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Sample records for selective lysosomal targeting

  1. Quantitative Modeling of Selective Lysosomal Targeting for Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Rosania, Gus R.; Horobin, Richard W.; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick-Nernst-Planck-equation. The cell model considers the diffusion of neutral and ionic molecules across biomembranes, dissociation to mono- or bivalent ions, adsorption to lipids, and electrical attraction or repulsion. Based on simulation results, high and selective accumulation in lysosomes was found for weak mono- and bivalent bases with intermediate to high log Kow. These findings were validated with experimental results and by a comparison to the properties of antimalarial drugs in clinical use. For ten active compounds, nine were predicted to accumulate to a greater extent in lysosomes than in other organelles, six of these were in the optimum range predicted by the model and three were close. Five of the antimalarial drugs were lipophilic weak dibasic compounds. The predicted optimum properties for a selective accumulation of weak bivalent bases in lysosomes are consistent with experimental values and are more accurate than any prior calculation. This demonstrates that the cell model can be a useful tool for the design of effective lysosome-targeting drugs with minimal off-target interactions. PMID:18504571

  2. Selective tracking of lysosomal Cu2+ ions using simultaneous target- and location-activated fluorescent nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinhui; Zhao, Yirong; Chan, Winghong; Wang, Yijun; You, Qihua; Liu, Changhui; Zheng, Jing; Li, Jishan; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-01-01

    Levels of lysosomal copper are tightly regulated in the human body. However, few methods for monitoring dynamic changes in copper pools are available, thus limiting the ability to diagnostically assess the influence of copper accumulation on health status. We herein report the development of a dual target and location-activated rhodamine-spiropyran probe, termed Rhod-SP, activated by the presence of lysosomal Cu(2+). Rhod-SP contains a proton recognition unit of spiropyran, which provides molecular switching capability, and a latent rhodamine fluorophore for signal transduction. Upon activation by lysosomal acidic pH, Rhod-SP binds with Cu(2+) by spiropyran-based proton activation, promoting, in turn, rhodamine ring opening, which shows a "switched on" fluorescence signal. However, to protect Rhod-SP from degradation and interference by the physiological environment, it is engineered on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and the surface of Rhod-SP@MSNs is further anchored with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to enhance the solubility and bioavailability of Rhod-SP@MSN-CD. Next, to enhance cell specificity, a guiding unit of c(RGDyK) peptide conjugated adamantane (Ad-RGD) as prototypical system, is incorporated on the surface of Rhod-SP@MSN-CD to target integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5 overexpressed on cancer cells. Fluorescence imaging showed that both Rhod-SP@MSN-CD and Rhod-SP@MSN-CD-RGD were suitable for visualizing exogenous and endogenous Cu(2+) in lysosomes of living cells. This strategy addresses some common challenges of chemical probes in biosensing, such as spatial resolution in cell imaging, the solubility and stability in biological system, and the interference from intracellular species. The newly designed nanoprobe, which allows one to track, on a location-specific basis, and visualize lysosomal Cu(2+), offers a potentially rich opportunity to examine copper physiology in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:25435382

  3. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  4. Lysosomal Targeting of Cystinosin Requires AP-3.

    PubMed

    Andrzejewska, Zuzanna; Névo, Nathalie; Thomas, Lucie; Bailleux, Anne; Chauvet, Véronique; Benmerah, Alexandre; Antignac, Corinne

    2015-07-01

    Cystinosin is a lysosomal cystine transporter defective in cystinosis, an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder. It is composed of seven transmembrane (TM) domains and contains two lysosomal targeting motifs: a tyrosine-based signal (GYDQL) in its C-terminal tail and a non-classical motif in its fifth inter-TM loop. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we showed that the GYDQL motif specifically interacted with the μ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 3 (AP-3). Moreover, cell surface biotinylation and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that cystinosin was partially mislocalized to the plasma membrane (PM) in AP-3-depleted cells. We generated a chimeric CD63 protein to specifically analyze the function of the GYDQL motif. This chimeric protein was targeted to lysosomes in a manner similar to cystinosin and was partially mislocalized to the PM in AP-3 knockdown cells where it also accumulated in the trans-Golgi network and early endosomes. Together with the fact that the surface levels of cystinosin and of the CD63-GYDQL chimeric protein were not increased when clathrin-mediated endocytosis was impaired, our data show that the tyrosine-based motif of cystinosin is a 'strong' AP-3 interacting motif responsible for lysosomal targeting of cystinosin by a direct intracellular pathway. PMID:25753619

  5. Hexamethylene amiloride engages a novel reactive oxygen species- and lysosome-dependent programmed necrotic mechanism to selectively target breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rowson-Hodel, Ashley R; Berg, Anastasia L; Wald, Jessica H; Hatakeyama, Jason; VanderVorst, Kacey; Curiel, Daniel A; Leon, Leonardo J; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L

    2016-05-28

    Anticancer chemotherapeutics often rely on induction of apoptosis in rapidly dividing cells. While these treatment strategies are generally effective in debulking the primary tumor, post-therapeutic recurrence and metastasis are pervasive concerns with potentially devastating consequences. We demonstrate that the amiloride derivative 5-(N,N-hexamethylene) amiloride (HMA) harbors cytotoxic properties particularly attractive for a novel class of therapeutic agent. HMA is potently and specifically cytotoxic toward breast cancer cells, with remarkable selectivity for transformed cells relative to non-transformed or primary cells. Nonetheless, HMA is similarly cytotoxic to breast cancer cells irrespective of their molecular profile, proliferative status, or species of origin, suggesting that it engages a cell death mechanism common to all breast tumor subtypes. We observed that HMA induces a novel form of caspase- and autophagy-independent programmed necrosis relying on the orchestration of mitochondrial and lysosomal pro-death mechanisms, where its cytotoxicity was attenuated with ROS-scavengers or lysosomal cathepsin inhibition. Overall, our findings suggest HMA may efficiently target the heterogeneous populations of cancer cells known to reside within a single breast tumor by induction of a ROS- and lysosome-mediated form of programmed necrosis. PMID:26944316

  6. Induced oligomerization targets Golgi proteins for degradation in lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Ritika; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese protects cells against forms of Shiga toxin by down-regulating the cycling Golgi protein GPP130. Down-regulation occurs when Mn binding causes GPP130 to oligomerize and traffic to lysosomes. To determine how GPP130 is redirected to lysosomes, we tested the role of GGA1 and clathrin, which mediate sorting in the canonical Golgi-to-lysosome pathway. GPP130 oligomerization was induced using either Mn or a self-interacting version of the FKBP domain. Inhibition of GGA1 or clathrin specifically blocked GPP130 redistribution, suggesting recognition of the aggregated GPP130 by the GGA1/clathrin-sorting complex. Unexpectedly, however, GPP130’s cytoplasmic domain was not required, and redistribution also occurred after removal of GPP130 sequences needed for its normal cycling. Therefore, to test whether aggregate recognition might be a general phenomenon rather than one involving a specific GPP130 determinant, we induced homo-oligomerization of two unrelated Golgi-targeted constructs using the FKBP strategy. These were targeted to the cis- and trans-Golgi, respectively, using domains from mannosidase-1 and galactosyltransferase. Significantly, upon oligomerization, each redistributed to peripheral punctae and was degraded. This occurred in the absence of detectable UPR activation. These findings suggest the unexpected presence of quality control in the Golgi that recognizes aggregated Golgi proteins and targets them for degradation in lysosomes. PMID:26446839

  7. Induced oligomerization targets Golgi proteins for degradation in lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Ritika; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    Manganese protects cells against forms of Shiga toxin by down-regulating the cycling Golgi protein GPP130. Down-regulation occurs when Mn binding causes GPP130 to oligomerize and traffic to lysosomes. To determine how GPP130 is redirected to lysosomes, we tested the role of GGA1 and clathrin, which mediate sorting in the canonical Golgi-to-lysosome pathway. GPP130 oligomerization was induced using either Mn or a self-interacting version of the FKBP domain. Inhibition of GGA1 or clathrin specifically blocked GPP130 redistribution, suggesting recognition of the aggregated GPP130 by the GGA1/clathrin-sorting complex. Unexpectedly, however, GPP130's cytoplasmic domain was not required, and redistribution also occurred after removal of GPP130 sequences needed for its normal cycling. Therefore, to test whether aggregate recognition might be a general phenomenon rather than one involving a specific GPP130 determinant, we induced homo-oligomerization of two unrelated Golgi-targeted constructs using the FKBP strategy. These were targeted to the cis- and trans-Golgi, respectively, using domains from mannosidase-1 and galactosyltransferase. Significantly, upon oligomerization, each redistributed to peripheral punctae and was degraded. This occurred in the absence of detectable UPR activation. These findings suggest the unexpected presence of quality control in the Golgi that recognizes aggregated Golgi proteins and targets them for degradation in lysosomes. PMID:26446839

  8. A Lysosome-Compatible Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probe for Targeted Monitoring of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baogang; Yu, Shichong; Chai, Xiaoyun; Li, Tiejun; Wu, Qiuye; Wang, Ting

    2016-04-11

    The requirement for nitric oxide (NO) of lysosomes has motivated the development of a sophisticated fluorescent probe to monitor the distribution of this important biomolecule at the subcellular level in living cells. A near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent Si-rhodamine (SiRB)-NO probe was designed based on the NO-induced ring-opening process of Si-rhodamine. The probe exhibits fast chromogenic and fluorogenic responses, and high sensitivity and selectivity toward trace amounts of NO. Significantly, the spirolactam in Si-rhodamine exhibits very good tolerance to H(+) , which in turn brings extremely low background fluorescence not only in the physiological environment but also under acidic conditions. The stability of the highly fluorescent product in acidic solution provides persistent fluorescence emission for long-term imaging experiments. To achieve targeted imaging with improved spatial resolution and sensitivity, an efficient lysosome-targeting moiety was conjugated to a SiRB-NO probe, affording a tailored lysosome-targeting NIR fluorescent Lyso-SiRB-NO probe. Inheriting the key advantages of its parent SiRB-NO probe, Lyso-SiRB-NO is a functional probe that is suited for monitoring lysosomal NO with excellent lysosome compatibility. Imaging experiments demonstrated the monitoring of both exogenous and endogenous NO in real time by using the Lyso-SiRB-NO probe. PMID:26933828

  9. Neuronal-Targeted TFEB Accelerates Lysosomal Degradation of APP, Reducing Aβ Generation and Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Tripoli, Danielle L.; Czerniewski, Leah; Ballabio, Andrea; Cirrito, John R.

    2015-01-01

    In AD, an imbalance between Aβ production and removal drives elevated brain Aβ levels and eventual amyloid plaque deposition. APP undergoes nonamyloidogenic processing via α-cleavage at the plasma membrane, amyloidogenic β- and γ-cleavage within endosomes to generate Aβ, or lysosomal degradation in neurons. Considering multiple reports implicating impaired lysosome function as a driver of increased amyloidogenic processing of APP, we explored the efficacy of targeting transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal pathways, to reduce Aβ levels. CMV promoter-driven TFEB, transduced via stereotactic hippocampal injections of adeno-associated virus particles in APP/PS1 mice, localized primarily to neuronal nuclei and upregulated lysosome biogenesis. This resulted in reduction of APP protein, the α and β C-terminal APP fragments (CTFs), and in the steady-state Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid. In aged mice, total Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load were selectively reduced in the TFEB-transduced hippocampi. TFEB transfection in N2a cells stably expressing APP695, stimulated lysosome biogenesis, reduced steady-state levels of APP and α- and β-CTFs, and attenuated Aβ generation by accelerating flux through the endosome-lysosome pathway. Cycloheximide chase assays revealed a shortening of APP half-life with exogenous TFEB expression, which was prevented by concomitant inhibition of lysosomal acidification. These data indicate that TFEB enhances flux through lysosomal degradative pathways to induce APP degradation and reduce Aβ generation. Activation of TFEB in neurons is an effective strategy to attenuate Aβ generation and attenuate amyloid plaque deposition in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A key driver for AD pathogenesis is the net balance between production and clearance of Aβ, the major component of amyloid plaques. Here we demonstrate that lysosomal degradation of holo-APP influences Aβ production by limiting the availability of APP for amyloidogenic processing. Using viral gene transfer of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis in neurons of APP/PS1 mice, steady-state levels of APP were reduced, resulting in decreased interstitial fluid Aβ levels and attenuated amyloid deposits. These effects were caused by accelerated lysosomal degradation of endocytosed APP, reflected by reduced APP half-life and steady-state levels in TFEB-expressing cells, with resultant decrease in Aβ production and release. Additional studies are needed to explore the therapeutic potential of this approach. PMID:26338325

  10. Chaperone-mediated autophagy: Dice's 'wild' idea about lysosomal selectivity.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2011-08-01

    A little over 1 year ago, we lost a bright scientist and a dear colleague who, in his younger years, proposed the 'heretical' idea that lysosomes could selectively degrade cytosolic proteins. That scientist was J. Fred Dice, and his lifetime's discovery was the degradative pathway that we now know as chaperone-mediated autophagy. PMID:21750569

  11. Monitoring lipid peroxidation within foam cells by lysosome-targetable and ratiometric probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinfu; Wang, Benlei; Wang, Chao; Chen, Lingcheng; Xiao, Yi

    2015-08-18

    Lipid peroxidation (LPO) in lysosomes is a valuable analyte because it is close associated with the evolutions of some major diseases. As a typical example, in the start-up phase of atherosclerosis, lysosomes get as swollen as foams, by accumulating a large amount of lipoproteins, which facilitates the free-radical chain propagation of LPO. Despite the existences of several fluorescent LPO probes, they are not appropriate for reporting the local extents of lysosomal LPO, for their unspecific intracellular localizations. Here, Foam-LPO, the first fluorescent LPO probe specifically targeting lysosomes, has been developed through straightforward synthesis using low-cost reagents. A basic tertiary amine group enables it to selectively localize in acidic lysosomes; and the conjugated diene moiety within the BODIPY fluorophore will degrade in response to lipid peroxidation, which results in fluorescence maximum shifting from 586 to 512 nm. Thus, under a confocal fluorescence microscope, Foam-LPO is able not only to visualize dynamic morphological changes of lysosomes during the evolution of foam cells, but also to relatively quantify local LPO extents in single lysosomes through ratiometric imaging. In addition, Foam-LPO proves applicable for two-color flow cytometry (FCM) analysis to make quantitative and high-throughput evaluation of LPO levels in large quantity of cells at different stages during the induction to form foam cells. Also importantly, with the aid of this new probe, the different roles played by low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its oxidized form (ox-LDL) for the LPO processes of foam cells are distinguished and clarified, which benefits the understanding in the initiation and control factors of atherosclerosis. PMID:26200003

  12. Vesicular disruption of lysosomal targeting organometallic polyarginine bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Gross, Annika; Alborzinia, Hamed; Piantavigna, Stefania; Martin, Lisandra L; Wölfl, Stefan; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2015-02-01

    Compounds which are able to destabilize the lysosomal membrane have been proposed as interesting candidates for targeted anticancer drugs due to the pronounced lysosomal changes in cancer cells. For this purpose, metallocene derivatives of a cell penetrating polyarginine peptide M–(Arg)9(Phe)2Lys–NH2 (where M = ferrocene carboxylate or ruthenocene carboxylate) were designed and their biological activities were investigated in detail. The ferrocenoyl- and ruthenocenoyl polyarginine bioconjugates were synthesized via Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) protocols on a microwave-assisted synthesizer. After HPLC purification >98% purity was observed for all conjugates. Their interaction with supported biomimetic membranes was investigated on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and revealed a very strong binding of the metallocene peptides and their metal-free congeners to an artificial eukaryotic membrane model (DMPC–cholesterol). To demonstrate their antiproliferative utility as cytotoxic compounds for a targeted anticancer drug, cell viability (by the crystal violet assay), apoptosis (flow cytometry, Ann V/PI staining), induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, by flow cytometry with dihydroethidium staining), and changes in cancer cell metabolism, e.g. respiration and glycolysis, were studied. Our results reveal only a weak toxicity for the metal-free polyarginine peptide, which could be significantly enhanced (to ca. 50 μM against HeLa cells in the best case) by coupling ferrocene or ruthenocene carboxylates to the N-terminus of the peptide. The investigation of the cellular uptake and intracellular localization by fluorescence microscopy revealed an enhanced vesicular disruption by the metallocene bioconjugate compared to the metal-free derivative which could be triggered by light and chemicals. Further studies of apoptosis, respiration, glycolysis and ROS formation reveal the superior characteristics of the metallocene compounds. While most cells remain viable even at 300 μM of the metal free bioconjugate 1, most cells are dead or in late stages of apoptosis at 200 μM of the ruthenocene derivative 3, and at 100 μM of the most active ferrocene derivative 2, however, all show very little sign of necrosis. Also, the metal free compound 1 does not induce ROS formation but both metallocene–polyarginine bioconjugates are clearly associated with enhanced intracellular ROS levels, with levels for the redox-active ferrocene derivative being two times higher than for the structurally very similar but redox-silent ruthenocene derivative. We propose that such metallocene–polyarginine peptides induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby could be developed towards targeted anticancer drugs. PMID:25608481

  13. Lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammation cytokine secreted by various cells. Understanding its secretive pathway is important to understand the biological functions of TNF-α and diseases associated with TNF-α. TNF-α is one of the first proteins known be modified by lysine fatty acylation (e.g. myristoylation). We previously demonstrated that SIRT6, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of enzymes, can remove the fatty acyl modification on TNF-α and promote its secretion. However, the mechanistic details about how lysine fatty acylation regulates TNF-α secretion have been unknown. Here we present experimental data supporting that lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α. The result is an important first step toward understanding the biological functions of lysine fatty acylation. PMID:27079798

  14. Utilization of the indirect lysosome targeting pathway by lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) is influenced largely by the C-terminal residue of their GYXXphi targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Gough, N R; Zweifel, M E; Martinez-Augustin, O; Aguilar, R C; Bonifacino, J S; Fambrough, D M

    1999-12-01

    A systematic study was conducted on the requirements at the C-terminal position for the targeting of LAMPs to lysosomes, examining the hypothesis that a bulky hydrophobic residue is required. Mutations deleting or replacing the C-terminal valine with G, A, C, L, I, M, K, F, Y, or W were constructed in a reporter protein consisting of the lumenal/extracellular domain of avian LAMP-1 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of LAMP-2b. The steady-state distribution of each mutant form in mouse L-cells was assessed by quantitative antibody binding assays and immunofluorescence microscopy; efficiency of internalization from the plasma membrane and delivery to the lysosome were also estimated. It is found that (a) only C-terminal V, L, I, M, and F mediated efficient targeting to lysosomes, demonstrating the importance hydrophobicity and an optimal size of the C-terminal residue in targeting; (b) efficiency of lysosomal targeting generally correlated with efficiency of internalization; and (c) mutant forms that did not target well to lysosomes showed unique distributions in cells rather than simply default accumulation in the plasma membrane. Interactions of the targeting signals with adaptor subunits were measured using a yeast two-hybrid assay. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that trafficking of LAMP forms in cells through the indirect pathway is determined by the affinities of their targeting signals, predominantly for the mu2 and mu3 adaptors involved at plasma membrane and endosomal cellular sorting sites, respectively. PMID:10564644

  15. Iron-binding drugs targeted to lysosomes: a potential strategy to treat inflammatory lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Persson, H Lennart; Richardson, Des R

    2005-08-01

    In many inflammatory lung disorders, an abnormal assimilation of redox-active iron will exacerbate oxidative tissue damage. It may be that the most important cellular pool of redox-active iron exists within lysosomes, making these organelles vulnerable to oxidative stress. In experiments employing respiratory epithelial cells and macrophages, the chelation of intra-lysosomal iron efficiently prevented lysosomal rupture and the ensuing cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide, ionising radiation or silica particles. Furthermore, cell-permeable iron-binding agents (weak bases) that accumulate within lysosomes due to proton trapping were much more efficient for cytoprotection than the chelator, desferrioxamine. On a molar basis, the weak base alpha-lipoic acid plus was 5000 times more effective than desferrioxamine at preventing lysosomal rupture and apoptotic cell death in cell cultures exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Thus, iron-chelating therapy that targets the lysosome might be a future treatment strategy for inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:16050792

  16. Palmitoylation-dependent association with CD63 targets the Ca2+ sensor synaptotagmin VII to lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrew R.; Czibener, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Syt VII is a Ca2+ sensor that regulates lysosome exocytosis and plasma membrane repair. Because it lacks motifs that mediate lysosomal targeting, it is unclear how Syt VII traffics to these organelles. In this paper, we show that mutations or inhibitors that abolish palmitoylation disrupt Syt VII targeting to lysosomes, causing its retention in the Golgi complex. In macrophages, Syt VII is translocated simultaneously with the lysosomal tetraspanin CD63 from tubular lysosomes to nascent phagosomes in a Ca2+-dependent process that facilitates particle uptake. Mutations in Syt VII palmitoylation sites block trafficking of Syt VII, but not CD63, to lysosomes and phagosomes, whereas tyrosine replacement in the lysosomal targeting motif of CD63 causes both proteins to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Complexes of CD63 and Syt VII are detected only when Syt VII palmitoylation sites are intact. These findings identify palmitoylation-dependent association with the tetraspanin CD63 as the mechanism by which Syt VII is targeted to lysosomes. PMID:21041449

  17. A Lysosome-Targeting AIEgen for Autophagy Visualization.

    PubMed

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Wang, Zhiming; Zhao, Engui; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Kwok, Ryan Tsz Kin; Leung, Anakin Chun Sing; Wen, Rongsen; Li, Bingshi; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a morpholine-functionalized aggregation-induced emission luminogen (AIEgen), AIE-LysoY, is reported for lysosomal imaging and autophagy visualization. To attain outstanding imaging contrast, AIE-LysoY is equipped with excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) characteristic. AIE-LysoY provides a new platform for lysosome visualization with good biocompatibility, large Stokes shift, superior signal-to-noise ratio, and high photostability. PMID:26688031

  18. Receptor Crosslinking: A General Method to Trigger Internalization and Lysosomal Targeting of Therapeutic Receptor:Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Paul R; Sayers, Edward J; Magnusson, Johannes P; Alexander, Cameron; Borri, Paola; Watson, Peter; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    A major unmet clinical need is a universal method for subcellular targeting of bioactive molecules to lysosomes. Delivery to this organelle enables either degradation of oncogenic receptors that are overexpressed in cancers, or release of prodrugs from antibody–drug conjugates. Here, we describe a general method that uses receptor crosslinking to trigger endocytosis and subsequently redirect trafficking of receptor:cargo complexes from their expected route, to lysosomes. By incubation of plasma membrane receptors with biotinylated cargo and subsequent addition of streptavidin to crosslink receptor:cargo–biotin complexes, we achieved rapid and selective lysosomal targeting of transferrin, an anti-MHC class I antibody, and the clinically approved anti-Her2 antibody trastuzumab. These three protein ligands each target a receptor with a distinct cellular function and intracellular trafficking profile. Importantly, we confirmed that crosslinking of trastuzumab increased lysosomal degradation of its cognate oncogenic receptor Her2 in breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474. These data suggest that crosslinking could be exploited for a wide range of target receptors, for navigating therapeutics through the endolysosomal pathway, for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:26412588

  19. An aberrant sugar modification of BACE1 blocks its lysosomal targeting in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Kitazume, Shinobu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Saito, Takashi; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C; Nakano, Miyako; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Manya, Hiroshi; Endo, Tamao; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1), an essential protease for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, is a major drug target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there is a concern that inhibiting BACE1 could also affect several physiological functions. Here, we show that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), a sugar modification highly expressed in brain, and demonstrate that AD patients have higher levels of bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1. Analysis of knockout mice lacking the biosynthetic enzyme for bisecting GlcNAc, GnT-III (Mgat3), revealed that cleavage of Aβ-precursor protein (APP) by BACE1 is reduced in these mice, resulting in a decrease in Aβ plaques and improved cognitive function. The lack of this modification directs BACE1 to late endosomes/lysosomes where it is less colocalized with APP, leading to accelerated lysosomal degradation. Notably, other BACE1 substrates, CHL1 and contactin-2, are normally cleaved in GnT-III-deficient mice, suggesting that the effect of bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1 is selective to APP. Considering that GnT-III-deficient mice remain healthy, GnT-III may be a novel and promising drug target for AD therapeutics. PMID:25592972

  20. Ubiquitin ligase trapping identifies an SCF(Saf1) pathway targeting unprocessed vacuolar/lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Mark, Kevin G; Simonetta, Marco; Maiolica, Alessio; Seller, Charles A; Toczyski, David P

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique, called Ubiquitin Ligase Substrate Trapping, for the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates in complex with their ubiquitin ligase (E3). By fusing a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain to an E3 ligase, we were able to selectively purify the polyubiquitinated forms of E3 substrates. Using ligase traps of eight different F box proteins (SCF specificity factors) coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified known, as well as previously unreported, substrates. Polyubiquitinated forms of candidate substrates associated with their cognate F box partner, but not other ligase traps. Interestingly, the four most abundant candidate substrates identified for the F box protein Saf1 were all vacuolar/lysosomal proteins. Analysis of one of these substrates, Prb1, showed that Saf1 selectively promotes ubiquitination of the unprocessed form of the zymogen. This suggests that Saf1 is part of a pathway that targets protein precursors for proteasomal degradation. PMID:24389104

  1. Ubiquitin Ligase Trapping Identifies an SCFSaf1 Pathway Targeting Unprocessed Vacuolar/Lysosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Kevin G.; Simonetta, Marco; Maiolica, Alessio; Seller, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a technique, called Ubiquitin Ligase Substrate Trapping, for the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates in complex with their ubiquitin ligase (E3). By fusing a ubiquitin associated (UBA) domain to an E3 ligase, we were able to selectively purify the polyubiquitinated forms of E3 substrates. Using Ligase Traps of eight different F-box proteins (SCF specificity factors) coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified known, as well as previously uncharacterized substrates. Polyubiquitinated forms of candidate substrates associated with their cognate F-box partner, but not other Ligase Traps. Interestingly, the four most abundant candidate substrates identified for the F-box protein Saf1 were all vacuolar/lysosomal proteins. Analysis of one of these substrates, Prb1, showed that Saf1 selectively promotes ubiquitination of the unprocessed form of the zymogen. This suggests that Saf1 is part of a pathway that targets protein precursors for proteasomal degradation. PMID:24389104

  2. Plasticity of Polyubiquitin Recognition as Lysosomal Targeting Signals by the Endosomal Sorting Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Barriere, Herve; Nemes, Csilla; Du, Kai

    2007-01-01

    Lysosomal targeting is fundamental for the regulated disposal of ubiquitinated membrane proteins from the cell surface. To elucidate ubiquitin (Ub) configurations that are necessary and sufficient as multivesicular body (MVB)/lysosomal-sorting motifs, the intraendosomal destination and transport kinetics of model transmembrane cargo molecules bearing monoubiquitinated, multi-monoubiquitinated, or polyubiquitinated cytoplasmic tails were determined. Monomeric CD4 chimeras with K63-linked poly-Ub chains and tetrameric CD4-mono-Ub chimeras were rapidly targeted to the lysosome. In contrast, lysosomal delivery of CD4 chimeras exposing K48-linked Ub chains was delayed, whereas delivery of monoubiquitinated CD4 chimeras was undetectable. Similar difference was observed in the lysosomal targeting of mono- versus polyubiquitinated invariant chain and CD4 ubiquitinated by the MARCH (membrane-associated RING-CH) IV Ub ligase. Consistent with this, Hrs (hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase phosphorylated substrate), an endosomal sorting adaptor, binds preferentially to K63-Ub chain and negligibly to mono-Ub. These results highlight the plasticity of Ub as a sorting signal and its recognition by the endosomal sorting machinery, and together with previous data, suggest a regulatory role for assembly and disassembly of Ub chains of specific topology in lysosomal cargo sorting. PMID:17686993

  3. Activation of Membrane NADPH Oxidase Associated with Lysosome-Targeted Acid Sphingomyelinase in Coronary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jun-Xiang; Jin, Si; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zheng-Chao; Li, Ningjun

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the mechanism mediating the aggregation of membrane NADPH oxidase (NOX) subunits and subsequent activation of this enzyme in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). With confocal microscopy, we found that FasL stimulated lipid rafts (LRs) clustering with NOX subunit aggregation and acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) gathering, which was blocked by the siRNA of sortilin, an intracellular protein responsible for the binding and targeting of ASM to lysosomes. Correspondingly, FasL-induced O2·− production through NOX in LRs fractions was abolished by sortilin siRNA. Further, with flow-cytometry and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis, we surprisingly demonstrated that after FasL stimulation, sortilin was exposed to cell membranes from lysosomes together with Lamp-1 and ASM, and these lysosomal components were aggregated and form a signaling complex in cell membranes. With co-immunoprecipitation, lysosomal sortilin and ASM were found to interact more strongly when CAECs were stimulated by FasL. Functionally, inhibition of either sortilin expression, lysosome function, LRs clustering, or NOX activity significantly attenuated FasL-induced decrease in nitric oxide (NO) levels. It is concluded that lysosome-targeted ASM, through sortilin, is able to traffic to and expose to cell-membrane surface, which may lead to LRs clustering and NOX activation in CAECs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 703–712. PMID:19761405

  4. Lysosomal Targeting with Stable and Sensitive Fluorescent Probes (Superior LysoProbes): Applications for Lysosome Labeling and Tracking during Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Bi, Yue; Wang, Tianyang; Li, Pengfei; Yan, Xin; Hou, Shanshan; Bammert, Catherine E.; Ju, Jingfang; Gibson, K. Michael; Pavan, William J.; Bi, Lanrong

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pH plays an important role in the response to cancer invasion. We have designed and synthesized a series of new fluorescent probes (Superior LysoProbes) with the capacity to label acidic organelles and monitor lysosomal pH. Unlike commercially available fluorescent dyes, Superior LysoProbes are lysosome-specific and are highly stable. The use of Superior LysoProbes facilitates the direct visualization of the lysosomal response to lobaplatin elicited in human chloangiocarcinoma (CCA) RBE cells, using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, we have characterized the role of lysosomes in autophagy, the correlation between lysosome function and microtubule strength, and the alteration of lysosomal morphology during apoptosis. Our findings indicate that Superior LysoProbes offer numerous advantages over previous reagents to examine the intracellular activities of lysosomes. PMID:25758662

  5. Impaired selection of invariant natural killer T cells in diverse mouse models of glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gadola, Stephan D.; Silk, Jonathan D.; Jeans, Aruna; Illarionov, Petr A.; Salio, Mariolina; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Dwek, Raymond; Butters, Terry D.; Platt, Frances M.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Glycolipid ligands for invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are loaded onto CD1d molecules in the late endosome/lysosome. Accumulation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in lysosomal storage diseases could potentially influence endogenous and exogenous lipid loading and/or presentation and, thus, affect iNKT cell selection or function. The percentages and frequency of iNKT cells were reduced in multiple mouse models of lysosomal GSL storage disease, irrespective of the specific genetic defect or lipid species stored. Reduced numbers of iNKT cells resulted in the absence of cytokine production in response to ?-galactosylceramide (?-GalCer) and reduced iNKT cellmediated lysis of wild-type targets loaded with ?-GalCer. The reduction in iNKT cells did not result from defective expression of CD1d or a lack of antigen-presenting cells. Although H-2 restricted CD4+ T cell responses were generally unaffected, processing of a lysosome-dependent analogue of ?-GalCer was impaired in all the strains of mice tested. These data suggest that GSL storage may result in alterations in thymic selection of iNKT cells caused by impaired presentation of selecting ligands. PMID:16982810

  6. Impaired selection of invariant natural killer T cells in diverse mouse models of glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Gadola, Stephan D; Silk, Jonathan D; Jeans, Aruna; Illarionov, Petr A; Salio, Mariolina; Besra, Gurdyal S; Dwek, Raymond; Butters, Terry D; Platt, Frances M; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2006-10-01

    Glycolipid ligands for invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are loaded onto CD1d molecules in the late endosome/lysosome. Accumulation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in lysosomal storage diseases could potentially influence endogenous and exogenous lipid loading and/or presentation and, thus, affect iNKT cell selection or function. The percentages and frequency of iNKT cells were reduced in multiple mouse models of lysosomal GSL storage disease, irrespective of the specific genetic defect or lipid species stored. Reduced numbers of iNKT cells resulted in the absence of cytokine production in response to alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) and reduced iNKT cell-mediated lysis of wild-type targets loaded with alpha-GalCer. The reduction in iNKT cells did not result from defective expression of CD1d or a lack of antigen-presenting cells. Although H-2 restricted CD4(+) T cell responses were generally unaffected, processing of a lysosome-dependent analogue of alpha-GalCer was impaired in all the strains of mice tested. These data suggest that GSL storage may result in alterations in thymic selection of iNKT cells caused by impaired presentation of selecting ligands. PMID:16982810

  7. Limited and selective transfer of plasma membrane glycoproteins to membrane of secondary lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Haylett, T.; Thilo, L.

    1986-10-01

    Radioactive galactose, covalently bound to cell surface glycoconjugates on mouse macrophage cells, P388D/sub 1/, was used as a membrane marker to study the composition, and the kinetics of exchange, of plasma membrane-derived constituents in the membrane of secondary lysosomes. Secondary lysosomes were separated from endosomes and plasma membrane by self-forming Percoll density gradients. Horseradish peroxidase, taken up by fluid-phase pinocytosis, served as a vesicle contents marker to monitor transfer of endosomal contents into secondary lysosomes. Concurrently, the fraction of plasma membrane-derived label of secondary lysosomes increased by first order kinetics from <0.1% to a steady-state level of approx.2.5% of the total label. As analyzed by NaDodSO/sub 4/ PAGE, labeled molecules of M/sub r/ 160-190 kD were depleted and of the M/sub r/ 100-120 kD were enriched in lysosome membrane compared with the relative composition of label on the cell surface. No corresponding selectivity was observed for the degradation of label, with all M/sub r/ classes being affected to the same relative extent. The results indicate that endocytosis-derived transfer of plasma membrane constitutents to secondary lysosomes is a limited and selective process, and that only approx.1% of internalized membrane is recycled via a membrane pool of secondary lysosomes.

  8. TNFα Post-Translationally Targets ZnT2 to Accumulate Zinc in Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Hennigar, Stephen R; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2015-10-01

    Mammary epithelial cells undergo widespread lysosomal-mediated cell death (LCD) during early mammary gland involution. Recently, we demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a cytokine released during early involution, redistributes the zinc (Zn) transporter ZnT2 to accumulate Zn in lysosomes and activate LCD and involution. The objective of this study is to determine how TNFα retargets ZnT2 to lysosomes. We tested the hypothesis that TNFα signaling dephosphorylates ZnT2 to uncover a highly conserved dileucine motif (L294L) in the C-terminus of ZnT2, allowing adaptor protein complex-3 (AP-3) to bind and traffic ZnT2 to lysosomes. Confocal micrographs showed that TNFα redistributed wild-type (WT) ZnT2 from late endosomes (Pearson's coefficient = 0.202 ± 0.05 and 0.097 ± 0.03; P<0.05) to lysosomes (0.292 ± 0.03 and 0.649 ± 0.03; P<0.0001), which increased lysosomal Zn (P<0.0001) and activated LCD (P<0.0001) compared to untreated cells. Mutation of the dileucine motif (L294V) eliminated the ability of TNFα to redistribute ZnT2 from late endosomes to lysosomes, increase lysosomal Zn, or activate LCD. Moreover, TNFα increased (P<0.05) AP-3 binding to wt ZnT2 but not to L294V immunoprecipitates. Finally, using phospho- and dephospho-mimetics of predicted phosphorylation sites (T281, T288, and S296), we found that dephosphorylated S296 was required to target ZnT2 to accumulate Zn in lysosomes and activate LCD. Our findings suggest that women with variation in the C-terminus of ZnT2 may be at risk for inadequate involution and breast disease due the inability to traffic ZnT2 to lysosomes. PMID:25808614

  9. Antibodies protect against intracellular bacteria by Fc receptor-mediated lysosomal targeting.

    PubMed

    Joller, Nicole; Weber, Stefan S; Müller, Andreas J; Spörri, Roman; Selchow, Petra; Sander, Peter; Hilbi, Hubert; Oxenius, Annette

    2010-11-23

    The protective effect of antibodies (Abs) is generally attributed to neutralization or complement activation. Using Legionella pneumophila and Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin as a model, we discovered an additional mechanism of Ab-mediated protection effective against intracellular pathogens that normally evade lysosomal fusion. We show that Fc receptor (FcR) engagement by Abs, which can be temporally and spatially separated from bacterial infection, renders the host cell nonpermissive for bacterial replication and targets the pathogens to lysosomes. This process is strictly dependent on kinases involved in FcR signaling but not on host cell protein synthesis or protease activation. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism whereby Abs and FcR engagement subverts the strategies by which intracellular bacterial pathogens evade lysosomal degradation. PMID:21048081

  10. Identification of a Novel Lysosomal Trafficking Peptide using Phage Display Biopanning Coupled with Endocytic Selection Pressure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Methods to select ligands that accumulate specifically in cancer cells and traffic through a defined endocytic pathway may facilitate rapid pairing of ligands with linkers suitable for drug conjugate therapies. We performed phage display biopanning on cancer cells that are treated with selective inhibitors of a given mechanism of endocytosis. Using chlorpromazine to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis in H1299 nonsmall cell lung cancer cells, we identified two clones, ATEPRKQYATPRVFWTDAPG (15.1) and a novel peptide LQWRRDDNVHNFGVWARYRL (H1299.3). The peptides segregate by mechanism of endocytosis and subsequent location of subcellular accumulation. The H1299.3 peptide primarily utilizes clathrin-mediated endocytosis and colocalizes with Lamp1, a lysosomal marker. Conversely, the 15.1 peptide is clathrin-independent and localizes to a perinuclear region. Thus, this novel phage display scheme allows for selection of peptides that selectively internalize into cells via a known mechanism of endocytosis. These types of selections may allow for better matching of linker with targeting ligand by selecting ligands that internalize and traffic to known subcellular locations. PMID:25188559

  11. Enhanced Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Degradation in Breast Cancer Cells by Lysosome-Targeting Gold Nanoconstructs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Ha, Ji Won; Yue, Jun; Odom, Teri W

    2015-10-27

    This paper describes how gold nanoparticle nanoconstructs can enhance anticancer effects of lysosomal targeting aptamers in breast cancer cells. Nanoconstructs consisting of anti-HER2 aptamer (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, HApt) densely grafted on gold nanostars (AuNS) first targeted HER2 and then were internalized via HER2-mediated endocytosis. As incubation time increased, the nanoconstruct complexes were found in vesicular structures, starting from early endosomes to lysosomes as visualized by confocal fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy. Within the target organelle, lysosomes, HER2 was degraded by enzymes at low pH, which resulted in apoptosis. At specific time points related to the doubling time of the cancer cells, we found that accumulation of HER2-HApt-AuNS complexes in lysosomes, lysosomal activity, and lysosomal degradation of HER2 were positively correlated. Increased HER2 degradation by HApt-AuNS triggered cell death and cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase inhibition of cell proliferation. This work shows how a perceived disadvantage of nanoparticle-based therapeutics-the inability of nanoconstructs to escape from vesicles and thus induce a biological response-can be overcome by both targeting lysosomes and exploiting lysosomal degradation of the biomarkers. PMID:26335372

  12. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srikumar M; Desale, Swapnil S; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Band, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla®; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance receptor endocytosis and lysosomal routing can provide a novel strategy to significantly improve therapy with ANPs and ADCs. PMID:26859680

  13. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain. PMID:24880782

  14. Two crystal structures for cathepsin D: the lysosomal targeting signal and active site.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, P; Fusek, M

    1993-01-01

    Two crystal structures are described for the lysosomal aspartic protease cathepsin D (EC 3.4.23.5). The molecular replacement method was used with X-ray diffraction data to 3 A resolution to produce structures for human spleen cathepsin D and for bovine liver cathepsin D complexed with the 6-peptide inhibitor pepstatin A. The lysosomal targeting region of cathepsin D defined by previous expression studies [Barnaski et al. (1990) Cell, 63, 281-219] is located in well defined electron density on the surface of the molecules. This region includes the putative binding site of the cis-Golgi phosphotransferase which is responsible for the initial sorting step for soluble proteins destined for lysosomes by phosphorylating the carbohydrates on these molecules. Carbohydrate density is visible at both expected positions on the cathepsin D molecules and, at the best defined position, four sugar residues extend towards the lysosomal targeting region. The active site of the protease and the active site cleft substrate binding subsites are described using the pepstatin inhibited structure. The model geometry for human cathepsin D has rms deviations from ideal of bonds and angles of 0.013 A and 3.2 degrees respectively. For bovine cathepsin D the corresponding figures are 0.014 A and 3.3 degrees. The crystallographic residuals (R factors) are 16.1% and 15.8% for the human and inhibited bovine cathepsin D models respectively. The free R factors, calculated with 10% of the data reserved for testing the models and not used for refinement, are 25.1% and 24.1% respectively. Images PMID:8467789

  15. Targeted disruption of the mouse cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor results in partial missorting of multiple lysosomal enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, T; Ovitt, C E; Bauer, U; Hollinshead, M; Remmler, J; Lobel, P; Rüther, U; Hoflack, B

    1993-01-01

    In mammalian cells two mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs) are involved in lysosomal enzyme transport. To understand the precise function of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CD-MPR), one allele of the corresponding gene has been disrupted in mouse embryonic stem cells and homozygous mice lacking this receptor have been generated. The homozygous mice appear normal, suggesting that other targeting mechanisms can partially compensate for the loss of the CD-MPR in vivo. However, homozygous receptor-deficient cells and animals clearly exhibit defects in targeting of multiple lysosomal enzymes when compared with wild-types. Increased levels of phosphorylated lysosomal enzymes were present in body fluids of homozygous animals. In thymocytes from homozygous mice or in primary cultures of fibroblasts from homozygous embryos, there is a marked increase in the amount of phosphorylated lysosomal enzymes that are secreted into the extracellular medium. The cultured fibroblasts have decreased intracellular levels of multiple lysosomal enzymes and accumulate macromolecules within their endosomal/lysosomal system. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that the CD-MPR is required for efficient intracellular targeting of multiple lysosomal enzymes. Images PMID:8262065

  16. Impairment of chaperone-mediated autophagy leads to selective lysosomal degradation defects in the lysosomal storage disease cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Gennaro; Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Rocca, Celine J; Monfregola, Jlenia; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Cherqui, Stephanie; Catz, Sergio D

    2015-02-01

    Metabolite accumulation in lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) results in impaired cell function and multi-systemic disease. Although substrate reduction and lysosomal overload-decreasing therapies can ameliorate disease progression, the significance of lysosomal overload-independent mechanisms in the development of cellular dysfunction is unknown for most LSDs. Here, we identify a mechanism of impaired chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cystinosis, a LSD caused by defects in the cystine transporter cystinosin (CTNS) and characterized by cystine lysosomal accumulation. We show that, different from other LSDs, autophagosome number is increased, but macroautophagic flux is not impaired in cystinosis while mTOR activity is not affected. Conversely, the expression and localization of the CMA receptor LAMP2A are abnormal in CTNS-deficient cells and degradation of the CMA substrate GAPDH is defective in Ctns(-/-) mice. Importantly, cysteamine treatment, despite decreasing lysosomal overload, did not correct defective CMA in Ctns(-/-) mice or LAMP2A mislocalization in cystinotic cells, which was rescued by CTNS expression instead, suggesting that cystinosin is important for CMA activity. In conclusion, CMA impairment contributes to cell malfunction in cystinosis, highlighting the need for treatments complementary to current therapies that are based on decreasing lysosomal overload. PMID:25586965

  17. Lysosomal trafficking and cysteine protease metabolism confer target-specific cytotoxicity by peptide-linked anti-CD30-auristatin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, May S Kung; Sanderson, Russell J; Gordon, Kristine A; Andreyka, Jamie; Cerveny, Charles G; Yu, Changpu; Lewis, Timothy S; Meyer, Damon L; Zabinski, Roger F; Doronina, Svetlana O; Senter, Peter D; Law, Che-Leung; Wahl, Alan F

    2006-04-14

    The chimeric anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody cAC10, linked to the antimitotic agents monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) or F (MMAF), produces potent and highly CD30-selective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. These drugs are appended via a valine-citrulline (vc) dipeptide linkage designed for high stability in serum and conditional cleavage and putative release of fully active drugs by lysosomal cathepsins. To characterize the biochemical processes leading to effective drug delivery, we examined the intracellular trafficking, internalization, and metabolism of the parent antibody and two antibody-drug conjugates, cAC10vc-MMAE and cAC10vc-MMAF, following CD30 surface antigen interaction with target cells. Both cAC10 and its conjugates bound to target cells and internalized in a similar manner. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the antibody and antibody-drug conjugates entering target cells migrated to the lysosomes. Trafficking of both species was blocked by inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, suggesting that drug conjugation does not alter the fate of antibody-antigen complexes. Incubation of cAC10vc-MMAE or cAC10vc-MMAF with purified cathepsin B or with enriched lysosomal fractions prepared by subcellular fractionation resulted in the release of active, free drug. Cysteine protease inhibitors, but not aspartic or serine protease inhibitors, blocked antibody-drug conjugate metabolism and the ensuing cytotoxicity of target cells and yielded enhanced intracellular levels of the intact conjugates. These findings suggest that in addition to trafficking to the lysosomes, cathepsin B and perhaps other lysosomal cysteine proteases are requisite for drug release and provide a mechanistic basis for developing antibody-drug conjugates cleavable by intracellular proteases for the targeted delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:16484228

  18. Studies on the activity of selected lysosomal exoglycosidases in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, K; Drózdz, M; Kucharz, E; Piwowarczyk, B; Kardaszewicz, E; Harbut-Gryłka, A

    1984-01-01

    The activity of selected lysosomal hydrolases ( (beta-galactosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, beta-xylosidase, alpha-mannosidase, alpha-fucosidase) was determined in the blood serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An increased activity of all the enzymes studied was found as compared to control subjects. Presumable mechanisms of the observed changes are discussed. It is suggested that the studied enzymes may be responsible for the desintegration of the connective tissue ground substance in SLE. PMID:6436958

  19. SETI target selection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Soderblom, D. R.

    1995-06-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey consists of two complementary elements: a Sky Survey of the entire sky to a moderate level of sensitivity; and a Targeted Search of nearby stars, one at a time, to a much deeper level of sensitivity. The authors propose strategies for target selection with two goals: to improve the chances of successful detection of signals from technical civilizations that inhabit planets around solar-type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites.

  20. Visualization of Endogenous and Exogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Using A Lysosome-Targetable Fluorescent Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dabin; Kim, Gyoungmi; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yin, Jun; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play crucial roles in diverse physiological processes; therefore, the efficient detection of ROS is very crucial. In this study, we report a boronate-based hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) probe having naphthalimide fluorophore. This probe also contained a morpholine moiety as a directing group for lysosome. The recognition property indicated that the probe exhibited high selectivity towards H2O2 not only in the solution but also in the living cells. Furthermore, it was used to monitor the level of endogenous and exogenous H2O2. These results support that the probe can function as an efficient indicator to detect H2O2.

  1. The AAA-ATPase VPS4 Regulates Extracellular Secretion and Lysosomal Targeting of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Takafumi; Konno, Masatoshi; Baba, Toru; Sugeno, Naoto; Kikuchi, Akio; Kobayashi, Michiko; Miura, Emiko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Mori, Fumiaki; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Aoki, Masashi; Itoyama, Yasuto; Takeda, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathological feature: the deposition of amyloid-like fibrils composed of misfolded proteins. Emerging evidence suggests that these proteins may spread from cell-to-cell and encourage the propagation of neurodegeneration in a prion-like manner. Here, we demonstrated that α-synuclein (αSYN), a principal culprit for Lewy pathology in Parkinson's disease (PD), was present in endosomal compartments and detectably secreted into the extracellular milieu. Unlike prion protein, extracellular αSYN was mainly recovered in the supernatant fraction rather than in exosome-containing pellets from the neuronal culture medium and cerebrospinal fluid. Surprisingly, impaired biogenesis of multivesicular body (MVB), an organelle from which exosomes are derived, by dominant-negative mutant vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) not only interfered with lysosomal targeting of αSYN but facilitated αSYN secretion. The hypersecretion of αSYN in VPS4-defective cells was efficiently restored by the functional disruption of recycling endosome regulator Rab11a. Furthermore, both brainstem and cortical Lewy bodies in PD were found to be immunoreactive for VPS4. Thus, VPS4, a master regulator of MVB sorting, may serve as a determinant of lysosomal targeting or extracellular secretion of αSYN and thereby contribute to the intercellular propagation of Lewy pathology in PD. PMID:22216284

  2. Burglar Target Selection

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Michael; Bernasco, Wim; Ruiter, Stijn; Johnson, Shane D.; White, Gentry; Baum, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study builds on research undertaken by Bernasco and Nieuwbeerta and explores the generalizability of a theoretically derived offender target selection model in three cross-national study regions. Methods: Taking a discrete spatial choice approach, we estimate the impact of both environment- and offender-level factors on residential burglary placement in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Combining cleared burglary data from all study regions in a single statistical model, we make statistical comparisons between environments. Results: In all three study regions, the likelihood an offender selects an area for burglary is positively influenced by proximity to their home, the proportion of easily accessible targets, and the total number of targets available. Furthermore, in two of the three study regions, juvenile offenders under the legal driving age are significantly more influenced by target proximity than adult offenders. Post hoc tests indicate the magnitudes of these impacts vary significantly between study regions. Conclusions: While burglary target selection strategies are consistent with opportunity-based explanations of offending, the impact of environmental context is significant. As such, the approach undertaken in combining observations from multiple study regions may aid criminology scholars in assessing the generalizability of observed findings across multiple environments. PMID:25866418

  3. A comparative study of lysosome-targetable pH probes based on phenoxazinium attached with aliphatic and aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Li, Xiao-Jun; Sun, Ru; Xu, Yu-Jie; Ge, Jian-Feng

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, phenoxazinium was used as a fluorophore for the design of pH probes by the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. Phenoxazinium with an aliphatic morpholinyl group (probe ) gave increased emission at 665 nm with pH ranging from 7.4 to 4.4; meanwhile, the other one with an aromatic diethylaminophenyl group (probe ) gave nearly OFF-ON emission at 679 nm with pH ranging from 7.4 to 4.2. They both were reversible pH probes with good selectivity. Their optical properties, especially the PET mechanism, were illustrated by (TD)DFT theory. Fluorescence confocal imaging of probes and a typical phenoxazinium dye (Oxazine 1) was also performed, and the results indicated that probes are lysosome-targetable biomarkers. PMID:27048759

  4. Targeting HER2+ breast cancer cells: lysosomal accumulation of anti-HER2 antibodies is influenced by antibody binding site and conjugation to polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Owen, Shawn C; Patel, Nish; Logie, Jennifer; Pan, Guohua; Persson, Helena; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Shoichet, Molly S

    2013-12-10

    Humanized monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HER2 are being engineered to treat cancer. We utilized phage-display technology to generate a novel anti-HER2 mAb (named 73JIgG) that binds an epitope of HER2 distinct from that of trastuzumab. Although these mAbs bind to the same cell surface receptor, they have different cell distribution profiles. After 3h of incubation, almost 10% of the total 73JIgG reaches the lysosome compared to less than 3% of trastuzumab. Interestingly, 73JIgG disassociates from HER2 whereas trastuzumab remains bound to the receptor. Importantly, HER2 distribution is not affected by the antibody binding epitope, thus negating this mechanism as the reason for the difference in intracellular trafficking of 73JIgG versus trastuzumab. Each of trastuzumab and 73JIgG was chemically-modified with either a small molecule or polymeric nanoparticle to better understand the influence of conjugation on cellular localization. Relative to antibody alone, antibody-nanoparticle conjugates resulted in a higher concentration of antibodies in the lysosome whereas antibody-small molecule conjugates did not affect cell trafficking to the lysosome. Given the importance of lysosomal targeting, these results demonstrate the importance of understanding the influence of the antibody-conjugate on cell trafficking for ultimate optimization of treatment selection. PMID:23880472

  5. Up-regulation of lysosomal TRPML1 channels is essential for lysosomal adaptation to nutrient starvation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Lu; Lawas, Maria; Li, Xinran; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel T; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2015-03-17

    Upon nutrient starvation, autophagy digests unwanted cellular components to generate catabolites that are required for housekeeping biosynthesis processes. A complete execution of autophagy demands an enhancement in lysosome function and biogenesis to match the increase in autophagosome formation. Here, we report that mucolipin-1 (also known as TRPML1 or ML1), a Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome that regulates many aspects of lysosomal trafficking, plays a central role in this quality-control process. By using Ca(2+) imaging and whole-lysosome patch clamping, lysosomal Ca(2+) release and ML1 currents were detected within hours of nutrient starvation and were potently up-regulated. In contrast, lysosomal Na(+)-selective currents were not up-regulated. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) mimicked a starvation effect in fed cells. The starvation effect also included an increase in lysosomal proteostasis and enhanced clearance of lysosomal storage, including cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) cells. However, this effect was not observed when ML1 was pharmacologically inhibited or genetically deleted. Furthermore, overexpression of ML1 mimicked the starvation effect. Hence, lysosomal adaptation to environmental cues such as nutrient levels requires mTOR/TFEB-dependent, lysosome-to-nucleus regulation of lysosomal ML1 channels and Ca(2+) signaling. PMID:25733853

  6. Visualization of Endogenous and Exogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Using A Lysosome-Targetable Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dabin; Kim, Gyoungmi; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yin, Jun; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play crucial roles in diverse physiological processes; therefore, the efficient detection of ROS is very crucial. In this study, we report a boronate-based hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) probe having naphthalimide fluorophore. This probe also contained a morpholine moiety as a directing group for lysosome. The recognition property indicated that the probe exhibited high selectivity towards H2O2 not only in the solution but also in the living cells. Furthermore, it was used to monitor the level of endogenous and exogenous H2O2. These results support that the probe can function as an efficient indicator to detect H2O2. PMID:25684681

  7. Rab7 Silencing Prevents μ-Opioid Receptor Lysosomal Targeting and Rescues Opioid Responsiveness to Strengthen Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Shaaban A.; Shaqura, Mohammed; Khalefa, Baled I.; Zöllner, Christian; Schaad, Laura; Schneider, Jonas; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Richter, Jan F.; Hellweg, Rainer; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schäfer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is poorly controlled by analgesics and requires high doses of opioids, triggering side effects and reducing patient quality of life. This study investigated whether enhanced Rab7-mediated lysosomal targeting of peripheral sensory neuron μ-opioid receptors (MORs) is responsible for diminished opioid responsiveness in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. In diabetic animals, significantly impaired peripheral opioid analgesia was associated with a loss in sensory neuron MOR and a reduction in functional MOR G-protein-coupling. In control animals, MORs were retained mainly on the neuronal cell membrane. In contrast, in diabetic rats, they were colocalized with upregulated Rab7 in LampI-positive perinuclear lysosome compartments. Silencing endogenous Rab7 with intrathecal Rab7-siRNA or, indirectly, by reversing nerve growth factor deprivation in peripheral sensory neurons not only prevented MOR targeting to lysosomes, restoring their plasma membrane density, but also rescued opioid responsiveness toward better pain relief. These findings elucidate in vivo the mechanisms by which enhanced Rab7 lysosomal targeting of MORs leads to a loss in opioid antinociception in diabetic neuropathic pain. This is in contrast to peripheral sensory neuron MOR upregulation and antinociception in inflammatory pain, and provides intriguing evidence that regulation of opioid responsiveness varies as a function of pain pathogenesis. PMID:23230081

  8. Lysosome sorting of β-glucocerebrosidase by LIMP-2 is targeted by the mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuguang; Ren, Jingshan; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I

    2014-01-01

    The integral membrane protein LIMP-2 has been a paradigm for mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR) independent lysosomal targeting, binding to β-glucocerebrosidase (β-GCase) and directing it to the lysosome, before dissociating in the late-endosomal/lysosomal compartments. Here we report structural results illuminating how LIMP-2 binds and releases β-GCase according to changes in pH, via a histidine trigger, and suggesting that LIMP-2 localizes the ceramide portion of the substrate adjacent to the β-GCase catalytic site. Remarkably, we find that LIMP-2 bears P-Man9GlcNAc2 covalently attached to residue N325, and that it binds MPR, via mannose 6-phosphate, with a similar affinity to that observed between LIMP-2 and β-GCase. The binding sites for β-GCase and the MPR are functionally separate, so that a stable ternary complex can be formed. By fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we also demonstrate that LIMP-2 interacts with MPR in living cells. These results revise the accepted view of LIMP-2-β-GCase lysosomal targeting. PMID:25027712

  9. Lysosome sorting of β-glucocerebrosidase by LIMP-2 is targeted by the mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Ren, Jingshan; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.

