid Suppresses T-cell Activities and Increases Tregs and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Rebecca H.; Meissler, Joseph J.; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Daohai; Adler, Martin W.; Eisenstein, Toby K.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that agonists selective for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), including O-1966, inhibit the Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR), an in vitro correlate of organ graft rejection, predominantly through effects on T-cells. Current studies explored the mechanism of this immunosuppression by O-1966 using mouse spleen cells. Treatment with O-1966 dose-relatedly decreased levels of the active nuclear forms of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT in wild-type T-cells, but not T-cells from CB2 knockout (CB2R k/o) mice. Additionally, a gene expression profile of purified T-cells from MLR cultures generated using a PCR T-cell activation array showed that O-1966 decreased mRNA expression of CD40 ligand and CyclinD3, and increased mRNA expression of Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2), Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 5 (SOCS5), and IL-10. The increase in IL-10 was confirmed by measuring IL-10 protein levels in MLR culture supernatants. Further, an increase in the percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) was observed in MLR cultures. Pretreatment with anti-IL-10 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibition of proliferation and blocked the increase of Tregs. Additionally, O-1966 treatment caused a dose-related decrease in the expression of CD4 in MLR cultures from wild-type, but not CB2R k/o, mice. These data support the potential of CB2-selective agonists as useful therapeutic agents to prolong graft survival in transplant patients, and strengthens their potential as a new class of immunosuppressive agents with broader applicability. PMID:25980325

  20. A new gas lesion syndrome in man, induced by 'isobaric gas counterdiffusion'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Idicula, J.

    1975-01-01

    Normal men have been found to develop pruritis and gas bubble lesions in the skin, and disruption of vestibular function, when breathing nitrogen or neon with oxygen while surrounded by helium at increased ambient pressure. This phenomenon, which occurs at stable ambient pressures, at 1 or many ATA, has been designated the isobaric gas counterdiffusion syndrome. In a series of analyses and experiments in vivo and in vitro the cause of the syndrome has been established as due to gas accumulation and development of gas bubbles in tissues as a result of differences in selective diffusivities, for various respired and ambient gases, in the tissue substances between capillary blood and the surrounding atmosphere. The phenomenon described in man is an initial stage of a process shown later in animals to progress to continuous, massive, lethal, intravascular gas embolization.

  1. Hard breakup of the deuteron into two Δ -isobars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Carlos; Sargsian, Misak

    2011-04-01

    Photodisintegration of the deuteron into two Δ-isobars at large center of mass angles is studied within the QCD hard rescattering model (HRM). According to the HRM, the reaction proceeds in three main steps: the photon knocks the quark from one of the nucleons in the deuteron; the struck quark rescatters off a quark from the other nucleon sharing the high energy of the photon; then the energetic quarks recombine into two outgoing baryons emerging at large transverse momenta. Within the HRM, the cross section is expressed through the amplitude of pn --> ΔΔ scattering which we evaluated based on the quark-interchange model of hard hadronic scattering. We predict that the cross section of the deuteron breakup to Δ++Δ- is 4-5 times larger than that of the breakup to the Δ+Δ0 channel. Also, the angular distributions for these two channels are markedly different. These can be compared with the predictions based on the assumption that two hard Δ-isobars are the result of the disintegration of initial ΔΔ components of the deuteron wave function. In this case, the angular distributions and cross sections of the breakup in both Δ++Δ- and Δ+Δ0 channels are expected to be similar. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant under contract DE-FG02-01ER41172, and by the FIU DEA program.

  2. Hard breakup of the deuteron into two Δ isobars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Carlos G.; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2011-05-01

    We study high-energy photodisintegration of the deuteron into two Δ isobars at large center of mass angles within the QCD hard rescattering model (HRM). According to the HRM, the process develops in three main steps: the photon knocks a quark from one of the nucleons in the deuteron; the struck quark rescatters off a quark from the other nucleon sharing the high energy of the photon; then the energetic quarks recombine into two outgoing baryons which have large transverse momenta. Within the HRM, the cross section is expressed through the amplitude of pn→ΔΔ scattering which we evaluated based on the quark-interchange model of hard hadronic scattering. Calculations show that the angular distribution and the strength of the photodisintegration is mainly determined by the properties of the pn→ΔΔ scattering. We predict that the cross section of the deuteron breakup to Δ++Δ- is 4-5 times larger than that of the breakup to the Δ+Δ0 channel. Also, the angular distributions for these two channels are markedly different. These can be compared with the predictions based on the assumption that two hard Δ isobars are the result of the disintegration of the preexisting ΔΔ components of the deuteron wave function. In this case, one expects the angular distributions and cross sections of the breakup in both Δ++Δ- and Δ+Δ0 channels to be similar.

  3. An objective isobaric/isentropic technique for upper air analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancuso, R. L.; Endlich, R. M.; Ehernberger, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An objective meteorological analysis technique is presented whereby both horizontal and vertical upper air analyses are performed. The process used to interpolate grid-point values from the upper-air station data is the same as for grid points on both an isobaric surface and a vertical cross-sectional plane. The nearby data surrounding each grid point are used in the interpolation by means of an anisotropic weighting scheme, which is described. The interpolation for a grid-point potential temperature is performed isobarically; whereas wind, mixing-ratio, and pressure height values are interpolated from data that lie on the isentropic surface that passes through the grid point. Two versions (A and B) of the technique are evaluated by qualitatively comparing computer analyses with subjective handdrawn analyses. The objective products of version A generally have fair correspondence with the subjective analyses and with the station data, and depicted the structure of the upper fronts, tropopauses, and jet streams fairly well. The version B objective products correspond more closely to the subjective analyses, and show the same strong gradients across the upper front with only minor smoothing.

  4. Selective Neural Synchrony Suppression as a Forward Gatekeeper to Piecemeal Conscious Perception.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan; Vidal, Juan R; Fries, Pascal; Démonet, Jean-François; Goldstein, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of conscious visual perception is assumed to ignite late (∼250 ms) gamma-band oscillations shortly after an initial (∼100 ms) forward sweep of neural sensory (nonconscious) information. However, this neural evidence is not utterly congruent with rich behavioral data which rather point to piecemeal (i.e., graded) perceptual processing. To address the unexplored neural mechanisms of piecemeal ignition of conscious perception, hierarchical script sensitivity of the putative visual word form area (VWFA) was exploited to signal null (i.e., sensory), partial (i.e., letter-level), and full (i.e., word-level) conscious perception. Two magnetoencephalography experiments were conducted in which healthy human participants viewed masked words (Experiment I: active task, Dutch words; Experiment II: passive task, Hebrew words) while high-frequency (broadband gamma) brain activity was measured. Findings revealed that piecemeal conscious perception did not ignite a linear piecemeal increase in oscillations. Instead, whereas late (∼250 ms) gamma-band oscillations signaled full conscious perception (i.e., word-level), partial conscious perception (i.e., letter-level) was signaled via the inhibition of the early (∼100 ms) forward sweep. This inhibition regulates the downstream broadcast to filter out irrelevant (i.e., masks) information. The findings thus highlight a local (VWFA) gatekeeping mechanism for conscious perception, operating by filtering out and in selective percepts. PMID:26045565

  5. Coumarin sulfonamides derivatives as potent and selective COX-2 inhibitors with efficacy in suppressing cancer proliferation and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Yuan; Wang, Zhong-Chang; Ren, Shen-Zhen; Shen, Fa-Qian; Man, Ruo-Jun; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 is frequently overexpression in malignant tumors and the product PGE2 promotes cancer cell progression and metastasis. We designed novel series of coumarin sulfonamides derivatives to improve biological activities of COX-2 inhibition and anticancer. Among them, compound 7t showed most powerful selective inhibitory and antiproliferative activity (IC50=0.09μM for COX-2, IC50=48.20μM for COX-1, IC50=0.36μM against HeLa cells), comparable to the control positive compound Celecoxib (0.31μM, 43.37μM, 7.79μM). Cancer cell apoptosis assay were performed and results indicated that compound 7t effectively fuels HeLa cells apoptosis in a dose and time-dependent manner. Moreover, 7t could significantly suppress cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion which were essential process of cancer metastasis. Docking simulations results was further indicated that compound 7t could bind well to the COX-2 active site and guided a reasonable design of selective COX-2 inhibitor with anticancer activities in future. PMID:27349331

  6. Selective suppression of bacterial contaminants by process conditions during lignocellulose based yeast fermentations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Contamination of bacteria in large-scale yeast fermentations is a serious problem and a threat to the development of successful biofuel production plants. Huge research efforts have been spent in order to solve this problem, but additional ways must still be found to keep bacterial contaminants from thriving in these environments. The aim of this project was to develop process conditions that would inhibit bacterial growth while giving yeast a competitive advantage. Results Lactic acid bacteria are usually considered to be the most common contaminants in industrial yeast fermentations. Our observations support this view but also suggest that acetic acid bacteria, although not so numerous, could be a much more problematic obstacle to overcome. Acetic acid bacteria showed a capacity to drastically reduce the viability of yeast. In addition, they consumed the previously formed ethanol. Lactic acid bacteria did not show this detrimental effect on yeast viability. It was possible to combat both types of bacteria by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol to the wood hydrolysate medium used. As a result of NaCl + ethanol additions the amount of viable bacteria decreased and yeast viability was enhanced concomitantly with an increase in ethanol concentration. The successful result obtained via addition of NaCl and ethanol was also confirmed in a real industrial ethanol production plant with its natural inherent yeast/bacterial community. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the number of bacteria and offer a selective advantage to yeast by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol when cultivated in lignocellulosic medium such as wood hydrolysate. However, for optimal results, the concentrations of NaCl + ethanol must be adjusted to suit the challenges offered by each hydrolysate. PMID:22185398

  7. Selective suppression of the slow-inactivating potassium currents by nootropics in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Bukanova, Julia V; Solntseva, Elena I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2002-09-01

    The role of the voltage-gated K+ channels in the effect of some nootropics was investigated. Earlier, the multiple effect of high concentrations of two nootropics, piracetam and its peptide analogue GVS-111 [Seredenin et al. (1995), US Patent No. 5,439,930], on Ca2+ and K+ currents of molluscan neurons was shown [Solntseva et al. (1997), General Pharmacology 29, 85-89]. In the present work, we describe the selective effect of low concentrations of these nootropics as well as vinpocetine on certain types of K+ current. The experiments were performed on isolated neurons of the land snail Helix pomatia using a two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method. The inward voltage-gated Ca2+ current (ICa) and three subtypes of the outward voltage-gated K+ current were recorded: Ca2+-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), delayed rectifying current (IKD), and fast-inactivating K+ current (IA). It has been found that I Ca was not changed in the presence of 30 microM vinpocetine, 100 microM piracetam or 10 nM GVS-111, while slow-inactivating, TEA-sensitive IK(Ca) and IKD were inhibited (IK(Ca) more strongly than IKD). In contrast, the fast-inactivating, 4-AP-sensitive K+ current (IA) was not diminished by low concentrations of piracetam and GVS-111, while vinpocetine even augmented it. A possible role of slow-inactivating subtypes of the K+ channels in the development of different forms of dementia is discussed. PMID:12366875

  8. Nested sampling of isobaric phase space for the direct evaluation of the isothermal-isobaric partition function of atomic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Blake A.; Nielsen, Steven O.; Gelb, Lev D.

    2015-10-21

    Nested Sampling (NS) is a powerful athermal statistical mechanical sampling technique that directly calculates the partition function, and hence gives access to all thermodynamic quantities in absolute terms, including absolute free energies and absolute entropies. NS has been used predominately to compute the canonical (NVT) partition function. Although NS has recently been used to obtain the isothermal-isobaric (NPT) partition function of the hard sphere model, a general approach to the computation of the NPT partition function has yet to be developed. Here, we describe an isobaric NS (IBNS) method which allows for the computation of the NPT partition function of any atomic system. We demonstrate IBNS on two finite Lennard-Jones systems and confirm the results through comparison to parallel tempering Monte Carlo. Temperature-entropy plots are constructed as well as a simple pressure-temperature phase diagram for each system. We further demonstrate IBNS by computing part of the pressure-temperature phase diagram of a Lennard-Jones system under periodic boundary conditions.

  9. The isobaric multiplet mass equation for A≤71 revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Yi Hua; Blank, Bertram; Smirnova, Nadezda A.; Bueb, Jean Bernard; Antony, Maria Susai

    2013-11-15

    Accurate mass determination of short-lived nuclides by Penning-trap spectrometers and progress in the spectroscopy of proton-rich nuclei have triggered renewed interest in the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME). The energy levels of the members of T=1/2,1,3/2, and 2 multiplets and the coefficients of the IMME are tabulated for A≤71. The new compilation is based on the most recent mass evaluation (AME2011) and it includes the experimental results on energies of the states evaluated up to end of 2011. Taking into account the error bars, a significant deviation from the quadratic form of the IMME for the A=9,35 quartets and the A=32 quintet is observed.

  10. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WHEAT TAKE-ALL DISEASE: II – RAPID SELECTION OF BACTERIA SUPPRESSIVE TO GAEUMANNOMYCES GRAMINIS VAR. TRITICI IN LABORATORY WITH GREENHOUSE AND FIELD CONFIRMATION TRIALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening large collections of bacteria for potential biological control activity on economically important diseases is often difficult. A quick test tube assay was developed to rapidly screen selected bacterial isolates for their ability to suppress take-all disease of wheat, caused by Gaeumannomyc...

  11. Hard breakup of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2011-05-15

    We study high-energy photodisintegration of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars at large center of mass angles within the QCD hard rescattering model (HRM). According to the HRM, the process develops in three main steps: the photon knocks a quark from one of the nucleons in the deuteron; the struck quark rescatters off a quark from the other nucleon sharing the high energy of the photon; then the energetic quarks recombine into two outgoing baryons which have large transverse momenta. Within the HRM, the cross section is expressed through the amplitude of pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering which we evaluated based on the quark-interchange model of hard hadronic scattering. Calculations show that the angular distribution and the strength of the photodisintegration is mainly determined by the properties of the pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering. We predict that the cross section of the deuteron breakup to {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} is 4-5 times larger than that of the breakup to the {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channel. Also, the angular distributions for these two channels are markedly different. These can be compared with the predictions based on the assumption that two hard {Delta} isobars are the result of the disintegration of the preexisting {Delta}{Delta} components of the deuteron wave function. In this case, one expects the angular distributions and cross sections of the breakup in both {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} and {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channels to be similar.

  12. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  13. Tigecycline-Amikacin Combination Effectively Suppresses the Selection of Resistance in Clinical Isolates of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wentao; Wei, Chuanqi; Zhou, Chufei; Zhao, Jin; Liang, Beibei; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-01-01

    By far, only tigecycline, colistin, and some aminoglycosides still show favorable in vitro activities against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. However, rapid emergence of resistance often occurs during long-term treatment in clinic, challenging these last resort antimicrobials. In this study, we measured mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) of tigecycline, colistin and amikacin alone and in combination for clinical isolates of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, and characterized the resistant mutants recovered. The MPC90 of 30 tested isolates for tigecycline, colistin, and amikacin were 16, >128, and 128 mg/L, respectively. The average MSW of tigecycline-amikacin, tigecycline-colistin, and amikacin-colistin combinations for four representative strains were 11.99, 200.13, and 372.38, respectively. A strong correlation was found between the MSWcombination and the product of MSW of each single drug. Combinations of 1 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) multiple tigecycline and 1 MIC multiple amikacin could result in 1000- to 10000-fold reduction in mutational frequency relative to their individual mutational frequencies, and combinations of 1 MIC multiple amikacin and 1.5–2 MIC multiple tigecycline could successfully restrict the recovery of resistant mutants on agar plates. However, 2 MIC multiple colistin in combination with 2 MIC multiple tigecycline or amikacin merely resulted in approximately 10-fold decrease in the mutational frequency. In conclusion, this study showed tigecycline-amikacin combination could effectively suppress the selection of resistance at low concentrations compared with the colistin-tigecycline and colistin-amikacin combinations, suggesting that this combination may be useful in clinical therapy. PMID:27594855

  14. Heat dissipation does not suppress an immune response in laboratory mice divergently selected for basal metabolic rate (BMR).

    PubMed

    Książek, Aneta; Konarzewski, Marek

    2016-05-15

    The capacity for heat dissipation is considered to be one of the most important constraints on rates of energy expenditure in mammals. To date, the significance of this constraint has been tested exclusively under peak metabolic demands, such as during lactation. Here, we used a different set of metabolic stressors, which do not induce maximum energy expenditures and yet are likely to expose the potential constraining effect of heat dissipation. We compared the physiological responses of mice divergently selected for high (H-BMR) and low basal metabolic rate (L-BMR) to simultaneous exposure to the keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) antigen and high ambient temperature (Ta). At 34°C (and at 23°C, used as a control), KLH challenge resulted in a transient increase in core body temperature (Tb) in mice of both line types (by approximately 0.4°C). Warm exposure did not produce line-type-dependent differences in Tb (which was consistently higher by ca. 0.6°C in H-BMR mice across both Ta values), nor did it result in the suppression of antibody synthesis. These findings were also supported by the lack of between-line-type differences in the mass of the thymus, spleen or lymph nodes. Warm exposure induced the downsizing of heat-generating internal organs (small intestine, liver and kidneys) and an increase in intrascapular brown adipose tissue mass. However, these changes were similar in scope in both line types. Mounting a humoral immune response in selected mice was therefore not affected by ambient temperature. Thus, a combined metabolic challenge of high Ta and an immune response did not appreciably compromise the capacity to dissipate heat, even in the H-BMR mice. PMID:26944492

  15. A Novel Function for Arabidopsis CYCLASE1 in Programmed Cell Death Revealed by Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J.; Kroon, Johan T. M.; Simon, William J.; Slabas, Antoni R.; Chivasa, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death is essential for plant development and stress adaptation. A detailed understanding of the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant programmed cell death requires identification of the underpinning protein networks. Here, we have used a protagonist and antagonist of programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin B1 as probes to identify key cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis. Our hypothesis was that changes in the abundance of cell death-regulatory proteins induced by the protagonist should be blocked or attenuated by concurrent treatment with the antagonist. We focused on proteins present in the mobile phase of the extracellular matrix on the basis that they are important for cell–cell communications during growth and stress-adaptive responses. Salicylic acid, a plant hormone that promotes programmed cell death, and exogenous ATP, which can block fumonisin B1-induced cell death, were used to treat Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures prior to isobaric-tagged relative and absolute quantitation analysis of secreted proteins. A total of 33 proteins, whose response to salicylic acid was suppressed by ATP, were identified as putative cell death-regulatory proteins. Among these was CYCLASE1, which was selected for further analysis using reverse genetics. Plants in which CYCLASE1 gene expression was knocked out by insertion of a transfer-DNA sequence manifested dramatically increased cell death when exposed to fumonisin B1 or a bacterial pathogen that triggers the defensive hypersensitive cell death. Although pathogen inoculation altered CYCLASE1 gene expression, multiplication of bacterial pathogens was indistinguishable between wild type and CYCLASE1 knockout plants. However, remarkably severe chlorosis symptoms developed on gene knockout plants in response to inoculation with either a virulent bacterial pathogen or a disabled mutant that is incapable of causing disease in wild type plants. These results show that CYCLASE1, which

  16. Dehydroeffusol inhibits gastric cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity by selectively inducing tumor-suppressive endoplasmic reticulum stress and a moderate apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Han, Hongyan; Fu, Shilong; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2016-03-15

    Gastric cancer is ranked as the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Although extensive efforts have been made in recent decades to treat gastric cancer with various anticancer drugs, effective anti-gastric cancer therapeutics to cure the disease are still lacking in the clinics. Therefore, potent novel anti-gastric cancer drugs are greatly needed. In this study, we explored a novel anti-gastric cancer agent from a medicinal herb named Juncus effusus and found that the active component dehydroeffusol (DHE), a small molecular phenanthrene, effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by inducing tumor suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and by triggering moderate apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that DHE selectively activated the intracellular tumor suppressive stress response by promoting the overexpression of the key ER stress marker DNA damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3), through upregulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Concurrently, DHE suppressed the expression of the cell survival and ER stress marker glucose regulated protein of molecular mass 78 (GRP78) via downregulation of the transcription factor ATF6. In addition, DHE markedly activated the stress response signaling pathway MEKK4-MKK3/6-p38-DDIT3, but significantly inhibited ERK signaling. Our data suggest that DHE inhibits gastric cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity through selectively inducing a robust tumor suppressive ER stress response and a moderate apoptosis response. Therefore, DHE may provide a novel drug candidate for further development of potential anti-gastric cancer therapeutics. PMID:26774454

  17. Compact high resolution isobar separator for study of exotic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepunov, V.; Piechaczek, A.; Carter, H. K.; Batchelder, J. C.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2009-05-01

    A compact isobar separator, based on the Multi-Pass-Time-of-Flight (MTOF) principle, is developed. A mass resolving power (MRP) of 110,000 (FWHM) is achieved as spectrometer with a transmission of 50 - 80%. The transverse beam acceptance and the energy acceptance are 42 π mm mrad and about ± 2.5%. Operated as a separator, molecules of N2 and CO with δM/M = 1/2500 or 10.433 MeV were separated with a Bradbury Nielsen gate. In that mode of operation, the MRP (FWHM) is about 40,000 after 120 laps. To inject radioactive ion beams into the separator, and to further improve its MRP, cooler and buncher RF quadrupoles were designed^1 and tested. A bunch width of 30 ns at 1% of the peak height (FWHM = 9 ns) and a transmission in DC mode of 75 -- 80 % were achieved. With such bunch parameters, MRPs of ˜ 400,000 (FWHM) are expected for the MTOF separator. At HRIBF, it will provide pure samples of exotic nuclides around ^100Sn, of neutron deficient rare-earth nuclei and of neutron-rich nuclei. Incidental measurements of mass differences will determine Qβ values with accuracies of ˜ 1%. ^1 V. Shchepunov and V. Kozlovskiy et al., to be published

  18. Rapid Analysis of Isobaric Exogenous Metabolites by Differential Mobility Spectrometry Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, Whitney B; Schneider, Bradley B; Kertesz, Vilmos; Corr, Jay; Covey, Thomas R.; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    The direct separation of isobaric glucuronide metabolites from propranolol dosed tissue extracts by differential mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) with the use of a polar gas-phase chemical modifier was demonstrated. The DMS gas-phase separation was able to resolve the isobaric metabolites with separation times on the order of ms instead of mins to hrs typically required when using pre-ionization chromatographic separation methods. Direct separation of isobaric metabolites from the complex tissue extract was validated using standards as well as implementing an HPLC separation prior to the DMS-MS analysis to pre-separate the species of interest. The ability to separate isobaric exogenous metabolites directly from a complex tissue extract is expected to facilitate the drug development process by increasing analytical throughput without the requirement for pre-ionization cleanup or separation strategies.

  19. Isobar separation by time-of-flight mass spectrometry for low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Dickel, Timo; Czok, Ulrich; Geissel, Hans; Petrick, Martin; Reinheimer, Katrin; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Yavor, Mikhail I.

    2008-10-01

    A multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) system for low-energy radioactive ion beam facilities has been developed, which can be used for (i) isobar separation and (ii) direct mass measurements of very short-lived nuclei with half-lives of about 1 ms or longer, and (iii) for identification and diagnosis of the ion beam by mass spectrometry. The system has been designed and simulated, and individual subsystems have been built and characterized experimentally. An injection trap for cooling and bunching of the ion beam has been developed, and cooling times of less than one millisecond have been achieved. The performance of the MR-TOF-MS was characterized using the isobaric doublet of carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecular ions. A mass resolving power of 105 (FWHM) has been obtained even with an uncooled ion population. The separator capabilities of the MR-TOF-MS have been demonstrated by removing either carbon monoxide or nitrogen ions from the beam in a Bradbury-Nielsen Gate after a flight time of 320 μs. The separation power achieved is thus at least 7000 (FWHM) and increases for longer time-of-flight. An energy buncher stage has been designed that compresses the energy spread of the beam after the separation and facilitates efficient injection of the selected ions into an accumulation trap prior to transfer of the ions to experiments downstream of the MR-TOF-MS.

  20. Rational design of antisense oligonucleotides targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms for potent and allele selective suppression of mutant Huntingtin in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Michael E.; Southwell, Amber L.; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T.; Skotte, Niels H.; Doty, Crystal N.; Vaid, Kuljeet; Villanueva, Erika B.; Swayze, Eric E.; Frank Bennett, C.; Hayden, Michael R.; Seth, Punit P.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD) are caused by a gain of function mutant protein and/or RNA. An ideal treatment for these diseases is to selectively suppress expression of the mutant allele while preserving expression of the wild-type variant. RNase H active antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) or small interfering RNAs can achieve allele selective suppression of gene expression by targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the repeat expansion. ASOs have been previously shown to discriminate single nucleotide changes in targeted RNAs with ∼5-fold selectivity. Based on RNase H enzymology, we enhanced single nucleotide discrimination by positional incorporation of chemical modifications within the oligonucleotide to limit RNase H cleavage of the non-targeted transcript. The resulting oligonucleotides demonstrate >100-fold discrimination for a single nucleotide change at an SNP site in the disease causing huntingtin mRNA, in patient cells and in a completely humanized mouse model of HD. The modified ASOs were also well tolerated after injection into the central nervous system of wild-type animals, suggesting that their tolerability profile is suitable for advancement as potential allele-selective HD therapeutics. Our findings lay the foundation for efficient allele-selective downregulation of gene expression using ASOs—an outcome with broad application to HD and other dominant genetic disorders. PMID:23963702

  1. Selective suppression of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor function can be mediated through binding interference at the C-terminal half of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lina; Thompson, John D; Cheung, Michael; Ngo, Katherine; Sung, Sarah; Leong, Scott; Chan, William K

    2016-05-01

    The human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a cytosolic signaling molecule which affects immune response and aberrant cell growth. Canonical signaling of the receptor requires the recruitment of coactivators to the promoter region to remodel local chromatin structure. We predicted that interference of this recruitment would block the aryl hydrocarbon receptor function. To prove that, we employed phage display to identify nine peptides of twelve-amino-acid in length which target the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor, including the region where coactivators bind. Eight 12mer peptides, in the form of GFP fusion, suppressed the ligand-dependent transcription of six AHR target genes (cyp1a1, cyp1a2, cyp1b1, ugt1a1, nqo1, and ahrr) in different patterns in Hep3B cells, whereas the AHR antagonist CH-223191 suppressed all these target genes similarly. Three of the 12mer peptides (namely 11-3, 1-7, and 7-3) suppressed the 3MC-induced, CYP1A1-dependent EROD activity and the ROS production caused by benzo[a]pyrene. These 12mer peptides suppressed the AHR function synergistically with CH-223191. In conclusion, we provide evidence that targeting the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a viable, new approach to selectively block the receptor function. PMID:26970402

  2. Acute Aortic Dissection Biomarkers Identified Using Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ziya; Xue, Yuan; Gu, Guorong; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Jin; Fan, Fan; Luan, Xiao; Deng, Zhi; Tao, Zhengang; Song, Zhen-ju; Tong, Chaoyang; Wang, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of potential serum biomarkers for acute aortic dissection (AAD) that were identified by isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) approaches. Serum samples from 20 AAD patients and 20 healthy volunteers were analyzed using iTRAQ technology. Protein validation was performed using samples from 120 patients with chest pain. A total of 355 proteins were identified with the iTRAQ approach; 164 proteins reached the strict quantitative standard, and 125 proteins were increased or decreased more than 1.2-fold (64 and 61 proteins were up- and downregulated, resp.). Lumican, C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and D-dimer were selected as candidate biomarkers for the validation tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that Lumican and D-dimer have diagnostic value (area under the curves [AUCs] 0.895 and 0.891, P < 0.05). For Lumican, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 73.33% and 98.33%, while the corresponding values for D-dimer were 93.33% and 68.33%. For Lumican and D-dimer AAD combined diagnosis, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.33% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, Lumican has good specificity and D-dimer has good sensitivity for the diagnosis of AAD, while the combined detection of D-dimer and Lumican has better diagnostic value. PMID:27403433

  3. A Triple Knockout (TKO) Proteomics Standard for Diagnosing Ion Interference in Isobaric Labeling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Isobaric labeling is a powerful strategy for quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic investigations. A complication of such analyses has been the co-isolation of multiple analytes of similar mass-to-charge resulting in the distortion of relative protein abundance measurements across samples. When properly implemented, synchronous precursor selection and triple-stage mass spectrometry (SPS-MS3) can reduce the occurrence of this phenomenon, referred to as ion interference. However, no diagnostic tool is available currently to rapidly and accurately assess ion interference. To address this need, we developed a multiplexed tandem mass tag (TMT)-based standard, termed the triple knockout (TKO). This standard is comprised of three yeast proteomes in triplicate, each from a strain deficient in a highly abundant protein (Met6, Pfk2, or Ura2). The relative abundance patterns of these proteins, which can be inferred from dozens of peptide measurements can demonstrate ion interference in peptide quantification. We expect no signal in channels where the protein is knocked out, permitting maximum sensitivity for measurements of ion interference against a null background. Here, we emphasize the need to investigate further ion interference-generated ratio distortion and promote the TKO standard as a tool to investigate such issues.

  4. Acute Aortic Dissection Biomarkers Identified Using Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ziya; Xue, Yuan; Yao, Chenling; Gu, Guorong; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Jin; Fan, Fan; Luan, Xiao; Deng, Zhi; Tao, Zhengang; Song, Zhen-Ju; Tong, Chaoyang; Wang, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of potential serum biomarkers for acute aortic dissection (AAD) that were identified by isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) approaches. Serum samples from 20 AAD patients and 20 healthy volunteers were analyzed using iTRAQ technology. Protein validation was performed using samples from 120 patients with chest pain. A total of 355 proteins were identified with the iTRAQ approach; 164 proteins reached the strict quantitative standard, and 125 proteins were increased or decreased more than 1.2-fold (64 and 61 proteins were up- and downregulated, resp.). Lumican, C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and D-dimer were selected as candidate biomarkers for the validation tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that Lumican and D-dimer have diagnostic value (area under the curves [AUCs] 0.895 and 0.891, P < 0.05). For Lumican, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 73.33% and 98.33%, while the corresponding values for D-dimer were 93.33% and 68.33%. For Lumican and D-dimer AAD combined diagnosis, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.33% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, Lumican has good specificity and D-dimer has good sensitivity for the diagnosis of AAD, while the combined detection of D-dimer and Lumican has better diagnostic value. PMID:27403433

  5. A Triple Knockout (TKO) Proteomics Standard for Diagnosing Ion Interference in Isobaric Labeling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-07-01

    Isobaric labeling is a powerful strategy for quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic investigations. A complication of such analyses has been the co-isolation of multiple analytes of similar mass-to-charge resulting in the distortion of relative protein abundance measurements across samples. When properly implemented, synchronous precursor selection and triple-stage mass spectrometry (SPS-MS3) can reduce the occurrence of this phenomenon, referred to as ion interference. However, no diagnostic tool is available currently to rapidly and accurately assess ion interference. To address this need, we developed a multiplexed tandem mass tag (TMT)-based standard, termed the triple knockout (TKO). This standard is comprised of three yeast proteomes in triplicate, each from a strain deficient in a highly abundant protein (Met6, Pfk2, or Ura2). The relative abundance patterns of these proteins, which can be inferred from dozens of peptide measurements can demonstrate ion interference in peptide quantification. We expect no signal in channels where the protein is knocked out, permitting maximum sensitivity for measurements of ion interference against a null background. Here, we emphasize the need to investigate further ion interference-generated ratio distortion and promote the TKO standard as a tool to investigate such issues.

  6. Delta. sub 33 -isobar contribution to the soft nucleon-nucleon potentials. I. 2. pi. -exchange potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, T.A.; Stoks, V.G.J. )

    1992-07-01

    Two-pion-exchange (TPE) nucleon-nucleon potentials are derived for one or two {Delta} isobars in the intermediate states. Strong dynamical pair suppression is assumed. At the {ital NN}{pi} and the {ital N}{Delta}{pi} vertices Gaussian form factors are incorporated into the relativistic two-body framework by using a dispersion representation for the one-pion-exchange amplitudes. The Fourier transformations are performed using factorization techniques for the energy denominators, taking into account the mass difference between the nucleon and the {Delta} isobar. Analytic expressions for the TPE potentials are obtained, which contain at most one-dimensional integrals. The TPE potentials are first calculated up to orders ({ital f}{sub {ital N}{ital N}{pi}} f{sub {ital N}{Delta}{pi}}){sup 2} and {ital f}{sub {ital N}{Delta}{pi}}{sup 4}. These come from the adiabatic contributions of all planar and crossed three-dimensional momentum-space TPE diagrams. We also give the contributions of the OPE iteration, which can be subtracted or not, depending on whether one performs a coupled-channel calculation for, e.g., the {ital NN}, {ital N}{Delta} system, or a single {ital NN}-channel calculation. Next, we calculate the ({ital m}{sub {pi}}/{ital M}) corrections. These are due to the 1/{ital M} terms in the pion-nucleon vertices, and the 1/{ital M} terms in the nonadiabatic expansion of the nucleon energies in the intermediate states.

  7. Stored waveform inverse fourier-transform (SWIFT) excitation for water-suppressed whole-body slice-selected proton chemical shift spectra at 1.5 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Annjia T.; Hunter, William W.; Schmalbrock, Petra; Marshall, Alan G.

    Proton NMR spectroscopy for the in vivo study of metabolites in a spatially resolved region with a clinical NMR imaging device must contend with the 70% hydration of normal man. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of several excitation waveforms designed to suppress the H 2O signal in proton NMR spectroscopy and chemical shift imaging have been conducted. In particular, we have compared the 1 overline33 overline1 and 1 overline1 pulse sequences with those obtained via a stored waveform inverse Fourier-transform (SWIFT) time-domain apodized waveform generated by inverse Fourier transformation of a quadratically phase-encoded excitation magnitude spectrum. Theoretical excitation profiles are compared to those measured in a slice selected with a General Electric Signa 1.5 T whole-body imaging system, and demonstrated for a phantom (toluene, dioxane, and dichloromethane). The SWIFT waveform is theoretically and experimentally superior to 1 overline1 and 1 overline33 overline1 for selective suppression of one spectral segment with simultaneous uniform excitation over the rest of the spectral frequency range. SWIFT-excited water-suppressed depth-resolved chemical shift spectra are demonstrated for human brain and human calf muscle of normal volunteers.

  8. Linear dependency of full scattering profile isobaric point on tissue diameter.

    PubMed

    Duadi, Hamootal; Feder, Idit; Fixler, Dror

    2014-02-01

    Most methods for measuring light-tissue interaction focus on volume reflectance, while very few measure light transmission. In a previous work, we suggested investigating the influence of blood vessel diameter on photons exiting the tissue at all exit angles to receive the full scattering profile. By this method, we have shown that there is a central angle, i.e., the isobaric point, independent of blood vessel diameter. The vessel diameter changes the effective reduced scattering coefficient. However, both the scattering profile and the value of the isobaric point strongly depend on optical properties and the exact geometry of the tissue. In this study, we investigate the dependency of the isobaric point on tissue diameter and scattering coefficient in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations. We show that the value of this point linearly depends on tissue diameter. The findings of this work solve the dilemma of whether to measure transmission or reflection since the isobaric point reduces by half the total amount of exiting photons. Furthermore, the full scattering profile is sensitive to changes in the scattering properties, but a single isobaric point to these changes is expected. If this point is not found, it is a diagnostic indication of an unexpected change in the tissue. PMID:24522807

  9. Generation of multiple reporter ions from a single isobaric reagent increases multiplexing capacity for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Braun, Craig R; Bird, Gregory H; Wühr, Martin; Erickson, Brian K; Rad, Ramin; Walensky, Loren D; Gygi, Steven P; Haas, Wilhelm

    2015-10-01

    Isobaric labeling strategies for mass spectrometry-based proteomics enable multiplexed simultaneous quantification of samples and therefore substantially increase the sample throughput in proteomics. However, despite these benefits, current limits to multiplexing capacity are prohibitive for large sample sizes and impose limitations on experimental design. Here, we introduce a novel mechanism for increasing the multiplexing density of isobaric reagents. We present Combinatorial Isobaric Mass Tags (CMTs), an isobaric labeling architecture with the unique ability to generate multiple series of reporter ions simultaneously. We demonstrate that utilization of multiple reporter ion series improves multiplexing capacity of CMT with respect to a commercially available isobaric labeling reagent with preserved quantitative accuracy and depth of coverage in complex mixtures. We provide a blueprint for the realization of 16-plex reagents with 1 Da spacing between reporter ions and up to 28-plex at 6 mDa spacing using only 5 heavy isotopes per reagent. We anticipate that this improvement in multiplexing capacity will further advance the application of quantitative proteomics, particularly in high-throughput screening assays. PMID:26308379

  10. Selective PCAF inhibitor ameliorates cognitive and behavioral deficits by suppressing NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation induced by Aβ in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Bae, Donghyuk; Kim, Sunoh; Na, Younghwa; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2015-04-01

    Several recent studies have reported an association between neurodegeneration and histone modifications, such as acetylation, deacetylation and methylation. In addition, questions have been raised regarding a potential functional role for the histone acetylation enzymes in β-amyloid (Aβ)-mediated neurotoxicity, particularly the p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) enzyme. We recently reported the potential utility of a PCAF inhibitor in the suppression of Aβ-induced neuronal cell death, although the in vivo effectiveness of the PCAF inhibitor remained unclear. In this study, we modified the PCAF inhibitor by chemical derivatization and selected compound C-30-27 as the most potent PCAF inhibitor. We demonstrated that C-30-27 selectively inhibited acetylation-dependent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) at Lys-122 and suppressed the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Aβ in both BV2 and Neuro-2A (N2A) cells. Finally, we demonstrated that C-30-27 improved cognitive deficits, as well as the capacity for locomotion and the damaged cholinergic system in the Aβ-treated rats. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that this selective PCAF inhibitor has the potential to reduce the neuroinflammatory response induced by Aβ. PMID:25672970

  11. Spectroscopy of the neutron-deficient isobars {sup 163}Re and {sup 163}W using tagging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Joss, D. T.; Thomson, J.; Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Grahn, T.; Pakarinen, J.; Paul, E. S.; Scholey, C.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaennen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Sorri, J.

    2008-11-11

    Selective tagging techniques have been used to establish new band structures in the transitional isobars {sup 163}Re and {sup 163}W. These nuclei were produced in the {sup 106}Cd({sup 60}Ni, xp yn {gamma}) reaction at a bombarding energy of 270 MeV. Prompt {gamma} rays were detected at the target position using the JUROGAM spectrometer while recoiling ions were separated by the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. At low spin, the yrast band of {sup 163}Re is shown to be a strongly coupled collective band based on a proton h{sub 11/2} configuration. In {sup 163}W, the decay path of the 13/2{sup +} isomeric state to the ground state has been identified and negative parity structures based on the ground state established.

  12. Orbital-selective singlet dimer formation and suppression of double exchange in 4d and 5d systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, Sergey; Cao, Gang; Khomskii, Daniel

    One of the main mechanisms of ferromagnetic ordering in conducting materials is the double exchange (DE). It is usually supposed in DE model that the Hund's coupling JH is much larger than electron hopping t; in this case one stabilizes the state with maximum spin per pair of ions, which finally leads to ferromagnetism in bulk systems. We show that in the dimerized 4 d / 5 d transition metal oxides for which JH is reduced and t is in contrast enhanced, another situation is possible, when formation of the spin-singlets on delocalized orbitals is more favorable. This leads to suppression of the DE and to a strong decrease of the total spin. The model calculations using the dynamical mean-field theory show that this effect survives even in the extended systems, not only for dimers. Such a situation is realized, e.g., in Y5Mo2O12, CrO2 under pressure and in many other 4 d / 5 d based materials. Another mechanism, which may suppress DE and which is also typical for 4 d / 5 d compounds is the spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We show on the example of Ba5AlIr2O11, that in this system it is the combination of molecular-orbital formation and SOC that strongly decreases magnetic moment on Ir. Civil Research and Development Foundation via FSCX-14-61025-0.

  13. Biochanin A, a Phytoestrogenic Isoflavone with Selective Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase 4, Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wun-Chang; Lin, Ling-Hung; Shen, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Shih, Chung-Hung

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential of biochanin A, a phytoestrogenic isoflavone of red clover (Triflolium pratense), for use in treating asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Biochanin A (100 μmol/kg, orally (p.o.)) significantly attenuated airway resistance (RL), enhanced pause (Penh), and increased lung dynamic compliance (Cdyn) values induced by methacholine (MCh) in sensitized and challenged mice. It also significantly suppressed an increase in the number of total inflammatory cells, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the mice. However, it did not influence interferon (IFN)-γ levels. Biochanin A (100 μmol/kg, p.o.) also significantly suppressed the total and ovalbumin (OVA)-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in the serum and BALF, and enhanced the total IgG2a level in the serum of these mice. The PDE4H/PDE4L value of biochanin A was calculated as >35. Biochanin A did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia. Biochanin A (10~30 μM) significantly reduced cumulative OVA (10~100 μg/mL)-induced contractions in the isolated guinea pig trachealis, suggesting that it inhibits degranulation of mast cells. In conclusion, red clover containing biochanin A has the potential for treating allergic asthma and COPD. PMID:21437195

  14. The role of iterative isobar processes in nuclear matter and the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, J.; Samanta, B. C.; Dey, M.

    1980-09-01

    A calculation is performed using lowest order Brueckner theory in momentum space, with explicit isobar configurations included through the coupled channel mathod. The effective interaction for the1 S 0-5 D 0 channel is extracted from this calculation. Two different transition potentials are used — one due to Green and Niskanen (1976), the other, due to Green and co-workers (1978). The nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction used is the Reid soft core potential, compensated for the inclusion of the explicit isobar channel. The effective interaction shows marked momentum dependence in the intermediate range. The loss of attraction depends on the transition potential one chooses. The correlation function involving the nucleon-isobar intermediate state is anti-correlated to the NN part.

  15. Isobar separation of 93Zr and 93Nb at 24 MeV with a new multi-anode ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martschini, Martin; Buchriegler, Josef; Collon, Philippe; Kutschera, Walter; Lachner, Johannes; Lu, Wenting; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    93Zr with a half-life of 1.6 Ma is produced with high yield in nuclear fission, and thus should be present as a natural or anthropogenic trace isotope in all compartments of the general environment. Sensitive measurements of this isotope would immediately find numerous applications, however, its detection at sufficiently low levels has not yet been achieved. AMS measurements of 93Zr suffer from the interference of the stable isobar 93Nb. At the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator VERA a new multi-anode ionization chamber was built. It is optimized for isobar separation in the medium mass range and is based on the experience from AMS experiments of 36Cl at our 3-MV tandem accelerator facility. The design provides high flexibility in anode configuration and detector geometry. After validating the excellent energy resolution of the detector with 36S, it was recently used to study iron-nickel and zirconium-niobium-molybdenum isobar separation. To our surprise, the separation of 94Zr (Z = 40) from 94Mo (Z = 42) was found to be much better than that of 58Fe (Z = 26) from 58Ni (Z = 28), despite the significantly larger ΔZ/Z of the latter pair. This clearly contradicts results from SRIM-simulations and suggests that differences in the stopping behavior may unexpectedly favor identification of 93Zr. At 24 MeV particle energy, a 93Nb (Z = 41) suppression factor of 1000 is expected based on a synthetic 93Zr spectrum obtained by interpolation between experimental spectra from the two neighboring stable isotopes 92Zr and 94Zr. Assuming realistic numbers for chemical niobium reduction, a detection level of 93Zr/Zr below 10-9 seems feasible.

  16. Tofogliflozin, A Highly Selective Inhibitor of SGLT2 Blocks Proinflammatory and Proapoptotic Effects of Glucose Overload on Proximal Tubular Cells Partly by Suppressing Oxidative Stress Generation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Yamagishi, S

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of glucose filtered by the glomerulus is reabsorbed by a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), which is mainly expressed on S1 and S2 segment of renal proximal tubules. Since SGLT-2-mediated glucose reabsorption is increased under diabetic conditions, selective inhibition of SGLT2 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes. We have recently shown that an inhibitor of SGLT2 has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects on experimental diabetic nephropathy partly by suppressing advanced glycation end products formation and oxidative stress generation in the kidney. However, the direct effects of SGLT2 inhibitor on tubular cell damage remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of tofogliflozin, a highly selective inhibitor of SGLT2 on oxidative stress generation, inflammatory and proapoptotic reactions in cultured human proximal tubular cells exposed to high glucose. Tofogliflozin dose-dependently suppressed glucose entry into tubular cells. High glucose exposure (30 mM) for 4 and 24 h significantly increased oxidative stress generation in tubular cells, which were suppressed by the treatment of tofogliflozin or an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) gene expression and apoptotic cell death were induced by 4 h- and 8 day-exposure to high glucose, respectively, both of which were also blocked by tofogliflozin or NAC. The present study suggests that SGLT2-mediated glucose entry into tubular cells could stimulate oxidative stress and evoke inflammatory and proapoptotic reactions in this cell type. Blockade of glucose reabsorption in tubular cells by SGLT2 inhibitor might exert beneficial effects on tubulointerstitial damage in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26158396

  17. Revalidation of the isobaric multiplet mass equation at A = 53, T = 3/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Liu, W. P.; Zhang, N. T.; Shen, Y. P.; Lam, Y. H.; Smirnova, N. A.; MacCormick, M.; Wang, J. S.; Jing, L.; Li, Z. H.; Wang, Y. B.; Guo, B.; Yan, S. Q.; Li, Y. J.; Zeng, S.; Lian, G.; Du, X. C.; Gan, L.; Bai, X. X.; Gao, Z. C.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Tang, X. D.; He, J. J.; Yang, Y. Y.; Jin, S. L.; Ma, P.; Ma, J. B.; Huang, M. R.; Bai, Z.; Zhou, Y. J.; Ma, W. H.; Hu, J.; Xu, S. W.; Ma, S. B.; Chen, S. Z.; Zhang, L. Y.; Ding, B.; Li, Z. H.; Audi, G.

    2016-05-01

    The T = 3 / 2 isobaric analog state (IAS) in 53Co is firmly established through a comprehensive measurement of β-delayed γ and proton decay of 53Ni. The determined excitation energy of 53Co IAS combined with the mass of 53Co generates a precise mass excess of - 38 333.6 (27) keV for the 53Co IAS, which is 70(18) keV lower than the previously adopted value. The new result solves a problem raised by incorrect assignments of the 53Co IAS of unexpected deviation from the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME) at A = 53, T = 3 / 2.

  18. Bayesian identification of protein differential expression in multi-group isobaric labelled mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Jow, Howsun; Boys, Richard J; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we develop a Bayesian statistical inference approach to the unified analysis of isobaric labelled MS/MS proteomic data across multiple experiments. An explicit probabilistic model of the log-intensity of the isobaric labels' reporter ions across multiple pre-defined groups and experiments is developed. This is then used to develop a full Bayesian statistical methodology for the identification of differentially expressed proteins, with respect to a control group, across multiple groups and experiments. This methodology is implemented and then evaluated on simulated data and on two model experimental datasets (for which the differentially expressed proteins are known) that use a TMT labelling protocol. PMID:25153608

  19. Selective β2-AR Blockage Suppresses Colorectal Cancer Growth Through Regulation of EGFR-Akt/ERK1/2 Signaling, G1-Phase Arrest, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chih-Chien; Li, Jhy-Ming; Lee, Kam-Fai; Huang, Yun-Ching; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Lai, Hsiao-Ching; Cheng, Chih-Chung; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The stress-upregulated catecholamines-activated β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors (β1/2-ARs) have been shown to accelerate the progression of cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the underlying mechanism of the inhibition of β1/2-ARs signaling for the treatment of CRC and elucidated the significance of β2-AR expression in CRC in vitro and in clinical samples. The impacts of β1/2-AR antagonists in CRC in vitro and CRC-xenograft in vivo were examined. We found that repression of β2-AR but not β1-AR signaling selectively suppressed cell viability, induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest, caused both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways-mediated apoptosis of specific CRC cells and inhibited CRC-xenograft growth in vivo. Moreover, the expression of β2-AR was not consistent with the progression of CRC in vitro or in clinical samples. Our data evidence that the expression profiles, signaling, and blockage of β2-AR have a unique pattern in CRC comparing to other cancers. β2-AR antagonism selectively suppresses the growth of CRC accompanying active β2-AR signaling, which potentially carries wild-type KRAS, in vitro and in vivo via the inhibition of β2-AR transactivated EFGR-Akt/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Thus, β2-AR blockage might be a potential therapeutic strategy for combating the progressions of β2-AR-dependent CRC. PMID:26189563

  20. Technique to select the optimum modulation indices for suppression of undesired signals for simultaneous range and data operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    An algorithm to search for the optimum set of modulation indices that will optimize a given simultaneous range/command/telemetry communications link is presented. This technique provides a way to suppress the ranging signal in order to limit performance degradation in the data channel due to interference from the ranging channel to a desired level, given a specified ranging accuracy. The link (when optimized) will (1) provide maximum available power to both the data and ranging channels for a specified degradation in the data channel so that it will transmit at the required data rate, (2) achieve a specified ranging accuracy over a maximum distance, under a certain set of conditions, and (3) provide adequate power for carrier tracking without degrading the data-channel thresholds. In addition, both data and ranging channels will fall below the threshold at the same point.

  1. Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse Macrophages Using Resin-Assisted Enrichment and Isobaric Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Guo, Jia; Hatchell, Kayla E.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Wu, Si; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.; Qian, Weijun

    2014-02-11

    Protein S-glutathionylation (SSG) is an important regulatory posttranslational modification of protein cysteine (Cys) thiol redox switches, yet the role of specific cysteine residues as targets of modification is poorly understood. We report a novel quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic method for site-specific identification and quantification of S-glutathionylation across different conditions. Briefly, this approach consists of initial blocking of free thiols by alkylation, selective reduction of glutathionylated thiols and enrichment using thiol affinity resins, followed by on-resin tryptic digestion and isobaric labeling with iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) for MS-based identification and quantification. The overall approach was validated by application to RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages treated with different doses of diamide to induce glutathionylation. A total of 1071 Cys-sites from 690 proteins were identified in response to diamide treatment, with ~90% of the sites displaying >2-fold increases in SSG-modification compared to controls.. This approach was extended to identify potential SSG modified Cys-sites in response to H2O2, an endogenous oxidant produced by activated macrophages and many pathophysiological stimuli. The results revealed 364 Cys-sites from 265 proteins that were sensitive to S-glutathionylation in response to H2O2 treatment. These proteins covered a range of molecular types and molecular functions with free radical scavenging, and cell death and survival included as the most significantly enriched functional categories. Overall the results demonstrate that our approach is effective for site-specific identification and quantification of S-glutathionylated proteins. The analytical strategy also provides a unique approach to determining the major pathways and cell processes most susceptible to glutathionylation at a proteome-wide scale.

  2. Proteomic identification and quantification of S-glutathionylation in mouse macrophages using resin-assisted enrichment and isobaric labeling.

    PubMed

    Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J; Guo, Jia; Hatchell, Kayla E; Chu, Rosalie K; Clauss, Therese R W; Aldrich, Joshua T; Wu, Si; Purvine, Sam; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Thrall, Brian D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-02-01

    S-Glutathionylation (SSG) is an important regulatory posttranslational modification on protein cysteine (Cys) thiols, yet the role of specific cysteine residues as targets of modification is poorly understood. We report a novel quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic method for site-specific identification and quantification of S-glutathionylation across different conditions. Briefly, this approach consists of initial blocking of free thiols by alkylation, selective reduction of glutathionylated thiols, and covalent capture of reduced thiols using thiol affinity resins, followed by on-resin tryptic digestion and isobaric labeling with iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) for MS-based identification and quantification. The overall approach was initially validated by application to RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages treated with different doses of diamide to induce glutathionylation. A total of 1071 Cys sites from 690 proteins were identified in response to diamide treatment, with ~90% of the sites displaying >2-fold increases in SSG modification compared to controls. This approach was extended to identify potential SSG-modified Cys sites in response to H2O2, an endogenous oxidant produced by activated macrophages and many pathophysiological stimuli. The results revealed 364 Cys sites from 265 proteins that were sensitive to S-glutathionylation in response to H2O2 treatment, thus providing a database of proteins and Cys sites susceptible to this modification under oxidative stress. Functional analysis revealed that the most significantly enriched molecular function categories for proteins sensitive to SSG modifications were free radical scavenging and cell death/survival. Overall the results demonstrate that our approach is effective for site-specific identification and quantification of SSG-modified proteins. The analytical strategy also provides a unique approach to determining the major pathways and cellular processes most susceptible

  3. High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics Enabled by Mass Defect-Based 12-Plex DiLeu Isobaric Tags.

    PubMed

    Frost, Dustin C; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Isobaric labeling has become a popular technique for high-throughput, mass spectrometry (MS)-based relative quantification of peptides and proteins. However, widespread use of the approach for large-scale proteomics applications has been limited by the high cost of commercial isobaric tags. To address this, we have developed our own N,N-dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) multiplex isobaric tags as a cost-effective alternative that can be synthesized with ease using readily available isotopic reagents. When paired with high-resolution tandem mass (MS(n)) acquisition, mass defect-based DiLeu isobaric tags allow relative quantification of up to twelve samples in a single liquid chromatography (LC)-MS(2) experiment. Herein, we present detailed methods for synthesis of 12-plex DiLeu isobaric tags, labeling of complex protein digest samples, analysis by high-resolution nanoLC-MS(n), and processing of acquired data. PMID:26867744

  4. Selective suppression of cocaine- versus food-maintained responding by monoamine releasers in rhesus monkeys: benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Baumann, M H; Rothman, R B; Mello, N K; Blough, B E

    2009-04-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of drugs currently under investigation as potential agonist medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence. The efficacy and safety of monoamine releasers as candidate medications may be influenced in part by their relative potency to release dopamine and serotonin, and we reported previously that releasers with approximately 30-fold selectivity for dopamine versus serotonin release may be especially promising. The present study examined the effects of the releasers benzylpiperazine, (+)phenmetrazine, and 4-benzylpiperidine, which have 20- to 48-fold selectivity in vitro for releasing dopamine versus serotonin. In an assay of cocaine discrimination, rhesus monkeys were trained to discriminate 0.4 mg/kg i.m. cocaine from saline in a two-key, food-reinforced procedure. Each of the releasers produced a dose- and time-dependent substitution for cocaine. 4-Benzylpiperidine had the most rapid onset and shortest duration of action. Phenmetrazine and benzylpiperazine had slower onsets and longer durations of action. In an assay of cocaine self-administration, rhesus monkeys were trained to respond for cocaine injections and food pellets under a second order schedule. Treatment for 7 days with each of the releasers produced a dose-dependent and selective reduction in self-administration of cocaine (0.01 mg/kg/injection). The most selective effects were produced by phenmetrazine. Phenmetrazine also produced a downward shift in the cocaine self-administration dose effect curve, virtually eliminating responding maintained by a 30-fold range of cocaine doses (0.0032-0.1 mg/kg/injection) while having only small and transient effects on food-maintained responding. These findings support the potential utility of dopamine-selective releasers as candidate treatments for cocaine dependence. PMID:19151247

  5. Formation of isobaric discontinuities in large-scale flute drift motions

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizin, Y.A.; Sokolov, E.P.

    1982-05-01

    The flute drift motion in MHD-stable plasma configurations with closed lines of force is analyzed qualitatively. The onset of this motion can lead to isobaric discontinuities in experimentally observable quantitites: the electric potential and the electron and ion densities and temperatures.

  6. Masses of proton-rich T/sub z/<0 nuclei via the isobaric mass equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pape, A.; Antony, M.S.

    1988-07-01

    Masses of T/sub z/<0 nuclei through the element Sm, corresponding to Aless than or equal to117, have been calculated with the isobaric multiplet mass equation using parameterizations of its constant b and T/sub z/>0 reference masses of Wapstra, Audi, and Hoekstra. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  7. Differential quantification of isobaric phosphopeptides using data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, Simone; Fujiwara, Rina; Kulej, Katarzyna; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2016-07-19

    Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) fundamental for processes such as signal transduction and enzyme activity. We propose to apply data-independent acquisition (DIA) using mass spectrometry (MS) to determine unexplored phosphorylation events on isobarically modified peptides. Such peptides are commonly not quantitatively discriminated in phosphoproteomics due to their identical mass. PMID:27301801

  8. Strategies for differentiation of isobaric flavonoids using liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fridén, Mikael E; Sjöberg, Per J R

    2014-07-01

    Flavonoids are a class of secondary plant metabolites existing in great variety in nature. Due to this variety, identification can be difficult, especially as overlapping compounds in both chromatographic separations and mass spectrometric detection are common. Methods for distinguishing isobaric flavonoids using MS(2) and MS(3) have been developed. Chromatographic separation of various plant extracts was done with RP-HPLC and detected with positive ESI-MS operated in information-dependent acquisition (IDA) mode. Two methods for the determination of flavonoid identity and substitution pattern, both featuring IDA criteria, were used together with the HPLC equipment. A third method where the collision energy was ramped utilized direct infusion. With the developed strategies, it is possible to differentiate between many isobaric flavonoids. Various classes of flavonoids were found in all of the plant extracts, in the red onion extract 45 components were detected and for 29 of them the aglycone was characterized, while the substituents were tentatively identified for 31 of them. For the strawberry extract, those numbers were 66, 30 and 60, and for the cherry extract 99, 56 and 71. The great variety of flavonoids, several of them isobaric, found in each of the extracts highlights the need for reliable methods for flavonoid characterization. Methods capable of differentiating between most of the isobars analyzed have been developed. PMID:25044850

  9. Residue Coulomb Interaction Among Isobars and Its Influence in Symmetry Energy of Neutron-Rich Fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan-Li; Zhao, Yi-Long; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2015-09-01

    The residue Coulomb interaction (RCI), which affects the result of symmetry-energy coefficient of neutron-rich nucleus in isobaric yield ratio (IYR) method, is difficult to be determined. Four RCI approximations are investigated: (i) The M1-RCI adopting the ac/T (the ratio of Coulomb energy coefficient to temperature) determined from the IYR of mirror-nucleus fragments; (ii) The M2-RCI by fitting the difference between IYRs; (iii) The M3-RCI adopting the standard Coulomb energy at a temperature T = 2 MeV; and (iv) Neglecting the RCI among isobars. The M1-, M2- and M3-RCI are no larger than 0.4. In particular, the M2-RCI is very close to zero. The effects of RCI in asym/T of fragment are also studied. The M1- and M4-asym/T are found to be the lower and upper limitations of asym/T, respectively. The M2-asym/T overlaps the M4-asym/T, which indicates that the M2-RCI is negligible in the IYR method, and the RCI among the three isobars can be neglected. The relative consistent low values of M3-asym/T (7.5 ± 2.5) are found in very neutron-rich isobars. Supported by the Program for Science & Technology Innovation Talents in Universities of Henan Province (13HASTIT046), and Young Teacher Project in Henan Normal University (HNU), China

  10. Paramagnetic NMR relaxation in polymeric matrixes: sensitivity enhancement and selective suppression of embedded species (1H and 13C PSR filter).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Megia, Eduardo; Correa, Juan; Novoa-Carballal, Ramon; Riguera, Ricardo

    2007-12-12

    A study of the practical applications of the addition of paramagnetic spin relaxation (PSR) ions to a variety of polymers (PLL, PAA, PGA, PVP, and polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid, chitosan, mannan, and dextran) in solution (D2O and DMSO-d6) is described. Use of Gd(III), Cu(II), and Mn(II) allows a reduction of up to 500% in the 1H longitudinal relaxation times (T1), and so in the time necessary for recording quantitative NMR spectra (sensitivity enhancement) neither an increase of the spectral line width nor chemical shift changes resulted from addition of any of the PSR agents tested. Selective suppression of the 1H and 13C NMR signals of certain components (low MW molecules and polymers) in the spectrum of a mixture was attained thanks to their different sensitivity [transverse relaxation times (T2)] to Gd(III) (PSR filter). Illustration of this strategy with block copolymers (PGA-g-PEG) and mixtures of polymers and low MW molecules (i.e., lactose-hyaluronic acid, dextran-PAA, PVP-glutamic acid) in 1D and 2D NMR experiments (COSY and HMQC) is presented. In those mixtures where PSR and CPMG filters alone failed in the suppression of certain components (i.e., PVP-mannan-hyaluronic acid) due to their similarity of 1H T2 values and sensitivities to Gd(III), use of the PSR filter in combination with CPMG sequences (PSR-CPMG filter) successfully resulted in the sequential suppression of the components (hyaluronic acid first and then mannan). PMID:18004845

  11. Hesperetin-7,3'-O-dimethylether selectively inhibits phosphodiesterase 4 and effectively suppresses ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness with a high therapeutic ratio

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hesperetin was reported to selectively inhibit phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4). While hesperetin-7,3'-O-dimethylether (HDME) is a synthetic liposoluble hesperetin. Therefore, we were interested in investigating its selectivity on PDE4 and binding ability on high-affinity rolipram-binding sites (HARBs) in vitro, and its effects on ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo, and clarifying its potential for treating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods PDE1~5 activities were measured using a two-step procedure. The binding of HDME on high-affinity rolipram-binding sites was determined by replacing 2 nM [3H]-rolipram. AHR was assessed using the FlexiVent system and barometric plethysmography. Inflammatory cells were counted using a hemocytometer. Cytokines were determined using mouse T helper (Th)1/Th2 cytokine CBA kits, and total immunoglobulin (Ig)E or IgG2a levels were done using ELISA method. Xylazine (10 mg/kg)/ketamine (70 mg/kg)-induced anesthesia was performed. Results HDME revealed selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibition with a therapeutic (PDE4H/PDE4L) ratio of 35.5 in vitro. In vivo, HDME (3~30 μmol/kg, orally (p.o.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway resistance (RL) and increased lung dynamic compliance (Cdyn), and decreased enhanced pause (Penh) values induced by methacholine in sensitized and challenged mice. It also significantly suppressed the increases in the numbers of total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of these mice. In addition, HDME (3~30 μmol/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and ovalbumin-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E levels in the BALF and serum, and enhanced IgG2a level in the serum of these mice. Conclusions HDME exerted anti-inflammatory effects

  12. Selection of dinB Alleles Suppressing Survival Loss upon dinB Overexpression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Ryan W.; Cafarelli, Tiziana M.; Rands, Thomas J.; Lin, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains overproducing DinB undergo survival loss; however, the mechanisms regulating this phenotype are poorly understood. Here we report a genetic selection revealing DinB residues essential to effect this loss-of-survival phenotype. The selection uses strains carrying both an antimutator allele of DNA polymerase III (Pol III) α-subunit (dnaE915) and either chromosomal or plasmid-borne dinB alleles. We hypothesized that dnaE915 cells would respond to DinB overproduction differently from dnaE+ cells because the dnaE915 allele is known to have an altered genetic interaction with dinB+ compared to its interaction with dnaE+. Notably, we observe a loss-of-survival phenotype in dnaE915 strains with either a chromosomal catalytically inactive dinB(D103N) allele or a low-copy-number plasmid-borne dinB+ upon DNA damage treatment. Furthermore, we find that the loss-of-survival phenotype occurs independently of DNA damage treatment in a dnaE915 strain expressing the catalytically inactive dinB(D103N) allele from a low-copy-number plasmid. The selective pressure imposed resulted in suppressor mutations that eliminated growth defects. The dinB intragenic mutations examined were either base pair substitutions or those that we inferred to be loss of function (i.e., deletions and insertions). Further analyses of selected novel dinB alleles, generated by single-base-pair substitutions in the dnaE915 strain, indicated that these no longer effect loss of survival upon overproduction in dnaE+ strains. These mutations are mapped to specific areas of DinB; this permits us to gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the DinB-mediated overproduction loss-of-survival phenotype. PMID:24914188

  13. Suppression of acetylpolyamine oxidase by selected AP-1 members regulates DNp73 abundance: mechanistic insights for overcoming DNp73-mediated resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bunjobpol, W; Dulloo, I; Igarashi, K; Concin, N; Matsuo, K; Sabapathy, K

    2014-08-01

    Enhanced resistance to chemotherapy has been correlated with high levels of Delta-Np73 (DNp73), an anti-apoptotic protein of the p53 tumor-suppressor family which inhibits the pro-apoptotic members such as p53 and TAp73. Although genotoxic drugs have been shown to induce DNp73 degradation, lack of mechanistic understanding of this process precludes strategies to enhance the targeting of DNp73 and improve treatment outcomes. Antizyme (Az) is a mediator of ubiquitin-independent protein degradation regulated by the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. We show here that acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAOX), a catabolic enzyme of this pathway, upregulates DNp73 levels by suppressing its degradation via the Az pathway. Conversely, downregulation of PAOX activity by siRNA-mediated knockdown or chemical inhibition leads to DNp73 degradation in an Az-dependent manner. PAOX expression is suppressed by several genotoxic drugs, via selected members of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors, namely c-Jun, JunB and FosB, which are required for stress-mediated DNp73 degradation. Finally, chemical- and siRNA-mediated inhibition of PAOX significantly reversed the resistant phenotype of DNp73-overexpressing cancer cells to genotoxic drugs. Together, these data define a critical mechanism for the regulation of DNp73 abundance, and reveal that inhibition of PAOX could widen the therapeutic index of cytotoxic drugs and overcome DNp73-mediated chemoresistance in tumors. PMID:24722210

  14. Selective class I histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress persistent spontaneous nociception and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of bee venom-induced inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Fei; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Li, Zhen; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-25

    To confirm whether class I histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are effective in relief of peripheral inflammatory pain, the effects of two selective inhibitors, MS-275 and MGCD0103, were studied in rats inflamed by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of bee venom (BV). The BV test is characterized by displaying both persistent spontaneous nociception (PSN) and primary hypersensitivity. Intrathecal (i.t.) pre-treatment of either MS-275 or MGCD0103 with a single dose of 60 nmol/20 μL resulted in profound suppression of both PSN and primary thermal hypersensitivity but without significant influence upon the primary mechanical hypersensitivity and mirror-image thermal hypersensitivity. Moreover, the up-regulation of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 induced by s.c. BV injection was completely suppressed by i.t. pre-treatment of MS-275. The present results provide with another new line of evidence showing involvement of epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure by HDAC1/2-mediated histone hypoacetylation in the BV-induced PSN and thermal hypersensitivity and demonstrate the beneficial effects of class I HDACIs in prevention of peripheral inflammatory pain from occurring. PMID:26490061

  15. Slice-selective FID acquisition, localized by outer volume suppression (FIDLOVS) for (1)H-MRSI of the human brain at 7 T with minimal signal loss.

    PubMed

    Henning, Anke; Fuchs, Alexander; Murdoch, James B; Boesiger, Peter

    2009-08-01

    In comparison to 1.5 and 3 T, MR spectroscopic imaging at 7 T benefits from signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain and increased spectral resolution and should enable mapping of a large number of metabolites at high spatial resolutions. However, to take full advantage of the ultra-high field strength, severe technical challenges, e.g. related to very short T(2) relaxation times and strict limitations on the maximum achievable B(1) field strength, have to be resolved. The latter results in a considerable decrease in bandwidth for conventional amplitude modulated radio frequency pulses (RF-pulses) and thus to an undesirably large chemical-shift displacement artefact. Frequency-modulated RF-pulses can overcome this problem; but to achieve a sufficient bandwidth, long pulse durations are required that lead to undesirably long echo-times in the presence of short T(2) relaxation times. In this work, a new magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) localization scheme (free induction decay acquisition localized by outer volume suppression, FIDLOVS) is introduced that enables MRSI data acquisition with minimal SNR loss due to T(2) relaxation and thus for the first time mapping of an extended neurochemical profile in the human brain at 7 T. To overcome the contradictory problems of short T(2) relaxation times and long pulse durations, the free induction decay (FID) is directly acquired after slice-selective excitation. Localization in the second and third dimension and skull lipid suppression are based on a T(1)- and B(1)-insensitive outer volume suppression (OVS) sequence. Broadband frequency-modulated excitation and saturation pulses enable a minimization of the chemical-shift displacement artefact in the presence of strict limits on the maximum B(1) field strength. The variable power RF pulses with optimized relaxation delays (VAPOR) water suppression scheme, which is interleaved with OVS pulses, eliminates modulation side bands and strong baseline distortions. Third

  16. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  17. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  18. Selective CDK7 inhibition with BS-181 suppresses cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo-Yong; Liu, Quan-Yan; Cao, Jun; Chen, Ji-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Su

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family members have been considered as attractive therapeutic targets for cancer. In this study, we aim to investigate the anticancer effects of a selective CDK7 inhibitor, BS-181, in gastric cancer (GC) cell line. Human GC cells (BGC823) were cultured with or without BS-181 at different concentrations for 24–72 hours. BS-181 significantly reduced the activity of CDK7 with downregulation of cyclin D1 and XIAP in GC cells. Treatment with BS-181 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The expression of Bax and caspase-3 was significantly increased, while Bcl-2 expression was decreased in cells treated with BS-181. In addition, the inhibition of CDK7 with BS-181 resulted in reduced rates of proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cells. Those results demonstrated the anticancer activities of selective CDK7 inhibitor BS-181 in BGC823 cells, suggesting that CDK7 may serve as a novel therapeutic target or the treatment of GC. PMID:27042010

  19. Trichostatin A selectively suppresses the cold-induced transcription of the ZmDREB1 gene in maize.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Lin; Li, Jun; He, Shibin; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Fei; Huang, Min; Jiang, Li; Li, Lijia

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone proteins play a crucial role in responding to environmental stresses. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of an acetyl group from histones and are generally believed to be a transcriptional repressor. In this paper, we report that cold treatment highly induces the up-regulation of HDACs, leading to global deacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Treatment of maize with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) under cold stress conditions strongly inhibits induction of the maize cold-responsive genes ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413. However, up-regulation of the ZmICE1 gene in response to cold stress is less affected. The expression of drought and salt induced genes, ZmDBF1 and rab17, is almost unaffected by TSA treatment. Thus, these observations show that HDACs may selectively activate transcription. The time course of TSA effects on the expression of ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413 genes indicates that HDACs appear to directly activate the ZmDREB1 gene, which in turn modulates ZmCOR413 expression. After cold treatment, histone hyperacetylation and DNA demethylation occurs in the ICE1 binding region, accompanied by an increase in accessibility to micrococcal nuclease (MNase). The two regions adjacent to the ICE1 binding site remain hypoacetylated and methylated. However, during cold acclimation, TSA treatment increases the acetylation status and accessibility of MNase and decreases DNA methylation at these two regions. However, TSA treatment does not affect histone hyperacetylation and DNA methylation levels at the ICE1 binding regions of the ZmDREB1 gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that HDACs positively regulate the expression of the cold-induced ZmDREB1 gene through histone modification and chromatin conformational changes and that this activation is both gene and site selective. PMID:21811564

  20. Moving Stimuli Are Less Effectively Masked Using Traditional Continuous Flash Suppression (CFS) Compared to a Moving Mondrian Mask (MMM): A Test Case for Feature-Selective Suppression and Retinotopic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Moors, Pieter; Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Continuous flash suppression (CFS) is a powerful interocular suppression technique, which is often described as an effective means to reliably suppress stimuli from visual awareness. Suppression through CFS has been assumed to depend upon a reduction in (retinotopically specific) neural adaptation caused by the continual updating of the contents of the visual input to one eye. In this study, we started from the observation that suppressing a moving stimulus through CFS appeared to be more effective when using a mask that was actually more prone to retinotopically specific neural adaptation, but in which the properties of the mask were more similar to those of the to-be-suppressed stimulus. In two experiments, we find that using a moving Mondrian mask (i.e., one that includes motion) is more effective in suppressing a moving stimulus than a regular CFS mask. The observed pattern of results cannot be explained by a simple simulation that computes the degree of retinotopically specific neural adaptation over time, suggesting that this kind of neural adaptation does not play a large role in predicting the differences between conditions in this context. We also find some evidence consistent with the idea that the most effective CFS mask is the one that matches the properties (speed) of the suppressed stimulus. These results question the general importance of retinotopically specific neural adaptation in CFS, and potentially help to explain an implicit trend in the literature to adapt one’s CFS mask to match one’s to-be-suppressed stimuli. Finally, the results should help to guide the methodological development of future research where continuous suppression of moving stimuli is desired. PMID:24879378

  1. Selective suppression of Notch1 inhibits proliferation of renal cell carcinoma cells through JNK/p38 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerong; Hu, Linkun; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-05-01

    The present study was performed to explore the effects of Notch1 inhibition selectively by siRNA on the proliferation and cell cycle of renal carcinoma cells. Human renal carcinoma cell lines, 786-0 and Caki-1, were treated with Si-Notch1 or negative control (NC). RT-PCR and western blotting were used to confirm the efficiency of siRNA on Notch1 expression. MTT, cell cycle analysis, colony formation as well as migration and invasion assays were performed. The expression levels of p38 and SAPK/JNK were measured by western blotting. For both cell lines, as compared with the NC group, the cell growth was markedly reduced, and colony formation was restricted in the Si-Notch1‑treated group. After incubated with Si-Notch1 or NC for 48 h, Si-Notch1-treated cells arrested the cell cycle at G1/S phase. The Si-Notch1 group also had a reduced rate of migration as well as invasion. Moreover, we observed a reduction in p-SAPK/JNK and p-p38 in Si-Notch1 transfected cells. The present study indicated that Notch signaling is important in the tumorigenesis of renal cell carcinoma. Notch1 may be a potential therapeutic regimen towards renal cell carcinoma, and JNK/p38 may serve as an important molecular mechanism for Notch1-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:26986634

  2. Quantitation of protein post-translational modifications using isobaric tandem mass tags.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui-Chung; Lahert, Emma; Pike, Ian; Ward, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to modulate many cellular processes and their qualitative and quantitative evaluation is fundamental for understanding the mechanisms of biological events. Over the past decade, improvements in sample preparation techniques and enrichment strategies, the development of quantitative labeling strategies, the launch of a new generation of mass spectrometers and the creation of bioinformatics tools for the interrogation of ever larger datasets has established MS-based quantitative proteomics as a powerful workflow for global proteomics, PTM analysis and the elucidation of key biological mechanisms. With the advantage of their multiplexing capacity and the flexibility of an ever-growing family of different peptide-reactive groups, isobaric tandem mass tags facilitate quantitative proteomics and PTM experiments and enable higher sample throughput. In this review, we focus on the technical concept and utility of the isobaric tandem mass tag labeling approach to PTM analysis, including phosphorylation, glycosylation and S-nitrosylation. PMID:25697195

  3. Revalidation of the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the A=20 quintet

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Glassman, B. E.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Wrede, C.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bennett, M. B.; Brown, B. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Febbraro, M.; Fry, C.; et al

    2015-10-29

    An unexpected breakdown of the isobaric multiplet mass equation in the A = 20, T = 2 quintet was recently reported, presenting a challenge to modern theories of nuclear structure. In the present work, the excitation energy of the lowest T = 2 state in Na-20 has been measured to be 6498.4 +/- 0.2stat ± 0.4syst keV by using the superallowed 0+ → 0+ beta decay of Mg-20 to access it and an array of high-purity germanium detectors to detect its gamma-ray deexcitation. This value differs by 27 keV (1.9 standard deviations) from the recommended value of 6525 ± 14more » keV and is a factor of 28 more precise. The isobaric multiplet mass equation is shown to be revalidated when the new value is adopted.« less

  4. 'Coulomb' description of basic relaxation parameters of isobar analog and charge-exchange giant monopole resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L.; Rykovanov, V. S.; Urin, M. G.

    2010-12-15

    Within a semimicroscopic approach, basic relaxation parameters of the isobaric analog resonance and of the charge-exchange giant monopole resonance, which is an overtone of the isobaric analog resonance, are interpreted in terms of the mean Coulomb field of a nucleus. The continuum version of the random-phase approximation, allowance for an approximate isospin conservation in nuclei in an explicit form, and a phenomenological description of the fragmentation effect are basic ingredients of the approach used. The aforementioned parameters were calculated for a number of magic and near-magic nuclei by using a partly self-consistent phenomenological nuclear mean field and the isovector part of the Landau-Migdal interaction in the particle-hole channel. The results of the calculations are compared with corresponding experimental data.

  5. Dependence of the isobaric specific heat capacity of water vapor on the pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestfálová, Magda; Šafařík, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental base for the calculation of the thermodynamic properties of substances is the thermal equation of state and the dependence of some of the basic specific heat capacities on temperature. Dependence of isobaric specific heat capacity on the pressure can already be deduced from these relations. International standards of the properties of water and steam are based on the new scientific formulation IAPWS-95. The equation is in the form of Helmholtz dimensionless function with very much parameters. The aim of this paper is to design the simple dependence of the isobaric specific heat capacity of water vapor on the pressure and temperature in the range in which the steam occurs in the atmospheric moist air.

  6. Isobars of an ideal Bose gas within the grand canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Imtak; Kim, Sang-Woo; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the isobar of an ideal Bose gas confined in a cubic box within the grand canonical ensemble for a large yet finite number of particles, N. After solving the equation of the spinodal curve, we derive precise formulas for the supercooling and the superheating temperatures that reveal an N-1/3 or N-1/4 power correction to the known Bose-Einstein condensation temperature in the thermodynamic limit. Numerical computations confirm the accuracy of our analytical approximation, and further show that the isobar zigzags on the temperature-volume plane if N≥14393. In particular, for the Avogadro’s number of particles, the volume expands discretely about 105 times. Our results quantitatively agree with a previous study on the canonical ensemble within 0.1% error.

  7. Isobaric Heat Capacity, Isothermal Compressibility and Fluctuational Properties of 1-Bromoalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkovskii, V. I.; Ryshkova, O. S.; Neruchev, Yu. A.; Goncharov, A. L.; Postnikov, E. B.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of the experimental measurements of the isobaric heat capacity for 1-bromohexane, 1-bromoheptane, 1-bromooctane, 1-bromononane, 1-bromodecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-bromododecane and 1-bromotetradecane at normal pressure and the speed of sound and the density for 1-bromotetradecane within the temperature range 298.15-423.15 K. These data on the isobaric heat capacity and the literature-based reference data for the density and the speed of sound were used to calculate the isothermal compressibility and the inverse reduced fluctuations. Based on the comparison of the results for pure n-alkanes and α ,ω -dibromoalkanes, we discuss the influence of bromine atom on the volume fluctuations.

  8. Nonresonant Background in Isobaric Models of Photoproduction of η-Mesons on Nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryasuchev, V. A.; Alekseev, B. A.; Yakovleva, V. S.; Kondratyeva, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    Within the framework of isobaric models of pseudoscalar meson photoproduction, the nonresonant background of photoproduction of η-mesons on nucleons is investigated as a function of energy. A bound on the magnitude of the pseudoscalar coupling constant of the η-meson with a nucleon is obtained: g {ηNN/ 2}/4π ≤ 0.01, and a bound on vector meson exchange models is also obtained.

  9. Densities, isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Zhang, Q. M.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Zhou, L.; Cao, J.

    2015-05-01

    We report the measurements of the densities of linear alkylbenzene at three temperatures over 4 to 23 °C with pressures up to 10 MPa. The measurements have been analysed to yield the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and, so far for the first time, isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene. Relevance of results for current generation (i.e., Daya Bay) and next generation (i.e. JUNO) large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors are discussed.

  10. Nonresonant Background in Isobaric Models of Photoproduction of η-Mesons on Nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryasuchev, V. A.; Alekseev, B. A.; Yakovleva, V. S.; Kondratyeva, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    Within the framework of isobaric models of pseudoscalar meson photoproduction, the nonresonant background of photoproduction of η-mesons on nucleons is investigated as a function of energy. A bound on the magnitude of the pseudoscalar coupling constant of the η-meson with a nucleon is obtained: g η NN 2 /4π ≤ 0.01, and a bound on vector meson exchange models is also obtained.

  11. CONSTANd : A Normalization Method for Isobaric Labeled Spectra by Constrained Optimization.

    PubMed

    Maes, Evelyne; Hadiwikarta, Wahyu Wijaya; Mertens, Inge; Baggerman, Geert; Hooyberghs, Jef; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    In quantitative proteomics applications, the use of isobaric labels is a very popular concept as they allow for multiplexing, such that peptides from multiple biological samples are quantified simultaneously in one mass spectrometry experiment. Although this multiplexing allows that peptide intensities are affected by the same amount of instrument variability, systematic effects during sample preparation can also introduce a bias in the quantitation measurements. Therefore, normalization methods are required to remove this systematic error. At present, a few dedicated normalization methods for isobaric labeled data are at hand. Most of these normalization methods include a framework for statistical data analysis and rely on ANOVA or linear mixed models. However, for swift quality control of the samples or data visualization a simple normalization technique is sufficient. To this aim, we present a new and easy-to-use data-driven normalization method, named CONSTANd. The CONSTANd method employs constrained optimization and prior information about the labeling strategy to normalize the peptide intensities. Further, it allows maintaining the connection to any biological effect while reducing the systematic and technical errors. As a result, peptides can not only be compared directly within a multiplexed experiment, but are also comparable between other isobaric labeled datasets from multiple experimental designs that are normalized by the CONSTANd method, without the need to include a reference sample in every experimental setup. The latter property is especially useful when more than six, eight or ten (TMT/iTRAQ) biological samples are required to detect differential peptides with sufficient statistical power and to optimally make use of the multiplexing capacity of isobaric labels. PMID:27302888

  12. Oxygen chemisorption on V/sub 2/O/sub 5/: isotherms and isobars of adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, L.; Gambaro, L.A.; Thomas, H.J.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental results of oxygen adsorption on V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ (isotherms and isobars) are reported. In its normal state V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is a nonstoichiometric oxide that shows oxygen vacancies with the subsequent formation of V/sup 4 +/ ions. A model is developed for the interaction between oxygen (gaseous, adsorbed, and bulk) and the solid phase (V/sub 2/O/sub 5/). 12 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  13. A regression model for calculating the boiling point isobars of tetrachloromethane-based binary solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preobrazhenskii, M. P.; Rudakov, O. B.

    2016-01-01

    A regression model for calculating the boiling point isobars of tetrachloromethane-organic solvent binary homogeneous systems is proposed. The parameters of the model proposed were calculated for a series of solutions. The correlation between the nonadditivity parameter of the regression model and the hydrophobicity criterion of the organic solvent is established. The parameter value of the proposed model is shown to allow prediction of the potential formation of azeotropic mixtures of solvents with tetrachloromethane.

  14. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR. PMID:27026564

  15. Enhanced sample multiplexing for nitrotyrosine-modified proteins using combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Renã A S; Evans, Adam R

    2012-06-01

    Current strategies for identification and quantification of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) post-translationally modified proteins (PTM) generally rely on biotin/avidin enrichment. Quantitative approaches have been demonstrated which employ isotopic labeling or isobaric tagging in order to quantify differences in the relative abundances of 3NT-modified proteins in two or potentially eight samples, respectively. Here, we present a novel strategy which uses combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT) to increase the multiplexing capability of quantifying 3NT-modified proteins to 12 or 16 samples using commercially available tandem mass tags (TMT) or isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), respectively. This strategy employs "light" and "heavy" labeled acetyl groups to block both N-termini and lysine residues of tryptic peptides. Next, 3NT is reduced to 3-aminotyrosine (3AT) using sodium dithionite followed by derivatization of light and heavy labeled 3AT-peptides with either TMT or iTRAQ multiplex reagents. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle utility of cPILOT with in vitro nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mouse splenic proteins using TMT(0), TMT(6), and iTRAQ(8) reagents and discuss limitations of the strategy. PMID:22509719

  16. Delta-Isobar Production in the Hard Photodisintegration of a Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Carlos; Sargsian, Misak

    2010-02-01

    Hard photodisintegration of the deuteron in delta-isobar production channels is proposed as a useful process in identifying the quark structure of hadrons and of hadronic interactions at large momentum and energy transfer. The reactions are modeled using the hard re scattering model, HRM, following previous works on hard breakup of a nucleon nucleon (NN) system in light nuclei. Here,quantitative predictions through the HRM require the numerical input of fits of experimental NN hard elastic scattering cross sections. Because of the lack of data in hard NN scattering into δ-isobar channels, the cross section of the corresponding photodisintegration processes cannot be predicted in the same way. Instead, the corresponding NN scattering process is modeled through the quark interchange mechanism, QIM, leaving an unknown normalization parameter. The observables of interest are ratios of differential cross sections of δ-isobar production channels to NN breakup in deuteron photodisintegration. Both entries in these ratios are derived through the HRM and QIM so that normalization parameters cancel out and numerical predictions can be obtained. )

  17. Coupled-channel treatment of Isobaric Analog Resonances in (p,p') Capture Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I J; Arbanas, Goran

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nuclear reactions on unstable isotopes, there has been a renewed interest in using isobaric analogue resonances (IAR) as a tool for probing the nuclear structure. The position and width of isobaric analogue resonances in nucleon-nucleus scattering are accurate and detailed indicators of the positions of resonances and bound states with good single-particle characters. We report on implementation within our coupled-channels code FRESCO of the charge-exchange interaction term that transforms an incident proton into a neutron. Isobaric analog resonances are seen as peaks in gamma-ray spectrum when the proton is transformed into a neutron at an energy near a neutron bound state. The Lane coupled-channels formalism was extended to follow the nonorthogonality of this neutron channel with that configuration of an inelastic outgoing proton, and the target being left in a particle-hole excited state. This is tested for 208Pb, for which good (p,p g)

  18. Coupled-channel Treatment of Isobaric Analog Resonances in (p,p‧) Capture Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, I. J.; Arbanas, G.

    2014-04-01

    With the advent of nuclear reactions on unstable isotopes, there has been a renewed interest in using isobaric analogue resonances (IAR) as a tool for probing the nuclear structure. The position and width of isobaric analogue resonances in nucleon-nucleus scattering are accurate and detailed indicators of the positions of resonances and bound states with good single-particle characters. We report on implementation within our coupled-channels code FRESCO of the charge-exchange interaction term that transforms an incident proton into a neutron. Isobaric analog resonances are seen as peaks in γ-ray spectrum when the proton is transformed into a neutron at an energy near a neutron bound state. The Lane coupled-channels formalism was extended to follow the non-orthogonality of this neutron channel with that configuration of an inelastic outgoing proton, and the target being left in a particle-hole excited state. This is tested for 208Pb, for which good (p,p'γ) coincidence data exists.

  19. Weed control and yield potential for a promising rice line, STG06L-35-061, selected from crosses between weed-suppressive indicas and commercial long-grain rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustainable weed control is an ongoing challenge in rice production. Indica rice lines such as PI 312777 that can suppress Echinochloa crus-galli and other troublesome C4 grass weeds have been evaluated extensively in Arkansas for more than a decade. In an ongoing breeding/selection program, we are...