    2014-01-01

    The integral membrane protein LIMP-2 has been a paradigm for mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR) independent lysosomal targeting, binding to β-glucocerebrosidase (β-GCase) and directing it to the lysosome, before dissociating in the late-endosomal/lysosomal compartments. Here we report structural results illuminating how LIMP-2 binds and releases β-GCase according to changes in pH, via a histidine trigger, and suggesting that LIMP-2 localizes the ceramide portion of the substrate adjacent to the β-GCase catalytic site. Remarkably, we find that LIMP-2 bears P-Man9GlcNAc2 covalently attached to residue N325, and that it binds MPR, via mannose 6-phosphate, with a similar affinity to that observed between LIMP-2 and β-GCase. The binding sites for β-GCase and the MPR are functionally separate, so that a stable ternary complex can be formed. By fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we also demonstrate that LIMP-2 interacts with MPR in living cells. These results revise the accepted view of LIMP-2–β-GCase lysosomal targeting. PMID:25027712

  10. AN UNCONVENTIONAL DILEUCINE AND A NOVEL CYTOSOLIC MOTIF ARE REQUIRED FOR THE LYSOSOMAL/MELANOSOMAL TARGETING OF OA1

    PubMed Central

    Piccirillo, Rosanna; Palmisano, Ilaria; Innamorati, Giulio; Bagnato, Paola; Altimare, Domenico; Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY The protein product of the gene responsible for ocular albinism type 1, named OA1, is a pigment cell-specific membrane glycoprotein, displaying features of G protein-coupled receptors, yet exclusively localized to late endosomes/lysosomes and melanosomes. To dissect the signals responsible for the intracellular localization of OA1 we generated LAMP1/OA1 chimeras and OA1 mutants at the cytosolic domains of the protein. By this approach we identified two separate sorting signals that are both necessary and sufficient for intracellular retention and lysosomal/melanosomal localization in melanocytic and non-melanocytic cells: an unconventional dileucine motif within the third cytosolic loop and a novel motif, characterized by a tryptophan-glutamic acid doublet, within the C-terminal tail. Both motifs must be mutated to promote the plasma membrane localization of OA1, suggesting that they can independently drive its intracellular targeting. In addition, both motifs act similarly as lysosomal sorting signals in non-melanocytic cells, but appear to carry different specificities in melanocytic cells. Our findings indicate that OA1 contains multiple unconventional signals responsible for its lysosomal/melanosomal localization, and reveal a remarkable and unforeseen complexity in the regulation of polytopic protein sorting to specialized secretory organelles. PMID:16621890

  11. Targeting (cellular) lysosomal acid ceramidase by B13: Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel DMG-B13 ester prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Aiping; Szulc, Zdzislaw, M.; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S.; Rembisa, Barbara; Terzieva, Silva; Mao, Cungui; Xu, Ruijuan; Wu, Bill; Clarke, Christopher J.; Newcomb, Benjamin; Liu, Xiang; Norris, James; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Bielawska, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Acid ceramidase (ACDase) is being recognized as a therapeutic target for cancer. B13 represents a moderate inhibitor of ACDase. The present study concentrates on the lysosomal targeting of B13 via its N, N-dimethylglycine (DMG) esters (DMG-B13 prodrugs). Novel analogs, the isomeric mono-DMG-B13, LCL522 (3-O-DMG-B13•HCl) and LCL596 (1-O-DMG-B13•HCl) and di-DMG-B13, LCL521 (1,3-O, O-DMG-B13•2HCl) conjugates, were designed and synthesized through N, N-dimethyl glycine (DMG) esterification of the hydroxyl groups of B13. In MCF7 cells, DMG-B13 prodrugs were efficiently metabolized to B13. The early inhibitory effect of DMG-B13 prodrugs on cellular ceramidases was ACDase specific by their lysosomal targeting. The corresponding dramatic decrease of cellular Sph (80-97% Control/1h) by DMG-B13 prodrugs was mainly from the inhibition of the lysosomal ACDase. PMID:25456083

  12. Detection of Misdistribution of Tyrosinase from Melanosomes to Lysosomes and Its Upregulation under Psoralen/Ultraviolet A with a Melanosome-Targeting Tyrosinase Fluorescent Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Shi, Wen; Li, Lihong; Gong, Qiuyu; Wu, Xiaofeng; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2016-04-19

    Tyrosinase is regarded as an important biomarker of melanoma cancer, and its metabolism is closely related to some severe skin diseases such as vitiligo. Since tyrosinase is mainly located in the melanosomes of melanocytes, a probe that can specifically detect and image tysosinase in melanosomes would be in urgent demand to study the behavior of the enzyme in cells, but unfortunately, no melanosome-targeting tyrosinase fluorescent probe has been reported so far to the best of our knowledge. In this work, we have developed such a new probe, Mela-TYR, which bears morpholine as a melanosome-targeting group and 4-aminophenol as a tyrosinase reaction group. The probe exhibits not only a highly sensitive and selective off-on response to tyrosinase via oxidization cleavage, but also an accurate targeting ability toward the acidic organelles of melanosomes and lyososomes, which is validated by colocalization experiments with mCherry-tagged melanosomes as well as DND-99 (a commercial dye). The probe has been used to image the relative contents of tyrosinase in different cells. Notably, because of the tyrosinase deficiency in normal lysosomes, the probe only fluoresces in melanosomes in principle although it can accumulate in other acidic organelles like lysosomes. By virtue of this property, the misdistribution of tyrosinase from melanosomes to lysosomes in murine melanoma B16 cells under the stimulation of inulavosin is imaged in real time for the first time. Moreover, the upregulation of melanosomal tyrosinase in live B16 cells under the stimulation of psoralen/ultraviolet A is detected with our probe, and this upregulation is further verified by standard colorimetric assay. The probe provides a simple, visual method to study the metabolism of tyrosinase in cells and shows great potential in clinical diagnosis and treatments of tyrosinase-associated diseases. PMID:27021123

  13. Targeted rescue of a polycystic kidney disease mutation by lysosomal inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hofherr, Alexis; Wagner, Claudius J; Watnick, Terry; Köttgen, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common monogenic cause of end-stage renal disease. The molecular pathogenesis of ADPKD is not completely known, and there is no approved therapy. To date, there is limited knowledge concerning the molecular consequences of specific disease-causing mutations. Here we show that the ADPKD missense variant TRPP2(D511V) greatly reduces TRPP2 protein stability, and that TRPP2(D511V) function can be rescued in vivo by small molecules targeting the TRPP2 degradation pathway. Expression of the TRPP2(D511V) protein was significantly reduced compared to wild-type TRPP2. Inhibition of lysosomal degradation of TRPP2(D511V) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug chloroquine strongly increased TRPP2 protein levels in vitro. The validation of these results in vivo requires appropriate animal models. However, there are currently no mouse models harboring human PKD2 missense mutations, and screening for chemical rescue of patient mutations in rodent models is time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model expressing the ortholog of TRPP2(D511V) to test chemical rescue of mutant TRPP2 in vivo. Notably, chloroquine was sufficient to improve the phenotype of flies expressing mutant TRPP2. Thus, this proof-of-concept study highlights the potential of directed therapeutic approaches for ADPKD, and provides a rapid-throughput experimental model to screen PKD2 patient mutations and small molecules in vivo. PMID:26924047

  14. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Ramazan; Chandra, Partha K.; Aboulnasr, Fatma; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Ferraris, Pauline; Aydin, Yucel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Wu, Tong; Balart, Luis A.; Dash, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α)-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA)-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1), which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired. Aim To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment. Method HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate) and unsaturated (oleate) long-chain free fatty acids (FFA). Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α) and Type III IFN (IFN-λ) was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated. Results FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ), which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA-treated cell culture. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as ammonium chloride and bafilomycin, prevented IFNAR1 degradation in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. Activators of chaperone-mediated autophagy, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased IFNAR1 levels in Huh-7.5 cells. Co-immunoprecipitation, colocalization and siRNA knockdown experiments revealed that IFNAR1 but not IFNLR1 interacts with HSC70 and LAMP2A, which are core components of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Conclusion Our study presents evidence indicating that chaperone-mediated autophagy targets IFNAR1 degradation in the lysosome in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. These results provide a mechanism for why HCV induced autophagy response selectively degrades type I but not the type III IFNAR1. PMID:25961570

  15. Targeting lysosomal degradation induces p53-dependent cell death and prevents cancer in mouse models of lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Kirsteen H; Dorsey, Frank C; Cleveland, John L; Kastan, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    Despite great interest in cancer chemoprevention, effective agents are few. Here we show that chloroquine, a drug that activates the stress-responsive Atm-p53 tumor-suppressor pathway, preferentially enhances the death of Myc oncogene-overexpressing primary mouse B cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and impairs Myc-induced lymphomagenesis in a transgenic mouse model of human Burkitt lymphoma. Chloroquine-induced cell death in primary MEFs and human colorectal cancer cells was dependent upon p53, but not upon the p53 modulators Atm or Arf. Accordingly, chloroquine impaired spontaneous lymphoma development in Atm-deficient mice, a mouse model of ataxia telangiectasia, but not in p53-deficient mice. Chloroquine treatment enhanced markers of both macroautophagy and apoptosis in MEFs but ultimately impaired lysosomal protein degradation. Interestingly, chloroquine-induced cell death was not dependent on caspase-mediated apoptosis, as neither overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 nor deletion of the proapoptotic Bax and Bak affected chloroquine-induced MEF death. However, when both apoptotic and autophagic pathways were blocked simultaneously, chloroquine-induced killing of Myc-overexpressing cells was blunted. Thus chloroquine induces lysosomal stress and provokes a p53-dependent cell death that does not require caspase-mediated apoptosis. These findings specifically demonstrate that intermittent chloroquine use effectively prevents cancer in mouse models of 2 genetically distinct human cancer syndromes, Burkitt lymphoma and ataxia telangiectasia, suggesting that agents targeting lysosome-mediated degradation may be effective in cancer prevention. PMID:18097482

  16. Lysosomal Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haoxing; Ren, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic compartments filled with more than 60 different types of hydrolases. They mediate the degradation of extracellular particles from endocytosis and of intracellular components from autophagy. The digested products are transported out of the lysosome via specific catabolite exporters or via vesicular membrane trafficking. Lysosomes also contain more than 50 membrane proteins and are equipped with the machinery to sense nutrient availability, which determines the distribution, number, size, and activity of lysosomes to control the specificity of cargo flux and timing (the initiation and termination) of degradation. Defects in degradation, export, or trafficking result in lysosomal dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Lysosomal channels and transporters mediate ion flux across perimeter membranes to regulate lysosomal ion homeostasis, membrane potential, catabolite export, membrane trafficking, and nutrient sensing. Dysregulation of lysosomal channels underlies the pathogenesis of many LSDs and possibly that of metabolic and common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25668017

  17. Biosynthesis, targeting, and processing of lysosomal proteins: pulse-chase labeling and immune precipitation.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Sandra; Hasilik, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive precursors of amino acids and/or modifier groups into proteins, isolation and sizing of polypeptide species of interest, and finally their detection and characterization provide a robust handle to examine the life cycle and varied modifications of any protein. A prerequisite in application of these techniques to lysosomal enzymes is the availability of an avid and specific antibody, because lysosomal proteins represent a very minor fraction of the cellular protein and must be purified without a significant loss many 1000-fold as conveniently as possible. Pulse-chase labeling and good knowledge on organelle-specific modifications of lysosomal proteins may enhance the information that can be obtained from such experiments. We describe procedures for pulse-chase labeling experiments that have proven to work with a commercially available antibody against a mouse and a human lysosomal protease and can be used as a reference in establishing the technique in any laboratory that has an access to a certified isotope facility and the knowledge to handle radioactivity safely. We discuss the crucial steps and refer to alternatives described in the literature. The present model protein cathepsin Z is synthesized as a larger proenzyme that contains two N-linked oligosaccharides and matures to a shorter single chain enzyme retaining the processed oligosaccharides. A pulse-chase experiment demonstrates the conversion of the precursor into the mature form. In addition, results on deglycosylation of metabolically labeled cathepsin Z are shown and the alterations in the apparent size of the glycopeptides are explained. PMID:25665441

  18. Targeted disruption of the M(r) 46,000 mannose 6-phosphate receptor gene in mice results in misrouting of lysosomal proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Köster, A; Saftig, P; Matzner, U; von Figura, K; Peters, C; Pohlmann, R

    1993-01-01

    Lysosomal enzymes containing mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers are sorted to lysosomes by mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs). The physiological importance of this targeting mechanism is illustrated by I-cell disease, a fatal lysosomal storage disorder caused by the absence of mannose 6-phosphate residues in lysosomal enzymes. Most mammalian cells express two MPRs. Although the binding specificities, subcellular distribution and expression pattern of the two receptors can be differentiated, their coexpression is not understood. The larger of the two receptors with an M(r) of approximately 300,000 (MPR300), which also binds IGFII, appears to have a dominant role in lysosomal enzyme targeting, while the function of the smaller receptor with an M(r) of 46,000 (MPR46) is less clear. To investigate the in vivo function of the MPR46, we generated MPR46-deficient mice using gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Reduced intracellular retention of newly synthesized lysosomal proteins in cells from MPR46 -/- mice demonstrated an essential sorting function of MPR46. The phenotype of MPR46 -/- mice was normal, indicating mechanisms that compensate the MPR46 deficiency in vivo. Images PMID:8262064

  19. Interaction of HIV-1 Nef protein with the host protein Alix promotes lysosomal targeting of CD4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Nathaly A; da Silva, Eulália M L; de Castro, Rodrigo O; da Silva-Januário, Mara E; Mendonça, Luiza M; Bonifacino, Juan S; da Costa, Luciana J; daSilva, Luis L P

    2014-10-01

    Nef is an accessory protein of human immunodeficiency viruses that promotes viral replication and progression to AIDS through interference with various host trafficking and signaling pathways. A key function of Nef is the down-regulation of the coreceptor CD4 from the surface of the host cells. Nef-induced CD4 down-regulation involves at least two independent steps as follows: acceleration of CD4 endocytosis by a clathrin/AP-2-dependent pathway and targeting of internalized CD4 to multivesicular bodies (MVBs) for eventual degradation in lysosomes. In a previous work, we found that CD4 targeting to the MVB pathway was independent of CD4 ubiquitination. Here, we report that this targeting depends on a direct interaction of Nef with Alix/AIP1, a protein associated with the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery that assists with cargo recruitment and intraluminal vesicle formation in MVBs. We show that Nef interacts with both the Bro1 and V domains of Alix. Depletion of Alix or overexpression of the Alix V domain impairs lysosomal degradation of CD4 induced by Nef. In contrast, the V domain overexpression does not prevent cell surface removal of CD4 by Nef or protein targeting to the canonical ubiquitination-dependent MVB pathway. We also show that the Nef-Alix interaction occurs in late endosomes that are enriched in internalized CD4. Together, our results indicate that Alix functions as an adaptor for the ESCRT-dependent, ubiquitin-independent targeting of CD4 to the MVB pathway induced by Nef. PMID:25118280

  20. Interaction of HIV-1 Nef Protein with the Host Protein Alix Promotes Lysosomal Targeting of CD4 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Nathaly A.; da Silva, Eulália M. L.; de Castro, Rodrigo O.; da Silva-Januário, Mara E.; Mendonça, Luiza M.; Bonifacino, Juan S.; da Costa, Luciana J.; daSilva, Luis L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Nef is an accessory protein of human immunodeficiency viruses that promotes viral replication and progression to AIDS through interference with various host trafficking and signaling pathways. A key function of Nef is the down-regulation of the coreceptor CD4 from the surface of the host cells. Nef-induced CD4 down-regulation involves at least two independent steps as follows: acceleration of CD4 endocytosis by a clathrin/AP-2-dependent pathway and targeting of internalized CD4 to multivesicular bodies (MVBs) for eventual degradation in lysosomes. In a previous work, we found that CD4 targeting to the MVB pathway was independent of CD4 ubiquitination. Here, we report that this targeting depends on a direct interaction of Nef with Alix/AIP1, a protein associated with the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery that assists with cargo recruitment and intraluminal vesicle formation in MVBs. We show that Nef interacts with both the Bro1 and V domains of Alix. Depletion of Alix or overexpression of the Alix V domain impairs lysosomal degradation of CD4 induced by Nef. In contrast, the V domain overexpression does not prevent cell surface removal of CD4 by Nef or protein targeting to the canonical ubiquitination-dependent MVB pathway. We also show that the Nef-Alix interaction occurs in late endosomes that are enriched in internalized CD4. Together, our results indicate that Alix functions as an adaptor for the ESCRT-dependent, ubiquitin-independent targeting of CD4 to the MVB pathway induced by Nef. PMID:25118280

  1. Novel Mechanism of Cytotoxicity for the Selective Selenosemicarbazone, 2-Acetylpyridine 4,4-Dimethyl-3-selenosemicarbazone (Ap44mSe): Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Al-Eisawi, Zaynab; Stefani, Christian; Jansson, Patric J; Arvind, Akanksha; Sharpe, Philip C; Basha, Maram T; Iskander, George M; Kumar, Naresh; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Lane, Darius J R; Sahni, Sumit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Richardson, Des R; Kalinowski, Danuta S

    2016-01-14

    Selenosemicarbazones show marked antitumor activity. However, their mechanism of action remains unknown. We examined the medicinal chemistry of the selenosemicarbazone, 2-acetylpyridine 4,4-dimethyl-3-selenosemicarbazone (Ap44mSe), and its iron and copper complexes to elucidate its mechanisms of action. Ap44mSe demonstrated a pronounced improvement in selectivity toward neoplastic relative to normal cells compared to its parent thiosemicarbazone. It also effectively depleted cellular Fe, resulting in transferrin receptor-1 up-regulation, ferritin down-regulation, and increased expression of the potent metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1. Significantly, Ap44mSe limited deleterious methemoglobin formation, highlighting its usefulness in overcoming toxicities of clinically relevant thiosemicarbazones. Furthermore, Cu-Ap44mSe mediated intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, which was attenuated by the antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, or Cu sequestration. Notably, Ap44mSe forms redox active Cu complexes that target the lysosome to induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization. This investigation highlights novel structure-activity relationships for future chemotherapeutic design and underlines the potential of Ap44mSe as a selective anticancer/antimetastatic agent. PMID:26645570

  2. Assessment of a targeted resequencing assay as a support tool in the diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With over 50 different disorders and a combined incidence of up to 1/3000 births, lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) constitute a major public health problem and place an enormous burden on affected individuals and their families. Many factors make LSD diagnosis difficult, including phenotype and penetrance variability, shared signs and symptoms, and problems inherent to biochemical diagnosis. Developing a powerful diagnostic tool could mitigate the protracted diagnostic process for these families, lead to better outcomes for current and proposed therapies, and provide the basis for more appropriate genetic counseling. Methods We have designed a targeted resequencing assay for the simultaneous testing of 57 lysosomal genes, using in-solution capture as the enrichment method and two different sequencing platforms. A total of 84 patients with high to moderate-or low suspicion index for LSD were enrolled in different centers in Spain and Portugal, including 18 positive controls. Results We correctly diagnosed 18 positive blinded controls, provided genetic diagnosis to 25 potential LSD patients, and ended with 18 diagnostic odysseys. Conclusion We report the assessment of a next–generation-sequencing-based approach as an accessory tool in the diagnosis of LSDs, a group of disorders which have overlapping clinical profiles and genetic heterogeneity. We have also identified and quantified the strengths and limitations of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology applied to diagnosis. PMID:24767253

  3. Crystal structures of native and inhibited forms of human cathepsin D: implications for lysosomal targeting and drug design.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, E T; Bhat, T N; Gulnik, S; Hosur, M V; Sowder, R C; Cachau, R E; Collins, J; Silva, A M; Erickson, J W

    1993-01-01

    Cathepsin D (EC 3.4.23.5) is a lysosomal protease suspected to play important roles in protein catabolism, antigen processing, degenerative diseases, and breast cancer progression. Determination of the crystal structures of cathepsin D and a complex with pepstatin at 2.5 A resolution provides insights into inhibitor binding and lysosomal targeting for this two-chain, N-glycosylated aspartic protease. Comparison with the structures of a complex of pepstatin bound to rhizopuspepsin and with a human renin-inhibitor complex revealed differences in subsite structures and inhibitor-enzyme interactions that are consistent with affinity differences and structure-activity relationships and suggest strategies for fine-tuning the specificity of cathepsin D inhibitors. Mutagenesis studies have identified a phosphotransferase recognition region that is required for oligosaccharide phosphorylation but is 32 A distant from the N-domain glycosylation site at Asn-70. Electron density for the crystal structure of cathepsin D indicated the presence of an N-linked oligosaccharide that extends from Asn-70 toward Lys-203, which is a key component of the phosphotransferase recognition region, and thus provides a structural explanation for how the phosphotransferase can recognize apparently distant sites on the protein surface. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8393577

  4. Biotherapeutic target or sink: analysis of the macrophage mannose receptor tissue distribution in murine models of lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin Sheen; Brondyk, William; Lydon, John T; Thurberg, Beth L; Piepenhagen, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are metabolic disorders caused by enzyme deficiencies that lead to lysosomal accumulation of undegraded substrates. Enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) have been developed as treatments for patients with Gaucher, Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Pompe diseases. Depending on the disease, the corresponding therapeutic enzyme is designed to be internalized by diseased cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis via macrophage mannose receptors (MMR) or mannose-6-phosphate receptors (M6PR). Enzymes developed to treat Gaucher and Niemann-Pick diseases are meant to target MMR-expressing cells, and in the case of Cerezyme [recombinant human ?-glucocerebrosidase (rh?GC)] for treating Gaucher disease, glycans on the enzyme are modified to increase specificity toward this receptor. Due to heterogeneity in glycosylation on enzymes intended to target the M6PR, however, there may also be some unintended targeting to MMR-expressing cells, which could act as unwanted sinks. Examples include Fabrazyme [recombinant human ?-galactosidase A (rh?Gal)] for treating Fabry disease and Myozyme [recombinant human acid ?-glucosidase (rhGAA)] for treating Pompe disease. It is therefore of great interest to better understand the cell type and tissue distribution of MMR in murine LSD models used to evaluate ERT efficacy and mechanism of action. In this study, we generated affinity-purified polyclonal antibody against murine MMR and used it to carry out a systematic examination of MMR protein localization in murine models of Gaucher, Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Pompe diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy, we examined MMR distribution in liver, spleen, lung, kidney, heart, diaphragm, quadriceps, and triceps in these animal models and compared them with MMR distribution in wild-type mice. PMID:21416197

  5. BODIPY-labeled DC-SIGN-targeting glycodendrons efficiently internalize and route to lysosomes in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Viana, Renato; García-Vallejo, Juan J; Collado, Daniel; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Bloem, Karien; van Kooyk, Yvette; Rojo, Javier

    2012-10-01

    Glycodendrons bearing nine copies of mannoses or fucoses have been prepared by an efficient convergent strategy based on Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). These glycodendrons present a well-defined structure and have an adequate size and shape to interact efficiently with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN. We have selected a BODIPY derivative to label these glycodendrons due to its interesting physical and chemical properties as chromophore. These BODIPY-labeled glycodendrons were internalized into dendritic cells by mean of DC-SIGN. The internalized mannosylated and fucosylated dendrons are colocalized with LAMP1, which suggests routing to lysosomes. The interaction of these glycodendrons with DC-SIGN at the surface of dendritic cells did not induce maturation of the cells. Signaling analysis by checking different cytokines indicated also the lack of induction the expression of inflammatory and noninflammatory cytokines by these second generation glycodendrons. PMID:22920925

  6. Lysosome electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xi Z; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The physiology and functions of ion channels have been major topics of interest in biomedical research. Patch clamping is one of the most powerful techniques used in the study of ion channels and has been widely applied to the investigation of electrical properties of ion channels on the plasma membrane in a variety of cells. A number of ion channels have been found in intracellular lysosomal membranes. However, their properties had been difficult to study due to the lack of a direct patch-clamping methodology on lysosomal membranes. Past attempts to record lysosomal channels that were forced to express on the plasma membrane or reconstituted into lipid bilayers have largely generated inconclusive and conflicting results. Recently, a novel lysosome patch-clamping technique has been developed, making it possible to examine lysosomal channels under near physiological conditions. This chapter provides a detailed description of this technique, which has been successfully applied in several studies concerning lysosomal ion channels. This technique will expand our understanding of the nature of lysosomes and lysosome-related diseases. PMID:25665447

  7. Strategies for SETI target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Soderblom, David R.

    1993-08-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey consists of two complementary elements: a Sky Survey of the entire sky to a moderate level of sensitivity; and a Targeted Search of nearby stars, one at a time, to a much deeper level of sensitivity. In this paper we present a strategy for target selection and observing. The strategy has two goals: to improve the chances of successful detection of signals from technical civilizations that inhabit planets around solar- type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites. For the main Targeted Search survey of approximately 1000 nearby solar-type stars, we argue that the selection criteria should be heavily biased by what we know about the origin and evolution of life here on earth. We propose that observations of stars with stellar companions orbiting near the habitable zone should be de-emphasized, because such companions would prevent the formation of habitable planets. We also propose that observations of stars younger than about three billion years should be de-emphasized in favor of older stars, because our own technical civilization took longer than three billion years to evolve here on earth.

  8. Ubiquitination of lysine-331 by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protein K5 targets HFE for lysosomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David A.; Boyle, Louise H.; Boname, Jessica M.; Lehner, Paul J.; Trowsdale, John

    2010-01-01

    The nonclassical MHC class I-related (MHC-I) molecule HFE controls cellular iron homeostasis by a mechanism that has not been fully elucidated. We examined the regulation of HFE by K5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV8), that is known to down-regulate classical MHC-I. K5 down-regulated HFE efficiently, using polyubiquitination of the membrane proximal lysine in the HFE cytoplasmic tail (K331), to target the molecule for degradation via ESCRT1/TSG101-dependent sorting from endosomes to multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/lysosomes. In the primary effusion lymphoma cell line BC-3, which carries latent KSHV, HFE was degraded rapidly upon virus reactivation. HFE was ubiquitinated on lysine-331 in unactivated BC-3 cells, conditions where K5 was not detectable, consistent with an endogenous E3 ubiquitin ligase controlling HFE expression. The results show regulated expression of HFE by ubiquitination, consistent with a role in cellular iron homeostasis, a molecular mechanism targeted by KSHV to achieve a positive iron balance. PMID:20805500

  9. Lysosome-dependent p300/FOXP3 degradation and limits Treg cell functions and enhances targeted therapy against cancers.

    PubMed

    Du, Taofeng; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Greene, Mark I; Zhang, Hongtao

    2013-08-01

    p300 is one of several acetyltransferases that regulate FOXP3 acetylation and functions. Our recent studies have defined a complex set of histone acetyltransferase interactions which can lead to enhanced or repressed changes in FOXP3 function. We have explored the use of a natural p300 inhibitor, Garcinol, as a tool to understand mechanisms by which p300 regulates FOXP3 acetylation. In the presence of Garcinol, p300 appears to become disassociated from the FOXP3 complex and undergoes lysosome-dependent degradation. As a consequence of p300's physical absence, FOXP3 becomes less acetylated and eventually degraded, a process that cannot be rescued by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. p300 plays a complex role in FOXP3 acetylation, as it could also acetylate a subset of four Lys residues that repressively regulate total FOXP3 acetylation. Garcinol acts as a degradation device to reduce the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells (Treg) and to enhance the in vivo anti-tumor activity of a targeted therapeutic anti-p185(her2/neu) (ERBB2) antibody in MMTV-neu transgenics implanted with neu transformed breast tumor cells. Our studies provide the rationale for molecules that disrupt p300 stability to limit Treg functions in targeted therapies for cancers. PMID:23644046

  10. Dual Site-Controlled and Lysosome-Targeted Intramolecular Charge Transfer-Photoinduced Electron Transfer-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Fluorescent Probe for Monitoring pH Changes in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Baoli; Song, Xuezhen; Wang, Chao; Kong, Xiuqi; Tang, Yonghe; Lin, Weiying

    2016-04-01

    Acidic pH is a critical physiological factor for controlling the activities and functions of lysosome. Herein, we report a novel dual site-controlled and lysosome-targeted intramolecular charge transfer-photoinduced electron transfer-Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (ICT-PET-FRET) fluorescent probe (CN-pH), which was essentially the combination of a turn-on pH probe (CN-1) and a turn-off pH probe (CN-2) by a nonconjugated linker. Coumarin and naphthalimide fluorophores were selected as donor and acceptor to construct the FRET platform. Hydroxyl group and morpholine were simultaneously employed as the two pH sensing sites and controlled the fluorescence of coumarin and naphthalimide units by ICT and PET, respectively. The sensing mechanism of CN-pH to pH was essentially an integration of ICT, PET, and FRET processes. Meanwhile, the morpholine also can serve as a lysosome-targeted group. By combining the two data analysis approaches of the ratios of the two emission intensities (R) and the reverse ratio R' (R' = 1/R), the fluorescent ratio of CN-pH can show proportional relationship to pH values in a very broad range from pH 4.0 to 8.0 with high sensitivity. The probe has been successfully applied for the fluorescence imaging of the lysosomal pH values, as well as ratiometrically visualizing chloroquine-stimulated changes of intracellular pH in living cells. These features demonstrate that the probe can afford practical application in biological systems. PMID:26987045

  11. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles.

    PubMed

    Luzio, J Paul; Hackmann, Yvonne; Dieckmann, Nele M G; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2014-09-01

    Lysosomes were once considered the end point of endocytosis, simply used for macromolecule degradation. They are now recognized to be dynamic organelles, able to fuse with a variety of targets and to be re-formed after fusion events. They are also now known to be the site of nutrient sensing and signaling to the cell nucleus. In addition, lysosomes are secretory organelles, with specialized machinery for regulated secretion of proteins in some cell types. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles is discussed, taking into account their dynamic nature and multiple roles. PMID:25183830

  12. Fusion to the Lysosome Targeting Signal of the Invariant Chain Alters the Processing and Enhances the Immunogenicity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Isaguliants, M G; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Krotova, O A; Karpov, V L

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular processing of the antigen encoded by a DNA vaccine is one of the key steps in generating an immune response. Immunization with DNA constructs targeted to the endosomal-lysosomal compartments and to the MHC class II pathway can elicit a strong immune response. Herein, the weakly immunogenic reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 was fused to the minimal lysosomal targeting motif of the human MHC class II invariant chain. The motif fused to the N-terminus shifted the enzyme intracellular localization and accelerated its degradation. Degradation of the chimeric protein occurred predominantly in the lysosomal compartment. BALB/c mice immunized with the plasmid encoding the chimeric protein demonstrated an enhanced immune response, in the form of an increased antigen-specific production of Th1 cytokines, INF-γ and IL-2, by mouse splenocytes. Moreover, the majority of the splenocytes secreted both cytokines; i.e., were polyfunctional. These findings suggest that retargeting of the antigen to the lysosomes enhances the immune response to DNA vaccine candidates with low intrinsic immunogenicity. PMID:24772328

  13. Comparative binding, endocytosis, and biodistribution of antibodies and antibody-coated carriers for targeted delivery of lysosomal enzymes to ICAM-1 versus transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Papademetriou, Jason; Garnacho, Carmen; Serrano, Daniel; Bhowmick, Tridib; Schuchman, Edward H.; Muro, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Targeting lysosomal enzymes to receptors involved in transport into and across cells holds promise to enhance peripheral and brain delivery of enzyme replacement therapies for lysosomal storage disorders. Receptors being explored include those associated with clathrin-mediated pathways, yet other pathways seem also viable. Well characterized examples are that of transferrin receptor (TfR) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), involved in iron transport and leukocyte extravasation, respectively. TfR and ICAM-1 support ERT delivery via clathrin- vs. cell adhesion molecule-mediated mechanisms, displaying different valency and size restrictions. To comparatively assess this, we used antibodies vs. larger multivalent antibody-coated carriers and evaluated TfR vs. ICAM-1 binding and endocytosis in endothelial cells, as well as in vivo biodistribution and delivery of a model lysosomal enzyme required in peripheral organs and brain: acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), deficient in types A–B Niemann Pick disease. We found similar binding of antibodies to both receptors under control conditions, with enhanced binding to activated endothelium for ICAM-1, yet only anti-TfR induced endocytosis efficiently. Contrarily, antibody-coated carriers showed enhanced binding, engulfment, and endocytosis for ICAM-1. In mice, anti-TfR enhanced brain targeting over anti-ICAM, with an opposite outcome in the lungs, while carriers enhanced ICAM-1 targeting over TfR in both organs. Both targeted carriers enhanced ASM delivery to the brain and lungs vs. free ASM, with greater enhancement for anti-ICAM carriers. Therefore, targeting TfR or ICAM-1 improves lysosomal enzyme delivery. Yet, TfR targeting may be more efficient for smaller conjugates or fusion proteins, while ICAM-1 targeting seems superior for multivalent carrier formulations. PMID:22968581

  14. Astrocytes and lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Rama Rao, K V; Kielian, T

    2016-05-26

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) encompass a wide range of disorders characterized by inborn errors of lysosomal function. The majority of LSDs result from genetic defects in lysosomal enzymes, although some arise from mutations in lysosomal proteins that lack known enzymatic activity. Neuropathological abnormalities are a feature of several LSDs and when severe, represent an important determinant in disease outcome. Glial dysfunction, particularly in astrocytes, is also observed in numerous LSDs and has been suggested to impact neurodegeneration. This review will discuss the potential role of astrocytes in LSDs and highlight the possibility of targeting glia as a beneficial strategy to counteract the neuropathology associated with LSDs. PMID:26037807

  15. Quasar target selection fiber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.; Yanny, B.

    1996-05-01

    We present estimates of the efficiency for finding QSOs as a function of limiting magnitude and galactic latitude. From these estimates, we have formulated a target selection strategy that should net 80,000 QSOs in the north galactic cap with an average of 70 fibers per plate, not including fibers reserved for high-redshift quasars. With this plan, we expect 54% of the targets to be QSOs. The North Galactic Cap is divided into two zones of high and low stellar density. We use about five times as many fibers for QSO candidates in the half of the survey with the lower stellar density as we use in the half with higher stellar density. The current plan assigns 15% of the fibers to FIRST radio sources; if these are not available, those fibers would be allocated to lower probability QSO sources, dropping the total number of QSOs by a small factor (5%). We will find about 17,000 additional quasars in the southern strips, and maybe a few more at very high redshift. Use was made of two data sets: the star and quasar simulated test data generated by Don Schneider, and the data from UJFN plate surveys by Koo (1986) and Kron (1980). This data was compared to results from the Palomar-Green Survey and a recent survey by Pat Osmer and collaborators.

  16. The mechanical activation of mTOR signaling: an emerging role for late endosome/lysosomal targeting.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brittany L; Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-02-01

    It is well recognized that mechanical signals play a critical role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass is essential for mobility, disease prevention and quality of life. Furthermore, over the last 15 years it has become established that signaling through a protein kinase called the mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for mechanically-induced changes in protein synthesis and muscle mass, however, the mechanism(s) via which mechanical stimuli regulate mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nonetheless, advancements are being made, and an emerging body of evidence suggests that the late endosome/lysosomal (LEL) system might play a key role in this process. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize this body of evidence. Specifically, we will first explain why the Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are considered to be direct activators of mTOR signaling. We will then describe the process of endocytosis and its involvement in the formation of LEL structures, as well as the evidence which indicates that mTOR and its direct activators (Rheb and PA) are all enriched at the LEL. Finally, we will summarize the evidence that has implicated the LEL in the regulation of mTOR by various growth regulatory inputs such as amino acids, growth factors and mechanical stimuli. PMID:24162376

  17. Expression and lysosomal targeting of CLN7, a major facilitator superfamily transporter associated with variant late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, A; Kousi, M; Sagné, C; Bellenchi, G C; Morel, L; Darmon, M; Hulková, H; Ruivo, R; Debacker, C; El Mestikawy, S; Elleder, M; Lehesjoki, A-E; Jalanko, A; Gasnier, B; Kyttälä, A

    2010-11-15

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) constitute a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders resulting from mutations in at least eight different genes. Mutations in the most recently identified NCL gene, MFSD8/CLN7, underlie a variant of late-infantile NCL (vLINCL). The MFSD8/CLN7 gene encodes a polytopic protein with unknown function, which shares homology with ion-coupled membrane transporters. In this study, we confirmed the lysosomal localization of the native CLN7 protein. This localization of CLN7 is not impaired by the presence of pathogenic missense mutations or after genetic ablation of the N-glycans. Expression of chimeric and full-length constructs showed that lysosomal targeting of CLN7 is mainly determined by an N-terminal dileucine motif, which specifically binds to the heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 in vitro. We also show that CLN7 mRNA is more abundant in neurons than astrocytes and microglia, and that it is expressed throughout rat brain, with increased levels in the granular layer of cerebellum and hippocampal pyramidal cells. Interestingly, this cellular and regional distribution is in good agreement with the autofluorescent lysosomal storage and cell loss patterns found in brains from CLN7-defective patients. Overall, these data highlight lysosomes as the primary site of action for CLN7, and suggest that the pathophysiology underpinning CLN7-associated vLINCL is a cell-autonomous process. PMID:20826447

  18. Hurpin is a selective inhibitor of lysosomal cathepsin L and protects keratinocytes from ultraviolet-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Welss, Thomas; Sun, Jiuru; Irving, James A; Blum, Rainer; Smith, A Ian; Whisstock, James C; Pike, Robert N; von Mikecz, Anna; Ruzicka, Thomas; Bird, Phillip I; Abts, Harry F

    2003-06-24

    Hurpin (headpin/PI13/serpinB13) is an intracellular, differentially spliced member of the serpin superfamily that has been linked to differentiation and apoptosis of human keratinocytes. It is transiently downregulated by UV light and overexpressed in psoriatic skin lesions. Although it has all of the features of an inhibitory serpin, a productive interaction between hurpin and a proteinase has not yet been reported. Here we demonstrate that hurpin is a potent and selective inhibitor of the archetypal lysosomal cysteine proteinase cathepsin L (catL). Recombinant hurpin inhibits human catL with a stoichiometry of inhibition (SI) of 1.7 and a rate constant k(assoc) of (4.6 +/- 0.14) x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). It inefficiently inhibits catV and does not inhibit papain, catB, or catK. To investigate the inhibitory mechanism, we determined the P1-P1' bond in the reactive center loop cleaved by catL ((356)Thr-(357)Ser) and expressed variants in which the proximal hinge, P1 residue, or differentially spliced CD loop was mutated. The results of assays using these proteins suggest that inhibition of catL by hurpin occurs via the conventional serpin inhibitory mechanism and that the CD loop plays no role in the process. Finally, it was found that the majority of hurpin is cytosolic and that its overexpression in human keratinocytes confers resistance to UV-induced apoptosis. Given that lysosomal disruption, release of catL, and catL-mediated caspase activation are known to occur in response to cellular stress, we propose that a physiological role of hurpin is to protect epithelial cells from ectopic catL. PMID:12809493

  19. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs. PMID:23393155

  20. Lysosomal Adaptation: How the Lysosome Responds to External Cues

    PubMed Central

    Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the importance of the lysosome in cell metabolism and organism physiology goes far beyond the simple disposal of cellular garbage. This dynamic organelle is situated at the crossroad of the most important cellular pathways and is involved in sensing, signaling, and transcriptional mechanisms that respond to environmental cues, such as nutrients. Two main mediators of these lysosomal adaptation mechanisms are the mTORC1 kinase complex and the transcription factor EB (TFEB). These two factors are linked in a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that provides the lysosome with the ability to adapt to extracellular cues and control its own biogenesis. Modulation of lysosomal function by acting on TFEB has a profound impact on cellular clearance and energy metabolism and is a promising therapeutic target for a large variety of disease conditions. PMID:24799353

  1. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ERα mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most notably with the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen. Selectively targeting ERs occurs at two levels: tissue selectivity and receptor subtype selectivity. SERMs have been developed with emphasis on tissue selectivity to target ER signaling for breast cancer treatment. Additionally, new approaches to selectively target the action of ERα going beyond ligand-dependent activity are under current investigation. As evidence of the anti-proliferative role of ERβ accumulates, selectively targeting ERβ is an attractive approach for designing new cancer therapies with the emphasis shifted to designing ligands with subtype selectivity. This review will present the mechanistic and structural features of ERs that determine tissue and subtype selectivity with an emphasis on current approaches to selectively target ERα and ERβ for cancer treatment. PMID:20708050

  2. Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator (LYST).

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaojie; Chang, Bo; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of vesicle trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) as well as regulation of the size of these organelles are critical to maintain their functions. Disruption of the lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) results in Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, prolonged bleeding, severe immunodeficiency, recurrent bacterial infection, neurologic dysfunction and hemophagocytic lympohistiocytosis (HLH). The classic diagnostic feature of the syndrome is enlarged LROs in all cell types, including lysosomes, melanosomes, cytolytic granules and platelet dense bodies. The most striking CHS ocular pathology observed is an enlargement of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which leads to aberrant distribution of eye pigmentation, and results in photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Understanding the molecular function of LYST and identification of its interacting partners may provide therapeutic targets for CHS and other diseases associated with the regulation of LRO size and/or vesicle trafficking, such as asthma, urticaria and Leishmania amazonensis infections. PMID:26427484

  3. Selective Targeting to Glioma with Nucleic Acid Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Shraddha; Arora, Mohit; Lawrence, Clare Louise; Lea, Robert William; Ashton, Katherine; Dawson, Tim; Alder, Jane Elizabeth; Shaw, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterised by a rapid growth rate and high capacity for invasive infiltration to surrounding brain tissue; hence, diagnosis and treatment is difficult and patient survival is poor. Aptamers contribute a promising and unique technology for the in vitro imaging of live cells and tissues, with a potentially bright future in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for malignant glioma. The binding selectivity, uptake capacity and binding target of two DNA aptamers, SA43 and SA44, were investigated in glioma cells and patient tissues. The binding assay showed that SA43 and SA44 bound with strong affinity (Kd, 21.56 ± 4.60 nM and Kd, 21.11 ± 3.30 nM respectively) to the target U87MG cells. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry showed that the aptamers were able to actively internalise in U87MG and 1321N1 glioma cells compared to the non-cancerous and non-glioma cell types. Confocal microscopy confirmed staining in the cytoplasm, and co-localisation studies with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomal markers suggested internalisation and compartmentalisation within the endomembrane system. Both aptamers selectively bound to Ku 70 and Ku 80 DNA repair proteins as determined by aptoprecipitation (AP) followed by mass spectrometry analysis and confirmation by Western blot. In addition, aptohistochemical (AHC) staining on paraffin embedded, formalin fixed patient tissues revealed that the binding selectivity was significantly higher for SA43 aptamer in glioma tissues (grade I, II, III and IV) compared to the non-cancerous tissues, whereas SA44 did not show selectivity towards glioma tissues. The results indicate that SA43 aptamer can differentiate between glioma and non-cancerous cells and tissues and therefore, shows promise for histological diagnosis of glioma. PMID:26252900

  4. Target Selection for the TESS Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the TESS mission is to discover small, rocky planets transiting bright stars. To reach that goal, we have constructed a compiled catalog of stars from which to select TESS targets. The catalog contains all dwarf stars in the sky with spectral types F5 and later, and I < 12, along with selected sets of fainter M stars. Provisions are being made to augment the target list with stars that fall outside the nominal spectral type and magnitude limits, and to permit dynamic updating of the catalog to accommodate new survey data being released (e.g. Gaia). I will describe the overall target selection strategy, the current target catalog, and how we intend to further expand and refine the TESS target lists.

  5. Lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein (LAMP) – preliminary study on a hidden antigen target for vaccination against schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nawaratna, Sujeevi S. K.; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Willis, Charlene; Mulvenna, Jason; Hofmann, Andreas; McManus, Donald P.; Jones, Malcolm K.

    2015-01-01

    Our previously reported gene atlasing of schistosome tissues revealed transcripts that were highly enriched in the digestive tract of Schistosoma mansoni. From these, we selected two candidates, Sm-LAMP and Sm-NPC2 for testing as vaccine targets. The two molecules were selected on the basis of relatively high expression in the gastrodermis, their potentially important biological function, divergence from homologous molecules of the host and possible apical membrane expression in the gastrodermis. Bacterially expressed recombinant peptides corresponding to regions excluding trans-membrane domains of the selected vaccine targets were used in blinded vaccine trials in CBA mice using alum-CpG as adjuvant. Vaccine trials using the recombinant insoluble Sm-LAMP protein showed 16–25% significant reduction in total worm burden. Faecal egg count reduction was 52% and 60% in two trials, respectively, with similar results for the solubly expressed protein. Liver egg burden was reduced significantly (20% and 38%) with an insoluble recombinant Sm-LAMP in two trials, but not with the soluble recombinant form. Parasite fecundity was not affected by either Sm-LAMP protein preparations in the trials. It is concluded that Sm-LAMP may provide limited protection towards S. mansoni infections but could be used in combination with other vaccine candidates, to provide more comprehensive protection. PMID:26472258

  6. Lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein (LAMP)--preliminary study on a hidden antigen target for vaccination against schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Nawaratna, Sujeevi S K; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Willis, Charlene; Mulvenna, Jason; Hofmann, Andreas; McManus, Donald P; Jones, Malcolm K

    2015-01-01

    Our previously reported gene atlasing of schistosome tissues revealed transcripts that were highly enriched in the digestive tract of Schistosoma mansoni. From these, we selected two candidates, Sm-LAMP and Sm-NPC2 for testing as vaccine targets. The two molecules were selected on the basis of relatively high expression in the gastrodermis, their potentially important biological function, divergence from homologous molecules of the host and possible apical membrane expression in the gastrodermis. Bacterially expressed recombinant peptides corresponding to regions excluding trans-membrane domains of the selected vaccine targets were used in blinded vaccine trials in CBA mice using alum-CpG as adjuvant. Vaccine trials using the recombinant insoluble Sm-LAMP protein showed 16-25% significant reduction in total worm burden. Faecal egg count reduction was 52% and 60% in two trials, respectively, with similar results for the solubly expressed protein. Liver egg burden was reduced significantly (20% and 38%) with an insoluble recombinant Sm-LAMP in two trials, but not with the soluble recombinant form. Parasite fecundity was not affected by either Sm-LAMP protein preparations in the trials. It is concluded that Sm-LAMP may provide limited protection towards S. mansoni infections but could be used in combination with other vaccine candidates, to provide more comprehensive protection. PMID:26472258

  7. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics identified lysosome as a fast response target to PDT agent Gd-N induced oxidative stress in human ovarian cancer IGROV1 cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dandan; Wang, Qianqian; Li, Hongguang; Zhang, Tao; Lan, Rongfeng; Kwong, Daniel W J; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung; Li, Shuiming; Lu, Fei

    2015-11-01

    Biological systems have developed an intact network and strategies in response to various environmental pressures such as irradiation, viral invasion and oxidative stress. Therefore, elucidation of the cellular response mechanism toward oxidative stress can contribute to the knowledge of redox regulation. By using a newly developed gadolinium based photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent Gd-N and SILAC quantified proteomic analysis, we observed 485 proteins dysregulated in expression, 106 in phosphorylation and 1050 in oxidation. Interestingly, lysosome was discovered as the main organelle affected by Gd-N induced singlet oxygen, along with the down regulation of a majority of lysosomal acid hydrolases and proton pump complex ATP6V/TCIRG1. Besides, phosphorylation sites with sequence patterns "TP" or "SP" were enriched in dysregulated phosphoproteins. Protein oxidation also shows sequence patterns in target proteins with "M.D" or "KM" taking methionine as the central residue. Oxidized proteins were most enriched in the pathways of Parkinson's disease, an oxidative stress closely related neurodegenerative disease. In conclusion, our study reveals new insights into the cellular mechanism to oxidative stress and may contribute to the discovery of new targets and development of novel PDT agents. PMID:26331702

  8. Target Selection for the TESS Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan; De Lee, Nathan M.; Paegert, Martin; Latham, David W.; Winn, Joshua N.; TESS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the TESS mission is to discover small, rocky planets transiting bright stars. To reach that goal, we have constructed a compiled catalog of stars from which to select TESS targets. The catalog contains all dwarf stars in the sky with spectral types F5 and later, and I < 12, along with selected sets of fainter M stars. Provisions are being made to augment the target list with stars that fall outside the nominal spectral type and magnitude limits, and to permit dynamic updating of the catalog to accommodate new survey data being released (e.g. GAIA). We will describe the overall target selection strategy, and the current catalogs that have been constructed, and how we intend to further expand and refine our target lists.

  9. Imidazoacridinone-dependent lysosomal photodestruction: a pharmacological Trojan horse approach to eradicate multidrug-resistant cancers.

    PubMed

    Adar, Y; Stark, M; Bram, E E; Nowak-Sliwinska, P; van den Bergh, H; Szewczyk, G; Sarna, T; Skladanowski, A; Griffioen, A W; Assaraf, Y G

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a primary hindrance to curative cancer therapy. Thus, introduction of novel strategies to overcome MDR is of paramount therapeutic significance. Sequestration of chemotherapeutics in lysosomes is an established mechanism of drug resistance. Here, we show that MDR cells display a marked increase in lysosome number. We further demonstrate that imidazoacridinones (IAs), which are cytotoxic fluorochromes, undergo a dramatic compartmentalization in lysosomes because of their hydrophobic weak base nature. We hence developed a novel photoactivation-based pharmacological Trojan horse approach to target and eradicate MDR cancer cells based on photo-rupture of IA-loaded lysosomes and tumor cell lysis via formation of reactive oxygen species. Illumination of IA-loaded cells resulted in lysosomal photodestruction and restoration of parental cell drug sensitivity. Lysosomal photodestruction of MDR cells overexpressing the key MDR efflux transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 or ABCC1 resulted in 10- to 52-fold lower IC(50) values of various IAs, thereby restoring parental cell sensitivity. Finally, in vivo application of this photodynamic therapy strategy after i.v. injection of IAs in human ovarian tumor xenografts in the chorioallantoic membrane model revealed selective destruction of tumors and their associated vasculature. These findings identify lysosomal sequestration of IAs as an Achilles heel of MDR cells that can be harnessed to eradicate MDR tumor cells via lysosomal photodestruction. PMID:22476101

  10. Target selection for FDA-approved medicines.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Hoyer, Denton; Patridge, Eric; Plummer, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The biopharmaceutical industry translates fundamental understanding of disease into new medicines. As part of a comprehensive analysis of FDA-approved new molecular entities (NMEs), we assessed the mechanistic basis of drug efficacy, with emphasis on target selection. Three target families capture almost half of all NMEs and the leading ten families capture more than three-quarters of NME approvals. Target families were related to their clinical application and identify dynamic trends in targeting over time. These data suggest increasing attention toward novel target families, which presumably reflects increased understanding of disease etiology. We also suggest the need to balance the ongoing emphasis on target-based drug discovery with phenotypic approaches to drug discovery. PMID:25462532

  11. Gamma-interferon causes a selective induction of the lysosomal proteases, cathepsins B and L, in macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lah, T. T.; Hawley, M.; Rock, K. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that acid-optimal cysteine proteinase(s) in the endosomal-lysosomal compartments, cathepsins, play a critical role in the proteolytic processing of endocytosed proteins to generate the antigenic peptides presented to the immune system on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. The presentation of these peptides and the expression of MHC class II molecules by macrophages and lymphocytes are stimulated by gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN). We found that treatment of human U-937 monocytes with gamma-IFN increased the activities and the content of the two major lysosomal cysteine proteinases, cathepsins B and L. Assays of protease activity, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA) and immunoblotting showed that this cytokine increased the amount of cathepsin B 5-fold and cathepsin L 3-fold in the lysosomal fraction. By contrast, the aspartic proteinase, cathepsin D, in this fraction was not significantly altered by gamma-IFN treatment. An induction of cathepsins B and L was also observed in mouse macrophages, but not in HeLa cells. These results suggest coordinate regulation in monocytes of the expression of cathepsins B and L and MHC class II molecules. Presumably, this induction of cysteine proteases contributes to the enhancement of antigen presentation by gamma-IFN.