  20. Immune modulation of metalloproteinase production in human macrophages. Selective pretranslational suppression of interstitial collagenase and stromelysin biosynthesis by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, S D; Campbell, E J; Kobayashi, D K; Welgus, H G

    1990-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a lymphokine that activates mononuclear phagocytes. To test the hypothesis that IFN-gamma might have important effects upon the ability of human mononuclear phagocytes to degrade extracellular matrix, we have studied the action of this cytokine on the production of metalloproteinases and the counterregulatory tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) by the human alveolar macrophage. We have found that IFN-gamma potently and selectively suppresses the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of two metalloproteinases--interstitial collagenase and stromelysin--by 50-90% at doses greater than or equal to 10 U/ml. The synthesis of TIMP and 92-kD type IV collagenase was also diminished by IFN-gamma, but these responses required 50- to 100-fold higher concentrations of the cytokine. All doses of IFN-gamma increased total and secreted protein synthesis slightly, indicating a highly specific effect on metalloenzyme biosynthesis. Inhibition of metalloproteinase expression occurred at a pretranslational level, as evidenced by parallel reductions in enzyme biosynthesis and collagenase-specific steady-state mRNA levels. Interestingly, the effect of IFN-gamma on metalloenzyme production was not readily reversible. Therefore, while IFN-gamma activates the macrophage and renders it tumoricidal, this enhanced function appears to be attained at the expense of the cell's capacity to degrade extracellular matrix. Images PMID:2170447

  1. Conception of PIPERADE: A high-capacity Penning-trap mass separator for high isobaric contamination at DESIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaya Ramirez, E.; Alfaurt, P.; Aouadi, M.; Ascher, P.; Blank, B.; Blaum, K.; Cam, J.-F.; Chauveau, P.; Daudin, L.; Delahaye, P.; Delalee, F.; Dupré, P.; El Abbeir, S.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Guérin, H.; Lunney, D.; Metz, F.; Naimi, S.; Perrot, L.; de Roubin, A.; Serani, L.; Thomas, B.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2016-06-01

    The DESIR (decay, excitation and storage of radioactive ions) facility at GANIL-SPIRAL2 will receive a large variety of exotic nuclei at low energy (up to 60 keV) with high intensities. However, the production methods of radioactive beams are non selective, limiting the purity of the beams of interest. Moreover, the high precision needed for nuclear structure and astrophysics studies using beta decay spectroscopy, laser spectroscopy and trap-based experiments at DESIR requires highly pure samples of exotic nuclei. The aim of the double-Pennig-trap mass separator PIPERADE is to deliver large and very pure samples of exotic nuclei to the different experiments in DESIR. New excitation schemes and a large inner diameter of the first trap will mitigate space charge effects to attempt trapping of up to 105 ions per pulse. The purification cycle will be performed in a few milliseconds so that short-lived nuclei can be purified. To extract the nuclides of interest from the large amount of isobaric contaminants, a resolving power of 105 is mandatory. Afterwards the ions of interest will be accumulated in the second trap until they constitute a sufficiently pure sample for the measurements. The status of the project is presented.

  2. Quantitative analysis of single amino acid variant peptides associated with pancreatic cancer in serum by an isobaric labeling quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; Yin, Haidi; Tan, Zhijing; Anderson, Michelle A; Ruffin, Mack T; Simeone, Diane M; Lubman, David M

    2014-12-01

    Single amino acid variations are highly associated with many human diseases. The direct detection of peptides containing single amino acid variants (SAAVs) derived from nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in serum can provide unique opportunities for SAAV associated biomarker discovery. In the present study, an isobaric labeling quantitative strategy was applied to identify and quantify variant peptides in serum samples of pancreatic cancer patients and other benign controls. The largest number of SAAV peptides to date in serum including 96 unique variant peptides were quantified in this quantitative analysis, of which five variant peptides showed a statistically significant difference between pancreatic cancer and other controls (p-value < 0.05). Significant differences in the variant peptide SDNCEDTPEAGYFAVAVVK from serotransferrin were detected between pancreatic cancer and controls, which was further validated by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. The novel biomarker panel obtained by combining α-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT), Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1) and this variant peptide showed an excellent diagnostic performance in discriminating pancreatic cancer from healthy controls (AUC = 0.98) and chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.90). These results suggest that large-scale analysis of SAAV peptides in serum may provide a new direction for biomarker discovery research. PMID:25393578

  3. Isobaric yield ratio difference between the 140 A MeV 58Ni + 9Be and 64Ni +9Be reactions studied by the antisymmetric molecular dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, C. Y.; Wei, H. L.; Ma, C. W.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wang, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    Background: The isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) method is found to be sensitive to the density difference of neutron-rich nucleus induced reaction around the Fermi energy. Purpose: An investigation is performed to study the IBD results in the transport model. Methods: The antisymmetric molecular dynamics (AMD) model plus the sequential decay model gemini are adopted to simulate the 140 A MeV 58 ,64Ni +9Be reactions. A relative small coalescence radius Rc= 2.5 fm is used for the phase space at t = 500 fm/c to form the hot fragment. Two limitations on the impact parameter (b 1 =0 -2 fm and b 2 =0 -9 fm) are used to study the effect of central collisions in IBD. Results: The isobaric yield ratios (IYRs) for the large-A fragments are found to be suppressed in the symmetric reaction. The IBD results for fragments with neutron excess I = 0 and 1 are obtained. A small difference is found in the IBDs with the b 1 and b 2 limitations in the AMD simulated reactions. The IBD with b 1 and b 2 are quite similar in the AMD + GEMINI simulated reactions. Conclusions: The IBDs for the I =0 and 1 chains are mainly determined by the central collisions, which reflects the nuclear density in the core region of the reaction system. The increasing part of the IBD distribution is found due to the difference between the densities in the peripheral collisions of the reactions. The sequential decay process influences the IBD results. The AMD + GEMINI simulation can better reproduce the experimental IBDs than the AMD simulation.

  4. Effect of isospin dependence of radius on transverse flow and fragmentation in isobaric pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sakshi

    2013-11-01

    We study the role of nuclear structure effects through radius in reaction dynamics via transverse flow and multifragmentation of isobaric colliding pairs. Our study reveals that isospin-dependent radius [proposed by Royer and Rousseau [Eur. Phys. J. A10.1140/epja/i2008-10745-8 42, 541 (2009)] has significant effect towards isospin effects. The collective flow behavior and fragmentation pattern of neutron-rich system with respect to neutron-deficient system is found to get reversed with isospin-dependent radius compared to that with liquid drop radius.

  5. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria in the system methyl propanoate + n-butyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Susial, P.; Ortega, J. . Lab. de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica)

    1993-10-01

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were determined at 74.66, 101.32, and 127.99 kPa for binary mixtures containing methyl propanoate + n-butyl alcohol by using a dynamic still with vapor and liquid circulation. No azeotrope was detected. The data were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to the point to point test. Application of the group-contribution models ASOG, UNIFAC, and modified UNIFAC to the activity coefficients at the three pressures studied gives average errors of less than 10%, 11%, and 3%, respectively.

  6. Coefficients of the isobaric mass equation and their correlations with various nuclear parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Britz, J.; Pape, A.; Antony, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    The coefficients of the isobaric multiplet mass equation M = a + bT{sub z} + cT{sub z}{sup 2} have been calculated for the 430 identified T = 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2 multiplets and correlations of its b, c coefficients with various nuclear parameters have been sought. For most mass numbers A there is a tendency for b to increase, and for c to decrease, with the average excitation energy of the multiplet. There seems to be no separate dependence of b or c on spin, but there could be a dependence of b on parity.

  7. Two-proton decay from Isobaric Analog States of light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kyle

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University using the charged-particle array HiRA and the gamma-ray array CAESAR have shed light on a new class of two-proton emitters associated with Isobaric Analog States (IAS). The two-proton decay is to the Isobaric Analog state of the daughter, which then gamma decays. These isospin-allowed transitions occur when one-proton decays are forbidden by either energy or isospin conservation, and when two-proton decay to the ground state is isospin forbidden. Three possible examples of this decay path will be discussed (8BIAS, 12NIAS, and 16FIAS) . The known IAS of 8C in 8B was confirmed to decay by two-proton emission to the 3.56 MeV IAS in 6Li. While the IAS in 8B was previously known, it was measured in this experiment with unbiased statistics and in coincidence with the 3.56 MeV gamma-ray. The IAS in 16F was investigated for the first time in this experiment and is still under investigation. Previous work on the IAS of 12O in 12N at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M will also be presented.

  8. Advances in surface ion suppression from RILIS: Towards the Time-of-Flight Laser Ion Source (ToF-LIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, S.; Catherall, R.; Crepieux, B.; Day Goodacre, T.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Giles, T.; Marsh, B. A.; Ramos, J. P.; Rossel, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the development towards the Time-of-Flight Laser Ion Source (ToF-LIS) aiming for the suppression of isobaric contaminants through fast beam gating. The capability to characterize high resistance ion sources has been successfully demonstrated. A ninefold selectivity gain has been achieved through suppression of surface ionized potassium, while maintaining >90% transmission for laser-ionized gallium using a thin wall graphite ionizer cavity combined with a fast beam gate. Initial results from the investigation of glassy carbon as a potential hot cavity ion source are presented. Power-cycle tests of a newly designed mount for fragile ion source cavities indicates its capability to survive the thermal stress expected during operation in an ISOLDE target unit. Finally, we introduce fast ion beam switching at a rate of 10 kHz using the ISOLDE ion beam switchyard as a new concept for ion beam distribution and conclude by highlighting the potential applications of this ion beam multiplexing technique.

  9. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions. PMID:24978887

  10. Isobaric molecular dynamics version of the generalized replica exchange method (gREM): Liquid–vapor equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-09-23

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed for simulating first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed and a study is presented of the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. As a result, phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained.

  11. Two-proton decay of the 6Be ground state and the double isobaric analog of 11Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.; Elson, J. M.; Komarov, S.; Sobotka, L. G.; Manfredi, J.; Shane, R.; Egorova, I. A.; Grigorenko, L. V.; Hagino, K.; Bazin, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Gade, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Kilbrun, M.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Lynch, W. G.; Mocko, M.; Lobastov, S. P.; Rodgers, A.; Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.; Winkelbauer, J.; Youngs, M.; Hudan, S.; Metelko, C.; Famino, M. A.; Marley, S. T.; Shetty, D. V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; van Goethem, M. J.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2013-03-01

    Two-proton decay is discussed in a number of light isobaric multiplets. For the lightest two-proton emitter, 6Be, the momentum correlations between the three decay products were measured and found to be consistent with quantum-mechanical three-cluster-model calculations. Two-proton decay was also found for two members of the A=8 and A=11 quintets. Finally, a third member of the A=11 sextet, the double isobaric analog of the halo nucleus 11Li in 11B was observed by its two-proton decay.

  12. Isobaric Molecular Dynamics Version of the Generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM): Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-22

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed to simulate first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed, and a study is presented for the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. Phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained. PMID:26398582

  13. A Quantitative Tool to Distinguish Isobaric Leucine and Isoleucine Residues for Mass Spectrometry-Based De Novo Monoclonal Antibody Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poston, Chloe N.; Higgs, Richard E.; You, Jinsam; Gelfanova, Valentina; Hale, John E.; Knierman, Michael D.; Siegel, Robert; Gutierrez, Jesus A.

    2014-07-01

    De novo sequencing by mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the determination of the complete amino acid (AA) sequence of a given protein based on the mass difference of detected ions from MS/MS fragmentation spectra. The technique relies on obtaining specific masses that can be attributed to characteristic theoretical masses of AAs. A major limitation of de novo sequencing by MS is the inability to distinguish between the isobaric residues leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (Ile). Incorrect identification of Ile as Leu or vice versa often results in loss of activity in recombinant antibodies. This functional ambiguity is commonly resolved with costly and time-consuming AA mutation and peptide sequencing experiments. Here, we describe a set of orthogonal biochemical protocols, which experimentally determine the identity of Ile or Leu residues in monoclonal antibodies (mAb) based on the selectivity that leucine aminopeptidase shows for n-terminal Leu residues and the cleavage preference for Leu by chymotrypsin. The resulting observations are combined with germline frequencies and incorporated into a logistic regression model, called Predictor for Xle Sites (PXleS) to provide a statistical likelihood for the identity of Leu at an ambiguous site. We demonstrate that PXleS can generate a probability for an Xle site in mAbs with 96% accuracy. The implementation of PXleS precludes the expression of several possible sequences and, therefore, reduces the overall time and resources required to go from spectra generation to a biologically active sequence for a mAb when an Ile or Leu residue is in question.

  14. Gamow-Teller strength studied through {Gamma}-excitation of isobaric analog states

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, M. S.; Young, A. R.; Ejiri, H.

    2013-04-19

    We consider a measurement of isobaric analog states (IAS) of 76As in 76Se as a method for measuring the Gamow-Teller (GT) strength important to constrain and possibly help normalize calculations of double beta ({beta}{beta}) decay matrix elements. We show that photo-nuclear reactions via IAS can provide valuable information about the parent and daughter states of {beta}{beta}-decay not currently available from measurements of charge exchange reactions. Several experiments have been proposed at the HI{open_square} Sfacility at the Triangle Nuclear Research Laboratory in Durham, NC, the first of which will measure the lowest 1{sup -}, 1{sup +} and 2{sup +} IAS in {sup 76}Se.

  15. Neutron density distributions of neutron-rich nuclei studied with the isobaric yield ratio difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Bai, Xiao-Man; Yu, Jiao; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-09-01

    The isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) between two reactions of similar experimental setups is found to be sensitive to nuclear density differences between projectiles. In this article, the IBD probe is used to study the density variation in neutron-rich 48Ca . By adjusting diffuseness in the neutron density distribution, three different neutron density distributions of 48Ca are obtained. The yields of fragments in the 80 A MeV 40, 48Ca + 12C reactions are calculated by using a modified statistical abrasion-ablation model. It is found that the IBD results obtained from the prefragments are sensitive to the density distribution of the projectile, while the IBD results from the final fragments are less sensitive to the density distribution of the projectile.

  16. Excitation of Δ and N* resonances in isobaric charge-exchange reactions of heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, I.; Benlliure, J.; Geissel, H.; Lenske, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Vargas, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for the study of the excitation of Δ(1232) and N*(1440) resonances in isobaric charge-exchange (AZ, A(Z ± 1)) reactions of heavy nuclei. Quasi-elastic and inelastic elementary processes contributing to the double differential cross sections of the reactions are described in terms of the exchange of virtual pions. The inelastic channel includes processes where the resonances are excited both in the target and in the projectile nucleus. We present results for reactions of 112Sn and 124Sn on different targets. Our results confirm that the position of the Δ peak is insensitive to targets with mass number A ≥ 12, and show that the origin of the Δ peak shift towards low excitation energies, with respect to its position in reactions with a proton target, can be easily explained in terms of the superposition of the different excitation mechanisms contributing to the reaction.

  17. Two-proton decay of the isobaric analogue state of 31Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukha, I.; Axelsson, L.; Äystö, J.; Bergmann, U. C.; Borge, M. J. G.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Honkanen, A.; Hornshøj, P.; Jading, Y.; Jonson, B.; Jokinen, A.; Martel, I.; Oinonen, M.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Petersen, B.; Riisager, K.; Siiskonen, T.; Smedberg, M. H.; Tengblad, O.; Wenander, F.; Isolde Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    We have studied several two proton branches in the β-decay of 31Ar, the most intensive ones proceeding through the isobaric analogue state (IAS) in 31Cl. The energy and angular correlations of the two protons originating from the IAS have been measured. An indication of non-isotropic emission has been observed in the p+p+ 29P branch. The energy spectra of protons from the IAS 2p-branches seem to be continuous, which is difficult to explain by a sequential emission through a few intermediate levels in 30S. The model of non-sequential or democratic three-particle decay gives the best fit to the present data favoring the IAS spin-parity {5}/{2 +}.

  18. K--Nucleus Elastic Scattering at IntermediateEnergies in the Isobar-Doorway Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, F. M.

    1983-11-01

    The differential cross sections for the K--nucleus elastic scattering at about PK = 800 MeV/c are calculated in the phenomenological isobar-doorway model. The many-body corrections on Y* resonances in nuclei are represented by the resonance energy shift Δ E and width-modification factor β. The parametrizations given by Gopal et al. are used for the resonance amplitudes. The effects of Δ E and β on the cross sections are investigated in detail. The results are compared with the available experimental data for the K- elastic scattering on 12C and 40Ca at PK = 800 MeV/c. The calculated cross sections are in good agreement with the data. However, the cross sections are not very sensitive to Δ E and β.

  19. Isobaric yield ratio difference in heavy-ion collisions, and comparison to isoscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan-Li; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2013-03-01

    An isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) method is proposed to study the ratio of the difference between the chemical potential of neutron and proton to temperature (Δμ/T) in heavy-ion collisions. The Δμ/T determined by the IBD method (IB-Δμ/T) is compared to the results of the isoscaling method (IS-Δμ/T), which uses the isotopic or the isotonic yield ratio. Similar distributions of the IB- and IS-Δμ/T are found in the measured 140A MeV 40,48Ca+9Be and the 58,64Ni+9Be reactions. The IB- and IS-Δμ/T both have a distribution with a plateau in the small mass fragments plus an increasing part in the fragments of relatively larger mass. The IB- and IS-Δμ/T plateaus show dependence on the n/p ratio of the projectile. It is suggested that the height of the plateau is decided by the difference between the neutron density (ρn) and the proton density (ρp) distributions of the projectiles, and the width shows the overlapping volume of the projectiles in which ρn and ρp change very little. The difference between the IB- and IS-Δμ/T is explained by the isoscaling parameters being constrained by the many isotopes and isotones, while the IBD method only uses the yields of two isobars. It is suggested that the IB-Δμ/T is more reasonable than the IS-Δμ/T, especially when the isotopic or isotonic ratio disobeys the isoscaling. As to the question whether the Δμ/T depends on the density or the temperature, the density dependence is preferred since the low density can result in low temperature in the peripheral reactions.

  20. Ultrahigh-temperature metamorphism under isobaric heating: New evidence from the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong-Yan; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, Toshiaki

    2014-12-01

    The Khondalite Belt within Inner Mongolia Suture Zone (IMSZ) in the North China Craton (NCC) preserves evidence for extreme crustal metamorphism under ultra-high temperature (UHT) conditions at ca. 1.92 Ga, associated with the subduction-collision tectonics between the Yinshan and Ordos Blocks. Here we report a new locality in Hongsigou where cordierite- and spinel-bearing granulites record UHT metamorphism. The prograde, peak, and retrograde mineral assemblages in these pelitic granulites have been identified based on petrography and mineral chemistry as: Bt1 + Grt1 + Sil1 + Kfs1 + Pl1 + Ilm + Qtz1, Grt1 + Sil2 + Kfs2 + Pl2 + Spl + Ilm + Qtz2 + Liq, and Crd + Grt2 + Sil3 + Kfs2 + Pl2 + Ilm + Qtz2 respectively. The peak metamorphic conditions of the pelitic granulite were estimated as 930-1050 °C and 6.5-7.5 kbar based on pseudosection analysis in the system NCKFMASHTO, suggesting extreme thermal metamorphism. We report LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb data from the granulite which show weighted mean 207Pb/206Pb age of 1881 ± 6.6 Ma, marking the timing of UHT metamorphism. Lu-Hf analyses of the zircons show εHf(t) values within a restricted range of -4.2 to 0.3 and together with Hf model ages, a Paleoproterozoic arc magmatic source is inferred for the detrital zircons. The estimated P-T path for the UHT granulite suggests isobaric heating followed by cooling and decompression along a clockwise trajectory, different from the anti-clockwise P-T paths defined in earlier studies for the 1.92 Ga UHT rocks from the IMSZ. The younger age and the isobaric heating trajectory suggest that the Hongsigou UHT rocks are related to heat input from underplated mafic magmas following continental collision.

  1. N, N-Dimethyl Leucines as Novel Isobaric Tandem Mass Tags for Quantitative Proteomics and Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Feng; Ye, Hui; Chen, Ruibing; Fu, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2010-01-01

    Herein we describe the development and application of a set of novel N, N-dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) 4-plex isobaric tandem mass (MS2) tagging reagents with high quantitation efficacy and greatly reduced cost for neuropeptide and protein analysis. DiLeu reagents serve as attractive alternatives for isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and tandem mass tags (TMTs) due to their synthetic simplicity, labeling efficiency and improved fragmentation efficiency. DiLeu reagent resembles the general structure of a tandem mass tag in that it contains an amine reactive group (triazine ester) targeting the N-terminus and ε-amino group of the lysine side-chain of a peptide, a balance group, and a reporter group. A mass shift of m/z 145.1 is observed for each incorporated label. Intense a1 reporter ions at m/z 115.1, 116.1, 117.1, and 118.1 are observed for all pooled samples upon MS2. All labeling reagents are readily synthesized from commercially available chemicals with greatly reduced cost. Labels 117 and 118 can be synthesized in one step and labels 115 and 116 can be synthesized in two steps. Both DiLeu and iTRAQ reagents show comparable protein sequence coverage (~43%) and quantitation accuracy (<15%) for tryptically digested protein samples. Furthermore, enhanced fragmentation of DiLeu labeling reagents offers greater confidence in protein identification and neuropeptide sequencing from complex neuroendocrine tissue extracts from a marine model organism, Callinectes sapidus. PMID:20218596

  2. Intrathecal hyperbaric versus isobaric bupivacaine for adult non-caesarean-section surgery: systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Vishal; Shanthanna, Harsha; Prabhakar, Christopher; McKeen, Dolores M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bupivacaine is the most commonly used local anaesthetic for spinal anaesthesia (SA). There are two forms of commercially available bupivacaine; isobaric bupivacaine (IB): a formulation with a specific gravity or density equal to cerebrospinal fluid, and hyperbaric bupivacaine (HB): a formulation with density heavier than cerebrospinal fluid. The difference in densities of the two available preparations is believed to affect the diffusion pattern that determines the effectiveness, spread and side-effect profile of bupivacaine. This systematic review will summarise the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety on the use of HB compared with IB, when used to provide SA for surgery. Primarily, we will analyse the need for conversion to general anaesthesia. As secondary outcomes, we will compare the incidence of hypotension, incidence of nausea/vomiting, the onset time and duration of anaesthesia. Methods and analysis We will search key electronic databases using search strategy (1) injections, spinal OR intrathecal OR subarachnoid; (2) bupivacaine OR levobupivacaine; (3) hypobaric OR isobaric OR plain; (4) baricity. We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, from their inception for randomised controlled trials, with no restrictions on language. Caesarean section surgery will be excluded. 2 reviewers will independently extract the data using a standardised form. Extracted items will include study characteristics, risk of bias domains, as per modified Cochrane risk of bias, participant disposition and study outcomes. We will conduct a meta-analysis for variables that can be compared across the studies. We will evaluate clinical heterogeneity by qualitatively appraising differences in study characteristics in participants, interventions and the outcomes assessed. We will report our findings as relative risks (dichotomous), and weighted mean differences (continuous) for individual outcomes, along with their 95% CIs. Ethics and

  3. Nimesulide, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, suppresses obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic insulin resistance through the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Kishina, Manabu; Koda, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kohei; Harada, Yusuke; Yoshida, Akio; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors suppress non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine how the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide suppresses NAFLD in a murine model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NC), an HFD, or HFD plus nimesulide (HFD-nime) for 12 weeks. Body weight, hepatic COX-2 mRNA expression and triglyceride accumulation were significantly increased in the HFD group. Triglyceride accumulation was suppressed in the HFD-nime group. The mRNA expression of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the natural PPARγ agonist 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) were significantly increased in the HFD group and significantly suppressed in the HFD-nime group. Glucose metabolism was impaired in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and it was significantly improved in the HFD-nime group. In addition, the plasma insulin levels in the HFD group were increased compared with those in the NC group, and were decreased in the HFD-nime group. These results indicate that HFD-induced NAFLD is mediated by the increased hepatic expression of COX-2. We suggest that the production of 15d-PGJ2, which is mediated by COX-2, induces NAFLD and hepatic insulin resistance by activating PPARγ. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), procollagen-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as the number of F4/80-positive hepatic (Kupffer) cells, were significantly increased in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and they were reduced by nimesulide. In conclusion, COX-2 may emerge as a molecular target for preventing the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in diet-related obesity. PMID:27431935

  4. Suppression of transverse-mode spurious responses for SAW resonators on SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 structure by selective removal of SiO2.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Goto, Rei; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2011-10-01

    A SiO(2)/Al/LiNbO(3) structure has a large electromechanical coupling factor (K(2)) and good temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) for applications as a SAW duplexer of the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) Band I. However, the SiO(2)/Al/LiNbO(3) structure also supports two unwanted spurious responses; one is caused by the Rayleigh mode and the other by the transverse mode. As the authors have previously discussed, the Rayleigh-mode spurious response can be suppressed by controlling the cross-sectional shape of a SiO(2) overlay deposited on resonator electrodes. In this paper, a new technique to suppress the transverse-mode spurious responses is proposed. In the technique, the SiO(2) overlay is selectively removed from the dummy electrode region. The spurious responses are analyzed by the laser probe system. The results indicate that the spurious responses in question were hybrid modes caused by the coupling between the main (SH) SAW and another (Rayleigh) SAW with different velocities. The hybrid-mode spurious behavior was dependent on the velocities in the IDT and the dummy regions (v(i) and v(d)). The hybrid-mode spurious responses could be suppressed by selectively removing SiO(2). Furthermore, the SAW energy confinement could be enhanced in the IDT electrode region when v(i) < v(d). The transverse-mode spurious responses were successfully suppressed without degrading the SAW resonator performances. PMID:21989882

  5. Suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion by a selective GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonist. Direct evidence for involvement of endogenous GHRH in the generation of GH pulses.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, C A; Friberg, R D; Barkan, A L

    1993-01-01

    To study the potential involvement of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in the generation of growth hormone (GH) pulses in humans we have used a competitive antagonist to the GHRH receptor, (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Arg2)GHRH(1-29)NH2(GHRH-Ant). Six healthy young men were given a bolus injection of GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg body wt or vehicle at 2200 h and nocturnal GH concentrations were assessed by every 10-min blood sampling until 0800 h. Integrated total and pulsatile GH secretion were suppressed during GHRH-Ant treatment by 40 +/- 6 (SE) % and 75 +/- 5%, respectively. GHRH-Ant suppressed maximum (7.6 +/- 2.2 vs 1.8 +/- 0.5 micrograms/liter; P < 0.001) and mean (3.3 +/- 1.0 vs 1.1 +/- 0.2 micrograms/liter; P = 0.02) GH pulse amplitudes. There was no change in integrated nonpulsatile GH levels, pulse frequency, or interpulse GH concentration. GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg also suppressed the GH responses to intravenous boluses of GHRH 0.33 micrograms/kg given 1, 6, 12, and 24 h later by 95, 81, 59, and 4%, respectively. In five healthy men, the responses to 10-fold larger GHRH boluses (3.3 micrograms/kg) were suppressed by 82 and 0%, 1 and 6 h after GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg, respectively. These studies provide the first direct evidence that endogenous GHRH participates in the generation of spontaneous GH pulses in humans. PMID:8349808

  6. A comparative quantitative analysis of the IDEAL (iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation) and the CHESS (chemical shift selection suppression) techniques in 3.0 T L-spine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eng-Chan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Min-Hye; Kim, Ki-Hong; Choi, Cheon-Woong; Seok, Jong-min; Na, Kil-Ju; Han, Man-Seok

    2013-03-01

    This study was conducted on 20 patients who had undergone pedicle screw fixation between March and December 2010 to quantitatively compare a conventional fat suppression technique, CHESS (chemical shift selection suppression), and a new technique, IDEAL (iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least squares estimation). The general efficacy and usefulness of the IDEAL technique was also evaluated. Fat-suppressed transverse-relaxation-weighed images and longitudinal-relaxation-weighted images were obtained before and after contrast injection by using these two techniques with a 1.5T MR (magnetic resonance) scanner. The obtained images were analyzed for image distortion, susceptibility artifacts and homogenous fat removal in the target region. The results showed that the image distortion due to the susceptibility artifacts caused by implanted metal was lower in the images obtained using the IDEAL technique compared to those obtained using the CHESS technique. The results of a qualitative analysis also showed that compared to the CHESS technique, fewer susceptibility artifacts and more homogenous fat removal were found in the images obtained using the IDEAL technique in a comparative image evaluation of the axial plane images before and after contrast injection. In summary, compared to the CHESS technique, the IDEAL technique showed a lower occurrence of susceptibility artifacts caused by metal and lower image distortion. In addition, more homogenous fat removal was shown in the IDEAL technique.

  7. Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Selective Inhibition of Rac GTPase versus Global Suppression of Rho Family GTPases Is Mediated by Alterations in Distinct Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascades*

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Ramaswami, Sai Anandi; Bouchard, Ron J.; Aktories, Klaus; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases play integral roles in neuronal differentiation and survival. We have shown previously that Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB), an inhibitor of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, induces apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). In this study, we compared the effects of ToxB to a selective inhibitor of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors Tiam1 and Trio (NSC23766). In a manner similar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis associated with enhanced caspase-3 activation and reduced phosphorylation of the Rac effector p21-activated kinase. In contrast to ToxB, caspase inhibitors do not protect CGNs from targeted inhibition of Rac. Also dissimilar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac does not inhibit MEK1/2/ERK1/2 or activate JNK/c-Jun. Instead, targeted inhibition of Rac suppresses distinct MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent signaling cascades known to regulate the localization and expression of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bad. Adenoviral expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK5 is sufficient to attenuate neuronal cell death induced by selective inhibition of Rac with NSC23766 but not apoptosis induced by global inhibition of Rho GTPases with ToxB. Collectively, these data demonstrate that global suppression of Rho family GTPases with ToxB causes a loss of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and activation of JNK/c-Jun, resulting in diminished degradation and enhanced transcription of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bim. In contrast, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis by repressing unique MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent prosurvival pathways, ultimately leading to enhanced expression, dephosphorylation, and mitochondrial localization of proapoptotic Bad. PMID:25666619

  8. Neuronal apoptosis induced by selective inhibition of Rac GTPase versus global suppression of Rho family GTPases is mediated by alterations in distinct mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R; Ramaswami, Sai Anandi; Bouchard, Ron J; Aktories, Klaus; Linseman, Daniel A

    2015-04-10

    Rho family GTPases play integral roles in neuronal differentiation and survival. We have shown previously that Clostridium difficile toxin B (ToxB), an inhibitor of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, induces apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). In this study, we compared the effects of ToxB to a selective inhibitor of the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors Tiam1 and Trio (NSC23766). In a manner similar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis associated with enhanced caspase-3 activation and reduced phosphorylation of the Rac effector p21-activated kinase. In contrast to ToxB, caspase inhibitors do not protect CGNs from targeted inhibition of Rac. Also dissimilar to ToxB, selective inhibition of Rac does not inhibit MEK1/2/ERK1/2 or activate JNK/c-Jun. Instead, targeted inhibition of Rac suppresses distinct MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent signaling cascades known to regulate the localization and expression of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bad. Adenoviral expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK5 is sufficient to attenuate neuronal cell death induced by selective inhibition of Rac with NSC23766 but not apoptosis induced by global inhibition of Rho GTPases with ToxB. Collectively, these data demonstrate that global suppression of Rho family GTPases with ToxB causes a loss of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 signaling and activation of JNK/c-Jun, resulting in diminished degradation and enhanced transcription of the Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only protein Bim. In contrast, selective inhibition of Rac induces CGN apoptosis by repressing unique MEK5/ERK5, p90Rsk, and Akt-dependent prosurvival pathways, ultimately leading to enhanced expression, dephosphorylation, and mitochondrial localization of proapoptotic Bad. PMID:25666619

  9. Isobaric multiplet mass equation in the A =31 ,T =3 /2 quartets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M. B.; Wrede, C.; Brown, B. A.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chen, A. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Fry, C.; Glassman, B. E.; Langer, C.; Larson, N. R.; McNeice, E. I.; Meisel, Z.; Ong, W.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Prokop, C. J.; Schwartz, S. B.; Suchyta, S.; Thompson, P.; Walters, M.; Xu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Background: The observed mass excesses of analog nuclear states with the same mass number A and isospin T can be used to test the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME), which has, in most cases, been validated to a high degree of precision. A recent measurement [Kankainen et al., Phys. Rev. C 93, 041304(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.041304] of the ground-state mass of 31Cl led to a substantial breakdown of the IMME for the lowest A =31 ,T =3 /2 quartet. The second-lowest A =31 ,T =3 /2 quartet is not complete, due to uncertainties associated with the identity of the 31S member state. Purpose: Our goal is to populate the two lowest T =3 /2 states in 31S and use the data to investigate the influence of isospin mixing on tests of the IMME in the two lowest A =31 ,T =3 /2 quartets. Methods: Using a fast 31Cl beam implanted into a plastic scintillator and a high-purity Ge γ -ray detection array, γ rays from the 31Cl(β γ )31S sequence were measured. Shell-model calculations using USDB and the recently-developed USDE interactions were performed for comparison. Results: Isospin mixing between the 31S isobaric analog state (IAS) at 6279.0(6) keV and a nearby state at 6390.2(7) keV was observed. The second T =3 /2 state in 31S was observed at Ex=7050.0 (8 ) keV. Calculations using both USDB and USDE predict a triplet of isospin-mixed states, including the lowest T =3 /2 state in 31P, mirroring the observed mixing in 31S, and two isospin-mixed triplets including the second-lowest T =3 /2 states in both 31S and 31P. Conclusions: Isospin mixing in 31S does not by itself explain the IMME breakdown in the lowest quartet, but it likely points to similar isospin mixing in the mirror nucleus 31P, which would result in a perturbation of the 31P IAS energy. USDB and USDE calculations both predict candidate 31P states responsible for the mixing in the energy region slightly above Ex=6400 keV. The second quartet has been completed thanks to the identification of the second 31S T

  10. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry determination of morphine and its isobaric glucuronide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Theresa A; Strickland, Erin C; Hitchcock, Jennifer; McIntire, Gregory; Colyer, Christa L

    2015-02-01

    The determination of morphine and its isobaric metabolites morphine-3-beta-d-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-beta-d-glucuronide (M6G) is useful for therapeutic drug monitoring and forensic identification of drug use. In particular, capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) represents an attractive tool for opioid analysis. Whereas volatile background electrolytes in CE often improve electrospray ionization for coupled MS detection, such electrolytes may reduce CE separation efficiency and resolution. To better understand the effects of background electrolyte (BGE) composition on separation efficiency and detection sensitivity, this work compares and contrasts method development for both volatile (ammonium formate and acetate) and nonvolatile (ammonium phosphate and borate) buffers. Peak efficiencies and migration times for morphine and morphine metabolites were optimal with a 25mM ammonium borate buffer (pH=9.5) although greater sensitivities were achieved in the ammonium formate buffer. Optimized CE methods allowed for the resolution of the isobaric morphine metabolites prior to high mass accuracy, electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-QTOF) MS detection applicable to the analysis of urine samples in under seven minutes. Urine sample preparation required only a 10-fold dilution with BGE prior to analysis. Limits of detection (LOD) in normal human urine were found to be 1.0μg/mL for morphine and 2.5μg/mL for each of M3G and M6G by CE-ESI-QTOF-MS. These LODs were comparable to those for CE-UV analysis of opioid standards in buffer, whereas CE-ESI-QTOF-MS analysis of opioid standards in buffer yielded LODs an order of magnitude lower. Patient urine samples (N=12) were analyzed by this new CE-ESI-QTOF-MS method and no significant difference in total morphine content relative to prior liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) results was found as per a paired-t test at the 99% confidence level. Whereas the LC-MS method applied

  11. Parametric study and characterization of the isobaric thermomechanical transformation fatigue of nickel-rich NiTi SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertacchini, Olivier W.; Schick, Justin; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2009-03-01

    The recent development of various aerospace applications utilizing Ni-rich NiTi Shape memory Alloys (SMAs) as actuators motivated the need to characterize the cyclic response and the transformation fatigue behavior of such alloys. The fatigue life validation and certification of new designs is required in order to be implemented and used in future applications. For that purpose, a custom built fatigue test frame was designed to perform isobaric thermally induced transformation cycles on small dogbones SMA actuators (test gauge cross-section up to: 1.270 x 0.508 mm2). A parametric study on the cyclic response and transformation fatigue behavior of Ni-rich NiTi SMAs led to the optimization of several material/process and test parameters, namely: the applied stress range, the heat treatment, the heat treatment environment and the specimen thickness. However, fatigue testing was performed in a chilled waterless glycol environment maintained at a temperature of 5°C that showed evidence of corrosion-assisted transformation fatigue failure. Therefore, it was necessary to build a fatigue test frame that would employ a dry and inert cooling methodology to get away from any detrimental interactions between the specimens and the cooling medium (corrosion). The selected cooling method was gaseous nitrogen, sprayed into a thermally insulated chamber, maintaining a temperature of -20°C. The design of the gaseous nitrogen cooling was done in such a way that the actuation frequency is similar to the one obtained using the original design (~ 0.1 Hz). For both cooling methods, Joule resistive heating was used to heat the specimens. In addition and motivated by the difference in surface quality resulting from different material processing such as EDM wire cutting and heat treatments, EDM recast layer and oxide layer were removed. The removal was followed by an ultra-fine polish (0.05 μm) that was performed on a subset of the fatigue specimens. Experimental results are presented

  12. Direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry for aroma analysis: Speed, sensitivity and resolution of isobaric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jublot, Lionel; Linforth, Robert S. T.; Taylor, Andrew J.

    2005-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) sources were developed for real time analysis of volatile release from foods using an ion trap (IT) mass spectrometer (MS). Key objectives were spectral simplicity (minimal fragmentation), response time and signal to noise ratio. The benefits of APCI-IT-MS were assessed by comparing the performance for in vivo and headspace analyses with that obtained using APCI coupled to a quadrupole mass analyser. Using MS-MS, direct APCI-IT-MS was able to differentiate mixtures of some C6 and terpene isobaric aroma compounds. Resolution could be achieved for some compounds by monitoring specific secondary ions. Direct resolution was also achieved with two of the three isobaric compounds released from chocolate with time as the sample was eaten.

  13. Differentiating Isobaric Steroid Hormone Metabolites Using Multi-Stage Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedmon, Lauren; Barnes, Jeremy S.; Nguyen, Hien P.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2013-03-01

    Steroid hormones and their metabolites are currently undergoing clinical trials as potential therapeutics for traumatic brain injury (TBI). To support this work, it is necessary to develop improved procedures for differentiating isobaric species in this compound class. Equilin sulfate (E-S), estrone sulfate (E1-S), 17α-dihydroequilin sulfate (ADHE-S), and 17β-dihydroequilin sulfate (BDHE-S) are primary constituents in hormone replacement therapies, such as Premarin, which are among pharmaceuticals being investigated for TBI treatment. The latter three compounds are isomers and can be difficult to differentiate in trace analytical determinations. In this work, a systematic study of the fragmentation of ADHE-S, BDHE-S, E1-S, and E-S under different stages of higher order tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) and variation of collision energy, allowed optimization of conditions for distinguishing the isomeric structures. For epimeric variants (e.g., ADHE-S versus BDHE-S; α- versus β-stereoisomerization in the C-17 position), differentiation was achieved at MS4 and fragmentation was demonstrated through MS5. Computational analysis was performed to further explore differences in the fragmentation pathways due to changes in stereochemistry.

  14. Volume crossover in deeply supercooled water adiabatically freezing under isobaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, Francesco; Giaquinta, Paolo V; Pochylski, Mikolaj; Ponterio, Rosina C; Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Vasi, Cirino

    2013-05-14

    The irreversible return of a supercooled liquid to stable thermodynamic equilibrium often begins as a fast process which adiabatically drives the system to solid-liquid coexistence. Only at a later stage will solidification proceed with the expected exchange of thermal energy with the external bath. In this paper we discuss some aspects of the adiabatic freezing of metastable water at constant pressure. In particular, we investigated the thermal behavior of the isobaric gap between the molar volume of supercooled water and that of the warmer ice-water mixture which eventually forms at equilibrium. The available experimental data at ambient pressure, extrapolated into the metastable region within the scheme provided by the reference IAPWS-95 formulation, show that water ordinarily expands upon (partially) freezing under isenthalpic conditions. However, the same scheme also suggests that, for increasing undercoolings, the volume gap is gradually reduced and eventually vanishes at a temperature close to the currently estimated homogeneous ice nucleation temperature. This behavior is contrasted with that of substances which do not display a volumetric anomaly. The effect of increasing pressures on the alleged volume crossover from an expanded to a contracted ice-water mixture is also discussed. PMID:23676053

  15. Volume crossover in deeply supercooled water adiabatically freezing under isobaric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, Francesco; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Pochylski, Mikolaj; Ponterio, Rosina C.; Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Vasi, Cirino

    2013-05-01

    The irreversible return of a supercooled liquid to stable thermodynamic equilibrium often begins as a fast process which adiabatically drives the system to solid-liquid coexistence. Only at a later stage will solidification proceed with the expected exchange of thermal energy with the external bath. In this paper we discuss some aspects of the adiabatic freezing of metastable water at constant pressure. In particular, we investigated the thermal behavior of the isobaric gap between the molar volume of supercooled water and that of the warmer ice-water mixture which eventually forms at equilibrium. The available experimental data at ambient pressure, extrapolated into the metastable region within the scheme provided by the reference IAPWS-95 formulation, show that water ordinarily expands upon (partially) freezing under isenthalpic conditions. However, the same scheme also suggests that, for increasing undercoolings, the volume gap is gradually reduced and eventually vanishes at a temperature close to the currently estimated homogeneous ice nucleation temperature. This behavior is contrasted with that of substances which do not display a volumetric anomaly. The effect of increasing pressures on the alleged volume crossover from an expanded to a contracted ice-water mixture is also discussed.

  16. Mass of astrophysically relevant 31Cl and the breakdown of the isobaric multiplet mass equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankainen, A.; Canete, L.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Koponen, J.; Moore, I. D.; Nesterenko, D.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Voss, A.; ńystö, J.

    2016-04-01

    The mass of 31Cl has been measured with the JYFLTRAP double-Penning-trap mass spectrometer at the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. The determined mass-excess value, -7034.7 (34 ) keV, is 15 times more precise than in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012. The quadratic form of the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the T =3 /2 quartet at A =31 fails (χn2=11.6 ) and a nonzero cubic term, d =-3.5 (11 ) keV, is obtained when the new mass value is adopted. 31Cl has been found to be less proton-bound, with a proton separation energy of Sp=264.6 (34 ) keV. Energies for the excited states in 31Cl and the photodisintegration rate on 31Cl have been determined with significantly improved precision by using the new Sp value. The improved photodisintegration rate helps to constrain astrophysical conditions where 30S can act as a waiting point in the rapid proton capture process in type-I x-ray bursts.

  17. The manometric sorptomat—an innovative volumetric instrument for sorption measurements performed under isobaric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudasik, Mateusz

    2016-03-01

    The present paper discusses the concept of measuring the process of sorption by means of the volumetric method, developed in such a way as to allow measurements performed under isobaric conditions. On the basis of the concept in question, a prototype of a sorption instrument was built: the manometric sorptomat. The paper provides a detailed description of the idea of the instrument, and of the way it works. In order to evaluate the usefulness of the device in sorption measurements carried out under laboratory conditions, comparative studies were conducted, during which the results of sorption measurements obtained with the developed instrument were compared with the results Mateusz obtained with a reference device. The objects of comparison were the sorption capacities of hard coal samples, calculated on the basis of the established courses of the methane sorption process. The results were regarded as compatible if the compared values fell within the range of the measurement uncertainty of the two devices. For the sake of the comparative studies, fifteen granular samples of hard coal—representing the 0.20-0.25 mm grain fraction and coming from various mines of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin—were used. After comparing the results obtained with the original manometric sorptomat with the results obtained with the gravimetric reference device, it was observed that the compatibility of measurements of sorption capacities was over 90%, based on the defined criterion of the measurement compatibility.

  18. Precision Test of the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation in the A = 32, T = 2 Quintet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bollen, G.; Campbell, C. M.; Folden, C. M., III; Lincoln, D.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pang, G. K.; Prinke, A.; Savory, J.; Schwarz, S.

    2008-10-01

    Masses of the radionuclides ^32,33Si and ^34P and of the stable nuclide ^32S have been measured with the Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap (LEBIT) Penning trap mass spectrometer. Relative mass uncertainties of 3 x 10-8 and better have been achieved. The measured mass value of ^32Si differs from the literature value [1,2] by four standard deviations. The precise mass determination of ^32Si and ^32S have been employed to test the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the A = 32, T= 2 isospin quintet. The experimental results indicate a significant deviation from the quadratic form. This work has been supported by Michigan State University, the NSF under contract number PHY- 0606007, and the DOE under the contract DE-FG02-00ER41144. References: 1. G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl. Phys. A729 (2003) 337 2. A. Paul, S. R"ottger, A. Zimbal, and U. Keyser, Hyperfine Interact. 132 (2001) 189

  19. Improved Isobaric Tandem Mass Tag Quantification by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Isobaric tandem mass tags are an attractive alternative to mass difference tags and label free approaches for quantitative proteomics due to the high degree of multiplexing that can be performed with their implementation. A drawback of tandem mass tags are that the co-isolation and co-fragmentation of labeled peptide precursors can result in chimeric MS/MS spectra that can underestimate the fold-change expression of each peptide. Two methods (QuantMode and MS3) have addressed this concern for ion trap and orbitrap instruments, but there is still a need to solve this problem for quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instruments. Ion mobility (IM) separations coupled to Q-TOF instruments have the potential to mitigate MS/MS spectra chimeracy since IM-MS has the ability to separate ions based on charge, m/z, and collision cross section (CCS). This work presents results that showcase the power of IM-MS to improve tandem mass tag peptide quantitation accuracy by resolving co-isolated differently charged and same charged peptides prior to MS/MS fragmentation. PMID:24677527

  20. Analyses of the Kaon - and Electro-Production in the Isobar Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, T. K.; Cheoun, Myung Ki; Kim, K. S.; Yu, B. G.

    2004-06-01

    The SAPHIR cross section data of K+Λ and K+Σ0 reactions are analyzed with new SPring-8(LEPS) data on the beam polarization asymmetry, which are taken into account as new constraints on the Isobar model. The simultaneous fit of model parameters to these data yields the consistent description of both data at the price of worse χ2 value and rather large K* contribution. The role of resonance D13(1895) is obvious in the energy region Eγ ≃ 1.45 GeV and the resonance F15(1650) improves the χ2 fit of cross sections with beam polarization data to a good degree. Analysis of kaon electro-production p(e, e' K+)Λ is also presented by including the contribution of the longitudinal virtual photon. Various electro-magnetic form factors for K, K1 and K* resonances are adopted to compare dependence of the electro-production cross section on these form factors. Our recent progress in this field is also presented.

  1. Excitation energies of double isobar-analog states in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poplavskii, I. V.

    1988-12-01

    Several new relationships are established for isomultiplets on the basis of a theory in which the Coulomb coupling constant (CCC) is allowed to be complex. In particular, the following rule is formulated: the energies for fission or decay of members of an isomultiplet into a charged cluster and members of the corresponding daughter isomultiplet are equidistant. This relationship is well satisfied for isomultiplets with /ital A/less than or equal to60. By extrapolating the rule for fission and decay energies to the region of heavy nuclei, the excitation energies /ital E//sub /ital x// of double isobar-analog states (DIASs) are found for the nuclei /sup 197,199/Hg, /sup 205/Pb, /sup 205 - -209/Po, /sup 209/At, and /sup 238/Pu. A comparison of the computed energies /ital E//sub /ital x// with the experimentally measured values for /sup 208/Po attest to the reliability and good accuracy of the method proposed here when used to determine the excitation energies of DIASs in heavy nuclei.

  2. Sensitivity of N/Z ratio in projectile break-up of isobaric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Russotto, P.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Baran, V.; Cap, T.; Cardella, G.; Colonna, M.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Marquínez-Durán, G.; Maiolino, C.; Minniti, T.; Norella, S.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Piasecki, E.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Wilczyński, J.

    2016-05-01

    The binary break-up of projectile-like fragments in non central heavy-ion collisions follows different decay patterns, from equilibrated emission towards dynamical (prompt) fission. Recently, comparing two systems with different N/Z in the entrance channel, it has been shown that the dynamical emission cross-section is enhanced for the most neutron rich system while the statistical emission cross-section is independent from the isotopic composition. In order to understand this dependence and disentangle it from the initial size of the nuclei, we have studied the two isobaric systems 124Xe+64 Zn and 124Xe+64 Ni at 35 A MeV (InKiIsSy experiment), in comparison with the previous studied reactions (124Sn +64 Ni and 112Sn +58 Ni) at the same bombarding energy. We present the first results evidencing a striking similar effect in the dynamical decay as a function of the N/Z of the target for equal size systems.

  3. Search for isobar-analog states of superheavy hydrogen isotopes5-7He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, B. A.; Gurov, Yu B.; Korotkova, L. Yu; Kuznetsov, D. S.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Tel'kushev, M. V.; Schurenkova, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    Search for isobar-analog states (IAS) of superheavy hydrogen isotopes 5-7H was performed among the high-excited states of helium isotopes 5-7He. The excited spectra were measured in stopped pion absorption by light nuclei. The experiment was performed at low energy pion channel of LANL with two-arm multilayer semiconductor spectrometer. Excited states of 5-7He were observed in three-body reaction channels on 10,11B nuclei. Several excited levels were observed for the first time. 6He excited state with Ex = 27.0(8) MeV observed in 10B(π-,pt)X channel is an IAS candidate for 6H with Er ∼ 5.5 MeV. 7He excited state with Ex = 24.8(4) MeV observed in 10B(π-,pd)X, nB(π-,pt)X and nB(π-,dd)X channels is an IAS candidate for 7H with Er ∼ 3 MeV.

  4. Proteomic analysis of astrocytic secretion that regulates neurogenesis using quantitative amine-specific isobaric tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hu; Zhou, Wenhao; Wei, Liming; Zhong, Fan; Yang, Yi

    2010-01-08

    Astrocytes are essential components of neurogenic niches that affect neurogenesis through membrane association and/or the release of soluble factors. To identify factors released from astrocytes that could regulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation, we used mild oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to inhibit the secretory capacity of astrocytes. Using the Transwell co-culture system, we found that OGD-treated astrocytes could not promote neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Next, isobaric tagging for the relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics techniques was performed to identify the proteins in the supernatants of astrocytes (with or without OGD). Through a multi-step analysis and gene ontology classification, 130 extracellular proteins were identified, most of which were involved in neuronal development, the inflammatory response, extracellular matrix composition and supportive functions. Of these proteins, 44 had never been reported to be produced by astrocytes. Using ProteinPilot software analysis, we found that 60 extracellular proteins were significantly altered (27 upregulated and 33 downregulated) in the supernatant of OGD-treated astrocytes. Among these proteins, 7 have been reported to be able to regulate neurogenesis, while others may have the potential to regulate neurogenesis. This study profiles the major proteins released by astrocytes, which play important roles in the modulation of neurogenesis.

  5. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions for resolution of atomic isobars: AMS and ICP-MS perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandura, Dmitry R.; Baranov, Vladimir I.; Litherland, A. E.; Tanner, Scott D.

    2006-09-01

    Ion-molecule reactions that can be used for resolution of spectral overlaps of long-lived or stable (T1/2 > 100 years) atomic isobars on the long-lived radio-isotopes (100 < T1/2 < 1012 years) in mass spectrometry are considered. Results for the separations of isobaric overlaps via cation reactions with NO, N2O, O2, CO2, C2H2, CH3F studied with the Inductively Coupled Plasma Dynamic Reaction Cell(TM) Mass Spectrometer (ICP-DRC(TM)-MS) with use of stable isotopes are presented. Overview of potential and reported reactions for separation of 35 isobars is given. Potential for the following isobaric pairs separation is shown (reaction gas and the extent of separation achieved to date in parenthesis): 32Si+/32S+(NO, 5 x 104), 40K+/40Ar+(N2O, 1.9 x 103), 40K+/40Ca+(N2O, 50), 59Ni+/59Co+(N2O, 6), 79Se+/79Br+(O2, 7.2 x 103), 81Kr+/81Br+(C2H2, 1.5 x 104), 93Mo+/93Nb+(N2O, 100), 93Mo+/93Zr+(N2O, 150), 135Cs+/135Ba+(N2O, 8 x 104), 137,138La+/137,138Ba+(O2, 40), 146Sm+/146Nd+(CO2, 1.5 x 105), 176Lu+/176Hf+(NO, 2.8 x 103), 187Re+/187Os+(N2O, 2.8 x 104). Effect of instrumental parameters on reactivity is discussed. The relevance of this work to accelerator mass spectrometry is discussed briefly.

  6. jTraqX: a free, platform independent tool for isobaric tag quantitation at the protein level.

    PubMed

    Muth, Thilo; Keller, Daniela; Puetz, Stephanie Michaela; Martens, Lennart; Sickmann, Albert; Boehm, Andreas M

    2010-03-01

    Many proteomic studies focus on quantitative aspects, using different stable isotope labeling techniques that require specialized software to analyze the generated data. Here we present jTraqX, an easy-to-use tool for processing and visualizing protein quantification data. jTraqX is platform independent and is compatible with all available 4-plex isobaric tags. jTraqX can be freely downloaded at http://sourceforge.net/projects/protms. PMID:20058250

  7. Nimesulide, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, suppresses obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic insulin resistance through the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Kishina, Manabu; Koda, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kohei; Harada, Yusuke; Yoshida, Akio; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors suppress non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine how the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide suppresses NAFLD in a murine model of high-fat diet (HFD)‑induced obesity. Mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NC), an HFD, or HFD plus nimesulide (HFD-nime) for 12 weeks. Body weight, hepatic COX-2 mRNA expression and triglyceride accumulation were significantly increased in the HFD group. Triglyceride accumulation was suppressed in the HFD-nime group. The mRNA expression of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the natural PPARγ agonist 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d‑PGJ2) were significantly increased in the HFD group and significantly suppressed in the HFD-nime group. Glucose metabolism was impaired in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and it was significantly improved in the HFD-nime group. In addition, the plasma insulin levels in the HFD group were increased compared with those in the NC group, and were decreased in the HFD-nime group. These results indicate that HFD-induced NAFLD is mediated by the increased hepatic expression of COX-2. We suggest that the production of 15d-PGJ2, which is mediated by COX-2, induces NAFLD and hepatic insulin resistance by activating PPARγ. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP‑1), procollagen-1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as the number of F4/80-positive hepatic (Kupffer) cells, were significantly increased in the HFD group compared with the NC group, and they were reduced by nimesulide. In conclusion, COX-2 may emerge as a molecular target for preventing the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in diet-related obesity. PMID:27431935

  8. MRI analysis of the ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs: a comparison with rigid internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we analyzed the efficacy of the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs, with particular emphasis on its effects on degenerative intervertebral disc disease. Methods We retrospectively compared the MRIs of 54 patients who had previously undergone either rigid internal fixation of the lumbar spine or ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation for the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. All patients had received preoperative and 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI scans of the lumbar spine with acquisition of both routine and diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The upper-segment discs of the fusion were subjected to Pfirrmann grading, and the lumbar intervertebral discs in the DWI sagittal plane were manually drawn; the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was measured. Results ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group measured at the 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI studies were increased compared to the preoperative ADC values. The ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group at 24 months postoperatively were significantly different from the preoperative values (P < 0.05). At 24 months, the postoperative ADC values were significantly different between the rigid fixation group and the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group (P < 0.05). Conclusion MRI imaging findings indicated that the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system can prevent or delay the degeneration of intervertebral discs. PMID:24898377

  9. Markedly additive antitumor activity with the combination of a selective survivin suppressant YM155 and alemtuzumab in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Shih, Joanna H; Morris, John C; Janik, John E; Conlon, Kevin C; Keating, Anne; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2013-03-14

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignancy of CD4(+)CD25(+) lymphocytes caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. Currently, there is no accepted curative therapy for ATL. In gene expression profiling, the antiapoptotic protein survivin (BIRC5) demonstrated a striking increase in ATL, and its expression was increased in patient ATL cells resistant to the anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab (Campath-1H). In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of a small-molecule survivin suppressant YM155 alone and in combination with alemtuzumab in a murine model of human ATL (MET-1). Both YM155 alone and its combination with alemtuzumab demonstrated therapeutic efficacy by lowering serum soluble IL-2Rα (sIL-2Rα) levels (P < .001) and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice (P < .0001). Moreover, the combination of YM155 with alemtuzumab demonstrated markedly additive antitumor activity by significantly lowering serum sIL-2Rα levels and improving the survival of leukemia-bearing mice compared with monotherapy with either YM155 (P < .001) or alemtuzumab (P < .05). More significantly, all mice that received the combination therapy survived and were tumor free >6 months after treatment. Our data support a clinical trial of the combination of YM155 with alemtuzumab in ATL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00061048. PMID:23321252

  10. Markedly additive antitumor activity with the combination of a selective survivin suppressant YM155 and alemtuzumab in adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A.; Shih, Joanna H.; Morris, John C.; Janik, John E.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Keating, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignancy of CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. Currently, there is no accepted curative therapy for ATL. In gene expression profiling, the antiapoptotic protein survivin (BIRC5) demonstrated a striking increase in ATL, and its expression was increased in patient ATL cells resistant to the anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab (Campath-1H). In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of a small-molecule survivin suppressant YM155 alone and in combination with alemtuzumab in a murine model of human ATL (MET-1). Both YM155 alone and its combination with alemtuzumab demonstrated therapeutic efficacy by lowering serum soluble IL-2Rα (sIL-2Rα) levels (P < .001) and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice (P < .0001). Moreover, the combination of YM155 with alemtuzumab demonstrated markedly additive antitumor activity by significantly lowering serum sIL-2Rα levels and improving the survival of leukemia-bearing mice compared with monotherapy with either YM155 (P < .001) or alemtuzumab (P < .05). More significantly, all mice that received the combination therapy survived and were tumor free >6 months after treatment. Our data support a clinical trial of the combination of YM155 with alemtuzumab in ATL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00061048. PMID:23321252

  11. Population Genetics as a Tool to Select Tsetse Control Strategies: Suppression or Eradication of Glossina palpalis gambiensis in the Niayes of Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Solano, Philippe; Kaba, Dramane; Ravel, Sophie; Dyer, Naomi A.; Sall, Baba; Vreysen, Marc J. B.; Seck, Momar T.; Darbyshir, Heather; Gardes, Laetitia; Donnelly, Martin J.; De Meeûs, Thierry; Bouyer, Jérémy

    2010-01-01

    Background The Government of Senegal has initiated the “Projet de lutte contre les glossines dans les Niayes” to remove the trypanosomosis problem from this area in a sustainable way. Due to past failures to sustainably eradicate Glossina palpalis gambiensis from the Niayes area, controversies remain as to the best strategy implement, i.e. “eradication” versus “suppression.” To inform this debate, we used population genetics to measure genetic differentiation between G. palpalis gambiensis from the Niayes and those from the southern tsetse belt (Missira). Methodology/Principal Findings Three different markers (microsatellite DNA, mitochondrial CO1 DNA, and geometric morphometrics of the wings) were used on 153 individuals and revealed that the G. p. gambiensis populations of the Niayes were genetically isolated from the nearest proximate known population of Missira. The genetic differentiation measured between these two areas (θ = 0.12 using microsatellites) was equivalent to a between-taxa differentiation. We also demonstrated that within the Niayes, the population from Dakar – Hann was isolated from the others and had probably experienced a bottleneck. Conclusion/Significance The information presented in this paper leads to the recommendation that an eradication strategy for the Niayes populations is advisable. This kind of study may be repeated in other habitats and for other tsetse species to (i) help decision on appropriate tsetse control strategies and (ii) find other possible discontinuities in tsetse distribution. PMID:20520795

  12. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics with Δ isobar and large- N c relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, C.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-01

    Transverse densities describe the spatial distribution of electromagnetic current in the nucleon at fixed light-front time. At peripheral distances b = O( M π - 1 ) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). Recent work has shown that the EFT results can be represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft-pion-nucleon intermediate states, resulting in a quantum-mechanical picture of the peripheral transverse densities. We now extend this representation to include intermediate states with Δ isobars and implement relations based on the large- N c limit of QCD. We derive the wave function overlap formulas for the Δ contributions to the peripheral transverse densities by way of a three-dimensional reduction of relativistic chiral EFT expressions. Our procedure effectively maintains rotational invariance and avoids the ambiguities with higher-spin particles in the light-front time-ordered approach. We study the interplay of π N and πΔ intermediate states in the quantum-mechanical picture of the densities in a transversely polarized nucleon. We show that the correct N c -scaling of the charge and magnetization densities emerges as the result of the particular combination of currents generated by intermediate states with degenerate N and Δ. The off-shell behavior of the chiral EFT is summarized in contact terms and can be studied easily. The methods developed here can be applied to other peripheral densities and to moments of the nucleon's generalized parton distributions.

  13. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  14. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  15. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  16. No selection of CXCR4-using variants in cell reservoirs of dual-mixed HIV-infected patients on suppressive maraviroc therapy.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Stéphanie; Nicot, Florence; Carcenac, Romain; Jeanne, Nicolas; Cazabat, Michelle; Requena, Mary; Cuzin, Lise; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-03-27

    We used ultradeep sequencing to investigate the evolution of the frequency of CXCR4-using viruses in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 22 patients infected with both CCR5 and CXCR4-using viruses treated with the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc for 24 weeks and a stable antiviral therapy. The mean CXCR4-using virus frequency in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 59% before maraviroc intensification and 52% after 24 weeks of effective treatment, indicating no selection by maraviroc. PMID:26752281

  17. The Emotional Gatekeeper: A Computational Model of Attentional Selection and Suppression through the Pathway from the Amygdala to the Inhibitory Thalamic Reticular Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Daniel; Barbas, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In a complex environment that contains both opportunities and threats, it is important for an organism to flexibly direct attention based on current events and prior plans. The amygdala, the hub of the brain's emotional system, is involved in forming and signaling affective associations between stimuli and their consequences. The inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a hub of the attentional system that gates thalamo-cortical signaling. In the primate brain, a recently discovered pathway from the amygdala sends robust projections to TRN. Here we used computational modeling to demonstrate how the amygdala-TRN pathway, embedded in a wider neural circuit, can mediate selective attention guided by emotions. Our Emotional Gatekeeper model demonstrates how this circuit enables focused top-down, and flexible bottom-up, allocation of attention. The model suggests that the amygdala-TRN projection can serve as a unique mechanism for emotion-guided selection of signals sent to cortex for further processing. This inhibitory selection mechanism can mediate a powerful affective ‘framing’ effect that may lead to biased decision-making in highly charged emotional situations. The model also supports the idea that the amygdala can serve as a relevance detection system. Further, the model demonstrates how abnormal top-down drive and dysregulated local inhibition in the amygdala and in the cortex can contribute to the attentional symptoms that accompany several neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26828203

  18. The Emotional Gatekeeper: A Computational Model of Attentional Selection and Suppression through the Pathway from the Amygdala to the Inhibitory Thalamic Reticular Nucleus.

    PubMed

    John, Yohan J; Zikopoulos, Basilis; Bullock, Daniel; Barbas, Helen

    2016-02-01

    In a complex environment that contains both opportunities and threats, it is important for an organism to flexibly direct attention based on current events and prior plans. The amygdala, the hub of the brain's emotional system, is involved in forming and signaling affective associations between stimuli and their consequences. The inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a hub of the attentional system that gates thalamo-cortical signaling. In the primate brain, a recently discovered pathway from the amygdala sends robust projections to TRN. Here we used computational modeling to demonstrate how the amygdala-TRN pathway, embedded in a wider neural circuit, can mediate selective attention guided by emotions. Our Emotional Gatekeeper model demonstrates how this circuit enables focused top-down, and flexible bottom-up, allocation of attention. The model suggests that the amygdala-TRN projection can serve as a unique mechanism for emotion-guided selection of signals sent to cortex for further processing. This inhibitory selection mechanism can mediate a powerful affective 'framing' effect that may lead to biased decision-making in highly charged emotional situations. The model also supports the idea that the amygdala can serve as a relevance detection system. Further, the model demonstrates how abnormal top-down drive and dysregulated local inhibition in the amygdala and in the cortex can contribute to the attentional symptoms that accompany several neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26828203

  19. GS 455534 selectively suppresses binge eating of palatable food and attenuates dopamine release in the accumbens of sugar-bingeing rats.

    PubMed

    Bocarsly, Miriam E; Hoebel, Bartley G; Paredes, Daniel; von Loga, Isabell; Murray, Susan M; Wang, Miaoyuan; Arolfo, Maria P; Yao, Lina; Diamond, Ivan; Avena, Nicole M

    2014-04-01

    Binge eating palatable foods has been shown to have behavioral and neurochemical similarities to drug addiction. GS 455534 is a highly selective reversible aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibitor that has been shown to reduce alcohol and cocaine intake in rats. Given the overlaps between binge eating and drug abuse, we examined the effects of GS 455534 on binge eating and subsequent dopamine release. Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on a sugar (experiment 1) or fat (experiment 2) binge eating diet. After 25 days, GS 455534 was administered at 7.5 and 15 mg/kg by an intraperitoneal injection, and food intake was monitored. In experiment 3, rats with cannulae aimed at the nucleus accumbens shell were maintained on the binge sugar diet for 25 days. Microdialysis was performed, during which GS 455534 15 mg/kg was administered, and sugar was available. Dialysate samples were analyzed to determine extracellular levels of dopamine. In experiment 1, GS 455534 selectively decreased sugar intake food was made available in the Binge Sugar group but not the Ad libitum Sugar group, with no effect on chow intake. In experiment 2, GS 455534 decreased fat intake in the Binge Fat group, but not the Ad libitum Fat group, however, it also reduced chow intake. In experiment 3, GS 455534 attenuated accumbens dopamine release by almost 50% in binge eating rats compared with the vehicle injection. The findings suggest that selective reversible aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibitors may have the therapeutic potential to reduce binge eating of palatable foods in clinical populations. PMID:24603339

  20. Short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity ameliorates the suppressed expression of key β-cell factors under diabetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Naoki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Takebe, Satomi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneto, Hideaki; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-11-27

    Alleviation of hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidemia improves pancreatic β-cell function in type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not well clarified. In this study, we aimed to elucidate how the expression alterations of key β-cell factors are altered by the short-term selective alleviation of glucotoxicity or lipotoxicity. We treated db/db mice for one week with empagliflozin and/or bezafibrate to alleviate glucotoxicity and/or liptotoxicity, respectively. The gene expression levels of Pdx1 and Mafa, and their potential targets, insulin 1, Slc2a2, and Glp1r, were higher in the islets of empagliflozin-treated mice, and levels of insulin 2 were higher in mice treated with both reagents, than in untreated mice. Moreover, compared to the pretreatment levels, Mafa and insulin 1 expression increased in empagliflozin-treated mice, and Slc2a2 increased in combination-treated mice. In addition, empagliflozin treatment enhanced β-cell proliferation assessed by Ki-67 immunostaining. Our date clearly demonstrated that the one-week selective alleviation of glucotoxicity led to the better expression levels of the key β-cell factors critical for β-cell function over pretreatment levels, and that the alleviation of lipotoxicity along with glucotoxicity augmented the favorable effects under diabetic conditions. PMID:26471305

  1. Selective and augmented β-glucuronidase expression combined with DOX-GA3 application elicits the potent suppression of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Longxin; Dong, Jie; Wei, Ming; Wen, Weihong; Gao, Jianping; Zhang, Zhengyu; Qin, Weijun

    2016-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the specific and amplified β-glucuronidase (βG) expression in prostate cancer cells by using a prostate‑specific antigen (PSA) promoter-controlled bicistronic adenovirus and to evaluate the specific killing of prostate cancer cells after the application of the prodrug DOX‑GA3. Bicistronic adenoviral expression vectors were constructed, and the effectiveness of specific and amplified expression was evaluated using luciferase and EGFP as reporter genes. βG expression was detected in LNCaP cells after they were infected with the βG‑expressing PSA promoter-controlled bicistronic adenovirus. MTT assays were conducted to evaluate the cytoxicity on the infected cells after the application of the prodrug DOX‑GA3. Tumor growth inhibition was also evaluated in nude mice after treatment with the βG‑expressing adenovirus and DOX‑GA3. Selective and amplified expression was observed in the PSA-producing LNCaP cells, but not in the PSA‑non‑producing DU145 cells. Potent cytotoxity and a strong bystander effect were observed in the LNCaP cells after infection with the βG‑expressing adenovirus and the application of DOX‑GA3. Intravenous injection of a GAL4 regulated bicistronic adenovirus vector constructed to express βG under the control of the PSA promoter (Ad/PSAP‑GV16‑βG) and the application of DOX‑GA3 strongly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival time of tumor‑bearing nude mice. Selective and amplified βG expression together with the prodrug DOX‑GA3 had an increased antitumor effect, showing great potential for prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26648021

  2. The Isospin Admixture of The Ground State and The Properties of The Isobar Analog Resonances In Deformed Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Aygor, H. Ali; Maras, Ismail; Cakmak, Necla; Selam, Cevad

    2008-11-11

    Within quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), Pyatov-Salamov method for the self-consistent determination of the isovector effective interaction strength parameter, restoring a broken isotopic symmetry for the nuclear part of the Hamiltonian, is used. The isospin admixtures in the ground state of the parent nucleus, and the isospin structure of the isobar analog resonance (IAR) state are investigated by including the pairing correlations between nucleons for {sup 72-80}Kr isotopes. Our results are compared with the spherical case and with other theoretical results.

  3. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    PubMed

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced cocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients. PMID:20840845

  4. Selective activation of adenosine A2A receptors on immune cells by a CD73-dependent prodrug suppresses joint inflammation in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Burghoff, Sandra; van Lent, Peter L E M; Temme, Sebastian; Galbarz, Lisa; Ding, Zhaoping; El-Tayeb, Ali; Huels, Sandra; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Jacoby, Christoph; Müller, Christa E; van den Berg, Wim B; Schrader, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) agonists are both highly effective anti-inflammatory agents and potent vasodilators. To separate these two activities, we have synthesized phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists (prodrugs) that require the presence of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to become activated. In the model of collagen-induced arthritis, 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (chet-AMP), but not 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine (chet-adenosine), potently reduced inflammation as assessed by fluorine-19 ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging and by histology. The prodrug effect was blunted by inhibition of CD73 and A(2A)R. The selectivity of drug action is due to profound up-regulation of CD73 and adenosine A(2A)R expression in neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as found in recovered cells from the synovial fluid of arthritic mice. Plasma chet-adenosine was in the subnanomolar range when chet-AMP was applied, whereas concentrations required for vasodilation were about 100 times higher. Thus, chet-AMP is a potent immunosuppressant with negligible vasodilatory activity. These data suggest that phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists may serve as a promising new group of drugs for targeted immunotherapy of inflammation. PMID:22875828

  5. Rapid Discovery and Structure-Activity Relationships of Pyrazolopyrimidines That Potently Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Growth via SRC Kinase Inhibition with Exceptional Selectivity over ABL Kinase.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Craig; Dawson, John C; Dowling, Reece; Houston, Douglas R; Weiss, Jason T; Munro, Alison F; Muir, Morwenna; Harrington, Lea; Webster, Scott P; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G; Patton, E Elizabeth; Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2016-05-26

    Novel pyrazolopyrimidines displaying high potency and selectivity toward SRC family kinases have been developed by combining ligand-based design and phenotypic screening in an iterative manner. Compounds were derived from the promiscuous kinase inhibitor PP1 to search for analogs that could potentially target a broad spectrum of kinases involved in cancer. Phenotypic screening against MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells generated target-agnostic structure-activity relationships that biased subsequent designs toward breast cancer treatment rather than to a particular target. This strategy led to the discovery of two potent antiproliferative leads with phenotypically distinct anticancer mode of actions. Kinase profiling and further optimization resulted in eCF506, the first small molecule with subnanomolar IC50 for SRC that requires 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration to inhibit ABL. eCF506 exhibits excellent water solubility, an optimal DMPK profile and oral bioavailability, halts SRC-associated neuromast migration in zebrafish embryos without inducing life-threatening heart defects, and inhibits SRC phosphorylation in tumor xenografts in mice. PMID:27115835

  6. A selective inhibitor of the immunoproteasome subunit LMP2 induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses tumour growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Wehenkel, M; Ban, J-O; Ho, Y-K; Carmony, K C; Hong, J T; Kim, K B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the proteasome is a validated anticancer target, the clinical application of its inhibitors has been limited because of inherent systemic toxicity. To broaden clinical utility of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer agents, it is critical to develop strategies to selectively target proteasomes in cancer cells. The immunoproteasome is an alternative form of the constitutive proteasome that is expressed at high levels in cancer tissues, but not in most normal cells in the body. Methods: To validate the immunoproteasome as a chemotherapeutic target, an immunoproteasome catalytic subunit LMP2-targeting inhibitor and siRNA were used. The sensitivity of PC-3 prostate cancer cells to these reagents was investigated using viability assays. Further, a xenograft model of prostate cancer was studied to test the in vivo effects of LMP2 inhibition. Results: A small molecule inhibitor of the immunoproteasome subunit LMP2, UK-101, induced apoptosis of PC-3 cells and resulted in significant inhibition (∼50–60%) of tumour growth in vivo. Interestingly, UK-101 did not block degradation of IκBα in PC-3 cells treated with TNF-α, suggesting that its mode of action may be different from that of general proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib, which block IκBα degradation. Conclusion: These results strongly suggest that the immunoproteasome has important roles in cancer cell growth and thus provide a rationale for targeting the immunoproteasome in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22677907

  7. Rapid Discovery and Structure–Activity Relationships of Pyrazolopyrimidines That Potently Suppress Breast Cancer Cell Growth via SRC Kinase Inhibition with Exceptional Selectivity over ABL Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Novel pyrazolopyrimidines displaying high potency and selectivity toward SRC family kinases have been developed by combining ligand-based design and phenotypic screening in an iterative manner. Compounds were derived from the promiscuous kinase inhibitor PP1 to search for analogs that could potentially target a broad spectrum of kinases involved in cancer. Phenotypic screening against MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells generated target-agnostic structure–activity relationships that biased subsequent designs toward breast cancer treatment rather than to a particular target. This strategy led to the discovery of two potent antiproliferative leads with phenotypically distinct anticancer mode of actions. Kinase profiling and further optimization resulted in eCF506, the first small molecule with subnanomolar IC50 for SRC that requires 3 orders of magnitude greater concentration to inhibit ABL. eCF506 exhibits excellent water solubility, an optimal DMPK profile and oral bioavailability, halts SRC-associated neuromast migration in zebrafish embryos without inducing life-threatening heart defects, and inhibits SRC phosphorylation in tumor xenografts in mice. PMID:27115835

  8. From a natural product lead to the identification of potent and selective benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides as glycogen synthase kinase 3beta inhibitors that suppress proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gaisina, Irina N; Gallier, Franck; Ougolkov, Andrei V; Kim, Ki H; Kurome, Toru; Guo, Songpo; Holzle, Denise; Luchini, Doris N; Blond, Sylvie Y; Billadeau, Daniel D; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) is overexpressed in human colon and pancreatic carcinomas, contributing to cancer cell proliferation and survival. Here, we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides, potent GSK-3beta inhibitors. Some of these compounds show picomolar inhibitory activity toward GSK-3beta and an enhanced selectivity against cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK-2). Selected GSK-3beta inhibitors were tested in the pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa-2, BXPC-3, and HupT3. We determined that some of these compounds, namely compounds 5, 6, 11, 20, and 26, demonstrate antiproliferative activity against some or all of the pancreatic cancer cells at low micromolar to nanomolar concentrations. We found that the treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with GSK-3beta inhibitors 5 and 26 resulted in suppression of GSK-3beta activity and a distinct decrease of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) expression, leading to significant apoptosis. The present data suggest a possible role for GSK-3beta inhibitors in cancer therapy, in addition to their more prominent applications in CNS disorders. PMID:19338355

  9. BI 5700, a Selective Chemical Inhibitor of IκB Kinase 2, Specifically Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Metastasis in Mouse Models of Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Margit A.; Maier, Harald J.; Alacakaptan, Memetcan; Wiedemann, Eva; Braunger, Jürgen; Boehmelt, Guido; Madwed, Jeffrey B.; Young, Erick R.R.; Marshall, Daniel R.; Pehamberger, Hubert; Wirth, Thomas; Kraut, Norbert; Beug, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that processes termed epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) play a key role in therapeutic resistance, tumor recurrence, and metastatic progression. NF-κB signaling has been previously identified as an important pathway in the regulation of EMT in a mouse model of tumor progression. However, it remains unclear whether there is a broad requirement for this pathway to govern EMT and what the relative contribution of IKK family members acting as upstream NF-κB activators is toward promoting EMT and metastasis. To address this question, we have used a novel, small-molecule inhibitor of IκB kinase 2 (IKK2/IKKβ), termed BI 5700. We investigated the role of IKK2 in a number of mouse models of EMT, including TGFβ-induced EMT in the mammary epithelial cell line EpRas, CT26 colon carcinoma cells, and 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells. The latter model was also used to evaluate in vivo activities of BI 5700.We found that BI 5700 inhibits IKK2 with an IC50 of 9 nM and was highly selective as compared to other IKK family members (IKK1, IKKε, and TBK1) and other kinases. BI 5700 effectively blocks NF-κB activity in EpRas cells and prevents TGFβ-induced EMT. In addition, BI 5700 reverts EMT in mesenchymal CT26 cells and prevents EMT in the 4T1 model. Oral application of BI 5700 significantly interferes with metastasis after mammary fat-pad injection of 4T1 cells, yielding fewer, smaller, and more differentiated metastases as compared to vehicle-treated control animals. We conclude that IKK2 is a key regulator of both the induction and maintenance of EMT in a panel of mouse tumor progression models and that the IKK2 inhibitor BI 5700 constitutes a promising candidate for the treatment of metastatic cancers. PMID:21779445

  10. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  11. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  12. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  13. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  14. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  15. Large-scale identification and analysis of suppressive drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P

    2014-04-24

    One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound ("drug") pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  16. A randomized controlled study comparing intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture and isobaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture in common urological procedures

    PubMed Central

    Upadya, Madhusudan; Neeta, S; Manissery, Jesni Joseph; Kuriakose, Nigel; Singh, Rakesh Raushan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Bupivacaine is available in isobaric and hyperbaric forms for intrathecal use and opioids are used as additives to modify their effects. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and haemodynamic effect of intrathecal isobaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture and hyperbaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture in common urological procedures. Methods: One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients undergoing urological procedures were randomized into two groups. Group 1 received 3 ml of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl while Group 2 received 3 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl. The parameters measured include heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, onset and duration of motor and sensory blockade. Student's unpaired t-test and the χ2 test were used to analyse the results, using the SPSS version 11.5 software. Results: The haemodynamic stability was better with isobaric bupivacaine fentanyl mixture (Group 1) than with hyperbaric bupivacaine fentanyl mixture (Group 2). The mean onset time in Group 1 for both sensory block (4 min) and motor block (5 min) was longer compared with Group 2. The duration of sensory block (127.8 ± 38.64 min) and motor block (170.4 ± 27.8 min) was less with isobaric bupivacaine group compared with hyperbaric bupivacaine group (sensory blockade 185.4 ± 16.08 min and motor blockade 201.6 ± 14.28 min). Seventy percent of patients in Group 2 had maximum sensory block level of T6 whereas it was 53% in Group 1. More patients in Group 1 required sedation compared to Group 2. Conclusion: Isobaric bupivacaine fentanyl mixture was found to provide adequate anaesthesia with minimal incidence of haemodynamic instability. PMID:26962255

  17. 2p-2p decay of 8C and isospin-allowed 2p decay of the isobaric-analog state in 8B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.; Elson, J. M.; Manfredi, J.; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Kilburn, M.; Lee, Jenny; Lynch, W. G.; Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J.; Youngs, M.; Marley, S. T.; Shetty, D. V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Ghosh, T. K.; Howard, M. E.

    2010-10-01

    C8 is found to decay to four protons and an α particle in two 2p emission steps. The correlations between the protons in the first step (C8 to Be6) exhibit a significant enhancement in the region of the decay phase space where the two protons have small relative energy, a region sometimes called the diproton region. The decay of the isobaric analog of C8 in B8 is also found to decay by 2p emission. This is the first case of isospin-allowed 2p decay between isobaric analog states.

  18. 2p-2p decay of {sup 8}C and isospin-allowed 2p decay of the isobaric-analog state in {sup 8}B

    SciTech Connect

    Charity, R. J.; Elson, J. M.; Manfredi, J.; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Kilburn, M.; Lee, Jenny; Lynch, W. G.; Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J.; Youngs, M.; Marley, S. T.; Shetty, D. V.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Ghosh, T. K.

    2010-10-15

    {sup 8}C is found to decay to four protons and an {alpha} particle in two 2p emission steps. The correlations between the protons in the first step ({sup 8}C to {sup 6}Be) exhibit a significant enhancement in the region of the decay phase space where the two protons have small relative energy, a region sometimes called the diproton region. The decay of the isobaric analog of {sup 8}C in {sup 8}B is also found to decay by 2p emission. This is the first case of isospin-allowed 2p decay between isobaric analog states.

  19. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  20. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone suppression test measures whether adrenocorticotrophic hormone ( ACTH ) secretion by the pituitary can be suppressed. ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong ... your blood is drawn so that the cortisol level in your blood ...

  1. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  2. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  3. Selective inhibition of nuclear factor-κB by nuclear factor-κB essential modulator-binding domain peptide suppresses the metastasis of highly metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takuya; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Irie, Atsushi; Nagata, Masashi; Kawahara, Kenta; Takamune, Yasuo; Yoshida, Ryoji; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Ogi, Hidenao; Shinriki, Satoru; Ota, Kazutoshi; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Shinohara, Masanori

    2012-03-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation contributes to the development of metastasis, thus leading to a poor prognosis in many cancers, including OSCC. However, little in vivo experimental data are available about the effects of NF-κB inhibition on OSCC metastasis. OSCC sublines were established from a GFP-expressing parental cell line, GSAS, and designated GSAS/N3 and N5 according to the in vivo passage number after cervical lymph node metastasis by a serial orthotopic transplantation model. In vitro migration and invasion were assessed in these cells, and the NF-κB activities and expression of NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules were also examined. In in vivo experiments, the metastasis and survival of tumor-engrafted mice were monitored. Furthermore, the effects of a selective NF-κB inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain (NBD) peptide, on metastasis in GSAS/N5-engrafted mice were assessed, and engrafted tongue tumors were immunohistochemically examined. Highly metastatic GSAS/N3 and N5 cells showed an enhanced NF-κB activity, thus contributing to increased migration, invasion, and a poor prognosis compared with the parent cells. Furthermore, the expression levels of NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules, such as fibronectin, β1 integrin, MMP-1, -2, -9, and -14, and VEGF-C, were upregulated in the highly metastatic cells. The NBD peptide suppressed metastasis and tongue tumor growth in GSAS/N5-inoculated mice, and was accompanied by the downregulation of the NF-κB-regulated metastasis-related molecules in engrafted tongue tumors. Our results suggest that the selective inhibition of NF-κB activation by NBD peptide may provide an effective approach for the treatment of highly metastatic OSCC. PMID:22136381

  4. Selective anticancer agents suppress aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Kogan, Valeria; Fedichev, Peter; Moskalev, Alexey

    2013-09-01

    Mutations of the PI3K, TOR, iNOS, and NF-κB genes increase lifespan of model organisms and reduce the risk of some aging-associated diseases. We studied the effects of inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), TOR (rapamycin), iNOS (1400W), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamate and QNZ), and the combined effects of inhibitors: PI3K (wortmannin) and TOR (rapamycin), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamates) and PI3K (wortmannin), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamates) and TOR (rapamycin) on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and quality of life (locomotor activity and fertility). Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, TOR, NF-κB, and iNOS increases lifespan of Drosophila without decreasing quality of life. The greatest lifespan expanding effect was achieved by a combination of rapamycin (5 μM) and wortmannin (5 μM) (by 23.4%). The bioinformatic analysis (KEGG, REACTOME.PATH, DOLite, and GO.BP) showed the greatest aging-suppressor activity of rapamycin, consistent with experimental data. PMID:24096697

  5. Selective anticancer agents suppress aging in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Anton; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Kogan, Valeria; Fedichev, Peter; Moskalev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of the PI3K, TOR, iNOS, and NF-κB genes increase lifespan of model organisms and reduce the risk of some aging-associated diseases. We studied the effects of inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), TOR (rapamycin), iNOS (1400W), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamate and QNZ), and the combined effects of inhibitors: PI3K (wortmannin) and TOR (rapamycin), NF-κB (pyrrolidin dithiocarbamates) and PI3K (wortmannin), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamates) and TOR (rapamycin) on Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and quality of life (locomotor activity and fertility). Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, TOR, NF-κB, and iNOS increases lifespan of Drosophila without decreasing quality of life. The greatest lifespan expanding effect was achieved by a combination of rapamycin (5 μM) and wortmannin (5 μM) (by 23.4%). The bioinformatic analysis (KEGG, REACTOME.PATH, DOLite, and GO.BP) showed the greatest aging-suppressor activity of rapamycin, consistent with experimental data. PMID:24096697

  6. Development and characterization of novel 8-plex DiLeu isobaric labels for quantitative proteomics and peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Dustin C.; Greer, Tyler; Xiang, Feng; Liang, Zhidan; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Relative quantification of proteins via their enzymatically digested peptide products determines disease biomarker candidate lists in discovery studies. Isobaric label-based strategies using TMT and iTRAQ allow for up to 10 samples to be multiplexed in one experiment, but their expense limits their use. The demand for cost-effective tagging reagents capable of multiplexing many samples led us to develop an 8-plex version of our isobaric labeling reagent, DiLeu. Methods The original 4-plex DiLeu reagent was extended to an 8-plex set by coupling isotopic variants of dimethylated leucine to an alanine balance group designed to offset the increasing mass of the label’s reporter group. Tryptic peptides from a single protein digest, a protein mixture digest, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae lysate digest were labeled with 8-plex DiLeu and analyzed via nanoLC-MS2 on a Q-Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Characteristics of 8-plex DiLeu-labeled peptides, including quantitative accuracy and fragmentation, were examined. Results An 8-plex set of DiLeu reagents with 1 Da-spaced reporters was synthesized at a yield of 36%. The average cost to label eight 100 μg peptide samples was calculated to be approximately $15. Normalized collision energy tests on the Q-Exactive revealed that a higher-energy collisional dissociation value of 27 generated the optimum number of high-quality spectral matches. Relative quantification of DiLeu-labeled peptides yielded normalized median ratios accurate to within 12% of their expected values. Conclusions Cost-effective 8-plex DiLeu reagents can be synthesized and applied to relative peptide and protein quantification. These labels increase the multiplexing capacity of our previous 4-plex implementation without requiring high-resolution instrumentation to resolve reporter ion signals. PMID:25981542

  7. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  8. Identifying separate components of surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O.

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision. PMID:26756172

  9. Physiological consequences of selective suppression of synaptic transmission in developing cerebral cortical networks in vitro: differential effects on intrinsically generated bioelectric discharges in a living 'model' system for slow-wave sleep activity.