  12. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    PubMed

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed. PMID:24564165

  13. Autophagy sequesters damaged lysosomes to control lysosomal biogenesis and kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Ikuko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Omori, Hiroko; Kimura, Tomonori; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Hamasaki, Maho; Noda, Takeshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2013-01-01

    Diverse causes, including pathogenic invasion or the uptake of mineral crystals such as silica and monosodium urate (MSU), threaten cells with lysosomal rupture, which can lead to oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis or necrosis. Here, we demonstrate that lysosomes are selectively sequestered by autophagy, when damaged by MSU, silica, or the lysosomotropic reagent L-Leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (LLOMe). Autophagic machinery is recruited only on damaged lysosomes, which are then engulfed by autophagosomes. In an autophagy-dependent manner, low pH and degradation capacity of damaged lysosomes are recovered. Under conditions of lysosomal damage, loss of autophagy causes inhibition of lysosomal biogenesis in vitro and deterioration of acute kidney injury in vivo. Thus, we propose that sequestration of damaged lysosomes by autophagy is indispensable for cellular and tissue homeostasis. PMID:23921551

  14. Regulated lysosomal exocytosis mediates cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Eda; White-Gilbertson, Shai; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; Janke, Laura; Moshiach, Simon; Campos, Yvan; Finkelstein, David; Gomero, Elida; Mosca, Rosario; Qiu, Xiaohui; Morton, Christopher L.; Annunziata, Ida; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how tumor cells transition to an invasive and drug-resistant phenotype is central to cancer biology, but the mechanisms underlying this transition remain unclear. We show that sarcomas gain these malignant traits by inducing lysosomal exocytosis, a ubiquitous physiological process. During lysosomal exocytosis, the movement of exocytic lysosomes along the cytoskeleton and their docking at the plasma membrane involve LAMP1, a sialylated membrane glycoprotein and target of the sialidase NEU1. Cleavage of LAMP1 sialic acids by NEU1 limits the extent of lysosomal exocytosis. We found that by down-regulation of NEU1 and accumulation of oversialylated LAMP1, tumor cells exacerbate lysosomal exocytosis of soluble hydrolases and exosomes. This facilitates matrix invasion and propagation of invasive signals, and purging of lysosomotropic chemotherapeutics. In Arf−⁄− mice, Neu1 haploinsufficiency fostered the development of invasive, pleomorphic sarcomas, expressing epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and lysosomal exocytosis effectors, LAMP1 and Myosin-11. These features are analogous to those of metastatic, pleomorphic human sarcomas, where low NEU1 levels correlate with high expression of lysosomal exocytosis markers. In a therapeutic proof of principle, we demonstrate that inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis reversed invasiveness and chemoresistance in aggressive sarcoma cells. Thus, we reveal that this unconventional, lysosome-regulated pathway plays a primary role in tumor progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26824057

  15. Structural Implications for Selective Targeting of PARPs

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Armen, Roger S.; Pascal, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a family of enzymes that use NAD+ as a substrate to synthesize polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) as post-translational modifications of proteins. PARPs have important cellular roles that include preserving genomic integrity, telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation, and cell fate determination. The diverse biological roles of PARPs have made them attractive therapeutic targets, which have fueled the pursuit of small molecule PARP inhibitors. The design of PARP inhibitors has matured over the past several years resulting in several lead candidates in clinical trials. PARP inhibitors are mainly used in clinical trials to treat cancer, particularly as sensitizing agents in combination with traditional chemotherapy to reduce side effects. An exciting aspect of PARP inhibitors is that they are also used to selectivity kill tumors with deficiencies in DNA repair proteins (e.g., BRCA1/2) through an approach termed “synthetic lethality.” In the midst of the tremendous efforts that have brought PARP inhibitors to the forefront of modern chemotherapy, most clinically used PARP inhibitors bind to conserved regions that permits cross-selectivity with other PARPs containing homologous catalytic domains. Thus, the differences between therapeutic effects and adverse effects stemming from pan-PARP inhibition compared to selective inhibition are not well understood. In this review, we discuss current literature that has found ways to gain selectivity for one PARP over another. We furthermore provide insights into targeting other domains that make up PARPs, and how new classes of drugs that target these domains could provide a high degree of selectivity by affecting specific cellular functions. A clear understanding of the inhibition profiles of PARP inhibitors will not only enhance our understanding of the biology of individual PARPs, but may provide improved therapeutic options for patients. PMID:24392349

  16. Lysosomes as mediators of drug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhitomirsky, Benny; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a leading cause of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and cancer-related mortality. While some mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance have been well characterized, multiple mechanisms remain elusive. In this respect, passive ion trapping-based lysosomal sequestration of multiple hydrophobic weak-base chemotherapeutic agents was found to reduce the accessibility of these drugs to their target sites, resulting in a markedly reduced cytotoxic effect and drug resistance. Recently we have demonstrated that lysosomal sequestration of hydrophobic weak base drugs triggers TFEB-mediated lysosomal biogenesis resulting in an enlarged lysosomal compartment, capable of enhanced drug sequestration. This study further showed that cancer cells with an increased number of drug-accumulating lysosomes are more resistant to lysosome-sequestered drugs, suggesting a model of drug-induced lysosome-mediated chemoresistance. In addition to passive drug sequestration of hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics, other mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance have also been reported; these include active lysosomal drug sequestration mediated by ATP-driven transporters from the ABC superfamily, and a role for lysosomal copper transporters in cancer resistance to platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, lysosomal exocytosis was suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the clearance of chemotherapeutics which highly accumulated in lysosomes, thus providing an additional line of resistance, supplementing the organelle entrapment of chemotherapeutics away from their target sites. Along with these mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance, several approaches were recently developed for the overcoming of drug resistance or exploiting lysosomal drug sequestration, including lysosomal photodestruction and drug-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In this review we explore the current literature addressing the role of lysosomes in mediating cancer drug resistance as well as novel modalities to overcome this chemoresistance. PMID:26830313

  17. Spectral Signatures of Saccade Target Selection.

    PubMed

    Carl, Christine; Hipp, Joerg F; König, Peter; Engel, Andreas K

    2016-01-01

    Action generation relies on a widely distributed network of brain areas. However, little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of neuronal activity in the network that gives rise to voluntary action in humans. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) and source analysis (n = 15, 7 female subjects) to investigate the spectral signatures of human cortical networks engaged in active and intrinsically motivated viewing behavior. We compared neuronal activity of externally cued saccades with saccades to freely chosen targets. For planning and execution of both saccade types, we found an increase in gamma band (~64-128 Hz) activity and a concurrent decrease in beta band (~12-32 Hz) activity in saccadic control areas, including the intraparietal sulcus and the frontal eye fields. Guided compared to voluntary actions were accompanied by stronger transient increases in the gamma and low frequency (<16 Hz) range immediately following the instructional cue. In contrast, action selection between competing alternatives was reflected by stronger sustained fronto-parietal gamma increases that occurred later in time and persisted until movement execution. This sustained enhancement for free target selection was accompanied by a spatially widespread reduction of lower frequency power (~8-45 Hz) in parietal and extrastriate areas. Our results suggest that neuronal population activity in the gamma frequency band in a distributed network of fronto-parietal areas reflects the intrinsically driven process of selection among competing behavioral alternatives. PMID:25690830

  18. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2016-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a "Color-Enhanced" sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  19. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, David

    2015-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a 'Color-Enhanced' sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  20. Target Selection during Protein Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Shao, Sichen; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-02-01

    Protein quality control (QC) pathways survey the cellular proteome to selectively recognize and degrade faulty proteins whose accumulation can lead to various diseases. Recognition of the occasional aberrant protein among an abundant sea of similar normal counterparts poses a considerable challenge to the cell. Solving this problem requires protein QC machinery to assay multiple molecular criteria within a spatial and temporal context. Although each QC pathway has unique criteria and mechanisms for distinguishing right from wrong, they appear to share several general concepts. We discuss principles of high-fidelity target recognition, the decisive event of all protein QC pathways, to guide future work in this area. PMID:26628391

  1. The protonophore CCCP interferes with lysosomal degradation of autophagic cargo in yeast and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Padman, Benjamin S; Bach, Markus; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Prescott, Mark; Ramm, Georg

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy is a selective pathway, which targets and delivers mitochondria to the lysosomes for degradation. Depolarization of mitochondria by the protonophore CCCP is a strategy increasingly used to experimentally trigger not only mitophagy, but also bulk autophagy. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy we found that treatment of HeLa cells with CCCP caused redistribution of mitochondrially targeted dyes, including DiOC6, TMRM, MTR, and MTG, from mitochondria to the cytosol, and subsequently to lysosomal compartments. Localization of mitochondrial dyes to lysosomal compartments was caused by retargeting of the dye, rather than delivery of mitochondrial components to the lysosome. We showed that CCCP interfered with lysosomal function and autophagosomal degradation in both yeast and mammalian cells, inhibited starvation-induced mitophagy in mammalian cells, and blocked the induction of mitophagy in yeast cells. PARK2/Parkin-expressing mammalian cells treated with CCCP have been reported to undergo high levels of mitophagy and clearance of all mitochondria during extensive treatment with CCCP. Using correlative light and electron microscopy in PARK2-expressing HeLa cells, we showed that mitochondrial remnants remained present in the cell after 24 h of CCCP treatment, although they were no longer easily identifiable as such due to morphological alterations. Our results showed that CCCP inhibits autophagy at both the initiation and lysosomal degradation stages. In addition, our data demonstrated that caution should be taken when using organelle-specific dyes in conjunction with strategies affecting membrane potential. PMID:24150213

  2. Parkin-mediated K63-polyubiquitination targets ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 for degradation by the autophagy-lysosome system.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Jeanne E; Sha, Di; Li, Lian; Chin, Lih-Shen

    2015-05-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a key neuronal deubiquitinating enzyme which is mutated in Parkinson disease (PD) and in childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorder with optic atrophy. Furthermore, reduced UCH-L1 protein levels are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, whereas up-regulation of UCH-L1 protein expression is found in multiple types of cancer. However, very little is known about how UCH-L1 protein level is regulated in cells. Here, we report that UCH-L1 is a novel interactor and substrate of PD-linked E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase parkin. We find that parkin mediates K63-linked polyubiquitination of UCH-L1 in cooperation with the Ubc13/Uev1a E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex and promotes UCH-L1 degradation by the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Targeted disruption of parkin gene expression in mice causes a significant decrease in UCH-L1 ubiquitination with a concomitant increase in UCH-L1 protein level in brain, supporting an in vivo role of parkin in regulating UCH-L1 ubiquitination and degradation. Our findings reveal a direct link between parkin-mediated ubiquitin signaling and UCH-L1 regulation, and they have important implications for understanding the roles of these two proteins in health and disease. PMID:25403879

  3. 78 kDa receptor for Man6P-independent lysosomal enzyme targeting: Biosynthetic transport from endoplasmic reticulum to 'high-density vesicles'

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso . E-mail: gonor@biomedicas.unam.mx; Ortega Cuellar, Daniel D.; Michalak, Colette

    2006-04-15

    Recent work has shown that the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate and the 78 kDa receptors for lysosomal enzyme targeting are located in different cell compartments. While the mannose 6-phosphate receptor is enriched in the Percoll fractions that contain Golgi apparatus, most of the 78 kDa receptor is localized in a heavy fraction at the bottom of the Percoll gradient. This report presents the biosynthetic transport of the 78 kDa receptor. Newly synthesized 78 kDa receptor was transported to Golgi from endoplasmic reticulum with a half life of 5 min. From the Golgi apparatus, the receptor takes two routes; about 15-25% is transported to the plasma membrane, and the rest migrates to late endosomes, subsequently to prelysosomes and finally to the dense vesicles. The 78 kDa receptor starts appearing at the dense vesicles 120 min after biosynthesis and reaches a maximum of 40-50% of the total receptor. Treatment of cells with NH{sub 4}Cl causes depletion of the receptor from the dense vesicles and prelysosomes and corresponding augmentation in endosomes and plasma membrane. These results suggest that the 78 kDa receptor cycles between compartments and that the dense vesicles seem to represent the most distal compartment in the biosynthetic pathway of this receptor.

  4. Two distinct modes of ESCRT-III recognition are required for VPS4 functions in lysosomal protein targeting and HIV-1 budding

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, Collin; Skalicky, Jack J.; Morita, Eiji; De Dominico, Ivana; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2008-01-01

    The ESCRT pathway mediates membrane remodeling during enveloped virus budding, cytokinesis, and intralumenal endosomal vesicle formation. Late in the pathway, a subset of membrane-associated ESCRT-III proteins display terminal amphipathic “MIM1” helices that bind and recruit VPS4 ATPases via their MIT domains. We now report that VPS4 MIT domains also bind a second, “MIM2” motif found in a different subset of ESCRT-III subunits. The solution structure of the VPS4 MIT-CHMP6 MIM2 complex revealed that MIM2 elements bind in extended conformations along the groove between the first and third helices of the MIT domain. Mutations that block VPS4 MIT-MIM2 interactions inhibit VPS4 recruitment, lysosomal protein targeting and HIV-1 budding. MIT-MIM2 interactions appear to be common throughout the ESCRT pathway and possibly elsewhere, and we suggest how these interactions could contribute to a mechanism in which VPS4 and ESCRT-III proteins function together to constrict the necks of budding vesicles. PMID:18606141

  5. Optogenetic Acidification of Synaptic Vesicles and Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grauel, M. Katharina; Wozny, Christian; Bentz, Claudia; Blessing, Anja; Rosenmund, Tanja; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Acidification is required for the function of many intracellular organelles, but methods to acutely manipulate their intraluminal pH have not been available. Here we present a targeting strategy to selectively express the light-driven proton pump Arch3 on synaptic vesicles. Our new tool, pHoenix, can functionally replace endogenous proton pumps, enabling optogenetic control of vesicular acidification and neurotransmitter accumulation. Under physiological conditions, glutamatergic vesicles are nearly full, as additional vesicle acidification with pHoenix only slightly increased the quantal size. By contrast, we found that incompletely filled vesicles exhibited a lower release probability than full vesicles, suggesting preferential exocytosis of vesicles with high transmitter content. Our subcellular targeting approach can be transferred to other organelles, as demonstrated for a pHoenix variant that allows light-activated acidification of lysosomes. PMID:26551543

  6. Optogenetic acidification of synaptic vesicles and lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Rost, Benjamin R; Schneider, Franziska; Grauel, M Katharina; Wozny, Christian; Bentz, Claudia G; Blessing, Anja; Rosenmund, Tanja; Jentsch, Thomas J; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter; Rosenmund, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Acidification is required for the function of many intracellular organelles, but methods to acutely manipulate their intraluminal pH have not been available. Here we present a targeting strategy to selectively express the light-driven proton pump Arch3 on synaptic vesicles. Our new tool, pHoenix, can functionally replace endogenous proton pumps, enabling optogenetic control of vesicular acidification and neurotransmitter accumulation. Under physiological conditions, glutamatergic vesicles are nearly full, as additional vesicle acidification with pHoenix only slightly increased the quantal size. By contrast, we found that incompletely filled vesicles exhibited a lower release probability than full vesicles, suggesting preferential exocytosis of vesicles with high transmitter content. Our subcellular targeting approach can be transferred to other organelles, as demonstrated for a pHoenix variant that allows light-activated acidification of lysosomes. PMID:26551543

  7. Lysosomes, cholesterol and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, W Gray

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol-engorged macrophage foam cells are a critical component of the atherosclerotic lesion. Reducing the sterol deposits in lesions reduces clinical events. Sterol accumulations within lysosomes have proven to be particularly hard to mobilize out of foam cells. Moreover, excess sterol accumulation in lysosomes has untoward effects, including a complete disruption of lysosome function. Recently, we demonstrated that treatment of sterol-engorged macrophages in culture with triglyceride-containing particles can reverse many of the effects of cholesterol on lysosomes and dramatically reduce the sterol burden in these cells. This article describes what is known about lysosomal sterol engorgement, discusses the possible mechanisms by which triglyceride could produce its effects, and evaluates the possible positive and negative effects of reducing the lysosomal cholesterol levels in foam cells. PMID:21643524

  8. Calpain 1 induce lysosomal permeabilization by cleavage of lysosomal associated membrane protein 2.

    PubMed

    Villalpando Rodriguez, Gloria E; Torriglia, Alicia

    2013-10-01

    In light induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) photoreceptor cell death is mediated by caspase independent mechanisms. The activation of LEI/L-DNase II pathway in this model, is due to cathepsin D release from lysosomes, although the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this paper we studied the involvement of calpains in lysosomal permeabilization. We investigated, for the first time, the calpain targets at lysosomal membrane level. We found that calpain 1 is responsible for lysosomal permeabilization by cleavage of the lysosomal associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP 2). Moreover, LAMP 2 degradation and lysosomal permeabilization were rescued by calpain inhibition and the use of MEF(-/-)lamp 2 cells indicates that the cleavage of LAMP 2A is essential for this permeabilization. Finally, we found that LAMP 2 is cleaved in LIRD, suggesting that the mechanism of calpain induced lysosomal permeabilization is not exclusive of a single cell death model. Overall, these data shed new light on understanding the mechanisms of lysosomal and caspase-independent cell death and point to the original targets for development of the new therapeutic protocols. PMID:23747342

  9. Iron-dependent lysosomal dysfunction mediated by a natural product hybrid.

    PubMed

    Mariani, A; Mai, T T; Zacharioudakis, E; Hienzsch, A; Bartoli, A; Cañeque, T; Rodriguez, R

    2016-01-14

    Artesumycin is a fluorescent hybrid of the natural products marmycin A and artemisinin. It was designed to combine the lysosomotropic properties of the angucycline and the iron-reactive capacity of the endoperoxide to target the lysosomal compartment of cancer cells. Herein, we show that artesumycin inhibits cancer cell proliferation in an iron-dependent manner and chemically fragments in vitro in the presence of redox-active iron(ii). Visual detection of artesumycin by fluorescence microscopy provided substantial evidence that the small molecule selectively targets lysosomes. This original approach based on a fluorescent and iron-reactive probe represents a powerful strategy for initiating and, concomitantly, visualizing lysosomal dysfunction in human cells. PMID:26645586

  10. What are the targets of photodynamic therapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Castelli, Michelle; Reiners, John, Jr.

    2002-06-01

    We previously classified photosensitizing agents based on sites of photodamage: mitochondria, lysosomes and the plasma membrane. More recent studies have indicated that the first target for the mitochondrial sensitizers is the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2. Loss of bcl-2 results in a high bax/bcl-2 ratio, leading to an apoptotic response involving cytochrome c translocation. PDT with sensitizers that target lysosomes causes the release of lysosomal proteases that catalyze cleavage of the protein bid to a truncated form that can also initiate an apoptotic response. When the PDT target includes the plasma membrane, we found a greatly impaired apoptotic response, associated with caspase-3 photodamage. Sensitizers that localize in only lysosomes also catalyze variable levels of caspase photodamage, but apoptosis is only slightly impaired. PDT appears to be a highly-selective means for eradication of bcl-2, lysosomes or caspases, and can be a potentially useful tool in apoptosis research.

  11. Proteomics of the Lysosome

    PubMed Central

    Lübke, Torben; Lobel, Peter; Sleat, David

    2009-01-01

    Defects in lysosomal function have been associated with numerous monogenic human diseases typically classified as lysosomal storage diseases. However, there is increasing evidence that lysosomal proteins are also involved in more widespread human diseases including cancer and Alzheimer disease. Thus, there is a continuing interest in understanding the cellular functions of the lysosome and an emerging approach to this is the identification of its constituent proteins by proteomic analyses. To date, the mammalian lysosome has been shown to contain ~ 60 soluble luminal proteins and ~25 transmembrane proteins. However, recent proteomic studies based upon affinity purification of soluble components or subcellular fractionation to obtain both soluble and membrane components suggest that there may be many more of both classes of protein resident within this organelle than previously appreciated. Discovery of such proteins has important implications for understanding the function and the dynamics of the lysosome but can also lead the way towards the discovery of the genetic basis for human diseases of hitherto unknown etiology. Here, we describe current approaches to lysosomal proteomics and data interpretation and review the new lysosomal proteins that have recently emerged from such studies. PMID:18977398

  12. Lysosome Transport as a Function of Lysosome Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debjyoti; Cyphersmith, Austin; Zapata, Jairo A.; Kim, Y. Joseph; Payne, Christine K.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles responsible for the transport and degradation of intracellular and extracellular cargo. The intracellular motion of lysosomes is both diffusive and active, mediated by motor proteins moving lysosomes along microtubules. We sought to determine how lysosome diameter influences lysosome transport. We used osmotic swelling to double the diameter of lysosomes, creating a population of enlarged lysosomes. This allowed us to directly examine the intracellular transport of the same organelle as a function of diameter. Lysosome transport was measured using live cell fluorescence microscopy and single particle tracking. We find, as expected, the diffusive component of intracellular transport is decreased proportional to the increased lysosome diameter. Active transport of the enlarged lysosomes is not affected by the increased lysosome diameter. PMID:24497985

  13. Selecting a Targeting Method to Identify BPL Households in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Sabina; Seth, Suman

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes how to select a methodology to target multidimensionally poor households, and how to update that targeting exercise periodically. We present this methodology in the context of discussions regarding the selection of a targeting methodology in India. In 1992, 1997, and 2002 the Indian government identified households that are

  14. Selecting a Targeting Method to Identify BPL Households in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkire, Sabina; Seth, Suman

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes how to select a methodology to target multidimensionally poor households, and how to update that targeting exercise periodically. We present this methodology in the context of discussions regarding the selection of a targeting methodology in India. In 1992, 1997, and 2002 the Indian government identified households that are…

  15. A Phenotypic Compound Screening Assay for Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Miao; Liu, Ke; Swaroop, Manju; Sun, Wei; Dehdashti, Seameen J.; McKew, John C.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The lysosome is a vital cellular organelle that primarily functions as a recycling center for breaking down unwanted macromolecules through a series of hydrolases. Functional deficiencies in lysosomal proteins due to genetic mutations have been found in over 50 lysosomal storage diseases that exhibit characteristic lipid/macromolecule accumulation and enlarged lysosomes. Recently, the lysosome has emerged as a new therapeutic target for drug development for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases. However, a suitable assay for compound screening against the diseased lysosomes is currently unavailable. We have developed a Lysotracker staining assay that measures the enlarged lysosomes in patient derived cells using both fluorescence intensity readout and fluorescence microscopic measurement. This phenotypic assay has been tested in patient cells obtained from several lysosomal storage diseases and validated utilizing a known compound, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, in primary fibroblast cells derived from Niemann Pick C disease patients. The results demonstrate that the Lysotracker assay can be used in compound screening for the identification of lead compounds that are capable of reducing enlarged lysosomes for drug development. PMID:23983233

  16. Intracellular Protein Degradation: From a Vague Idea through the Lysosome and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and onto Human Diseases and Drug Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:23908826

  17. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea, through the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and onto human diseases and drug targeting (Nobel lecture).

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2005-09-19

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as the cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:16142822

  18. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea thru the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2006-07-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitinproteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:16816126

  19. Intracellular Protein Degradation: From a Vague Idea through the Lysosome and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and onto Human Diseases and Drug Targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:23908826

  20. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea thru the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:17124032

  1. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea through the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:20447892

  2. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea through the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2013-06-15

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:23485445

  3. Saccade target selection in Chinese reading.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingshan; Liu, Pingping; Rayner, Keith

    2015-04-01

    In Chinese reading, there are no spaces to mark the word boundaries, so Chinese readers cannot target their saccades to the center of a word. In this study, we investigated how Chinese readers decide where to move their eyes during reading. To do so, we introduced a variant of the boundary paradigm in which only the target stimulus remained on the screen, displayed at the saccade landing site, after the participant's eyes crossed an invisible boundary. We found that when the saccade target was a word, reaction times in a lexical decision task were shorter when the saccade landing position was closer to the end of that word. These results are consistent with the predictions of a processing-based strategy to determine where to move the eyes. Specifically, this hypothesis assumes that Chinese readers estimate how much information is processed in parafoveal vision and saccade to a location that will carry novel information. PMID:25056006

  4. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea thru the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50 years after the discovery of lysosome. PMID:21435401

  5. Analysis of catalytic properties of tripeptidyl peptidase I (TTP-I), a serine carboxyl lysosomal protease, and its detection in tissue extracts using selective FRET peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Marcia Y; Gouvea, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora N; Santos, Jorge A N; Souccar, Caden; Oda, Kohei; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A

    2016-02-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPP-I), also named ceroid lipofuscinosis 2 protease (CLN2p), is a serine carboxyl lysosomal protease involved in neurodegenerative diseases, and has both tripeptidyl amino- and endo- peptidase activities under different pH conditions. We developed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides using tryptophan (W) as the fluorophore to study TPP-I hydrolytic properties based on previous detailed substrate specificity study (Tian Y. et al., J. Biol. Chem. 2006, 281:6559-72). Tripeptidyl amino peptidase activity is enhanced by the presence of amino acids in the prime side and the peptide NH2-RWFFIQ-EDDnp is so far the best substrate described for TPP-I. The hydrolytic parameters of this peptide and its analogues indicated that the S4 subsite of TPP-I is occluded and there is an electrostatic interaction of the positively charged substrate N-terminus amino group and a negative locus in the region of the enzyme active site. KCl activated TPP-I in contrast to the inhibition by Ca(2+) and NaCl. Solvent kinetic isotope effects (SKIEs) show the importance of the free N-terminus amino group of the substrates, whose absence results in a more complex solvent-dependent enzyme: substrate interaction and catalytic process. Like pure TPP-I, rat spleen and kidney homogenates cleaved NH2-RWFFIQ-EDDnp only at FF bond and is not inhibited by pepstatin, E-64, EDTA or PMSF. The selectivity of NH2-RWFFIQ-EDDnp to TPP-I was also demonstrated by the 400 times higher kcat/KM compared to generally used substrate, NH2-AAF-MCA and by its resistance to hydrolysis by cathepsin D that is present in high levels in kidneys. PMID:26775801

  6. Lysosomal Signaling Molecules Regulate Longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Folick, Andrew; Oakley, Holly Doebbler; Yu, Yong; Armstrong, Eric H.; Kumari, Manju; Sanor, Lucas; Moore, David D.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Zechner, Rudolf; Wang, Meng C.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are crucial cellular organelles for human health that function in digestion and recycling of extracellular and intracellular macromolecules. We describe a signaling role for lysosomes that affects aging. In the worm, Caenorhabditis elegans, the lysosomal acid lipase LIPL-4 triggered nuclear translocalization of a lysosomal lipid chaperone LBP-8, consequently promoting longevity by activating the nuclear hormone receptors NHR-49 and NHR-80. We used high-throughput metabolomic analysis to identify several lipids whose abundance was increased in worms constitutively over-expressing LIPL-4. Among them, oleoylethanolamide directly bound to LBP-8 and NHR-80 proteins, activated transcription of target genes of NHR-49 and NHR-80, and promoted longevity in C. elegans. These findings reveal a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that promotes longevity and suggest a function of lysosomes as signaling organelles in metazoans. PMID:25554789

  7. Aging. Lysosomal signaling molecules regulate longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Folick, Andrew; Oakley, Holly D; Yu, Yong; Armstrong, Eric H; Kumari, Manju; Sanor, Lucas; Moore, David D; Ortlund, Eric A; Zechner, Rudolf; Wang, Meng C

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are crucial cellular organelles for human health that function in digestion and recycling of extracellular and intracellular macromolecules. We describe a signaling role for lysosomes that affects aging. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the lysosomal acid lipase LIPL-4 triggered nuclear translocalization of a lysosomal lipid chaperone LBP-8, which promoted longevity by activating the nuclear hormone receptors NHR-49 and NHR-80. We used high-throughput metabolomic analysis to identify several lipids in which abundance was increased in worms constitutively overexpressing LIPL-4. Among them, oleoylethanolamide directly bound to LBP-8 and NHR-80 proteins, activated transcription of target genes of NHR-49 and NHR-80, and promoted longevity in C. elegans. These findings reveal a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that promotes longevity and suggest a function of lysosomes as signaling organelles in metazoans. PMID:25554789

  8. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow-up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare seven different ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the ML methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30 per cent of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow-up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.

  9. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare 7 different ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the machine learning methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30% of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.

  10. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  11. Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones

    PubMed Central

    Dines, J. P.; Otárola-Castillo, E.; Ralph, P.; Alas, J.; Daley, T.; Smith, A. D.; Dean, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Male genitalia evolve rapidly, probably as a result of sexual selection. Whether this pattern extends to the internal infrastructure that influences genital movements remains unknown. Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) offer a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis: since evolving from land-dwelling ancestors, they lost external hind limbs and evolved a highly reduced pelvis which seems to serve no other function except to anchor muscles that maneuver the penis. Here we create a novel morphometric pipeline to analyze the size and shape evolution of pelvic bones from 130 individuals (29 species) in the context of inferred mating system. We present two main findings: 1) males from species with relatively intense sexual selection (inferred by relative testes size) have evolved relatively large penises and pelvic bones compared to their body size, and 2) pelvic bone shape diverges more quickly in species pairs that have diverged in inferred mating system. Neither pattern was observed in the anterior-most pair of vertebral ribs, which served as a negative control. This study provides evidence that sexual selection can affect internal anatomy that controls male genitalia. These important functions may explain why cetacean pelvic bones have not been lost through evolutionary time. PMID:25186496

  12. Target selection bias transfers across different response actions.

    PubMed

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    Target selection is biased by recent experience. For example, a selected target feature may be stored in memory and bias selection on future trials, such that objects matching that feature are "primed" for selection. In the present study, we examined the role of action history in selection biases. Participants searched for a uniquely colored object. Pretrial cues indicated whether participants should respond with a keypress or a reach movement. If the representation of the feature that biases selection is critically bound with its associated action, we would expect priming effects to be restricted to cases where both the response mode and target color are repeated. However, we found that responses to the target were faster when the target color was repeated, even when the response switched from a reach to a keypress, or vice versa. Priming effects were even observed after "no-go" trials in which a response was withheld, and priming effects transferred across response modes when eye movement recordings ensured that participants did not saccade to the target. These results demonstrate that target features are represented in memory separately from their associated actions and can bias selection on subsequent trials even when a different mode of action output is required. PMID:24490945

  13. PRD125, a potent and selective inhibitor of sterol O-acyltransferase 2 markedly reduces hepatic cholesteryl ester accumulation and improves liver function in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Adam M; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Posey, Kenneth S; Ohshiro, Taichi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Rudel, Lawrence L; Turley, Stephen D

    2015-11-01

    In most organs, the bulk of cholesterol is unesterified, although nearly all possess a varying capability of esterifying cholesterol through the action of either sterol O-acyltransferase (SOAT) 1 or, in the case of hepatocytes and enterocytes, SOAT2. Esterified cholesterol (EC) carried in plasma lipoproteins is hydrolyzed by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) when they are cleared from the circulation. Loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene that encodes LAL, result in Wolman disease or cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). Hepatomegaly and a massive increase in tissue EC levels are hallmark features of both disorders. While these conditions can be corrected with enzyme replacement therapy, the question arose as to whether pharmacological inhibition of SOAT2 might reduce tissue EC accretion in CESD. When weaned at 21 days, Lal(-/-) mice, of either gender, had a whole liver cholesterol content that was 12- to 13-fold more than that of matching Lal(+/+) littermates (23 versus 1.8 mg, respectively). In Lal(-/-) males given the selective SOAT2 inhibitor PRD125 1,11-O-o-methylbenzylidene-7-O-p-cyanobenzoyl-1,7,11-trideacetylpyripyropene A in their diet (∼10 mg/day per kg body weight) from 21 to 53 days, whole liver cholesterol content was 48.6 versus 153.7 mg in untreated 53-day-old Lal(-/-) mice. This difference reflected a 59% reduction in hepatic EC concentration (mg/g), combined with a 28% fall in liver mass. The treated mice also showed a 63% reduction in plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, in parallel with decisive falls in hepatic mRNA expression levels for multiple proteins that reflect macrophage presence and inflammation. These data implicate SOAT2 as a potential target in CESD management. PMID:26283692

  14. Selectively targeting pain in the trigeminal system

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Yeong; Kim, Kihwan; Li, Hai Ying; Chung, Gehoon; Park, Chul-Kyu; Kim, Joong Soo; Jung, Sung Jun; Lee, Min Kyung; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Hwang, Se Jin; Kang, Youngnam; Binshtok, Alexander M.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Oh, Seog Bae

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether it is possible to selectively block pain signals in the orofacial area by delivering the permanently charged lidocaine derivative QX-314 into nociceptors via TPRV1 channels. We examined the effects of co-applied QX-314 and capsaicin on nociceptive, proprioceptive, and motor function in the rat trigeminal system. QX-314 alone failed to block voltage-gated sodium channel currents (INa) and action potentials (APs) in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. However, co-application of QX-314 and capsaicin blocked INa and APs in TRPV1-positive TG and dental nociceptive neurons, but not in TRPV1-negative TG neurons or in small neurons from TRPV1 knock-out mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 is not expressed by trigeminal motor and trigeminal mesencephalic neurons. Capsaicin had no effect on rat trigeminal motor and proprioceptive mesencephalic neurons and therefore should not allow QX-314 to enter these cells. Co-application of QX-314 and capsaicin inhibited the jaw-opening reflex evoked by noxious electrical stimulation of the tooth pulp when applied to a sensory but not a motor nerve, and produced long-lasting analgesia in the orofacial area. These data show that selective block of pain signals can be achieved by co-application of QX-314 with TRPV1 agonists. This approach has potential utility in the trigeminal system for treating dental and facial pain. PMID:20236764

  15. Ii Chain Controls the Transport of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Molecules to and from Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Valérie; Raposo, Graça; Amigorena, Sebastian; Mellman, Ira

    1997-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II molecules are synthesized as a nonameric complex consisting of three αβ dimers associated with a trimer of invariant (Ii) chains. After exiting the TGN, a targeting signal in the Ii chain cytoplasmic domain directs the complex to endosomes where Ii chain is proteolytically processed and removed, allowing class II molecules to bind antigenic peptides before reaching the cell surface. Ii chain dissociation and peptide binding are thought to occur in one or more postendosomal sites related either to endosomes (designated CIIV) or to lysosomes (designated MIIC). We now find that in addition to initially targeting αβ dimers to endosomes, Ii chain regulates the subsequent transport of class II molecules. Under normal conditions, murine A20 B cells transport all of their newly synthesized class II I-Ab αβ dimers to the plasma membrane with little if any reaching lysosomal compartments. Inhibition of Ii processing by the cysteine/serine protease inhibitor leupeptin, however, blocked transport to the cell surface and caused a dramatic but selective accumulation of I-Ab class II molecules in lysosomes. In leupeptin, I-Ab dimers formed stable complexes with a 10-kD NH2-terminal Ii chain fragment (Ii-p10), normally a transient intermediate in Ii chain processing. Upon removal of leupeptin, Ii-p10 was degraded and released, I-Ab dimers bound antigenic peptides, and the peptide-loaded dimers were transported slowly from lysosomes to the plasma membrane. Our results suggest that alterations in the rate or efficiency of Ii chain processing can alter the postendosomal sorting of class II molecules, resulting in the increased accumulation of αβ dimers in lysosome-like MIIC. Thus, simple differences in Ii chain processing may account for the highly variable amounts of class II found in lysosomal compartments of different cell types or at different developmental stages. PMID:9105036

  16. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Movie showing simulation renderings of targeted (ρL = 1820/μm2, KD = 120 μM) nanoparticle selective binding to cancer (ρR = 256/μm2) vs. healthy (ρR = 64/μm2) cell surfaces. Target membrane proteins have linear color scale depending on binding energy ranging from white when unbound (URL = 0) to red when tightly bound (URL = UM). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03691g

  17. Exploiting Atropisomerism to Increase the Target Selectivity of Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Davis E; Marquez, Isaac; Lokensgard, Melissa E; Rheingold, Arnold L; Hecht, David A; Gustafson, Jeffrey L

    2015-09-28

    Many biologically active molecules exist as rapidly interconverting atropisomeric mixtures. Whereas one atropisomer inhibits the desired target, the other can lead to off-target effects. Herein, we study atropisomerism as a possibility to improve the selectivities of kinase inhibitors through the synthesis of conformationally stable pyrrolopyrimidines. Each atropisomer was isolated by HPLC on a chiral stationary phase and subjected to inhibitor profiling across a panel of 18 tyrosine kinases. Notably different selectivity patterns between atropisomers were observed, as well as improved selectivity compared to a rapidly interconverting parent molecule. Computational docking studies then provided insights into the structure-based origins of these effects. This study is one of the first examples of the intentional preorganization of a promiscuous scaffold along an atropisomeric axis to increase target selectivity, and provides fundamental insights that may be applied to other atropisomeric target scaffolds. PMID:26276764

  18. Lysosome: regulator of lipid degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway that has a fundamental role in the adaptation to fasting and primarily relies on the activity of the endolysosomal system, to which the autophagosome targets substrates for degradation. Recent studies have revealed that the lysosomal-autophagic pathway plays an important part in the early steps of lipid degradation. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional mechanisms underlying co-regulation between lysosome, autophagy, and other steps of lipid catabolism, including the activity of nutrient-sensitive transcription factors (TFs) and of members of the nuclear receptor family. In addition, we discuss how the lysosome acts as a metabolic sensor and orchestrates the transcriptional response to fasting. PMID:25061009

  19. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    PubMed

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions. PMID:26563393

  20. Selecting asteroids for a targeted spectroscopic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszkiewicz, D. A.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Tomov, T.; Birlan, M.; Geier, S.; Penttil, A.; Poli?ska, M.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Asteroid spectroscopy reflects surface mineralogy. There are a few thousand asteroids whose surfaces have been observed spectrally. Determining their surface properties is important for many practical and scientific applications, such as developing impact deflection strategies or studying the history and evolution of the solar system and planet formation. Aims: The aim of this study is to develop a preselection method that can be used to search for asteroids of any taxonomic complex. The method could then be utilized in multiple applications, such as searching for the missing V-types or looking for primitive asteroids. Methods: We used the Bayes Naive Classifier combined with observations obtained in the course of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer surveys, as well as a database of asteroid phase curves for asteroids with a known taxonomic type. With this new classification method, we selected a number of possible V-type candidates. Some of the candidates were then spectrally observed at the Nordic Optical Telescope and South African Large Telescope. Results: We developed and tested the new preselection method. We found three asteroids in the mid-to-outer main belt that probably have differentiated types. Near-infrared observations are still required to confirm this discovery. As in other studies we found that V-type candidates cluster around the Vesta family and are rare in the mid-to-outer main belt. Conclusions: The new method shows that even largely explored large databases when combined could still be exploited further in, for example, solving the missing dunite problem. Tables 6 and A.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A29

  1. Kinetic evidence that newly-synthesized endogenous lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) first transits early endosomes before it is delivered to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Roshan; Thilo, Lutz

    2011-05-01

    After de novo synthesis of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs), they are sorted in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) for delivery to lysosomes. Opposing views prevail on whether LAMPs are targeted to lysosomes directly, or indirectly via prelysosomal stages of the endocytic pathway, in particular early endosomes. Conflicting evidence is based on kinetic measurements with too limited quantitative data for sufficient temporal and organellar resolution. Using cells of the mouse macrophage cell line, P338D(1), this study presents detailed kinetic data that describe the extent of, and time course for, the appearance of newly-synthesized LAMP-1 in organelles of the endocytic pathway, which had been loaded selectively with horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) by appropriate periods of endocytosis. After a 5-min pulse of metabolic labelling, LAMP-1 was trapped in the respective organelles by HRP-catalyzed crosslinking with membrane-permeable diaminobenzidine (DAB). These kinetic observations provide sufficient quantitative evidence that in P338D(1) cells the bulk of newly-synthesized endogenous LAMP-1 first appeared in early endosomes, before it was delivered to late endosomes and lysosomes about 25 min later. PMID:21457058

  2. TDP-43 loss of function increases TFEB activity and blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qin; Wang, Hongfeng; Hao, Zongbing; Fu, Cheng; Hu, Qingsong; Gao, Feng; Ren, Haigang; Chen, Dong; Han, Junhai; Ying, Zheng; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-18

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by selective loss of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord. TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as a major component of disease pathogenesis in ALS, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and other neurodegenerative disease. Despite the fact that TDP-43 is a multi-functional protein involved in RNA processing and a large number of TDP-43 RNA targets have been discovered, the initial toxic effect and the pathogenic mechanism underlying TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration remain elusive. In this study, we found that loss of TDP-43 strongly induced a nuclear translocation of TFEB, the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, through targeting the mTORC1 key component raptor. This regulation in turn enhanced global gene expressions in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) and increased autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis. However, loss of TDP-43 also impaired the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes through dynactin 1 downregulation, leading to accumulation of immature autophagic vesicles and overwhelmed ALP function. Importantly, inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin treatment aggravated the neurodegenerative phenotype in a TDP-43-depleted Drosophila model, whereas activation of mTORC1 signaling by PA treatment ameliorated the neurodegenerative phenotype. Taken together, our data indicate that impaired mTORC1 signaling and influenced ALP may contribute to TDP-43-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:26702100

  3. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  4. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  5. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea through the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code was transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins were degraded had remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis was largely nonlysosomal, but the mechanisms involved have remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in the regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which subsequently led to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:22327508

  6. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea thru the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, A

    2005-09-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve, it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely nonlysosomal, but the mechanisms involved remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs. PMID:16094394

  7. Target DNA bending is an important specificity determinant in target site selection in Tn10 transposition.

    PubMed

    Pribil, Patrick A; Haniford, David B

    2003-07-01

    The bacterial transposon Tn10 inserts preferentially into specific DNA sequences. DNA footprinting and interference studies have revealed that the Tn10-encoded transposase protein contacts a large stretch of target DNA ( approximately 24 bp) and that the target DNA structure is deformed upon incorporation into the transpososome. Target DNA deformation might contribute significantly to target site selection and thus it is of interest to further define the nature of this deformation. Circular permutation analysis was used to demonstrate that the target DNA is bent upon its incorporation into the transpososome. Two lines of evidence are presented that target DNA bending is an important event in target site selection. First, we demonstrate a correlation between increased target site usage and an increased level of target DNA bending. Second, transposase mutants with relaxed target specificity are shown to cause increased target DNA bending relative to wild-type transposase. This latter observation provides new insight into how relaxed specificity may be achieved. We also show that Ca(2+) facilitates target capture by stabilizing transposase interactions with sequences immediately flanking the insertion site. Ca(2+) could, in theory, exert this effect by stabilizing bends in the target DNA. PMID:12823965

  8. A SIMPLE LIKELIHOOD METHOD FOR QUASAR TARGET SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Jessica A.; Schlegel, David J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2011-12-20

    We present a new method for quasar target selection using photometric fluxes and a Bayesian probabilistic approach. For our purposes, we target quasars using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to a magnitude limit of g = 22. The efficiency and completeness of this technique are measured using the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data taken in 2010. This technique was used for the uniformly selected (CORE) sample of targets in BOSS year-one spectroscopy to be realized in the ninth SDSS data release. When targeting at a density of 40 objects deg{sup -2} (the BOSS quasar targeting density), the efficiency of this technique in recovering z > 2.2 quasars is 40%. The completeness compared to all quasars identified in BOSS data is 65%. This paper also describes possible extensions and improvements for this technique.

  9. Prosaposin facilitates sortilin-independent lysosomal trafficking of progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Sun, Lirong; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco; Qi, Xiaoyang; Brown, William J.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene have been linked to two distinct neurodegenerative diseases, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Accumulating evidence suggests a critical role of PGRN in lysosomes. However, how PGRN is trafficked to lysosomes is still not clear. Here we report a novel pathway for lysosomal delivery of PGRN. We found that prosaposin (PSAP) interacts with PGRN and facilitates its lysosomal targeting in both biosynthetic and endocytic pathways via the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. PSAP deficiency in mice leads to severe PGRN trafficking defects and a drastic increase in serum PGRN levels. We further showed that this PSAP pathway is independent of, but complementary to, the previously identified PGRN lysosomal trafficking mediated by sortilin. Collectively, our results provide new understanding on PGRN trafficking and shed light on the molecular mechanisms behind FTLD and NCL caused by PGRN mutations. PMID:26370502

  10. Autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy serves as the sole catabolic mechanism for degrading organelles and protein aggregates. Increasing evidence implicates autophagic dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases associated with protein misprocessing and accumulation. Under physiologic conditions, the autophagic/lysosomal system efficiently recycles organelles and substrate proteins. However, reduced autophagy function leads to the accumulation of proteins and autophagic and lysosomal vesicles. These vesicles contain toxic lysosomal hydrolases as well as the proper cellular machinery to generate amyloid-beta, the major component of AD plaques. Here, we provide an overview of current research focused on the relevance of autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction in AD pathogenesis as well as potential therapeutic targets aimed at restoring autophagic/lysosomal pathway function. PMID:24171818

  11. Promotion of Proapoptotic Signals by Lysosomal Photodamage.

    PubMed

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that low-level lysosomal photodamage enhanced the efficacy of subsequent mitochondrial photodamage, resulting in a substantial promotion of apoptotic cell death. We now extend our analysis of the sequential PDT protocol to include two additional lysosomal-targeting photosensitizers. These agents, because of enhanced permeability, are more potent than the agent (N-aspartyl chlorin E6, NPe6) used in the initial study. Addition of the cell-permeable cysteine protease inhibitor E-64d and calcium chelator BAPTA-AM almost completely suppressed sequential PDT-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of procaspases-3 and -7. These inhibitors did not, however, suppress the proapoptotic effect of a BH3 mimetic or mitochondrial photodamage. Knockdowns of ATG7 or ATG5, proteins normally associated with autophagy, suppressed photodamage induced by the sequential PDT protocol. These effects appear to be independent of the autophagic process as pharmacological inhibition of autophagy offered no such protection. Effects of ATG7 and ATG5 knockdowns may reflect the role that ATG7 plays in regulating lysosome permeability, and the likelihood that a proteolytic fragment of ATG5 amplifies mitochondrial proapoptotic processes. Our results suggest that low-dose photodamage that sequentially targets lysosomes and mitochondria may offer significant advantages over the use of single photosensitizers. PMID:25873082

  12. Spastic paraplegia proteins spastizin and spatacsin mediate autophagic lysosome reformation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jaerak; Lee, Seongju; Blackstone, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy allows cells to adapt to changes in their environment by coordinating the degradation and recycling of cellular components and organelles to maintain homeostasis. Lysosomes are organelles critical for terminating autophagy via their fusion with mature autophagosomes to generate autolysosomes that degrade autophagic materials; therefore, maintenance of the lysosomal population is essential for autophagy-dependent cellular clearance. Here, we have demonstrated that the two most common autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia gene products, the SPG15 protein spastizin and the SPG11 protein spatacsin, are pivotal for autophagic lysosome reformation (ALR), a pathway that generates new lysosomes. Lysosomal targeting of spastizin required an intact FYVE domain, which binds phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Loss of spastizin or spatacsin resulted in depletion of free lysosomes, which are competent to fuse with autophagosomes, and an accumulation of autolysosomes, reflecting a failure in ALR. Moreover, spastizin and spatacsin were essential components for the initiation of lysosomal tubulation. Together, these results link dysfunction of the autophagy/lysosomal biogenesis machinery to neurodegeneration. PMID:25365221

  13. Regulation of HIV-Gag expression and targeting to the endolysosomal/secretory pathway by the luminal domain of lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1) enhance Gag-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Rodrigo Maciel da Costa; Matassoli, Flavio Lemos; Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J Thomas; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field. PMID:24932692

  14. Regulation of HIV-Gag Expression and Targeting to the Endolysosomal/Secretory Pathway by the Luminal Domain of Lysosomal-Associated Membrane Protein (LAMP-1) Enhance Gag-Specific Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J. Thomas; de Azevedo Marques, Ernesto Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field. PMID:24932692

  15. Target Selection for the LBTI Exozodi Key Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Alycia J.; Bryden, Geoff; Kennedy, Grant M.; Roberge, Aki; Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Danchi, William C.; Haniff, Chris; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Skemer, Andrew J.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2015-02-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ~300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels of survey sensitivity induced by weather conditions.

  16. Mesoscale Nanoparticles Selectively Target the Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Shah, Janki; Ng, Brandon D.; Minton, Denise R.; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Park, Christopher Y.; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized “mesoscale” nanoparticles, approximately 400 nm in diameter, which unexpectedly localized selectively in renal proximal tubules and up to 7 times more efficiently in the kidney than other organs. Although nanoparticles typically localize in the liver and spleen, modulating their size and opsonization potential allowed for stable targeting of the kidneys through a new proposed uptake mechanism. Applying this kidney targeting strategy, we anticipate use in the treatment of renal disease and the study of renal physiology. PMID:25811353

  17. Lysosomal calcium homeostasis defects, not proton pump defects, cause endo-lysosomal dysfunction in PSEN-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Katrijn; Flannagan, Ronald S.; Baron, Szilvia; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R.; Wang, Dong; Vermeire, Wendy; Michiels, Christine; Munck, Sebastian; Baert, Veerle; Sugita, Shuzo; Wuytack, Frank; Hiesinger, Peter Robin; Grinstein, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Presenilin (PSEN) deficiency is accompanied by accumulation of endosomes and autophagosomes, likely caused by impaired endo-lysosomal fusion. Recently, Lee et al. (2010. Cell. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2010.05.008) attributed this phenomenon to PSEN1 enabling the transport of mature V0a1 subunits of the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) to lysosomes. In their view, PSEN1 mediates the N-glycosylation of V0a1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); consequently, PSEN deficiency prevents V0a1 glycosylation, compromising the delivery of unglycosylated V0a1 to lysosomes, ultimately impairing V-ATPase function and lysosomal acidification. We show here that N-glycosylation is not a prerequisite for proper targeting and function of this V-ATPase subunit both in vitro and in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. We conclude that endo-lysosomal dysfunction in PSEN−/− cells is not a consequence of failed N-glycosylation of V0a1, or compromised lysosomal acidification. Instead, lysosomal calcium storage/release is significantly altered in PSEN−/− cells and neurons, thus providing an alternative hypothesis that accounts for the impaired lysosomal fusion capacity and accumulation of endomembranes that accompanies PSEN deficiency. PMID:22753898

  18. Genome Engineering Using Targeted Oligonucleotide Libraries and Functional Selection

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Elie J.; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The λ phage Red proteins greatly enhance homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Red-mediated recombination or “recombineering” can be used to construct targeted gene deletions as well as to introduce point mutations into the genome. Here, we describe our method for scanning mutagenesis using recombineered oligonucleotide libraries. This approach entails randomization of specific codons within a target gene, followed by functional selection to isolate mutants. Oligonucleotide library mutagenesis has generated hundreds of novel antibiotic resistance mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins, and should be applicable to other systems for which functional selections exist. PMID:21815087

  19. Target Selection and Determination of Function in Structural Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Watson, James D.; Todd, Annabel E.; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A.; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question. PMID:12880206

  20. Feature Extraction and Selection Strategies for Automated Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. Nicholas; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Several feature extraction and selection methods for an existing automatic target recognition (ATR) system using JPLs Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and Optimal Trade-Off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter were tested using MATLAB. The ATR system is composed of three stages: a cursory region of-interest (ROI) search using the GOC and OT-MACH filter, a feature extraction and selection stage, and a final classification stage. Feature extraction and selection concerns transforming potential target data into more useful forms as well as selecting important subsets of that data which may aide in detection and classification. The strategies tested were built around two popular extraction methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Performance was measured based on the classification accuracy and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) output of a support vector machine(SVM) and a neural net (NN) classifier.