    PubMed

    Corner, Michael A; Baker, Robert E; van Pelt, Jaap

    2008-10-01

    Within the context of an updated thorough review of the literature concerning activity-dependent cerebro-cortical development, a survey is made of recent experiments which utilize spontaneous spike-trains as the dependent variable in rodent neocortex cultures when synaptic transmission is interfered with during early ontogeny. Emphasis is placed on the complexity of homeostatic adaptations to reduced as well as intensified firing. Two kinds of adaptation are distinguished: (i) rapid recovery (within several hours) towards baseline levels despite sustained blockade of excitatory synaptic transmission, and (ii) the generation of essentially normal firing patterns in cultures assayed in control medium following development in the presence of excitatory receptor blockers. The former category of homeostatic responses is strongly dependent on the type of preparation, with isolated organotypic explants showing greatly limited plasticity in comparison with co-cultures of matching contralateral pieces of cortical tissue. In such co-cultures, compensatory excitatory drive manifests itself even when all three known types of ionotropic glutamate receptors are chronically blocked, and is then mediated by (muscarinic) cholinergic mechanisms which normally do not contribute measurably to spontaneous activity. The rapid return of high levels of spontaneous firing during sustained selective glutamatergic receptor blockade appears to protect neuronal cultures treated in this way from becoming hyperexcitable. In particular, quasi-epileptiform paroxysmal bursting upon return to control medium, such as appears in preparations where bioelectric activity has been totally suppressed during network formation, fails to appear in chronically receptor blocked cultures. On the contrary, desensitization of blocked glutamate receptors, as a physiological compensation for the up-regulation of non-blocked receptors, could be demonstrated for both the AMPA and the NMDA glutamate receptor sub

  10. Effects of phlorizin on diabetic retinopathy according to isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification–based proteomics in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-yang; Li, Bao-ying; Li, Xiao-li; Cheng, Mei; Cai, Qian; Yu, Fei; Wang, Wei-dong; Tan, Min; Yan, Guang; Hu, Shi-lian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in working-age people. To retard the development and progression of retina lesions, effective therapeutic strategies directed toward key molecular targets are desired. Phlorizin is effective in treating diabetic complications, but little is known about functional protein changes that may mediate its actions. The aim of this study was to identify retinal proteomic alterations in db/db mice treated with phlorizin. Methods We used C57BLKS/J db/db mice as a type 2 diabetic animal model, while C57BLKS/J db/m mice were selected as the control. Phlorizin (20 mg/kg bodyweight /d) was administrated to db/db mice for ten weeks. Serum fasting blood glucose and advanced glycation end products were determined. Meanwhile, retina cell apoptosis was determined with terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification and subsequent liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were used to identify and profile retinal proteins among control, untreated diabetic, and phlorizin-treated db/db mice. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein was measured in retinas using western blotting analysis. Results Phlorizin treatment significantly reduced fasting blood glucose and levels of advanced glycation end products (p<0.05) and remarkably inhibited retina cell apoptosis and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the retinas of db/db mice. In addition, we identified 1,636 proteins from retina tissue in total, of which 348 proteins were differentially expressed in db/db mice compared with the controls. Only 60 proteins in the retinas of the db/db mice were found to be differentially changed following phlorizin treatment, including 33 proteins that were downregulated and 27 proteins that were upregulated. Most of these differentially changed proteins were involved in oxidative stress, apoptosis, energy metabolism, and signaling transduction

  11. Revalidation of the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the A=20 quintet

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, B. E.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Wrede, C.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bennett, M. B.; Brown, B. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Febbraro, M.; Fry, C.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Liddick, S. N.; O'Malley, P.; Ong, W.; Pain, S. D.; Schwartz, S. B.; Shidling, P.; Sims, H.; Thompson, P.; Zhang, H.

    2015-10-29

    An unexpected breakdown of the isobaric multiplet mass equation in the A = 20, T = 2 quintet was recently reported, presenting a challenge to modern theories of nuclear structure. In the present work, the excitation energy of the lowest T = 2 state in Na-20 has been measured to be 6498.4 +/- 0.2stat ± 0.4syst keV by using the superallowed 0+ → 0+ beta decay of Mg-20 to access it and an array of high-purity germanium detectors to detect its gamma-ray deexcitation. This value differs by 27 keV (1.9 standard deviations) from the recommended value of 6525 ± 14 keV and is a factor of 28 more precise. The isobaric multiplet mass equation is shown to be revalidated when the new value is adopted.

  12. Effect of isobaric breathing gas shifts from air to heliox mixtures on resolution of air bubbles in lipid and aqueous tissues of recompressed rats.

    PubMed

    Hyldegaard, O; Kerem, D; Melamed, Y

    2011-09-01

    Deep tissue isobaric counterdiffusion that may cause unwanted bubble formation or transient bubble growth has been referred to in theoretical models and demonstrated by intravascular gas formation in animals, when changing inert breathing gas from nitrogen to helium after hyperbaric air breathing. We visually followed the in vivo resolution of extravascular air bubbles injected at 101 kPa into nitrogen supersaturated rat tissues: adipose, spinal white matter, skeletal muscle or tail tendon. Bubbles were observed during isobaric breathing-gas shifts from air to normoxic (80:20) heliox mixture while at 285 kPa or following immediate recompression to either 285 or 405 kPa, breathing 80:20 and 50:50 heliox mixtures. During the isobaric shifts, some bubbles in adipose tissue grew marginally for 10-30 min, subsequently they shrank and disappeared at a rate similar to or faster than during air breathing. No such bubble growth was observed in spinal white matter, skeletal muscle or tendon. In spinal white matter, an immediate breathing gas shift after the hyperbaric air exposure from air to both (80:20) and (50:50) heliox, coincident with recompression to either 285 or 405 kPa, caused consistent shrinkage of all air bubbles, until they disappeared from view. Deep tissue isobaric counterdiffusion may cause some air bubbles to grow transiently in adipose tissue. The effect is marginal and of no clinical consequence. Bubble disappearance rate is faster with heliox breathing mixtures as compared to air. We see no reason for reservations in the use of heliox breathing during treatment of air-diving-induced decompression sickness. PMID:21318313

  13. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome. PMID:24462261

  14. Aqua Ions-Graphene Interfacial and Confinement Behavior: Insights from isobaric-isothermal molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    We carry out a systematic micro-structural characterization of the solidfluid interface (SFI) of water and simple metal chloride aqueous solutions in contact with a free standing plate or with two such plates separated by an inter-plate distance 0 ! h( ) ! 30 at ambient conditions via isothermalisobaric molecular dynamics. With this characterization we target the interrogation of the system in search for answers to fundamental questions regarding the structure of the external and internal (confined) SFI s, the effect of the differential hydration behavior among species and its link to species expulsion from confinement. For water at ambient conditions we found that the structure of the external SFI s is independent of the interplate distance h in the range 0 ! h( ) ! 30 , i.e., the absence of wallmediated correlation effects between external and internal SFI s, and that for h < 9 the slit-pores de-wet. Moreover, we observed a selective expulsion of ions caused by the differential hydration between the anion and the cations with a consequent charging of the slit-pore. All these observations were interpreted in terms of the axial profiles for precisely defined order parameters including tetrahedral configuration, hydrogen bonding, and species coordination numbers.

  15. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  16. Two-mica and tourmaline leucogranites from the Everest Makalu region (Nepal Tibet). Himalayan leucogranite genesis by isobaric heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visonà, Dario; Lombardo, Bruno

    2002-06-01

    In the Higher Himalaya of the region from Cho Oyu to the Arun valley northeast of Makalu, the Miocene leucogranites are not hosted only in the upper High Himalayan Crystallines (HHC); a network of dykes also cuts the lower HHC and the Lesser Himalayan Crystallines (LHC). The plutons and dykes are mainly composed of two-mica (muscovite+biotite±tourmaline±cordierite±andalusite±sillimanite) leucogranite, with tourmaline≤2.6% and biotite>1.5% modal, and tourmaline (muscovite+tourmaline±biotite±sillimanite ±garnet±kyanite±andalusite±spinel±corundum) leucogranite, with tourmaline>2.2% and biotite<1.5% modal. Both leucogranite types were produced by partial melting in the andalusite-sillimanite facies series, under LP/HT conditions constrained by the occurrence of peritectic andalusite and cordierite. The geochemical features of the leucogranites suggest that tourmaline leucogranite was produced by muscovite dehydration melting in muscovite-rich metapelites at P˜350 MPa and T≥640°C, whereas two-mica leucogranite was produced by biotite dehydration melting in biotite-rich metapelites at P˜300 MPa and T≥660-710 °C. Melting in fertile muscovite-rich metapelites of the top of both the HHC and LHC produced magmas which were emplaced at the same structural level in which they had been generated. Melting in the biotite-rich gneiss of both the HHC and LHC produced hotter magmas which were transported upwards by dyking and eventually coalesced in the plutons of the upper HHC. A similar process also produced a network of two-mica granite at the top of the LHC in the Ama Drime-Nyönno Ri Range northeast of Makalu. The prograde character of leucogranite melt-producing reactions in the Everest-Makalu area suggests that, here, the generation of Miocene leucogranites took place in a regime of nearly isobaric heating following nearly adiabatic decompression.

  17. High-Field Asymmetric-Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Electron Detachment Dissociation of Isobaric Mixtures of Glycosaminoglycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailemia, Muchena J.; Park, Melvin; Kaplan, Desmond A.; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is shown to be capable of resolving isomeric and isobaric glycosaminoglycan negative ions and to have great utility for the analysis of this class of molecules when combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry. Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) and other ion activation methods for tandem mass spectrometry can be used to determine the sites of labile sulfate modifications and for assigning the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). However, mixtures with overlapping mass-to-charge values present a challenge, as their precursor species cannot be resolved by a mass analyzer prior to ion activation. FAIMS is shown to resolve two types of mass-to-charge overlaps. A mixture of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) oligomers with 4-10 saccharides units produces ions of a single mass-to-charge by electrospray ionization, as the charge state increases in direct proportion to the degree of polymerization for these sulfated carbohydrates. FAIMS is shown to resolve the overlapping charge. A more challenging type of mass-to-charge overlap occurs for mixtures of diastereomers. FAIMS is shown to separate two sets of epimeric GAG tetramers. For the epimer pairs, the complexity of the separation is reduced when the reducing end is alkylated, suggesting that anomers are also resolved by FAIMS. The resolved components were activated by EDD and the fragment ions were analyzed by FTICR-MS. The resulting tandem mass spectra were able to distinguish the two epimers from each other.

  18. Isobaric molecular formulae of C, H, and O: a view from the negative quadrants of van Krevelen space.

    PubMed

    Perdue, E Michael; Green, Nelson W

    2015-01-01

    When compositions of an isobaric series of molecular formulae consisting of C, H, and O are displayed in a van Krevelen plot, a remarkable number of nonparallel lines of compositions can be observed. Each group of related lines converge at a point in a negative quadrant of van Krevelen space (e.g., H/C = 4, O/C = -1). These points of convergence have H/C and O/C ratios that correspond to "molecular formulae" in which the stoichiometric coefficients of some of the isotopes are negative. In this manner, a group of related low-mass moieties have been identified (CH4O(-1), C4O(-3), C2H(-8)O(-1), CH(-12), etc.). Each of these moieties has a nominal mass of zero and a very small exact mass. Furthermore, all of these low-mass moieties have compositions that fall on the line H/C = -12 - 16(O/C), which lies entirely in the negative quadrants of van Krevelen space. This paper demonstrates that all low-mass moieties consisting of C, H, and O can be expressed formally as linear combinations of any two moieties. Likewise, all molecular formulae that fall on a line that passes through a given low-mass moiety must differ compositionally by a multiple of the composition of that moiety, and their exact masses must differ by a multiple of the exact mass of the moiety. This latter relationship has been invoked for very rapid assignment of a molecular formula to an exact mass. Finally, a more comprehensive and theoretically based understanding of family scores has been developed around the concept of low-mass moieties. PMID:25649129

  19. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus’kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion’s central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  20. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-02-15

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  1. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  2. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  3. Parasitic suppressing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. T.; Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A circuit for suppressing parasitic oscillations across an inductor operating in a resonant mode is described. The circuit includes a switch means and resistive means connected serially across the inductor. A unidirectional resistive-capacitive network is also connected across the inductor and to the switch means to automatically render the switch means conducting when inductive current through the inductor ceases to flow.

  4. Vadose zone isobaric well

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2001-01-01

    A deep tensiometer is configured with an outer guide tube having a vented interval along a perforate section at its lower end, which is isolated from atmospheric pressure at or above grade. A transducer having a monitoring port and a reference port is located within a coaxial inner guide tube. The reference port of the transducer is open to the vented interval of the outer guide tube, which has the same gas pressure as in the sediment surrounding the tensiometer. The reference side of the pressure transducer is thus isolated from the effects of atmospheric pressure changes and relative to pressure changes in the material surrounding the tensiometer measurement location and so it is automatically compensated for such pressure changes.

  5. Simultaneous quantification of protein phosphorylation sites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics: a linear algebra approach for isobaric phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Sheng, Yuan; Zhong, Ting; Yang, Mi; Chen, Yun

    2014-12-01

    As one of the most studied post-translational modifications (PTM), protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in almost all cellular processes. Current methods are able to predict and determine thousands of phosphorylation sites, whereas stoichiometric quantification of these sites is still challenging. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics is emerging as a promising technique for site-specific quantification of protein phosphorylation using proteolytic peptides as surrogates of proteins. However, several issues may limit its application, one of which relates to the phosphopeptides with different phosphorylation sites and the same mass (i.e., isobaric phosphopeptides). While employment of site-specific product ions allows for these isobaric phosphopeptides to be distinguished and quantified, site-specific product ions are often absent or weak in tandem mass spectra. In this study, linear algebra algorithms were employed as an add-on to targeted proteomics to retrieve information on individual phosphopeptides from their common spectra. To achieve this simultaneous quantification, a LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was first developed and validated for each phosphopeptide. Given the slope and intercept of calibration curves of phosphopeptides in each transition, linear algebraic equations were developed. Using a series of mock mixtures prepared with varying concentrations of each phosphopeptide, the reliability of the approach to quantify isobaric phosphopeptides containing multiple phosphorylation sites (≥ 2) was discussed. Finally, we applied this approach to determine the phosphorylation stoichiometry of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) at Ser78 and Ser82 in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. PMID:25403019

  6. Measurement and isobar-model analysis of the doubly differential cross section for the. pi. /sup +/ produced in. pi. /sup -/p. -->. pi. /sup +/. pi. /sup -/n

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, D.M.

    1981-11-01

    The doubly differential cross section d/sup 2/sigma/d..cap omega..dT for ..pi../sup +/ mesons produced in the reaction ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/n was measured at 203, 230, 256, and 358 MeV with a single-arm magnetic spectrometer. A set of five previous measurements at 254, 280, 292, 331, and 356 MeV was reanalyzed with the new measurements. Integrated cross sections were calculated for the combined data set with unprecedented accuracy for this energy range. The chiral-symmetry-breaking parameter was determined to be epsilon = -0.03 +- 0.26 by extrapolating the mean square modulus of the matrix element to threshold and comparing the threshold matrix element with the prediction of soft-pion theory. This value of epsilon is consistent with zero as required by the Weinberg Lagrangian. Measurements at the three highest energies were compared with the results of an isobar-model analysis of bubble-chamber events by an LBL-SLAC collaboration. After allowing for an overall normalization difference, the measurements at 331 and 358 MeV were in excellent agreement with the results of their analysis. The measurement at 292 MeV required variation of the PS11(epsilonN) amplitude, as well as the overall normalization, which could be due to the limited number of bubble-chamber events available for the LBL-SLAC analysis at this energy. A partial-wave analysis of the measurements was also carried out with the VPI isobar model. Within this model, the matrix element contains a background term calculated from a phenomenological ..pi..N Lagrangian that is consistent with the hypotheses of current algebra and PCAC. The reaction was found to be dominated by the initial P11 wave. Production of the ..delta.. isobar from initial D waves was found to be significant at the two highest energies.

  7. Rare evidence for formation of garnet + corundum during isobaric cooling of ultrahigh temperature metapelites: New insights for retrograde P-T trajectory of the Highland Complex, Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmapriya, P. L.; Malaviarachchi, Sanjeeva P. K.; Galli, Andrea; Su, Ben-Xun; Subasinghe, N. D.; Dissanayake, C. B.

    2015-04-01

    We report the occurrence of coexisting garnet + corundum in spinel- and corundum-bearing, garnet-sillimanite-biotite-graphite gneiss (pelitic granulites) from the Highland Complex (HC), Sri Lanka. In the investigated pelitic granulites, two domains such as quartz-saturated and quartz-undersaturated are distinguishable. The quartz-saturated domains consist of porphyroblastic garnet, quartz, plagioclase, alkali-feldspar and biotite flakes rimming garnet. The quartz-undersaturated domains are constituted of two generations of garnet (Grt1 and Grt2), sillimanite, plagioclase, alkali-feldspar, corundum, spinel and biotite. Grt1 encloses rare Ti-rich biotite and numerous rutile needles and apatite rods. Grt2 contains rare sillimanite and/or spinel inclusions. Corundum occurs in mutual contact with Grt2, partially embedded at the rim or as an inclusions in Grt2. Thermobarometry on inclusion phases in Grt1 indicates that during the prograde history pelitic granulites attained a P of 10.5-11 kbar at T of ~ 850 °C. Textural observations coupled with both pseudosections calculated in the NCKFMASHTMnO system and Ti-in-Garnet geothermobarometry suggest that peak metamorphism occurred at ultrahigh temperature (UHT) conditions of 950-975 °C and pressures of 9-9.5 kbar. Peak T was followed by a period of isobaric cooling that formed corundum and Grt2 at approx. 930 °C along with exsolution of rutile needles and apatite rods in Grt1. Thermodynamic modelling confirms that corundum appears along an isobaric cooling path at about 920-930 °C and 9-9.5 kbar. Therefore, the investigated granulites provide a rare example of post-peak crystallization of garnet + corundum along a retrograde metamorphic trajectory under UHT conditions. Thus, isobaric cooling at the base of the crust could be regarded as an alternative process to form coexisting garnet + corundum.

  8. Evidence for a breakdown of the isobaric multiplet mass equation: A study of the A=35,T=3/2 isospin quartet

    SciTech Connect

    Yazidjian, C.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Herlert, A.; Schweikhard, L.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.

    2007-08-15

    Mass measurements on radionuclides along the potassium isotope chain have been performed with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. For {sup 35}K (T{sub 1/2}=178 ms) to {sup 46}K (T{sub 1/2}=105 s) relative mass uncertainties of 2x10{sup -8} and better have been achieved. The accurate mass determination of {sup 35}K ({delta}m=0.54 keV) has been exploited to test the isobaric multiplet mass equation for the A=35,T=3/2 isospin quartet. The experimental results indicate a deviation from the generally adopted quadratic form.

  9. K-shell ionization probability in elastic proton scattering on /sup 138/Ba through an f/sub 7/2/ isobaric-analog resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, M.; Lorek, R.; Roehl, S.; Seidel, J.; Koenig, W.

    1985-10-01

    The bombarding energy dependence of the K-shell ionization probability P/sub K/ was measured in elastic proton scattering on /sup 138/Ba at energies near the 69-keV-wide f/sub 7/2/ isobaric-analog resonance at 9.965 MeV. The best simultaneous fit to P/sub K/ in the scattering angle intervals 45/sup 0/--80/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/--135/sup 0/ yields R/sub 0/ = -0.30 +- 0.30 for the tangent of the phase angle of the semiclassical monopole ionization amplitude.

  10. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  11. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  12. Menstrual suppression: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Paula Adams

    2014-01-01

    Menstrual suppression to provide relief of menstrual-related symptoms or to manage medical conditions associated with menstrual morbidity or menstrual exacerbation has been used clinically since the development of steroid hormonal therapies. Options range from the extended or continuous use of combined hormonal oral contraceptives, to the use of combined hormonal patches and rings, progestins given in a variety of formulations from intramuscular injection to oral therapies to intrauterine devices, and other agents such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists. The agents used for menstrual suppression have variable rates of success in inducing amenorrhea, but typically have increasing rates of amenorrhea over time. Therapy may be limited by side effects, most commonly irregular, unscheduled bleeding. These therapies can benefit women’s quality of life, and by stabilizing the hormonal milieu, potentially improve the course of underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or a seizure disorder. This review addresses situations in which menstrual suppression may be of benefit, and lists options which have been successful in inducing medical amenorrhea. PMID:25018654

  13. Vibrotactile suppression of tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Martin L.

    2002-05-01

    At the Society's 142nd meeting, the efficacy of high frequency bone conducted stimulation in suppressing tinnitus was presented. The hypothesized mechanism was the reprogramming of frequency tuning of auditory neurons in the central nervous system, secondarily to peripheral hearing loss. This mechanism is unlikely in cases of tinnitus in the presence of normal audiometric sensitivity. There is the possibility that hearing loss above 10 kHz can play a role in tinnitus, an association not thoroughly explored. Somatomotor stimulation influencing the quality of tinnitus has been reported, as have interconnections of the auditory and somatosensory systems. There would appear to be an evolutionary advantage of linking the sensorimotor organization of the external ear and the auditory function of the brainstem in sound localization. Thus, stimulation of the pinna and post auricular area may be a means of suppressing tinnitus. To that end a thin aluminum ceramic bimorph was constructed to fit on the inner surface of the pinna. When driven by low (<100 Hz) and high (>10 kHz) frequencies multiplied by MHz carriers, demodulation in the skin resulted in vibrotactile stimulation. Tactile stimulation was an adjunct to the high frequencies resulting in a multimodal suppressive effect in a small pilot study.

  14. A high-performance multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer and isobar separator for the research with exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Becker, A.; Czok, U.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Kinsel, W.; Petrick, M.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, A.; Yavor, M. I.

    2015-03-01

    A novel multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) and isobar separator for the research with exotic nuclides at low-energy rare isotope beam facilities has been developed, commissioned and characterized. It can be used (i) as broadband mass spectrometer with medium resolution, (ii) as highly accurate mass spectrometer for direct mass measurements and (iii) as high-resolution mass separator. The device features a worldwide unique combination of performance characteristics: a mass resolving power of 600,000 (FWHM), a mass measurement accuracy of ~10-7, large ion capacities in excess of 106 ions per second, a transmission efficiency of up to 70%, single-ion sensitivity, and cycle frequencies of up to 400 Hz have been achieved. The spatial separation of close-lying isobars with an intensity ratio of 200:1 and a binding energy difference as small as 4 MeV has been demonstrated. The MR-TOF-MS is ideally suited for experiments with rare and very short-lived nuclei at present and future in-flight, ISOL or IGISOL facilities, such as the FRS Ion-Catcher and SHIP/SHIPTRAP at GSI, TITAN at TRIUMF, IGISOL at the University of Jyväskylä and the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS at FAIR.

  15. Custom 4-Plex DiLeu Isobaric Labels Enable Relative Quantification of Urinary Proteins in Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS)

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Hao, Ling; Nechyporenko, Anatoliy; Lee, Sanghee; Vezina, Chad M.; Ricke, Will A.; Marker, Paul C.; Bjorling, Dale E.; Bushman, Wade; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    The relative quantification of proteins using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has allowed researchers to compile lists of potential disease markers. These complex quantitative workflows often include isobaric labeling of enzymatically-produced peptides to analyze their relative abundances across multiple samples in a single LC-MS run. Recent efforts by our lab have provided scientists with cost-effective alternatives to expensive commercial labels. Although the quantitative performance of these dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) labels has been reported using known ratios of complex protein and peptide standards, their potential in large-scale proteomics studies using a clinically relevant system has never been investigated. Our work rectifies this oversight by implementing 4-plex DiLeu to quantify proteins in the urine of aging human males who suffer from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Protein abundances in 25 LUTS and 15 control patients were compared, revealing that of the 836 proteins quantified, 50 were found to be differentially expressed (>20% change) and statistically significant (p-value <0.05). Gene ontology (GO) analysis of the differentiated proteins showed that many were involved in inflammatory responses and implicated in fibrosis. While confirmation of individual protein abundance changes would be required to verify protein expression, this study represents the first report using the custom isobaric label, 4-plex DiLeu, to quantify protein abundances in a clinically relevant system. PMID:26267142

  16. Excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in deuteron charge exchange on hydrogen at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.3 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Barsov, S.; Carbonell, J.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Engels, R.; Gebel, R.; Glagolev, V.; Grigoryev, K.; Goslawski, P.; Hartmann, M.; Imambekov, O.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Komarov, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Macharashvili, G.; Maier, R.; Merzliakov, S.; Mielke, M.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Papenbrock, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Seyfarth, H.; Stein, H. J.; Steffens, E.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Trusov, S.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.

    2013-10-01

    The charge-exchange break-up of polarised deuterons d→p→{pp}sn, where the final {pp}s diproton system has a very low excitation energy and hence is mainly in the S01 state, is a powerful tool to probe the spin-flip terms in the proton-neutron charge-exchange scattering. Recent measurements with the ANKE spectrometer at the COSY storage ring at 1.6, 1.8, and 2.27 GeV have extended these studies into the pion-production regime in order to investigate the mechanism for the excitation of the Δ(1232) isobar in the d→p→{pp}sX reaction. Values of the differential cross section and two deuteron tensor analysing powers, Axx and Ayy, have been extracted as functions of the momentum transfer to the diproton or the invariant mass MX of the unobserved system X. The unpolarised cross section in the high MX region is well described in a model that includes only direct excitation of the Δ isobar through undistorted one pion exchange. However, the cross section is grossly underestimated for low MX, even when Δ excitation in the projectile deuteron is included in the calculation. Furthermore, direct Δ production through one pion exchange only reproduces the angular dependence of the difference between the two tensor analysing powers.

  17. Microstructural Response During Isothermal and Isobaric Loading of a Precipitation-Strengthened Ni-29.7Ti-20Hf High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2012-12-01

    A stable Ni-rich Ni-29.7Ti-20Hf (at. pct) shape memory alloy, with relatively high transformation temperatures, was shown to exhibit promising properties at lower raw material cost when compared to typical NiTi-X (X = Pt, Pd, Au) high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs). The excellent dimensional stability and high work output for this alloy were attributed to a coherent, nanometer size precipitate phase observed using transmission electron microscopy. To establish an understanding of the role of these precipitates on the microstructure and ensuing stability of the NiTiHf alloy, a detailed study of the micromechanical and microstructural behaviors was performed. In-situ neutron diffraction at stress and temperature was used to obtain quantitative information on phase-specific internal strain, texture, and phase volume fractions during both isothermal and isobaric testing of the alloy. During isothermal testing, the alloy exhibited low isothermal strains due to limited detwinning, consistent with direct measurements of the bulk texture through neutron diffraction. This limited detwinning was attributed to the pinning of twin and variant boundaries by the dispersion of fine precipitates. During isobaric thermal cycling at 400 MPa, the high work output and near-perfect dimensional stability was attributed to the presence of the precipitates that act as homogeneous sources for the nucleation of martensite throughout the material, while providing resistance to irrecoverable processes such as plastic deformation.

  18. Suppression of flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An active aerodynamic control system to control flutter over a large range of oscillatory frequencies is described. The system is not affected by mass, stiffness, elastic axis, or center of gravity location of the system, mode of vibration, or Mach number. The system consists of one or more pairs of leading edge and trailing edge hinged or deformable control surfaces, each pair operated in concert by a stability augmentation system. Torsion and bending motions are sensed and converted by the stability augmentation system into leading and trailing edge control surface deflections which produce lift forces and pitching moments to suppress flutter.

  19. Relationships between thought suppression and symptoms of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Shannon E; Baer, Ruth A

    2009-02-01

    The current study examined relationships among childhood emotional vulnerability, an invalidating childhood environment, thought suppression, and symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Emotional vulnerability and an invalidating childhood environment are described by Linehan (1993) as important biosocial precursors to the development of BPD. Using a student sample selected to have a wide range of BPD symptoms, we examined whether thought suppression mediates the relationship between these biosocial precursors and symptoms of BPD. Results supported the hypothesis that thought suppression fully mediates the relationship between invalidating environment and BPD symptoms. Mixed support was found for the hypothesis that thought suppression mediates the relationship between emotional vulnerability and BPD symptoms. We also examined whether fear of emotions mediates the relationship between the biosocial precursors and thought suppression. Results supported this hypothesis, and also suggested that fear of emotion contributes independently to mediating the relationship between biosocial precursors and BPD symptoms. PMID:19267661

  20. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Tissue Samples by Combining iTRAQ Isobaric Labeling with Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics is an indispensible technique used in the discovery and quantification of phosphorylation events on proteins in biological samples. The application of this technique to tissue samples is especially useful for the discovery of biomarkers as well as biological studies. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM/MRM-based quantitation to develop a strategy for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers using tissue samples. PMID:26584920

  2. Sustained and selective suppression of intestinal cholesterol synthesis by Ro 48-8071, an inhibitor of 2,3-oxidosqualene:lanosterol cyclase, in the BALB/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Valasek, Mark A; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Repa, Joyce J; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-04-01

    The small intestine plays a fundamentally important role in regulating whole body cholesterol balance and plasma lipoprotein composition. This is articulated through the interplay of a constellation of genes that ultimately determines the net amount of chylomicron cholesterol delivered to the liver. Major advances in our insights into regulation of the cholesterol absorption pathway have been made using genetically manipulated mouse models and agents such as ezetimibe. One unresolved question is how a sustained pharmacological inhibition of intestinal cholesterol synthesis in vivo may affect cholesterol handling by the absorptive cells. Here we show that the lanosterol cyclase inhibitor, Ro 48-8071, when fed to BALB/c mice in a chow diet (20 mg/day/kg body weight), leads to a rapid and sustained inhibition (>50%) of cholesterol synthesis in the whole small intestine. Sterol synthesis was also reduced in the large intestine and stomach. In contrast, hepatic cholesterol synthesis, while markedly suppressed initially, rebounded to higher than baseline rates within 7 days. Whole body cholesterol synthesis, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretion were not consistently changed with Ro 48-8071 treatment. There were no discernible effects of this agent on intestinal histology as determined by H&E staining and the level of Ki67, an index of proliferation. The mRNA expression for multiple genes involved in intestinal cholesterol regulation including NPC1L1 was mostly unchanged although there was a marked rise in the mRNA level for the PXR target genes CYP3A11 and CES2A. PMID:24486573

  3. Sustained and Selective Suppression of Intestinal Cholesterol Synthesis by Ro 48-8071, an Inhibitor of 2,3-Oxidosqualene:Lanosterol Cyclase, in the BALB/c Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Valasek, Mark A.; Lopez, Adam M.; Posey, Kenneth S.; Repa, Joyce J.; Turley, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine plays a fundamentally important role in regulating whole body cholesterol balance and plasma lipoprotein composition. This is articulated through the interplay of a constellation of genes that ultimately determines the net amount of chylomicron cholesterol delivered to the liver. Major advances in our insights into regulation of the cholesterol absorption pathway have been made using genetically manipulated mouse models and agents such as ezetimibe. One unresolved question is how a sustained pharmacological inhibition of intestinal cholesterol synthesis in vivo may affect cholesterol handling by the absorptive cells. Here we show that the lanosterolcyclase inhibitor, Ro 48-8071, when fed to BALB/c mice in a chow diet (20 mg/day/kg body weight), leads to a rapid and sustained inhibition (>50%) of cholesterol synthesis in the whole small intestine. Sterol synthesis was also reduced in the large intestine and stomach. In contrast, hepatic cholesterol synthesis, while markedly suppressed initially, rebounded to higher than baseline rates within 7 days. Whole body cholesterol synthesis, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretion were not consistently changed with Ro 48-8071 treatment. There were no discernible effects of this agent on intestinal histology as determined by H&E staining and the level of Ki67, an index of proliferation. The mRNA expression for multiple genes involved in intestinal cholesterol regulation including NPC1L1 was mostly unchanged although there was a marked rise in the mRNA level for the PXR target genes CYP3A11 and CES2A. PMID:24486573

  4. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  5. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  6. Interference suppression of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V P

    2011-01-24

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1){pi} (n=0, {+-}1, {+-}2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  7. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  8. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: The lowest energy states in 9He via their T = 5/2 isobaric analogs in 9Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uberseder, E.; Rogachev, G. V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Koshchiy, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Alcorta, M.; Chubarian, G.; Davids, B.; Fu, C.; Hooker, J.; Jayatissa, H.; Melconian, D.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-03-01

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound 9He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy 9He states exist with spins Jπ = 1 /2+ and Jπ = 1 /2- and widths on the order of 100-200 keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the 8He+n system, performed via a search for the T = 5 / 2 isobaric analog states in 9Li populated through 8He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad Jπ = 1 /2+ state in 9He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

  9. Solvation and Ion Pair Association in Aqueous Metal Sulfates: Interpretation of NDIS raw data by isobaric-isothermal molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Simonson, J Michael {Mike}

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the solvation behavior of aqueous lithium, nickel, and ytterbium sulfates at ambient conditions in terms of the relevant radial distributions functions and the corresponding first-order difference of the sulfur-site neutronweighted distribution functions generated by isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics simulation. We determined of the partial contributions to the neutronweighted distribution functions, to identify the main peaks, and the effect of the contact ion-pair configuration on the resulting H ! S coordination number. Finally, we assessed the extent of the ion-pair formation according to Poirier- DeLap formalism and highlighted the significant increase of the ion-pair association exhibited by these salts with cation charge.

  10. Isobaric-Isothermal Molecular Dynamics Utilizing Density Functional Theory: An Assessment of the Structure and Density of Water at Near-Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J; VandeVondele, J; Kuo, I W; Sebastiani, D; Siepmann, J I; Hutter, J; Mundy, C J

    2009-03-06

    We present herein a comprehensive density functional theory study toward assessing the accuracy of two popular gradient-corrected exchange correlation functionals on the structure and density of liquid water at near ambient conditions in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble. Our results indicate that both PBE and BLYP functionals under predict the density and over structure the liquid. Adding the dispersion correction due to Grimme(1, 2) improves the predicted densities for both BLYP and PBE in a significant manner. Moreover, the addition of the dispersion correction for BLYP yields an oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function in excellent agreement with experiment. Thus, we conclude that one can obtain a very satisfactory model for water using BLYP and a correction for dispersion.

  11. Nematic-smectic-A phase boundary of ideally oriented Gay-Berne system: local density functional versus isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Józefowicz, W; Cholewiak, G; Longa, L

    2005-03-01

    The main focus of the present paper is on studying the nematic-smectic- A phase boundary of an ideally oriented Gay-Berne system. The phase diagram is determined by means of an isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo simulation. The results are compared with predictions of the local density functional expanded up to second and third order in the one-particle distribution function. It is shown that generally the second-order expansion does not give satisfactory predictions for smectics. Going beyond the leading order yields good quantitative agreement at moderate densities. With increasing density the relative error of the local density functional calculations increases, but usually does not exceed 10% in densities. We conclude that the density functional approach could be competitive to time-consuming simulations in determining phase diagrams of spatially and orientationally ordered liquid crystalline structures. PMID:15903474

  12. Nematic-smectic- A phase boundary of ideally oriented Gay-Berne system: Local density functional versus isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefowicz, W.; Cholewiak, G.; Longa, L.

    2005-03-01

    The main focus of the present paper is on studying the nematic-smectic- A phase boundary of an ideally oriented Gay-Berne system. The phase diagram is determined by means of an isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo simulation. The results are compared with predictions of the local density functional expanded up to second and third order in the one-particle distribution function. It is shown that generally the second-order expansion does not give satisfactory predictions for smectics. Going beyond the leading order yields good quantitative agreement at moderate densities. With increasing density the relative error of the local density functional calculations increases, but usually does not exceed 10% in densities. We conclude that the density functional approach could be competitive to time-consuming simulations in determining phase diagrams of spatially and orientationally ordered liquid crystalline structures.

  13. Formation of garnet + corundum during isobaric cooling at UHT conditions: an example from pelitic granulites of the Highland Complex, Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laksthitha Dharmapriya, Prasanna; Galli, Andrea; Prabath Malaviarachchi, Sanjeeva; Su, Ben-Xun

    2014-05-01

    prograde history. Further heating induced a series of biotite-melting reactions which progressively consumed biotite and quartz from the rock matrix and produced garnet-porphyroblasts and spinel. Textural observations coupled with both pseudosections calculated in the CNKFMASHTMnO system and Ti-in-garnet geothermobarometry suggest that peak metamorphic temperature occurred at UHT conditions of 950-975 0C and pressures of 9-9.5 kbar. Peak T was followed by a period of isobaric cooling responsible for the formation of corundum and Grt2 via the reaction Spl + Sil = Grt2 + Crn at around 930 °C, as well as exsolution of rutile needles and apatite rods from Grt1. Modelling of the mode of spinel, sillimanite, corundum and garnet confirms that along an isobaric cooling path at about 920-930 °C and 9-9.5 kbar corundum appears and spinel contemporaneously disappears. At the same PT conditions, our model predicts a decrease of sillimanite and an increase of garnet content. Further isobaric cooling produced a second generation of biotite at the rim of large Grt1-porphyroblasts at ca. 800 °C. Therefore, the investigated granulites provide a rare but meaningful example where garnet + corundum formed along a retrograde metamorphic trajectory under UHT conditions, forcing to consider isobaric cooling at the base of the crust as an alternative process to explain the formation of coexisting garnet + corundum, especially if the studied rock lacks of cordierite or orthopyroxene.

  14. Compton suppression through rise-time analysis.

    PubMed

    Selvi, S; Celiktas, C

    2007-11-01

    We studied Compton suppression for 60Co and 137Cs radioisotopes using a signal selection criterion based on contrasting the fall time of the signals composing the photo peak with those composing the Compton continuum. The fall time criterion is employed by using the pulse shape analysis observing the change in the fall times of the gamma-ray pulses. This change is determined by measuring the changes in the rise times related to the fall time of the scintillator and the timing signals related to the fall time of the input signals. We showed that Compton continuum suppression is achieved best via the precise timing adjustment of an analog rise-time analyzer connected to a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. PMID:17703943

  15. Sulfonium Ion Derivatization, Isobaric Stable Isotope Labeling and Data Dependent CID- and ETD-MS/MS for Enhanced Phosphopeptide Quantitation, Identification and Phosphorylation Site Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yali; Zhou, Xiao; Stemmer, Paul M.; Reid, Gavin E.

    2012-04-01

    An amine specific peptide derivatization strategy involving the use of novel isobaric stable isotope encoded `fixed charge' sulfonium ion reagents, coupled with an analysis strategy employing capillary HPLC, ESI-MS, and automated data dependent ion trap CID-MS/MS, -MS3, and/or ETD-MS/MS, has been developed for the improved quantitative analysis of protein phosphorylation, and for identification and characterization of their site(s) of modification. Derivatization of 50 synthetic phosphopeptides with S, S'-dimethylthiobutanoylhydroxysuccinimide ester iodide (DMBNHS), followed by analysis using capillary HPLC-ESI-MS, yielded an average 2.5-fold increase in ionization efficiencies and a significant increase in the presence and/or abundance of higher charge state precursor ions compared to the non-derivatized phosphopeptides. Notably, 44% of the phosphopeptides (22 of 50) in their underivatized states yielded precursor ions whose maximum charge states corresponded to +2, while only 8% (4 of 50) remained at this maximum charge state following DMBNHS derivatization. Quantitative analysis was achieved by measuring the abundances of the diagnostic product ions corresponding to the neutral losses of `light' (S(CH3)2) and `heavy' (S(CD3)2) dimethylsulfide exclusively formed upon CID-MS/MS of isobaric stable isotope labeled forms of the DMBNHS derivatized phosphopeptides. Under these conditions, the phosphate group stayed intact. Access for a greater number of peptides to provide enhanced phosphopeptide sequence identification and phosphorylation site characterization was achieved via automated data-dependent CID-MS3 or ETD-MS/MS analysis due to the formation of the higher charge state precursor ions. Importantly, improved sequence coverage was observed using ETD-MS/MS following introduction of the sulfonium ion fixed charge, but with no detrimental effects on ETD fragmentation efficiency.

  16. Group VIA Phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β) Modulates Bcl-x 5'-Splice Site Selection and Suppresses Anti-apoptotic Bcl-x(L) in β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Suzanne E; Nguyen, Phuong T; Park, Margaret; Emani, Bhargavi; Lei, Xiaoyong; Kambalapalli, Mamatha; Shultz, Jacqueline C; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan; Chalfant, Charles E; Ramanadham, Sasanka

    2015-04-24

    Diabetes is a consequence of reduced β-cell function and mass, due to β-cell apoptosis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is induced during β-cell apoptosis due to various stimuli, and our work indicates that group VIA phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β) participates in this process. Delineation of underlying mechanism(s) reveals that ER stress reduces the anti-apoptotic Bcl-x(L) protein in INS-1 cells. The Bcl-x pre-mRNA undergoes alternative pre-mRNA splicing to generate Bcl-x(L) or Bcl-x(S) mature mRNA. We show that both thapsigargin-induced and spontaneous ER stress are associated with reductions in the ratio of Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(S) mRNA in INS-1 and islet β-cells. However, chemical inactivation or knockdown of iPLA2β augments the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(S) ratio. Furthermore, the ratio is lower in islets from islet-specific RIP-iPLA2β transgenic mice, whereas islets from global iPLA2β(-/-) mice exhibit the opposite phenotype. In view of our earlier reports that iPLA2β induces ceramide accumulation through neutral sphingomyelinase 2 and that ceramides shift the Bcl-x 5'-splice site (5'SS) selection in favor of Bcl-x(S), we investigated the potential link between Bcl-x splicing and the iPLA2β/ceramide axis. Exogenous C6-ceramide did not alter Bcl-x 5'SS selection in INS-1 cells, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2 inactivation only partially prevented the ER stress-induced shift in Bcl-x splicing. In contrast, 5(S)-hydroxytetraenoic acid augmented the ratio of Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(S) by 15.5-fold. Taken together, these data indicate that β-cell apoptosis is, in part, attributable to the modulation of 5'SS selection in the Bcl-x pre-mRNA by bioactive lipids modulated by iPLA2β. PMID:25762722

  17. Suppression of Drug Resistance in Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Roberto; Nagamine, Claude M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is a major human pathogen responsible for 400 million infections yearly. As with other RNA viruses, daunting challenges to antiviral design exist due to the high error rates of RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Indeed, treatment of dengue virus infection with a nucleoside analog resulted in the expected genetic selection of resistant viruses in tissue culture and in mice. However, when the function of the oligomeric core protein was inhibited, no detectable selection of drug resistance in tissue culture or in mice was detected, despite the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population. Suppressed selection of drug-resistant virus correlated with cooligomerization of the targeted drug-susceptible and drug-resistant core proteins. The concept of “dominant drug targets,” in which inhibition of oligomeric viral assemblages leads to the formation of drug-susceptible chimeras, can therefore be used to prevent the outgrowth of drug resistance during dengue virus infection. PMID:26670386

  18. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  19. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  20. Nonanesthetics can suppress learning.

    PubMed

    Kandel, L; Chortkoff, B S; Sonner, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I

    1996-02-01

    Nonanesthetic gases or vapors do not abolish movement in response to noxious stimuli despite partial pressures and affinities for lipids that would, according to the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, predict such abolition. We investigated whether nonanesthetics depress learning and memory (i.e., provide amnesia). To define learning, we used a "fear-potentiated startle paradigm": rats trained to associate light with a noxious stimulus (footshock) will startle more, as measured by an accelerometer, when a startle-eliciting stimulus (e.g., a noise) is paired with light than when the startle-eliciting stimulus is presented alone. We imposed light-shock pairings on 98 rats under three conditions: no anesthesia (control); 0.20, 0.29, and 0.38 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) of desflurane; or two nonanesthetics (1,2-dichloroperfluorocyclobutane and perfluoropentane) at partial pressures predicted from their lipid solubilities to be between 0.2 and 1 MAC. Desflurane produced a dose-related depression of learning with abolition of learning at 0.28 MAC. Perfluoropentane at 0.2-predicted MAC had the same effect as 0.28 MAC desflurane. 1,2-Dichloroperfluorocyclobutane at 0.5- to 1-predicted MAC abolished learning. Because nonanesthetics suppress learning but not movement (the two critical components of anesthesia), they may prove useful in discriminating between mechanisms and sites of action of anesthetics. PMID:8561335

  1. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  2. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Justin C; Henson, Richard N; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  3. Sound can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Ide, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio-visual interactions. However, direct behavioral evidence regarding the audio-visual perceptual suppression effect has not been reported in a study with humans. Here, we investigated whether sound could have a suppressive effect on visual perception. We found that white noise bursts presented through headphones degraded visual orientation discrimination performance. This auditory suppression effect on visual perception frequently occurred when these inputs were presented in a spatially and temporally consistent manner. These results indicate that the perceptual suppression effect could occur across auditory and visual modalities based on close and direct neural interactions among those sensory inputs. PMID:26023877

  4. NASA Instep/mdmsc Jitter Suppression Experiment (JITTER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Edward V.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are the following: (1) to develop and demonstrate in-space performance of both passive and active damping systems for suppression of micro-amplitude vibration on an actual application structure and operate despite uncertain dynamics and uncertain disturbance characteristics; and (2) to correlate ground and in-space performance - the performance metric is vibration attenuation. The goals are to achieve vibration suppression equivalent to 5 percent passive damping in selected models and 15 percent active damping in selected modes. Various aspects of this experiment are presented in viewgraph form.

  5. Suppression of Subthalamic Nucleus Activity by Micromagnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Fried, Shelley I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation delivered via 0.5-mm diameter coils was recently shown to activate retinal neurons; the small coil size raises the possibility that micromagnetic stimulation (μMS) could underlie a new generation of implanted neural prosthetics. Such an approach has several inherent advantages over conventional electric stimulation, including the potential for selective activation of neuronal targets as well as less susceptibility to inflamma-tory responses. The viability of μMS for some applications, e.g., deep brain stimulation (DBS), may require suppression (rather than creation) of neuronal activity, however, and therefore we explore here whether (μMS) could, in fact, suppress activity. While single pulses elicited weak and inconsistent spiking in neurons of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (in vitro), repetitive stimulation effectively suppressed activity in ~70% of targeted neurons. This is the same percentage suppressed by conventional electric stimulation; with both modalities, suppression occurred only after an initial increase in spiking. The latency to the onset of suppression was inversely correlated to the energy of the stimulus waveform: larger amplitudes and lower frequencies had the fastest onset of suppression. These findings continue to support the viability of μMS as a next-generation implantable neural prosthetic. PMID:25163063

  6. High-precision buffer circuit for suppression of regenerative oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Hare, David A.; Tcheng, Ping

    1995-01-01

    Precision analog signal conditioning electronics have been developed for wind tunnel model attitude inertial sensors. This application requires low-noise, stable, microvolt-level DC performance and a high-precision buffered output. Capacitive loading of the operational amplifier output stages due to the wind tunnel analog signal distribution facilities caused regenerative oscillation and consequent rectification bias errors. Oscillation suppression techniques commonly used in audio applications were inadequate to maintain the performance requirements for the measurement of attitude for wind tunnel models. Feedback control theory is applied to develop a suppression technique based on a known compensation (snubber) circuit, which provides superior oscillation suppression with high output isolation and preserves the low-noise low-offset performance of the signal conditioning electronics. A practical design technique is developed to select the parameters for the compensation circuit to suppress regenerative oscillation occurring when typical shielded cable loads are driven.

  7. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-11-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. PMID:26116698

  8. Isobaric heating and cooling path of the lower crust of a Variscan exotic unit: evidences from P -T estimates in NW Iberian metapelitic granulites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alampi, A.; Gomez Barreiro, J.; Alvarez Valero, A.; Castiñeiras, P.

    2012-12-01

    Allochthonous complexes (AC) in NW Iberia consist of a pile of exotic units characterized by distinct tectonothermal evolution and lithological association, and separated from each other by tectonic contacts, either thrust or extensional detachments. In the Órdenes AC, three groups of units are recognized from bottom to top in the pile: Basal, Ophiolitic and Upper units. Upper units comprise an ensemble of arc-related rocks with a lower section that underwent a high-P and high-T (HP-HT) evolution, and an upper section with an intermediate - pressure (IP) evolution. Extensional detachments have been commonly identifying at the boundary between HP-HT and IP Upper units, like the Fornás and Corredoiras detachments. Pelitic granulites from one IP upper unit, the O Pino unit, have been investigated. Petrologic studies reveal an isobaric tectono-metamorphic crustal evolution throughout a multidisciplinary integration of: (i) detailed microstructural analysis; (ii) EMP mineral chemistry; (iii) mass-balance of the key and representative chemical reactions observed in the microstructures and subsequent interpretation of the reaction sequence; (iv) P-T estimates and paths from phase diagram modeling. Results in the NCKFMASHT system describe an isobaric (c. 7 kbar) continuous heating (and later cooling) evolution ranging from c. 620 to 680 C crossing into the melt-bearing stability fields. These achieved anatectic conditions are evidenced by the presence of both leucosomes (quartz, plagioclase and muscovite) and glass inclusions, mainly in local garnet cores through the dehydration/melting reactions of muscovite first and biotite later. Chemically distinct generations of garnet and plagioclase are evident and stoichiometrically balance each other in continuous reactions. They are consistent with the observations of both a garnet overgrowth and large patches of plagioclase which host euhedral, smaller garnets. In the cooling episode, the newly-grown garnet reacted with melt

  9. Non-spin-flip ( 3He, t) charge-exchange and isobaric analog states of actinide nuclei studied at θ = 0°, E( 3He) = 76 MeV and 200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jänecke, J.; Becchetti, F. D.; van den Berg, A. M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Brouwer, G.; Greenfield, M. B.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hofstee, M. A.; Nadasen, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Sawafta, R.; Schippers, J. M.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stewart, D. P.; van der Werf, S. Y.

    1991-04-01

    The ( 3He, t) charge-exchange reaction has been studied at θ = 0° and bombarding energies of E( 3He) = 76.5 MeV and 200 MeV. Spectra were measured using magnetic analysis for target nuclei of 12, 13C, 16O, 19F, 28, 29, 30Si, 90Zr, 117, 120Sn, natTa, natW, 197Au, 208Pb, 230, 232Th, 234, 236, 238U and 244Pu. The measurements at 76.5 MeV concentrated on the isobaric analog states of several actinide nuclei, particularly on their widths and the branching ratios for proton decay. Cross sections, Q-values and total widths were determined for the transitions to the isobaric analog states. Coulomb displacement energies derived from the measured Q-values display the influence of deformed nuclear shapes. Escape widths Γ ↑ and spreading widths Γ ↓ of the isobaric analog states in five actinide nuclei were deduced from the measured proton-decay branching ratios. They were found to be in agreement with predictions which postulate isospin mixing via the Coulomb force with the ( T0-1)-component of the isovector giant monopole resonance. The measurements at 200 MeV were concerned with transitions to isobaric analog states in both light and heavy nuclei, including several actinide nuclei, but Gamow-Teller resonances and transitions to numerous other states were also observed. The measured cross sections for several transitions to isobaric analog states from 30Si to 208Pb were used to extract the effective interaction Vτ for non-spin-flip ( 3He, t) charge exchange at E( 3He) ≈ 200 MeV. The interaction strength Vτ decreases by a factor 0.6 when compared to previously measured values for the energy range E( 3He) = 65 to 90 MeV. An angular distribution from θτ = 0° to 16° for the transition to the isobaric analog state in 120Sb measured at E( 3He) = 200 MeV was found to be in very good agreement with microscopic calculations.

  10. Suppressive drug interactions between antifungals.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Marjon G J; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2014-04-24

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Cokol and colleagues report a systematic study of drug interactions between antifungal compounds. Suppressive drug interactions occur more frequently than previously realized and come in different flavors with interesting implications. PMID:24766845

  11. Suppression of phase synchronisation in network based on cat's brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameu, Ewandson L.; Borges, Fernando S.; Borges, Rafael R.; Iarosz, Kelly C.; Caldas, Iberê L.; Batista, Antonio M.; Viana, Ricardo L.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the effects of perturbations on the cat's cerebral cortex. According to the literature, this cortex structure can be described by a clustered network. This way, we construct a clustered network with the same number of areas as in the cat matrix, where each area is described as a sub-network with a small-world property. We focus on the suppression of neuronal phase synchronisation considering different kinds of perturbations. Among the various controlling interventions, we choose three methods: delayed feedback control, external time-periodic driving, and activation of selected neurons. We simulate these interventions to provide a procedure to suppress undesired and pathological abnormal rhythms that can be associated with many forms of synchronisation. In our simulations, we have verified that the efficiency of synchronisation suppression by delayed feedback control is higher than external time-periodic driving and activation of selected neurons of the cat's cerebral cortex with the same coupling strengths.

  12. NMR solvent peak suppression by nonlinear excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1988-03-01

    Most existing NMR solvent peak suppression sequences provide a satisfactory dependence of the intensity of excited signals on frequency but poor phase characteristics. In practice this leads to spectral distortions which generally become more severe as the frequency selectivity of the sequence is increased. However, it is shown that by working well outside the linear response regime, excitation schemes which combine high frequency selectivity with good phase properties may be devised. Sequences of six rectangular radio-frequency pulses were discovered using a combination of coherent averaging theory to treat the near-resonant behavior and numerical simulation further from resonance. Extensive use of symmetry greatly simplifies both the coherent averaging calculations and the numerical simulations. The new pulse sequences have been given the acronym NERO (nonlinear excitation rejecting on-resonance). Experimental spectra of an enzyme in dilute aqueous solution are shown.

  13. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  14. First and Second-Phase Transitions of Gases at Isobaric Process; Lennard-Jones (9,6) Gases with a Hard Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Akira

    2014-12-01

    The thermodynamic functions for Lennard-Jones (9,6) gases with a hard core that are evaluated till the third virial coefficients, are investigated at an isobaric process. Some thermodynamic functions are analytically expressed as functions of intensive variables, temperature, and pressure. Some thermodynamic quantities for carbon dioxide are calculated numerically and drawn graphically. In critical states, the heat capacity diverges to infinity at the critical point while the Gibbs free energy, volume, enthalpy, and entropy are continuous at the critical point. In the coexistence of two phases, the boiling temperatures and the enthalpy changes of vaporization are obtained by numerical calculations for 20 substances. The Gibbs free energy indicates a polygonal line; entropy, volume, and enthalpy jump from the liquid to gaseous phase at the boiling point. The heat capacity does not diverge to infinity but shows a finite discrepancy at boiling point. This suggests that a first-order phase transition at the boiling point and a second-order phase transition may occur at the critical point.

  15. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line. The lowest energy states in 9He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in 9Li

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberseder, E.; Rogachev, G. V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Koshchiy, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Alcorta, M.; Chubarian, G.; Davids, B.; Fu, C.; Hooker, J.; et al

    2016-03-01

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound 9He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy 9He states exist with spins Jπ=1/2+and Jπ=1/2-and widths on the order of 100–200 keV. These find-ings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. Our present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the 8He+n system, performed via a search for the T =5/2 isobaric analog states in 9Li populated through 8He+p elastic scattering. Moreover, themore » present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad Jπ=1/2+state in 9He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.« less

  16. Chemical properties of colliding sources in 124, 136Xe and 112, 124Sn induced collisions in isobaric yield ratio difference and isoscaling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan-Li; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2013-12-01

    Isoscaling and isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) methods are used to study Δμ/T (Δμ being the difference between the chemical potentials of the neutron and proton, and T being the temperature) in the measured 1 A GeV 124Sn + 124Sn, 112Sn + 112Sn, 136Xe + Pb and 124Xe + Pb reactions. The isoscaling phenomena in the 124Sn/112Sn and 136Xe/124Xe reaction pairs are investigated, and the isoscaling parameters α and β are obtained. The Δμ/T determined by the isoscaling method (IS-Δμ/T) and the IBD method (IB-Δμ/T) in the measured Sn and Xe reactions are compared. It is shown that in most fragments, the IS- and IB-Δμ/T are consistent in the Xe reactions, while the IS- and IB-Δμ/T ones are only similar in the less neutron-rich fragments in the Sn reactions. The shell effects in IB-Δμ/T are also discussed.

  17. Ambient isobaric heat capacities, C(p,m), for ionic solids and liquids: an application of volume-based thermodynamics (VBT).

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2011-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties, such as standard entropy, among others, have been shown to correlate well with formula volume, V(m), thus permitting prediction of these properties on the basis of chemical formula and density alone, with no structural detail required. We have termed these procedures "volume-based thermodynamics" (VBT). We here extend these studies to ambient isobaric heat capacities, C(p,m), of a wide range of materials. We show that heat capacity is strongly linearly correlated with formula volume for large sets of minerals, for ionic solids in general, and for ionic liquids and that the results demonstrate that the Neumann-Kopp rule (additivity of heat capacity contributions per atom) is widely valid for ionic materials, but the smaller heat capacity contribution per unit volume for ionic liquids is noted and discussed. Using these correlations, it is possible to predict values of ambient (298 K) heat capacities quite simply. We also show that the heat capacity contribution of water molecules of crystallization is remarkably constant, at 41.3 ± 4.7 J K(-1) (mol of water)(-1), so that the heat capacities of various hydrates may be reliably estimated from the values of their chemical formula neighbors. This result complements similar observations that we have reported for other thermodynamic differences of hydrates. PMID:21812409

  18. Global Metabolomic and Isobaric Tagging Capillary Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry Approaches for Uncovering Pathway Dysfunction in Diabetic Mouse Aorta

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of diabetes and the global health risks it poses, the biochemical pathogenesis of diabetic complications remains poorly understood with few effective therapies. This study employs capillary liquid chromatography (capLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in conjunction with both global metabolomics and isobaric tags specific to amines and carbonyls to probe aortic metabolic content in diabetic mice with hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and stenotic vascular damage. Using these combined techniques, metabolites well-characterized in diabetes as well as novel pathways were investigated. A total of 53 986 features were detected, 719 compounds were identified as having significant fold changes (thresholds ≥2 or ≤0.5), and 48 metabolic pathways were found to be altered with at least 2 metabolite hits in diabetic samples. Pathways related to carbonyl stress, carbohydrate metabolism, and amino acid metabolism showed the greatest number of metabolite changes. Three novel pathways with previously limited or undescribed roles in diabetic complications—vitamin B6, propanoate, and butanoate metabolism—were also shown to be altered in multiple points along the pathway. These discoveries support the theory that diabetic vascular complications arise from the interplay of a myriad of metabolic pathways in conjunction with oxidative and carbonyl stress, which may provide not only new and much needed biomarkers but also insights into novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25368974

  19. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A technique for suppressing sublimation of key elements from skutterudite compounds in advanced thermoelectric devices has been demonstrated. The essence of the technique is to cover what would otherwise be the exposed skutterudite surface of such a device with a thin, continuous film of a chemically and physically compatible metal. Although similar to other sublimation-suppression techniques, this technique has been specifically tailored for application to skutterudite antimonides. The primary cause of deterioration of most thermoelectric materials is thermal decomposition or sublimation - one or more elements sublime from the hot side of a thermoelectric couple, changing the stoichiometry of the device. Examples of elements that sublime from their respective thermoelectric materials are Ge from SiGe, Te from Pb/Te, and now Sb from skutterudite antimonides. The skutterudite antimonides of primary interest are CoSb3 [electron-donor (n) type] and CeFe(3-x)Co(x)Sb12 [electron-acceptor (p) type]. When these compounds are subjected to typical operating conditions [temperature of 700 C and pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa)], Sb sublimes from their surfaces, with the result that Sb depletion layers form and advance toward their interiors. As the depletion layer advances in a given device, the change in stoichiometry diminishes the thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of the device. The problem, then, is to prevent sublimation, or at least reduce it to an acceptably low level. In preparation for an experiment on suppression of sublimation, a specimen of CoSb3 was tightly wrapped in a foil of niobium, which was selected for its chemical stability. In the experiment, the wrapped specimen was heated to a temperature of 700 C in a vacuum of residual pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa), then cooled and sectioned. Examination of the sectioned specimen revealed that no depletion layer had formed, indicating the niobium foil prevented sublimation of antimony at 700 C

  20. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  1. The amphetamine appetite suppressant saga.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    (1) In 1999, all amphetamine derivatives still sold in France as appetite suppressants were withdrawn from the market because of serious cardiovascular adverse effects. Sibutramine, marketed in France since 2001, is closely related to this group of drugs. (2) The adverse effects shared by these drugs are mainly neuropsychiatric (due to a psychostimulant action) and cardiovascular (arterial hypertension and tachycardia). (3) More specific cardiovascular adverse effects, such as pulmonary hypertension and severe cardiac valve damage, emerged after several years of use. The first reports date back to the 1960s. (4) The pulmonary hypertension associated with appetite suppressants can be fatal or necessitate transplantation. (5) Cardiac valve damage due to appetite suppressants is generally irreversible and sometimes requires surgery. PMID:15055225

  2. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  3. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility. PMID:23776442

  4. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  5. Reflection/suppression coatings for 900 - 1200 A radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Jerry

    1989-01-01

    The design and performance of multiple-layer, selective-reflection, selective-suppression coatings for the 900 - 1200 A band are described. These coatings are designed to optimize both high reflectivity at a desirable wavelength and low reflectivity at an undesirable wavelength. The minimum structure for a selective coating consists of a thin metal or metal oxide layer (50 - 150 A thickness) over an aluminum substrate protected with a semi-transparent dielectric (100 - 1000 A thickness). Predicted coating performance is strongly effected by varying the layer combination and thickness. A graphical method of optimizing the coating layer structure is developed. Aluminum, silicon, their oxides, and gold have been investigated as coating layer materials. A very simple coating with a 1026 to 1216 A reflectivity ratio greater than 100 was fabricated. Such reflection/suppression coatings may be of great utility to spaceborne EUV spectrographs.

  6. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  7. The director and molecular dynamics of the field-induced alignment of a Gay-Berne nematic phase: An isothermal-isobaric nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckhurst, Geoffrey R.; Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2010-05-01

    Isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for the generic Gay-Berne (GB) mesogen, GB(4.4, 20.0, 1, 1), to investigate director and molecular rotational motion during the field-induced alignment of a nematic. The alignment process for the director is discussed within the context of a hydrodynamic analysis based on the Ericksen-Leslie theory and this is found to predict the simulated behavior well. The dependence of the relaxation time for the alignment on the field strength is also in good accord with the theory. The rotational viscosity coefficient estimated from the simulation is smaller than that typically observed for real nematics and the possible reasons for this are discussed. However, the simulation results are found to follow not only the theory but also the experiments, at least qualitatively. No significant variation in the local and long-range structure of the nematic phase is found during the field-induced alignment process. In addition, we have explored the molecular dynamics in the nematic phase in the presence of the field using the first- and second-rank time autocorrelation functions. More importantly we are able to show that the director relaxation time is longer than that for molecular rotation. It is also possible to use the two orientational correlation times to explore the relationship between the rotational viscosity coefficient and the rotational diffusion constant. The diffusion constants determined from the orientational correlation times, based on the short-time expansion of the autocorrelation functions, are found to be significantly different. In consequence it is not possible to test, unambiguously, the relationship between the rotational viscosity coefficient and the rotational diffusion constant. However, it would seem that the second-rank rotational correlation time provides the most reliable route to the rotational viscosity coefficient.

  8. Equation of state of a dense plasma by orbital-free and quantum molecular dynamics: Examination of two isothermal-isobaric mixing rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.

    2015-01-01

    We test two isothermal-isobaric mixing rules, respectively based on excess-pressure and total-pressure equilibration, applied to the equation of state of a dense plasma. While the equation of state is generally known for pure species, that of arbitrary mixtures is not available so that the validation of accurate mixing rules, that implies resorting to first-principles simulations, is very useful. Here we consider the case of a plastic with composition C2H3 and we implement two complementary ab initio approaches adapted to the dense plasma domain: quantum molecular dynamics, limited to low temperature by its computational cost, and orbital-free molecular dynamics, that can be implemented at high temperature. The temperature and density range considered is 1-10 eV and 0.6-10 g/cm 3 for quantum molecular dynamics, and 5-1000 eV and 1-10 g/cm 3 for orbital-free molecular dynamics. Simulations for the full C2H3 mixture are the benchmark against which to assess the mixing rules, and both pressure and internal energy are compared. We find that the mixing rule based on excess-pressure equilibration is overall more accurate than that based on total-pressure equilibration; except for quantum molecular dynamics and a thermodynamic domain characterized by very low or negative excess pressures, it gives pressures which are generally within statistical error or within 1% of the exact ones. Besides, its superiority is amplified in the calculation of a principal Hugoniot.

  9. Stimulus Fractionation by Interocular Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zadbood, Asieh; Lee, Sang-Hun; Blake, Randolph

    2011-01-01

    Can human observers distinguish physical removal of a visible stimulus from phenomenal suppression of that stimulus during binocular rivalry? As so often happens, simple questions produce complex answers, and that is the case in the study reported here. Using continuous flash suppression to produce binocular rivalry, we were able to identify stimulus conditions where most – but not all – people utterly fail to distinguish physical from phenomenal stimulus removal, although we can be certain that those two equivalent perceptual states are accompanied by distinct neural events. More interestingly, we find subtle variants of the task where distinguishing the two states is trivially easy, even for people who utterly fail under the original conditions. We found that stimulus features are differentially vulnerable to suppression. Observers are able to be aware of existence/removal of some stimulus attributes (flicker) but not others (orientation), implying that interocular suppression breaks down the unitary awareness of integrated features belonging to a visual object. These findings raise questions about the unitary nature of awareness and, also, place qualifications on the utility of binocular rivalry as a tool for studying the neural concomitants of conscious visual awareness. PMID:22102839

  10. Charmonium suppression in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S. |

    1996-11-01

    Measurements of {psi} and {psi}{prime} production from experiment NA50 at the CERN SPS are compared to calculations based on a hadronic model of charmonium suppression developed previously. Data on centrality dependence and total cross sections are in good accord with these predictions. Uncertainties in theoretical quantities such as NA50`s L parameter are discussed.

  11. Suppressing explosive synchronization by contrarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiyun; Guan, Shuguang; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xiaosong; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-01-01

    Explosive synchronization (ES) has recently received increasing attention and studies have mainly focused on the conditions of its onset so far. However, its inverse problem, i.e. the suppression of ES, has not been systematically studied so far. As ES is usually considered to be harmful in certain circumstances such as the cascading failure of power grids and epileptic seizure, etc., its suppression is definitely important and deserves to be studied. We here study this inverse problem by presenting an efficient approach to suppress ES from a first-order to second-order transition, without changing the intrinsic network structure. We find that ES can be suppressed by only changing a small fraction of oscillators into contrarians with negative couplings and the critical fraction for the transition from the first order to the second order increases with both the network size and the average degree. A brief theory is presented to explain the underlying mechanism. This finding underlines the importance of our method to improve the understanding of neural interactions underlying cognitive processes.

  12. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  13. DENDRITIC POLYMERS AS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an evaluation of the applicability of one of the latest advances in polymer technology (dendritic polymers) to suppressing fires, one of the greatest survivability threats to military personnel and vehicles. Certain types of alkali and transition metal compl...

  14. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  15. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. PMID:26716881

  16. Apparatus and method for jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1983-08-01

    A method and apparatus for jet noise suppression through control of the static pressure of the jet and control of the rate of entrainment of ambient fluid into the jet downstream of the exhaust nozzle is disclosed. The momentum flux over an extended region of the jet is regulated, affecting Reynolds stresses in the jet and the spreading angle of the jet. Static pressure is controlled through a long hollow, porous nozzle plug centerbody which may be selectively vented to ambient conditions, connected to a vacuum source, or supplied with fluids of various densities for injection into the stream. Sound in the jet may be channeled along the nozzle plug centerbody by injecting coolant such as a cryogenic fluid throughout the center-body into the jet.

  17. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  18. Light induced suppression of sulfur in a cesium sputter ion source.

    PubMed

    Martschini, Martin; Rohlén, Johan; Andersson, Pontus; Golser, Robin; Hanstorp, Dag; Lindahl, Anton O; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Forstner, Oliver

    2012-04-01

    New techniques for suppression of atomic isobars in negative ion beams are of great interest for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Especially small and medium-sized facilities can significantly extend their measurement capabilities to new interesting isotopes with a technique independent of terminal voltage. In a new approach, the effect of continuous wave laser light directed towards the cathode surface in a cesium sputter ion source of the Middleton type was studied. The laser light induced a significant change in oxygen, sulfur and chlorine negative ion production from a AgCl target. Approximately 100 mW of laser light reduced the sulfur to chlorine ratio by one order of magnitude. The effect was found to depend on laser power and ion source parameters but not on the laser wavelength. The time constant of the effect varied from a few seconds up to several minutes. Experiments were first performed at the ion beam facility GUNILLA at University of Gothenburg with macroscopic amounts of sulfur. The results were then reproduced at the VERA AMS facility with chemically cleaned AgCl targets containing ∼1 ppm sulfur. The physical explanation behind the effect is still unclear. Nevertheless, the technique has been successfully applied during a regular AMS measurement of (36)Cl. PMID:23576897

  19. Light induced suppression of sulfur in a cesium sputter ion source

    PubMed Central

    Martschini, Martin; Rohlén, Johan; Andersson, Pontus; Golser, Robin; Hanstorp, Dag; Lindahl, Anton O.; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Forstner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    New techniques for suppression of atomic isobars in negative ion beams are of great interest for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Especially small and medium-sized facilities can significantly extend their measurement capabilities to new interesting isotopes with a technique independent of terminal voltage. In a new approach, the effect of continuous wave laser light directed towards the cathode surface in a cesium sputter ion source of the Middleton type was studied. The laser light induced a significant change in oxygen, sulfur and chlorine negative ion production from a AgCl target. Approximately 100 mW of laser light reduced the sulfur to chlorine ratio by one order of magnitude. The effect was found to depend on laser power and ion source parameters but not on the laser wavelength. The time constant of the effect varied from a few seconds up to several minutes. Experiments were first performed at the ion beam facility GUNILLA at University of Gothenburg with macroscopic amounts of sulfur. The results were then reproduced at the VERA AMS facility with chemically cleaned AgCl targets containing ∼1 ppm sulfur. The physical explanation behind the effect is still unclear. Nevertheless, the technique has been successfully applied during a regular AMS measurement of 36Cl. PMID:23576897

  20. Evaluation of CO2, N2 and He as Fire Suppression Agents in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Hicks, Michael; Pettegrew, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. modules of the International Space Station use gaseous CO2 as the fire extinguishing agent. This was selected as a result of extensive experience with CO2 as a fire suppressant in terrestrial applications, trade studies on various suppressants, and experiments. The selection of fire suppressants and suppression strategies for NASA s Lunar and Martian exploration missions will be based on the same studies and normal-gravity data unless reduced gravity fire suppression data is obtained. In this study, the suppressant agent concentrations required to extinguish a flame in low velocity convective flows within the 20-sec of low gravity on the KC-135 aircraft were investigated. Suppressant gas mixtures of CO2, N2, and He with the balance being oxygen/nitrogen mixtures with either 21% or 25% O2 were used to suppress flames on a 19-mm diameter PMMA cylinder in reduced gravity. For each of the suppressant mixtures, limiting concentrations were established that would extinguish the flame at any velocity. Similarly, concentrations were established that would not extinguish the flame. The limiting concentrations were generally consistent with previous studies but did suggest that geometry had an effect on the limiting conditions. Between the extinction and non-extinction limits, the suppression characteristics depended on the extinguishing agent, flow velocity, and O2 concentration. The limiting velocity data from the CO2, He, and N2 suppressants were well correlated using an effective mixture enthalpy per mole of O2, indicating that all act via O2 displacement and cooling mechanisms. In reduced gravity, the agent concentration required to suppress the flames increased as the velocity increased, up to approximately 10 cm/s (the maximum velocity evaluated in this experiment). The effective enthalpy required to extinguish flames at velocities of 10 cm/s is approximately the same as the concentrations in normal gravity. A computational study is underway to further

  1. Reversible Smad-dependent signaling between tumor suppression and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Go; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Yoshida, Katsunori; Mori, Shigeo; Murata, Miki; Seki, Toshihito; Matsui, Hirofumi; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2007-06-01

    Cancer cells often gain advantage by reducing the tumor-suppressive activity of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) together with stimulation of its oncogenic activity as in Ras-transformed cells; however, molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. TGF-beta activates both its type I receptor (TbetaRI) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), which phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 at the COOH-terminal (pSmad2/3C) and linker regions (pSmad2/3L). Here, we report that Ras transformation suppresses TbetaRI-mediated pSmad3C signaling, which involves growth inhibition by down-regulating c-Myc. Instead, hyperactive Ras constitutively stimulates JNK-mediated pSmad2/3L signaling, which fosters tumor invasion by up-regulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-2, and MMP-9. Conversely, selective blockade of linker phosphorylation by a mutant Smad3 lacking JNK-dependent phosphorylation sites results in preserved tumor-suppressive function via pSmad3C in Ras-transformed cells while eliminating pSmad2/3L-mediated invasive capacity. Thus, specific inhibition of the JNK/pSmad2/3L pathway should suppress cancer progression by shifting Smad-dependent signaling from oncogenesis to tumor suppression. PMID:17545585

  2. Constrained evolvability of interferon suppression in an RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Garijo, Raquel; Cuevas, José M; Briz, Álvaro; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity responses controlled by interferon (IFN) are believed to constitute a major selective pressure shaping viral evolution. Viruses encode a variety of IFN suppressors, but these are often multifunctional proteins that also play essential roles in other steps of the viral infection cycle, possibly limiting their evolvability. Here, we experimentally evolved a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mutant carrying a defect in the matrix protein (M∆51) that abolishes IFN suppression and that has been previously used in the context of oncolytic virotherapy. Serial transfers of this virus in normal, IFN-secreting cells led to a modest recovery of IFN blocking capacity and to weak increases in viral fitness. Full-genome ultra-deep sequencing and phenotypic analysis of population variants revealed that the anti-IFN function of the matrix protein was not restored, and that the Mdelta51 defect was instead compensated by changes in the viral phosphoprotein. We also show that adaptation to IFN-secreting cells can be driven by the selection of fast-growing viruses with no IFN suppression capacity, and that these population variants can be trans-complemented by other, IFN-suppressing variants. Our results thus suggest that virus-virus interactions and alternative strategies of innate immunity evasion can determine the evolution of IFN suppression in a virus. PMID:27098004

  3. Constrained evolvability of interferon suppression in an RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Garijo, Raquel; Cuevas, José M.; Briz, Álvaro; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity responses controlled by interferon (IFN) are believed to constitute a major selective pressure shaping viral evolution. Viruses encode a variety of IFN suppressors, but these are often multifunctional proteins that also play essential roles in other steps of the viral infection cycle, possibly limiting their evolvability. Here, we experimentally evolved a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mutant carrying a defect in the matrix protein (M∆51) that abolishes IFN suppression and that has been previously used in the context of oncolytic virotherapy. Serial transfers of this virus in normal, IFN-secreting cells led to a modest recovery of IFN blocking capacity and to weak increases in viral fitness. Full-genome ultra-deep sequencing and phenotypic analysis of population variants revealed that the anti-IFN function of the matrix protein was not restored, and that the Mdelta51 defect was instead compensated by changes in the viral phosphoprotein. We also show that adaptation to IFN-secreting cells can be driven by the selection of fast-growing viruses with no IFN suppression capacity, and that these population variants can be trans-complemented by other, IFN-suppressing variants. Our results thus suggest that virus-virus interactions and alternative strategies of innate immunity evasion can determine the evolution of IFN suppression in a virus. PMID:27098004

  4. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  5. Older Adults Can Suppress Unwanted Memories When Given an Appropriate Strategy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Memory suppression refers to the ability to exclude distracting memories from conscious awareness, and this ability can be assessed with the think/no-think paradigm. Recent research with older adults has provided evidence suggesting both intact and deficient memory suppression. The present studies seek to understand the conditions contributing to older adults’ ability to suppress memories voluntarily. We report 2 experiments indicating that the specificity of the think/no-think task instructions contributes to older adults’ suppression success: When older adults receive open-ended instructions that require them to develop a retrieval suppression strategy on their own, they show diminished memory suppression compared with younger adults. Conversely, when older adults receive focused instructions directing them to a strategy thought to better isolate inhibitory control, they show suppression-induced forgetting similar to that exhibited by younger adults. Younger adults demonstrate memory suppression regardless of the specificity of the instructions given, suggesting that the ability to select a successful suppression strategy spontaneously may be compromised in older adults. If so, this deficit may be associated with diminished control over unwanted memories in naturalistic settings if impeded strategy development reduces the successful deployment of inhibitory control. PMID:25602491

  6. Analysis of Tospovirus NSs Proteins in Suppression of Systemic Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Hedil, Marcio; Sterken, Mark G.; de Ronde, Dryas; Lohuis, Dick; Kormelink, Richard

    2015-01-01

    RNA silencing is a sequence-specific gene regulation mechanism that in plants also acts antiviral. In order to counteract antiviral RNA silencing, viruses have evolved RNA silencing suppressors (RSS). In the case of tospoviruses, the non-structural NSs protein has been identified as the RSS. Although the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) tospovirus NSs protein has been shown to exhibit affinity to long and small dsRNA molecules, its ability to suppress the non-cell autonomous part of RNA silencing has only been studied to a limited extent. Here, the NSs proteins of TSWV, groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV), representatives for three distinct tospovirus species, have been studied on their ability and strength to suppress local and systemic silencing. A system has been developed to quantify suppression of GFP silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana 16C lines, to allow a comparison of relative RNA silencing suppressor strength. It is shown that NSs of all three tospoviruses are suppressors of local and systemic silencing. Unexpectedly, suppression of systemic RNA silencing by NSsTYRV was just as strong as those by NSsTSWV and NSsGRSV, even though NSsTYRV was expressed in lower amounts. Using the system established, a set of selected NSsTSWV gene constructs mutated in predicted RNA binding domains, as well as NSs from TSWV isolates 160 and 171 (resistance breakers of the Tsw resistance gene), were analyzed for their ability to suppress systemic GFP silencing. The results indicate another mode of RNA silencing suppression by NSs that acts further downstream the biogenesis of siRNAs and their sequestration. The findings are discussed in light of the affinity of NSs for small and long dsRNA, and recent mutant screen of NSsTSWV to map domains required for RSS activity and triggering of Tsw-governed resistance. PMID:26275304

  7. Comparison of Filters Dedicated to Speckle Suppression in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupidura, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the effectiveness of different filtering methods dedicated to speckle suppression in SAR images. The tests were performed on RadarSat-2 images and on an artificial image treated with simulated speckle noise. The research analysed the performance of particular filters related to the effectiveness of speckle suppression and to the ability to preserve image details and edges. Speckle is a phenomenon inherent to radar images - a deterministic noise connected with land cover type, but also causing significant changes in digital numbers of pixels. As a result, it may affect interpretation, classification and other processes concerning radar images. Speckle, resembling "salt and pepper" noise, has the form of a set of relatively small groups of pixels of values markedly different from values of other pixels representing the same type of land cover. Suppression of this noise may also cause suppression of small image details, therefore the ability to preserve the important parts of an image, was analysed as well. In the present study, selected filters were tested, and methods dedicated particularly to speckle noise suppression: Frost, Gamma-MAP, Lee, Lee-Sigma, Local Region, general filtering methods which might be effective in this respect: Mean, Median, in addition to morphological filters (alternate sequential filters with multiple structuring element and by reconstruction). The analysis presented in this paper compared the effectiveness of different filtering methods. It proved that some of the dedicated radar filters are efficient tools for speckle suppression, but also demonstrated a significant efficiency of the morphological approach, especially its ability to preserve image details.

  8. Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers suppress mutant huntingtin expression and attenuate neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Marque, Leonard O; Cordner, Zachary; Pruitt, Jennifer L; Bhat, Manik; Li, Pan P; Kannan, Geetha; Ladenheim, Ellen E; Moran, Timothy H; Margolis, Russell L; Rudnicki, Dobrila D

    2014-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Disease pathogenesis derives, at least in part, from the long polyglutamine tract encoded by mutant HTT. Therefore, considerable effort has been dedicated to the development of therapeutic strategies that significantly reduce the expression of the mutant HTT protein. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted to the CAG repeat region of HTT transcripts have been of particular interest due to their potential capacity to discriminate between normal and mutant HTT transcripts. Here, we focus on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs), ASOs that are especially stable, highly soluble and non-toxic. We designed three PMOs to selectively target expanded CAG repeat tracts (CTG22, CTG25 and CTG28), and two PMOs to selectively target sequences flanking the HTT CAG repeat (HTTex1a and HTTex1b). In HD patient-derived fibroblasts with expanded alleles containing 44, 77 or 109 CAG repeats, HTTex1a and HTTex1b were effective in suppressing the expression of mutant and non-mutant transcripts. CTGn PMOs also suppressed HTT expression, with the extent of suppression and the specificity for mutant transcripts dependent on the length of the targeted CAG repeat and on the CTG repeat length and concentration of the PMO. PMO CTG25 reduced HTT-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and suppressed mutant HTT expression in vivo in the N171-82Q transgenic mouse model. Finally, CTG28 reduced mutant HTT expression and improved the phenotype of Hdh(Q7/Q150) knock-in HD mice. These data demonstrate the potential of PMOs as an approach to suppressing the expression of mutant HTT. PMID:25035419

  9. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  10. Distracted by cues for suppressed memories.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Paula T; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    We examined the potential cost of practicing suppression of negative thoughts on subsequent performance in an unrelated task. Cues for previously suppressed and unsuppressed (baseline) responses in a think/no-think procedure were displayed as irrelevant flankers for neutral words to be judged for emotional valence. These critical flankers were homographs with one negative meaning denoted by their paired response during learning. Responses to the targets were delayed when suppression cues (compared with baseline cues and new negative homographs) were used as flankers, but only following direct-suppression instructions and not when benign substitutes had been provided to aid suppression. On a final recall test, suppression-induced forgetting following direct suppression and the flanker task was positively correlated with the flanker effect. Experiment 2 replicated these findings. Finally, valence ratings of neutral targets were influenced by the valence of the flankers but not by the prior role of the negative flankers. PMID:25904596

  11. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues. PMID:17848022

  12. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  13. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  14. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  15. Relative quantification of amine-containing metabolites using isobaric N,N-dimethyl-leucine (DiLeu) reagents via LC-ESI-MS/MS and CE-ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ling; Zhong, Xuefei; Greer, Tyler; Ye, Hui; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based relative quantification by isobaric labeling is a useful technique to compare different metabolic expression levels in biological systems. For the first time, we have labeled primary and secondary amine-containing small molecules using 4-plex isobaric N,N-dimethyl-leucine (DiLeu) to perform relative quantification. Good labeling efficiency and quantification accuracy were demonstrated with a mixture of 12 metabolite standards including amino acids and small molecule neurotransmitters. Labeling amine-containing metabolites with DiLeu reagents also enabled the separation of polar metabolites by nanoRPLC and improved the detection sensitivity by CE-ESI-MS. The 4-plex DiLeu labeling technique combined with LC-MS/MS and CE-MS/MS platforms were applied to profile and quantify amine-containing metabolites in mouse urine. The variability of concentrations of identified metabolites in urine samples from different mouse individuals was illustrated by the ratios of reporter ion intensities acquired from online data-dependent analysis. PMID:25429371

  16. Human regulatory T cells suppress proliferation of B lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Biernacka, Marzena; Bujko, Mateusz; Nowak, Eliza; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Paszkiewicz-Kozik, Ewa; Borycka, Ilona Sara; Bystydzienski, Zbigniew; Walewski, Jan; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-08-01

    Activated regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress proliferation and differentiation of normal B cells. In our study, allogeneic polyclonal CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs and CD4 (+) CD25 (+) CD127(lo)Tregs expanded in vitro in the presence of rapamycin and low dose IL-2 suppressed proliferation of 11 out of 12 established lymphoma B-cell lines. The effect of expanded CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs on survival of freshly isolated lymphoma B cells maintained in culture with soluble multimeric CD40L and IL-4 was variable across lymphoma entities. The survival of freshly isolated follicular lymphoma cells usually decreased in cocultures with CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs. Treg effect on chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma cells ranged from suppression to help in individual patients. CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs or CD4 (+) CD25 (+) CD127(lo)Tregs expanded ex vivo with rapamycin could be used to suppress regrowth of residual lymphoma after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and to counteract both graft-versus-host disease and lymphoma re-growth after allogeneic HCT in select patients with lymphoma susceptible to the regulation by Tregs. PMID:26758248

  17. Using multiple perspectives to suppress information and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, R.L. |; Webster, R.B.; Hartley, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Dissemination of battlespace information involves getting information to particular warfighters that is both useful and in a form that facilitates the tasks of those particular warfighters. There are two issues which motivate this problem of dissemination. The first issue deals with disseminating pertinent information to a particular warfighter. This can be thought of as information suppression. The second issue deals with facilitating the use of the information by tailoring the computer interface to the specific tasks of an individual warfighter. This can be thought of as interface complexity suppression. This paper presents a framework for suppressing information using an object-based knowledge representation methodology. This methodology has the ability to represent knowledge and information in multiple perspectives. Information can be suppressed by creating a perspective specific to an individual warfighter. In this way, only the information pertinent and useful to a warfighter is made available to that warfighter. Information is not removed, lost, or changed, but spread among multiple perspectives. Interface complexity is managed in a similar manner. Rather than have one generalized computer interface to access all information, the computer interface can be divided into interface elements. Interface elements can then be selected and arranged into a perspective-specific interface. This is done in a manner to facilitate completion of tasks contained in that perspective. A basic battlespace domain containing ground and air elements and associated warfighters is used to exercise the methodology.

  18. Functional imaging correlates of impaired distractor suppression following sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Danyang; Soon, Chun Siong; Chee, Michael W L

    2012-05-15

    Sleep deprivation (SD) has been shown to affect selective attention but it is not known how two of its component processes: target enhancement and distractor suppression, are affected. To investigate, young volunteers either attended to houses or were obliged to ignore them (when attending to faces) while viewing superimposed face-house pictures. MR signal enhancement and suppression in the parahippocampal place area (PPA) were determined relative to a passive viewing control condition. Sleep deprivation was associated with lower PPA activation across conditions. Critically SD specifically impaired distractor suppression in selective attention, leaving target enhancement relatively preserved. These findings parallel some observations in cognitive aging. Additionally, following SD, attended houses were not significantly better recognized than ignored houses in a post-experiment test of recognition memory contrasting with the finding of superior recognition of attended houses in the well-rested state. These results provide evidence for co-encoding of distracting information with targets into memory when one is sleep deprived. PMID:22426349

  19. Continuous flash suppression reduces negative afterimages.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Koch, Christof

    2005-08-01

    Illusions that produce perceptual suppression despite constant retinal input are used to manipulate visual consciousness. Here we report on a powerful variant of existing techniques, continuous flash suppression. Distinct images flashed successively at approximately 10 Hz into one eye reliably suppress an image presented to the other eye. The duration of perceptual suppression is at least ten times greater than that produced by binocular rivalry. Using this tool we show that the strength of the negative afterimage of an adaptor was reduced by half when it was perceptually suppressed by input from the other eye. The more completely the adaptor was suppressed, the more strongly the afterimage intensity was reduced. Paradoxically, trial-to-trial visibility of the adaptor did not correlate with the degree of reduction. Our results imply that formation of afterimages involves neuronal structures that access input from both eyes but that do not correspond directly to the neuronal correlates of perceptual awareness. PMID:15995700

  20. Engineered decoherence: Characterization and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2014-06-01

    Due to omnipresent environmental interferences, quantum coherences inevitably undergo irreversible transformations over certain time scales, thus leading to the loss of encoded information. This process, known as decoherence, has been a major obstacle in realizing efficient quantum information processors. Understanding the mechanism of decoherence is crucial in developing tools to inhibit it. Here we utilize a method proposed by Teklemariam et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 062316 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.062316] to engineer artificial decoherence in the system qubits by randomly perturbing their surrounding ancilla qubits. Using a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum register, we characterize the artificial decoherence by noise spectroscopy and quantum process tomography. Further, we study the efficacy of dynamical decoupling sequences in suppressing the artificial decoherence. Here we describe the experimental results and their comparisons with theoretical simulations.