  1. Lysosomes: Regulators of autophagy in the retinal pigmented epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Debasish; Valapala, Mallika; Shang, Peng; Hose, Stacey; Grebe, Rhonda; Lutty, Gerard A; Zigler, J Samuel; Kaarniranta, Kai; Handa, James T

    2016-03-01

    The retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is critically important to retinal homeostasis, in part due to its very active processes of phagocytosis and autophagy. Both of these processes depend upon the normal functioning of lysosomes, organelles which must fuse with (auto)phagosomes to deliver the hydrolases that effect degradation of cargo. It has become clear that signaling through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), is very important in the regulation of lysosomal function. This signaling pathway is becoming a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), where lysosomal function is defective. In addition, our laboratory has been studying animal models in which the gene (Cryba1) for βA3/A1-crystallin is deficient. These animals exhibit impaired lysosomal clearance in the RPE and pathological signs that are similar to some of those seen in AMD patients. The data demonstrate that βA3/A1-crystallin localizes to lysosomes in the RPE and that it is a binding partner of V-ATPase, the proton pump that acidifies the lysosomal lumen. This suggests that βA3/A1-crystallin may also be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in AMD. In this review, we focus on effector molecules that impact the lysosomal-autophagic pathway in RPE cells. PMID:26321509

  2. Ethambutol neutralizes lysosomes and causes lysosomal zinc accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Daisuke; Saiki, Shinji; Furuya, Norihiko; Ishikawa, Kei-Ichi; Imamichi, Yoko; Kambe, Taiho; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ueno, Takashi; Koike, Masato; Sumiyoshi, Katsuhiko; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2016-02-26

    Ethambutol is a common medicine used for the treatment of tuberculosis, which can have serious side effects, such as retinal and liver dysfunction. Although ethambutol has been reported to impair autophagic flux in rat retinal cells, the precise molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using various mammalian cell lines, we showed that ethambutol accumulated in autophagosomes and vacuolated lysosomes, with marked Zn(2+) accumulation. The enlarged lysosomes were neutralized and were infiltrated with Zn(2+) accumulations in the lysosomes, with simultaneous loss of acidification. These results suggest that EB neutralizes lysosomes leading to insufficient autophagy, implying that some of the adverse effects associated with EB in various organs may be of this mechanism. PMID:26851368

  3. Target SNP selection in complex disease association studies

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Background The massive amount of SNP data stored at public internet sites provides unprecedented access to human genetic variation. Selecting target SNP for disease-gene association studies is currently done more or less randomly as decision rules for the selection of functional relevant SNPs are not available. Results We implemented a computational pipeline that retrieves the genomic sequence of target genes, collects information about sequence variation and selects functional motifs containing SNPs. Motifs being considered are gene promoter, exon-intron structure, AU-rich mRNA elements, transcription factor binding motifs, cryptic and enhancer splice sites together with expression in target tissue. As a case study, 396 genes on chromosome 6p21 in the extended HLA region were selected that contributed nearly 20,000 SNPs. By computer annotation ~2,500 SNPs in functional motifs could be identified. Most of these SNPs are disrupting transcription factor binding sites but only those introducing new sites had a significant depressing effect on SNP allele frequency. Other decision rules concern position within motifs, the validity of SNP database entries, the unique occurrence in the genome and conserved sequence context in other mammalian genomes. Conclusion Only 10% of all gene-based SNPs have sequence-predicted functional relevance making them a primary target for genotyping in association studies. PMID:15248903

  4. Autophagic-lysosomal dysregulation downstream of cathepsin B inactivation in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA

    PubMed Central

    Lamore, Sarah D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, using 2D-DIGE proteomics we have identified cathepsin B as a novel target of UVA in human Hs27 skin fibroblasts. In response to chronic exposure to noncytotoxic doses of UVA (9.9 J/cm2, twice a week, 3 weeks), photooxidative impairment of cathepsin B enzymatic activity occurred with accumulation of autofluorescent aggregates colocalizing with lysosomes, an effect mimicked by pharmacological antagonism of cathepsin B using the selective inhibitor CA074Me. Here, we have further explored the mechanistic involvement of cathepsin B inactivation in UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations using autophagy-directed PCR expression array analysis as a discovery tool. Consistent with lysosomal expansion, UVA upregulated cellular protein levels of the lysosomal marker glycoprotein Lamp-1, and increased levels of the lipidated autophagosomal membrane constituent LC3-II were detected. UVA did not alter expression of beclin 1 (BECN1), an essential factor for initiation of autophagy, but upregulation of p62 (sequestosome 1, SQSTM1), a selective autophagy substrate, and α-synuclein (SNCA), an autophagic protein substrate and aggresome component, was observed at the mRNA and protein level. Moreover, UVA downregulated transglutaminase-2 (TGM2), an essential enzyme involved in autophagolysosome maturation. Strikingly, UVA effects on Lamp-1, LC3-II, beclin 1, p62, α-synuclein, and transglutaminase-2 were mimicked by CA074Me treatment. Taken together, our data suggest that UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations occur as a consequence of impaired autophagic flux downstream of cathepsin B inactivation, a novel molecular mechanism potentially involved in UVA-induced skin photodamage. PMID:21773629

  5. Kinetics of lysosomal storage of indigestible matter.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, J; Alward, J

    1975-01-01

    In lysosomal storage diseases and in accumulation of lipofusion in the lysosomes there is a gradual eroding of the lysosomal system due to overloading the lysosomes by molecules which cannot be digested or expelled. The kinetics of this accumulation is examined for tissue cultures in terms of the cell growth rate, lysosomal production rate, and of generation of the indigestible element. PMID:1125388

  6. Lysosomal Protease Expression in Mature Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Tye, Coralee E.; Lorenz, Rachel L.; Bartlett, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The enamel matrix proteins (amelogenin, enamelin and ameloblastin) are degraded by matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-4 during enamel development and mature enamel is virtually protein free. The precise mechanism of removal and degradation of the enamel protein cleavage products from the matrix, however, remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that receptor-mediated endocytosis allows for the cleaved proteins to be removed from the matrix during enamel formation and then transported to the lysosome for further degradation. This study aims to identify lysosomal proteases that are present in maturation-stage enamel organ. RNA from first molars of 11-day-old mice was collected and expression was initially assessed by RT-PCR and then quantified by qPCR. The pattern of expression of selected proteases was assessed by immunohistochemical staining of demineralized mouse incisors. With the exception of cathepsin G, all lysosomal proteases assessed were expressed in maturation-stage enamel organ. Identified proteases included cathepsins B, D, F, H, K, L, O, S and Z. Tripeptidyl peptidases I and II as well as dipeptidyl peptidases I, II, III and IV were also found to be expressed. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the maturation-stage ameloblasts express cathepsins L and S and tripeptidyl peptidase II. Our results suggest that the ameloblasts are enriched by a large number of lysosomal proteases at maturation that are likely involved in the degradation of the organic matrix. PMID:18703868

  7. Highly Stable and Sensitive Fluorescent Probes (LysoProbes) for Lysosomal Labeling and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yapici, Nazmiye B.; Bi, Yue; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Xin; Yan, Xin; Mandalapu, Srinivas Rao; Faucett, Megan; Jockusch, Steffen; Ju, Jingfang; Gibson, K. Michael; Pavan, William J.; Bi, Lanrong

    2015-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis and application of several new fluorescent probes (LysoProbes I-VI) that facilitate lysosomal pH monitoring and characterization of lysosome-dependent apoptosis. LysoProbes are superior to commercially available lysosome markers since the fluorescent signals are both stable and highly selective, and they will aid in characterization of lysosome morphology and trafficking. We predict that labeling of cancer cells and solid tumor tissues with LysoProbes will provide an important new tool for monitoring the role of lysosome trafficking in cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:25715948

  8. Perceptual task induces saccadic adaptation by target selection

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Alexander C.; Souto, David

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation of saccades can be induced by different error signals, such as retinal position errors, prediction errors, or reinforcement learning. Recently, we showed that a shift in the spatial goal of a perceptual task can induce saccadic adaptation, in the absence of a bottom-up position error. Here, we investigated whether this top-down effect is mediated by the visibility of the task-relevant object, by reinforcement due to the feedback about the perceptual judgment or by a target selection mechanism. Participants were asked to discriminate visual stimuli arranged in a vertical compound. To induce adaptation, the discrimination target was presented at eccentric locations in the compound. In the first experiment, we compared adaptation with an easy and difficult discrimination. In the second experiment, we compared adaptation when feedback about the perceptual task was valid and when feedback was provided but was unrelated to performance. In the third experiment, we compared adaptation with instructions to fixate one of the elements in the compound—target selection—to the perceptual task condition—target selection and discrimination. To control for a bottom-up stimulus effect, we ran a fourth experiment in which the only instruction was to look at the compound. The saccade amplitude data were fitted by a two-state model distinguishing between an immediate and a gradual error correction process. We replicated our finding that a perceptual task can drive adaptation of saccades. Adaptation showed no effect of feedback reliability, nor an effect of the perceptual task beyond target selection. Adaptation was induced by a top-down signal since it was absent when there was no target selection instruction and no perceptual task. The immediate error correction was larger for the difficult than for the easy condition, suggesting that task difficulty affects mainly voluntary saccade targeting. In addition, the repetition of experiments one week later increased the magnitude of the gradual error correction. The results dissociate two distinct components of adaptation: an immediate and a gradual error correction. We conclude that perceptual-task induced adaptation is most likely due to top-down target selection within a larger object. PMID:26539095

  9. Selective screening for lysosomal storage diseases with dried blood spots collected on filter paper in 4,700 high-risk colombian subjects.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Giugliani, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a very heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders. The diagnostic process usually involves complex sampling, processing, testing, and validation procedures, performed by specialized laboratories only, which causes great limitations in reaching a diagnosis for patients affected by these diseases.There are few studies about LSDs in Colombia. The diagnostic limitations often make medical practitioners disregard the possibility of these disorders while diagnosing their patients. The current study documents the results of a 7-year screening in high-risk patients, aimed to detect LSDs using dried blood spots (DBS) collected on filter paper, with a micromethodology that facilitates diagnosis even with a large number of samples.The activities of α-galactosidase A, α glucosidase, α-L-iduronidase, arylsulfatase B, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase, total hexosaminidase, iduronate sulfatase, and chitotriosidase were analyzed in high-risk patients for lysosomal disease. The catalytic activity was evaluated with fluorometric micromethods using artificial substrates marked with 4-methylumbelliferone.The reference values for a control population were established for the enzymes listed above, and 242 patients were found to have an enzyme deficiency, guiding to the following diagnoses: Fabry disease (n = 31), Pompe disease (n = 16), Hurler Syndrome (n = 15), Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome (n = 34), GM1 Gangliosidosis (n = 10), Morquio B (n = 1), Gaucher disease (n = 101), Sandhoff disease (n = 1), Mucolipidosis (n = 2), and Hunter Syndrome (n = 31). In conclusion, this protocol provides a comprehensive diagnostic approach which could be carried out in Colombia and made it available to medical services spread around the country, enabling the identification of a large number of patients affected by LSDs, which could potentially benefit from the therapeutic tools already available for many of these diseases. PMID:23609959

  10. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R.; Granato, Daniela C.; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Winck, Flavia V.; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R.; Cruz, Karen S. P.; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J.; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W.; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  11. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R; Granato, Daniela C; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R; Winck, Flavia V; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Cruz, Karen S P; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W; Santos-Silva, Alan R; Coletta, Ricardo D; Sherman, Nicholas E; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2015-12-22

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  12. Highly selective luminescent nanostructures for mitochondrial imaging and targeting.

    PubMed

    Fanizza, E; Iacobazzi, R M; Laquintana, V; Valente, G; Caliandro, G; Striccoli, M; Agostiano, A; Cutrignelli, A; Lopedota, A; Curri, M L; Franco, M; Depalo, N; Denora, N

    2016-02-14

    Here a luminescent hybrid nanostructure based on functionalized quantum dots (QDs) is used as a fluorescent imaging agent able to target selectively mitochondria thanks to the molecular recognition of the translocator protein (TSPO). The selective targeting of such an 18 kDa protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and overexpressed in several pathological states including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers may provide valuable information for the early diagnosis and therapy of human disorders. In particular, the rational design of amino functionalized luminescent silica coated QD nanoparticles (QD@SiO2 NPs) provides a versatile nanoplatform to anchor a potent and selective TSPO ligand, characterized by a 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide structure along with a derivatizable carboxylic end group, useful to conjugate the TSPO ligand and achieve TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs by means of a covalent amide bond. The colloidal stability and optical properties of the proposed nanomaterials are comprehensively investigated and their potential as mitochondrial imaging agents is fully assessed. Sub-cellular fractionation, together with confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and co-localization analysis of targeted TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs in C6 glioma cells overexpressing the TSPO, proves the great potential of these multifunctional nanosystems as in vitro selective mitochondrial imaging agents. PMID:26763470

  13. Acoustic gaze adjustments during active target selection in echolocating porpoises.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Johnson, Mark; Beedholm, Kristian; Wahlberg, Magnus; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2012-12-15

    Visually dominant animals use gaze adjustments to organize perceptual inputs for cognitive processing. Thereby they manage the massive sensory load from complex and noisy scenes. Echolocation, as an active sensory system, may provide more opportunities to control such information flow by adjusting the properties of the sound source. However, most studies of toothed whale echolocation have involved stationed animals in static auditory scenes for which dynamic information control is unnecessary. To mimic conditions in the wild, we designed an experiment with captive, free-swimming harbor porpoises tasked with discriminating between two hydrophone-equipped targets and closing in on the selected target; this allowed us to gain insight into how porpoises adjust their acoustic gaze in a multi-target dynamic scene. By means of synchronized cameras, an acoustic tag and on-target hydrophone recordings we demonstrate that porpoises employ both beam direction control and range-dependent changes in output levels and pulse intervals to accommodate their changing spatial relationship with objects of immediate interest. We further show that, when switching attention to another target, porpoises can set their depth of gaze accurately for the new target location. In combination, these observations imply that porpoises exert precise vocal-motor control that is tied to spatial perception akin to visual accommodation. Finally, we demonstrate that at short target ranges porpoises narrow their depth of gaze dramatically by adjusting their output so as to focus on a single target. This suggests that echolocating porpoises switch from a deliberative mode of sensorimotor operation to a reactive mode when they are close to a target. PMID:23175527

  14. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Megan E.; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss. PMID:26578874

  15. Histone target selection within chromatin: an exemplary case of teamwork.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Cheng, Xue; Ct, Jacques

    2014-05-15

    Histone modifiers like acetyltransferases, methyltransferases, and demethylases are critical regulators of most DNA-based nuclear processes, de facto controlling cell cycle progression and cell fate. These enzymes perform very precise post-translational modifications on specific histone residues, which in turn are recognized by different effector modules/proteins. We now have a better understanding of how these enzymes exhibit such specificity. As they often reside in multisubunit complexes, they use associated factors to target their substrates within chromatin structure and select specific histone mark-bearing nucleosomes. In this review, we cover the current understanding of how histone modifiers select their histone targets. We also explain how different experimental approaches can lead to conflicting results about the histone specificity and function of these enzymes. PMID:24831698

  16. Target Selection for the LBTI Exozodi Key Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, Alycia J.; Bryden, Geoff; Kennedy, Grant M.; Roberge, Aki; Defrere, Denis; Hinz, Philip M.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Danchi, William C.; Haniff, Chris; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugne; Skemer, Andrew J.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from approximately 300K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels of survey sensitivity induced by weather conditions.

  17. Selective Mitochondrial Targeting Exerts Anxiolytic Effects In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, Markus; Asara, John M; Teplytska, Larysa; Murphy, Michael P; Logan, Angela; Turck, Christoph W; Filiou, Michaela D

    2016-06-01

    Current treatment strategies for anxiety disorders are predominantly symptom-based. However, a third of anxiety patients remain unresponsive to anxiolytics highlighting the need for more effective, mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. We have previously compared high vs low anxiety mice and identified changes in mitochondrial pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress. In this work, we show that selective pharmacological targeting of these mitochondrial pathways exerts anxiolytic effects in vivo. We treated high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) mice with MitoQ, an antioxidant that selectively targets mitochondria. MitoQ administration resulted in decreased anxiety-related behavior in HAB mice. This anxiolytic effect was specific for high anxiety as MitoQ treatment did not affect the anxiety phenotype of C57BL/6N and DBA/2J mouse strains. We furthermore investigated the molecular underpinnings of the MitoQ-driven anxiolytic effect and found that MitoQ treatment alters the brain metabolome and that the response to MitoQ treatment is characterized by distinct molecular signatures. These results indicate that a mechanism-driven approach based on selective mitochondrial targeting has the potential to attenuate the high anxiety phenotype in vivo, thus paving the way for translational implementation as long-term MitoQ administration is well-tolerated with no reported side effects in mice and humans. PMID:26567514

  18. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE LBTI EXOZODI KEY SCIENCE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Alycia J.; Bryden, Geoff; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Roberge, Aki; Danchi, William C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M.; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Haniff, Chris

    2015-02-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ∼300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels of survey sensitivity induced by weather conditions.

  19. Lysosome: regulator of lipid degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway that has a fundamental role in the adaptation to fasting and primarily relies on the activity of the endolysosomal system, to which the autophagosome targets substrates for degradation. Recent studies have revealed that the lysosomal–autophagic pathway plays an important part in the early steps of lipid degradation. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional mechanisms underlying co-regulation between lysosome, autophagy, and other steps of lipid catabolism, including the activity of nutrient-sensitive transcription factors (TFs) and of members of the nuclear receptor family. In addition, we discuss how the lysosome acts as a metabolic sensor and orchestrates the transcriptional response to fasting. PMID:25061009

  20. Autophagy, lipophagy and lysosomal lipid storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carl; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Otten, Elsje G; Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Singh, Rajat; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process with an essential function in the maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. It is primarily recognised for its role in the degradation of dysfunctional proteins and unwanted organelles, however in recent years the range of autophagy substrates has also been extended to lipids. Degradation of lipids via autophagy is termed lipophagy. The ability of autophagy to contribute to the maintenance of lipo-homeostasis becomes particularly relevant in the context of genetic lysosomal storage disorders where perturbations of autophagic flux have been suggested to contribute to the disease aetiology. Here we review recent discoveries of the molecular mechanisms mediating lipid turnover by the autophagy pathways. We further focus on the relevance of autophagy, and specifically lipophagy, to the disease mechanisms. Moreover, autophagy is also discussed as a potential therapeutic target in several key lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:26778751

  1. A Deterministic Approach to Active Debris Removal Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, A.; Lewis, H.; Armellin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Many decisions, with widespread economic, political and legal consequences, are being considered based on space debris simulations that show that Active Debris Removal (ADR) may be necessary as the concerns about the sustainability of spaceflight are increasing. The debris environment predictions are based on low-accuracy ephemerides and propagators. This raises doubts about the accuracy of those prognoses themselves but also the potential ADR target-lists that are produced. Target selection is considered highly important as removal of many objects will increase the overall mission cost. Selecting the most-likely candidates as soon as possible would be desirable as it would enable accurate mission design and allow thorough evaluation of in-orbit validations, which are likely to occur in the near-future, before any large investments are made and implementations realized. One of the primary factors that should be used in ADR target selection is the accumulated collision probability of every object. A conjunction detection algorithm, based on the smart sieve method, has been developed. Another algorithm is then applied to the found conjunctions to compute the maximum and true probabilities of collisions taking place. The entire framework has been verified against the Conjunction Analysis Tools in AGIs Systems Toolkit and relative probability error smaller than 1.5% has been achieved in the final maximum collision probability. Two target-lists are produced based on the ranking of the objects according to the probability they will take part in any collision over the simulated time window. These probabilities are computed using the maximum probability approach, that is time-invariant, and estimates of the true collision probability that were computed with covariance information. The top-priority targets are compared, and the impacts of the data accuracy and its decay are highlighted. General conclusions regarding the importance of Space Surveillance and Tracking for the purpose of ADR are also drawn and a deterministic method for ADR target selection, which could reduce the number of ADR missions to be performed, is proposed.

  2. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: instrument specification and target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. J.; Owers, M. S.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Lorente, N. P. F.; Cortese, L.; Scott, N.; Colless, M.; Schaefer, A.; Taylor, E. N.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Allen, J. T.; Baldry, I.; Barnes, L.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Brooks, A. M.; Brough, S.; Cecil, G.; Couch, W.; Croton, D.; Davies, R.; Ellis, S.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Foster, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Goodwin, M.; Green, A.; Gunawardhana, M. L.; Hampton, E.; Ho, I.-T.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kewley, L.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Leslie, S.; McElroy, R.; Lewis, G.; Liske, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mahajan, S.; Medling, A. M.; Metcalfe, N.; Meyer, M.; Mould, J.; Obreschkow, D.; O'Toole, S.; Pracy, M.; Richards, S. N.; Shanks, T.; Sharp, R.; Sweet, S. M.; Thomas, A. D.; Tonini, C.; Walcher, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope in a 3-yr survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume-limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar-mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12 and 14.5 h, and cover a total of 144 deg2 (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and photometry in regions covered by the SDSS and/or VLT Survey Telescope/ATLAS. The aim is to cover a broad range in stellar mass and environment, and therefore the primary survey targets cover redshifts 0.004 < z < 0.095, magnitudes rpet < 19.4, stellar masses 107-1012 M⊙, and environments from isolated field galaxies through groups to clusters of ˜1015 M⊙.

  3. Selection of molecular targets for drug development against trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Smirlis, Despina; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites are a group of flagellated protozoa that includes the genera Leishmania and Trypanosoma, which are the causative agents of diseases (leishmaniases, sleeping sickness and Chagas disease) that cause considerable morbidity and mortality, affecting more than 27 million people worldwide. Today no effective vaccines for the prevention of these diseases exist, whereas current chemotherapy is ineffective, mainly due to toxic side effects of current drugs and to the emergence of drug resistance and lack of cost effectiveness. For these reasons, rational drug design and the search of good candidate drug targets is of prime importance. The search for drug targets requires a multidisciplinary approach. To this end, the completion of the genome project of many trypanosomatid species gives a vast amount of new information that can be exploited for the identification of good drug candidates with a prediction of "druggability" and divergence from mammalian host proteins. In addition, an important aspect in the search for good drug targets is the "target identification" and evaluation in a biological pathway, as well as the essentiality of the gene in the mammalian stage of the parasite, which is provided by basic research and genetic and proteomic approaches. In this chapter we will discuss how these bioinformatic tools and experimental evaluations can be integrated for the selection of candidate drug targets, and give examples of metabolic and signaling pathways in the parasitic protozoa that can be exploited for rational drug design. PMID:24264240

  4. Brevinin-2R1 semi-selectively kills cancer cells by a distinct mechanism, which involves the lysosomal-mitochondrial death pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ghavami, Saeid; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Klonisch, Thomas; Halayko, Andrew J; Kadkhoda, Kamran; Kroczak, Tadeusz J; Gibson, Spencer B; Booy, Evan P; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Los, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Brevinin-2R is a novel non-hemolytic defensin that was isolated from the skin of the frog Rana ridibunda. It exhibits preferential cytotoxicity towards malignant cells, including Jurkat (T-cell leukemia), BJAB (B-cell lymphoma), HT29/219, SW742 (colon carcinomas), L929 (fibrosarcoma), MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), as compared to primary cells including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), T cells and human lung fibroblasts. Jurkat and MCF-7 cells overexpressing Bcl2, and L929 and MCF-7 over-expressing a dominant-negative mutant of a pro-apoptotic BNIP3 (ΔTM-BNIP3) were largely resistant towards Brevinin-2R treatment. The decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), or total cellular ATP levels, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, but not caspase activation or the release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) or endonuclease G (Endo G), were early indicators of Brevinin-2R-triggered death. Brevinin-2R interacts with both early and late endosomes. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization inhibitors and inhibitors of cathepsin-B and cathepsin-L prevented Brevinin-2R-induced cell death. Autophagosomes have been detected upon Brevinin-2R treatment. Our results show that Brevinin-2R activates the lysosomalmitochondrial death pathway, and involves autophagy-like cell death. PMID:18494941

  5. PDT: loss of autophagic cytoprotection after lysosomal photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Price, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is known to evoke both autophagy and apoptosis. Apoptosis is an irreversible death pathway while autophagy can serve a cytoprotective function. In this study, we examined two photosensitizing agents that target lysosomes, although they differ in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during irradiation. With both agents, the 'shoulder' on the PDT dose-response curve was substantially attenuated, consistent with loss of a cytoprotective pathway. In contrast, this 'shoulder' is commonly observed when PDT targets mitochondria or the ER. We propose that lysosomal targets may offer the possibility of promoting PDT efficacy by eliminating a potentially protective pathway.

  6. Highly selective luminescent nanostructures for mitochondrial imaging and targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanizza, E.; Iacobazzi, R. M.; Laquintana, V.; Valente, G.; Caliandro, G.; Striccoli, M.; Agostiano, A.; Cutrignelli, A.; Lopedota, A.; Curri, M. L.; Franco, M.; Depalo, N.; Denora, N.

    2016-02-01

    Here a luminescent hybrid nanostructure based on functionalized quantum dots (QDs) is used as a fluorescent imaging agent able to target selectively mitochondria thanks to the molecular recognition of the translocator protein (TSPO). The selective targeting of such an 18 kDa protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and overexpressed in several pathological states including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers may provide valuable information for the early diagnosis and therapy of human disorders. In particular, the rational design of amino functionalized luminescent silica coated QD nanoparticles (QD@SiO2 NPs) provides a versatile nanoplatform to anchor a potent and selective TSPO ligand, characterized by a 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide structure along with a derivatizable carboxylic end group, useful to conjugate the TSPO ligand and achieve TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs by means of a covalent amide bond. The colloidal stability and optical properties of the proposed nanomaterials are comprehensively investigated and their potential as mitochondrial imaging agents is fully assessed. Sub-cellular fractionation, together with confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and co-localization analysis of targeted TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs in C6 glioma cells overexpressing the TSPO, proves the great potential of these multifunctional nanosystems as in vitro selective mitochondrial imaging agents.Here a luminescent hybrid nanostructure based on functionalized quantum dots (QDs) is used as a fluorescent imaging agent able to target selectively mitochondria thanks to the molecular recognition of the translocator protein (TSPO). The selective targeting of such an 18 kDa protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and overexpressed in several pathological states including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers may provide valuable information for the early diagnosis and therapy of human disorders. In particular, the rational design of amino functionalized luminescent silica coated QD nanoparticles (QD@SiO2 NPs) provides a versatile nanoplatform to anchor a potent and selective TSPO ligand, characterized by a 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide structure along with a derivatizable carboxylic end group, useful to conjugate the TSPO ligand and achieve TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs by means of a covalent amide bond. The colloidal stability and optical properties of the proposed nanomaterials are comprehensively investigated and their potential as mitochondrial imaging agents is fully assessed. Sub-cellular fractionation, together with confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and co-localization analysis of targeted TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs in C6 glioma cells overexpressing the TSPO, proves the great potential of these multifunctional nanosystems as in vitro selective mitochondrial imaging agents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional TEM micrographs, fluorescence and UV-Vis absorbance spectra of silica coated QD nanoparticles and TSPO ligand. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08139d

  7. Selective Genomic Targeting by FRA-2/FOSL2 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jeff S.; Klein, David C.; Carter, David A.

    2011-01-01

    FRA-2/FOSL2 is a basic region-leucine zipper motif transcription factor that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. The functional repertoire of this factor is unclear, partly due to a lack of knowledge of genomic sequences that are targeted. Here, we identified novel, functional FRA-2 targets across the genome through expression profile analysis in a knockdown transgenic rat. In this model, a nocturnal rhythm of pineal gland FRA-2 is suppressed by a genetically encoded, dominant negative mutant protein. Bioinformatic analysis of validated sets of FRA-2-regulated and -nonregulated genes revealed that the FRA-2 regulon is limited by genomic target selection rules that, in general, transcend core cis-sequence identity. However, one variant AP-1-related (AP-1R) sequence was common to a subset of regulated genes. The functional activity and protein binding partners of a candidate AP-1R sequence were determined for a novel FRA-2-repressed gene, Rgs4. FRA-2 protein preferentially associated with a proximal Rgs4 AP-1R sequence as demonstrated by ex vivo ChIP and in vitro EMSA analysis; moreover, transcriptional repression was blocked by mutation of the AP-1R sequence, whereas mutation of an upstream consensus AP-1 family sequence did not affect Rgs4 expression. Nocturnal changes in protein complexes at the Rgs4 AP-1R sequence are associated with FRA-2-dependent dismissal of the co-activator, CBP; this provides a mechanistic basis for Rgs4 gene repression. These studies have also provided functional insight into selective genomic targeting by FRA-2, highlighting discordance between predicted and actual targets. Future studies should address FRA-2-Rgs4 interactions in other systems, including the brain, where FRA-2 function is poorly understood. PMID:21367864

  8. Dynamic interactions between visual working memory and saccade target selection

    PubMed Central

    Schneegans, Sebastian; Spencer, John P.; Schöner, Gregor; Hwang, Seongmin; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recent psychophysical experiments have shown that working memory for visual surface features interacts with saccadic motor planning, even in tasks where the saccade target is unambiguously specified by spatial cues. Specifically, a match between a memorized color and the color of either the designated target or a distractor stimulus influences saccade target selection, saccade amplitudes, and latencies in a systematic fashion. To elucidate these effects, we present a dynamic neural field model in combination with new experimental data. The model captures the neural processes underlying visual perception, working memory, and saccade planning relevant to the psychophysical experiment. It consists of a low-level visual sensory representation that interacts with two separate pathways: a spatial pathway implementing spatial attention and saccade generation, and a surface feature pathway implementing color working memory and feature attention. Due to bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and feature attention in the model, the working memory content can indirectly exert an effect on perceptual processing in the low-level sensory representation. This in turn biases saccadic movement planning in the spatial pathway, allowing the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed interaction effects. The continuous coupling between representations in the model also implies that modulation should be bidirectional, and model simulations provide specific predictions for complementary effects of saccade target selection on visual working memory. These predictions were empirically confirmed in a new experiment: Memory for a sample color was biased toward the color of a task-irrelevant saccade target object, demonstrating the bidirectional coupling between visual working memory and perceptual processing. PMID:25228628

  9. Analysis of mucolipidosis II/III GNPTAB missense mutations identifies domains of UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase involved in catalytic function and lysosomal enzyme recognition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; van Meel, Eline; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Yox, Alex; Steet, Richard; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase tags newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes with mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers, which are required for their targeting to the endolysosomal system. GNPTAB encodes the α and β subunits of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, and mutations in this gene cause the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and III αβ. Prior investigation of missense mutations in GNPTAB uncovered amino acids in the N-terminal region and within the DMAP domain involved in Golgi retention of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase and its ability to specifically recognize lysosomal hydrolases, respectively. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the remaining missense mutations in GNPTAB reported in mucolipidosis II and III αβ patients using cell- and zebrafish-based approaches. We show that the Stealth domain harbors the catalytic site, as some mutations in these regions greatly impaired the activity of the enzyme without affecting its Golgi localization and proteolytic processing. We also demonstrate a role for the Notch repeat 1 in lysosomal hydrolase recognition, as missense mutations in conserved cysteine residues in this domain do not affect the catalytic activity but impair mannose phosphorylation of certain lysosomal hydrolases. Rescue experiments using mRNA bearing Notch repeat 1 mutations in GNPTAB-deficient zebrafish revealed selective effects on hydrolase recognition that differ from the DMAP mutation. Finally, the mutant R587P, located in the spacer between Notch 2 and DMAP, was partially rescued by overexpression of the γ subunit, suggesting a role for this region in γ subunit binding. These studies provide new insight into the functions of the different domains of the α and β subunits. PMID:25505245

  10. Autophagy in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Andrew P.; Puertollano, Rosa; Raben, Nina; Slaugenhaupt, Susan; Walkley, Steven U.; Ballabio, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous intracellular organelles that have an acidic internal pH, and play crucial roles in cellular clearance. Numerous functions depend on normal lysosomes, including the turnover of cellular constituents, cholesterol homeostasis, downregulation of surface receptors, inactivation of pathogenic organisms, repair of the plasma membrane and bone remodeling. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are characterized by progressive accumulation of undigested macromolecules within the cell due to lysosomal dysfunction. As a consequence, many tissues and organ systems are affected, including brain, viscera, bone and cartilage. The progressive nature of phenotype development is one of the hallmarks of LSDs. In recent years biochemical and cell biology studies of LSDs have revealed an ample spectrum of abnormalities in a variety of cellular functions. These include defects in signaling pathways, calcium homeostasis, lipid biosynthesis and degradation and intracellular trafficking. Lysosomes also play a fundamental role in the autophagic pathway by fusing with autophagosomes and digesting their content. Considering the highly integrated function of lysosomes and autophagosomes it was reasonable to expect that lysosomal storage in LSDs would have an impact upon autophagy. The goal of this review is to provide readers with an overview of recent findings that have been obtained through analysis of the autophagic pathway in several types of LSDs, supporting the idea that LSDs could be seen primarily as “autophagy disorders.” PMID:22647656

  11. THINK OUTSIDE THE COLOR BOX: PROBABILISTIC TARGET SELECTION AND THE SDSS-XDQSOQUASAR TARGETING CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    BOVY, J.; Sheldon, E.; Hennawi, J.F.; Hogg, D.W.; Myers, A.D.; et al.

    2011-03-10

    We present the SDSS-XDQSO quasar targeting catalog for efficient flux-based quasar target selection down to the faint limit of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) catalog, even at medium redshifts (2.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3) where the stellar contamination is significant. We build models of the distributions of stars and quasars in flux space down to the flux limit by applying the extreme-deconvolution method to estimate the underlying density. We convolve this density with the flux uncertainties when evaluating the probability that an object is a quasar. This approach results in a targeting algorithm that is more principled, more efficient, and faster than other similar methods. We apply the algorithm to derive low-redshift (z < 2.2), medium-redshift (2.2 {le} z {le} 3.5), and high-redshift (z > 3.5) quasar probabilities for all 160,904,060 point sources with dereddened i-band magnitude between 17.75 and 22.45 mag in the 14,555 deg{sup 2} of imaging from SDSS Data Release 8. The catalog can be used to define a uniformly selected and efficient low- or medium-redshift quasar survey, such as that needed for the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey project. We show that the XDQSO technique performs as well as the current best photometric quasar-selection technique at low redshift, and outperforms all other flux-based methods for selecting the medium-redshift quasars of our primary interest. We make code to reproduce the XDQSO quasar target selection publicly available.

  12. X-linked Angelman-like syndrome caused by Slc9a6 knockout in mice exhibits evidence of endosomal–lysosomal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Strømme, Petter; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Sillitoe, Roy V.; Gulinello, Maria; Ali, Nafeeza F.; Davidson, Cristin; Micsenyi, Matthew C.; Stephney, Gloria; Ellevog, Linda; Klungland, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in solute carrier family 9 isoform 6 on chromosome Xq26.3 encoding sodium–hydrogen exchanger 6, a protein mainly expressed in early and recycling endosomes are known to cause a complex and slowly progressive degenerative human neurological disease. Three resulting phenotypes have so far been reported: an X-linked Angelman syndrome-like condition, Christianson syndrome and corticobasal degeneration with tau deposition, with each characterized by severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, autistic behaviour and ataxia. Hypothesizing that a sodium–hydrogen exchanger 6 deficiency would most likely disrupt the endosomal–lysosomal system of neurons, we examined Slc9a6 knockout mice with tissue staining and related techniques commonly used to study lysosomal storage disorders. As a result, we found that sodium–hydrogen exchanger 6 depletion leads to abnormal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and unesterified cholesterol within late endosomes and lysosomes of neurons in selective brain regions, most notably the basolateral nuclei of the amygdala, the CA3 and CA4 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and some areas of cerebral cortex. In these select neuronal populations, histochemical staining for β-hexosaminidase activity, a lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of GM2 ganglioside, was undetectable. Neuroaxonal dystrophy similar to that observed in lysosomal disease was observed in the cerebellum and was accompanied by a marked and progressive loss of Purkinje cells, particularly in those lacking the expression of Zebrin II. On behavioural testing, Slc9a6 knockout mice displayed a discrete clinical phenotype attributable to motor hyperactivity and cerebellar dysfunction. Importantly, these findings show that sodium–hydrogen exchanger 6 loss of function in the Slc9a6-targeted mouse model leads to compromise of endosomal–lysosomal function similar to lysosomal disease and to conspicuous neuronal abnormalities in specific brain regions, which in concert could provide a unified explanation for the cellular and clinical phenotypes in humans with SLC9A6 mutations. PMID:21964919

  13. SELECTION, PRIORITIZATION, AND CHARACTERISTICS OF KEPLER TARGET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Haas, Michael R.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Hall, Jennifer R.; Latham, David W.; Meibom, Soren; Monet, David G.

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission began its 3.5 year photometric monitoring campaign in 2009 May on a select group of approximately 150,000 stars. The stars were chosen from the {approx} half million in the field of view that are brighter than 16th magnitude. The selection criteria are quantitative metrics designed to optimize the scientific yield of the mission with regard to the detection of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone. This yields more than 90,000 G-type stars on or close to the main sequence, >20, 000 of which are brighter than 14th magnitude. At the temperature extremes, the sample includes approximately 3000 M-type dwarfs and a small sample of O- and B-type MS stars (<200). The small numbers of giants are included in the sample: {approx}5000 stars with surface gravities log(g) < 3.5. We present a brief summary of the selection process and the stellar populations it yields in terms of surface gravity, effective temperature, and apparent magnitude. In addition to the primary, statistically derived target set, several ancillary target lists were manually generated to enhance the science of the mission, examples being: known eclipsing binaries, open cluster members, and high proper motion stars.

  14. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R.

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  15. Target and temporal pattern selection at neocortical synapses.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Alex M; Bannister, A Peter; Mercer, Audrey; Morris, Oliver T

    2002-12-29

    We attempt to summarize the properties of cortical synaptic connections and the precision with which they select their targets in the context of information processing in cortical circuits. High-frequency presynaptic bursts result in rapidly depressing responses at most inputs onto spiny cells and onto some interneurons. These 'phasic' connections detect novelty and changes in the firing rate, but report frequency of maintained activity poorly. By contrast, facilitating inputs to interneurons that target dendrites produce little or no response at low frequencies, but a facilitating-augmenting response to maintained firing. The neurons activated, the cells they in turn target and the properties of those synapses determine which parts of the circuit are recruited and in what temporal pattern. Inhibitory interneurons provide both temporal and spatial tuning. The 'forward' flow from layer-4 excitatory neurons to layer 3 and from 3 to 5 activates predominantly pyramids. 'Back' projections, from 3 to 4 and 5 to 3, do not activate excitatory cells, but target interneurons. Despite, therefore, an increasing complexity in the information integrated as it is processed through these layers, there is little 'contamination' by 'back' projections. That layer 6 acts both as a primary input layer feeding excitation 'forward' to excitatory cells in other layers and as a higher-order layer with more integrated response properties feeding inhibition to layer 4 is discussed. PMID:12626012

  16. Selective targeting of the stress chaperome as a therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Taldone, Tony; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Patel, Pallav D.; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Normal cellular function is maintained by coordinated proteome machinery that performs a vast array of activities. Helping the proteome in such roles is the chaperome, a network of molecular chaperones and folding enzymes. The stressed cell contains, at any time, a complex mixture of chaperome complexes; a majority performs housekeeping functions similarly to non-stressed, normal cells, but a finely-tuned fraction buffers the proteome altered by chronic stress. The stress chaperome is epigenetically distinct from its normal, housekeeping counterpart, providing a basis for its selective targeting by small molecules. Here we discuss development of chaperome inhibitors, and how agents targeting chaperome members in stressed cells are in fact being directed towards chaperome complexes and their effect is therefore determined by their ability to sample and engage such complexes. A new approach is needed to target and implement chaperome modulators in the investigation of diseases, and we propose that the classical thinking in drug discovery needs adjustment when developing chaperome-targeting drugs. PMID:25262919

  17. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles. PMID:21087645

  18. A negative selection heuristic to predict new transcriptional targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Supervised machine learning approaches have been recently adopted in the inference of transcriptional targets from high throughput trascriptomic and proteomic data showing major improvements from with respect to the state of the art of reverse gene regulatory network methods. Beside traditional unsupervised techniques, a supervised classifier learns, from known examples, a function that is able to recognize new relationships for new data. In the context of gene regulatory inference a supervised classifier is coerced to learn from positive and unlabeled examples, as the counter negative examples are unavailable or hard to collect. Such a condition could limit the performance of the classifier especially when the amount of training examples is low. Results In this paper we improve the supervised identification of transcriptional targets by selecting reliable counter negative examples from the unlabeled set. We introduce an heuristic based on the known topology of transcriptional networks that in fact restores the conventional positive/negative training condition and shows a significant improvement of the classification performance. We empirically evaluate the proposed heuristic with the experimental datasets of Escherichia coli and show an example of application in the prediction of BCL6 direct core targets in normal germinal center human B cells obtaining a precision of 60%. Conclusions The availability of only positive examples in learning transcriptional relationships negatively affects the performance of supervised classifiers. We show that the selection of reliable negative examples, a practice adopted in text mining approaches, improves the performance of such classifiers opening new perspectives in the identification of new transcriptional targets. PMID:23368951

  19. Target Search & Selection for the DI/EPOXI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebow, Daniel J.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Chesley, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Upon completion of the Hartley 2 flyby in November 2010, the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft resided in a solar orbit without possibility for gravity assist with any large body. Conservative estimates of remaining fuel were enough to provide only an 18 m/s impulse on the spacecraft. We present our method and results of our systematic scan of potential small body encounters for DI, and our criteria to narrow the selection to the asteroid 2002 GT as the target flyby body. The mission profile has two deterministic maneuvers to achieve the encounter, the first of which executed on November 25, 2011.

  20. Target Search and Selection for the DI/EPOXI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebow, Daniel J.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Chesley, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Upon completion of the Hartley 2 flyby in November 2010, the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft resided in a solar orbit without possibility for gravity assist with any large body. Conservative estimates of remaining fuel were enough to provide only an 18 m/s impulse on the spacecraft. We present our method and results of our systematic scan of potential small body encounters for DI, and our criteria to narrow the selection to the asteroid 2002 GT as the target flyby body. The mission profile has two deterministic maneuvers to achieve the encounter, the first of which executed on November 25, 2011.

  1. Target selective tilt-after effect during texture learning.

    PubMed

    Harris, Hila; Pinchuk-Yacobi, Noga; Sagi, Dov

    2015-01-01

    In texture learning, observers are presented with repeated stimulations, resulting in within-day threshold elevation, as well as between day threshold reductions. Within-day deteriorations were shown to be location and orientation specific (Mednick et. al., 2002; Ofen et al., 2007). Accordingly, the declined performance was suggested to reflect sensory adaptation. Here we test whether extensive training produces adaptation dependent tilt after-effects (TAE). Six observers were trained for 5 days on the texture discrimination task (Karni & Sagi, 1991), 800-1000 trials/day. The target (40ms) was composed of 3 lines of 22.5o orientation, stacked vertically or horizontally (2AFC task), embedded in a background of -22.5o lines. The target was followed by a variable blank interval and a mask (100ms). Multiple tests of perceived vertical (PV) were carried out prior and after each daily session to evaluate TAE at four locations, corresponding to: a target line, +22.5o on all trials (T+); both target and background lines, balanced, either +22.5o or -22.5o (T0); and the two background locations, near (BN) and far from the target (BF). Results showed learning across days, with within-day deterioration that varied across days. There was a significant TAE immediately following TDT training at both target's locations, at T+ (-1.6°±0.3, mean±SEM; p< 0.01) and, more surprisingly, at T0 (-0.8°±0.2; p=0.03) but not at background locations (BN, 0.3°±0.3; BF, 0.3°±0.1). The persistence of the TAE varied across days, as indicated by successive PV tests; decaying faster at location T+ (p=0.02), while persisting longer at location T0 (p=0.02). Here we show that texture training induces a localized target-selective TAE, which in return has a training-dependent component. The absence of background TAE and the target-biased TAE at the balanced location indicate that aftereffects are not determined by stimulus statistics, but rather by experience-dependent task-relevance. This supports mutual interactions between sensory adaptation and perceptual learning. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326822

  2. Neospora caninum: infection induces high lysosomal activity.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Alexandre M; Santos, Cláudia Valle Cabral D; Rodrigues, Luiz Erlon A

    2013-08-01

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle and neuromuscular lesions in dogs, making it an important target of veterinary medicine. Lysosomes are cellular organelles responsible for important biological functions as cellular defense mechanisms. The aim of this work was to evaluate the lysosomal stability of rat gliocytes infected in vitro with N. caninum. Rat glial cultures were infected at a ratio of 1:1 (cell/parasite). The enzymatic activity of acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.2) was assayed in the medium of control and infected cell cultures. The activity observed at 24h of incubation was 0.4±0.08mU/mg/min for control cells and 1.3±0.5mU/mg/min for infected cells. After 72h, control and infected cells exhibited activities of 1.3±0.5 and 4.1±0.9mU/mg/min, respectively. These results suggested that lysosomal compartment plays an important role in the mechanisms of cellular infection by N. caninum. PMID:23648665

  3. Isolation and characterization of chicken liver lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, T; Ikezawa, H

    1988-06-01

    The distribution patterns of chicken liver lysosomal enzymes were studied in iso-osmotic gradients of Percoll. The lysosomal enzymes separated by Percoll gradients showed three different types of distribution. In contrast with rat liver lysosomes, purified chicken liver lysosomes were very stable during storage at 4 degrees C. PMID:2845991

  4. Mannose 6-phosphate-independent Lysosomal Sorting of LIMP-2.

    PubMed

    Blanz, Judith; Zunke, Friederike; Markmann, Sandra; Damme, Markus; Braulke, Thomas; Saftig, Paul; Schwake, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The lysosomal integral membrane protein type 2 (LIMP-2/SCARB2) has been described as a mannose 6-phosphate (M6P)-independent trafficking receptor for β-glucocerebrosidase (GC). Recently, a putative M6P residue in a crystal structure of a recombinantly expressed LIMP-2 ectodomain has been reported. Based on surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence lifetime imaging analyses, it was suggested that the interaction of soluble LIMP-2 with the cation-independent M6P receptor (MPR) results in M6P-dependent targeting of LIMP-2 to lysosomes. As the physiological relevance of this observation was not addressed, we investigated M6P-dependent delivery of LIMP-2 to lysosomes in murine liver and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We demonstrate that LIMP-2 and GC reach lysosomes independent of the M6P pathway. In fibroblasts lacking either MPRs or the M6P-forming N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-1-phosphotransferase, LIMP-2 still localizes to lysosomes. Immunoblot analyses also revealed comparable LIMP-2 levels within lysosomes purified from liver of wild-type (wt) and GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase-defective mice. Heterologous expression of the luminal domain of LIMP-2 in wild-type, LIMP-2-deficient and GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase-defective cells further established that the M6P modification is dispensable for lysosomal sorting of LIMP-2. Finally, cathepsin Z, a known GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase substrate, but not LIMP-2, could be precipitated with M6P-specific antibodies. These data prove M6P-independent lysosomal sorting of LIMP-2 and subsequently GC in vivo. PMID:26219725

  5. Neuropathic Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pastores, Gregory M.; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of inborn errors of metabolism, associated with the accumulation of incompletely degraded macromolecules within several cellular sites. Affected individuals present with a broad range of clinical problems, including hepatosplenomegaly and skeletal dysplasia. Onset of symptoms may range from birth to adulthood. The majority are associated with neurological features, including developmental delay, behavioral/psychiatric disturbances, seizures, acroparesthesia, motor weakness, cerebrovascular ischemic events and extra-pyramidal signs. It should be noted that later-onset forms are often misdiagnosed as symptoms, which might include psychiatric manifestations, are slowly progressive and may precede other neurologic or systemic features. Inheritance is primarily autosomal recessive. For all subtypes, diagnosis can be confirmed using a combination of biochemical and/or molecular assays. In a few LSDs, treatment with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, enzyme replacement or substrate reduction therapy is available. Genetic counseling is important, so patients and their families can be informed of reproductive risks, disease prognosis and therapeutic options. Investigations of disease mechanisms are providing insights into potential therapeutic approaches. Symptomatic care, which remains the mainstay for most subtypes, can lead to significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24176423

  6. Positive–negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Zenpei; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Toki, Seiichi; Terada, Rie

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting (GT) refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s) through homologous recombination (HR). GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive–negative selection (PNS) is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology based on PNS are discussed. PMID:25601872

  7. Selectively Targeting Prostate Cancer with Antiandrogen Equipped Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gryder, Berkley E.; Akbashev, Michelle J.; Rood, Michael K.; Raftery, Eric D.; Meyers, Warren M.; Dillard, Paulette; Khan, Shafiq; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse cellular processes relevant to cancer progression are regulated by the acetylation status of proteins. Among such processes is chromatin remodeling via histone proteins, controlled by opposing histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) show great promise in preclinical cancer models, but clinical trials treating solid tumors have failed to improve patient survival. This is due in part to an inability of HDACi to effectively accumulate in cancerous cells. To address this problem we designed HDACi with secondary pharmacophores to facilitate selective accumulation in malignant cells. We present the first example of HDACi compounds targeted to prostate tumors by equipping them with the additional ability to bind the androgen receptor (AR) with non-steroidal antiandrogen moieties. Leads among these new dual-acting molecules bind to the AR and halt AR transcriptional activity at lower concentrations than clinical antiandrogens. They inhibit key isoforms of HDAC with low nanomolar potency. Fluorescent microscopy reveals varying degrees of AR nuclear localization in response to these compounds that correlates with their HDAC activity. These biological properties translate into potent anticancer activity against hormone dependent (AR+) LNCaP and to a lesser extent against hormone independent (AR−) DU145 prostate cancer, while having greatly reduced toxicity in non-cancerous cells. This illustrates that engaging multiple biological targets with a single chemical probe can achieve both potent and cell-type selective responses. PMID:24004176

  8. [Current therapeutic strategies in lysosomal disorders].

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Pierre; Lidove, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) comprise a heterogeneous group of inborn errors of metabolism. The resulting enzymatic defect leads to accumulation of its substrate in the lysosome. Their clinical patterns reflect the site of substrate storage. Central nervous system involvement is often present in the younger patients affected by the most severe phenotypes. Substantial progress has been made in the pathophysiological knowledge, leading to new therapeutic options in LSD. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is the dominant approach and is actually proposed in six LSD: Gaucher disease, Fabry disease, Pompe disease and mucopolysaccharidoisis (MPS) I (Hurler disease), II (Hunter disease) and VI (Maroteaux-Lamy disease). This treatment reduces lysosomal storage, and sometimes reduces, but most often limits the progression of visceral involvement and of its clinical consequences. However, ERT does not cross the blood-brain barrier and is ineffective on neurological symptoms. In the younger patients with MPS I (Hurler disease) and with selected cases of other LSD, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the optimal option. Other strategies using small molecules are being explored in order to cross the blood-brain barrier. This includes substrate reduction or depletion therapies, which decrease the amount of substrate, and the use of pharmacological chaperones, which enhance the residual activity of the mutant enzyme. Miglustat is the proposed substrate reduction therapy in Niemann-Pick C disease and clinical trials are actually performed in several LSD using other substrate reduction or chaperone drugs. PMID:24863660

  9. Integration target site selection by a resurrected human endogenous retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Troy; Lee, Young Nam; Ronen, Keshet; Malani, Nirav; Berry, Charles C.; Bieniasz, Paul D.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2009-01-01

    At least 8% of the human genome was formed by integration of retroviral DNA sequences. Here we analyze the forces directing the accumulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) by comparing de novo HERV integration targeting with the distribution of fixed HERV elements in the human genome. All known genomic HERVs are inactive due to mutation, but we were able to study integration targeting using a reconstituted consensus HERV-K (designated HERV-KCon). We found that HERV-KCon integrated preferentially in transcription units, in gene-rich regions, and near features associated with active transcription units and associated regulatory regions. In contrast, genomic HERV-K proviruses are found preferentially outside transcription units. The minority of genomic HERVKs present inside transcription units are in opposite transcriptional orientation relative to the host gene, the orientation predicted to be minimally disruptive to host mRNA synthesis, but de novo HERV-KCon integration within transcription units showed no orientation bias. We also found that the youngest HERV-K elements in the human genome showed a distribution intermediate between de novo HERV-KCon integration sites and older fixed HERV-Ks. These findings indicate that accumulation of HERVs in the human germline is a two-step process: integration targeting biases direct initial accumulation, then purifying selection leads to loss of proviruses disrupting gene function. PMID:19270161

  10. Distinct cathepsins control necrotic cell death mediated by pyroptosis inducers and lysosome-destabilizing agents.

    PubMed

    Brojatsch, Jürgen; Lima, Heriberto; Palliser, Deborah; Jacobson, Lee S; Muehlbauer, Stefan M; Furtado, Raquel; Goldman, David L; Lisanti, Michael P; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death triggers a range of biological responses including a strong adaptive immune response, yet we know little about the cellular pathways that control necrotic cell death. Inhibitor studies suggest that proteases, and in particular cathepsins, drive necrotic cell death. The cathepsin B-selective inhibitor CA-074-Me blocks all forms of programmed necrosis by an unknown mechanism. We found that cathepsin B deficiency does not prevent induction of pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis suggesting that CA-074-Me blocks necrotic cell death by targeting cathepsins other than cathepsin B. A single cathepsin, cathepsin C, drives necrotic cell death mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing agent Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). Here we present evidence that cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing in a distinct and cell type-specific fashion. Cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing of all myeloid cells, except for neutrophils. Cathepsin C-deficiency, but not CA-074-Me, blocks LLOMe killing of neutrophils suggesting that CA-074-Me does not target cathepsin C directly, consistent with inhibitor studies using recombinant cathepsin C. Unlike other cathepsins, cathepsin C lacks endoproteolytic activity, and requires activation by other lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsin D. Consistent with this theory, we found that lysosomotropic agents and cathepsin D downregulation by siRNA block LLOMe-mediated necrosis. Our findings indicate that a proteolytic cascade, involving cathepsins C and D, controls LLOMe-mediated necrosis. In contrast, cathepsins C and D were not required for pyroptotic cell death suggesting that distinct cathepsins control pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis. PMID:25830414

  11. Landslide susceptibility mapping in three selected target zones in Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Seegers, Joe; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-04-01

    In May 2014, a large and mobile landslide destroyed the village Ab Barek, a village in Badakshan Province, Afghanistan. The landslide caused several hundred fatalities and once again demonstrated the vulnerability of Afghanistan's population to extreme natural events following more than 30 years of civil war and violent conflict. Increasing the capacity of Afghanistan's population by strengthening the disaster preparedness and management of responsible government authorities and institutions is thus a major component of international cooperation and development strategies. Afghanistan is characterized by high relief and widely varying rock types that largely determine the spatial distribution as well as emplacement modes of mass movements. The major aim of our study is to characterize this variability by conducting a landslide susceptibility analysis in three selected target zones: Greater Kabul Area, Badakhshan Province and Takhar Province. We expand on an existing landslide database by mapping landforms diagnostic for landslides (e.g. head scarps, normal faults and tension cracks), and historical landslide scars and landslide deposits by visual interpretation of high-resolution satellite imagery. We conduct magnitude frequency analysis within subregional physiogeographic classes based on geological maps, climatological and topographic data to identify regional parameters influencing landslide magnitude and frequency. In addition, we prepare a landslide susceptibility map for each area using the Weight-of-Evidence model. Preliminary results show that the three selected target zones vastly differ in modes of landsliding. Low magnitude but frequent rockfall events are a major hazard in the Greater Kabul Area threatening buildings and infrastructure encroaching steep terrain in the city's outskirts. Mass movements in loess covered areas of Badakshan are characterized by medium to large magnitudes. This spatial variability of characteristic landslide magnitudes and modes of emplacement necessitates different strategies to assess, mitigate, and prepare for landslides in the three different target zones.

  12. Lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagy in a novel mouse model deficient for the lysosomal membrane protein Cln7.