  1. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  2. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  3. Mechanisms of suppression in mixed allogeneic chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-08-01

    Cells with the ability to suppress cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation are found in the spleens of whole-body-irradiated (WBI) mixed allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplant recipients in the early weeks after BMT. Previous studies have indicated that suppression is mediated by null cells similar to natural suppressor (NS) cells (1), and have ruled out several possible trivial explanations for the suppressive effect. We report here the results of additional experiments designed to assess possible mechanisms of suppression. We compared the cell populations after 5 days' incubation of cultures containing normal responding splenocytes plus irradiated allogeneic stimulator cells, with or without a cocultured suppressive chimeric splenocyte population. The data indicate that total viable cell yields are only slightly reduced, if at all, in suppressed cultures, but that the proportion of T cells is markedly reduced as measured at the end of the incubation period. Splenocytes from early BMT recipients do not appear to proliferate during the suppression of a mixed lymphocyte culture, and such populations represent only 15% of cells at the end of the 5-day incubation period. Suppression is strongest when the suppressive population is added at the initiation of MLC, and is lost if addition is delayed beyond day 3. Suppression can be overcome by T cell growth factor (TCGF)--and, to a lesser extent, by recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), although resting suppressive populations do not consume appreciable amounts of these lymphokines. These results therefore suggest that suppression in MLC may occur primarily during the induction of helper T lymphocytes.

  4. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  5. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  6. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  7. Adrenocortical suppression in cats given megestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Chastain, C B; Graham, C L; Nichols, C E

    1981-12-01

    Megestrol acetate was given orally to 8 cats at a dose of 2.5 mg every other day for 2 weeks and to 8 cats at a dose of 5.0 mg every day for 2 weeks. Four cats were designated nontreated controls. Pre-ACTH-stimulated plasma concentrations of cortisol (hydrocortisone) and ACTH-stimulated cortisol and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion (IV) were determined on each of the 20 cats given megestrol acetate. Cats were restrained with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride during blood sample collection and large-dose glucose infusion. Adrenocortical function and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion were reevaluated for 4 weeks--after 1st and 2nd weeks of megestrol acetate treatment of the treated groups, and after 1st and 2nd weeks when treatment was stopped (ie, experiment weeks 3 and 4). Each week a cat from the control group and 2 cats from the 2 treated groups were selected to determine the changes occurring during the experiment for that week; after collection of plasma samples, each week's 5 selected cats were euthanatized and necropsied. Significant impairment of adrenocortical function and alteration of adrenocortical morphology occurred with both treated groups. The most severe adrenocortical alterations occurred in the cats 1 week after megestrol acetate was no longer given (ie, experiment week 3). Megestrol acetate-induced adrenocortical suppression contributed to the death of 1 cat. It was concluded that if stress occurs to cats on treatment or soon after treatment with megestrol acetate, glucocorticoids should be supplemented. The effects of megestrol acetate on glucose tolerance were overshadowed by the unforeseen intolerance caused by chemical restraint with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride. PMID:6280517

  8. Overdrive suppression of implanted pacemakers in patients with AV block.

    PubMed Central

    Grendahl, H; Miller, M; Kjekshus, J

    1978-01-01

    Patients being permanently paced for symptomatic AV block were studied by overdrive suppression of the QRS-inhibited pacemaker, in order to observe the underlying heart rhythm. The chest wall stimulation method was used. In complete AV block the escape rhythm recovery time proved highly reproducible on repeated testing on the same day, and in many patients remained so over months or years. Occasionally, a doubling of the escape rhythm recovery time was seen, suggesting initial exit block of the escape focus. Resetting of the escape rhythm usually followed an exponential curve until stabilisation after about 3 minutes. An early escape rhythm with a recovery time of less than 4 seconds was found on every occasion in 21 of 58 patients with complete AV block, and inconstantly in 23 more; in 14 it was never observed. Accidental pacing failure was seen in 15 patients. The overdrive suppression test was helpful in selecting pacemaker dependent patients. PMID:637960

  9. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  10. Photoperiodic Suppression of Drug Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Stark, Gemaine; Sergeeva, Anna; Jansen, Heiko T.

    2011-01-01

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  11. 7 CFR 2902.32 - Dust suppressants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dust suppressants. 2902.32 Section 2902.32... Items § 2902.32 Dust suppressants. (a) Definition. Products formulated to reduce or eliminate the spread of dust associated with gravel roads, dirt parking lots, or similar sources of dust,...

  12. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance probe liftoff suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1985-01-01

    A liftoff suppression apparatus utilizing a liftoff sensing coil to sense the amount a ferromagnetic resonance probe lifts off the test surface during flaw detection and utilizing the liftoff signal to modulate the probe's field modulating coil to suppress the liftoff effects.

  14. Selection Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerby, Ramona

    2002-01-01

    Discusses library collection development by school library media specialists and describes selection sources for new books and materials; retrospective selection sources for materials published in preceding years; and an acquisition source. Provides an overview of the selection process and includes 10 suggestions for selection. (LRW)

  15. Mechanical Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownson, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    Defines mechanical and expert selection of library materials and investigates the usefulness of mechanical selection in three test cases involving popular novels, German literature, and contemporary poetry. The cost of mechanical selection is examined and more quantification in selection practice is recommended. Data are presented in eight tables,…

  16. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  17. Mass measurements of the neutron-deficient 41Ti, 45Cr, 49Fe, and 53Ni nuclides: first test of the isobaric multiplet mass equation in f p-shell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y H; Xu, H S; Litvinov, Yu A; Tu, X L; Yan, X L; Typel, S; Blaum, K; Wang, M; Zhou, X H; Sun, Y; Brown, B A; Yuan, Y J; Xia, J W; Yang, J C; Audi, G; Chen, X C; Jia, G B; Hu, Z G; Ma, X W; Mao, R S; Mei, B; Shuai, P; Sun, Z Y; Wang, S T; Xiao, G Q; Xu, X; Yamaguchi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Zang, Y D; Zhao, H W; Zhao, T C; Zhang, W; Zhan, W L

    2012-09-01

    Isochronous mass spectrometry has been applied to neutron-deficient 58Ni projectile fragments at the HIRFL-CSR facility in Lanzhou, China. Masses of a series of short-lived T(z)=-3/2 nuclides including 41Ti, 45Cr, 49Fe, and 53Ni have been measured with a precision of 20-40 keV. The new data enable us to test for the first time the isobaric multiplet mass equation (IMME) in fp-shell nuclei. We observe that the IMME is inconsistent with the generally accepted quadratic form for the A=53, T=3/2 quartet. We perform full space shell model calculations and compare them with the new experimental results. PMID:23005283

  18. Higher-order suppression in an on-blaze plane-grating monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, W.R.; Rife, J.C.

    1984-01-15

    The transmittance of an on-blaze plane-grating monochromator has been calculated as a function of wavelength for different spectral orders. The calculations show that higher, undesirable orders can be suppressed by a judicious selection of grating blaze angle and coating material. However, for intense sources, such as storage ring operating at high power and current, higher-order suppression due to blaze angle and coating material may have to be augmented by using transmitting filters or spectrally selective detectors or both.

  19. Mu suppression - A good measure of the human mirror neuron system?

    PubMed

    Hobson, Hannah M; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2016-09-01

    Mu suppression has been proposed as a signature of the activity of the human mirror neuron system (MNS). However the mu frequency band (8-13 Hz) overlaps with the alpha frequency band, which is sensitive to attentional fluctuation, and thus mu suppression could potentially be confounded by changes in attentional engagement. The specific baseline against which mu suppression is assessed may be crucial, yet there is little consistency in how this is defined. We examined mu suppression in 61 typical adults, the largest mu suppression study so far conducted. We compared different methods of baselining, and examined activity at central and occipital electrodes, to both biological (hands) and non-biological (kaleidoscope) moving stimuli, to investigate the involvement of attention and alpha activity in mu suppression. We also examined changes in beta power, another candidate index of MNS engagement. We observed strong mu suppression restricted to central electrodes when participants performed hand movements, demonstrating that mu is indeed responsive to the activity of the motor cortex. However, when we looked for a similar signature of mu suppression to passively observed stimuli, the baselining method proved to be crucial. Selective suppression for biological versus non-biological stimuli was seen at central electrodes only when we used a within-trial baseline based on a static stimulus: this method greatly reduced trial-by-trial variation in the suppression measure compared with baselines based on blank trials presented in separate blocks. Even in this optimal condition, 16-21% of participants showed no mu suppression. Changes in beta power also did not match our predicted pattern for MNS engagement, and did not seem to offer a better measure than mu. Our conclusions are in contrast to those of a recent meta-analysis, which concluded that mu suppression is a valid means to examine mirror neuron activity. We argue that mu suppression can be used to index the human MNS

  20. Studies on the mechanism of systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity by UVB radiation. II. Differences in the suppression of delayed and contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kripke, M L; Morison, W L

    1986-05-01

    Exposing mice to UV radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm) causes a selective immune suppression that contributes to the development of UVB-induced skin cancers. Among the immune responses suppressed by UVB irradiation are contact and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to haptens administered at unexposed sites. In these studies we provide evidence that delayed and contact hypersensitivity to the same hapten are not equivalent reactions and that they are suppressed in UVB-irradiated mice by 2 different mechanisms. This conclusion is based on the findings that: suppression of contact hypersensitivity could not be overcome by immunizing UVB-irradiated mice with hapten-coupled antigen-presenting cells derived from normal donors; and treatment of UVB-irradiated mice with methylprednisolone before immunization prevented the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity but had no effect on the suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The decreased ability to induce contact hypersensitivity in UVB-irradiated mice could be transferred to x-irradiated mice by reconstituting them with spleen cells from UVB-irradiated donors. The induction of hapten-specific suppressor cells, however, required both UVB irradiation and priming with hapten. Based on these results, we postulate that UVB irradiation induces a population of suppressor-inducer cells with specificity for a modified skin antigen and that this antigen serves as a carrier molecule for haptens that induce contact hypersensitivity and for tumor-specific transplantation antigens on UVB-induced tumors. PMID:3745963

  1. Simultaneous suppression of water and fat signals in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, Yuri A.; Anisimov, Nikolai V.; Gubskii, Leonid V.

    2002-05-01

    MR diagnostics with obtaining images cleaned of strong signals of water and fat for discovery small tissue contrast variations related with a pathology is discussed. With help of water suppression, one can reveal the pathological changes of brain in small zones near the liquor spaces, particularly disseminated sclerosis cortical plaques, cerebral lesions, subarachnoid hemorrhage. Under the fat suppression T2-weighted images, inflammatory changes in orbits, cranial base, and spine are surely determined. Among several methods of water or fat suppression, one can indicate methods based on frequency selective saturation of fat signals and methods based on inversion-recovery (IR) pulse sequence. Simultaneous suppression of fat and water opens up additional possibilities in medical diagnostics. We realized simultaneous suppression of fat and water signals at the MR scanner Tomikon S50 (Bruker). We used a pulse sequence based on the IR technique, supplemented with special procedure of frequency-selective fat saturation. Sometimes only simultaneous suppression of fat and water signal made possible successful MRI diagnostics.

  2. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  3. Hydrogen suppresses UO 2 corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbol, Paul; Fors, Patrik; Gouder, Thomas; Spahiu, Kastriot

    2009-08-01

    Release of long-lived radionuclides such as plutonium and caesium from spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repositories will depend mainly on the dissolution rate of the UO 2 fuel matrix. This dissolution rate will, in turn, depend on the redox conditions at the fuel surface. Under oxidative conditions UO 2 will be oxidised to the 1000 times more soluble UO 2.67. This may occur in a repository as the reducing deep groundwater becomes locally oxidative at the fuel surface under the effect of α-radiolysis, the process by which α-particles emitted from the fuel split water molecules. On the other hand, the groundwater corrodes canister iron generating large amounts of hydrogen. The role of molecular hydrogen as reductant in a deep bedrock repository is questioned. Here we show evidence of a surface-catalysed reaction, taking place in the H 2-UO 2-H 2O system where molecular hydrogen is able to reduce oxidants originating from α-radiolysis. In our experiment the UO 2 surface remained stoichiometric proving that the expected oxidation of UO 2.00 to UO 2.67 due to radiolytic oxidants was absent. As a consequence, the dissolution of UO 2 stopped when equilibrium was reached between the solid phase and U 4+ species in the aqueous phase. The steady-state concentration of uranium in solution was determined to be 9 × 10 -12 M, about 30 times lower than previously reported for reducing conditions. Our findings show that fuel dissolution is suppressed by H 2. Consequently, radiotoxic nuclides in spent nuclear fuel will remain immobilised in the UO 2 matrix. A mechanism for the surface-catalysed reaction between molecular hydrogen and radiolytic oxidants is proposed.

  4. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25998381

  5. Spider mites suppress tomato defenses downstream of jasmonate and salicylate independently of hormonal crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Juan M; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Glas, Joris J; Ataide, Livia M S; Pappas, Maria L; Villarroel, Carlos A; Schuurink, Robert C; Sabelis, Maurice W; Kant, Merijn R

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory by mounting a defense. Some plant-eating spider mites (Tetranychus spp.) have adapted to plant defenses to maintain a high reproductive performance. From natural populations we selected three spider mite strains from two species, Tetranychus urticae and Tetranychus evansi, that can suppress plant defenses, using a fourth defense-inducing strain as a benchmark, to assess to which extent these strains suppress defenses differently. We characterized timing and magnitude of phytohormone accumulation and defense-gene expression, and determined if mites that cannot suppress defenses benefit from sharing a leaf with suppressors. The nonsuppressor strain induced a mixture of jasmonate- (JA) and salicylate (SA)-dependent defenses. Induced defense genes separated into three groups: ‘early’ (expression peak at 1 d postinfestation (dpi)); ‘intermediate’ (4 dpi); and ‘late’, whose expression increased until the leaf died. The T. evansi strains suppressed genes from all three groups, but the T. urticae strain only suppressed the late ones. Suppression occurred downstream of JA and SA accumulation, independently of the JA–SA antagonism, and was powerful enough to boost the reproductive performance of nonsuppressors up to 45%. Our results show that suppressing defenses not only brings benefits but, within herbivore communities, can also generate a considerable ecological cost when promoting the population growth of a competitor. PMID:25297722

  6. Linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Narusuye, K; Kawai, F; Matsuzaki, K; Miyachi, E

    2005-02-01

    Linalool is a major component of essential oils and possesses various biological effects in sensory or central nervous systems. To investigate the pharmacological and biophysical effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in sensory neurons, we used the whole-cell patch clamp and the Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Under the voltage clamp, membrane depolarization generated time- and voltage-dependent current responses in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Linalool significantly and reversibly suppressed the voltage-gated currents in ORCs. The dose-suppression relation of linalool for the voltage-gated Na(+) current could be fitted by the Hill equation with a half-blocking concentration of 0.56 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.2. To test whether linalool suppresses voltage-gated currents in ORCs specifically or suppresses currents in other neurons generally, we next examined the effects of linalool on voltage-gated currents in newt retinal neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. Linalool suppressed the voltage-gated currents not only in retinal horizontal cells and ganglion cells but also in Purkinje cells. Furthermore, bath application of linalool inhibited the KCl-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response of ORCs, suggesting that linalool suppresses Ca(2+) currents in ORCs. These results suggest that linalool non-selectively suppresses the voltage-gated currents in newt sensory neurons and rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:15365786

  7. Evaluation of rhizobacterial indicators of tobacco black root rot suppressiveness in farmers' fields.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Almario, Juliana; Kopecký, Jan; Ságová-Marečková, Markéta; Haurat, Jacqueline; Muller, Daniel; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2014-08-01

    Very few soil quality indicators include disease-suppressiveness criteria. We assessed whether 64 16S rRNA microarray probes whose signals correlated with tobacco black root rot suppressiveness in greenhouse analysis could also discriminate suppressive from conducive soils under field conditions. Rhizobacterial communities of tobacco and wheat sampled in 2 years from four farmers' fields of contrasted suppressiveness status were compared. The 64 previously identified indicator probes correctly classified 72% of 29 field samples, with nine probes for Azospirillum, Gluconacetobacter, Sphingomonadaceae, Planctomycetes, Mycoplasma, Lactobacillus crispatus and Thermodesulforhabdus providing the best prediction. The whole probe set (1033 probes) revealed strong effects of plant, field location and year on rhizobacterial community composition, and a smaller (7% variance) but significant effect of soil suppressiveness status. Seventeen additional probes correlating with suppressiveness status in the field (noticeably for Agrobacterium, Methylobacterium, Ochrobactrum) were selected, and combined with the nine others, they improved correct sample classification from 72% to 79% (100% tobacco and 63% wheat samples). Pseudomonas probes were not informative in the field, even those targeting biocontrol pseudomonads producing 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, nor was quantitative polymerase chain reaction for 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-synthesis gene phlD. This study shows that a subset of 16S rRNA probes targeting diverse rhizobacteria can be useful as suppressiveness indicators under field conditions. PMID:24992533

  8. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  9. Psychopathology and thought suppression: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Magee, Joshua C; Harden, K Paige; Teachman, Bethany A

    2012-04-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. PMID:22388007

  10. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  11. A suppression hierarchy among competing motor programs drives sequential grooming in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Seeds, Andrew M; Ravbar, Primoz; Chung, Phuong; Hampel, Stefanie; Midgley, Frank M; Mensh, Brett D; Simpson, Julie H

    2014-01-01

    Motor sequences are formed through the serial execution of different movements, but how nervous systems implement this process remains largely unknown. We determined the organizational principles governing how dirty fruit flies groom their bodies with sequential movements. Using genetically targeted activation of neural subsets, we drove distinct motor programs that clean individual body parts. This enabled competition experiments revealing that the motor programs are organized into a suppression hierarchy; motor programs that occur first suppress those that occur later. Cleaning one body part reduces the sensory drive to its motor program, which relieves suppression of the next movement, allowing the grooming sequence to progress down the hierarchy. A model featuring independently evoked cleaning movements activated in parallel, but selected serially through hierarchical suppression, was successful in reproducing the grooming sequence. This provides the first example of an innate motor sequence implemented by the prevailing model for generating human action sequences. PMID:25139955

  12. Low-level gamma spectrometry using beta coincidence and Compton suppression.

    PubMed

    Grigorescu, E L; De Felice, P; Razdolescu, Anamaria-Cristina; Luca, A

    2004-01-01

    A low-level gamma-ray spectrometry system was developed using a Ge(Li) detector with 6% relative efficiency coupled to a 2pi beta plastic detector for coincidence selection and a massive NaI(Tl) detector for Compton suppression. The integral background count rate for (50-1500)keV was 0.5 s(-1)kg(-1) (Ge), using only beta coincidences. With Compton suppression, a value of 0.25 s(-1)kg(-1) (Ge) was obtained. Spectra with and without Compton suppression were studied for 60Co, 137Cs and 152Eu point sources. Considerations are made concerning the Compton suppression advantages in different situations. PMID:15177343

  13. Molecular Mechanisms for Sweet-suppressing Effect of Gymnemic Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kusakabe, Yuko; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nakamura, Seiji; Imoto, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2014-01-01

    Gymnemic acids are triterpene glycosides that selectively suppress taste responses to various sweet substances in humans but not in mice. This sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids is diminished by rinsing the tongue with γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids and the interaction between gymnemic acids versus sweet taste receptor and/or γ-CD. To investigate whether gymnemic acids directly interact with human (h) sweet receptor hT1R2 + hT1R3, we used the sweet receptor T1R2 + T1R3 assay in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Similar to previous studies in humans and mice, gymnemic acids (100 μg/ml) inhibited the [Ca2+]i responses to sweet compounds in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing hT1R2 + hT1R3 but not in those expressing the mouse (m) sweet receptor mT1R2 + mT1R3. The effect of gymnemic acids rapidly disappeared after rinsing the HEK293 cells with γ-CD. Using mixed species pairings of human and mouse sweet receptor subunits and chimeras, we determined that the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 was mainly required for the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids. Directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 revealed that the interaction site for gymnemic acids shared the amino acid residues that determined the sensitivity to another sweet antagonist, lactisole. Glucuronic acid, which is the common structure of gymnemic acids, also reduced sensitivity to sweet compounds. In our models, gymnemic acids were predicted to dock to a binding pocket within the transmembrane domain of hT1R3. PMID:25056955

  14. Cross-orientation suppression in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heeger, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-orientation suppression was measured in human primary visual cortex (V1) to test the normalization model. Subjects viewed vertical target gratings (of varying contrasts) with or without a superimposed horizontal mask grating (fixed contrast). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the activity in each of several hypothetical channels (corresponding to subpopulations of neurons) with different orientation tunings and fit these orientation-selective responses with the normalization model. For the V1 channel maximally tuned to the target orientation, responses increased with target contrast but were suppressed when the horizontal mask was added, evident as a shift in the contrast gain of this channel's responses. For the channel maximally tuned to the mask orientation, a constant baseline response was evoked for all target contrasts when the mask was absent; responses decreased with increasing target contrast when the mask was present. The normalization model provided a good fit to the contrast-response functions with and without the mask. In a control experiment, the target and mask presentations were temporally interleaved, and we found no shift in contrast gain, i.e., no evidence for suppression. We conclude that the normalization model can explain cross-orientation suppression in human visual cortex. The approach adopted here can be applied broadly to infer, simultaneously, the responses of several subpopulations of neurons in the human brain that span particular stimulus or feature spaces, and characterize their interactions. In addition, it allows us to investigate how stimuli are represented by the inferred activity of entire neural populations. PMID:21775720

  15. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    to enhanced signalling of co-trafficked receptor tyrosine kinases10, 11 it has remained unclear whether endocytosed active integrins signal in endosomes. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to focal adhesions as previously described and that endocytosis is necessary for full ECM-induced, integrin mediated ERK, AKT and FAK signalling. We find that FAK binds directly to and can become activated on purified endosomes. Moreover, the FERM-domain of FAK is able to bind purified integrin containing endosomes, suggesting the potential for integrin signalling complexes to assemble on endosomes after internalization of active integrins. Importantly, FAK is required for anchorage-independent growth and suppression of anoikis 12. Integrin endosomal signalling correlates with reduced anoikis sensitivity in normal cells and anchorage-independent growth and metastasis in breast cancer cells. PMID:26436690

  16. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  17. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  18. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  19. Attention modulates sensory suppression during back movements.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Lore; Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert; Van Damme, Stefaan

    2013-06-01

    Tactile perception is often impaired during movement. The present study investigated whether such sensory suppression also occurs during back movements, and whether this would be modulated by attention. In two tactile detection experiments, participants simultaneously engaged in a movement task, in which they executed a back-bending movement, and a perceptual task, consisting of the detection of subtle tactile stimuli administered to their upper or lower back. The focus of participants' attention was manipulated by raising the probability that one of the back locations would be stimulated. The results revealed that tactile detection was suppressed during the execution of the back movements. Furthermore, the results of Experiment 2 revealed that when the stimulus was always presented to the attended location, tactile suppression was substantially reduced, suggesting that sensory suppression can be modulated by top-down attentional processes. The potential of this paradigm for studying tactile information processing in clinical populations is discussed. PMID:23454431

  20. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  1. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  2. Suppression of the Primordial Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumurtushaa, Gansukh; Koh, Seoktae; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We study the primordial gravitational waves induced by space-space condensate inflation model. For modes that cross the comoving horizon during matter dominated era, we calculate the energy spectrum of gravitational waves. The energy spectrum of gravitational waves for our model has significantly suppressed in the low frequency range. The suppression occurs due to the phase transition during the early evolution of the Universe and depends on model parameter.

  3. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities. PMID:24658876

  4. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Christopher; Monti, Jim M.P.; Trittschuh, Emily H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Egner, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked neural activity is attenuated upon stimulus repetition (‘repetition suppression’), a phenomenon attributed to largely automatic processes in sensory neurons. By manipulating the likelihood of stimulus repetition, we show that repetition suppression in the human brain is reduced when stimulus repetitions are improbable (and thus, unexpected). These data suggest that repetition suppression reflects a relative reduction in top-down perceptual ‘prediction error’ when processing an expected compared to an unexpected stimulus. PMID:19160497

  5. Leptin suppresses sweet taste responses of enteroendocrine STC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Jyotaki, Masafumi; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-09-22

    Leptin is an important hormone that regulates food intake and energy homeostasis by acting on central and peripheral targets. In the gustatory system, leptin is known to selectively suppress sweet responses by inhibiting the activation of sweet sensitive taste cells. Sweet taste receptor (T1R2+T1R3) is also expressed in gut enteroendocrine cells and contributes to nutrient sensing, hormone release and glucose absorption. Because of the similarities in expression patterns between enteroendocrine and taste receptor cells, we hypothesized that they may also share similar mechanisms used to modify/regulate the sweet responsiveness of these cells by leptin. Here, we used mouse enteroendocrine cell line STC-1 and examined potential effect of leptin on Ca(2+) responses of STC-1 cells to various taste compounds. Ca(2+) responses to sweet compounds in STC-1 cells were suppressed by a rodent T1R3 inhibitor gurmarin, suggesting the involvement of T1R3-dependent receptors in detection of sweet compounds. Responses to sweet substances were suppressed by ⩾1ng/ml leptin without affecting responses to bitter, umami and salty compounds. This effect was inhibited by a leptin antagonist (mutant L39A/D40A/F41A) and by ATP gated K(+) (KATP) channel closer glibenclamide, suggesting that leptin affects sweet taste responses of enteroendocrine cells via activation of leptin receptor and KATP channel expressed in these cells. Moreover, leptin selectively inhibited sweet-induced but not bitter-induced glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion from STC-1 cells. These results suggest that leptin modulates sweet taste responses of enteroendocrine cells to regulate nutrient sensing, hormone release and glucose absorption in the gut. PMID:27353597

  6. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  7. Sample Multiplexing with Cysteine-Selective Approaches: cysDML and cPILOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liqing; Evans, Adam R.; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine-selective proteomics approaches simplify complex protein mixtures and improve the chance of detecting low abundant proteins. It is possible that cysteinyl-peptide/protein enrichment methods could be coupled to isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging methods for quantitative proteomics analyses in as few as two or up to 10 samples, respectively. Here we present two novel cysteine-selective proteomics approaches: cysteine-selective dimethyl labeling (cysDML) and cysteine-selective combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT). CysDML is a duplex precursor quantification technique that couples cysteinyl-peptide enrichment with on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling. Cysteine-selective cPILOT is a novel 12-plex workflow based on cysteinyl-peptide enrichment, on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling, and iodoTMT tagging on cysteine residues. To demonstrate the broad applicability of the approaches, we applied cysDML and cPILOT methods to liver tissues from an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. From the cysDML experiments, an average of 850 proteins were identified and 594 were quantified, whereas from the cPILOT experiment, 330 and 151 proteins were identified and quantified, respectively. Overall, 2259 unique total proteins were detected from both cysDML and cPILOT experiments. There is tremendous overlap in the proteins identified and quantified between both experiments, and many proteins have AD/WT fold-change values that are within ~20% error. A total of 65 statistically significant proteins are differentially expressed in the liver proteome of AD mice relative to WT. The performance of cysDML and cPILOT are demonstrated and advantages and limitations of using multiple duplex experiments versus a single 12-plex experiment are highlighted.

  8. A checkerboard selective absorber with excellent spectral selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liu; Mo, Lei; Chen, Tuo; Forsberg, Erik; He, Sailing

    2015-11-14

    A selective absorber with excellent spectral selectivity is proposed and analyzed. The absorber is based on a germanium (Ge) checkerboard on top of a tantalum (Ta) substrate. At wavelengths shorter than the 1.2 μm cutoff, a very high absorption is achieved due to strong cavity resonances in the Ge nanosquares, and their interactions with adjacent nanocavities and the bottom Ta substrate. At longer wavelengths, absorption is greatly suppressed due to destructive interference between the transparent checkerboard layer and the highly reflective Ta substrate. To better describe the superior selectivity of our configuration, a new figure of merit (FOM) is introduced. We observe a FOM value of 0.88 compared to 0.69 for its planar counterpart. We also conduct a thermal analysis to verify the excellent selectivity of our absorber. A high temperature can be achieved and maintained, promising good potential for applications in solar thermophotovoltaic systems.

  9. Antibiosis and acidification by Panoea agglomerans strain E325 may contribute to suppression of Erwinia amylovora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325, a commercially-available antagonist for fire blight of apple and pear, was originally selected through broad screening based on suppression of Erwinia amylovora on flower stigmas, but specific mechanisms were unknown. Bacterial modification of pH was evaluated as a p...

  10. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING UAl$sub 4$ FORMATION IN U-Al ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Picklesimer, M.L.; Thurber, W.C.

    1960-08-23

    A method is given for suppressing the formation of UAl/sub 4/ in uranium- - aluminum alloys, thereby rendering these alloys more easily workable. The method comprises incorporating in the base alloy a Group Four element selected from the group consisting of Si, Ti, Ge, Zr, and Sn, the addition preferably being within the range of 0.5to20at.%.

  11. Selecting Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereus, Steven C.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a comprehensive computer software selection and evaluation process, including documenting district needs, evaluating software packages, weighing the alternatives, and making the purchase. (PKP)

  12. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  13. Suppressibility of the 2f1-f2 stimulated acoustic emissions in gerbil and man.

    PubMed

    Brown, A M; Kemp, D T

    1984-01-01

    The suppression tuning properties of the oto-acoustic distortion product emission, 2f1-f2 have been measured in the ear canal of gerbil and man. The results show the acoustic response to be suppressible in a similar, frequency-dependent manner in both species. Frequencies near to those of the stimulating tones are most effective in suppressing the response. Derived iso-suppression tuning curves have Q10dB values of between 1 and 6. Suppressor tones having frequencies near to f2 (the higher frequency stimulus) make a contribution to the tuning curve which is largely independent of the stimulus intensity and the frequency ratio between the two primary tones. Suppressors having f1-associated frequencies produce a variable amount of suppression depending on the stimulus parameters chosen. No specific suppression feature could be associated with suppressors near to 2f1-f2. The frequency selectivity of the acoustic DP generation mechanism shown by this study indicates a close association with the transduction mechanism. The demonstration of comparable signals in gerbil and man facilitates the direct transfer of laboratory results to the study of human ears. PMID:6706860

  14. Suppression of strike-slip fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    depth. Selected areas on Earth with anomalously undeveloped strike-slip faulting where plate models would predict otherwise were compared with results from the analog model experiments in this study. Physical similarities between this model and Brothers Fault Zone (BFZ), Walker Lane (WL) and the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) imply that strike-slip faulting may be suppressed at the surface in these regions due to the presence of pre-existing structures. Filled circles show offset required for breakthrough faulting, empty circles denote lower limit of breakthrough. Triangles show clay offset as a fraction of box offset. Note that clays with pre-existing structures showed larger offsets although breakthrough did not occur.

  15. Why compton-suppressed germanium detector arrays?

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear spectroscopic studies have provided a strong incentive to obtain {gamma}-ray detectors with increasingly better energy resolution, higher full-energy peak efficiencies, and greater sensitivity or resolving power. A major step was the introduction of Ge detectors in the early 60`s. But because of the low atomic number of Ge they have a poor response function; a majority of interacting gamma rays of moderate energy Compton scatter out of the detector leaving a large low-energy background. The remedy was to add a Compton-suppression shield made of NaI around the Ge crystal, and if interactions occurred simultaneously in the NaI scintillator and in the Ge detector to veto that event. Efficiencies also increased greatly when an English-Danish collaboration assembled five Ge detectors, each with a NaI suppressor, into the first array at the end of 1980. Obviously, a system of five such detectors gave much better statistics than the usual two bare detectors used for obtaining coincidence data (by a factor of 10). A few years later, another major improvement came with replacement of the NaI suppressors with shields made of the much denser bismuth germanate (BGO) as scintillator, as these could be thinner leading to arrays with of order 20 detectors. Use of such a large number of detectors led to the realization that for cascades of coincident gamma rays, as in going down a band, the improvement in the peak/background ratio observed and already appreciated in going from singles spectra to gated (double-) coincidence spectra continued when doubly-gated triple-coincidence data were compared for the first time to singly-gated double-coincidence ones. The higher-gated spectra were much cleaner and more selective, though with poorer statistics, and the advantages of higher folds and efficiencies led to the proposals for the larger 4{pi} arrays of today, Eurogam and GASP in Europe and Gammasphere in the U.S.

  16. Teacher Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heynderickx, James J.

    1987-01-01

    A one-page introduction is followed by three pages containing summaries of three journal articles and two documents on teacher selection. Mary Cihak Jensen argues that final selection decisions should be based on multiple information sources, since teaching requires proficiency in many interrelated skills. Superintendent Richard J. Caliendo…

  17. Suppression on Your Own Terms: Internally Generated Displays of Craving Suppression Predict Rebound Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, W. Michael; Sayette, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on emotion suppression has shown a rebound effect, in which expression of the targeted emotion increases following a suppression attempt. In prior investigations, participants have been explicitly instructed to suppress their responses, which has drawn the act of suppression into metaconsciousness. Yet emerging research emphasizes the importance of nonconscious approaches to emotion regulation. This study is the first in which a craving rebound effect was evaluated without simultaneously raising awareness about suppression. We aimed to link spontaneously occurring attempts to suppress cigarette craving to increased smoking motivation assessed immediately thereafter. Smokers (n = 66) received a robust cued smoking-craving manipulation while their facial responses were videotaped and coded using the Facial Action Coding System. Following smoking-cue exposure, participants completed a behavioral choice task previously found to index smoking motivation. Participants evincing suppression-related facial expressions during cue exposure subsequently valued smoking more than did those not displaying these expressions, which suggests that internally generated suppression can exert powerful rebound effects. PMID:23842957

  18. Clinical use of selective decontamination: the concept.

    PubMed

    van der Waaij, D; Manson, W L; Arends, J P; de Vries-Hospers, H G

    1990-01-01

    Infections can be classified according to: (1) the type of offending microorganism (virus, bacteria, fungi, parasites), (2) according to the clearance by the defence system (T cell dependent/independent) and (3) in case bacteria are the causative agents in Gram-positive and Gram-negative infections. The latter classification in Gram-positive and Gram-negative infections has appeared to have a practical consequence. Gram-negative bacteria, often involved in major infections and yeasts, appear to play practically no role in the intestinal ecological system. Consequently, it is nowadays increasingly attempted to eliminate Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts selectively from the digestive tract with antimicrobial agents. Selective suppression of Gram-positive bacteria may severely affect the ecosystem of the digestive tract. This selective suppression of Gram-negatives must be continued as long as patients are immunocompromised (locally or systemically) and is called selective decontamination of the digestive tract. PMID:2289993

  19. 40 CFR 279.82 - Use as a dust suppressant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use as a dust suppressant. 279.82... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Use as a Dust Suppressant and Disposal of Used Oil § 279.82 Use as a dust suppressant. (a) The use of used oil as a dust suppressant...

  20. Evolutionary suppression of erythropoiesis via the modulation of TGF-β signalling in an Antarctic icefish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianghua; Cai, Chang; Hu, Xingxing; Liu, Yun; Guo, Yanan; Hu, Peng; Chen, Zuozhou; Peng, Sihua; Zhang, Dongsheng; Jiang, Shouwen; Wu, Zhichao; Chan, Jiulin; Chen, Liangbiao

    2015-09-01

    The Antarctic icefish, a family (Channichthyidae) of teleosts within the perciform suborder Notothenioidei, are the only known vertebrates without oxygen-transporting haemoglobins and that are largely devoid of circulating erythrocytes. To elucidate the evo-devo mechanisms underpinning the suppressed erythropoiesis in the icefish, we conducted comparative studies on the transcriptomes and microRNAomes of the primary haematopoietic tissues between an icefish (Chionodraco hamatus) and two red-blooded notothenioids (Trematomus bernacchii and Gymnodraco acuticeps). We identified substantial remodelling of the haematopoietic programs in the icefish through which erythropoiesis is selectively suppressed. Experimental verification showed that erythropoietic suppression in the icefish may be attributable to the upregulation of TGF-β signalling, which coincides with reductions in multiple transcription factors essential for erythropoiesis and the upregulation of hundreds of microRNAs, the majority (> 80%) of which potentially target erythropoiesis regulating factors. Of the six microRNAs selected for verification, three miRNAs (miR-152, miR-1388 and miR-16b) demonstrated suppressive functions on GATA1 and ALAS2, which are two factors important for erythroid differentiation, resulting in reduced numbers of erythroids in microinjected zebra fish embryos. Codon substitution analyses of the genes of the TGF-β superfamily revealed signs of positive selection in TGF-β1 and endoglin in the lineages leading to Antarctic notothenioids. Both genes are previously known to function in erythropoietic suppression. These findings implied a general trend of erythropoietic suppression in the cold-adapted notothenioid lineages through evolutionary modulation of the multi-functional TGF-β signalling pathway. This trend is more pronounced in the haemoglobin-less icefish, which may pre-emptively hinder the otherwise defective erythroids from production. PMID:26268413

  1. The multiple facets of Peto's paradox: a life-history model for the evolution of cancer suppression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joel S.; Cunningham, Jessica J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Large animals should have higher lifetime probabilities of cancer than small animals because each cell division carries an attendant risk of mutating towards a tumour lineage. However, this is not observed—a (Peto's) paradox that suggests large and/or long-lived species have evolved effective cancer suppression mechanisms. Using the Euler–Lotka population model, we demonstrate the evolutionary value of cancer suppression as determined by the ‘cost’ (decreased fecundity) of suppression verses the ‘cost’ of cancer (reduced survivorship). Body size per se will not select for sufficient cancer suppression to explain the paradox. Rather, cancer suppression should be most extreme when the probability of non-cancer death decreases with age (e.g. alligators), maturation is delayed, fecundity rates are low and fecundity increases with age. Thus, the value of cancer suppression is predicted to be lowest in the vole (short lifespan, high fecundity) and highest in the naked mole rat (long lived with late female sexual maturity). The life history of pre-industrial humans likely selected for quite low levels of cancer suppression. In modern humans that live much longer, this level results in unusually high lifetime cancer risks. The model predicts a lifetime risk of 49% compared with the current empirical value of 43%. PMID:26056365

  2. The multiple facets of Peto's paradox: a life-history model for the evolution of cancer suppression.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joel S; Cunningham, Jessica J; Gatenby, Robert A

    2015-07-19

    Large animals should have higher lifetime probabilities of cancer than small animals because each cell division carries an attendant risk of mutating towards a tumour lineage. However, this is not observed--a (Peto's) paradox that suggests large and/or long-lived species have evolved effective cancer suppression mechanisms. Using the Euler-Lotka population model, we demonstrate the evolutionary value of cancer suppression as determined by the 'cost' (decreased fecundity) of suppression verses the 'cost' of cancer (reduced survivorship). Body size per se will not select for sufficient cancer suppression to explain the paradox. Rather, cancer suppression should be most extreme when the probability of non-cancer death decreases with age (e.g. alligators), maturation is delayed, fecundity rates are low and fecundity increases with age. Thus, the value of cancer suppression is predicted to be lowest in the vole (short lifespan, high fecundity) and highest in the naked mole rat (long lived with late female sexual maturity). The life history of pre-industrial humans likely selected for quite low levels of cancer suppression. In modern humans that live much longer, this level results in unusually high lifetime cancer risks. The model predicts a lifetime risk of 49% compared with the current empirical value of 43%. PMID:26056365

  3. Wing rock suppression using forebody vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. T.; Ong, L. Y.; Suarez, C. J.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Static and free-to-roll tests were conducted in a water tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and 78-deg sweep delta wings. Flow visualization was performed and the roll angle histories were obtained. The fluid mechanisms governing the wing rock of this configuration were identified. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetries had to be induced at the same time. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the forebody was demonstrated to be potentially an effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  4. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-04-15

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10{sup 7} and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  5. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  6. Atrial selectivity of antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ravens, Ursula; Poulet, Claire; Wettwer, Erich; Knaut, Michael

    2013-01-01

    New antiarrhythmic drugs for treatment of atrial fibrillation should ideally be atrial selective in order to avoid pro-arrhythmic effects in the ventricles. Currently recognized atrial selective targets include atrial Nav1.5 channels, Kv1.5 channels and constitutively active Kir3.1/3.4 channels, each of which confers atrial selectivity by different mechanisms. Na+ channel blockers with potential- and frequency-dependent action preferentially suppress atrial fibrillation because of the high excitation rate and less negative atrial resting potential, which promote drug binding in atria. Kv1.5 channels are truly atrial selective because they do not conduct repolarizing current IKur in ventricles. Constitutively active IK,ACh is predominantly observed in remodelled atria from patients in permanent atrial fibrillation (AF). A lot of effort has been invested to detect compounds which will selectively block Kir3.1/Kir3.4 in their remodelled constitutively active form. Novel drugs which have been and are being developed aim at atrial-selective targets. Vernakalant and ranolazine which mainly block atrial Na+ channels are clinically effective. Newly designed selective IKur blockers and IK,ACh blockers are effective in animal models; however, clinical benefit in converting AF into sinus rhythm (SR) or reducing AF burden remains to be demonstrated. In conclusion, atrial-selective antiarrhythmic agents have a lot of potential, but a long way to go. PMID:23732646

  7. Suppression of correlated electron escape in double ionization in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, Bruno; Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the Pauli exclusion principle on double ionization of He atoms by strong, linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We show that correlated electron escape, with electron momenta symmetric with respect to the field polarization axis, is suppressed if atoms are initially prepared in the metastable state S3 . The effect is a consequence of selection rules for the transition to the appropriate outgoing two-electron states. We illustrate the suppression in numerical calculations of electron and ion momentum distributions within a reduced dimensionality model.

  8. A simple scheme for the design of solvent-suppression pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, Élise; Sizun, Philippe; Piotto, Martial; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc

    2002-11-01

    Excitation sculpting was first introduced as a way to efficiently suppress solvent signals. It requires a pulse sequence that acts as a null pulse at the solvent-resonance frequency and as an inversion pulse everywhere else. In this article, it is shown that such a goal can be achieved starting with "top-hat" inversion shaped pulses such as I-BURP-2 or gaussian cascade G3. The result is a Globally Antisymmetric Selective Pulse, or GASP. Numerical optimization was used to extend the performance of such pulses. Multifrequency signal suppression was shown to be possible through application of successive excitation sculpting modules.

  9. A simple scheme for the design of solvent-suppression pulses.

    PubMed

    Prost, Elise; Sizun, Philippe; Piotto, Martial; Nuzillard, Jean Marc

    2002-11-01

    Excitation sculpting was first introduced as a way to efficiently suppress solvent signals. It requires a pulse sequence that acts as a null pulse at the solvent-resonance frequency and as an inversion pulse everywhere else. In this article, it is shown that such a goal can be achieved starting with "top-hat" inversion shaped pulses such as I-BURP-2 or gaussian cascade G3. The result is a Globally Antisymmetric Selective Pulse, or GASP. Numerical optimization was used to extend the performance of such pulses. Multifrequency signal suppression was shown to be possible through application of successive excitation sculpting modules. PMID:12468306

  10. Vibration Isolation, Suppression, Steering, and Pointing (VISSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Rahman, Zahidul; Kedikian, Roland

    1996-01-01

    The design of a six degree of freedom flight vibration isolation suppression and steering (VISS) subsystem for a mid-wave infrared camera on the top of a spacecraft is presented. The development of a long stroke piezoelectric, redundant, compact, low stiffness and power efficient actuator is summarized. A subsystem that could be built and validated for flight within 15 months was investigated. The goals of the VISS are 20 dB vibration isolation above 2 Hz, 15 dB vibration suppression of disturbances at about 60 Hz and 120 Hz, and +/- 0.3 deg steering at 2 Hz and 4 Hz.

  11. Task motivation influences alpha suppression following errors.

    PubMed

    Compton, Rebecca J; Bissey, Bryn; Worby-Selim, Sharoda

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the present research is to examine the influence of motivation on a novel error-related neural marker, error-related alpha suppression (ERAS). Participants completed an attentionally demanding flanker task under conditions that emphasized either speed or accuracy or under conditions that manipulated the monetary value of errors. Conditions in which errors had greater motivational value produced greater ERAS, that is, greater alpha suppression following errors compared to correct trials. A second study found that a manipulation of task difficulty did not affect ERAS. Together, the results confirm that ERAS is both a robust phenomenon and one that is sensitive to motivational factors. PMID:24673621

  12. Suppressed conductance in a metallic graphene nanojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haidong; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    The linear conductance spectrum of a metallic graphene junction formed by interconnecting two gapless graphene nanoribbons is calculated. A strong conductance suppression appears in the vicinity of the Dirac point. We found that such a conductance suppression arises from the antiresonance effect associated with an edge state localized at the zigzag-edged shoulder of the junction. The conductance valley due to the antiresonance is rather robust in the presence of the impurity and vacancy scattering. Also the center of the conductance valley can be readily tuned by an electric field exerted on the wider nanoribbon.

  13. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  14. Suppression of Bedbug's Reproduction by RNA Interference of Vitellogenin.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Minoru; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2016-01-01

    Recent resurgence of the bedbug Cimex lectularius is a global problem on the public health. On account of the worldwide rise of insecticide-resistant bedbug populations, exploration of new approaches to the bedbug control and management is anticipated. In this context, gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been considered for its potential application to pest control and management, because RNAi enables specific suppression of target genes and thus flexible selection of target traits to be disrupted. In this study, in an attempt to develop a control strategy targeting reproduction of the bedbug, we investigated RNAi-mediated gene silencing of vitellogenin (Vg), a major yolk protein precursor essential for oogenesis. From the bedbug transcriptomes, we identified a typical Vg gene and a truncated Vg gene, which were designated as ClVg and ClVg-like, respectively. ClVg gene was highly expressed mainly in the fat body of adult females, which was more than 100 times higher than the expression level of ClVg-like gene, indicating that ClVg gene is the primary functional Vg gene in the bedbug. RNAi-mediated suppression of ClVg gene expression in adult females resulted in drastically reduced egg production, atrophied ovaries, and inflated abdomen due to hypertrophied fat bodies. These phenotypic consequences are expected not only to suppress the bedbug reproduction directly but also to deteriorate its feeding and survival indirectly via behavioral modifications. These results suggest the potential of ClVg gene as a promising target for RNAi-based population management of the bedbug. PMID:27096422

  15. Selective mutism

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need to continue therapy for shyness and social anxiety into the teenage years, and possibly into adulthood. ... Call your health care provider if your child has symptoms of selective mutism, and it is affecting school and social activities.

  16. MPLM fire detection and suppression: architecture and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Balocco, P.; Potenza, F.; Cafero, E. |

    1993-12-31

    The Mini Pressurized Logistics Module (MPLM) is a servicer of the Space Station Freedom (SSF), whose purpose is to provide location for both subsystems and payload racks (active racks i.e. namely a freezer and a freezer/refrigerator, is to be serviced, and passive racks). The MPLM will be used to supply and return a pressurized cargo to and from the SSF via the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), optimizing the NSTS cargo capabilities. Being a pressurized module, the MPLM is characterized by an Environmental Control System that consists of two sections: The Enviromental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). The ECLSS is constituted by other subsections, among which is the Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS) Subsystem. The fire suppression method, selected at SSF level, is the CO2 discharge and diffusion in the affected enclosed areas. As far as the mathematical simulation of the FDS aspects is concerned, a big effort has been made and is still on-going. The related mathematical modelization is quite complex, involving two-phase phenomena, chocked flow and gas diffusion: this means the implementation and running of dedicated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The diffusion analysis is particularly time-consuming, due to the complexity of the geometry with respect to modelization capability.

  17. Alamethicin suppresses methanogenesis and promotes acetogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-06-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼ 3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml(-1) day(-1), similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. PMID:25819972

  18. Betulin Derivatives Effectively Suppress Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Laavola, Mirka; Haavikko, Raisa; Hämäläinen, Mari; Leppänen, Tiina; Nieminen, Riina; Alakurtti, Sami; Moreira, Vânia M; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Moilanen, Eeva

    2016-02-26

    Betulin is a pharmacologically active triterpenoid found in the bark of the birch tree (Betula sp. L.). Betulin and betulinic acid are structurally related to anti-inflammatory steroids, but little is known about their potential anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, the inflammatory gene expression and the anti-inflammatory properties of betulin, betulinic acid, and 16 semisynthetic betulin derivatives were investigated. Betulin derivatives 3, 4, and 5 selectively inhibited the expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a post-transcriptional manner. They also inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production but had no effect on the other inflammatory factors studied. More interestingly, a new anti-inflammatory betulin derivative 9 with a wide-spectrum anti-inflammatory activity was discovered. Compound 9 was found to suppress the expression of cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), as well as that of prostaglandin synthase-2 (COX-2) in addition to iNOS. The in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of compound 9 was indicated via significant suppression of the carrageenan-induced paw inflammation in mice. The results show, for the first time, that the pyrazole-fused betulin derivative (9) and related compounds have anti-inflammatory properties that could be utilized in drug development. PMID:26915998

  19. Alamethicin Suppresses Methanogenesis and Promotes Acetogenesis in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml−1 day−1, similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. PMID:25819972

  20. A nonclassical vitamin D receptor pathway suppresses renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ichiaki; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Masato; Abe, Rumi; Nagai, Yu; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Yuka; Ohkido, Ichiro; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Murayama, Akiko; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2013-01-01

    The TGF-β superfamily comprises pleiotropic cytokines that regulate SMAD and non-SMAD signaling. TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is known to be involved in tissue fibrosis, including renal fibrosis. Here, we found that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3–bound [1,25(OH)2D3-bound] vitamin D receptor (VDR) specifically inhibits TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction through direct interaction with SMAD3. In mouse models of tissue fibrosis, 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment prevented renal fibrosis through the suppression of TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction. Based on the structure of the VDR-ligand complex, we generated 2 synthetic ligands. These ligands selectively inhibited TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction without activating VDR-mediated transcription and significantly attenuated renal fibrosis in mice. These results indicate that 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent suppression of TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is independent of VDR-mediated transcriptional activity. In addition, these ligands did not cause hypercalcemia resulting from stimulation of the transcriptional activity of the VDR. Thus, our study provides a new strategy for generating chemical compounds that specifically inhibit TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction. Since TGF-β–SMAD signal transduction is reportedly involved in several disorders, our results will aid in the development of new drugs that do not cause detectable adverse effects, such as hypercalcemia. PMID:24135137

  1. The Suppression of Dominant Acoustic Frequencies in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Xingxian; Brown, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Patient discomfort and brain imaging distortion are serious MRI acoustic noise problems arising from the rapid switching on and off of gradient coils in the presence of the strong Larmor magnetic field. A study is made of dominant frequencies in the acoustic noise spectrum and, motivated by both spring and string ideas, we propose the cancellation of selected frequencies by appropriate gradient pulse sequence design. From both simulations and experiments, vibrations resulting from an impulsive force associated with a ramping up of a gradient pulse are shown to be cancelled upon the application of another impulsive force coming from the appropriately timed ramping down of that pulse. A method for the suppression of multiple-frequency contributions involving a series of gradient pulses with variable timings is developed and confirmed by experiment. Whether we refer to reduction in terms of dB (about 30-40 dB per peak), or to the verdict of a listener, the conclusion is that a marked reduction in sound can be achieved when at least three of the dominant frequency peaks are suppressed. A variety of pulse profiles and timing combinations can be used to attenuate important contributions to the acoustic spectrum. Supported by the Ohio Third Frontier Program.

  2. Reward association facilitates distractor suppression in human visual search.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mengyuan; Yang, Feitong; Li, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Although valuable objects are attractive in nature, people often encounter situations where they would prefer to avoid such distraction while focusing on the task goal. Contrary to the typical effect of attentional capture by a reward-associated item, we provide evidence for a facilitation effect derived from the active suppression of a high reward-associated stimulus when cuing its identity as distractor before the display of search arrays. Selection of the target is shown to be significantly faster when the distractors were in high reward-associated colour than those in low reward-associated or non-rewarded colours. This behavioural reward effect was associated with two neural signatures before the onset of the search display: the increased frontal theta oscillation and the strengthened top-down modulation from frontal to anterior temporal regions. The former suggests an enhanced working memory representation for the reward-associated stimulus and the increased need for cognitive control to override Pavlovian bias, whereas the latter indicates that the boost of inhibitory control is realized through a frontal top-down mechanism. These results suggest a mechanism in which the enhanced working memory representation of a reward-associated feature is integrated with task demands to modify attentional priority during active distractor suppression and benefit behavioural performance. PMID:26797805

  3. Thought Suppression in Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J.; Alatiq, Yousra; Geddes, John R.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of negative thoughts has been observed under experimental conditions among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) but has never been examined among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Patients with BD (n = 36), patients with MDD (n = 20), and healthy controls (n = 20) completed a task that required unscrambling 6-word strings into 5-word sentences, leaving out 1 word. The extra word allowed the sentences to be completed in a negative, neutral, or “hyperpositive” (manic/goal-oriented) way. Participants completed the sentences under conditions of cognitive load (rehearsing a 6-digit number), reward (a bell tone), load and reward, or neither load nor reward. We hypothesized that patients with BD would engage in more active suppression of negative and hyperpositive thoughts than would controls, as revealed by their unscrambling more word strings into negative or hyperpositive sentences. Under conditions of load or reward and in the absence of either load or reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did controls. Under conditions of reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did patients with MDD. Patients with BD also reported more use of negative thought suppression than did controls. These group differences in negative biases were no longer significant when current mood states were controlled. Finally, the groups did not differ in the proportion of hyperpositive sentence completions in any condition. Thought suppression may provide a critical locus for psychological interventions in BD. PMID:20455608

  4. Sound-suppressing structure with thermal relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. O.; Holowach, J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Sound-suppressing structure comprising stacked acoustic panels wherein the inner high frequency panel is mounted for thermal expansion with respect to the outer low frequency panel is discussed. Slip joints eliminate the potential for thermal stresses, and a thermal expansion gap between the panels provides for additional relative thermal growth while reducing heat convection into the low frequency panel.

  5. Government Doublethink: Protection or Suppression in Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses regulations and actions related to government withholding, suppressing, and altering information since September 11, 2001. Topics include conflicting goals of an informed citizenry versus national security, science and technology progress versus protection of sensitive information, and public health versus ideology; political pressure;…

  6. ICE FOG SUPPRESSION USING THIN CHEMICAL FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ice fog suppression experiments on the Fort Wainwright Power Plant cooling pond were conducted during the winters of 1974-76. Baseline information studies occupied a sizeable portion of the available ice fog weather in 1974-75. Hexadecanol was added to the pond and dramatically i...

  7. Suppressed Carrier Synchronizers for ISI Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Simon, Marvin K.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate a class of suppressed carrier synchronization loops that are motivated by MAP estimation theory and in the presence of ISI outperform the conventional I-Q loop which is designed on the basis of zero ISI (wideband assumption). The measure of comparison used is the so-called.

  8. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  9. Noise suppression methods for robust speech processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boll, S. F.; Kajiya, J.; Youngberg, J.; Petersen, T. L.; Ravindra, H.; Done, W.; Cox, B. V.; Cohen, E.

    1981-04-01

    Robust speech processing in practical operating environments requires effective environmental and processor noise suppression. This report describes the technical findings and accomplishments during the reporting period for the research program funded to develop real-time, compressed speech analysis-synthesis algorithms whose performance is invariant under signal contamination. Fulfillment of this requirement is necessary to insure reliable secure compressed speech transmission within realistic military command and control environments. Overall contributions resulting from this research program include the understanding of how environmental noise degrades narrow band, coded speech, development of appropriate real-time noise suppression algorithms, and development of speech parameter identification methods that consider signal contamination as a fundamental element in the estimation process. This report describes the research and results in the areas of noise suppression using the dual input adaptive noise cancellation articulation rate change techniques, spectral subtraction and a description of an experiment which demonstrated that the spectral substraction noise suppression algorithm can improve the intelligibility of 2400 bps, LPC-10 coded, helicopter speech by 10.6 points. In addition summaries are included of prior studies in Constant-Q signal analysis and synthesis, perceptual modelling, speech activity detection, and pole-zero modelling of noisy signals. Three recent studies in speech modelling using the critical band analysis-synthesis transform and using splines are then presented. Finally a list of major publications generated under this contract is given.

  10. Quantum origin of suppression for vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balitsky, Ja. V.; Kiselev, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    By example of a model with a spatially global scalar field, we show that the energy density of zero-point modes is exponentially suppressed by an average number of field quanta in a finite volume with respect to the energy density in the stationary state of minimal energy. We describe cosmological implications of mechanism.

  11. Suppression of ras-transformants (review).

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, N

    1991-01-01

    Transforming ras genes are the oncogenes most frequently identified in human cancers. This justifies the intense interest in finding ways to suppress oncogenicity in these gene family-mediated transformants. The methods of suppression can be classified as 1) genetical, 2) biological and 3) pharmacological. Most of the reagents used for the suppression inhibit rodent transformants induced by transfected viral or activated cellular ras oncogenes, but some of the reagents are also effective when applied to natural human transformants that contain activated ras oncogenes. The growth and tumorigenicity of the ras-transformants are suppressed by the inhibition of the integration, transcription, translation or post-translational modification of the ras genes and p21 ras proteins, as well as the inhibition of the expression of genes which collaborate in the ras-transformation or the enhancement of some tumor suppressor genes. These observations offer novel approaches to the investigation of malignant transformation by ras-oncogenes, and have potential application in treatment of ras-oncogene-induced tumors. PMID:2018365

  12. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  13. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  14. Spacecraft Fire Suppression: Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Wu, Ming-Shin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project is the testing and evaluation of the effectiveness of a variety of fire suppressants and fire-response techniques that will be used in the next generation of spacecraft (Crew Exploration Vehicle, CEV) and planetary habitats. From the many lessons learned in the last 40 years of space travel, there is common agreement in the spacecraft fire safety community that a new fire suppression system will be needed for the various types of fire threats anticipated in new space vehicles and habitats. To date, there is no single fire extinguishing system that can address all possible fire situations in a spacecraft in an effective, reliable, clean, and safe way. The testing conducted under this investigation will not only validate the various numerical models that are currently being developed, but it will provide new design standards on fire suppression that can then be applied to the next generation of spacecraft extinguishment systems. The test program will provide validation of scaling methods by conducting small, medium, and large scale fires. A variety of suppression methods will be tested, such as water mist, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen with single and multiple injection points and direct or distributed agent deployment. These injection methods cover the current ISS fire suppression method of a portable hand-held fire extinguisher spraying through a port in a rack and also next generation spacecraft units that may have a multi-point suppression delivery system built into the design. Consideration will be given to the need of a crew to clean-up the agent and recharge the extinguishers in flight in a long-duration mission. The fire suppression methods mentioned above will be used to extinguish several fire scenarios that have been identified as the most relevant to spaceflight, such as overheated wires, cable bundles, and circuit boards, as well as burning cloth and paper. Further testing will be conducted in which obstructions and

  15. Results from computer program for analyzing scattered light suppression systems for large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tifft, W. G.; Fannin, B. B.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program was developed which has the ability to analyze the performance of most light suppression systems so as to predict the amount of scattered light which will reach the image plane for various conditions of unwanted light input from the sun, earth, or moon. This program was used to analyze three different configurations of the large space telescope (LST): an LST with a truncated sunshield, an LST with an extended cylindrical sunshield, and an LST with a conical sunshield which is tilted upwards. The computer program gives the user detailed information as to the paths taken by the unwanted stray light to reach the image plane, and pinpoints those portions of the light suppression system which contribute most of the stray light, so that areas requiring improvements are evident. Certain design guide lines were formulated for any light suppression system selected for the LST, and one which meets these requirements (the tilted sunshade) is described in detail.

  16. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  17. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  18. Automatic Laser Glare Suppression in Electro-Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Gunnar; Eberle, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. PMID:25569754

  19. Electro-optical sensor with automatic suppression of laser dazzling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, G.; Eberle, B.

    2012-10-01

    The progress in laser technology leads to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Especially continuous wave laser sources pose a serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of wavelengths cannot be encountered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. An anti-dazzle algorithm comprises the analysis of the laser wavelength and the subsequent activation of the appropriate micromirrors of the DMD.

  20. Automatic laser glare suppression in electro-optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Gunnar; Eberle, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. PMID:25569754

  1. Method of suppressing formation of contrails and solution therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.

    1988-08-30

    This patent describes a method of suppressing the formation of contrails from water vapor in the hot exhaust gases of an engine discharged into a cold temperature atmosphere comprising the steps of providing in relatively sufficient proportions to effect hypernucleation of the water vapor in the hot exhaust gases a solution of a non-corrosive surfactant for reducing the surface energy of the water vapor and a combined carrier and nucleating agent selected from the group of water soluble monohydric, dihydric, trihydric and polyhydric alcohols, and injecting the solution into the hot exhaust gases of the engine, the solution reducing ice particles formed from the water vapor in the cold atmosphere to a size below a humanly visible range.

  2. The tendency to suppress, inhibiting thoughts, and dream rebound.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Fiona; Bryant, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Ironic control theory proposes that suppressing thoughts leads to increased occurrence of the suppressed thought because monitoring for the unwanted thought leads to intrusions. This study investigated the influence of suppressing unwanted thoughts on dream content. One hundred participants who had high or low levels of tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts nominated an intrusive thought, and half of the participants were instructed to suppress that thought for 5 min prior to sleeping. Participants completed a dream diary upon waking, which was subsequently rated by independent raters for dream content. In terms of the 79 participants who reported dreaming, more high suppressors who were instructed to suppress dreamt about the intrusive thought than high suppressors in the control condition. There was no difference between low suppressors in the suppression and control conditions. These results suggest that dream content can be influenced by attempted suppression prior to sleep, and this is particularly apparent in people with a tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts. PMID:16516140

  3. FMRI repetition suppression for voices is modulated by stimulus expectations.

    PubMed

    Andics, Attila; Gál, Viktor; Vicsi, Klára; Rudas, Gábor; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán

    2013-04-01

    According to predictive coding models of sensory processing, stimulus expectations have a profound effect on sensory cortical responses. This was supported by experimental results, showing that fMRI repetition suppression (fMRI RS) for face stimuli is strongly modulated by the probability of stimulus repetitions throughout the visual cortical processing hierarchy. To test whether processing of voices is also affected by stimulus expectations, here we investigated the effect of repetition probability on fMRI RS in voice-selective cortical areas. Changing ('alt') and identical ('rep') voice stimulus pairs were presented to the listeners in blocks, with a varying probability of alt and rep trials across blocks. We found auditory fMRI RS in the nonprimary voice-selective cortical regions, including the bilateral posterior STS, the right anterior STG and the right IFC, as well as in the IPL. Importantly, fMRI RS effects in all of these areas were strongly modulated by the probability of stimulus repetition: auditory fMRI RS was reduced or not present in blocks with low repetition probability. Our results revealed that auditory fMRI RS in higher-level voice-selective cortical regions is modulated by repetition probabilities and thus suggest that in audition, similarly to the visual modality, processing of sensory information is shaped by stimulus expectation processes. PMID:23268783

  4. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution. PMID:23011851

  5. Age-related decline in global form suppression.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Iris; Finke, Kathrin; Töllner, Thomas; Starman, Kornelija; Müller, Hermann J; Conci, Markus

    2015-12-01

    Visual selection of illusory 'Kanizsa' figures, an assembly of local elements that induce the percept of a whole object, is facilitated relative to configurations composed of the same local elements that do not induce a global form--an instance of 'global precedence' in visual processing. Selective attention, i.e., the ability to focus on relevant and ignore irrelevant information, declines with increasing age; however, how this deficit affects selection of global vs. local configurations remains unknown. On this background, the present study examined for age-related differences in a global-local task requiring selection of either a 'global' Kanizsa- or a 'local' non-Kanizsa configuration (in the presence of the respectively other configuration) by analyzing event-related lateralizations (ERLs). Behaviorally, older participants showed a more pronounced global-precedence effect. Electrophysiologically, this effect was accompanied by an early (150-225 ms) 'positivity posterior contralateral' (PPC), which was elicited for older, but not younger, participants, when the target was a non-Kanizsa configuration and the Kanizsa figure a distractor (rather than vice versa). In addition, timing differences in the subsequent (250-500 ms) posterior contralateral negativity (PCN) indicated that attentional resources were allocated faster to Kanizsa, as compared to non-Kanizsa, targets in both age groups, while the allocation of spatial attention seemed to be generally delayed in older relative to younger age. Our results suggest that the enhanced global-local asymmetry in the older age group originated from less effective suppression of global distracter forms on early processing stages--indicative of older observers having difficulties with disengaging from a global default selection mode and switching to the required local state of attentional resolution. PMID:26498865

  6. Dermal exposure to jet fuel suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity: a critical role for aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gerardo; Limon-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    Dermal exposure to military (JP-8) and/or commercial (Jet-A) jet fuel suppresses cell-mediated immune reactions. Immune regulatory cytokines and biological modifiers, including platelet activating factor (PAF), prostaglandin E(2), and interleukin-10, have been implicated in the pathway of events leading to immune suppression. It is estimated that approximately 260 different hydrocarbons are found in jet fuel, and the exact identity of the active immunotoxic agent(s) is unknown. The recent availability of synthetic jet fuel (S-8), which is refined from natural gas, and is devoid of aromatic hydrocarbons, made it feasible to design experiments to address this problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that the aromatic hydrocarbons present in jet fuel are responsible for immune suppression. We report that applying S-8 to the skin of mice does not upregulate the expression of epidermal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) nor does it induce immune suppression. Adding back a cocktail of seven of the most prevalent aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, 1,2,4-trimethlybenzene, cyclohexylbenzene, and dimethylnaphthalene) to S-8 upregulated epidermal COX-2 expression and suppressed a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. Injecting PAF receptor antagonists, or a selective cycloozygenase-2 inhibitor into mice treated with S-8 supplemented with the aromatic cocktail, blocked suppression of DTH, similar to data previously reported using JP-8. These findings identify the aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel as the agents responsible for suppressing DTH, in part by the upregulation of COX-2, and the production of immune regulatory factors and cytokines. PMID:17890764

  7. Paradoxical lateral suppression in the dolphin's auditory system: weak sounds suppress response to strong sounds.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin AYa; Klishin, V O

    1997-09-26

    A paradoxical phenomenon was found in the auditory system of dolphins: weak sounds suppressed the brain responses to much stronger sounds. This occurred when the brain evoked potentials to rhythmic sound amplitude modulations were recorded. The response was markedly suppressed by addition of another sound of higher frequency and down to 40 dB lower intensity than the amplitude-modulated signal. Only the sustained rhythmic response was suppressed while transient on-response was not, thus indicating that the suppression influenced the ability of evoked potentials to follow rapid amplitude modulations. This prevents weak sounds from being masked by stronger ones. It may help a dolphin to perceive weaker echo-signals in the background of stronger emitted pulses. PMID:9347944

  8. Suppressed visual looming stimuli are not integrated with auditory looming signals: Evidence from continuous flash suppression

    PubMed Central

    Moors, Pieter; Huygelier, Hanne; Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee; van Ee, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using binocular rivalry have shown that signals in a modality other than the visual can bias dominance durations depending on their congruency with the rivaling stimuli. More recently, studies using continuous flash suppression (CFS) have reported that multisensory integration influences how long visual stimuli remain suppressed. In this study, using CFS, we examined whether the contrast thresholds for detecting visual looming stimuli are influenced by a congruent auditory stimulus. In Experiment 1, we show that a looming visual stimulus can result in lower detection thresholds compared to a static concentric grating, but that auditory tone pips congruent with the looming stimulus did not lower suppression thresholds any further. In Experiments 2, 3, and 4, we again observed no advantage for congruent multisensory stimuli. These results add to our understanding of the conditions under which multisensory integration is possible, and suggest that certain forms of multisensory integration are not evident when the visual stimulus is suppressed from awareness using CFS. PMID:26034573

  9. Properties and requirements for production of a macrophage product which suppresses steroid production by adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mathison, J C; La Forest, A C; Ulevitch, R J

    1984-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-treated murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM) release a factor or factors into the supernatant that suppress adrenocorticotropic hormone-induced steroidogenesis in explanted rabbit adrenocortical cells (J. C. Mathison et al., J. Immunol. 130:2757-2762, 1983). To determine the requirements for suppression, PEM supernatants (30 microliters) were added to explanted rabbit adrenocortical cells in a final volume of 120 microliters with 10 mU of adrenocorticotropic hormone per ml, and after 18 h at 37 degrees C, steroid concentrations were measured by a fluorometric assay. Supernatant from proteose peptone-elicited C3HeB/FeJ PEM (5 X 10(6) PEM per 3.5-cm well, 10 micrograms of Salmonella minnesota Re595 LPS per ml, 18 h) suppressed steroid production ca. 50%, and kinetic studies demonstrated that the appearance of suppressive activity in the supernatant was gradual over 4 to 18 h. Release of suppressive activity was not associated with decreased viability of the PEM (assessed by fluorescein diacetate staining and measurement of lactic dehydrogenase in the supernatant). Suppression was not observed when the PEM supernatant was diluted 10-fold before addition to the adrenocortical cells, whereas supernatant concentrated 20-fold (prepared with a 10,000-molecular-weight-cutoff filter) produced 75 to 80% suppression. The suppressive activity was stable at pH 4, pH 11, or 70 degrees C for 30 min but was inactivated at 100 degrees C (10 min). Suppressive activity was also induced in C3HeB/FeJ PEM by O111:B4 lipopolysaccharide or heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes. In contrast, PEM from C3H/HeJ mice did not produce detectable suppressive activity in response to Re595 lipopolysaccharide or heat-killed L. monocytogenes. Thus, these results provide additional support for the inducible, selective release of a macrophage product that could affect the host response to lipopolysaccharide by regulation of the adrenocortical response to adrenocorticotropic

  10. Evolutionary Agroecology: the potential for cooperative, high density, weed-suppressing cereals

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jacob; Andersen, Sven B; Wille, Wibke K-M; Griepentrog, Hans W; Olsen, Jannie M

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary theory can be applied to improve agricultural yields and/or sustainability, an approach we call Evolutionary Agroecology. The basic idea is that plant breeding is unlikely to improve attributes already favored by millions of years of natural selection, whereas there may be unutilized potential in selecting for attributes that increase total crop yield but reduce plants’ individual fitness. In other words, plant breeding should be based on group selection. We explore this approach in relation to crop-weed competition, and argue that it should be possible to develop high density cereals that can utilize their initial size advantage over weeds to suppress them much better than under current practices, thus reducing or eliminating the need for chemical or mechanical weed control. We emphasize the role of density in applying group selection to crops: it is competition among individuals that generates the ‘Tragedy of the Commons’, providing opportunities to improve plant production by selecting for attributes that natural selection would not favor. When there is competition for light, natural selection of individuals favors a defensive strategy of ‘shade avoidance’, but a collective, offensive ‘shading’ strategy could increase weed suppression and yield in the high density, high uniformity cropping systems we envision. PMID:25567940

  11. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  12. Determining the Capacity of Time-Based Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Derrick G.; Kunar, Melina A.

    2012-01-01

    In visual search, a set of distractor items can be suppressed from future selection if they are presented (previewed) before a second set of search items arrive. This "visual marking" mechanism provides a top-down way of prioritizing the selection of new stimuli, at the expense of old stimuli already in the field (Watson & Humphreys, 1997).…

  13. Lexical and Syntactic Influences on Structural Selection in Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazer, Alexandra Kate

    2016-01-01

    We still know surprisingly little about how grammatical structures are selected for use in sentence production. A major debate concerns whether structural selection is competitive or noncompetitive. Competitive accounts propose that alternative structures or structural components actively suppress one another's activation until one option reaches…

  14. Systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity by supernatants from UV-irradiated keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, J.M.; Ullrich, S.E. )

    1992-12-15

    Exposing murine keratinocyte cultures to UV radiation causes the release of a suppressive cytokine that mimics the immunosuppressive effects of total-body UV exposure. Injecting supernatants from UV-irradiated keratinocyte cultures into mice inhibits their ability to generate a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction against allogeneic histocompatibility Ag, and spleen cells from mice injected with supernatant do not respond to alloantigen in the in vitro MLR. A unique feature of the immunosuppression induced by either total-body UV-exposure or injecting the suppressive cytokine from UV-irradiated keratinocytes is the selectivity of suppression. Although cellular immune reactions such as delayed-type hypersensitivity are suppressed antibody production is unaffected. Because the selective nature to the UV-induced immunosuppression is similar to the biologic activity of IL-10, the authors examined the hypothesis that UV exposure of keratinocytes causes the release of IL-10. Keratinocyte monolayers were exposed to UV radiation and at specific times after exposure mRNA was isolated or the culture supernatant from the cells was collected. These data indicate that activated keratinocytes are capable of secreting IL-10 and suggest that the release of IL-10 by UV-irradiated keratinocytes plays an essential role in the induction of systemic immunosuppression after total-body UV exposure. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Inhibition of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Input to Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli Mediated by Suppression of Presynaptic Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Matt; McGann, John P.; Heyward, Philip M.; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanism underlying presynaptic regulation of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) input to the mouse olfactory bulb using optical-imaging techniques that selectively report activity in the ORN pre-synaptic terminal. First, we loaded ORNs with calcium-sensitive dye and imaged stimulus-evoked calcium influx in a slice preparation. Single olfactory nerve shocks evoked rapid fluorescence increases that were largely blocked by the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA. Paired shocks revealed a long-lasting suppression of calcium influx with ~40% suppression at 400-ms interstimulus intervals and a recovery time constant of ~450 ms. Blocking activation of postsynaptic olfactory bulb neurons with APV/CNQX reduced this suppression. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited calcium influx, whereas GABAB antagonists reduced paired-pulse suppression without affecting the response to the conditioning pulse. We also imaged transmitter release directly using a mouse line that expresses synaptopHluorin selectively in ORNs. We found that the relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release was superlinear and that paired-pulse suppression of transmitter release was reduced, but not eliminated, by APV/CNQX and GABAB antagonists. These results demonstrate that primary olfactory input to the CNS can be presynaptically regulated by GABAergic interneurons and show that one major intracellular pathway for this regulation is via the suppression of calcium influx through N-type calcium channels in the pre-synaptic terminal. This mechanism is unique among primary sensory afferents. PMID:15917320

  16. Sustained firing of cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus evokes endocannabinoid release and retrograde suppression of parallel fiber synapses.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, Miloslav; Tipton, Philip W; Brenowitz, Stephan D

    2011-11-01

    Neurons in many brain regions release endocannabinoids from their dendrites that act as retrograde signals to transiently suppress neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. Little is known, however, about the physiological mechanisms of short-term endocannabinoid-mediated plasticity under physiological conditions. Here we investigate calcium-dependent endocannabinoid release from cartwheel cells (CWCs) of the mouse dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) in the auditory brainstem that provide feedforward inhibition onto DCN principal neurons. We report that sustained action potential firing by CWCs evokes endocannabinoid release in response to submicromolar elevation of dendritic calcium that transiently suppresses their parallel fiber (PF) inputs by >70%. Basal spontaneous CWC firing rates are insufficient to evoke tonic suppression of PF synapses. However, elevating CWC firing rates by stimulating PFs triggers the release of endocannabinoids and heterosynaptic suppression of PF inputs. Spike-evoked suppression by endocannabinoids selectively suppresses excitatory synapses, but glycinergic/GABAergic inputs onto CWCs are not affected. Our findings demonstrate a mechanism of transient plasticity mediated by endocannabinoids that heterosynaptically suppresses subsets of excitatory presynaptic inputs to CWCs that regulates feedforward inhibition of DCN principal neurons and may influence the output of the DCN. PMID:22049424

  17. Greater magnocellular saccadic suppression in high versus low autistic tendency suggests a causal path to local perceptual style.

    PubMed

    Crewther, David P; Crewther, Daniel; Bevan, Stephanie; Goodale, Melvyn A; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-12-01

    Saccadic suppression-the reduction of visual sensitivity during rapid eye movements-has previously been proposed to reflect a specific suppression of the magnocellular visual system, with the initial neural site of that suppression at or prior to afferent visual information reaching striate cortex. Dysfunction in the magnocellular visual pathway has also been associated with perceptual and physiological anomalies in individuals with autism spectrum disorder or high autistic tendency, leading us to question whether saccadic suppression is altered in the broader autism phenotype. Here we show that individuals with high autistic tendency show greater saccadic suppression of low versus high spatial frequency gratings while those with low autistic tendency do not. In addition, those with high but not low autism spectrum quotient (AQ) demonstrated pre-cortical (35-45 ms) evoked potential differences (saccade versus fixation) to a large, low contrast, pseudo-randomly flashing bar. Both AQ groups showed similar differential visual evoked potential effects in later epochs (80-160 ms) at high contrast. Thus, the magnocellular theory of saccadic suppression appears untenable as a general description for the typically developing population. Our results also suggest that the bias towards local perceptual style reported in autism may be due to selective suppression of low spatial frequency information accompanying every saccadic eye movement. PMID:27019719

  18. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  19. Ultratrace uranium fingerprinting with isotope selective laser ionization spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Summer L; Bushaw, Bruce A

    2008-08-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of isotope selective laser ionization spectrometry for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes (234)U, (235)U, and (236)U with respect to (238)U. The inherent isotopic selectivity of three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers results in measurement of the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as (235)UH(+) during measurement of (236)U. This relative abundance limit is attained without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 microg total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes. PMID:18613650

  20. Ultratrace Uranium Fingerprinting with Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Summer L.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2008-08-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry (ISLIS) for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes 234U, 235U, and 236U with respect to 238U. Optical isotopic selectivity in three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers is capable of measuring the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm, and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as 235UH+ during measurement of 236U. This relative abundance limit approaches the threshold for measurement of uranium minor isotopes with conventional mass spectrometry, typically 10-7, but without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 µg total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes.

  1. SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yuzhu; Qiu, Qingchao; Jiang, Ming; Jin, Renjie; Lehmann, Brian D; Strand, Douglas W; Jovanovic, Bojana; DeGraff, David J; Zheng, Yi; Yousif, Dina A; Case, Thomas C; Yi, Jia; Cates, Justin M; Virostko, John; He, Xiusheng; Jin, Xunbo; Hayward, Simon W; Matusik, Robert J; George, Alfred L; Yi, Yajun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metastasis, the main cause of death from cancer, remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Experimental design Based on a pattern of reduced expression in human prostate cancer tissues and tumor cell lines, a candidate suppressor gene (SPARCL1) was identified. We used in vitro approaches to determine whether overexpression of SPARCL1 affects cell growth, migration, and invasiveness. We then employed xenograft mouse models to analyze the impact of SPARCL1 on prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis in vivo. Results SPARCL1 expression did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation in vitro. By contrast, SPARCL1 did suppress tumor cell migration and invasiveness in vitro and tumor metastatic growth in vivo, conferring improved survival in xenograft mouse models. Conclusions We present the first in vivo data suggesting that SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis of prostate cancer. PMID:23916135

  2. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  3. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  4. Deciphering and Reversing Tumor Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Motz, Greg T.; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Generating an anti-tumor immune response is a multi-step process that is executed by effector T cells that can recognize and kill tumor targets. However, tumors employ multiple strategies to attenuate the effectiveness of T cell-mediated attack. This is achieved by interfering with nearly every step required for effective immunity, from deregulation of antigen-presenting cells, to establishment of a physical barrier at the vasculature that prevents homing of effector tumor-rejecting cells, and through the suppression of effector lymphocytes through the recruitment and activation of immunosuppressive cells like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tolerogenic monocytes and T regulatory cells (Tregs). Here, we review the ways in which tumors exert immune suppression and highlight the new therapies that seek to reverse this phenomenon and promote anti-tumor immunity. Understanding anti-tumor immunity, and how it becomes disabled by tumors, will ultimately lead to improved immune therapies and prolonged survival of patients. PMID:23890064

  5. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  6. Immersion diuresis without expected suppression of vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, L. C.; Silver, J. E.; Wong, N.; Spaul, W. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kravik, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is a shift of blood from the lower parts of the body to the thoracic circulation during bed rest, water immersion, and presumably during weightlessness. On earth, this central fluid shift is associated with a profound diuresis. However, the mechanism involved is not yet well understood. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the plasma vasopressin, fluid, electrolyte, and plasma renin activity (PRA) responses in subjects with normal preimmersion plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration. In the conducted experiments, PRA was suppressed significantly at 30 min of immersion and had declined by 74 percent by the end of the experiment. On the basis of previously obtained results, it appears that sodium excretion during immersion may be independent of aldosterone action. Experimental results indicate that PVP is not suppressed by water immersion in normally hydrated subjects and that other factors may be responsible for the diuresis.

  7. Suppression of Vortex Induced Vibrations by Fairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Yan, Hongmei; Constantinides, Yiannis; Oakley, Owen; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    Fairings are nearly-neutrally buoyant devices, which are fitted along the axis of long circular risers to suppress vortex induced vibrations (VIV) and possibly reduce the drag force. Here we study numerically how VIV can be practically eliminated by using free-to-rotate fairings. Since the mass ratio and rotational inertia are both low for the fairings, direct numerical simulations based on standard flow-structure interaction algorithms fail because of the so-called added mass effect. To resolve this problem we introduce fictitious methods and successfully stabilize the simulations. In particular, we investigate the effect of rotational friction Cf on the stabilization effect of the fairings. We found that there exists a critical value for the rotational friction, and when Cf is close to this value, large oscillations and unsymmetrical trajectories can be observed for the riser but for smaller Cf values VIV are suppressed substantially.

  8. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  9. HIV-1 Reservoirs During Suppressive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) 20 years ago has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-1. Initially there was hope that ART would be curative, but it quickly became clear that even though ART was able to restore CD4(+) T cell counts and suppress viral loads below levels of detection, discontinuation of treatment resulted in a rapid rebound of infection. This is due to persistence of a small reservoir of latently infected cells with a long half-life, which necessitates life-long ART. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in defining and characterizing the latent reservoir of HIV-1, and here we review how understanding the latent reservoir during suppressive therapy will lead to significant advances in curative approaches for HIV-1. PMID:26875617

  10. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  11. System for Suppressing Vibration in Turbomachine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor); Provenza, Andrew J. (Inventor); Choi, Benjamin B. (Inventor); Bakhle, Milind A. (Inventor); Min, James B (Inventor); Stefko, George L. (Inventor); Kussmann, John A (Inventor); Fougere, Alan J (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for suppressing vibration and noise mitigation in structures such as blades in turbomachinery. The system includes flexible piezoelectric patches which are secured on or imbedded in turbomachinery blades which, in one embodiment, comprises eight (8) fan blades. The system further includes a capacitor plate coupler and a power transfer apparatus, which may both be arranged into one assembly, that respectively transfer data and power. Each of the capacitive plate coupler and power transfer apparatus is configured so that one part is attached to a fixed member while another part is attached to a rotatable member with an air gap there between. The system still further includes a processor that has 16 channels, eight of which serve as sensor channels, and the remaining eight, serving as actuation channels. The processor collects and analyzes the sensor signals and, in turn, outputs corrective signals for vibration/noise suppression of the turbine blades.

  12. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  13. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  14. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  15. Suppression of friction by mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Vezzani, Alessandro; Zapperi, Stefano

    2009-08-21

    Mechanical vibrations are known to affect frictional sliding and the associated stick-slip patterns causing sometimes a drastic reduction of the friction force. This issue is relevant for applications in nanotribology and to understand earthquake triggering by small dynamic perturbations. We study the dynamics of repulsive particles confined between a horizontally driven top plate and a vertically oscillating bottom plate. Our numerical results show a suppression of the high dissipative stick-slip regime in a well-defined range of frequencies that depends on the vibrating amplitude, the normal applied load, the system inertia and the damping constant. We propose a theoretical explanation of the numerical results and derive a phase diagram indicating the region of parameter space where friction is suppressed. Our results allow to define better strategies for the mechanical control of friction. PMID:19792738

  16. Identification of isobaric lyso-phosphatidylcholines in lipid extracts of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fillets by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution Fourier-transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Granafei, Sara; Losito, Ilario; Palmisano, Francesco; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2015-08-01

    The numerous and varied biological roles of phosphatidylcholines (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC) have fueled a great demand for technologies that enable rapid, in-depth structural examination of these lipids in foodstuffs. Here, we describe the capabilities of a newly configured combination of high-efficiency liquid chromatography and high-resolution/accuracy Fourier-transform mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (LC-ESI-FTMS), designed for lipidomics applications that require the identification of PC in their lyso forms. The devised strategy, involving a separation by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) on spherical, fused-core ultrapure silica particles (2.7 μm) of a narrow-bore column (2.1 mm i.d.), enabled the identification of as many as 71 LPC species in the lipid extracts of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fillets. In this way, LPC as proton (43) and sodium (28) adducts, i.e., [M + H](+) and [M + Na](+) ions (with M representing the zwitterionic form), were identified. In several cases, the extremely high (sub-ppm) mass accuracy and the high chromatographic efficiency available with the adopted instrumentation enabled the distinction of isobaric and closely eluting LPC species. Informative tandem mass spectra, based on high-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD), were also obtained, thus distinguishing regioisomeric LPC species (i.e., LPC differing only for the location of the residual side chain on the glycerol backbone) and between proton and sodium adducts. Graphical Abstract Extracted Ion Current chromatogram (XIC) obtained for the m/z value 568.339, showing the presence of two regioisomeric Lysophosphatidylcholines. The corresponding high collisional energy tandem MS spectra, obtained using a HCD cell, are shown as insets. PMID:25935670

  17. Integrated Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) and Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identifies Galectin-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Predicting Sorafenib Resistance in Liver Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chao-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Shao, Yu-Yun; Ho, Wen-Ching; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Feng, Wen-Chi; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has become the standard therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance. Therefore, it is important to identify potential biomarkers that could predict the efficacy of sorafenib. To identify target proteins associated with the development of sorafenib resistance, we applied stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomic approach to analyze differences in protein expression levels between parental HuH-7 and sorafenib-acquired resistance HuH-7 (HuH-7R) cells in vitro, combined with an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) quantitative analysis of HuH-7 and HuH-7R tumors in vivo. In total, 2,450 quantified proteins were identified in common in SILAC and iTRAQ experiments, with 81 showing increased expression (>2.0-fold) with sorafenib resistance and 75 showing decreased expression (<0.5-fold). In silico analyses of these differentially expressed proteins predicted that 10 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Knockdown of one of these candidate proteins, galectin-1, decreased cell proliferation and metastasis in HuH-7R cells and restored sensitivity to sorafenib. We verified galectin-1 as a predictive marker of sorafenib resistance and a downstream target of the AKT/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling pathway. In addition, increased galectin-1 expression in HCC patients' serum was associated with poor tumor control and low response rate. We also found that a high serum galectin-1 level was an independent factor associated with poor progression-free survival and overall survival. In conclusion, these results suggest that galectin-1 is a possible biomarker for predicting the response of HCC patients to treatment with sorafenib. As such, it may assist in the stratification of HCC and help direct personalized therapy. PMID:25850433

  18. Fire suppression in human-crew spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Dietrich, Daniel L.

    1991-01-01

    Fire extinguishment agents range from water and foam in early-design spacecraft (Halon 1301 in the present Shuttle) to carbon dioxide proposed for the Space Station Freedom. The major challenge to spacecraft fire extinguishment design and operations is from the micro-gravity environment, which minimizes natural convection and profoundly influences combustion and extinguishing agent effectiveness, dispersal, and post-fire cleanup. Discussed here are extinguishment in microgravity, fire-suppression problems anticipated in future spacecraft, and research needs and opportunities.

  19. [Cancer immunotherapy. Importance of overcoming immune suppression].

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Puchulo, Guillermo; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and address possible therapeutic approaches to overcome the immune suppression generated by tumors. PMID:21163748

  20. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis. PMID:17909897