    PubMed

    Brandenstein, Laura; Schweizer, Michaela; Sedlacik, Jan; Fiehler, Jens; Storch, Stephan

    2016-02-15

    CLN7 disease is an autosomal recessive, childhood-onset neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by the defective lysosomal membrane protein CLN7. We have disrupted the Cln7/Mfsd8 gene in mice by targeted deletion of exon 2 generating a novel knockout (KO) mouse model for CLN7 disease, which recapitulates key features of human CLN7 disease pathology. Cln7 KO mice showed increased mortality and a neurological phenotype including hind limb clasping and myoclonus. Lysosomal dysfunction in the brain of mutant mice was shown by the storage of autofluorescent lipofuscin-like lipopigments, subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase and saposin D and increased expression of lysosomal cathepsins B, D and Z. By immunohistochemical co-stainings, increased cathepsin Z expression restricted to Cln7-deficient microglia and neurons was found. Ultrastructural analyses revealed large storage bodies in Purkinje cells of Cln7 KO mice containing inclusions composed of irregular, curvilinear and rectilinear profiles as well as fingerprint profiles. Generalized astrogliosis and microgliosis in the brain preceded neurodegeneration in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex and cerebellum in Cln7 KO mice. Increased levels of LC3-II and the presence of neuronal p62- and ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates suggested that impaired autophagy represents a major pathomechanism in the brain of Cln7 KO mice. The data suggest that loss of the putative lysosomal transporter Cln7 in the brain leads to lysosomal dysfunction, impaired constitutive autophagy and neurodegeneration late in disease. PMID:26681805

  13. Clearance of lysosomal glycogen accumulation by Transcription factor EB (TFEB) in muscle cells from lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hoi Ming; Feeney, Erin; Li, Lishu; Zare, Hossein; Puertollano, Rosa; Raben, Nina

    2013-01-01

    A recently proposed therapeutic approach for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) relies upon the ability of transcription factor EB (TFEB) to stimulate autophagy and induce lysosomal exocytosis leading to cellular clearance. This approach is particularly attractive in Glycogen Storage Disease type II (a severe metabolic myopathy and a paradigm for LSDs, also called Pompe disease) as the currently available therapy, replacement of the missing enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase, fails to reverse skeletal muscle pathology. Pompe disease is characterized by both lysosomal abnormality and dysfunctional autophagy. Here we show that TFEB is a viable therapeutic target in Pompe disease: overexpression of TFEB in a newly established conditionally immortalized skeletal muscle cell model reduced glycogen load and lysosomal size; and in the muscle fibers of GFP-LC3 Pompe disease mouse model significantly increased the motility of lysosomes in the fibers, and stimulated the fusion between lysosomes and autophagosomes under stress. Hence, modulation of TFEB activity holds promise for the development of a better therapy. In addition, the newly developed mouse and cell models have many potential applications such as large-scale drug screening for Pompe disease. PMID:23416076

  14. Measuring Cysteine Cathepsin Activity to Detect Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urška; Česen, Maruša Hafner; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    During lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), lysosomal lumenal contents can be released into the cytosol. Small molecules are more likely to be released, and cysteine cathepsins, with mature forms possessing a mass of 25-30 kDa, are among the smallest lumenal lysosomal enzymes. In addition, specific substrates for cysteine cathepsins are available to investigators, and therefore the measurement of the cathepsin activity as a hallmark of LMP works well. Here, we present a protocol for measuring the activity of these enzymes after selective plasma membrane permeabilization with a low concentration of digitonin and after total cell membrane lysis with a high concentration of digitonin. A fluorogenic substrate can be added either directly to the well with lysed cells to show LMP or to the cell-free extract to show that the lysosomal membrane has been sufficiently destabilized to allow the translocation of lysosomal enzymes. Although the content of lysosomal cysteine cathepsins differs between cell lines, this method has general applicability, is sensitive, and has high throughput. The presented protocol shows how to measure cysteine cathepsin activity in the presence of lysed cells and also in cell-free extracts. Depending on the aim of the study, one or both types of measurements can be performed. PMID:27140915

  15. Lysosomal photodamage induces cell death via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Xian-wang; Li, Hui

    2009-11-01

    Lysosomal photosensitizers have been used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Combination of such photosensitizers and light causes lysosomal photodamage, inducing cell death. The lysosomal disruption can lead to apoptosis but its signaling pathways remain to be elucidated. In this study, we selected N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6), an effective photosensitizer which preferentially accumulates in lysosomes, to study the mechanism of apoptosis caused by lysosomal photodamage. Apoptosis in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells treated by NPe6-PDT was studied using real-time single-cell analysis. In this study, the fluorescence probes Cyto c-GFP and DsRed-Mit were used to detect the spatial and temporal changes of cytochrome c in real-time in sub-cell level; the Rhodamine 123 dyes were used to monitor the changes of mitochondrial membrane potential. The results showed that, after PDT treatment,the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased, and cytochrome c released from mitochondria; The caspase-3 was activated obviously. These results suggested that lysosomal photodamage activates mitochondrial apoptotic pathway to induce cell death.

  16. Targeted erythropoietin selectively stimulates red blood cell expansion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burrill, Devin R; Vernet, Andyna; Collins, James J; Silver, Pamela A; Way, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-10

    The design of cell-targeted protein therapeutics can be informed by natural protein-protein interactions that use cooperative physical contacts to achieve cell type specificity. Here we applied this approach in vivo to the anemia drug erythropoietin (EPO), to direct its activity to EPO receptors (EPO-Rs) on red blood cell (RBC) precursors and prevent interaction with EPO-Rs on nonerythroid cells, such as platelets. Our engineered EPO molecule was mutated to weaken its affinity for EPO-R, but its avidity for RBC precursors was rescued via tethering to an antibody fragment that specifically binds the human RBC marker glycophorin A (huGYPA). We systematically tested the impact of these engineering steps on in vivo markers of efficacy, side effects, and pharmacokinetics. huGYPA transgenic mice dosed with targeted EPO exhibited elevated RBC levels, with only minimal platelet effects. This in vivo selectivity depended on the weakening EPO mutation, fusion to the RBC-specific antibody, and expression of huGYPA. The terminal plasma half-life of targeted EPO was ∼28.3 h in transgenic mice vs. ∼15.5 h in nontransgenic mice, indicating that huGYPA on mature RBCs acted as a significant drug sink but did not inhibit efficacy. In a therapeutic context, our targeting approach may allow higher restorative doses of EPO without platelet-mediated side effects, and also may improve drug pharmacokinetics. These results demonstrate how rational drug design can improve in vivo specificity, with potential application to diverse protein therapeutics. PMID:27114509

  17. Mitochondrial genomes are retained by selective constraints on protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Björkholm, Patrik; Harish, Ajith; Hagström, Erik; Ernst, Andreas M.; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells considered to be of bacterial origin. The mitochondrial genome has evolved under selection for minimization of gene content, yet it is not known why not all mitochondrial genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome. Here, we predict that hydrophobic membrane proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genomes would be recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum if they were nuclear-encoded and translated in the cytoplasm. Expression of the mitochondrially encoded proteins Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1, Apocytochrome b, and ATP synthase subunit 6 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells confirms export to the endoplasmic reticulum. To examine the extent to which the mitochondrial proteome is driven by selective constraints within the eukaryotic cell, we investigated the occurrence of mitochondrial protein domains in bacteria and eukaryotes. The accessory protein domains of the oxidative phosphorylation system are unique to mitochondria, indicating the evolution of new protein folds. Most of the identified domains in the accessory proteins of the ribosome are also found in eukaryotic proteins of other functions and locations. Overall, one-third of the protein domains identified in mitochondrial proteins are only rarely found in bacteria. We conclude that the mitochondrial genome has been maintained to ensure the correct localization of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that selective constraints on the eukaryotic cell have played a major role in modulating the evolution of the mitochondrial genome and proteome. PMID:26195779

  18. Mitochondrial genomes are retained by selective constraints on protein targeting.

    PubMed

    Björkholm, Patrik; Harish, Ajith; Hagström, Erik; Ernst, Andreas M; Andersson, Siv G E

    2015-08-18

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells considered to be of bacterial origin. The mitochondrial genome has evolved under selection for minimization of gene content, yet it is not known why not all mitochondrial genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome. Here, we predict that hydrophobic membrane proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genomes would be recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum if they were nuclear-encoded and translated in the cytoplasm. Expression of the mitochondrially encoded proteins Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1, Apocytochrome b, and ATP synthase subunit 6 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells confirms export to the endoplasmic reticulum. To examine the extent to which the mitochondrial proteome is driven by selective constraints within the eukaryotic cell, we investigated the occurrence of mitochondrial protein domains in bacteria and eukaryotes. The accessory protein domains of the oxidative phosphorylation system are unique to mitochondria, indicating the evolution of new protein folds. Most of the identified domains in the accessory proteins of the ribosome are also found in eukaryotic proteins of other functions and locations. Overall, one-third of the protein domains identified in mitochondrial proteins are only rarely found in bacteria. We conclude that the mitochondrial genome has been maintained to ensure the correct localization of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that selective constraints on the eukaryotic cell have played a major role in modulating the evolution of the mitochondrial genome and proteome. PMID:26195779

  19. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    PubMed

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators. PMID:26836578

  20. MESSI: metabolic engineering target selection and best strain identification tool.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kang; Li, Jun; Lim, Boon Leong; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are synergistically related fields for manipulating target pathways and designing microorganisms that can act as chemical factories. Saccharomyces cerevisiae's ideal bioprocessing traits make yeast a very attractive chemical factory for production of fuels, pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals as well as a wide range of chemicals. However, future attempts of engineering S. cerevisiae's metabolism using synthetic biology need to move towards more integrative models that incorporate the high connectivity of metabolic pathways and regulatory processes and the interactions in genetic elements across those pathways and processes. To contribute in this direction, we have developed Metabolic Engineering target Selection and best Strain Identification tool (MESSI), a web server for predicting efficient chassis and regulatory components for yeast bio-based production. The server provides an integrative platform for users to analyse ready-to-use public high-throughput metabolomic data, which are transformed to metabolic pathway activities for identifying the most efficient S. cerevisiae strain for the production of a compound of interest. As input MESSI accepts metabolite KEGG IDs or pathway names. MESSI outputs a ranked list of S. cerevisiae strains based on aggregation algorithms. Furthermore, through a genome-wide association study of the metabolic pathway activities with the strains' natural variation, MESSI prioritizes genes and small variants as potential regulatory points and promising metabolic engineering targets. Users can choose various parameters in the whole process such as (i) weight and expectation of each metabolic pathway activity in the final ranking of the strains, (ii) Weighted AddScore Fuse or Weighted Borda Fuse aggregation algorithm, (iii) type of variants to be included, (iv) variant sets in different biological levels.Database URL: http://sbb.hku.hk/MESSI/. PMID:26255308

  1. MESSI: metabolic engineering target selection and best strain identification tool

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kang; Li, Jun; Lim, Boon Leong; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are synergistically related fields for manipulating target pathways and designing microorganisms that can act as chemical factories. Saccharomyces cerevisiae’s ideal bioprocessing traits make yeast a very attractive chemical factory for production of fuels, pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals as well as a wide range of chemicals. However, future attempts of engineering S. cerevisiae’s metabolism using synthetic biology need to move towards more integrative models that incorporate the high connectivity of metabolic pathways and regulatory processes and the interactions in genetic elements across those pathways and processes. To contribute in this direction, we have developed Metabolic Engineering target Selection and best Strain Identification tool (MESSI), a web server for predicting efficient chassis and regulatory components for yeast bio-based production. The server provides an integrative platform for users to analyse ready-to-use public high-throughput metabolomic data, which are transformed to metabolic pathway activities for identifying the most efficient S. cerevisiae strain for the production of a compound of interest. As input MESSI accepts metabolite KEGG IDs or pathway names. MESSI outputs a ranked list of S. cerevisiae strains based on aggregation algorithms. Furthermore, through a genome-wide association study of the metabolic pathway activities with the strains’ natural variation, MESSI prioritizes genes and small variants as potential regulatory points and promising metabolic engineering targets. Users can choose various parameters in the whole process such as (i) weight and expectation of each metabolic pathway activity in the final ranking of the strains, (ii) Weighted AddScore Fuse or Weighted Borda Fuse aggregation algorithm, (iii) type of variants to be included, (iv) variant sets in different biological levels. Database URL: http://sbb.hku.hk/MESSI/ PMID:26255308

  2. Uncovering the role of Snapin in regulating autophagy-lysosomal function.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2011-04-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal system is the major degradation pathway essential for the maintenance and survival of neurons. This process requires efficient late endocytic transport from distal processes to the soma, in which lysosomes are predominantly localized. However, it is not clear how late endocytic transport has an impact upon neuronal autophagy-lysosomal function. We recently revealed that Snapin acts as a dynein motor adaptor and coordinates retrograde transport and late endosomal-lysosomal trafficking, thus maintaining efficient autophagy-lysosomal function in neurons. Snapin(-/-) neurons display impaired retrograde transport and clustering of late endosomes along neuronal processes, aberrant accumulation of immature lysosomes, and impaired clearance of autolysosomes. Snapin deficiency leads to reduced neuron viability, neurodegeneration, and developmental defects in the central nervous system. Reintroducing the snapin transgene rescues these phenotypes by enhancing the delivery of endosomal cargos to lysosomes and by facilitating autophagy-lysosomal function. Our study suggests that Snapin is a candidate molecular target for autophagy-lysosomal regulation. PMID:21233602

  3. DNA Aptamers Selectively Target Leishmania infantum H2A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. Elena; García-Hernández, Marta; García-Recio, Eva M.; Gómez-Chacón, Gerónimo F.; Sánchez-López, Marta; González, Víctor M.

    2013-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Leishmania produce leishmaniasis which affects millions people around the world. Understanding the molecular characteristics of the parasite can increase the knowledge about the mechanisms underlying disease development and progression. Thus, the study of the molecular features of histones has been considered of particular interest because Leishmania does not condense the chromatin during mitosis and, consequently, a different role for these proteins in the biology of the parasite can be expected. Furthermore, the sequence divergences in the amino and in the carboxy-terminal domains of the kinetoplastid core histones convert them in potential diagnostic and/or therapeutics targets. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that are selected in vitro by their affinity and specificity for the target as a consequence of the particular tertiary structure that they are able to acquire depending on their sequence. Development of high-affinity molecules with the ability to recognize specifically Leishmania histones is essential for the progress of this kind of study. Two aptamers which specifically recognize Leishmania infantum H2A histone were cloned from a previously obtained ssDNA enriched population. These aptamers were sequenced and subjected to an in silico analysis. ELONA, slot blot and Western blot were performed to establish aptamer affinity and specificity for LiH2A histone and ELONA assays using peptides corresponding to overlapped sequences of LiH2A were made mapping the aptamers:LiH2A interaction. As “proofs of concept”, aptamers were used to determine the number of parasites in an ELONA platform and to purify LiH2A from complex mixtures. The aptamers showed different secondary structures among them; however, both of them were able to recognize the same peptides located in a side of the protein. In addition, we demonstrate that these aptamers are useful for LiH2A identification and also may be of potential application as diagnostic system and as a laboratory tool with purification purpose. PMID:24205340

  4. Selection of Nanobodies that Target Human Neonatal Fc Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jan Terje; Gonzalez-Pajuelo, Maria; Foss, Stian; Landsverk, Ole J. B.; Pinto, Débora; Szyroki, Alexander; de Haard, Hans J.; Saunders, Michael; Vanlandschoot, Peter; Sandlie, Inger

    2013-01-01

    FcRn is a key player in several immunological and non-immunological processes, as it mediates maternal-fetal transfer of IgG, regulates the serum persistence of IgG and albumin, and transports both ligands between different cellular compartments. In addition, FcRn enhances antigen presentation. Thus, there is an intense interest in studies of how FcRn binds and transports its cargo within and across several types of cells, and FcRn detection reagents are in high demand. Here we report on phage display-selected Nanobodies that target human FcRn. The Nanobodies were obtained from a variable-domain repertoire library isolated from a llama immunized with recombinant human FcRn. One candidate, Nb218-H4, was shown to bind FcRn with high affinity at both acidic and neutral pH, without competing ligand binding and interfering with FcRn functions, such as transcytosis of IgG. Thus, Nb218-H4 can be used as a detection probe and as a tracker for visualization of FcRn-mediated cellular transport. PMID:23346375

  5. Saccade-target selection of dyslexic children when reading Chinese.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jinger; Yan, Ming; Laubrock, Jochen; Shu, Hua; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the eye movements of dyslexic children and their age-matched controls when reading Chinese. Dyslexic children exhibited more and longer fixations than age-matched control children, and an increase of word length resulted in a greater increase in the number of fixations and gaze durations for the dyslexic than for the control readers. The report focuses on the finding that there was a significant difference between the two groups in the fixation landing position as a function of word length in single-fixation cases, while there was no such difference in the initial fixation of multi-fixation cases. We also found that both groups had longer incoming saccade amplitudes while the launch sites were closer to the word in single fixation cases than in multi-fixation cases. Our results suggest that dyslexic children's inefficient lexical processing, in combination with the absence of orthographic word boundaries in Chinese, leads them to select saccade targets at the beginning of words conservatively. These findings provide further evidence for parafoveal word segmentation during reading of Chinese sentences. PMID:24508073

  6. Selected attributes of polyphenols in targeting oxidative stress in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stepanic, Visnja; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Troselj, Koraljka Gall; Amic, Dragan; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-01-01

    Various plant polyphenols have been recognized as redox active molecules. This review discusses some aspects of polyphenols' modes of redox action, corresponding structure-activity relationships and their potential to be applied as adjuvants to conventional cytostatic drugs. Polyphenols' antioxidative capacity has been discussed as the basis for targeting oxidative stress and, consequently, for their chemopreventive and anti-inflammatory activities, which may alleviate side-effects on normal cells arising from oxidative stress caused by cytostatics. Some polyphenols may scavenge various free radicals directly, and some of them are found to suppress free radical production through inhibiting NADPH oxidases and xanthine oxidase. Additionally, polyphenols may increase antioxidative defense in normal cells by increasing the activity of NRF2, transcription factor for many protective proteins. The activation of the NRF2-mediated signaling pathways in cancer cells results in chemoresistance. Luteolin, apigenin and chrysin reduce NRF2 expression and increase the chemosensitivity of cancer cells to cytostatic drugs. Their common 5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one moiety, may represent a starting pharmacophore model for designing novel, non-toxic compounds for overcoming chemoresistance. However, prooxidative activity of some polyphenols (quercetin, EGCG) may also provide a basis for their use as chemotherapeutic adjuvants since they may enhance cytotoxic effects of cytostatics selectively on cancer cells. However, considerable caution is needed in applying polyphenols to anticancer therapy, since their effects greatly depend on the applied dose, the cell type, exposure time and environmental conditions. PMID:25665579

  7. Human hair follicle: reservoir function and selective targeting.

    PubMed

    Blume-Peytavi, U; Vogt, A

    2011-10-01

    Penetration of topically applied compounds may occur via the stratum corneum, skin appendages and hair follicles. The follicular infundibulum increases the surface area, disrupts the epidermal barrier towards the lower parts of the follicle, and serves as a reservoir. Topical delivery of active compounds to specific targets within the skin, especially to distinct hair follicle compartments or cell populations, may help to treat local inflammatory reactions selectively, with reduced systemic side-effects. Various in vitro and in vivo methods exist for studying the hair follicle structure and follicular penetration pathways. These include cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping, confocal microscopy and cyanoacrylate scalp follicle biopsy. The complex anatomical structure as well as the cyclical activity of the hair follicle must be taken into consideration when designing delivery systems. In addition, delivery into and retention inside the infundibular reservoir are controlled by, for example, molecule or particle size, their polarity and the type of preparation. Preferred penetration depth and storage time must also be considered. Particles with release mechanisms should be preferred; however, the release of drugs from nanoparticles still requires further investigations. PMID:21919898

  8. Saccade-target selection of dyslexic children when reading Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jinger; Yan, Ming; Laubrock, Jochen; Shu, Hua; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the eye movements of dyslexic children and their age-matched controls when reading Chinese. Dyslexic children exhibited more and longer fixations than age-matched control children, and an increase of word length resulted in a greater increase in the number of fixations and gaze durations for the dyslexic than for the control readers. The report focuses on the finding that there was a significant difference between the two groups in the fixation landing position as a function of word length in single-fixation cases, while there was no such difference in the initial fixation of multi-fixation cases. We also found that both groups had longer incoming saccade amplitudes while the launch sites were closer to the word in single fixation cases than in multi-fixation cases. Our results suggest that dyslexic children's inefficient lexical processing, in combination with the absence of orthographic word boundaries in Chinese, leads them to select saccade targets at the beginning of words conservatively. These findings provide further evidence for parafoveal word segmentation during reading of Chinese sentences. PMID:24508073

  9. The Nutrient-Responsive Transcription Factor TFE3, Promotes Autophagy, Lysosomal Biogenesis, and Clearance of Cellular Debris

    PubMed Central

    Martina, José A.; Diab, Heba I.; Lishu, Li; Jeong-A, Lim; Patange, Simona; Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a gene network regulating lysosomal biogenesis and its transcriptional regulator TFEB revealed that cells monitor lysosomal function and respond to degradation requirements and environmental cues. Here, we report the identification of transcription factor E3 (TFE3) as another regulator of lysosomal homeostasis that induced expression of genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis in ARPE-19 cells in response to starvation and lysosomal stress. We found that in nutrient-replete cells, TFE3 was recruited to lysosomes through interaction with active Rag GTPases and exhibited mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation. Phosphorylated TFE3 was retained in the cytosol through its interaction with the cytosolic chaperone 14-3-3. Following starvation, TFE3 rapidly translocated to the nucleus and bound to the CLEAR elements present in the promoter region of many lysosomal genes, thereby inducing lysosomal biogenesis. Depletion of endogenous TFE3 entirely abolished the response of ARPE-19 cells to starvation, suggesting that TFE3 plays a critical role in nutrient sensing and regulation of energy metabolism. Furthermore, overexpression of TFE3 triggered lysosomal exocytosis and resulted in efficient cellular clearance in a cellular model of a lysosomal storage disorder, Pompe disease, thus identifying TFE3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal disorders. PMID:24448649

  10. Lysosomes relax in the cellular suburbs.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Ferguson, Shawn M

    2016-03-14

    Lysosomes support cellular homeostasis by degrading macromolecules and recycling nutrients. In this issue, Johnson et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201507112) reveal a heterogeneity in lysosomal pH and degradative ability that correlates with lysosome subcellular localization, raising questions about the functional implications and mechanisms underlying these observations. PMID:26975848

  11. Lysosomal Cathepsin B: Correlation with Metastatic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloane, Bonnie F.; Dunn, John R.; Honn, Kenneth V.

    1981-06-01

    Although lysosomal enzymes are implicated in the processes of tumor invasion and metastasis, their cellular origin within the tumor is unclear. The activity of the lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B is significantly elevated in a variant of the B16 melanoma with high metastatic potential. The cathepsin B activity is localized to the lysosomes of the tumor cells.

  12. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD. PMID:26071627

  13. Input Control Processes in Rapid Serial Visual Presentations: Target Selection and Distractor Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivers, Christian N. L.; Watson, Derrick G.

    2006-01-01

    The attentional blink refers to the finding that the 2nd of 2 targets embedded in a stream of rapidly presented distractors is often missed. Whereas most theories of the attentional blink focus on limited-capacity processes that occur after target selection, the present work investigates the selection process itself. Identifying a target letter…

  14. How targets select activation or repression in response to Wnt

    PubMed Central

    Murgan, Sabrina; Bertrand, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In metazoans, the Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in the regulation of binary decisions during development. During this process different sets of target genes are activated in cells where the Wnt pathway is active (classic target genes) versus cells where the pathway is inactive (opposite target genes). While the mechanism of transcriptional activation is well understood for classic target genes, how opposite target genes are activated in the absence of Wnt remains poorly characterized. Here we discuss how the key transcriptional mediator of the Wnt pathway, the TCF family member POP-1, regulates opposite target genes during C. elegans development. We examine recent findings suggesting that the direction of the transcriptional output (activation or repression) can be determined by the way TCF is recruited and physically interacts with its target gene. PMID:27123368

  15. Autophagy negatively regulates cancer cell proliferation via selectively targeting VPRBP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Shi; Liu, Yi-Zhen; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Hao, Jia-Jie; Yang, Hai; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Zi-Qiang; Zhan, Qi-Min; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-02-01

    There have been multiple lines of evidence suggesting that autophagy selectively targets signalling proteins and regulates cancer cell signalling in addition to bulk clearance of long-lived proteins and organelles. Protein degradation through autophagy requires receptor protein LC3B to sequester the substrates into the autophagosome. In the present study, we screened LC3B (light-chain 3B)-binding partners and identified autophagic substrates in cancer cells. With lung cancer NCI-H1975 and oesophageal cancer KYSE30 cell lines as models, we found that VPRBP (viral protein R-binding protein) was a novel LC3B-binding protein through GST (glutathione transferase)-LC3B pull-down combined with LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-tandem MS) methods. Co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that VPRBP-LC3/p62 were in the same protein complex as the two cell lines. Induction of autophagy led to a down-regulation of VPRPB, which could be rescued by the inhibition of autophagy degradation by BFA1 (bafilomycin A1) and by the disruption of autophagy through ATG5-knockdown. We also found that induction of autophagy promotes VPRBP-LC3/p62 interaction. Immunohistochemical examination of human NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) tissues showed that VPRBP was positively correlated with p62 and negatively correlated with LC3B. Moreover, p62 and VPRBP were associated with poor prognosis in lung ADC (adenocarcinoma) (p62, P=0.019; VPRBP, P=0.005). Patients with low expression of both p62 and VPRBP showed the best prognosis. PMID:22963397

  16. Target product selection - where can Molecular Pharming make the difference?

    PubMed

    Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y H; Twyman, Richard M; Ma, Julian K-C

    2013-01-01

    Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant biotechnology approaches that appear to hold the greatest promise and in doing so attempt to define the product areas that are most likely to benefit from different Molecular Pharming technologies. PMID:23394563

  17. Fading characteristics of panchromatic radar backscatter from selected agricultural targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was performed to empirically determine the fading characteristics of backscattered radar signals from four agricultural targets at 9 GHz. After a short review of the statistics of Rayleigh fading backscatter, the data processing method and results of the data are analyzed. Comparison with theory shows adequate agreement with the experimental results, provided of course, the targets are modeled in a correct manner.

  18. Controlling nematodes in dairy calves using targeted selective treatments.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, J; Earley, B; Mee, J F; Doherty, M L; Crosson, P; Barrett, D; de Waal, T

    2015-04-30

    With increasing concerns of anthelmintic resistance in cattle nematode populations worldwide, there is a need to explore alternative approaches to nematode control. One alternative approach is the use of targeted selective treatments (TST) where only individual animals are treated instead of the entire group. This study reports the findings of a TST approach in dairy calves conducted over their first grazing season (FGS) to control both gastrointestinal nematode and lungworm challenge. Ninety-six calves with an initial mean (s.d.) age and live weight of 130 (28.3) days and 120 (23.6)kg, respectively, were randomised by breed, age and live weight to one of two treatments; Control (n=24; ×2) and TST (n=24; ×2). Control calves were treated three times at pasture with ivermectin by subcutaneous injection. Individual calves in the TST group were treated at pasture with ivermectin when one of the following thresholds was met: (1) positive for lungworm larvae using the modified Baermann technique or (2) positive or negative for lungworm larvae using the modified Baermann technique with plasma pepsinogen concentration (PP) ≥ two international units of tyrosine/litre and faecal egg count (FEC) ≥ 200 strongyle eggs per gram of faeces. Calves were rotationally grazed from July 3rd 2012 (day 0) to November 2nd 2012 (day 122) when calves were housed. Calves were weighed and sampled (blood and faecal) every three weeks. There was an effect of treatment and time on both FEC [treatment (P=0.023), time (P<0.001)] and PP [treatment (P=0.002), time (P<0.001)]. Both FEC and PP were higher in TST calves. There was a 50% reduction in anthelmintic use in TST calves compared to control calves. Clinical signs of lungworm infection, confirmed by the modified Baermann technique, were evident in TST calves on days 62 and 63 of the study. The average daily live weight gain for control and TST calves was 0.50 (0.02)kg day(-1) and 0.47 (0.03)kg day(-1), respectively (P=0.41). Thus, performance in dairy calves can potentially be maintained with fewer anthelmintic treatments but farmers need to be vigilant of the challenge posed by lungworm. Any future approach into the use of TST in FGS calves must take into consideration the relative importance of lungworm as a pathogen. PMID:25770853

  19. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Jäättelä, Marja

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 siRNAs was preceded by lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and all identified siRNAs induced several changes in the endo-lysosomal compartment, i.e. increased lysosomal volume (KIF11, KIF20A, KIF25, MYO1G, MYH1), increased cysteine cathepsin activity (KIF20A, KIF25), altered lysosomal localization (KIF25, MYH1, TPM2), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide or cisplatin. Similarly to KIF11 siRNA, the KIF11 inhibitor monastrol induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and sensitized several cancer cell lines to siramesine. While KIF11 inhibitors are under clinical development as mitotic blockers, our data reveal a new function for KIF11 in controlling lysosomal stability and introduce six other molecular motors as putative cancer drug targets. PMID:23071517

  20. Reprogramming of lysosomal gene expression by interleukin-4 and Stat6

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lysosomes play important roles in multiple aspects of physiology, but the problem of how the transcription of lysosomal genes is coordinated remains incompletely understood. The goal of this study was to illuminate the physiological contexts in which lysosomal genes are coordinately regulated and to identify transcription factors involved in this control. Results As transcription factors and their target genes are often co-regulated, we performed meta-analyses of array-based expression data to identify regulators whose mRNA profiles are highly correlated with those of a core set of lysosomal genes. Among the ~50 transcription factors that rank highest by this measure, 65% are involved in differentiation or development, and 22% have been implicated in interferon signaling. The most strongly correlated candidate was Stat6, a factor commonly activated by interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-13. Publicly available chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data from alternatively activated mouse macrophages show that lysosomal genes are overrepresented among Stat6-bound targets. Quantification of RNA from wild-type and Stat6-deficient cells indicates that Stat6 promotes the expression of over 100 lysosomal genes, including hydrolases, subunits of the vacuolar H+ ATPase and trafficking factors. While IL-4 inhibits and activates different sets of lysosomal genes, Stat6 mediates only the activating effects of IL-4, by promoting increased expression and by neutralizing undefined inhibitory signals induced by IL-4. Conclusions The current data establish Stat6 as a broadly acting regulator of lysosomal gene expression in mouse macrophages. Other regulators whose expression correlates with lysosomal genes suggest that lysosome function is frequently re-programmed during differentiation, development and interferon signaling. PMID:24314139

  1. Classification of Subcellular Location by Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Native and Density-shifted Lysosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Della Valle, Maria Cecilia; Sleat, David E.; Zheng, Haiyan; Moore, Dirk F.; Jadot, Michel; Lobel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    One approach to the functional characterization of the lysosome lies in the use of proteomic methods to identify proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for this organelle. However, distinguishing between true lysosomal residents and proteins from other cofractionating organelles is challenging. To this end, we implemented a quantitative mass spectrometry approach based on the selective decrease in the buoyant density of liver lysosomes that occurs when animals are treated with Triton-WR1339. Liver lysosome-enriched preparations from control and treated rats were fractionated by isopycnic sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Tryptic peptides derived from gradient fractions were reacted with isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation eight-plex labeling reagents and analyzed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS. Reporter ion intensities were used to generate relative protein distribution profiles across both types of gradients. A distribution index was calculated for each identified protein and used to determine a probability of lysosomal residence by quadratic discriminant analysis. This analysis suggests that several proteins assigned to the lysosome in other proteomics studies are not true lysosomal residents. Conversely, results support lysosomal residency for other proteins that are either not or only tentatively assigned to this location. The density shift for two proteins, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and ATP-binding cassette subfamily B (MDR/TAP) member 6, was corroborated by quantitative Western blotting. Additional balance sheet analyses on differential centrifugation fractions revealed that Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase is predominantly cytosolic with a secondary lysosomal localization whereas ATP-binding cassette subfamily B (MDR/TAP) member 6 is predominantly lysosomal. These results establish a quantitative mass spectrometric/subcellular fractionation approach for identification of lysosomal proteins and underscore the necessity of balance sheet analysis for localization studies. PMID:21252268

  2. Lysosomes and the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Norma W.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the cell invasion mechanism of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi led to a series of novel findings, which revealed a previously unsuspected ability of conventional lysosomes to fuse with the plasma membrane. This regulated exocytic process, previously regarded mostly as a specialization of certain cell types, was recently shown to play an important role in the mechanism by which cells reseal their plasma membrane after injury. PMID:12147679

  3. Lysosomal ATP imaging in living cells by a water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing-Huan; Geng, Zhi-Rong; Ma, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Zhi-Yang; Wang, Zhi-Lin

    2016-09-15

    Lysosomes in astrocytes and microglia can release ATP as the signaling molecule for the cells through ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli. At present, fluorescent probes that can detect ATP in lysosomes have not been reported. In this work, we have developed a new water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative that can be specifically localized in lysosomes and can be utilized as a fluorescent probe to sense ATP in cells. PEMTEI exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity to ATP at physiological pH values and the detection limit of ATP is as low as 10(-11)M. The probe has low cytotoxicity, good permeability and high photostability in living cells and has been applied successfully to real-time monitoring of the change in concentrations of ATP in lysosomes though fluorescence microscopy. We also demonstrated that lysosomes in Hela cells can release ATP through Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to drug stimuli. PMID:27131993

  4. Di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-Dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) Overcomes Multidrug Resistance by a Novel Mechanism Involving the Hijacking of Lysosomal P-Glycoprotein (Pgp)*

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Patric J.; Yamagishi, Tetsuo; Arvind, Akanksha; Seebacher, Nicole; Gutierrez, Elaine; Stacy, Alexandra; Maleki, Sanaz; Sharp, Danae; Sahni, Sumit; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle in cancer treatment. More than half of human cancers express multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein (Pgp), which correlates with a poor prognosis. Intriguingly, through an unknown mechanism, some drugs have greater activity in drug-resistant tumor cells than their drug-sensitive counterparts. Herein, we investigate how the novel anti-tumor agent di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) overcomes MDR. Four different cell types were utilized to evaluate the effect of Pgp-potentiated lysosomal targeting of drugs to overcome MDR. To assess the mechanism of how Dp44mT overcomes drug resistance, cellular studies utilized Pgp inhibitors, Pgp silencing, lysosomotropic agents, proliferation assays, immunoblotting, a Pgp-ATPase activity assay, radiolabeled drug uptake/efflux, a rhodamine 123 retention assay, lysosomal membrane permeability assessment, and DCF (2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin) redox studies. Anti-tumor activity and selectivity of Dp44mT in Pgp-expressing, MDR cells versus drug-sensitive cells were studied using a BALB/c nu/nu xenograft mouse model. We demonstrate that Dp44mT is transported by the lysosomal Pgp drug pump, causing lysosomal targeting of Dp44mT and resulting in enhanced cytotoxicity in MDR cells. Lysosomal Pgp and pH were shown to be crucial for increasing Dp44mT-mediated lysosomal damage and subsequent cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cells, with Dp44mT being demonstrated to be a Pgp substrate. Indeed, Pgp-dependent lysosomal damage and cytotoxicity of Dp44mT were abrogated by Pgp inhibitors, Pgp silencing, or increasing lysosomal pH using lysosomotropic bases. In vivo, Dp44mT potently targeted chemotherapy-resistant human Pgp-expressing xenografted tumors relative to non-Pgp-expressing tumors in mice. This study highlights a novel Pgp hijacking strategy of the unique dipyridylthiosemicarbazone series of thiosemicarbazones that overcome MDR via utilization of lysosomal Pgp transport activity. PMID:25720491

  5. Leaving the lysosome behind: novel developments in autophagy inhibition.

    PubMed

    Solitro, Abigail R; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    The search for a single silver bullet for the treatment of cancer has now been overshadowed by the identification of multiple therapeutic targets unique to each malignancy and even to each patient. In recent years, autophagy has emerged as one such therapeutic target. In response to both therapeutic and oncogenic stress, cancer cells upregulate and demonstrate an increased dependence upon this intracellular recycling process. Particularly in malignancies that currently lack targeted therapeutic options, autophagy inhibitors are the next hopeful prospects for the treatment of this disease. In this review, we discuss the rapid evolution of autophagy inhibitors from early lysosomotropic agents to next-generation lysosome-targeted drugs and beyond. PMID:26689099

  6. Genes Associated with SLE Are Targets of Recent Positive Selection

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Paula S.; Shaftman, Stephanie R.; Ward, Ralph C.; Langefeld, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons for the ethnic disparities in the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the relative high frequency of SLE risk alleles in the population are not fully understood. Population genetic factors such as natural selection alter allele frequencies over generations and may help explain the persistence of such common risk variants in the population and the differential risk of SLE. In order to better understand the genetic basis of SLE that might be due to natural selection, a total of 74 genomic regions with compelling evidence for association with SLE were tested for evidence of recent positive selection in the HapMap and HGDP populations, using population differentiation, allele frequency, and haplotype-based tests. Consistent signs of positive selection across different studies and statistical methods were observed at several SLE-associated loci, including PTPN22, TNFSF4, TET3-DGUOK, TNIP1, UHRF1BP1, BLK, and ITGAM genes. This study is the first to evaluate and report that several SLE-associated regions show signs of positive natural selection. These results provide corroborating evidence in support of recent positive selection as one mechanism underlying the elevated population frequency of SLE risk loci and supports future research that integrates signals of natural selection to help identify functional SLE risk alleles. PMID:24587899

  7. A determination of the steady state lysosomal pH of bloodstream stage African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    McCann, Amanda K; Schwartz, Kevin J; Bangs, James D

    2008-06-01

    The lysosomal/endosomal system of African trypanosomes is developmentally regulated and is important in the pathogenesis associated with infection of the mammalian bloodstream. Long considered to be a target for drug development, the internal pH of the lysosome has been variously reported to range from <5.0 to >6.0. We have refined a flow cytometric technique using a pH-sensitive probe that specifically targets the lysosome, tomato lectin:Oregon Green 488 conjugate. The probe is delivered to the lysosome with fidelity, where it is shielded against external pH. Measurement of fluorescent output in the presence and absence of lysomotropic agent (NH(4)Cl) then allows precise titration of steady state lysosomal pH (4.84+/-0.23). Using bafilomycin A1 to inhibit acidification we demonstrate that this method is responsive to pharmacological perturbation of lysosomal physiology. This work should facilitate future studies of the lysosomal function in African trypanosomiasis, as well as other parasitic protozoa. PMID:18359105

  8. Glucose Modulation Induces Lysosome Formation and Increases Lysosomotropic Drug Sequestration via the P-Glycoprotein Drug Transporter.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Nicole A; Lane, Darius J R; Jansson, Patric J; Richardson, Des R

    2016-02-19

    Pgp is functional on the plasma membrane and lysosomal membrane. Lysosomal-Pgp can pump substrates into the organelle, thereby trapping certain chemotherapeutics (e.g. doxorubicin; DOX). This mechanism serves as a "safe house" to protect cells against cytotoxic drugs. Interestingly, in contrast to DOX, lysosomal sequestration of the novel anti-tumor agent and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrate, di-2-pyridylketone-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization. This mechanism of lysosomal-Pgp utilization enhances cytotoxicity to multidrug-resistant cells. Consequently, Dp44mT has greater anti-tumor activity in drug-resistant relative to non-Pgp-expressing tumors. Interestingly, stressors in the tumor microenvironment trigger endocytosis for cell signaling to assist cell survival. Hence, this investigation examined how glucose variation-induced stress regulated early endosome and lysosome formation via endocytosis of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the impact of glucose variation-induced stress on resistance to DOX was compared with Dp44mT and its structurally related analogue, di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC). These studies showed that glucose variation-induced stress-stimulated formation of early endosomes and lysosomes. In fact, through the process of fluid-phase endocytosis, Pgp was redistributed from the plasma membrane to the lysosomal membrane via early endosome formation. This lysosomal-Pgp actively transported the Pgp substrate, DOX, into the lysosome where it became trapped as a result of protonation at pH 5. Due to increased lysosomal DOX trapping, Pgp-expressing cells became more resistant to DOX. In contrast, cytotoxicity of Dp44mT and DpC was potentiated due to more lysosomes containing functional Pgp under glucose-induced stress. These thiosemicarbazones increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. This mechanism has critical implications for drug-targeting in multidrug-resistant tumors where a stressful micro-environment exists. PMID:26601947

  9. Evaluating Gaze-Based Interface Tools to Facilitate Point-and-Select Tasks with Small Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. less than 12 x 12 pixels) point-and-select tasks. We conducted two…

  10. Evaluating Gaze-Based Interface Tools to Facilitate Point-and-Select Tasks with Small Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. less than 12 x 12 pixels) point-and-select tasks. We conducted two

  11. Dynamin Regulates Autophagy by Modulating Lysosomal Function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuefei; Zhou, Jia; Liu, Wei; Duan, Xiuying; Gala, Upasana; Sandoval, Hector; Jaiswal, Manish; Tong, Chao

    2016-02-20

    Autophagy is a central lysosomal degradation pathway required for maintaining cellular homeostasis and its dysfunction is associated with numerous human diseases. To identify players in autophagy, we tested ∼1200 chemically induced mutations on the X chromosome in Drosophila fat body clones and discovered that shibire (shi) plays an essential role in starvation-induced autophagy. shi encodes a dynamin protein required for fission of clathrin-coated vesicles from the plasma membrane during endocytosis. We showed that Shi is dispensable for autophagy initiation and autophagosome-lysosome fusion, but required for lysosomal/autolysosomal acidification. We also showed that other endocytic core machinery components like clathrin and AP2 play similar but not identical roles in regulating autophagy and lysosomal function as dynamin. Previous studies suggested that dynamin directly regulates autophagosome formation and autophagic lysosome reformation (ALR) through its excision activity. Here, we provide evidence that dynamin also regulates autophagy indirectly by regulating lysosomal function. PMID:26924690

  12. Tropism and corticospinal target selection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Joosten, E A; Gispen, W H; Bär, P R

    1994-03-01

    Layer V pyramidal cells in the intermediate part of the cerebral cortex enter the lumbar spinal gray, but not the cervical spinal gray matter, during the first postnatal week. To study if the ingrowth of intermediate corticospinal axons into the lumbar spinal gray is guided by a diffusible tropic factor, we co-cultured explants of the intermediate part of the sensorimotor cortex and of the lumbar spinal gray matter in 3-D collagen gels. Using this test system, a target specific directional growth of cortical axons towards the lumbar spinal gray explant can be demonstrated in vitro. Retrograde labeling indicates that most labeled cell bodies were located in layer V of the cortex explant and were characterized by a pyramidal cell shape. Furthermore, axon behavior of retrogradely labeled neurons within the cortical explant is considerably affected by the presence of lumbar spinal gray target tissue. In contrast to lumbar spinal gray innervation, intermediate corticospinal tract axons do not enter the cervical spinal gray in vivo. Is it the inability of intermediate corticospinal tract axons to respond to cervical target-derived influences? In the current study we co-cultured explants of the intermediate cortex and cervical spinal gray matter in 3-D collagen gels. Our data indicate that in vitro axons from layer V neurons in the intermediate part of the cortex are capable of recognizing and responding to a diffusible factor released by the cervical spinal cord target area.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8190270

  13. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  14. Toward improved selectivity of targeted delivery: the potential of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles, mostly iron oxide-based nanoparticles, have long been used as contrasting agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications, heat mediators in hyperthermia treatments and carriers for targeted drug delivery. Magnetic nanoparticles offer some attractive characteristics for targeted drug delivery such as drug carrying ability, nano-scale dimensions and magnetism-driven selective targeting. In this issue, Escribano et al. demonstrated that iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles with an implanted magnet can improve selective targeting to the site of inflammation. This result opens a promising avenue for magnetic drug targeting to inflammatory diseases. PMID:22297736

  15. Regional Personalized Electrodes to Select Transcranial Current Stimulation Target

    PubMed Central

    Tecchio, Franca; Cancelli, A.; Cottone, C.; Tomasevic, L.; Devigus, B.; Zito, G.; Ercolani, Matilde; Carducci, F.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Personalizing transcranial stimulations promises to enhance beneficial effects for individual patients. Objective: To stimulate specific cortical regions by developing a procedure to bend and position custom shaped electrodes; to probe the effects on cortical excitability produced when the properly customized electrode is targeting different cortical areas. Method: An ad hoc neuronavigation procedure was developed to accurately shape and place the personalized electrodes on the basis of individual brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) on bilateral primary motor (M1) and somatosensory (S1) cortices. The transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) protocol published by Feurra et al. (2011b) was used to test the effects on cortical excitability of the personalized electrode when targeting S1 or M1. Results: Neuronal excitability as evaluated by tACS was different when targeting M1 or S1, with the General Estimating Equation model indicating a clear tCS Effect (p < 0.001), and post hoc comparisons showing solely M1 20 Hz tACS to reduce M1 excitability with respect to baseline and other tACS conditions. Conclusions: The present work indicates that specific cortical regions can be targeted by tCS properly shaping and positioning the stimulating electrode. Significance: Through multimodal brain investigations continuous efforts in understanding the neuronal changes related to specific neurological or psychiatric diseases become more relevant as our ability to build the compensating interventions improves. An important step forward on this path is the ability to target the specific cortical area of interest, as shown in the present pilot work. PMID:23626529

  16. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Pespeni, Melissa H; Garfield, David A; Manier, Mollie K; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2012-04-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species' wide latitudinal range. We examined 9112 polymorphic loci from upstream non-coding and coding regions of genes for signatures of selection with respect to gene function and tissue- and ontogenetic gene expression. We found that genetic differentiation (F(ST)) varied significantly across functional gene classes. The strongest enrichment occurred in the upstream regions of E3 ligase genes, enzymes known to regulate protein abundance during development and environmental stress. We found enrichment for high heterozygosity in genes directly involved in immune response, particularly NALP genes, which mediate pro-inflammatory signals during bacterial infection. We also found higher heterozygosity in immune genes in the southern population, where disease incidence and pathogen diversity are greater. Similar to the major histocompatibility complex in mammals, balancing selection may enhance genetic diversity in the innate immune system genes of this invertebrate. Overall, our results show that how genome-wide polymorphism data coupled with growing databases on gene function and expression can combine to detect otherwise hidden signals of selection in natural populations. PMID:21993504

  17. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Pespeni, Melissa H.; Garfield, David A.; Manier, Mollie K.; Palumbi, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species' wide latitudinal range. We examined 9112 polymorphic loci from upstream non-coding and coding regions of genes for signatures of selection with respect to gene function and tissue- and ontogenetic gene expression. We found that genetic differentiation (FST) varied significantly across functional gene classes. The strongest enrichment occurred in the upstream regions of E3 ligase genes, enzymes known to regulate protein abundance during development and environmental stress. We found enrichment for high heterozygosity in genes directly involved in immune response, particularly NALP genes, which mediate pro-inflammatory signals during bacterial infection. We also found higher heterozygosity in immune genes in the southern population, where disease incidence and pathogen diversity are greater. Similar to the major histocompatibility complex in mammals, balancing selection may enhance genetic diversity in the innate immune system genes of this invertebrate. Overall, our results show that how genome-wide polymorphism data coupled with growing databases on gene function and expression can combine to detect otherwise hidden signals of selection in natural populations. PMID:21993504

  18. Thiadiazole Carbamates: Potent Inhibitors of Lysosomal Acid Lipase and Potential Niemann-Pick Type C Disease Therapeuticsa

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Anton I.; Cosner, Casey C.; Mariani, Christopher J.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wiest, Olaf; Helquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized at the cellular level by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids in lysosomal storage organelles. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) has been recently identified as a potential therapeutic target for NPC. LAL can be specifically inhibited by a variety of 3,4-disubstituted thiadiazole carbamates. An efficient synthesis of the C(3) oxygenated/C(4) aminated analogues has been developed that furnishes the products in high yields and high degrees of purity. Common intermediates can also be used for the synthesis of the C(3) carbon substituted derivatives. Herein we tested various thiadiazole carbamates, amides, esters, and ketones for inhibition of LAL. In addition, we tested a diverse selection of commercially available non-thiadiazole carbamates. Our studies show that, among the compounds examined herein, only thiadiazole carbamates are effective inhibitors of LAL. We present a mechanism for LAL inhibition by these compounds whereby LAL transiently carbamoylates the enzyme similarly to previously described inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by rivastigmine and other carbamates as well as acylation of various lipases by orlistat. PMID:20557099

  19. From rare to common and back again: 60years of lysosomal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Maria Francisca; Alves, Sandra

    2016-02-01

    Sixty years after its discovery, the lysosome is no longer considered as cell's waste bin but as an organelle playing a central role in cell metabolism. Besides its well known association with lysosomal storage disorders (mostly rare and life-threatening diseases), recent data have shown that the lysosome is also a player in some of the most common conditions of our time; and, perhaps even most important, it is not only a target for orphan drugs (rare disease therapeutic approaches) but also a putative target to treat patients suffering from common complex diseases worldwide. Here we review the striking associations linking rare lysosomal storage disorders such as the well-known Gaucher disease, or even the recently discovered, extremely rare Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis-11 and some of the most frequent, multifaceted and complex disorders of modern society such as cancer, Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PMID:26422115

  20. A cation counterflux supports lysosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Huynh, Kassidy K.; Brodovitch, Alexandre; Jabs, Sabrina; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The profound luminal acidification essential for the degradative function of lysosomes requires a counter-ion flux to dissipate an opposing voltage that would prohibit proton accumulation. It has generally been assumed that a parallel anion influx is the main or only counter-ion transport that enables acidification. Indeed, defective anion conductance has been suggested as the mechanism underlying attenuated lysosome acidification in cells deficient in CFTR or ClC-7. To assess the individual contribution of counter-ions to acidification, we devised means of reversibly and separately permeabilizing the plasma and lysosomal membranes to dialyze the cytosol and lysosome lumen in intact cells, while ratiometrically monitoring lysosomal pH. Replacement of cytosolic Cl− with impermeant anions did not significantly alter proton pumping, while the presence of permeant cations in the lysosomal lumen supported acidification. Accordingly, the lysosomes were found to acidify to the same pH in both CFTR- and ClC-7–deficient cells. We conclude that cations, in addition to chloride, can support lysosomal acidification and defects in lysosomal anion conductance cannot explain the impaired microbicidal capacity of CF phagocytes. PMID:20566682

  1. The safety of ONRAB® in select non-target wildlife.

    PubMed

    Fry, Tricia L; Vandalen, Kaci K; Duncan, Colleen; Vercauteren, Kurt

    2013-08-20

    ONRAB(®) is a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5) with the rabies glycoprotein gene incorporated into its genome. ONRAB(®) has been used in Canada as an oral rabies vaccine in target wildlife species such as: red fox (Vulpes vulpes), raccoon (Procyon lotor), and striped skunk (Mepthis mephitis). We evaluated the safety of ONRAB(®) in non-target wildlife species likely to contact the vaccine baits during oral rabies vaccine campaigns in the United States. We investigated the effects of oral inoculation of high titer ONRAB(®), approximately ten times the dose given to target species, in wood rats (Neotoma spp.), eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana), eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestri), and fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on fecal swabs, oral swabs, and tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, large intestine, and when appropriate nasal turbinates, to detect ONRAB(®) DNA from inoculated animals. By seven days post-inoculation, turkeys, opossums, and cottontails had all stopped shedding ONRAB(®) DNA. One wood rat and one fox squirrel still had detectable levels of ONRAB(®) DNA in fecal swabs 14 days post-inoculation. Real-time PCR analysis of the tissues revealed some ONRAB(®) DNA persisting in certain tissues; however, there were no significant gross or histologic lesions associated with ONRAB(®) in any of the species studied. Our results suggest that many non-target species are not likely to be impacted by the distribution of ONRAB(®) as part of oral rabies vaccination programs in the United States. PMID:23831321

  2. Selective imaging of adherent targeted ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Kruse, D. E.; Ferrara, K. W.; Dayton, P. A.

    2007-04-01

    The goal of ultrasonic molecular imaging is the detection of targeted contrast agents bound to receptors on endothelial cells. We propose imaging methods that can distinguish adherent microbubbles from tissue and from freely circulating microbubbles, each of which would otherwise obscure signal from molecularly targeted adherent agents. The methods are based on a harmonic signal model of the returned echoes over a train of pulses. The first method utilizes an 'image-push-image' pulse sequence where adhesion of contrast agents is rapidly promoted by acoustic radiation force and the presence of adherent agents is detected by the signal change due to targeted microbubble adhesion. The second method rejects tissue echoes using a spectral high-pass filter. Free agent signal is suppressed by a pulse-to-pulse low-pass filter in both methods. An overlay of the adherent and/or flowing contrast agents on B-mode images can be readily created for anatomical reference. Contrast-to-tissue ratios from adherent microbubbles exceeding 30 dB and 20 dB were achieved for the two methods proposed, respectively. The performance of these algorithms is compared, emphasizing the significance and potential applications in ultrasonic molecular imaging.

  3. Target selection by natural and redesigned PUF proteins.

    PubMed

    Porter, Douglas F; Koh, Yvonne Y; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) proteins bind RNA with sequence specificity and modularity, and have become exemplary scaffolds in the reengineering of new RNA specificities. Here, we report the in vivo RNA binding sites of wild-type (WT) and reengineered forms of the PUF protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf2p across the transcriptome. Puf2p defines an ancient protein family present throughout fungi, with divergent and distinctive PUF RNA binding domains, RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs), and prion regions. We identify sites in RNA bound to Puf2p in vivo by using two forms of UV cross-linking followed by immunopurification. The protein specifically binds more than 1,000 mRNAs, which contain multiple iterations of UAAU-binding elements. Regions outside the PUF domain, including the RRM, enhance discrimination among targets. Compensatory mutants reveal that one Puf2p molecule binds one UAAU sequence, and align the protein with the RNA site. Based on this architecture, we redesign Puf2p to bind UAAG and identify the targets of this reengineered PUF in vivo. The mutant protein finds its target site in 1,800 RNAs and yields a novel RNA network with a dramatic redistribution of binding elements. The mutant protein exhibits even greater RNA specificity than wild type. The redesigned protein decreases the abundance of RNAs in its redesigned network. These results suggest that reengineering using the PUF scaffold redirects and can even enhance specificity in vivo. PMID:26668354

  4. Target track extraction in high false density environments using multiple hypothetical frame selection MLPDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Kameda, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Toru

    2013-09-01

    MLPDA (Maximum Likelihood Probabilistic Data Association) has drawn attention as an effective target track extraction algorithm in high false density environments. In this algorithm, the target track is estimated as the maximum likelihood state vector, by using multiple observation frames that include the target signal and many false signals. The track is confirmed whether it is the true target or not, by comparing its likelihood with a given track confirmation threshold. However, when the target signals are lost at several frames, the conventional MLPDA deteriorates the track estimation accuracy due to false signals in frames without the target signal. In this paper, we propose multiple hypothetical frame selection MLPDA, which can extract the target track under the situation where the target signals are lost in several frames. Specifically, a batch of stored frames is first selected for track extraction. If the track is not confirmed, our algorithm offers multiple frame selection hypotheses where some frames are assumed to be the frames without the target signal and the other frames include the target signal. The track is extracted under these hypotheses, respectively, and the most likely hypothesis is accepted. If all hypotheses are rejected, our proposed method generates hypotheses that increase the number of frames without the target signal, and verifies them again. Furthermore, the hypotheses that have likelihoods above a given threshold are retained in order to modify the wrong frame selection later. Simulation results show the validity of our proposed method.

  5. Apolipoprotein L-I Promotes Trypanosome Lysis by Forming Pores in Lysosomal Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Morga, David; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Paturiaux-Hanocq, Françoise; Nolan, Derek P.; Lins, Laurence; Homblé, Fabrice; Vanhamme, Luc; Tebabi, Patricia; Pays, Annette; Poelvoorde, Philippe; Jacquet, Alain; Brasseur, Robert; Pays, Etienne

    2005-07-01

    Apolipoprotein L-I is the trypanolytic factor of human serum. Here we show that this protein contains a membrane pore-forming domain functionally similar to that of bacterial colicins, flanked by a membrane-addressing domain. In lipid bilayer membranes, apolipoprotein L-I formed anion channels. In Trypanosoma brucei, apolipoprotein L-I was targeted to the lysosomal membrane and triggered depolarization of this membrane, continuous influx of chloride, and subsequent osmotic swelling of the lysosome until the trypanosome lysed.

  6. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy. PMID:26794434

  7. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy. PMID:26794434

  8. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy.

  9. Signal Transduction and Molecular Targets of Selected Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diet exerts a major influence on the risk for developing cancer and heart disease. Food factors such as flavonoids are alleged to protect cells from premature aging and disease by shielding DNA, proteins, and lipids from oxidative damage. Recent Advances: Our work has focused on clarifying the effects of dietary components on cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth, discovering mechanisms to explain the effects, and identifying the specific molecular targets of these compounds. Our strategy for identifying specific molecular targets of phytochemicals involves the use of supercomputer technology combined with protein crystallography, molecular biology, and experimental laboratory verification. Critical Issues: One of the greatest challenges for scientists is to reduce the accumulation of distortion and half truths reported in the popular media regarding the health benefits of certain foods or food supplements. The use of these is not new, but interest has increased dramatically because of perceived health benefits that are presumably acquired without unpleasant side effects. Flavonoids are touted to exert many beneficial effects in vitro. However, whether they can produce these effects in vivo is disputed. Future Directions: The World Health Organization indicates that one third of all cancer deaths are preventable and that diet is closely linked to prevention. Based on this idea and epidemiological findings, attention has centered on dietary phytochemicals as an effective intervention in cancer development. However, an unequivocal link between diet and cancer has not been established. Thus, identifying cancer preventive dietary agents with specific molecular targets is essential to move forward toward successful cancer prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 163–180. PMID:23458437

  10. Leveraging big data to transform target selection and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Butte, A J

    2016-03-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  11. Leveraging Big Data to Transform Target Selection and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  12. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  13. Computational selection of antibody-drug conjugate targets for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, François; Hill, Jennifer J; Jaramillo, Maria L; Pan, Youlian; Phan, Sieu; Famili, Fazel; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2016-01-19

    The selection of therapeutic targets is a critical aspect of antibody-drug conjugate research and development. In this study, we applied computational methods to select candidate targets overexpressed in three major breast cancer subtypes as compared with a range of vital organs and tissues. Microarray data corresponding to over 8,000 tissue samples were collected from the public domain. Breast cancer samples were classified into molecular subtypes using an iterative ensemble approach combining six classification algorithms and three feature selection techniques, including a novel kernel density-based method. This feature selection method was used in conjunction with differential expression and subcellular localization information to assemble a primary list of targets. A total of 50 cell membrane targets were identified, including one target for which an antibody-drug conjugate is in clinical use, and six targets for which antibody-drug conjugates are in clinical trials for the treatment of breast cancer and other solid tumors. In addition, 50 extracellular proteins were identified as potential targets for non-internalizing strategies and alternative modalities. Candidate targets linked with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were identified by analyzing differential gene expression in epithelial and mesenchymal tumor-derived cell lines. Overall, these results show that mining human gene expression data has the power to select and prioritize breast cancer antibody-drug conjugate targets, and the potential to lead to new and more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:26700623

  14. Computational selection of antibody-drug conjugate targets for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fauteux, François; Hill, Jennifer J.; Jaramillo, Maria L.; Pan, Youlian; Phan, Sieu; Famili, Fazel; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    The selection of therapeutic targets is a critical aspect of antibody-drug conjugate research and development. In this study, we applied computational methods to select candidate targets overexpressed in three major breast cancer subtypes as compared with a range of vital organs and tissues. Microarray data corresponding to over 8,000 tissue samples were collected from the public domain. Breast cancer samples were classified into molecular subtypes using an iterative ensemble approach combining six classification algorithms and three feature selection techniques, including a novel kernel density-based method. This feature selection method was used in conjunction with differential expression and subcellular localization information to assemble a primary list of targets. A total of 50 cell membrane targets were identified, including one target for which an antibody-drug conjugate is in clinical use, and six targets for which antibody-drug conjugates are in clinical trials for the treatment of breast cancer and other solid tumors. In addition, 50 extracellular proteins were identified as potential targets for non-internalizing strategies and alternative modalities. Candidate targets linked with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were identified by analyzing differential gene expression in epithelial and mesenchymal tumor-derived cell lines. Overall, these results show that mining human gene expression data has the power to select and prioritize breast cancer antibody-drug conjugate targets, and the potential to lead to new and more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:26700623

  15. Lysosomes in iron metabolism, ageing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Tino; Terman, Alexei; Gustafsson, Bertil; Brunk, Ulf T

    2008-04-01

    The lysosomal compartment is essential for a variety of cellular functions, including the normal turnover of most long-lived proteins and all organelles. The compartment consists of numerous acidic vesicles (pH approximately 4 to 5) that constantly fuse and divide. It receives a large number of hydrolases ( approximately 50) from the trans-Golgi network, and substrates from both the cells' outside (heterophagy) and inside (autophagy). Many macromolecules contain iron that gives rise to an iron-rich environment in lysosomes that recently have degraded such macromolecules. Iron-rich lysosomes are sensitive to oxidative stress, while 'resting' lysosomes, which have not recently participated in autophagic events, are not. The magnitude of oxidative stress determines the degree of lysosomal destabilization and, consequently, whether arrested growth, reparative autophagy, apoptosis, or necrosis will follow. Heterophagy is the first step in the process by which immunocompetent cells modify antigens and produce antibodies, while exocytosis of lysosomal enzymes may promote tumor invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Apart from being an essential turnover process, autophagy is also a mechanism by which cells will be able to sustain temporary starvation and rid themselves of intracellular organisms that have invaded, although some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to prevent their destruction. Mutated lysosomal enzymes are the underlying cause of a number of lysosomal storage diseases involving the accumulation of materials that would be the substrate for the corresponding hydrolases, were they not defective. The normal, low-level diffusion of hydrogen peroxide into iron-rich lysosomes causes the slow formation of lipofuscin in long-lived postmitotic cells, where it occupies a substantial part of the lysosomal compartment at the end of the life span. This seems to result in the diversion of newly produced lysosomal enzymes away from autophagosomes, leading to the accumulation of malfunctioning mitochondria and proteins with consequent cellular dysfunction. If autophagy were a perfect turnover process, postmitotic ageing and several age-related neurodegenerative diseases would, perhaps, not take place. PMID:18259769

  16. Automated selection of aptamers against protein targets translated in vitro: from gene to aptamer.

    PubMed

    Cox, J Colin; Hayhurst, Andrew; Hesselberth, Jay; Bayer, Travis S; Georgiou, George; Ellington, Andrew D

    2002-10-15

    Reagents for proteome research must of necessity be generated by high throughput methods. Aptamers are potentially useful as reagents to identify and quantitate individual proteins, yet are currently produced for the most part by manual selection procedures. We have developed automated selection methods, but must still individually purify protein targets. Therefore, we have attempted to select aptamers against protein targets generated by in vitro transcription and translation of individual genes. In order to specifically immobilize the protein targets for selection, they are also biotinylated in vitro. As a proof of this method, we have selected aptamers against translated human U1A, a component of the nuclear spliceosome. Selected sequences demonstrated exquisite mimicry of natural binding sequences and structures. These results not only reveal a potential path to the high throughput generation of aptamers, but also yield insights into the incredible specificity of the U1A protein for its natural RNA ligands. PMID:12384610

  17. Automated selection of aptamers against protein targets translated in vitro: from gene to aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Cox, J. Colin; Hayhurst, Andrew; Hesselberth, Jay; Bayer, Travis S.; Georgiou, George; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2002-01-01

    Reagents for proteome research must of necessity be generated by high throughput methods. Apta mers are potentially useful as reagents to identify and quantitate individual proteins, yet are currently produced for the most part by manual selection procedures. We have developed automated selection methods, but must still individually purify protein targets. Therefore, we have attempted to select aptamers against protein targets generated by in vitro transcription and translation of individual genes. In order to specifically immobilize the protein targets for selection, they are also biotinylated in vitro. As a proof of this method, we have selected aptamers against translated human U1A, a component of the nuclear spliceosome. Selected sequences demonstrated exquisite mimicry of natural binding sequences and structures. These results not only reveal a potential path to the high throughput generation of aptamers, but also yield insights into the incredible specificity of the U1A protein for its natural RNA ligands. PMID:12384610

  18. A molecular mechanism to regulate lysosome motility for lysosome positioning and tubulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-04-01

    To mediate the degradation of biomacromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 cause lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca(2+)-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region (where autophagosomes accumulate) following autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca(2+) sensor that associates physically with the minus-end-directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PtdIns(3,5)P2, a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PtdIns(3,5)P2-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signalling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely to be caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes thus provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning and tubulation. PMID:26950892

  19. Disulfiram-induced cytotoxicity and endo-lysosomal sequestration of zinc in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Helen L.; Wymant, Jennifer M.; Solfa, Francesca; Hiscox, Stephen E.; Taylor, Kathryn M.; Westwell, Andrew D.; Jones, Arwyn T.

    2015-01-01

    Disulfiram, a clinically used alcohol-deterrent has gained prominence as a potential anti-cancer agent due to its impact on copper-dependent processes. Few studies have investigated zinc effects on disulfiram action, despite it having high affinity for this metal. Here we studied the cytotoxic effects of disulfiram in breast cancer cells, and its relationship with both intra and extracellular zinc. MCF-7 and BT474 cancer cell lines gave a striking time-dependent biphasic cytotoxic response between 0.01 and 10 μM disulfiram. Co-incubation of disulfiram with low-level zinc removed this effect, suggesting that availability of extracellular zinc significantly influences disulfiram efficacy. Live-cell confocal microscopy using fluorescent endocytic probes and the zinc dye Fluozin-3 revealed that disulfiram selectively and rapidly increased zinc levels in endo-lysosomes. Disulfiram also caused spatial disorganization of late endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting they are novel targets for this drug. This relationship between disulfiram toxicity and ionophore activity was consolidated via synthesis of a new disulfiram analog and overall we demonstrate a novel mechanism of disulfiram-cytotoxicity with significant clinical implications for future use as a cancer therapeutic. PMID:25557293

  20. Rapid screening of endonuclease target site preference using a modified bacterial two-plasmid selection.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Jason M; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Edgell, David R

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonucleases and other site-specific endonucleases have potential applications in genome editing, yet efficient targeting requires a thorough understanding of DNA-sequence specificity. Here, we describe a modified two-plasmid genetic selection in Escherichia coli that allows rapid profiling of nucleotide substitutions within a target site of given endonucleases. The selection utilizes a toxic plasmid (pTox) that encodes a DNA gyrase toxin in addition to the endonuclease target site. Cleavage of the toxic plasmid by an endonuclease expressed from a second plasmid (pEndo) facilitates growth under selective conditions. The modified protocol utilizes competent cells harboring the endonuclease expression plasmid into which target site plasmids are transformed. Replica plating on nonselective and selective media plates identifies cleavable and non-cleavable targets. Thus, a library of randomized target sites, or many individual target sites, can be analyzed using a single transformation. Both cleavable and non-cleavable targets can be analyzed by DNA sequencing to gain information about nucleotide preference in the endonuclease's target site. PMID:24510263

  1. Ceramide channel: Structural basis for selective membrane targeting.

    PubMed

    Perera, Meenu N; Ganesan, Vidyaramanan; Siskind, Leah J; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Bielawska, Alicja; Bittman, Robert; Colombini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A ceramide commonly found in mammalian cells, C16-ceramide (N-palmitoyl-d-erythro-sphingosine), is capable of forming large, protein-permeable channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). However, C16-ceramide is unable to permeabilize the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. This specificity is unexpected considering that ceramide forms channels in simple phosphoglycerolipid membranes. Synthetic analogs of C16-ceramide with targeted changes at each of the functional regions of the molecule including methylation, altered hydrocarbon chain length, and changes in the stereochemistry, were tested to probe the role of ceramide's molecular features on its ability to form channels in these two different membrane types. The ability to permeabilize the MOM was relatively insensitive to modifications of the various functional groups of ceramide whereas the same modifications resulted in plasma membrane permeabilization (a gain of function rather than a loss of function). Some analogs (ceramine, NBD-labeled ceramide, C18,1 ceramide) gained another function, the ability to inhibit cytochrome oxidase. The gain of deleterious functions indicates that constraints on the structure of ceramide that is formed by the cell's synthetic machinery includes the avoidance of deleterious interactions. We propose that the specific structure of ceramide limits the size of its interactome (both proteins and lipids) thus reducing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. PMID:26408265

  2. Podocytes degrade endocytosed albumin primarily in lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Carson, John M; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and glomerulosclerosis in albuminuric diseases. Modifiers of lysosomal activity may have therapeutic potential in slowing the progression of glomerulosclerosis by enhancing the ability of podocytes to process and degrade albumin. PMID:24924335

  3. Podocytes Degrade Endocytosed Albumin Primarily in Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Carson, John M.; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and glomerulosclerosis in albuminuric diseases. Modifiers of lysosomal activity may have therapeutic potential in slowing the progression of glomerulosclerosis by enhancing the ability of podocytes to process and degrade albumin. PMID:24924335

  4. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rastall, David PW; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme’s substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood–brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field. PMID:26170711

  5. Chemical tools selectively target components of the PKA system

    PubMed Central

    Bertinetti, Daniela; Schweinsberg, Sonja; Hanke, Susanne E; Schwede, Frank; Bertinetti, Oliver; Drewianka, Stephan; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2009-01-01

    Background In the eukaryotic cell the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is a key enzyme in signal transduction and represents the main target of the second messenger cAMP. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterisation of specifically tailored cAMP analogs which can be utilised as a tool for affinity enrichment and purification as well as for proteomics based analyses of cAMP binding proteins. Results Two sets of chemical binders were developed based on the phosphorothioate derivatives of cAMP, Sp-cAMPS and Rp-cAMPS acting as cAMP-agonists and -antagonists, respectively. These compounds were tested via direct surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses for their binding properties to PKA R-subunits and holoenzyme. Furthermore, these analogs were used in an affinity purification approach to analyse their binding and elution properties for the enrichment and improvement of cAMP binding proteins exemplified by the PKA R-subunits. As determined by SPR, all tested Sp-analogs provide valuable tools for affinity chromatography. However, Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS displayed (i) superior enrichment properties while maintaining low unspecific binding to other proteins in crude cell lysates, (ii) allowing mild elution conditions and (iii) providing the capability to efficiently purify all four isoforms of active PKA R-subunit in milligram quantities within 8 h. In a chemical proteomics approach both sets of binders, Rp- and Sp-cAMPS derivatives, can be employed. Whereas Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS preferentially binds free R-subunit, Rp-AHDAA-cAMPS, displaying antagonist properties, not only binds to the free PKA R-subunits but also to the intact PKA holoenzyme both from recombinant and endogenous sources. Conclusion In summary, all tested cAMP analogs were useful for their respective application as an affinity reagent which can enhance purification of cAMP binding proteins. Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS was considered the most efficient analog since Sp-8-AHA-cAMPS and Sp-2-AHA-cAMPS, demonstrated incomplete elution from the matrix, as well as retaining notable amounts of bound protein contaminants. Furthermore it could be demonstrated that an affinity resin based on Rp-8-AHDAA-cAMPS provides a valuable tool for chemical proteomics approaches. PMID:19216744

  6. Evolutionary dynamics and population control during in vitro selection and amplification with multiple targets.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hua; Fan, Xiaochun; Ni, Zhuoyu; Lis, John T

    2002-01-01

    Iterative cycles of in vitro selection and amplification allow rare functional nucleic acid molecules, aptamers, to be isolated from large sequence pools. Here we present an analysis of the progression of a selection experiment that simultaneously yielded two families of RNA aptamers against two disparate targets: the intended target protein (B52/SRp55) and the partitioning matrix. We tracked the sequence abundance and binding activity to reveal the enrichment of the aptamers through successive generations of selected pools. The two aptamer families showed distinct trajectories of evolution, as did members within a single family. We also developed a method to control the relative abundance of an aptamer family in selected pools. This method, involving specific ribonuclease digestion, can be used to reduce the background selection for aptamers that bind the matrix. Additionally, it can be used to isolate a full spectrum of aptamers in a sequential and exhaustive manner for all the different targets in a mixture. PMID:12458799

  7. Auditory Stream Segregation Improves Infants' Selective Attention to Target Tones Amid Distracters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nicholas A.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of auditory stream segregation in the selective attention to target tones in infancy. Using a task adapted from Bregman and Rudnicky's 1975 study and implemented in a conditioned head-turn procedure, infant and adult listeners had to discriminate the temporal order of 2,200 and 2,400 Hz target tones presented alone,…

  8. Joint Skewness and Its Application in Unsupervised Band Selection for Small Target Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiurui; Sun, Kang; Ji, Luyan; Tang, Hairong; Zhao, Yongchao

    2015-04-01

    Few band selection methods are specially designed for small target detection. It is well known that the information of small targets is most likely contained in non-Gaussian bands, where small targets are more easily separated from the background. On the other hand, correlation of band set also plays an important role in the small target detection. When the selected bands are highly correlated, it will be unbeneficial for the subsequent detection. However, the existing non-Gaussianity-based band selection methods have not taken the correlation of bands into account, which generally result in high correlation of obtained bands. In this paper, combining the third-order (third-order tensor) and second-order (correlation) statistics of bands, we define a new concept, named joint skewness, for multivariate data. Moreover, we also propose an easy-to-implement approach to estimate this index based on high-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD). Based on the definition of joint skewness, we present an unsupervised band selection for small target detection for hyperspectral data, named joint skewness band selection (JSBS). The evaluation results demonstrate that the bands selected by JSBS are very effective in terms of small target detection.

  9. Joint Skewness and Its Application in Unsupervised Band Selection for Small Target Detection

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiurui; Sun, Kang; Ji, Luyan; Tang, Hairong; Zhao, Yongchao

    2015-01-01

    Few band selection methods are specially designed for small target detection. It is well known that the information of small targets is most likely contained in non-Gaussian bands, where small targets are more easily separated from the background. On the other hand, correlation of band set also plays an important role in the small target detection. When the selected bands are highly correlated, it will be unbeneficial for the subsequent detection. However, the existing non-Gaussianity-based band selection methods have not taken the correlation of bands into account, which generally result in high correlation of obtained bands. In this paper, combining the third-order (third-order tensor) and second-order (correlation) statistics of bands, we define a new concept, named joint skewness, for multivariate data. Moreover, we also propose an easy-to-implement approach to estimate this index based on high-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD). Based on the definition of joint skewness, we present an unsupervised band selection for small target detection for hyperspectral data, named joint skewness band selection (JSBS). The evaluation results demonstrate that the bands selected by JSBS are very effective in terms of small target detection. PMID:25873018

  10. Internalizing antibodies and targeted cancer therapy: direct selection from phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Nielsen; Marks

    2000-08-01

    Antibody internalization is required for the success of many targeted therapeutics, such as immunotoxins, immunoliposomes, antibody-drug conjugates and for the targeted delivery of genes or viral DNA into cells. Recently, it has become possible to directly select antibody fragments from phage display libraries for internalization into mammalian cells. Here we review the therapeutic applications of internalized antibodies and describe how phage display enables the isolation of internalizing antibodies to novel or known targets. PMID:10916148

  11. SELECTION FOR ORCHARDGRASS SEED YIELD IN TARGET VS. NON-TARGET INVIRONMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simultaneous improvement of forage traits and seed yield in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) has been problematic because of geographic separation of forage and seed production locations. Previous work has shown that a complex multi-location selection program in forage production environments c...

  12. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(8): 438-444] PMID:25999178

  13. Non-targeted evaluation of selectivity of water-compatible class selective adsorbents for the analysis of steroids in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kopperi, Matias; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2016-05-12

    Selective adsorbents for solid-phase extraction are needed to meet the low concentration requirements of new environmental quality standard directives, especially for the analysis of estrogens in wastewater. In this work, bulk polymerization procedures were first optimized for the synthesis of non-imprinted polymers (NIP) with low non-specific adsorption of nonpolar compounds in aqueous environments. Water-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) were then synthetized by increasing the selectivity of the polymer towards steroids with a testosterone template (average imprinting factor > 10). In addition, the affinity of synthetized entrapped β-cyclodextrin-epichlorohydrin polymers (ECD) towards steroids was clarified. The polymers were applied to the extraction of spiked wastewater effluent samples and their performance compared to commercially available adsorbents. The selectivity of the studied adsorbents was evaluated utilizing liquid chromatography ‒ mass spectrometry as well as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography ‒ time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Affinity between adsorbents and steroids as well as matrix removal potential were measured with targeted methodologies, and two novel non-targeted methodologies were proposed to quantitatively measure adsorbent selectivity by utilizing chemometrics. Semi-quantitative selectivity was measured from the ratio of peak areas between steroidal and other compounds. Semi-qualitative selectivity was calculated from the ratio between the number of tentatively identified steroidal and other compounds. The synthetized polymers provided good matrix removal potential (ion suppression 15-30%) and semi-qualitative selectivity (∼4 units) compared to the commercial adsorbents (ion suppression 45-80%, selectivity < 3 units). Simple non-targeted approaches provided a novel method of quantifying the selectivity of extraction. PMID:27114222

  14. Nanoparticles restore lysosomal acidification defects: Implications for Parkinson and other lysosomal-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Daniel, Jonathan; Genin, Emilie; Soria, Federico N; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Lysosomal impairment causes lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) and is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, notably Parkinson disease (PD). Strategies enhancing or restoring lysosomal-mediated degradation thus appear as tantalizing disease-modifying therapeutics. Here we demonstrate that poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) acidic nanoparticles (aNP) restore impaired lysosomal function in a series of toxin and genetic cellular models of PD, i.e. ATP13A2-mutant or depleted cells or glucocerebrosidase (GBA)-mutant cells, as well as in a genetic model of lysosomal-related myopathy. We show that PLGA-aNP are transported to the lysosome within 24 h, lower lysosomal pH and rescue chloroquine (CQ)-induced toxicity. Re-acidification of defective lysosomes following PLGA-aNP treatment restores lysosomal function in different pathological contexts. Finally, our results show that PLGA-aNP may be detected after intracerebral injection in neurons and attenuate PD-related neurodegeneration in vivo by mechanisms involving a rescue of compromised lysosomes. PMID:26761717

  15. Neural correlates of target selection for reaching movements in superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Song, Joo-Hyun; McPeek, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    We recently demonstrated that inactivation of the primate superior colliculus (SC) causes a deficit in target selection for arm-reaching movements when the reach target is located in the inactivated field (Song JH, Rafal RD, McPeek RM. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108: E1433-E1440, 2011). This is consistent with the notion that the SC is part of a general-purpose target selection network beyond eye movements. To understand better the role of SC activity in reach target selection, we examined how individual SC neurons in the intermediate layers discriminate a reach target from distractors. Monkeys reached to touch a color oddball target among distractors while maintaining fixation. We found that many SC neurons robustly discriminate the goal of the reaching movement before the onset of the reach even though no saccade is made. To identify these cells in the context of conventional SC cell classification schemes, we also recorded visual, delay-period, and saccade-related responses in a delayed saccade task. On average, SC cells that discriminated the reach target from distractors showed significantly higher visual and delay-period activity than nondiscriminating cells, but there was no significant difference in saccade-related activity. Whereas a majority of SC neurons that discriminated the reach target showed significant delay-period activity, all nondiscriminating cells lacked such activity. We also found that some cells without delay-period activity did discriminate the reach target from distractors. We conclude that the majority of intermediate-layer SC cells discriminate a reach target from distractors, consistent with the idea that the SC contains a priority map used for effector-independent target selection. PMID:25505107

  16. Biochemical differences in the mechanism of macrophage lysosomal exocytosis initiated by zymosan particles and weak bases.

    PubMed Central

    Riches, D W; Watkins, J L; Stanworth, D R

    1983-01-01

    By utilizing compounds with different inhibitory properties, discrete biochemical differences were found in the mechanism of selective lysosomal enzyme secretion by macrophages in response to stimulation with zymosan particles and methylamine. Pretreatment of macrophages with trypsin markedly impaired the capacity of the cells to respond to stimulation with zymosan particles, but had no effect on methylamine-stimulated lysosomal enzyme secretion. Similarly, the addition of phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or EDTA to the incubation medium substantially inhibited zymosan-induced lysosomal enzyme secretion, whereas the methylamine-stimulated response was unaffected by these agents. The addition of 2-deoxyglucose to incubation media, however, strongly inhibited both zymosan- and methylamine-stimulated beta-galactosidase secretion. These findings are consistent with a mechanism for lysosomal enzyme secretion by macrophages, based on a receptor-dependent uptake of zymosan particles and a receptor-independent uptake of methylamine. PMID:6411075

  17. Development of target protein-selective degradation inducer for protein knockdown.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Minoru; Kitaguchi, Risa; Sato, Shinichi; Naito, Mikihiko; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2011-05-15

    Our previous technique for inducing selective degradation of target proteins with ester-type SNIPER (Specific and Nongenetic Inhibitor-of-apoptosis-proteins (IAPs)-dependent Protein ERaser) degrades both the target proteins and IAPs. Here, we designed a small-molecular amide-type SNIPER to overcome this issue. As proof of concept, we synthesized and biologically evaluated an amide-type SNIPER which induces selective degradation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II), but not IAPs. Such small-molecular, amide-type SNIPERs that induce target protein-selective degradation without affecting IAPs should be effective tools to study the biological roles of target proteins in living cells. PMID:21515062

  18. The inactivation of the sortilin gene leads to a partial disruption of prosaposin trafficking to the lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jibin; Racicott, Jesse; Morales, Carlos R.

    2009-11-01

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles which contain enzymes and activator proteins involved in the digestion and recycling of a variety of cellular and extracellular substances. We have identified a novel sorting receptor, sortilin, which is involved in the lysosomal trafficking of the sphingolipid activator proteins, prosaposin and GM{sub 2}AP, and the soluble hydrolases cathepsin D, cathepsin H, and acid sphingomyelinase. Sortilin belongs to a growing family of receptors with homology to the yeast Vps10 protein, which acts as a lysosomal sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y. In this study we examined the effects of the sortilin gene inactivation in mice. The inactivation of this gene did not yield any noticeable lysosomal pathology. To determine the existence of an alternative receptor complementing the sorting function of sortilin, we quantified the concentration of prosaposin in the lysosomes of the nonciliated epithelial cells lining the efferent ducts. These cells were chosen because they express sortilin and have a large number of lysosomes containing prosaposin. In addition, the nonciliated cells are known to endocytose luminal prosaposin that is synthesized and secreted by Sertoli cells into the seminiferous luminal fluids. Consequently, the nonciliated cells are capable of targeting both exogenous and endogenous prosaposin to the lysosomes. Using electron microscope immunogold labeling and quantitative analysis, our results demonstrate that inactivation of the sortilin gene produces a significant decrease of prosaposin in the lysosomes. When luminal prosaposin was excluded from the efferent ducts, the level of prosaposin in lysosomes was even lower in the mutant mice. Nonetheless, a significant amount of prosaposin continues to reach the lysosomal compartment. These results strongly suggest the existence of an alternative receptor that complements the function of sortilin and explains the lack of lysosomal storage disorders in the sortilin-deficient mice.

  19. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  20. Targeting Protein Kinases with Selective and Semi-Promiscuous Covalent Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rand M.; Taunton, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors are an important class of therapeutics. In addition, selective kinase inhibitors can often reveal unexpected biological insights, augmenting genetic approaches and playing a decisive role in preclinical target validation studies. Nevertheless, developing protein kinase inhibitors with sufficient selectivity and pharmacodynamic potency presents significant challenges. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with covalent inhibitors is a powerful approach to address both challenges simultaneously. Here, we describe our efforts to design irreversible and reversible electrophilic inhibitors with varying degrees of kinase selectivity. Highly selective covalent inhibitors have been used to elucidate the roles of p90 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (RSK) in animal models of atherosclerosis and diabetes. By contrast, semi-promiscuous covalent inhibitors have revealed new therapeutic targets in disease-causing parasites and have shown utility as chemoproteomic probes for interrogating kinase occupancy in living cells. PMID:25399643

  1. Intracellular protein degradation from a vague idea through the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and on to human diseases and drug targeting: Nobel Lecture, December 8, 2004.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2007-11-01

    Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve, it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely nonlysosomal, but the mechanisms involved had remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved this enigma. We now recognize that ubiquitin- and proteasome-mediated degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in the regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, malignancies, and neurodegenerative disorders among them, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs; one is already in use. PMID:18083918

  2. Neuraminidase of Influenza A Virus Binds Lysosome-Associated Membrane Proteins Directly and Induces Lysosome Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiangwu; Yan, Yiwu; Liu, Qiang; Li, Ning; Sheng, Miaomiao; Zhang, Lifang; Li, Xiao; Liang, Zhu; Huang, Fengming; Liu, Kangtai; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yanxu; Zou, Zhen; Du, Jianchao; Zhong, Ying; Zhou, Huandi; Yang, Peng; Lu, Huijun; Tian, Mingyao; Li, Dangsheng; Zhang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a recycling center, lysosomes are filled with numerous acid hydrolase enzymes that break down waste materials and invading pathogens. Recently, lysosomal cell death has been defined as “lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of lysosome contents into cytosol.” Here, we show that the neuraminidase (NA) of H5N1 influenza A virus markedly deglycosylates and degrades lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs; the most abundant membrane proteins of lysosome), which induces lysosomal rupture, and finally leads to cell death of alveolar epithelial carcinoma A549 cells and human tracheal epithelial cells. The NA inhibitors peramivir and zanamivir could effectively block the deglycosylation of LAMPs, inhibit the virus cell entry, and prevent cell death induced by the H5N1 influenza virus. The NA of seasonal H1N1 virus, however, does not share these characteristics. Our findings not only reveal a novel role of NA in the early stage of the H5N1 influenza virus life cycle but also elucidate the molecular mechanism of lysosomal rupture crucial for influenza virus induced cell death. IMPORTANCE The integrity of lysosomes is vital for maintaining cell homeostasis, cellular defense and clearance of invading pathogens. This study shows that the H5N1 influenza virus could induce lysosomal rupture through deglycosylating lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) mediated by the neuraminidase activity of NA protein. NA inhibitors such as peramivir and zanamivir could inhibit the deglycosylation of LAMPs and protect lysosomes, which also further interferes with the H5N1 influenza virus infection at early stage of life cycle. This work is significant because it presents new concepts for NA's function, as well as for influenza inhibitors' mechanism of action, and could partially explain the high mortality and high viral load after H5N1 virus infection in human beings and why NA inhibitors have more potent therapeutic effects for lethal avian influenza virus infections at early stage. PMID:26246576

  3. Lysosomal Sequestration of Sunitinib: A Novel Mechanism of Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gotink, Kristy J.; Broxterman, Henk J.; Labots, Mariette; de Haas, Richard R.; Dekker, Henk; Honeywell, Richard J.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Beerepoot, Laurens V.; Musters, René J.; Jansen, Gerrit; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Pili, Roberto; Peters, Godefridus J.; Verheul, Henk M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Resistance to antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as sunitinib is an important clinical problem, but its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We analyzed tumor sunitinib levels in mice and patients and studied sensitivity and resistance mechanisms to sunitinib. Experimental Design Intratumoral and plasma sunitinib concentrations in mice and patients were determined. Sunitinib exposure on tumor cell proliferation was examined. Resistant tumor cells were derived by continuous exposure and studied for alterations in intracellular sunitinib accumulation and activity. Results Intratumoral concentrations of sunitinib in mice and patients were 10.9 ± 0.5 and 9.5 ± 2.4 μmol/L, respectively, whereas plasma concentrations were 10-fold lower, 1.0 ± 0.1 and 0.3 ± 0.1 μmol/L, respectively. Sunitinib inhibited tumor cell growth at clinically relevant concentrations in vitro, with IC50 values of 1.4 to 2.3 μmol/L. Continuous exposure to sunitinib resulted in resistance of 786-O renal and HT-29 colon cancer cells. Fluorescent microscopy revealed intracellular sunitinib distribution to acidic lysosomes, which were significantly higher expressed in resistant cells. A 1.7- to 2.5-fold higher sunitinib concentration in resistant cells was measured because of increased lysosomal sequestration. Despite the higher intracellular sunitinib accumulation, levels of the key signaling p-Akt and p-ERK 1/2 were unaffected and comparable with untreated parental cells, indicating reduced effectiveness of sunitinib. Conclusion We report that sunitinib inhibits tumor cell proliferation at clinically relevant concentrations and found lysosomal sequestration to be a novel mechanism of sunitinib resistance. This finding warrants clinical evaluation whether targeting lysosomal function will overcome sunitinib resistance. PMID:21980135

  4. PPAR? in lysosomal biogenesis: A perspective.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arunava; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound vesicles containing hydrolytic enzymes, ubiquitously present in all eukaryotic cells. Classically considered to be central to the cellular waste management machinery, recent studies revealed the role of lysosomes in a wide array of cellular processes like, degradation, cellular development, programmed cell death, secretion, plasma membrane repair, nutritional responses, and lipid metabolism. We recently studied the regulation of TFEB, considered to be the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, by activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor ? (PPAR?), one of the key regulators of lipid metabolism. In this article, we discuss how the recent finding could be put in to perspective with the previous findings that relate lysosomal biogenesis to lipid metabolism, and comment on the possibility of a bi-directional interplay between these two distinct cellular processes upon activation of PPAR?. PMID:26621249

  5. PPARα in lysosomal biogenesis: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound vesicles containing hydrolytic enzymes, ubiquitously present in all eukaryotic cells. Classically considered to be central to the cellular waste management machinery, recent studies revealed the role of lysosomes in a wide array of cellular processes like, degradation, cellular development, programmed cell death, secretion, plasma membrane repair, nutritional responses, and lipid metabolism. We recently studied the regulation of TFEB, considered to be the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, by activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα), one of the key regulators of lipid metabolism. In this article, we discuss how the recent finding could be put in to perspective with the previous findings that relate lysosomal biogenesis to lipid metabolism, and comment on the possibility of a bi-directional interplay between these two distinct cellular processes upon activation of PPARα. PMID:26621249

  6. Activation of the transcription factor EB rescues lysosomal abnormalities in cystinotic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Rega, Laura R; Polishchuk, Elena; Montefusco, Sandro; Napolitano, Gennaro; Tozzi, Giulia; Zhang, Jinzhong; Bellomo, Francesco; Taranta, Anna; Pastore, Anna; Polishchuk, Roman; Piemonte, Fiorella; Medina, Diego L; Catz, Sergio D; Ballabio, Andrea; Emma, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by accumulation of cystine into lysosomes secondary to mutations in the cystine lysosomal transporter, cystinosin. The defect initially causes proximal tubular dysfunction (Fanconi syndrome) which in time progresses to end-stage renal disease. Cystinotic patients treated with the cystine-depleting agent, cysteamine, have improved life expectancy, delayed progression to chronic renal failure, but persistence of Fanconi syndrome. Here, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, in conditionally immortalized proximal tubular epithelial cells derived from the urine of a healthy volunteer or a cystinotic patient. Lack of cystinosin reduced TFEB expression and induced TFEB nuclear translocation. Stimulation of endogenous TFEB activity by genistein, or overexpression of exogenous TFEB lowered cystine levels within 24 hours in cystinotic cells. Overexpression of TFEB also stimulated delayed endocytic cargo processing within 24 hours. Rescue of other abnormalities of the lysosomal compartment was observed but required prolonged expression of TFEB. These abnormalities could not be corrected with cysteamine. Thus, these data show that the consequences of cystinosin deficiency are not restricted to cystine accumulation and support the role of TFEB as a therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases, in particular of cystinosis. PMID:26994576

  7. Wilson Disease Protein ATP7B Utilizes Lysosomal Exocytosis to Maintain Copper Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Polishchuk, ElenaV.; Concilli, Mafalda; Iacobacci, Simona; Chesi, Giancarlo; Pastore, Nunzia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Paladino, Simona; Baldantoni, Daniela; vanIJzendoorn, SvenC.D.; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, ChristopherJ.; Amoresano, Angela; Pane, Francesca; Pucci, Piero; Tarallo, Antonietta; Parenti, Giancarlo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea; Polishchuk, RomanS.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Copper is an essential yet toxic metal and its overload causes Wilson disease, a disorder due to mutations in copper transporter ATP7B. To remove excess copper into the bile, ATP7B traffics toward canalicular area of hepatocytes. However, the trafficking mechanisms of ATP7B remain elusive. Here, we show that, in response to elevated copper, ATP7B moves from the Golgi to lysosomes and imports metal into their lumen. ATP7B enables lysosomes to undergo exocytosis through the interaction with p62 subunit of dynactin that allows lysosome translocation toward the canalicular pole of hepatocytes. Activation of lysosomal exocytosis stimulates copper clearance from the hepatocytes and rescues the most frequent Wilson-disease-causing ATP7B mutant to the appropriate functional site. Our findings indicate that lysosomes serve as an important intermediate in ATP7B trafficking, whereas lysosomal exocytosis operates as an integral process in copper excretion and hence can be targeted for therapeutic approaches to combat Wilson disease. PMID:24909901

  8. FOXP2 targets show evidence of positive selection in European populations.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Qasim; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Chen, Yuan; Xue, Yali; Hu, Min; Vernes, Sonja C; Fisher, Simon E; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2013-05-01

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a highly conserved transcription factor that has been implicated in human speech and language disorders and plays important roles in the plasticity of the developing brain. The pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in FOXP2 in modern populations suggests that it has been the target of positive (Darwinian) selection during recent human evolution. In our study, we searched for evidence of selection that might have followed FOXP2 adaptations in modern humans. We examined whether or not putative FOXP2 targets identified by chromatin-immunoprecipitation genomic screening show evidence of positive selection. We developed an algorithm that, for any given gene list, systematically generates matched lists of control genes from the Ensembl database, collates summary statistics for three frequency-spectrum-based neutrality tests from the low-coverage resequencing data of the 1000 Genomes Project, and determines whether these statistics are significantly different between the given gene targets and the set of controls. Overall, there was strong evidence of selection of FOXP2 targets in Europeans, but not in the Han Chinese, Japanese, or Yoruba populations. Significant outliers included several genes linked to cellular movement, reproduction, development, and immune cell trafficking, and 13 of these constituted a significant network associated with cardiac arteriopathy. Strong signals of selection were observed for CNTNAP2 and RBFOX1, key neurally expressed genes that have been consistently identified as direct FOXP2 targets in multiple studies and that have themselves been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders involving language dysfunction. PMID:23602712

  9. FOXP2 Targets Show Evidence of Positive Selection in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Qasim; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Chen, Yuan; Xue, Yali; Hu, Min; Vernes, Sonja C.; Fisher, Simon E.; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a highly conserved transcription factor that has been implicated in human speech and language disorders and plays important roles in the plasticity of the developing brain. The pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in FOXP2 in modern populations suggests that it has been the target of positive (Darwinian) selection during recent human evolution. In our study, we searched for evidence of selection that might have followed FOXP2 adaptations in modern humans. We examined whether or not putative FOXP2 targets identified by chromatin-immunoprecipitation genomic screening show evidence of positive selection. We developed an algorithm that, for any given gene list, systematically generates matched lists of control genes from the Ensembl database, collates summary statistics for three frequency-spectrum-based neutrality tests from the low-coverage resequencing data of the 1000 Genomes Project, and determines whether these statistics are significantly different between the given gene targets and the set of controls. Overall, there was strong evidence of selection of FOXP2 targets in Europeans, but not in the Han Chinese, Japanese, or Yoruba populations. Significant outliers included several genes linked to cellular movement, reproduction, development, and immune cell trafficking, and 13 of these constituted a significant network associated with cardiac arteriopathy. Strong signals of selection were observed for CNTNAP2 and RBFOX1, key neurally expressed genes that have been consistently identified as direct FOXP2 targets in multiple studies and that have themselves been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders involving language dysfunction. PMID:23602712

  10. Lysosomal storage diseases and the heat shock response: convergences and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Ingemann, Linda; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes play a vital role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the recycling of cell constituents, a key metabolic function which is highly dependent on the correct function of the lysosomal hydrolases and membrane proteins, as well as correct membrane lipid stoichiometry and composition. The critical role of lysosomal functionality is evident from the severity of the diseases in which the primary lesion is a genetically defined loss-of-function of lysosomal hydrolases or membrane proteins. This group of diseases, known as lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), number more than 50 and are associated with severe neurodegeneration, systemic disease, and early death, with only a handful of the diseases having a therapeutic option. Another key homeostatic system is the metabolic stress response or heat shock response (HSR), which is induced in response to a number of physiological and pathological stresses, such as protein misfolding and aggregation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, nutrient deprivation, elevated temperature, viral infections, and various acute traumas. Importantly, the HSR and its cardinal members of the heat shock protein 70 family has been shown to protect against a number of degenerative diseases, including severe diseases of the nervous system. The cytoprotective actions of the HSR also include processes involving the lysosomal system, such as cell death, autophagy, and protection against lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and have shown promise in a number of LSDs. This review seeks to describe the emerging understanding of the interplay between these two essential metabolic systems, the lysosomes and the HSR, with a particular focus on their potential as a therapeutic target for LSDs. PMID:24837749

  11. The BH3 Mimetic Obatoclax Accumulates in Lysosomes and Causes Their Alkalinization

    PubMed Central

    Stamelos, Vasileios A.; Fisher, Natalie; Bamrah, Harnoor; Voisey, Carolyn; Price, Joshua C.; Farrell, William E.; Redman, Charles W.; Richardson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Obatoclax belongs to a class of compounds known as BH3 mimetics which function as antagonists of Bcl-2 family apoptosis regulators. It has undergone extensive preclinical and clinical evaluation as a cancer therapeutic. Despite this, it is clear that obatoclax has additional pharmacological effects that contribute to its cytotoxic activity. It has been claimed that obatoclax, either alone or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapeutics, induces an autophagic form of cell death. In addition, obatoclax has been shown to inhibit lysosomal function, but the mechanism of this has not been elucidated. We have evaluated the mechanism of action of obatoclax in eight ovarian cancer cell lines. Consistent with its function as a BH3 mimetic, obatoclax induced apoptosis in three cell lines. However, in the remaining cell lines another form of cell death was evident because caspase activation and PARP cleavage were not observed. Obatoclax also failed to show synergy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, chemotherapeutic agents which we have previously shown to be synergistic with authentic Bcl-2 family antagonists. Obatoclax induced a profound accumulation of LC-3 but knockdown of Atg-5 or beclin had only minor effects on the activity of obatoclax in cell growth assays suggesting that the inhibition of lysosomal function rather than stimulation of autophagy may play a more prominent role in these cells. To evaluate how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function, confocal microscopy studies were conducted which demonstrated that obatoclax, which contains two basic pyrrole groups, accumulates in lysosomes. Studies using pH sensitive dyes demonstrated that obatoclax induced lysosomal alkalinization. Furthermore, obatoclax was synergistic in cell growth/survival assays with bafilomycin and chloroquine, two other drugs which cause lysosomal alkalinization. These studies explain, for the first time, how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function and suggest that lysosomal alkalinization contributes to the cytotoxic activity of obatoclax. PMID:26950068

  12. Microsomal and lysosomal enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism in rat placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, R A; Haynes, E B

    1984-01-01

    The placenta plays a major role in transporting lipid to the developing foetus. Since previous studies have suggested that placental lipid transport involves intermediate esterification steps, we investigated selected microsomal and lysosomal enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism in rat placenta. Between gestational days 10 and 14, microsomal phosphatidic acid phosphatase specific activity was 6-fold greater than the activity in adult rat liver. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity decreased 50% on day 15. Studies employing several different phosphorylated substrates indicated a high degree of substrate specificity. Lysosomal triacylglycerol lipase and cholesterol esterase activities decreased about 50% between days 15 and 18, then rose late in gestation. No changes were observed in the specific activities of fatty acid: CoA ligase, glycerolphosphate acyltransferase, lysophosphatidate acyltransferase, diacylglycerol acyltransferase or diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase during the final 12 days of gestation. Kinetic observations (competitive inhibition by alternative substrates, pH-dependence and thermal inactivation) were consistent with the hypothesis that glycerol phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate can be acylated by a single microsomal enzyme in placenta. Except for fatty acid: CoA ligase, the activities of microsomal and lysosomal enzymes of triacylglycerol metabolism were comparable with those in adult rat liver. These observations are consistent with physiological studies suggesting that triacylglycerol synthetic and degradative pathways are very active in rat placenta. PMID:6696738

  13. Changes during fasting in the activity of a specific lysosomal proteinase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Melloni, E; Pontremoli, S; Salamino, F; Sparatore, B; Michetti, M; Horecker, B L

    1981-01-01

    Three lysosomal proteinases capable of catalyzing a limited modification of the gluconeogenic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate 1-phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.11) have been purified from extracts of rabbit liver lysosomes. These have been designated "converting enzymes I, II, and III," respectively, based on the order of their elution from Ultrogel AcA34. The predominant form in lysosomes from livers of fed rabbits is converting enzyme III which has been identified as a mixture of cathepsins B and L. Fasting induces a 4- to 5-fold increase in the activity of converting enzyme II; in the livers of 96-hr-fasted rabbits, this form accounts for more than 70% of the total converting enzyme activity. The increase is largely in that fraction of converting enzyme II associated with lysosomal membranes; this increase is also seen in the activity expressed by intact lysosomes. The activity of intact lysosomes is not due to their increased fragility because other lysosomal enzyme activities remain latent. The effect of fasting on the activity of converting enzyme II is selective and greatly exceeds the 2-fold increase observed for other lysosomal enzymes. PMID:6262806

  14. Direct observation of lipoprotein cholesterol ester degradation in lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lusa, S; Tanhuanpää, K; Ezra, T; Somerharju, P

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated whether pyrene-labelled cholesterol esters (PyrnCEs) (n indicates the number of aliphatic carbons in the pyrene-chain) can be used to observe the degradation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol esters (CEs) in the lysosomes of living cells. To select the optimal substrates, hydrolysis of the PyrnCE species by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) in detergent/phospholipid micelles was compared. The rate of hydrolysis varied markedly depending on the length of the pyrenyl chain. Pyr10CE was clearly the best substrate, while Pyr4CE was practically unhydrolysed. Pyr10CE and [3H]cholesteryl linoleate, the major CE species in LDL, were hydrolysed equally by LAL when incorporated together into reconstituted LDL (rLDL) particles, thus indicating that Pyr10CE is a reliable reporter of the lysosomal degradation of native CEs. When rLDL particles containing Pyr4CE or Pyr10CE were incubated with fibroblasts, the accumulation of bright intracellular vesicular fluorescence was observed with the former fluorescent derivative, but not with the latter. However, when the cells were treated with chloroquine, an inhibitor of lysosomal hydrolysis, or when cells with defective LAL were employed, Pyr10CE also accumulated in vesicular structures. HPLC analysis of cellular lipid extracts fully supported these imaging results. It is concluded that PyrnCEs can be used to observe degradation of CEs directly in living cells. This should be particularly useful when exploring the mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of lipoprotein-derived CEs in complex systems such as the arterial intima. PMID:9601074

  15. PLEKHM1: Adapting to life at the lysosome.

    PubMed

    McEwan, David G; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The endosomal system and autophagy are 2 intertwined pathways that share a number of common protein factors as well as a final destination, the lysosome. Identification of adaptor platforms that can link both pathways are of particular importance, as they serve as common nodes that can coordinate the different trafficking arms of the endolysosomal system. Using a mass spectrometry approach to identify interaction partners of active (GTP-bound) RAB7, the late endosome/lysosome GTPase, and yeast 2-hybrid screening to identify LC3/GABARAP interaction partners we discovered the multivalent adaptor protein PLEKHM1. We discovered a highly conserved LC3-interaction region (LIR) between 2 PH domains of PLEKHM1 that mediated direct binding to all LC3/GABARAP family members. Subsequent mass spectrometry analysis of PLEKHM1 precipitated from cells revealed the HOPS (homotypic fusion and protein sorting) complex as a prominent interaction partner. Functionally, depletion of PLEKHM1, HOPS, or RAB7 results in decreased autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In Plekhm1 knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) we observed increased lipidated LC3B, decreased colocalization between LC3B and LAMP1 under amino acid starvation conditions and decreased autolysosome formation. Finally, PLEKHM1 binding to LC3-positive autophagosomes was also essential for selective autophagy pathways, as shown by clearance of puromycin-aggregates, in a PLEKHM1-LIR-dependent manner. Overall, we have identified PLEKHM1 as an endolysosomal adaptor platform that acts as a central hub to integrate endocytic and autophagic pathways at the lysosome. PMID:25905573

  16. Selection of IFE target materials from a safety and environmental perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowski, J. F.; Sanz, J.; Reyes, S.; Gomez del Rio, J.

    2001-05-01

    Target materials for inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant designs might be selected for a wide variety of reasons including wall absorption of driver energy, material opacity, cost and ease of fabrication. While each of these issues are of great importance, target materials should also be selected based upon their safety and environmental (S&E) characteristics. The present work focuses on the recycling, waste management and accident dose characteristics of potential target materials. If target materials are recycled so that the quantity is small, isotopic separation may be economically viable. Therefore, calculations have been completed for all stable isotopes for all elements from lithium to polonium. The results of these calculations are used to identify specific isotopes and elements that are most likely to be offensive as well as those most likely to be acceptable in terms of their S&E characteristics.

  17. Selective focusing through target identification and experimental acoustic signature extraction: Numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S; Jacob, X; Gibiat, V

    2016-05-01

    Using transducer arrays and appropriate emission delays allow to focus acoustic waves at a chosen location in a medium. The focusing spatial accuracy depends on the accurate knowledge of its acoustic properties. When those properties are unknown, methods based on the Time-Reversal principle allow accurate focusing. Still, these methods are either intrusive (an active source has to be introduced at the target location first), either blind (the target cannot be selected in the presence of several objects.) The purpose of the present work is to achieve non-invasive accurate focusing on a selected target using inaccurate acoustic properties for the investigated medium. Potential applications are for instance noninvasive surgery based on High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Numerical experiments are presented and demonstrate accurate focusing on a previously designated target located in an unknown heterogeneous medium. PMID:26890791

  18. Optimal Intermittence in Search Strategies under Speed-Selective Target Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Mndez, Vicen; Bartumeus, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Random search theory has been previously explored for both continuous and intermittent scanning modes with full target detection capacity. Here we present a new class of random search problems in which a single searcher performs flights of random velocities, the detection probability when it passes over a target location being conditioned to the searcher speed. As a result, target detection involves an N-passage process for which the mean search time is here analytically obtained through a renewal approximation. We apply the idea of speed-selective detection to random animal foraging since a fast movement is known to significantly degrade perception abilities in many animals. We show that speed-selective detection naturally introduces an optimal level of behavioral intermittence in order to solve the compromise between fast relocations and target detection capability.

  19. Para-toluenesulfonamide induces tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell death through disturbing lysosomal stability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Liang, Chenyuan; Zhang, Zhuoyuan; Pan, Jian; Xia, Hui; Zhong, Nanshan

    2015-01-01

    Para-toluenesulfonamide (PTS) has been implicated with anticancer effects against a variety of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of PTS on tongue squamous cell carcinoma (Tca-8113) and explored the lysosomal and mitochondrial changes after PTS treatment in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography showed that PTS selectively accumulated in Tca-8113 cells with a relatively low concentration in normal fibroblasts. Next, the effects of PTS on cell viability, invasion, and cell death were determined. PTS significantly inhibited Tca-8113 cells’ viability and invasive ability with increased cancer cell death. Flow cytometric analysis and the lactate dehydrogenase release assay showed that PTS induced cancer cell death by activating apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Morphological changes, such as cellular shrinkage, nuclear condensation as well as formation of apoptotic body and secondary lysosomes, were observed, indicating that PTS might induce cell death through disturbing lysosomal stability. Lysosomal integrity assay and western blot showed that PTS increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization associated with activation of lysosomal cathepsin B. Finally, PTS was shown to inhibit ATP biosynthesis and induce the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Therefore, our findings provide a novel insight into the use of PTS in cancer therapy. PMID:26302210

  20. Lysosomes and α-synuclein form a dangerous duet leading to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are (i) characterized by a selective neuronal vulnerability to degeneration in specific brain regions; and (ii) likely to be caused by disease-specific protein misfolding. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of intraneuronal proteinacious cytoplasmic inclusions, called Lewy Bodies (LB). α-Synuclein, an aggregation prone protein, has been identified as a major protein component of LB and the causative for autosomal dominant PD. Lysosomes are responsible for the clearance of long-lived proteins, such as α-synuclein, and for the removal of old or damaged organelles, such as mitochondria. Interestingly, PD-linked α-synuclein mutants and dopamine-modified wild-type α-synuclein block its own degradation, which result in insufficient clearance, leading to its aggregation and cell toxicity. Moreover, both lysosomes and lysosomal proteases have been found to be involved in the activation of certain cell death pathways. Interestingly, lysosomal alterations are observed in the brains of patients suffering from sporadic PD and also in toxic and genetic rodent models of PD-related neurodegeneration. All these events have unraveled a causal link between lysosomal impairment, α-synuclein accumulation, and neurotoxicity. In this review, we emphasize the pathophysiological mechanisms connecting α-synuclein and lysosomal dysfunction in neuronal cell death. PMID:25177278

  1. Involvement of BimL activation in apoptosis induced by lysosomal photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Xianwang; Li, Hui

    2008-12-01

    Lysosomal photosensitizers have been used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Combination of such photosensitizers and light causes lysosomal photodamage, inducing cell death. The lysosomal disruption can lead to apoptosis but its signaling pathways remain to be elucidated. In this study, we selected N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6), an effective photosensitizer which preferentially accumulates in lysosomes, to study the mechanism of apoptosis caused by lysosomal photodamage. Apoptosis in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells treated by NPe6-PDT was studied using real-time single-cell analysis. Confocal imaging of cells transfected with BimL-GFP demonstrated that BimL translocated to mitochondria after NPe6-PDT treatment for about 150 min, and then sequestered into clusters associated with the mitochondira within 30 min. The activation of BimL proved to be an important event in the apoptotic machinery, as demonstrated by the significant protection of cell death in samples suppressed the expression level of endogenous BimL. This study demonstrates that BimL activation was involved in the cell death induced by PDT with lysosomal photosensitizer.

  2. Toward tailored exosomes: the exosomal tetraspanin web contributes to target cell selection.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sanyukta; Yue, Shijing; Stadel, Daniela; Zöller, Margot

    2012-09-01

    Exosomes are discussed as potent therapeutics due to efficient transfer of proteins, mRNA and miRNA in selective targets. However, therapeutic exosome application requires knowledge on target structures to avoid undue delivery. Previous work suggesting exosomal tetraspanin-integrin complexes to be involved in target cell binding, we aimed to control this hypothesis and to define target cell ligands. Exosomes are rich in tetraspanins that associate besides other molecules with integrins. Co-immunoprecipitation of exosome lysates from rat tumor lines that differ only with respect to Tspan8 and beta4 revealed promiscuity of tetraspanin-integrin associations, but also few preferential interactions like that of Tspan8 with alpha4 and beta4 integrin chains. These minor differences in exosomal tetraspanin-complexes strongly influence target cell selection in vitro and in vivo, efficient exosome-uptake being seen in hematopoietic cells and solid organs. Exosomes expressing the Tspan8-alpha4 complex are most readily taken up by endothelial and pancreas cells, CD54 serving as a major ligand. Selectivity of uptake was confirmed with exosomes from an alpha4 cDNA transfected Tspan8(+) lymph node stroma line. Distinct from exosomes from the parental line, the latter preferentially targeted endothelial cells and in vivo the pancreas. Importantly, pulldown experiments provided strong evidence that exosome-uptake occurs in internalization-prone membrane domains. This is the first report on the exosomal tetraspanin web contributing to target cell selection such that predictions can be made on potential targets, which will facilitate tailoring exosomes for drug delivery. PMID:22728313

  3. Contextual control over selective attention: evidence from a two-target method.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Ellen; Shore, David I; Milliken, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    Selective attention is generally studied with conflict tasks, using response time as the dependent measure. Here, we study the impact of selective attention to a first target, T1, presented simultaneously with a distractor, on the accuracy of subsequent encoding of a second target item, T2. This procedure produces an "attentional blink" (AB) effect much like that reported in other studies, and allowed us to study the influence of context on cognitive control with a novel method. In particular, we examined whether preparation to attend selectively to T1 had an impact on the selective encoding of T1 that would translate to report of T2. Preparation to attend selectively was manipulated by varying whether difficult selective attention T1 trials were presented in the context of other difficult selective attention T1 trials. The results revealed strong context effects of this nature, with smaller AB effects when difficult selective attention T1 trials were embedded in a context with many, rather than few, other difficult selective attention T1 trials. Further, the results suggest that both the trial-to-trial local context and the block-wide global context modulate performance in this task. PMID:25030812

  4. Target selection of classical pulsating variables for space-based photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, E.; Molnar, L.; Szabo, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Banyai, E.

    2016-05-01

    In a few years the Kepler and TESS missions will provide ultra- precise photometry for thousands of RR Lyrae and hundreds of Cepheid stars. In the extended Kepler mission all targets are proposed in the Guest Observer (GO) Program, while the TESS space telescope will work with full frame images and a ~15-16th mag brightness limit with the possibility of short cadence measurements for a limited number of pre-selected objects. This paper highlights some details of the enormous and important work of the target selection process made by the members of Working Group 7 (WG#7) of the Kepler and TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortium.

  5. Hybrid EEG and eye movement interface to multi-directional target selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minho; Chae, Yongwook; Jo, Sungho

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses the development of a low-cost hybrid interface with eye tracking and brain signals. Eye movement detection is used for search task and EEG-based brain computer interface (BCI) for selection task. Multi-directional target selection experiments with the hybrid interface device were conducted with five subjects to evaluate the proposed hybrid interface scheme. The task asked each user to move a cursor onto a circular target among twelve possible positions and select it. Using the Fitts' law, the interface performance was compared with the computer mouse. With two BCI selection confirmation schemes, the hybrid interface attained 2-2.7 bit/s overall. Based on the results, the potential of the proposed hybrid interface was discussed. PMID:24109799

  6. Targeted Phosphoproteome Analysis Using Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics has been rapidly spread based on the advancement of mass spectrometry and development of efficient enrichment techniques for phosphorylated proteins or peptides. Non-targeted approach has been employed in most of the studies for phosphoproteome analysis. However, targeted approach using selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) is an indispensible technique used for the quantitation of known targets especially when we have many samples to quantitate phosphorylation events on proteins in biological or clinical samples. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM-based quantitation for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers. PMID:26700043

  7. DRAM1 Regulates Autophagy Flux through Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Chao; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that the mitochondria inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), induces the expression of DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator1 (DRAM1) and activation of autophagy in rat striatum. Although the role of DRAM1 in autophagy has been previously characterized, the detailed mechanism by which DRAM1 regulates autophagy activity has not been fully understood. The present study investigated the role of DRAM1 in regulating autophagy flux. In A549 cells expressing wilt-type TP53, 3-NP increased the protein levels of DRAM1 and LC3-II, whereas decreased the levels of SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1). The increase in LC3-II and decrease in SQSTM1 were blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl-adenine. Lack of TP53 or knock-down of TP53 in cells impaired the induction of DRAM1. Knock-down of DRAM1 with siRNA significantly reduced 3-NP-induced upregulation of LC3-II and downregulation of SQSTM1, indicating DRAM1 contributes to autophagy activation. Knock-down of DRAM1 robustly decreased rate of disappearance of induced autophagosomes, increased RFP-LC3 fluorescence dots and decreased the decline of LC3-II after withdraw of rapamycin, indicating DRAM1 promotes autophagy flux. DRAM1 siRNA inhibited lysosomal V-ATPase and acidification of lysosomes. As a result, DRAM1 siRNA reduced activation of lysosomal cathepsin D. Similar to DRAM1 siRNA, lysosomal inhibitors E64d and chloroquine also inhibited clearance of autophagosomes and activation of lysosomal cathapsin D after 3-NP treatment. These data suggest that DRAM1 plays important roles in autophagy activation induced by mitochondria dysfunction. DRAM1 affects autophagy through argument of lysosomal acidification, fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes and clearance of autophagosomes. PMID:23696801

  8. Signaling from lysosomes enhances mitochondria-mediated photodynamic therapy in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiogue, Geraldine; Saggu, Shalini; Hung, Hsin-I.; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Lemasters, John J.; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa

    2009-06-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Assessed by confocal microscopy, the photosensitizer phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4) localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes in cancer cells, resulting in mitochondria-mediated cell death. A Pc 4 derivative, Pc 181, accumulates into lysosomes. In comparison to Pc 4, Pc 181 was a more effective photosensitizer promoting killing cancer cells after PDT. The mode of cell death after Pc 181-PDT is predominantly apoptosis, and pancaspase and caspase-3 inhibitors prevent onset of the cell death. To assess further how lysosomes contribute to PDT, we monitored cell killing of A431cells after PDT in the presence and absence of bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the acidic vacuolar proton pump that collapses the pH gradient of the lysosomal/endosomal compartment. Bafilomycin by itself did not induce toxicity but greatly enhanced Pc 4-PDT-induced cell killing. In comparison to Pc 4, less enhancement of cell killing by bafilomycin occurred after Pc 181-PDT at photosensitizer doses producing equivalent cell killing in the absence of bafilomycin. These results indicate that lysosomal disruption can augment PDT with Pc 4, which targets predominantly mitochondria, but less so after PDT with Pc 181, since Pc 181 already targets lysosomes.

  9. Effect of reactive oxygen species on lysosomal membrane integrity. A study on a lysosomal fraction.

    PubMed

    Zdolsek, J M; Svensson, I

    1993-01-01

    Using a lysosome-enriched "light mitochondrial" fraction of a rat liver homogenate, the effects of the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, superoxide- and hydroxyl radicals were determined. Alterations in the intralysosomal pH and the release of a lysosomal marker enzyme, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, were used as indicators of changes in the lysosomal membrane integrity. Lipid peroxidation of the fraction was assayed by TBARS measurement. Neither superoxide radicals, generated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase, nor a bolus dose of hydrogen peroxide (0.5-1.5 mM) induced any lysosomal damage. If, however, Fe(III)ADP was included in the superoxide radical-generating system, lysosomal membrane damage was detected, both as an increase in lysosomal pH and as a release of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, but only after a lag phase of about 7 min. Lipid peroxidation, on the other hand, proceeded gradually. Lysosomes treated with hydrogen peroxide displayed similar dose-dependent alterations, albeit only if both Fe(III)ADP and the reducing amino acid cysteine were added. In the latter system, however, alterations of the lysosomal membrane stability occurred more rapidly, showing a lag phase of only 2 min. Lipid peroxidation, which proceeded faster and displayed no lag phase, levelled out within 10 min. The results indicate that neither superoxide radicals nor hydrogen peroxide are by themselves damaging to lysosomes. Available catalytically active iron in Fe(II) form, however, allows reactions yielding powerful oxidative species--probably hydroxyl radicals formed via Fenton reactions--to take place inducing peroxidation of the lysosomal membranes resulting in dissipation of the proton-gradient and leakage of their enzyme contents. PMID:8148962

  10. Efficient conditional knockout targeting vector construction using co-selection BAC recombineering (CoSBR)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Robert J.; Roose-Girma, Merone; Warming, Sren

    2015-01-01

    A simple and efficient strategy for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) recombineering based on co-selection is described. We show that it is possible to efficiently modify two positions of a BAC simultaneously by co-transformation of a single-stranded DNA oligo and a double-stranded selection cassette. The use of co-selection BAC recombineering reduces the DNA manipulation needed to make a conditional knockout gene targeting vector to only two steps: a single round of BAC modification followed by a retrieval step. PMID:26089387

  11. Joint Effect of Insertion of Spaces and Word Length in Saccade Target Selection in Chinese Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xingshan; Shen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined how insertion of spaces before and after a word affects saccade target selection in Chinese reading. We found that inserting spaces in Chinese text changes the eye movement behaviour of Chinese readers. They are less likely to fixate on the character near the space and will try their best to process the entire word with

  12. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zasowski, G.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Andrews, B.; Epstein, C.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Jackson, K.; Majewski, S. R.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beaton, R. L.; Nidever, D. L.; Pinto, H. J. Rocha; Girardi, L.; Cudworth, K. M.; Munn, J.; Blake, C. H.; Covey, K.; Deshpande, R.; Fleming, S. W.; Fabbian, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s and others

    2013-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of {approx}10{sup 5} red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.

  13. Joint Effect of Insertion of Spaces and Word Length in Saccade Target Selection in Chinese Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xingshan; Shen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined how insertion of spaces before and after a word affects saccade target selection in Chinese reading. We found that inserting spaces in Chinese text changes the eye movement behaviour of Chinese readers. They are less likely to fixate on the character near the space and will try their best to process the entire word with…

  14. Target Selection for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David W.; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Jones, Michael; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS) is a new large targeted HI survey now underway using Arecibo's L-band Wide receiver system. A major goal is to constrain models of the Pisces Perseus infall, producing 5-σ detections of infall motions ˜500 km s-1. We are targeting sources that are likely to be at the PPS distance, but that are just below the the HI mass detection threshold of the ALFALFA survey. We expect to identify ˜800 objects of mass ˜108—9 M⊙ which will alllow us to constrain the lower mass end of the HI mass function in this infall environment.We have pursued a multi-pronged approach to target selection for this survey. Sources from ALFALFA, SDSS, and the GALEX GCAT single source catalogs were matched and intercompared via multi-band color photometry, surface brightnesses, and appearance in SDSS images. Final target selection based on visual inspection of SDSS images was found to correlate well with a color-selection technique based on GALEX/NUV - SDSS/r. Along with the details of the source selection we will discuss the facilitation and implementation of this process via a multi-institution collaborative website, and early results from the APSS survey.This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  15. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  16. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  17. Selective removal of a target stimulus localized by taste in humans.

    PubMed

    Delwiche, J F; Lera, M F; Breslin, P A

    2000-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that people can localize a punctate gustatory stimulus on the lingual epithelium in the absence of discriminative tactile cues. The present studies examined the human ability to localize taste sensations on the tongue and to use this information to remove selectively a target stimulus (a flavored, 1 cm(3) gelatin cube) from the mouth when presented with non-target distractors that vary in number and taste. Findings indicate that humans are capable of localizing and removing either an aversive or an appetitive gustatory target from a field of tactile distractors via taste sensations alone, although this ability diminishes as the number of distractors increases (implicating serial searches, rather than parallel). In addition, humans can localize and selectively remove a target taste in the presence of distractors of another distinct taste quality. Under these conditions performance is either unaffected or reduced, which indicates that contrast with the distinct taste of the distractors does not enhance performance. Humans also are capable of removing a nearly tasteless cube from a field of flavored distractors, but this is clearly a more difficult task, suggesting that 'tactile capture' of taste occurs for the tasteless target cube and interferes with the localization of taste. Finally, perceived suprathreshold stimulus intensity did not seem to be related to the ability to localize and remove a target stimulus via taste sensations and failed to account for variations in performance across individuals. PMID:10781025

  18. Targeted Ultrasound-Assisted Cancer-Selective Chemical Labeling and Subsequent Cancer Imaging using Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Gauthier, Marianne; Kelly, Jamie R; Miller, Rita J; Xu, Ming; O'Brien, William D; Cheng, Jianjun

    2016-04-25

    Metabolic sugar labeling followed by the use of reagent-free click chemistry is an established technique for in vitro cell targeting. However, selective metabolic labeling of the target tissues in vivo remains a challenge to overcome, which has prohibited the use of this technique for targeted in vivo applications. Herein, we report the use of targeted ultrasound pulses to induce the release of tetraacetyl N-azidoacetylmannosamine (Ac4 ManAz) from microbubbles (MBs) and its metabolic expression in the cancer area. Ac4 ManAz-loaded MBs showed great stability under physiological conditions, but rapidly collapsed in the presence of tumor-localized ultrasound pulses. The released Ac4 ManAz from MBs was able to label 4T1 tumor cells with azido groups and significantly improved the tumor accumulation of dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO)-Cy5 by subsequent click chemistry. We demonstrated for the first time that Ac4 ManAz-loaded MBs coupled with the use of targeted ultrasound could be a simple but powerful tool for in vivo cancer-selective labeling and targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27010510

  19. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is a target for selective kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K; Larson, Eric T; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Castaneda, Lisa J; DeRocher, Amy E; Inampudi, Krishna K; Kim, Jessica E; Arakaki, Tracy L; Murphy, Ryan C; Zhang, Li; Napuli, Alberto J; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe LMJ; Buckner, Frederick S; Parsons, Marilyn; Hol, Wim GJ; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2010-01-01

    New drugs are needed to treat toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinases (TgCDPKs) are attractive targets because they are absent in mammals. We show that TgCDPK1 is inhibited by low nanomolar levels of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs), compounds designed to be inactive against mammalian kinases. Cocrystal structures of TgCDPK1 with BKIs confirm that the structural basis for selectivity is due to the unique glycine gatekeeper residue in the ATP-binding site at residue 128. We show that BKIs interfere with an early step in T. gondii infection of human cells in culture. Furthermore, we show that TgCDPK1 is the in vivo target of BKIs because T. gondii cells expressing a glycine to methionine gatekeeper mutant enzyme show significantly decreased sensitivity to this class of selective kinase inhibitors. Thus, design of selective TgCDPK1 inhibitors with low host toxicity may be achievable. PMID:20436472

  20. Characterization of Two-pore Channel 2 (TPCN2)-mediated Ca2+ Currents in Isolated Lysosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Schieder, Michael; Rötzer, Katrin; Brüggemann, Andrea; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A.

    2010-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCNs) have been proposed to form lysosomal Ca2+ release channels that are activated by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Here, we employ a glass chip-based method to record for the first time nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate -dependent currents through a two-pore channel (TPCN2) from intact lysosomes. We show that TPCN2 is a highly selective Ca2+ channel that is regulated by intralysosomal pH. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identify an amino acid residue in the putative pore region that is crucial for conferring high Ca2+ selectivity. Our glass chip-based method will provide electrophysiological access not only to lysosomal TPCN channels but also to a broad range of other intracellular ion channels. PMID:20495006

  1. Recent developments in protein and cell-targeted aptamer selection and applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; You, Mingxu; Pu, Ying; Liu, Huixia; Ye, Mao; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    Because of their easily modified chemical structures and wide range of targets, aptamers are ideal candidates for various applications, such as biomarker discovery, target diagnosis, molecular imaging, and drug delivery. Aptamers are oligonucleotide sequences that can bind to their targets specifically via unique three dimensional (3-D) structures. Usually, aptamers are obtained from repeated rounds of in vitro or in vivo selection termed SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment), which can generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity for many kinds of targets, such as biomedically important proteins and even cancer cells. In this review, some basic principles and recent developments in the design of SELEX process are discussed, hopefully to provide some guidelines towards performing more efficient aptamer isolation procedures. Moreover, the biomedical and bioanalytical applications of aptamers are further reviewed, based on some smart biochemical modifications of these oligonucleotide structures. PMID:21838693

  2. Stimulus selection and tracking during urination: autoshaping directed behavior with toilet targets.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, R K

    1977-01-01

    A simple procedure is described for investigating stimuli selected as targets during urination in the commode. Ten normal males preferred a floating target that could be tracked to a series of stationary targets. This technique was used to bring misdirected urinations in a severely retarded male under rapid stimulus control of a floating target in the commode. The float stimulus was also evaluated with nine institionalized, moderately retarded males and results indicated rapid autoshaping of directed urination without the use of verbal instructions or conventional toilet training. The technique can be applied in training children to control misdirected urinations in institution for the retarded, in psychiatric wards with regressed populations, and in certain male school dormitories. PMID:885828

  3. Lysosomal Storage Diseases—Regulating Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Onyenwoke, Rob U.; Brenman, Jay E.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a complex pathway regulated by numerous signaling events that recycles macromolecules and can be perturbed in lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). The concept of LSDs, which are characterized by aberrant, excessive storage of cellular material in lysosomes, developed following the discovery of an enzyme deficiency as the cause of Pompe disease in 1963. Great strides have since been made in better understanding the biology of LSDs. Defective lysosomal storage typically occurs in many cell types, but the nervous system, including the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, is particularly vulnerable to LSDs, being affected in two-thirds of LSDs. This review provides a summary of some of the better characterized LSDs and the pathways affected in these disorders. PMID:27081317

  4. DRAM1 regulates apoptosis through increasing protein levels and lysosomal localization of BAX

    PubMed Central

    Guan, J-J; Zhang, X-D; Sun, W; Qi, L; Wu, J-C; Qin, Z-H

    2015-01-01

    DRAM1 (DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator 1) is a TP53 target gene that modulates autophagy and apoptosis. We previously found that DRAM1 increased autophagy flux by promoting lysosomal acidification and protease activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis are not clearly defined. Here we report a novel pathway by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis involving BAX and lysosomes. A549 or HeLa cells were treated with the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP), or an anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Changes in the protein and mRNA levels of BAX and DRAM1 and the role of DRAM1 in BAX induction were determined. The interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and its effect on BAX degradation, BAX lysosomal localization, the release of cathepsin B and cytochrome c by BAX and the role of BAX in 3NP- or doxorubicin-induced cell death were studied. The results showed that BAX, a proapoptotic protein, was induced by DRAM1 in a transcription-independent manner. BAX was degraded by autophagy under basal conditions; however, its degradation was inhibited when DRAM1 expression was induced. There was a protein interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and this interaction prolonged the half-life of BAX. Furthermore, upregulated DRAM1 recruited BAX to lysosomes, leading to the release of lysosomal cathepsin B and cleavage of BID (BH3-interacting domain death agonist). BAX mediated the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, activation of caspase-3 and cell death partially through the lysosome-cathepsin B-tBid pathway. These results indicate that DRAM1 regulates apoptosis by inhibiting BAX degradation. In addition to mitochondria, lysosomes may also be involved in BAX-initiated apoptosis. PMID:25633293

  5. A fluorescent indicator for imaging lysosomal zinc(II) with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-enhanced photostability and a narrow band of emission.

    PubMed

    Sreenath, Kesavapillai; Yuan, Zhao; Allen, John R; Davidson, Michael W; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a strategy to transfer the zinc(II) sensitivity of a fluoroionophore with low photostability and a broad emission band to a bright and photostable fluorophore with a narrow emission band. The two fluorophores are covalently connected to afford an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) conjugate. The FRET donor in the conjugate is a zinc(II)-sensitive arylvinylbipyridyl fluoroionophore, the absorption and emission of which undergo bathochromic shifts upon zinc(II) coordination. When the FRET donor is excited, efficient intramolecular energy transfer occurs to result in the emission of the acceptor boron dipyrromethene (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene or BODIPY) as a function of zinc(II) concentration. The broad emission band of the donor/zinc(II) complex is transformed into the strong, narrow emission band of the BODIPY acceptor in the FRET conjugates, which can be captured within the narrow emission window that is preferred for multicolor imaging experiments. In addition to competing with other nonradiative decay processes of the FRET donor, the rapid intramolecular FRET of the excited FRET-conjugate molecule protects the donor fluorophore from photobleaching, thus enhancing the photostability of the indicator. FRET conjugates 3 and 4 contain aliphatic amino groups, which selectively target lysosomes in mammalian cells. This subcellular localization preference was verified by using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which also shows the zinc(II)-enhanced emission of 3 and 4 in lysosomes. It was further shown using two-color structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which is capable of extending the lateral resolution over the Abbe diffraction limit by a factor of two, that the morpholino-functionalized compound 4 localizes in the interior of lysosomes, rather than anchoring on the lysosomal membranes, of live HeLa cells. PMID:25382395

  6. A Fluorescent Indicator for Imaging Lysosomal Zinc(II) with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Enhanced Photostability and a Narrow Band of Emission.

    PubMed

    Sreenath, Kesavapillai; Yuan, Zhao; Allen, John R; Davidson, Michael W; Zhu, Lei

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a strategy to transfer the zinc(II) sensitivity of a fluoroionophore with low photostability and a broad emission band to a bright and photostable fluorophore with a narrow emission band. The two fluorophores are covalently connected to afford an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) conjugate. The FRET donor in the conjugate is a zinc(II)-sensitive arylvinylbipyridyl fluoroionophore, the absorption and emission of which undergo bathochromic shifts upon zinc(II) coordination. When the FRET donor is excited, efficient intramolecular energy transfer occurs to result in the emission of the acceptor boron dipyrromethene (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene or BODIPY) as a function of zinc(II) concentration. The broad emission band of the donor/zinc(II) complex is transformed into the strong, narrow emission band of the BODIPY acceptor in the FRET conjugates, which can be captured within the narrow emission window that is preferred for multicolor imaging experiments. In addition to competing with other nonradiative decay processes of the FRET donor, the rapid intramolecular FRET of the excited FRET-conjugate molecule protects the donor fluorophore from photobleaching, thus enhancing the photostability of the indicator. FRET conjugates 3 and 4 contain aliphatic amino groups, which selectively target lysosomes in mammalian cells. This subcellular localization preference was verified by using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which also shows the zinc(II)-enhanced emission of 3 and 4 in lysosomes. It was further shown using two-color structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which is capable of extending the lateral resolution over the Abbe diffraction limit by a factor of two, that the morpholino-functionalized compound 4 localizes in the interior of lysosomes, rather than anchoring on the lysosomal membranes, of live HeLa cells. PMID:25378058

  7. A Fluorescent Indicator for Imaging Lysosomal Zinc(II) with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Enhanced Photostability and a Narrow Band of Emission

    PubMed Central

    Sreenath, Kesavapillai; Yuan, Zhao; Allen, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a strategy to transfer the zinc(II) sensitivity of a fluoroionophore with low photostability and a broad emission band to a bright and photostable fluorophore with a narrow emission band. The two fluorophores are covalently connected to afford an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) conjugate. The FRET donor in the conjugate is a zinc(II)-sensitive arylvinylbipyridyl fluoroionophore, the absorption and emission of which undergo bathochromic shifts upon zinc(II) coordination. When the FRET donor is excited, efficient intramolecular energy transfer occurs to result in the emission of the acceptor boron dipyrromethene (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene or BODIPY) as a function of zinc(II) concentration. The broad emission band of the donor/zinc(II) complex is transformed into the strong, narrow emission band of the BODIPY acceptor in the FRET conjugates, which can be captured within the narrow emission window that is preferred for multicolor imaging experiments. In addition to competing with other nonradiative decay processes of the FRET donor, the rapid intramolecular FRET of the excited FRET-conjugate molecule protects the donor fluorophore from photobleaching, thus enhancing the photostability of the indicator. FRET conjugates 3 and 4 contain aliphatic amino groups, which selectively target lysosomes in mammalian cells. This subcellular localization preference was verified by using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which also shows the zinc(II)-enhanced emission of 3 and 4 in lysosomes. It was further shown using two-color structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which is capable of extending the lateral resolution over the Abbe diffraction limit by a factor of two, that the morpholino-functionalized compound 4 localizes in the interior of lysosomes, rather than anchoring on the lysosomal membranes, of live HeLa cells. PMID:25382395

  8. Extreme selective sweeps independently targeted the X chromosomes of the great apes

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Munch, Kasper; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien Yann; Veeramah, Krishna R.; Woerner, August E.; Hammer, Michael F.; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2015-01-01

    The unique inheritance pattern of the X chromosome exposes it to natural selection in a way that is different from that of the autosomes, potentially resulting in accelerated evolution. We perform a comparative analysis of X chromosome polymorphism in 10 great ape species, including humans. In most species, we identify striking megabase-wide regions, where nucleotide diversity is less than 20% of the chromosomal average. Such regions are found exclusively on the X chromosome. The regions overlap partially among species, suggesting that the underlying targets are partly shared among species. The regions have higher proportions of singleton SNPs, higher levels of population differentiation, and a higher nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution ratio than the rest of the X chromosome. We show that the extent to which diversity is reduced is incompatible with direct selection or the action of background selection and soft selective sweeps alone, and therefore, we suggest that very strong selective sweeps have independently targeted these specific regions in several species. The only genomic feature that we can identify as strongly associated with loss of diversity is the location of testis-expressed ampliconic genes, which also have reduced diversity around them. We hypothesize that these genes may be responsible for selective sweeps in the form of meiotic drive caused by an intragenomic conflict in male meiosis. PMID:25941379

  9. Arylsulfatase K, a Novel Lysosomal Sulfatase*

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmann, Elena Marie; Westendorf, Eva; Kalus, Ina; Pringle, Thomas H.; Lübke, Torben; Dierks, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The human sulfatase family has 17 members, 13 of which have been characterized biochemically. These enzymes specifically hydrolyze sulfate esters in glycosaminoglycans, sulfolipids, or steroid sulfates, thereby playing key roles in cellular degradation, cell signaling, and hormone regulation. The loss of sulfatase activity has been linked to severe pathophysiological conditions such as lysosomal storage disorders, developmental abnormalities, or cancer. A novel member of this family, arylsulfatase K (ARSK), was identified bioinformatically through its conserved sulfatase signature sequence directing posttranslational generation of the catalytic formylglycine residue in sulfatases. However, overall sequence identity of ARSK with other human sulfatases is low (18–22%). Here we demonstrate that ARSK indeed shows desulfation activity toward arylsulfate pseudosubstrates. When expressed in human cells, ARSK was detected as a 68-kDa glycoprotein carrying at least four N-glycans of both the complex and high-mannose type. Purified ARSK turned over p-nitrocatechol and p-nitrophenyl sulfate. This activity was dependent on cysteine 80, which was verified to undergo conversion to formylglycine. Kinetic parameters were similar to those of several lysosomal sulfatases involved in degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. An acidic pH optimum (∼4.6) and colocalization with LAMP1 verified lysosomal functioning of ARSK. Further, it carries mannose 6-phosphate, indicating lysosomal sorting via mannose 6-phosphate receptors. ARSK mRNA expression was found in all tissues tested, suggesting a ubiquitous physiological substrate and a so far non-classified lysosomal storage disorder in the case of ARSK deficiency, as shown before for all other lysosomal sulfatases. PMID:23986440

  10. Endo-lysosomal dysfunction in human proximal tubular epithelial cells deficient for lysosomal cystine transporter cystinosin.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; De Leo, Maria Giovanna; Van Den Heuvel, Lambertus; Pastore, Anna; Dijkman, Henry; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Levtchenko, Elena N

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles. PMID:25811383

  11. Endo-Lysosomal Dysfunction in Human Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells Deficient for Lysosomal Cystine Transporter Cystinosin

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Heuvel, Lambertus; Pastore, Anna; Dijkman, Henry; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC) deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles. PMID:25811383

  12. Diverse selective regimes shape genetic diversity at ADAR genes and at their coding targets

    PubMed Central

    Forni, Diego; Mozzi, Alessandra; Pontremoli, Chiara; Vertemara, Jacopo; Pozzoli, Uberto; Biasin, Mara; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele; Sironi, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing operated by ADAR enzymes is extremely common in mammals. Several editing events in coding regions have pivotal physiological roles and affect protein sequence (recoding events) or function. We analyzed the evolutionary history of the 3 ADAR family genes and of their coding targets. Evolutionary analysis indicated that ADAR evolved adaptively in primates, with the strongest selection in the unique N-terminal domain of the interferon-inducible isoform. Positively selected residues in the human lineage were also detected in the ADAR deaminase domain and in the RNA binding domains of ADARB1 and ADARB2. During the recent history of human populations distinct variants in the 3 genes increased in frequency as a result of local selective pressures. Most selected variants are located within regulatory regions and some are in linkage disequilibrium with eQTLs in monocytes. Finally, analysis of conservation scores of coding editing sites indicated that editing events are counter-selected within regions that are poorly tolerant to change. Nevertheless, a minority of recoding events occurs at highly conserved positions and possibly represents the functional fraction. These events are enriched in pathways related to HIV-1 infection and to epidermis/hair development. Thus, both ADAR genes and their targets evolved under variable selective regimes, including purifying and positive selection. Pressures related to immune response likely represented major drivers of evolution for ADAR genes. As for their coding targets, we suggest that most editing events are slightly deleterious, although a minority may be beneficial and contribute to antiviral response and skin homeostasis. PMID:25826567

  13. Diverse selective regimes shape genetic diversity at ADAR genes and at their coding targets.

    PubMed

    Forni, Diego; Mozzi, Alessandra; Pontremoli, Chiara; Vertemara, Jacopo; Pozzoli, Uberto; Biasin, Mara; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele; Sironi, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing operated by ADAR enzymes is extremely common in mammals. Several editing events in coding regions have pivotal physiological roles and affect protein sequence (recoding events) or function. We analyzed the evolutionary history of the 3 ADAR family genes and of their coding targets. Evolutionary analysis indicated that ADAR evolved adaptively in primates, with the strongest selection in the unique N-terminal domain of the interferon-inducible isoform. Positively selected residues in the human lineage were also detected in the ADAR deaminase domain and in the RNA binding domains of ADARB1 and ADARB2. During the recent history of human populations distinct variants in the 3 genes increased in frequency as a result of local selective pressures. Most selected variants are located within regulatory regions and some are in linkage disequilibrium with eQTLs in monocytes. Finally, analysis of conservation scores of coding editing sites indicated that editing events are counter-selected within regions that are poorly tolerant to change. Nevertheless, a minority of recoding events occurs at highly conserved positions and possibly represents the functional fraction. These events are enriched in pathways related to HIV-1 infection and to epidermis/hair development. Thus, both ADAR genes and their targets evolved under variable selective regimes, including purifying and positive selection. Pressures related to immune response likely represented major drivers of evolution for ADAR genes. As for their coding targets, we suggest that most editing events are slightly deleterious, although a minority may be beneficial and contribute to antiviral response and skin homeostasis. PMID:25826567

  14. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  15. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S.; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  16. Selection strategy to generate aptamer pairs that bind to distinct sites on protein targets.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qiang; Wang, Jinpeng; Ahmad, Kareem M; Csordas, Andrew T; Zhou, Jiehua; Nie, Jeff; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Rossi, John J; Soh, H Tom

    2012-06-19

    Many analytical techniques benefit greatly from the use of affinity reagent pairs, wherein each reagent recognizes a discrete binding site on a target. For example, antibody pairs have been widely used to dramatically increase the specificity of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Nucleic acid-based aptamers offer many advantageous features relative to protein-based affinity reagents, including well-established chemical synthesis, thermostability, and low production cost. However, the generation of suitable aptamer pairs has posed a significant challenge, and few such pairs have been reported to date. To address this important challenge, we present multivalent aptamer isolation systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (MAI-SELEX), a technique designed for the efficient selection of aptamer pairs. In contrast to conventional selection methods, our method utilizes two selection modules to generate separate aptamer pools that recognize distinct binding sites on a single target. Using MAI-SELEX, we have isolated two groups of 2'-fluoro-modified RNA aptamers that specifically recognize the αV or β3 subunits of integrin αVβ3. These aptamers exhibit low nanomolar affinities for their targets, with minimal cross-reactivity to other closely related integrin homologues. Moreover, we show that these aptamer pairs do not interfere with each other's binding and effectively detect the target even in complex mixtures such as undiluted serum. PMID:22624874

  17. Selection Strategy to Generate Aptamer Pairs that Bind to Distinct Sites on Protein Targets

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Qiang; Wang, Jinpeng; Ahmad, Kareem M.; Csordas, Andrew; Zhou, Jiehua; Nie, Jeff; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A.; Rossi, John J.; Soh, H. Tom

    2012-01-01

    Many analytical techniques benefit greatly from the use of affinity reagent pairs, wherein each reagent recognizes a discrete binding site on a target. For example, antibody pairs have been widely used to dramatically increase the specificity of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Nucleic acid-based aptamers offer many advantageous features relative to protein-based affinity reagents, including well-established chemical synthesis, thermostability and low production cost. However, the generation of suitable aptamer pairs has posed a significant challenge, and few such pairs have been reported to date. To address this important challenge, we present Multivalent Aptamer Isolation SELEX (MAI-SELEX), a technique designed for the efficient selection of aptamer pairs. In contrast to conventional selection methods, our method utilizes two selection modules to generate separate aptamer pools that recognize distinct binding sites on a single target. Using MAI-SELEX, we have isolated two groups of 2′-fluoro-modified RNA aptamers that specifically recognize the αV or β3 subunits of integrin αVβ3. These aptamers exhibit low nanomolar affinities for their targets, with minimal cross-reactivity to other closely related integrin homologs. Moreover, we show that these aptamer pairs do not interfere with each other’s binding, and effectively detect the target even in complex mixtures such as undiluted serum. PMID:22624874

  18. A new lactoferrin- and iron-dependent lysosomal death pathway is induced by benzo[a]pyrene in hepatic epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorria, Morgane; Tekpli, Xavier; Rissel, Mary |; Sergent, Odile; Huc, Laurence |; Landvik, Nina; Fardel, Olivier; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Therese |; Holme, Jorn A.; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique |

    2008-04-15

    While lysosomal disruption seems to be a late step of necrosis, a moderate lysosomal destabilization has been suggested to participate early in the apoptotic cascade. The origin of lysosomal dysfunction and its precise role in apoptosis or apoptosis-like process still needs to be clarified, especially upon carcinogen exposure. In this study, we focused on the implication of lysosomes in cell death induced by the prototype carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P; 50 nM) in rat hepatic epithelial F258 cells. We first demonstrated that B[a]P affected lysosomal morphology (increase in size) and pH (alkalinization), and that these changes were involved in caspase-3 activation and cell death. Subsequently, we showed that lysosomal modifications were partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction, and that lysosomes together with mitochondria participate in B[a]P-induced oxidative stress. Using two iron chelators (desferrioxamine and deferiprone) and siRNA targeting the lysosomal iron-binding protease lactoferrin, we further demonstrated that both lysosomal iron content and lactoferrin were required for caspase-3 activation and apoptosis-like cell death.

  19. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering increases host cell susceptibility to invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms and resistance to tissue culture trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Cristian; Real, Fernando; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental question to be clarified concerning the host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi is whether the insect-borne and mammalian-stage parasites use similar mechanisms for invasion. To address that question, we analysed the cell invasion capacity of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT) and tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT) under diverse conditions. Incubation of parasites for 1 h with HeLa cells in nutrient-deprived medium, a condition that triggered lysosome biogenesis and scattering, increased MT invasion and reduced TCT entry into cells. Sucrose-induced lysosome biogenesis increased HeLa cell susceptibility to MT and resistance to TCT. Treatment of cells with rapamycin, which inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), induced perinuclear lysosome accumulation and reduced MT invasion while augmenting TCT invasion. Metacylic trypomastigotes, but not TCT, induced mTOR dephosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a mTOR-associated lysosome biogenesis regulator. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering was stimulated upon HeLa cell interaction with MT but not with TCT. Recently, internalized MT, but not TCT, were surrounded by colocalized lysosome marker LAMP2 and mTOR. The recombinant gp82 protein, the MT-specific surface molecule that mediates invasion, induced mTOR dephosphorylation, nuclear TFEB translocation and lysosome biogenesis/scattering. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that MT invasion is mainly lysosome-dependent, whereas TCT entry is predominantly lysosome-independent. PMID:26572924

  20. Lysosomal enzyme cytochemistry in acute leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mann, J. R.; Simpson, J. S.; Munkley, R. M.; Stuart, J.

    1971-01-01

    A cytochemical study of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase in 60 cases of acute leukaemia has shown a qualitative difference in the cytoplasmic distribution of the enzyme between blast cells of the lymphoid and myeloid cell series. This difference provides a useful additional method for cytochemical classification of cell type and is superior in this respect to the other lysosomal enzymes studied (aryl sulphatase and acid phosphatase). The β-glucuronidase reaction is recommended in those cases of acute leukaemia in which the periodic acid-Schiff reaction is negative or equivocal. Images PMID:4110790

  1. A Proteolytic Cascade Controls Lysosome Rupture and Necrotic Cell Death Mediated by Lysosome-Destabilizing Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Muehlbauer, Stefan M.; Chandran, Kartik; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have linked necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins to the adaptive immune response mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants, alum and Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). However, the mechanism by which lysosome-destabilizing agents trigger necrosis and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins is poorly understood. The proteasome is a cellular complex that has been shown to regulate both necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins. We found that the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitors, MG115 and MG132, block lysosome rupture, degradation of inflammatory proteins and necrotic cell death mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing peptide LLOMe. However, non-aldehyde proteasome inhibitors failed to prevent LLOMe-induced cell death suggesting that aldehyde proteasome inhibitors triggered a pleotropic effect. We have previously shown that cathepsin C controls lysosome rupture, necrotic cell death and the adaptive immune response mediated by LLOMe. Using recombinant cathepsin C, we found that aldehyde proteasome inhibitors directly block cathepsin C, which presumably prevents LLOMe toxicity. The cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me also blocks lysosome rupture and necrotic cell death mediated by a wide range of necrosis inducers, including LLOMe. Using cathepsin-deficient cells and recombinant cathepsins, we demonstrate that the cathepsins B and C are not required for the CA-074-Me block of necrotic cell death. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants trigger an early proteolytic cascade, involving cathepsin C and a CA-074-Me-dependent protease. Identification of these early events leading to lysosome rupture will be crucial in our understanding of processes controlling necrotic cell death and immune responses mediated by lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants. PMID:24893007

  2. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5’-end including the 5’-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer. PMID:26221730

  3. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    PubMed

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer. PMID:26221730

  4. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam radiation or chemotherapy, with fewer side effects and improved quality of life. PMID:26901566

  5. Target selection and comparison of mission design for space debris removal by DLR's advanced study group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pas, Niels; Lousada, Joao; Terhes, Claudia; Bernabeu, Marc; Bauer, Waldemar

    2014-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem. Models show that the Kessler syndrome, the exponential growth of debris due to collisions, has become unavoidable unless an active debris removal program is initiated. The debris population in LEO with inclination between 60° and 95° is considered as the most critical zone. In order to stabilize the debris population in orbit, especially in LEO, 5 to 10 objects will need to be removed every year. The unique circumstances of such a mission could require that several objects are removed with a single launch. This will require a mission to rendezvous with a multitude of objects orbiting on different altitudes, inclinations and planes. Removal models have assumed that the top priority targets will be removed first. However this will lead to a suboptimal mission design and increase the ΔV-budget. Since there is a multitude of targets to choose from, the targets can be selected for an optimal mission design. In order to select a group of targets for a removal mission the orbital parameters and political constraints should also be taken into account. Within this paper a number of the target selection criteria are presented. The possible mission targets and their order of retrieval is dependent on the mission architecture. A comparison between several global mission architectures is given. Under consideration are 3 global missions of which a number of parameters are varied. The first mission launches multiple separate deorbit kits. The second launches a mother craft with deorbit kits. The third launches an orbital tug which pulls the debris in a lower orbit, after which a deorbit kit performs the final deorbit burn. A RoM mass and cost comparison is presented. The research described in this paper has been conducted as part of an active debris removal study by the Advanced Study Group (ASG). The ASG is an interdisciplinary student group working at the DLR, analyzing existing technologies and developing new ideas into preliminary concepts.

  6. Using Multiplexed Assays of Oncogenic Drivers in Lung Cancers to Select Targeted Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kris, Mark G.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Berry, Lynne D.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Iafrate, A. John; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Aronson, Samuel L.; Su, Pei-Fang; Shyr, Yu; Camidge, D. Ross; Sequist, Lecia V.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Garon, Edward B.; Pao, William; Rudin, Charles; Schiller, Joan; Haura, Eric B.; Socinski, Mark; Shirai, Keisuke; Chen, Heidi; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Ladanyi, Marc; Kugler, Kelly; Minna, John D.; Bunn, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Targeting oncogenic drivers (genomic alterations critical to cancer development and maintenance) has transformed the care of patients with lung adenocarcinomas. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium was formed to perform multiplexed assays testing adenocarcinomas of the lung for drivers in 10 genes to enable clinicians to select targeted treatments and enroll patients into clinical trials. OBJECTIVES To determine the frequency of oncogenic drivers in patients with lung adenocarcinomas and to use the data to select treatments targeting the identified driver(s) and measure survival. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS From 2009 through 2012, 14 sites in the United States enrolled patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinomas and a performance status of 0 through 2 and tested their tumors for 10 drivers. Information was collected on patients, therapies, and survival. INTERVENTIONS Tumors were tested for 10 oncogenic drivers, and results were used to select matched targeted therapies. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Determination of the frequency of oncogenic drivers, the proportion of patients treated with genotype-directed therapy, and survival. RESULTS From 2009 through 2012, tumors from 1007 patients were tested for at least 1 gene and 733 for 10 genes (patients with full genotyping). An oncogenic driver was found in 466 of 733 patients (64%). Among these 733 tumors, 182 tumors (25%) had the KRAS driver; sensitizing EGFR, 122 (17%); ALK rearrangements, 57 (8%); other EGFR, 29 (4%); 2 or more genes, 24 (3%); ERBB2 (formerly HER2), 19 (3%); BRAF, 16 (2%); PIK3CA, 6 (<1%); MET amplification, 5 (<1%); NRAS, 5 (<1%); MEK1, 1 (<1%); AKT1, 0. Results were used to select a targeted therapy or trial in 275 of 1007 patients (28%). The median survival was 3.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.96-7.70) for the 260 patients with an oncogenic driver and genotype-directed therapy compared with 2.4 years (IQR, 0.88-6.20) for the 318 patients with any oncogenic driver(s) who did not receive genotype-directed therapy (propensity scoreadjusted hazard ratio, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.53-0.9], P = .006). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Actionable drivers were detected in 64% of lung adenocarcinomas. Multiplexed testing aided physicians in selecting therapies. Although individuals with drivers receiving a matched targeted agent lived longer, randomized trials are required to determine if targeting therapy based on oncogenic drivers improves survival. PMID:24846037

  7. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  8. Gene expression levels are a target of recent natural selection in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Stranger, Barbara E; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression may represent an important mode of human adaptation. However, to date, there are relatively few known examples in which selection has been shown to act directly on levels or patterns of gene expression. In order to test whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that affect gene expression in cis are frequently targets of positive natural selection in humans, we analyzed genome-wide SNP and expression data from cell lines associated with the International HapMap Project. Using a haplotype-based test for selection that was designed to detect incomplete selective sweeps, we found that SNPs showing signals of selection are more likely than random SNPs to be associated with gene expression levels in cis. This signal is significant in the Yoruba (which is the population that shows the strongest signals of selection overall) and shows a trend in the same direction in the other HapMap populations. Our results argue that selection on gene expression levels is an important type of human adaptation. Finally, our work provides an analytical framework for tackling a more general problem that will become increasingly important: namely, testing whether selection signals overlap significantly with SNPs that are associated with phenotypes of interest. PMID:19091723

  9. Selective targeting of melanoma by PEG-masked protein-based multifunctional nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vannucci, Luca; Falvo, Elisabetta; Fornara, Manuela; Di Micco, Patrizio; Benada, Oldrich; Krizan, Jiri; Svoboda, Jan; Hulikova-Capkova, Katarina; Morea, Veronica; Boffi, Alberto; Ceci, Pierpaolo

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle-based systems are promising for the development of imaging and therapeutic agents. The main advantage of nanoparticles over traditional systems lies in the possibility of loading multiple functionalities onto a single molecule, which are useful for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. These functionalities include targeting moieties which are able to recognize receptors overexpressed by specific cells and tissues. However, targeted delivery of nanoparticles requires an accurate system design. We present here a rationally designed, genetically engineered, and chemically modified protein-based nanoplatform for cell/tissue-specific targeting. Methods Our nanoparticle constructs were based on the heavy chain of the human protein ferritin (HFt), a highly symmetrical assembly of 24 subunits enclosing a hollow cavity. HFt-based nanoparticles were produced using both genetic engineering and chemical functionalization methods to impart several functionalities, ie, the α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide as a melanoma-targeting moiety, stabilizing and HFt-masking polyethylene glycol molecules, rhodamine fluorophores, and magnetic resonance imaging agents. The constructs produced were extensively characterized by a number of physicochemical techniques, and assayed for selective melanoma-targeting in vitro and in vivo. Results Our HFt-based nanoparticle constructs functionalized with the α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide moiety and polyethylene glycol molecules were specifically taken up by melanoma cells but not by other cancer cell types in vitro. Moreover, experiments in melanoma-bearing mice indicate that these constructs have an excellent tumor-targeting profile and a long circulation time in vivo. Conclusion By masking human HFt with polyethylene glycol and targeting it with an α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone peptide, we developed an HFt-based melanoma-targeting nanoplatform for application in melanoma diagnosis and treatment. These results could be of general interest, because the same strategy can be exploited to develop ad hoc nanoplatforms for specific delivery towards any cell/tissue type for which a suitable targeting moiety is available. PMID:22619508

  10. A new method to select aimpoint for airplane target at end term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijuan

    2013-10-01

    Selecting key point in airplane target as tracking aimpoint at end term is important for IR imaging missiles to improve guidance accuracy. A new aimpoint selection method proper for engineering application is proposed in this article. Other than tracking the center of plume which is the most marked property of airplanes, some point near engine is selected as aimpoint. Firstly plume and skin are extracted by using different thresholds according to their gray scale statistics and features like circularity, distance ratio and central axis are obtained to classify the image types. Then referring to these image types, the centroid of the segmented sector or a point on the line of central axis of plume sector are selected as aimpoint respectively. The algorithm has the advantage of more efficiency in both space and time consuming. Tests have shown the validity of the algorithm.

  11. BLOC-1 Is Required for Cargo-specific Sorting from Vacuolar Early Endosomes toward Lysosome-related Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi; Tenza, Danile; Truschel, Steven T.; Chou, Evelyn; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Theos, Alexander C.; Lamoreux, M. Lynn; Di Pietro, Santiago M.; Starcevic, Marta; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C.; Raposo, Graa

    2007-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a genetic disorder characterized by defects in the formation and function of lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes. HPS in humans or mice is caused by mutations in any of 15 genes, five of which encode subunits of biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex (BLOC)-1, a protein complex with no known function. Here, we show that BLOC-1 functions in selective cargo exit from early endosomes toward melanosomes. BLOC-1deficient melanocytes accumulate the melanosomal protein tyrosinase-related protein-1 (Tyrp1), but not other melanosomal proteins, in endosomal vacuoles and the cell surface due to failed biosynthetic transit from early endosomes to melanosomes and consequent increased endocytic flux. The defects are corrected by restoration of the missing BLOC-1 subunit. Melanocytes from HPS model mice lacking a different protein complex, BLOC-2, accumulate Tyrp1 in distinct downstream endosomal intermediates, suggesting that BLOC-1 and BLOC-2 act sequentially in the same pathway. By contrast, intracellular Tyrp1 is correctly targeted to melanosomes in melanocytes lacking another HPS-associated protein complex, adaptor protein (AP)-3. The results indicate that melanosome maturation requires at least two cargo transport pathways directly from early endosomes to melanosomes, one pathway mediated by AP-3 and one pathway mediated by BLOC-1 and BLOC-2, that are deficient in several forms of HPS. PMID:17182842

  12. Application of support vector machine-based ranking strategies to search for target-selective compounds.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Geppert, Hanna; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Support vector machine (SVM)-based selectivity searching has recently been introduced to identify compounds in virtual screening libraries that are not only active for a target protein, but also selective for this target over a closely related member of the same protein family. In simulated virtual screening calculations, SVM-based strategies termed preference ranking and one-versus-all ranking were successfully applied to rank a database and enrich high-ranking positions with selective compounds while removing nonselective molecules from high ranks. In contrast to the original SVM approach developed for binary classification, these strategies enable learning from more than two classes, considering that distinguishing between selective, promiscuously active, and inactive compounds gives rise to a three-class prediction problem. In this chapter, we describe the extension of the one-versus-all strategy to four training classes. Furthermore, we present an adaptation of the preference ranking strategy that leads to higher recall of selective compounds than previously investigated approaches and is applicable in situations where the removal of nonselective compounds from high-ranking positions is not required. PMID:20838983

  13. Lysosomal pH Plays a Key Role in Regulation of mTOR Activity in Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yingwei; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R; Wang, Andrew; Owen, Celeste; Bajenova, Elena; Corey, Paul N; Brumell, John H; Voronov, Irina

    2016-02-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase involved in the regulation of cell growth. It has been shown to play an important role in osteoclast differentiation, particularly at the earlier stages of osteoclastogenesis. mTOR activation and function, as part of mTORC1 complex, is dependent on lysosomal localization and the vacuolar H(+) -ATPase (V-ATPase) activity; however, the precise mechanism is still not well understood. Using primary mouse osteoclasts that are known to have higher lysosomal pH due to R740S mutation in the V-ATPase a3 subunit, we investigated the role of lysosomal pH in mTORC1 signaling. Our results demonstrated that +/R740S cells had increased basal mTOR protein levels and mTORC1 activity compared to +/+ osteoclasts, while mTOR gene expression was decreased. Treatment with lysosomal inhibitors chloroquine and ammonium chloride, compounds known to raise lysosomal pH, significantly increased mTOR protein levels in +/+ cells, confirming the importance of lysosomal pH in mTOR signaling. These results also suggested that mTOR could be degraded in the lysosome. To test this hypothesis, we cultured osteoclasts with chloroquine or proteasomal inhibitor MG132. Both chloroquine and MG132 increased mTOR and p-mTOR protein levels in +/+ osteoclasts, suggesting that mTOR undergoes both lysosomal and proteasomal degradation. Treatment with cycloheximide, an inhibitor of new protein synthesis, confirmed that mTOR is constitutively expressed and degraded. These results show that, in osteoclasts, the lysosome plays a key role not only in mTOR activation but also in its deactivation through protein degradation, representing a novel molecular mechanism of mTOR regulation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 413-425, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26212375

  14. Criteria for dendritic cell receptor selection for efficient antibody-targeted vaccination.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Anika; Panozza, Scott E; Macri, Christophe; Dumont, Claire; Li, Jessica; Liu, Haiyin; Segura, Elodie; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Gupta, Nishma; Caminschi, Irina; Villadangos, Jose A; Johnston, Angus P R; Mintern, Justine D

    2015-03-15

    Ab-targeted vaccination involves targeting a receptor of choice expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) with Ag-coupled Abs. Currently, there is little consensus as to which criteria determine receptor selection to ensure superior Ag presentation and immunity. In this study, we investigated parameters of DC receptor internalization and determined how they impact Ag presentation outcomes. First, using mixed bone marrow chimeras, we established that Ag-targeted, but not nontargeted, DCs are responsible for Ag presentation in settings of Ab-targeted vaccination in vivo. Next, we analyzed parameters of DEC205 (CD205), Clec9A, CD11c, CD11b, and CD40 endocytosis and obtained quantitative measurements of internalization speed, surface turnover, and delivered Ag load. Exploiting these parameters in MHC class I (MHC I) and MHC class II (MHC II) Ag presentation assays, we showed that receptor expression level, proportion of surface turnover, or speed of receptor internalization did not impact MHC I or MHC II Ag presentation efficiency. Furthermore, the Ag load delivered to DCs did not correlate with the efficiency of MHC I or MHC II Ag presentation. In contrast, targeting Ag to CD8(+) or CD8(-) DCs enhanced MHC I or MHC II Ag presentation, respectively. Therefore, receptor expression levels, speed of internalization, and/or the amount of Ag delivered can be excluded as major determinants that dictate Ag presentation efficiency in setting of Ab-targeted vaccination. PMID:25653426

  15. Targeted drug delivery to mesothelioma cells using functionally selected internalizing human single-chain antibodies.

    PubMed

    An, Feng; Drummond, Daryl C; Wilson, Shannon; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Nishimura, Stephen L; Broaddus, V Courtney; Liu, Bin

    2008-03-01

    Mesothelioma is a malignancy of the mesothelium and current treatments are generally ineffective. One promising area of anticancer drug development is to explore tumor susceptibility to targeted therapy. To achieve efficient, targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents to mesothelioma cells, we selected a naive human single-chain (scFv) phage antibody display library directly on the surface of live mesothelioma cells to identify internalizing antibodies that target mesothelioma-associated cell surface antigens. We have identified a panel of internalizing scFvs that bind to mesothelioma cell lines derived from both epithelioid (M28) and sarcomatous (VAMT-1) types of this disease. Most importantly, these antibodies stain mesothelioma cells in situ and therefore define a panel of clinically represented tumor antigens. We have further exploited the internalizing function of these scFvs to achieve targeted intracellular drug delivery to mesothelioma cells. We showed that scFv-targeted immunoliposomes were efficiently and specifically taken up by both epithelioid and sarcomatous mesothelioma cells, but not control cells, and immunoliposomes encapsulating the small-molecule drug topotecan caused targeted killing of both types of mesothelioma cells in vitro. PMID:18319332

  16. Purification of Lysosomes Using Supraparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs).

    PubMed

    Rofe, Adam P; Pryor, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes can be rapidly isolated from tissue culture cells using supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIONs). In this protocol, colloidal iron dextran (FeDex) particles, a type of SPION, are taken up by cultured mouse macrophage cells via the endocytic pathway. The SPIONs accumulate in lysosomes, the end point of the endocytic pathway, permitting the lysosomes to be isolated magnetically. The purified lysosomes are suitable for in vitro fusion assays or for proteomic analysis. PMID:27037068

  17. Impact of high-risk conjunctions on Active Debris Removal target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, Aleksander A.; Lewis, Hugh G.; Armellin, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Space debris simulations show that if current space launches continue unchanged, spacecraft operations might become difficult in the congested space environment. It has been suggested that Active Debris Removal (ADR) might be necessary in order to prevent such a situation. Selection of objects to be targeted by ADR is considered important because removal of non-relevant objects will unnecessarily increase the cost of ADR. One of the factors to be used in this ADR target selection is the collision probability accumulated by every object. This paper shows the impact of high-probability conjunctions on the collision probability accumulated by individual objects as well as the probability of any collision occurring in orbit. Such conjunctions cannot be predicted far in advance and, consequently, not all the objects that will be involved in such dangerous conjunctions can be removed through ADR. Therefore, a debris remediation method that would address such events at short notice, and thus help prevent likely collisions, is suggested.

  18. Targeted activation of silent natural product biosynthesis pathways by reporter-guided mutant selection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Xiang, Sihai; Li, Liyuan; Wang, Bin; Rajasärkkä, Johanna; Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela, Kirsi; Ai, Guomin; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko; Yang, Keqian

    2015-03-01

    The continuously increasing genome sequencing data has revealed numerous cryptic pathways, which might encode novel secondary metabolites with interesting biological activities. However, utilization of this hidden potential has been hindered by the observation that many of these gene clusters remain silent (or poorly expressed) under laboratory conditions. Here we present reporter-guided mutant selection (RGMS) as an effective and widely applicable method for targeted activation of silent gene clusters in the native producers. The strategy takes advantage of genome-scale random mutagenesis for generation of genetic diversity and a reporter-guided selection system for the identification of the desired target-activated mutants. It was first validated in the re-activation of jadomycin biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230, where high efficiency of activation was achieved. The same strategy was then applied to a hitherto unactivable pga gene cluster in Streptomyces sp. PGA64 leading to the identification of two new anthraquinone aminoglycosides, gaudimycin D and E. PMID:25554073

  19. Designing the nanobiointerface of fluorescent nanodiamonds: highly selective targeting of glioma cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slegerova, Jitka; Hajek, Miroslav; Rehor, Ivan; Sedlak, Frantisek; Stursa, Jan; Hruby, Martin; Cigler, Petr

    2014-12-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy.Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, colloidal stability studies and cell viability studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02776k

  20. Comparison of five peptide vectors for improved brain delivery of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A.

    PubMed

    Böckenhoff, Annika; Cramer, Sandra; Wölte, Philipp; Knieling, Simeon; Wohlenberg, Claudia; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Matzner, Ulrich

    2014-02-26

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a treatment option for lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) caused by deficiencies of soluble lysosomal enzymes. ERT depends on receptor-mediated transport of intravenously injected recombinant enzyme to lysosomes of patient cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents efficient transfer of therapeutic polypeptides from the blood to the brain parenchyma and thus hinders effective treatment of LSDs with CNS involvement. We compared the potential of five brain-targeting peptides to promote brain delivery of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A (ASA). Fusion proteins between ASA and the protein transduction domain of the human immunodeficiency virus TAT protein (Tat), an Angiopep peptide (Ang-2), and the receptor-binding domains of human apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and ApoE (two versions, ApoE-I and ApoE-II) were generated. All ASA fusion proteins were enzymatically active and targeted to lysosomes when added to cultured cells. In contrast to wild-type ASA, which is taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptors, all chimeric proteins were additionally endocytosed via mannose-6-phosphate-independent routes. For ASA-Ang-2, ASA-ApoE-I, and ASA-ApoE-II, uptake was partially due to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. Transendothelial transfer in a BBB cell culture model was elevated for ASA-ApoB, ASA-ApoE-I, and ASA-ApoE-II. Brain delivery was, however, increased only for ASA-ApoE-II. ApoE-II was also superior to wild-type ASA in reducing lysosomal storage in the CNS of ASA-knock-out mice treated by ERT. Therefore, the ApoE-derived peptide appears useful to treat metachromatic leukodystrophy and possibly other neurological disorders more efficiently. PMID:24573272

  1. Diverse Actions and Target-Site Selectivity of Neonicotinoids: Structural Insights

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Kanaoka, Satoshi; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets for human and veterinary medicines as well as insecticides. Subtype-selectivity among the diverse nAChR family members is important for medicines targeting particular disorders, and pest-insect selectivity is essential for the development of safer, environmentally acceptable insecticides. Neonicotinoid insecticides selectively targeting insect nAChRs have important applications in crop protection and animal health. Members of this class exhibit strikingly diverse actions on their nAChR targets. Here we review the chemistry and diverse actions of neonicotinoids on insect and mammalian nAChRs. Electrophysiological studies on native nAChRs and on wild-type and mutagenized recombinant nAChRs have shown that basic residues particular to loop D of insect nAChRs are likely to interact electrostatically with the nitro group of neonicotinoids. In 2008, the crystal structures were published showing neonicotinoids docking into the acetylcholine binding site of molluscan acetylcholine binding proteins with homology to the ligand binding domain (LBD) of nAChRs. The crystal structures showed that 1) glutamine in loop D, corresponding to the basic residues of insect nAChRs, hydrogen bonds with the NO2 group of imidacloprid and 2) neonicotinoid-unique stacking and CH-π bonds at the LBD. A neonicotinoid-resistant strain obtained by laboratory-screening has been found to result from target site mutations, and possible reasons for this are also suggested by the crystal structures. The prospects of designing neonicotinoids that are safe not only for mammals but also for beneficial insects such as honey bees (Apis mellifera) are discussed in terms of interactions with non-α nAChR subunits. PMID:19321668

  2. Photostick: a method for selective isolation of target cells from culture

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Miao-Ping; Werley, Christopher A.; Farhi, Samouil L.

    2015-01-01

    Sorting of target cells from a heterogeneous pool is technically difficult when the selection criterion is complex, e.g. a dynamic response, a morphological feature, or a combination of multiple parameters. At present, mammalian cell selections are typically performed either via static fluorescence (e.g. fluorescence activated cell sorter), via survival (e.g. antibiotic resistance), or via serial operations (flow cytometry, laser capture microdissection). Here we present a simple protocol for selecting cells based on any static or dynamic property that can be identified by video microscopy and image processing. The “photostick” technique uses a cell-impermeant photochemical crosslinker and digital micromirror array-based patterned illumination to immobilize selected cells on the culture dish. Other cells are washed away with mild protease treatment. The crosslinker also labels the selected cells with a fluorescent dye and a biotin for later identification. The photostick protocol preserves cell viability, permits genetic profiling of selected cells, and can be performed with complex functional selection criteria such as neuronal firing patterns. PMID:25705368

  3. Microfluidics for Drug Discovery and Development: From Target Selection to Product Lifecycle Management

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lifeng; Chung, Bong Geun; Langer, Robert; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies’ ability to miniaturize assays and increase experimental throughput have generated significant interest in the drug discovery and development domain. These characteristics make microfluidic systems a potentially valuable tool for many drug discovery and development applications. Here, we review the recent advances of microfluidic devices for drug discovery and development and highlight their applications in different stages of the process, including target selection, lead identification, preclinical tests, clinical trials, chemical synthesis, formulations studies, and product management. PMID:18190858

  4. Designing the nanobiointerface of fluorescent nanodiamonds: highly selective targeting of glioma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Slegerova, Jitka; Hajek, Miroslav; Rehor, Ivan; Sedlak, Frantisek; Stursa, Jan; Hruby, Martin; Cigler, Petr

    2015-01-14

    Core-shell nanoparticles based on fluorescent nanodiamonds coated with a biocompatible N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer shell were developed for background-free near-infrared imaging of cancer cells. The particles showed excellent colloidal stability in buffers and culture media. After conjugation with a cyclic RGD peptide they selectively targeted integrin αvβ3 receptors on glioblastoma cells with high internalization efficacy. PMID:25132312

  5. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore as a selective target for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong H.; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hee S.; Chung, Hyun H.; Song, Yong S.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is the ultimate step in dozens of lethal apoptotic signal transduction pathways which converge on mitochondria. One of the representative systems proposed to be responsible for the MOMP is the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). Although the molecular composition of the MPTP is not clearly understood, the MPTP attracts much interest as a promising target for resolving two conundrums regarding cancer treatment: tumor selectivity and resistance to treatment. The regulation of the MPTP is closely related to metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells including mitochondrial alterations. Restoration of deregulated apoptotic machinery in cancer cells by tumor-specific modulation of the MPTP could therefore be a promising anti-cancer strategy. Currently, a number of MPTP-targeting agents are under pre-clinical and clinical studies. Here, we reviewed the structure and regulation of the MPTP as well as the current status of the development of promising MPTP-targeting drugs. PMID:23483560

  6. Spectral selective radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.

    2014-08-11

    The radio frequency emissions scanned over broad spectral range (30 MHz–1 GHz) from single shot nanosecond (7 ns) and picosecond (30 ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of different target materials (atmospheric air, aluminum, and copper) are presented. The dominant emissions from ns-LIB, compared to those from the ps-LIB, indicate the presence and importance of atomic and molecular clusters in the plasma. The dynamics of laser pulse-matter interaction and the properties of the target materials were found to play an important role in determining the plasma parameters which subsequently determine the emissions. Thus, with a particular laser and target material, the emissions were observed to be spectral selective. The radiation detection capability was observed to be relatively higher, when the polarization of the input laser and the antenna is same.

  7. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-01-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites as a promising tool for applying selective hunting to the management of transmissible diseases in a game species. PMID:24324876

  8. Close encounters of the lysosome/peroxisome kind

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yui; Strunk, Bethany S.; Weisman, Lois S.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes provide a major source for cellular cholesterol; however, most of this cholesterol is trafficked to the plasma membrane via unknown mechanisms. In this issue of Cell, Chu et al. identify an unexpected role for peroxisomes in the transport of cholesterol from the lysosome to the plasma membrane via a lysosome-peroxisome membrane contact site. PMID:25860602

  9. New affinity probe targeting VEGF receptors for kinase inhibitor selectivity profiling by chemical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ku, Xin; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Helm, Dominic; Médard, Guillaume; Kuster, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Solid tumors are dependent for growth on nutrients and the supply of oxygen, which they often acquire via neoangiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factors and the corresponding receptors (VEGFRs) play central roles in this process, and consequently, the blockade of this pathway is one therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. A number of small molecules inhibiting VEGFR inhibitors have been developed for clinical use, and a comprehensive view of target selectivity is important to assess the therapeutic as well as risk potential of a drug molecule. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics allow analyses of drug-target interactions under close-to-physiological conditions, and in this study, we report on the design, synthesis, and application of a small molecule affinity probe as a tool for the selectivity profiling of VEGFR and other kinase inhibitors. The probe is capable of binding >132 protein kinases, including angiokinases such as VEGFRs, PDGFRs, and c-KIT from lysates of cancer cell lines or human placenta tissue. Combining the new probe with Kinobeads in competitive binding assays, we were able to identify nanomolar off-targets of the VEGFR/PDGFR inhibitors pazopanib and axitinib. Because of its broad binding spectrum, the developed chemical tool can be generically used for the discovery of kinase inhibitor targets, which may contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of action of such drugs. PMID:24712744

  10. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  11. Synthetic, Non-saccharide, Glycosaminoglycan Mimetics Selectively Target Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective targeting of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) is a paradigm-shifting approach. We hypothesized that CSCs can be targeted by interfering with functions of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, which play key roles in cancer cell growth, invasion and metastasis. We developed a tandem, dual screen strategy involving (1) assessing inhibition of monolayer versus spheroid growth and (2) assessing inhibition of primary versus secondary spheroid growth to identify G2.2, a unique sulfated nonsaccharide GAG mimetic (NSGM) from a focused library of 53 molecules, as a selective inhibitor of colon CSCs. The NSGM down-regulated several CSC markers through regulation of gene transcription, while closely related, inactive NSGMs G1.4 and G4.1 demonstrated no such changes. G2.2s effects on CSCs were mediated, in part, through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of self-renewal factors. Overall, this work presents the proof-of-principle that CSCs can be selectively targeted through novel NSGMs, which are likely to advance fundamental understanding on CSCs while also aiding development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24968014

  12. Risk-targeted selection of agricultural holdings for post-epidemic surveillance: estimation of efficiency gains.

    PubMed

    Handel, Ian G; de C Bronsvoort, Barend M; Forbes, John F; Woolhouse, Mark E J

    2011-01-01

    Current post-epidemic sero-surveillance uses random selection of animal holdings. A better strategy may be to estimate the benefits gained by sampling each farm and use this to target selection. In this study we estimate the probability of undiscovered infection for sheep farms in Devon after the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak using the combination of a previously published model of daily infection risk and a simple model of probability of discovery of infection during the outbreak. This allows comparison of the system sensitivity (ability to detect infection in the area) of arbitrary, random sampling compared to risk-targeted selection across a full range of sampling budgets. We show that it is possible to achieve 95% system sensitivity by sampling, on average, 945 farms with random sampling and 184 farms with risk-targeted sampling. We also examine the effect of ordering samples by risk to expedite return to a disease-free status. Risk ordering the sampling process results in detection of positive farms, if present, 15.6 days sooner than with randomly ordered sampling, assuming 50 farms are tested per day. PMID:21674022

  13. A RANKL–PKCβ–TFEB signaling cascade is necessary for lysosomal biogenesis in osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Ferron, Mathieu; Settembre, Carmine; Shimazu, Junko; Lacombe, Julie; Kato, Shigeaki; Rawlings, David J.; Ballabio, Andrea; Karsenty, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Bone resorption by osteoclasts requires a large number of lysosomes that release proteases in the resorption lacuna. Whether lysosomal biogenesis is a consequence of the action of transcriptional regulators of osteoclast differentiation or is under the control of a different and specific transcriptional pathway remains unknown. We show here, through cell-based assays and cell-specific gene deletion experiments in mice, that the osteoclast differentiation factor RANKL promotes lysosomal biogenesis once osteoclasts are differentiated through the selective activation of TFEB, a member of the MITF/TFE family of transcription factors. This occurs following PKCβ phosphorylation of TFEB on three serine residues located in its last 15 amino acids. This post-translational modification stabilizes and increases the activity of this transcription factor. Supporting these biochemical observations, mice lacking in osteoclasts—either TFEB or PKCβ—show decreased lysosomal gene expression and increased bone mass. Altogether, these results uncover a RANKL-dependent signaling pathway taking place in differentiated osteoclasts and culminating in the activation of TFEB to enhance lysosomal biogenesis—a necessary step for proper bone resorption. PMID:23599343

  14. Approaches for plasma membrane wounding and assessment of lysosome-mediated repair responses

    PubMed Central

    Corrotte, M.; Castro-Gomes, T.; Koushik, A.B.; Andrews, N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid plasma membrane repair is essential to restore cellular homeostasis and improve cell survival after injury. Several mechanisms for plasma membrane repair have been proposed, including formation of an intracellular vesicle patch, reduction of plasma membrane tension, lesion removal by endocytosis, and/or shedding of the wounded membrane. Under all conditions studied to date, plasma membrane repair is strictly dependent on the entry of calcium into cells, from the extracellular medium. Calcium-dependent exocytosis of lysosomes is an important early step in the plasma membrane repair process, and defects in plasma membrane repair have been observed in cells carrying mutations responsible for serious lysosomal diseases, such as Chediak–Higashi (Huynh, Roth, Ward, Kaplan, & Andrews, 2004) and Niemann–Pick Disease type A (Tam et al., 2010). A functional role for release of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase, which generates ceramide on the cell surface and triggers endocytosis, has been described (Corrotte et al., 2013; Tam et al., 2010). Therefore, procedures for measuring the extent of lysosomal fusion with the plasma membrane of wounded cells are important indicators of the cellular repair response. The importance of carefully selecting the methodology for experimental plasma membrane injury, in order not to adversely impact the membrane repair machinery, is becoming increasingly apparent. Here, we describe physiologically relevant methods to induce different types of cellular wounds, and sensitive assays to measure the ability of cells to secrete lysosomes and reseal their plasma membrane. PMID:25665445

  15. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency. PMID:25926456

  16. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the percentage of accurately modeled proteinswould rise from 50 percent (243 of 486) to 58 percent (283 of 486).Sequences and data on experimental progress on our targets are availablein the public databases Target DB and PEPCdb.

  17. Lysosomal putative RNA transporter SIDT2 mediates direct uptake of RNA by lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Shu; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Contu, Viorica Raluca; Hase, Katsunori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Hisae; Kabuta, Chihana; Wada, Keiji; Kabuta, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lysosomes are thought to be the major intracellular compartment for the degradation of macromolecules. We recently identified a novel type of autophagy, RNautophagy, where RNA is directly taken up by lysosomes in an ATP-dependent manner and degraded. However, the mechanism of RNA translocation across the lysosomal membrane and the physiological role of RNautophagy remain unclear. In the present study, we performed gain- and loss-of-function studies with isolated lysosomes, and found that SIDT2 (SID1 transmembrane family, member 2), an ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans putative RNA transporter SID-1 (systemic RNA interference deficient-1), mediates RNA translocation during RNautophagy. We also observed that SIDT2 is a transmembrane protein, which predominantly localizes to lysosomes. Strikingly, knockdown of Sidt2 inhibited up to ˜50% of total RNA degradation at the cellular level, independently of macroautophagy. Moreover, we showed that this impairment is mainly due to inhibition of lysosomal RNA degradation, strongly suggesting that RNautophagy plays a significant role in constitutive cellular RNA degradation. Our results provide a novel insight into the mechanisms of RNA metabolism, intracellular RNA transport, and atypical types of autophagy. PMID:27046251

  18. Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein-2: A New Player in Lysosome-Related Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ashley; Valeiras, Mark; Sidransky, Ellen; Tayebi, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes require the presence of many specialized proteins to facilitate their roles in cellular maintenance. One such protein that has proven to be an important player in the lysosomal field is lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 (LIMP-2), encoded by the gene SCARB2. LIMP-2 is required for the normal biogenesis and maintenance of lysosomes and endosomes and has been identified as the specific receptor for glucocerebrosidase, the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease. Research into LIMP-2 and the SCARB2 gene indicate that it may be a factor contributing to the clinical heterogeneity seen among patients with Gaucher disease. Mutations in SCARB2 have also been identified as the cause of action myoclonus renal failure (AMRF), and in some cases progressive myoclonic epilepsy. A total of 14 disease-causing SCARB2 mutations have been identified to date. The role of LIMP-2 in human pathology has expanded with its identification as a component of the intercalated disc in cardiac muscle and as a receptor for specific enteroviruses, two unanticipated findings that reaffirm the myriad roles of lysosomal proteins. Studies into the full impact of LIMP-2 deficiency and the LIMP2/glucocerebrosidase molecular pathway will lead to a better understanding of disease pathogenesis in Gaucher disease and AMRF, and to new insights into lysosomal processing, trafficking and function. PMID:24389070

  19. Targeted delivery of photosensitizers: efficacy and selectivity issues revealed by multifunctional ORMOSIL nanovectors in cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvestrel, Francesco; Moret, Francesca; Segat, Daniela; Woodhams, Josephine H.; Fracasso, Giulio; Echevarria, Iria M. Rio; Baù, Luca; Rastrelli, Federico; Compagnin, Chiara; Reddi, Elena; Fedeli, Chiara; Papini, Emanuele; Tavano, Regina; MacKenzie, Alexandra; Bovis, Melissa; Yaghini, Elnaz; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Zanini, Silvia; Boscaini, Anita; Colombatti, Marco; Mancin, Fabrizio

    2013-06-01

    PEGylated and non-PEGylated ORMOSIL nanoparticles prepared by microemulsion condensation of vinyltriethoxy-silane (VTES) were investigated in detail for their micro-structure and ability to deliver photoactive agents. With respect to pure silica nanoparticles, organic modification substantially changes the microstructure and the surface properties. This in turn leads to a modulation of both the photophysical properties of embedded photosensitizers and the interaction of the nanoparticles with biological entities such as serum proteins. The flexibility of the synthetic procedure allows the rapid preparation and screening of multifunctional nanosystems for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Selective targeting of model cancer cells was tested by using folate, an integrin specific RGD peptide and anti-EGFR antibodies. Data suggest the interference of the stealth-conferring layer (PEG) with small targeting agents, but not with bulky antibodies. Moreover, we showed that selective photokilling of tumour cells may be limited even in the case of efficient targeting because of intrinsic transport limitations of active cellular uptake mechanisms or suboptimum localization.PEGylated and non-PEGylated ORMOSIL nanoparticles prepared by microemulsion condensation of vinyltriethoxy-silane (VTES) were investigated in detail for their micro-structure and ability to deliver photoactive agents. With respect to pure silica nanoparticles, organic modification substantially changes the microstructure and the surface properties. This in turn leads to a modulation of both the photophysical properties of embedded photosensitizers and the interaction of the nanoparticles with biological entities such as serum proteins. The flexibility of the synthetic procedure allows the rapid preparation and screening of multifunctional nanosystems for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Selective targeting of model cancer cells was tested by using folate, an integrin specific RGD peptide and anti-EGFR antibodies. Data suggest the interference of the stealth-conferring layer (PEG) with small targeting agents, but not with bulky antibodies. Moreover, we showed that selective photokilling of tumour cells may be limited even in the case of efficient targeting because of intrinsic transport limitations of active cellular uptake mechanisms or suboptimum localization. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures and additional characterization of nanoparticles. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00402c

  20. Target Selection for the LBTI Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberge, A.; Kennedy, G.; Hinz, P.; Bryden, G.; Defrere, D.; Wyatt, M.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Rieke, G.; Danchi, W. C.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Serabyn, G.; Skemer, A.; LBTI-HOSTS

    2014-01-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) will survey nearby stars for faint exozodiacal dust (exozodi). About 20% of field stars have cold debris disks created by the collisions and evaporation of planetesimals. Much less is known about warm circumstellar dust, such as that found in the vicinity of the Earth in our own system. This dust is generated in asteroidal collisions and cometary breakups, and current detection limits are at best ~500 times our system's level, i.e. 500 zodi. LBTI-HOSTS will be the first survey capable of measuring exozodi at the 10 zodi level (3σ). Exozodi of this brightness would be the major source of astrophysical noise for a future space telescope aimed at direct imaging and spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets. Detections of warm dust will also reveal new information about planetary system architectures and evolution. We describe the target star selection by the LBTI Science Team to satisfy the goals of the HOSTS survey -- to fully inform target selection for a future exoEarth mission. We are interested in actual stars likely to be observed by a mission and stars whose observation will enable sensible extrapolations to those stars that cannot be observed. We integrated two approaches to generate the HOSTS target list. The mission-driven approach concentrates on F, G, and K-type stars that are the best targets for future direct observations of exoEarths, thereby providing model-independent “ground truth” dust observations. However, not every potential target of a future exoEarth mission can be observed with LBTI. The sensitivity-driven approach selects targets based only on what exozodi sensitivity could be achieved, without consideration of exoEarth mission constraints. This naturally selects more luminous stars (A and early F-type stars). In both cases, all stars are close enough to Earth such that their habitable zones are resolvable by LBTI and bright enough at N-band (10 μm) to provide excellent sensitivity. We also discuss observational and astrophysical motivations for excluding binaries of certain separations.

  1. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small families, which may have little overlap with other species of interest. Random selection of targets from one or more genomes is similar to the Pfam5000 strategy in that proteins from larger families are more likely to be chosen, but substantial effort would be spent on small families.

  2. Determinants for DNA target structure selectivity of the human LINE-1 retrotransposon endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Repanas, Kostas; Zingler, Nora; Layer, Liliana E.; Schumann, Gerald G.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Weichenrieder, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The human LINE-1 endonuclease (L1-EN) is the targeting endonuclease encoded by the human LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposon. L1-EN guides the genomic integration of new L1 and Alu elements that presently account for ?28% of the human genome. L1-EN bears considerable technological interest, because its target selectivity may ultimately be engineered to allow the site-specific integration of DNA into defined genomic locations. Based on the crystal structure, we generated L1-EN mutants to analyze and manipulate DNA target site recognition. Crystal structures and their dynamic and functional analysis show entire loop grafts to be feasible, resulting in altered specificity, while individual point mutations do not change the nicking pattern of L1-EN. Structural parameters of the DNA target seem more important for recognition than the nucleotide sequence, and nicking profiles on DNA oligonucleotides in vitro are less well defined than the respective integration site consensus in vivo. This suggests that additional factors other than the DNA nicking specificity of L1-EN contribute to the targeted integration of non-LTR retrotransposons. PMID:17626046

  3. A two-step target binding and selectivity support vector machines approach for virtual screening of dopamine receptor subtype-selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxian; Han, Bucong; Wei, Xiaona; Tan, Chunyan; Chen, Yuzong; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-01-01

    Target selective drugs, such as dopamine receptor (DR) subtype selective ligands, are developed for enhanced therapeutics and reduced side effects. In silico methods have been explored for searching DR selective ligands, but encountered difficulties associated with high subtype similarity and ligand structural diversity. Machine learning methods have shown promising potential in searching target selective compounds. Their target selective capability can be further enhanced. In this work, we introduced a new two-step support vector machines target-binding and selectivity screening method for searching DR subtype-selective ligands, which was tested together with three previously-used machine learning methods for searching D1, D2, D3 and D4 selective ligands. It correctly identified 50.6%-88.0% of the 21-408 subtype selective and 71.7%-81.0% of the 39-147 multi-subtype ligands. Its subtype selective ligand identification rates are significantly better than, and its multi-subtype ligand identification rates are comparable to the best rates of the previously used methods. Our method produced low false-hit rates in screening 13.56 M PubChem, 168,016 MDDR and 657,736 ChEMBLdb compounds. Molecular features important for subtype selectivity were extracted by using the recursive feature elimination feature selection method. These features are consistent with literature-reported features. Our method showed similar performance in searching estrogen receptor subtype selective ligands. Our study demonstrated the usefulness of the two-step target binding and selectivity screening method in searching subtype selective ligands from large compound libraries. PMID:22720033

  4. Target selection by cortical axons: alternative mechanisms to establish axonal connections in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, D D; Bicknese, A R; De Carlos, J A; Heffner, C D; Koester, S E; Kutka, L J; Terashima, T

    1990-01-01

    We have described our studies of the development of projections from layer 5 of the rat neocortex to subcortical targets in the midbrain and hindbrain. The major points are briefly summarized here. 1. Layer-5 neurons extend a primary axon out of cortex and along a spinally directed trajectory, bypassing all of their targets in the midbrain and hindbrain. These targets are later contacted exclusively by collaterals formed by a delayed interstitial branching of the primary axon, not by growth cone bifurcation. 2. Collateral branches only form at stereotypic positions, not randomly along the length of the axon. Thus, specific cues identify branch points, and the length of the primary axon well behind its growth cone responds to these cues. 3. Layer-5 neurons in diverse areas of cortex initially develop the same basic set of collateral branches, although they will permanently retain different subsets of the initial common set. Therefore, branch cues are recognized by layer-5 neurons independent of whether the collateral projection formed is functionally appropriate for the cortical region in which the neuron resides. 4. In vitro and in vivo evidence indicates that one of the major branches, which forms the corticopontine projection, is induced and directed into its target, the basilar pons, by a diffusible, target-derived, tropic signal. Thus, a chemotropic cue promotes recognition of the basilar pontine target by the primary layer-5 axons. 5. In this system, then, target selection is not the responsibility of the growth cone of the primary axon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2132832

  5. PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors: next-generation targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2015-01-01

    The pivotal roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in human cancers have inspired active development of small molecules to inhibit these lipid kinases. However, the first-generation pan-PI3K and dual-PI3K/mTOR inhibitors have encountered problems in clinical trials, with limited efficacies as a monotherapeutic agent as well as a relatively high rate of side effects. It is increasingly recognized that different PI3K isoforms play non-redundant roles in particular tumor types, which has prompted the development of isoform-selective inhibitors for pre-selected patients with the aim for improving efficacy while decreasing undesirable side effects. The success of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors is represented by CAL101 (Idelalisib), a first-in-class PI3Kδ-selective small-molecule inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. Inhibitors targeting other PI3K isoforms are also being extensively developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in development of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the action modes of novel PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors will provide valuable information to further validate the concept of targeting specific PI3K isoforms, while the identification of biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to benefit from the therapy will be essential for the success of these agents. PMID:26364801

  6. PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors: next-generation targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2015-10-01

    The pivotal roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in human cancers have inspired active development of small molecules to inhibit these lipid kinases. However, the first-generation pan-PI3K and dual-PI3K/mTOR inhibitors have encountered problems in clinical trials, with limited efficacies as a monotherapeutic agent as well as a relatively high rate of side effects. It is increasingly recognized that different PI3K isoforms play non-redundant roles in particular tumor types, which has prompted the development of isoform-selective inhibitors for pre-selected patients with the aim for improving efficacy while decreasing undesirable side effects. The success of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors is represented by CAL101 (Idelalisib), a first-in-class PI3Kδ-selective small-molecule inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. Inhibitors targeting other PI3K isoforms are also being extensively developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in development of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the action modes of novel PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors will provide valuable information to further validate the concept of targeting specific PI3K isoforms, while the identification of biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to benefit from the therapy will be essential for the success of these agents. PMID:26364801

  7. Salinomycin induces selective cytotoxicity to MCF-7 mammosphere cells through targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying-Zi; Yan, Yuan-Yuan; He, Miao; Xiao, Qing-Huan; Yao, Wei-Fan; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Hui-Zhe; Yu, Zhao-Jin; Zhou, Ming-Yi; Lv, Mu-Tian; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are believed to be responsible for tumor chemoresistance, recurrence, and metastasis formation. Salinomycin (SAL), a carboxylic polyether ionophore, has been reported to act as a selective breast CSC inhibitor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying SAL-induced cytotoxicity on BCSCs remain unclear. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in CSC maintenance and carcinogenesis. Here, we investigated whether SAL induces cytotoxicity on BCSCs through targeting Hh pathway. In the present study, we cultured breast cancer MCF-7 cells in suspension in serum-free medium to obtain breast CSC-enriched MCF-7 mammospheres (MCF-7 MS). MCF-7 MS cells possessed typical BCSC properties, such as CD44+CD24-/low phenotype, high expression of OCT4 (a stem cell marker), increased colony-forming ability, strong migration and invasion capabilities, differentiation potential, and strong tumorigenicity in xenografted mice. SAL exhibited selective cytotoxicity to MCF-7 MS cells relative to MCF-7 cells. The Hh pathway was highly activated in BCSC-enriched MCF-7 MS cells and SAL inhibited Hh signaling activation by downregulating the expression of critical components of the Hh pathway such as PTCH, SMO, Gli1, and Gli2, and subsequently repressing the expression of their essential downstream targets including C-myc, Bcl-2, and Snail (but not cyclin D1). Conversely, Shh-induced Hh signaling activation could largely reverse SAL-mediated inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that SAL-induced selective cytotoxicity against MCF-7 MS cells is associated with the inhibition of Hh signaling activation and the expression of downstream targets and the Hh pathway is an important player and a possible drug target in the pathogenesis of BCSCs. PMID:26718029

  8. Secondary mAb--vcMMAE conjugates are highly sensitive reporters of antibody internalization via the lysosome pathway.

    PubMed

    Klussman, Kerry; Mixan, Bruce J; Cerveny, Charles G; Meyer, Damon L; Senter, Peter D; Wahl, Alan F

    2004-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) selectively recognizing tumor surface antigens are an important and evolving approach to targeted cancer therapy. One application of therapeutic mAbs is drug targeting via mAb-drug conjugate (ADC) technology. Identification of mAbs capable of internalizing following antigen binding has been accomplished by tracking decline of surface-bound mAb or by internalization of a secondary mAb linked to a toxin. These methods may not be sufficiently sensitive for screening nor wholly predictive of the mAbs' capacity for a specific drug delivery. We have developed a highly selective and sensitive method to detect mAbs for cell internalization and drug delivery. This system uses secondary anti-human or anti-murine mAbs conjugated to the high-potency drug monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) via a highly stable, enzymatically cleavable linker. Prior studies of this drug linker technology demonstrated internalization of a primary ADC leads to trafficking to lysosomes, drug release by lysosomal cathepsin B, and ensuing cell death. A secondary antibody--drug conjugate (2 degrees ADC) capable of binding primary mAbs bound to the surface of antigen-positive cells has comparable drug delivery capability. The system is sufficiently sensitive to detect internalizing mAbs in nonclonal hybridoma supernatants and is predictive of the activity of subsequently produced primary ADC. Because of their high extracellular stability, the noninternalized 2 degrees ADC are 100--1000-fold less toxic to cells over extended periods of time, permitting an assay in which components can be added without need for separate wash steps. This homogeneous screening system is amenable to medium-throughput screening applications and enables the early identification of mAbs capable of intracellular trafficking for drug delivery and release. PMID:15264863

  9. Characterization of parasite-specific indels and their proposed relevance for selective anthelminthic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Heizer, Esley; Rosa, Bruce A; Wildman, Scott A; Janetka, James W; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-04-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) are important sequence variants that are considered as phylogenetic markers that reflect evolutionary adaptations in different species. In an effort to systematically study indels specific to the phylum Nematoda and their structural impact on the proteins bearing them, we examined over 340,000 polypeptides from 21 nematode species spanning the phylum, compared them to non-nematodes and identified indels unique to nematode proteins in more than 3000 protein families. Examination of the amino acid composition revealed uneven usage of amino acids for insertions and deletions. The amino acid composition and cost, along with the secondary structure constitution of the indels, were analyzed in the context of their biological pathway associations. Species-specific indels could enable indel-based targeting for drug design in pathogens/parasites. Therefore, we screened the spatial locations of the indels in the parasite's protein 3D structures, determined the location of the indel and identified potential unique drug targeting sites. These indels could be confirmed by RNA-Seq data. Examples are presented illustrating the close proximity of some indels to established small-molecule binding pockets that can potentially facilitate selective targeting to the parasites and bypassing their host, thus reducing or eliminating the toxicity of the potential drugs. This study presents an approach for understanding the adaptation of pathogens/parasites at a molecular level, and outlines a strategy to identify such nematode-selective targets that remain essential to the organism. With further experimental characterization and validation, it opens a possible channel for the development of novel treatments with high target specificity, addressing both host toxicity and resistance concerns. PMID:26829384

  10. [Aggressive role of lysosomal enzymes in gastric ulceration].

    PubMed

    Amirov, N Sh; Antonov, D V

    1993-01-01

    Administration of lysosomes and lysosome enzymes into the submucous base of intact rats' stomachs did not result in ulceration. Premedication by histamine, serotonin (combined and separated) and ACTH did not increase sensibility of mucous membrane to lysosome enzymes. Prednisolone-premedication provoked the decrease of mucous membrane resistance to free lysosome enzymes and appearance of ulcerative lesions in the point of enzyme applications. Free lysosome enzymes are able to produce ulcerative lesions. This process is going on with the participation of prednisolone. PMID:8054573

  11. Target Selection for the LBTI Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, A.; Weinberger, A.; Kennedy, G.; Defrère, D.; LBTI Instrument; Science Teams

    2014-03-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) will survey nearby stars for faint exozodiacal dust (exozodi). This warm circumstellar dust, analogous to the interplanetary dust found in the vicinity of the Earth in our own system, is produced in comet breakups and asteroid collisions. Exozodi will be the major source of astrophysical noise for a future space telescope aimed at direct imaging and spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets (exo-Earths). About 20% of nearby field stars have cold dust coming from planetesimals at large distances from the stars (Eiroa et al. 2013). Much less is known about exozodi; current detection limits for individual stars are at best ~ 500 times our solar system's level (aka. 500 zodi). LBTI-HOSTS will be the first survey capable of measuring exozodi at the 10 zodi level (3s). Detections of warm dust will also reveal new information about planetary system architectures and evolution. We describe the target star selection by the LBTI Science Team to satisfy the goals of the HOSTS survey - to inform mission design and target selection for a future exo-Earth mission. We are interested in both 1) actual stars likely to be observed by such a mission and 2) stars whose observation will enable sensible extrapolations for stars that cannot be observed with LBTI. We integrated two approaches to generate the HOSTS target list. The mission-driven approach concentrates on F, G, and K-type stars that are the best targets for future direct observations of exo-Earths, thereby providing model-independent "ground truth" dust observations. However, not every potential target of a future exo-Earth mission can be observed with LBTI. The sensitivity-driven approach selects targets based on maximizing the exozodi sensitivity that can be achieved, without consideration of exo-Earth mission constraints. This naturally chooses more luminous stars (A and early F-type stars). In both cases, all stars are close enough to Earth such that their habitable zones are resolvable by LBTI and bright enough at N-band (10 µm) to provide excellent sensitivity. We also discuss observational and astrophysical motivations for excluding binaries of certain separations.

  12. The contribution of the major planet search surveys to EChO target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micela, Giuseppina; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Pagano, Isabella; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Wheatley, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    The EChO core science will be based on a three tier survey, each with increasing sensitivity, in order to study the population of exo-planets from super-Earths to Jupiter-like planets, in the very hot to temperate zones (temperatures of 300 K - 3000 K) of F to M-type host stars. To achieve a meaningful outcome, an accurate selection of the target sample is needed. In this paper we analyse the targets, suitable for EChO observations, expected to result from a sample of present and forthcoming detection surveys. Present day discovered exoplanets are sufficient to provide a large and diverse sample. However we expect that results from ongoing and planned surveys, aimed at identifying new planets, will increase the sample of smaller planets allowing us to optimize the EChO sample selection. The analysis of the expected yields of a representative set of those surveys both from ground and space shows that they will be able to provide a large number of targets, covering an ample range of planetary and stellar parameters, fitting the EChO capabilities.

  13. PITPs as Targets for Selectively Interfering With Phosphoinositide Signaling in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nile, Aaron H.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yuan, Peihua; Mousley, Carl J.; Suresh, Sundari; Wallace, Iain Michael; Shah, Sweety D.; Pohlhaus, Denise Teotico; Temple, Brenda; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Tropsha, Alexander; Davis, Ronald W.; St Onge, Robert P.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2013-01-01

    Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) integrate diverse territories of intracellular lipid metabolism with stimulated phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate production, and are discriminating portals for interrogating phosphoinositide signaling. Yet, neither Sec14-like PITPs, nor PITPs in general, have been exploited as targets for chemical inhibition for such purposes. Herein, we validate the first small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) of the yeast PITP Sec14. These SMIs are nitrophenyl(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methanones (NPPMs), and are effective inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. We further establish Sec14 is the sole essential NPPM target in yeast, that NPPMs exhibit exquisite targeting specificities for Sec14 (relative to related Sec14-like PITPs), propose a mechanism for how NPPMs exert their inhibitory effects, and demonstrate NPPMs exhibit exquisite pathway selectivity in inhibiting phosphoinositide signaling in cells. These data deliver proof-of-concept that PITP-directed SMIs offer new and generally applicable avenues for intervening with phosphoinositide signaling pathways with selectivities superior to those afforded by contemporary lipid kinase-directed strategies. PMID:24292071

  14. Selective Targeting of Extracellular Insulin-Degrading Enzyme by Quasi-Irreversible Thiol-Modifying Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Bannister, Thomas D; Wang, Hui; Cameron, Michael D; Caulfield, Thomas R; Masson, Amandine; Bertrand, Juliette; Howard, Erin A; McGuire, Michael P; Crisafulli, Umberto; Rosenberry, Terrone R; Topper, Caitlyn L; Thompson, Caroline R; Schürer, Stephan C; Madoux, Franck; Hodder, Peter; Leissring, Malcolm A

    2015-12-18

    Many therapeutically important enzymes are present in multiple cellular compartments, where they can carry out markedly different functions; thus, there is a need for pharmacological strategies to selectively manipulate distinct pools of target enzymes. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a thiol-sensitive zinc-metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes diverse peptide substrates in both the cytosol and the extracellular space, but current genetic and pharmacological approaches are incapable of selectively inhibiting the protease in specific subcellular compartments. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization, and kinetics-based optimization of potent benzoisothiazolone-based inhibitors that, by virtue of a unique quasi-irreversible mode of inhibition, exclusively inhibit extracellular IDE. The mechanism of inhibition involves nucleophilic attack by a specific active-site thiol of the enzyme on the inhibitors, which bear an isothiazolone ring that undergoes irreversible ring opening with the formation of a disulfide bond. Notably, binding of the inhibitors is reversible under reducing conditions, thus restricting inhibition to IDE present in the extracellular space. The identified inhibitors are highly potent (IC50(app) = 63 nM), nontoxic at concentrations up to 100 μM, and appear to preferentially target a specific cysteine residue within IDE. These novel inhibitors represent powerful new tools for clarifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this poorly understood protease, and their unusual mechanism of action should be applicable to other therapeutic targets. PMID:26398879

  15. Selective killing of candidate AML stem cells by antibody targeting of IL1RAP.

    PubMed

    Askmyr, Maria; Ågerstam, Helena; Hansen, Nils; Gordon, Sandra; Arvanitakis, Alexandros; Rissler, Marianne; Juliusson, Gunnar; Richter, Johan; Järås, Marcus; Fioretos, Thoas

    2013-05-01

    IL1RAP, a co-receptor for interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-33 receptors, was previously found to be highly upregulated on candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells, allowing for leukemia-selective killing using IL1RAP-targeting antibodies. We analyzed IL1RAP expression in a consecutive series of 29 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and, based on the level of expression in mononuclear cells (MNCs), we divided the samples into 3 groups: IL1RAP low (n = 6), IL1RAP intermediate (n = 11), and IL1RAP high (n = 12). Within the CD34+CD38- population, the intermediate and high groups expressed higher levels of IL1RAP than did corresponding normal cells. With the aim to target AML stem cells, an anti-IL1RAP monoclonal antibody was generated followed by isotype switching for improved antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity. Using this antibody, we achieved selective killing of AML MNC, CD34+CD38+, and CD34+CD38- cells. Our findings demonstrate that IL1RAP is a promising new therapeutic target in AML. PMID:23479569

  16. Lysosomal calcium signaling regulates autophagy via calcineurin and TFEB

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Diego L.; Di Paola, Simone; Peluso, Ivana; Armani, Andrea; De Stefani, Diego; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Scotto-Rosato, Anna; Prezioso, Carolina; Forrester, Alison; Settembre, Carmine; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing; Sandri, Marco; Rizzuto, Rosario; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Ballabio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The view of the lysosome as the terminal end of cellular catabolic pathways has been challenged by recent studies showing a central role of this organelle in the control of cell function. Here we show that a lysosomal Ca2+ signaling mechanism controls the activities of the phosphatase calcineurin and of its substrate TFEB, a master transcriptional regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. Lysosomal Ca2+ release via mucolipin 1 (MCOLN1) activates calcineurin, which binds and de-phosphorylates TFEB, thus promoting its nuclear translocation. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin suppressed TFEB activity during starvation and physical exercise, while calcineurin overexpression and constitutive activation had the opposite effect. Induction of autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis via TFEB required MCOLN1-mediated calcineurin activation, linking lysosomal calcium signaling to both calcineurin regulation and autophagy induction. Thus, the lysosome reveals itself as a hub for the signaling pathways that regulate cellular homeostasis. PMID:25720963

  17. Molecular pathologies of and enzyme replacement therapies for lysosomal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Sawada, Makoto; Matsuzawa, Fumiko; Aikawa, Sei-ichi; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-08-01

    Lysosomal diseases comprise a group of inherited disorders resulting from defects of lysosomal enzymes and their cofactors, and in many of them the nervous system is affected. Recently, enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant lysosomal enzymes has been clinically available for several lysosomal diseases. Such enzyme replacement therapies can improve non-neurological disorders but is not effective for neurological ones. In this review, we discuss the molecular pathologies of lysosomal diseases from the protein structural aspect, current enzyme replacement therapies, and attempts to develop enzyme replacement therapies effective for lysosomal diseases associated with neurological disorders, i.e., production of enzymes, brain-specific delivery and incorporation of lysosomal enzymes into cells. PMID:16918392

  18. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  19. Phototoxic effects of lysosome-associated genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Ryumina, Alina P.; Boulina, Maria E.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Bogdanova, Ekaterina A.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.

    2014-07-01

    KillerRed is a unique phototoxic red fluorescent protein that can be used to induce local oxidative stress by green-orange light illumination. Here we studied phototoxicity of KillerRed targeted to cytoplasmic surface of lysosomes via fusion with Rab7, a small GTPase that is known to be attached to membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. It was found that lysosome-associated KillerRed ensures efficient light-induced cell death similar to previously reported mitochondria- and plasma membrane-localized KillerRed. Inhibitory analysis demonstrated that lysosomal cathepsins play an important role in the manifestation of KillerRed-Rab7 phototoxicity. Time-lapse monitoring of cell morphology, membrane integrity, and nuclei shape allowed us to conclude that KillerRed-Rab7-mediated cell death occurs via necrosis at high light intensity or via apoptosis at lower light intensity. Potentially, KillerRed-Rab7 can be used as an optogenetic tool to direct target cell populations to either apoptosis or necrosis.

  20. Differential sorting of lysosomal enzymes in mannose 6-phosphate receptor-deficient fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, T; Munier-Lehmann, H; Bauer, U; Hollinshead, M; Ovitt, C; Lobel, P; Hoflack, B

    1994-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the transport of soluble lysosomal enzymes involves the recognition of their mannose 6-phosphate signal by two receptors: the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (CI-MPR) and the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CD-MPR). It is not known why these two different proteins are present in most cell types. To investigate their relative function in lysosomal enzyme targeting, we created cell lines that lack either or both MPRs. This was accomplished by mating CD-MPR-deficient mice with Thp mice that carry a CI-MPR deleted allele. Fibroblasts prepared from embryos that lack the two receptors exhibit a massive missorting of multiple lysosomal enzymes and accumulate undigested material in their endocytic compartments. Fibroblasts that lack the CI-MPR, like those lacking the CD-MPR, exhibit a milder phenotype and are only partially impaired in sorting. This demonstrates that both receptors are required for efficient intracellular targeting of lysosomal enzymes. More importantly, comparison of the phosphorylated proteins secreted by the different cell types indicates that the two receptors may interact in vivo with different subgroups of hydrolases. This observation may provide a rational explanation for the existence of two distinct mannose 6-phosphate binding proteins in mammalian cells. Images PMID:8062819

  1. Lysosomal storage and impaired autophagy lead to inflammasome activation in Gaucher macrophages.

    PubMed

    Aflaki, Elma; Moaven, Nima; Borger, Daniel K; Lopez, Grisel; Westbroek, Wendy; Chae, Jae Jin; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Maniwang, Emerson; Gonzalez, Ashley N; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is characterized by the presence of glucosylcer-amide macrophages, the accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. However, the connection between this lysosomal storage and inflammation is not clear. Studying macrophages derived from peripheral monocytes from patients with type 1 Gaucher disease with genotype N370S/N370S, we confirmed an increased secretion of interleukins IL-1β and IL-6. In addition, we found that activation of the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that activates caspase-1, led to the maturation of IL-1β in Gaucher macrophages. We show that inflammasome activation in these cells is the result of impaired autophagy. Treatment with the small-molecule glucocerebrosidase chaperone NCGC758 reversed these defects, inducing autophagy and reducing IL-1β secretion, confirming the role of the deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase in these processes. We found that in Gaucher macrophages elevated levels of the autophagic adaptor p62 prevented the delivery of inflammasomes to autophagosomes. This increase in p62 led to activation of p65-NF-kB in the nucleus, promoting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the secretion of IL-1β. This newly elucidated mechanism ties lysosomal dysfunction to inflammasome activation, and may contribute to the massive organomegaly, bone involvement and increased susceptibility to certain malignancies seen in Gaucher disease. Moreover, this link between lysosomal storage, impaired autophagy, and inflammation may have implications relevant to both Parkinson disease and the aging process. Defects in these basic cellular processes may also provide new therapeutic targets. PMID:26486234

  2. Reactivity of lysosomes to inside-out cell membrane vesicles in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Kawai, N; Ichihara, I

    1994-02-01

    To study ultrastructurally the mechanisms of lysosome reactions to cell membrane-derived intracellular membranes we developed a cell free system using small inside-out and rightside-out cell membrane vesicles (IOVs and ROVs) as a target of the reactions. The IOVs were generated from rat erythrocyte ghosts in a low ionic strength alkaline solution in the absence of divalent cations after erythrocytes were reacted with wheat germ agglutinin-coated colloidal gold [WGA (CG)], while ROVs were from ghosts homogenized in a buffer with MgSO4 and bovine serum albumin-coated CG [BSA (CG)]. WGA (CG)s bound to the cell surface were rearranged on the membrane and distributed irregularly on the inner surface of generated small IOVs. A coat structure derived from the ghost's submembranous coat was almost depleted from their outer surface. By contrast, BSA (CG)-binding to the membranes was negligible in the process of ROV formation. When isolated rat liver lysosomes were incubated with these WGA (CG)-binding small IOVs at 37 degrees C, CG particles were found in several lysosomes under electron microscopy. Some lysosomes adhered to the IOVs, and their limiting membranes were found to collapse and disappear partially at the adhering region, suggesting their fusion. This reaction seems to occur even in cytosol-free solution. By contrast, the lysosomes indicated very low reaction to BSA (CG)-containing ROV, and to WGA (CG) or BSA (CG) alone. Therefore, it is suggested that isolated liver lysosomes react, at least to fuse, in a cytosol-independent fashion, with surface coat-depleted IOVs derived from WGA (CG)-bound and then -rearranged erythrocyte membranes. PMID:8069943

  3. Siramesine triggers cell death through destabilisation of mitochondria, but not lysosomes.

    PubMed

    ?esen, M Hafner; Repnik, U; Turk, V; Turk, B

    2013-01-01

    A sigma-2 receptor agonist siramesine has been shown to trigger cell death of cancer cells and to exhibit a potent anticancer activity in vivo. However, its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. We show that siramesine can induce rapid cell death in a number of cell lines at concentrations above 20 ?M. In HaCaT cells, cell death was accompanied by caspase activation, rapid loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cytochrome c release, cardiolipin peroxidation and typical apoptotic morphology, whereas in U-87MG cells most apoptotic hallmarks were not notable, although MMP was rapidly lost. In contrast to the rapid loss of MMP above 20 ?M siramesine, a rapid increase in lysosomal pH was observed at all concentrations tested (5-40 ?M); however, it was not accompanied by lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and the release of lysosomal enzymes into the cytosol. Increased lysosomal pH reduced the lysosomal degradation potential as indicated by the accumulation of immature forms of cysteine cathepsins. The lipophilic antioxidant ?-tocopherol, but not the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, considerably reduced cell death and destabilisation of mitochondrial membranes, but did not prevent the increase in lysosomal pH. At concentrations below 15 ?M, siramesine triggered cell death after 2 days or later, which seems to be associated with a general metabolic and energy imbalance due to defects in the endocytic pathway, intracellular trafficking and energy production, and not by a specific molecular event. Overall, we show that cell death in siramesine-treated cells is induced by destabilisation of mitochondria and is independent of LMP and the release of cathepsins into the cytosol. Moreover, it is unlikely that siramesine acts exclusively through sigma-2 receptors, but rather through multiple molecular targets inside the cell. Our findings are therefore of significant importance in designing the next generation of siramesine analogues with high anticancer potential. PMID:24091661

  4. The transcription factor NRSF contributes to epileptogenesis by selective repression of a subset of target genes

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Shawn; Brennan, Gary P; Dubé, Celine; Rajpara, Seeta; Iyer, Shruti; Richichi, Cristina; Bernard, Christophe; Baram, Tallie Z

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms generating epileptic neuronal networks following insults such as severe seizures are unknown. We have previously shown that interfering with the function of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST), an important transcription factor that influences neuronal phenotype, attenuated development of this disorder. In this study, we found that epilepsy-provoking seizures increased the low NRSF levels in mature hippocampus several fold yet surprisingly, provoked repression of only a subset (∼10%) of potential NRSF target genes. Accordingly, the repressed gene-set was rescued when NRSF binding to chromatin was blocked. Unexpectedly, genes selectively repressed by NRSF had mid-range binding frequencies to the repressor, a property that rendered them sensitive to moderate fluctuations of NRSF levels. Genes selectively regulated by NRSF during epileptogenesis coded for ion channels, receptors, and other crucial contributors to neuronal function. Thus, dynamic, selective regulation of NRSF target genes may play a role in influencing neuronal properties in pathological and physiological contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01267.001 PMID:25117540

  5. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies. PMID:26109426

  6. Host factors in retroviral integration and the selection of integration target sites

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the last few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking of integration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  7. Selective cellular uptake and induction of apoptosis of cancer-targeted selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyu; He, Lizhen; Liu, Wen; Fan, Cundong; Zheng, Wenjie; Wong, Yum-Shing; Chen, Tianfeng

    2013-09-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential cancer therapeutic payloads. However, the in vivo targeting drug delivery has been challenging. Herein, we describe the synthesis of tansferrin (Tf)-conjugated SeNPs and its use as a cancer-targeted drug delivery system to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy. Tf as targeting ligand significantly enhances the cellular uptake of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded SeNPs through clathrin-mediated and caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis in cancer cells overexpressing transferrin receptor, and increases their selectivity between cancer and normal cells. DOX-loaded and Tf-conjugated SeNPs (Tf-SeNPs) exhibits unprecedented enhanced cytotoxicity toward cancer cells through induction of apoptosis with the involvement of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Internalized Tf-SeNPs triggers intracellular ROS overproduction, thus activates p53 and MAPKs pathways to promote cell apoptosis. In the nude mice xenograft experiment, Tf-SeNPs significantly inhibits the tumor growth via induction of p53-mediated apoptosis. This cancer-targeted design of SeNPs opens a new path for synergistic treating of cancer with higher efficacy and decreased side effects. PMID:23800743

  8. Aurora B kinase is a potent and selective target in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Dominik; Wei, Jun S; Azorsa, David O; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen; Guha, Rajarshi; Keller, Jonathan M; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Ferrer, Marc; Song, Young K; Liao, Hongling; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Gryder, Berkley E; Sindri, Sivasish; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Zhang, Shile; Shern, John F; Yohe, Marielle E; Taschner-Mandl, Sabine; Shohet, Jason M; Thomas, Craig J; Martin, Scott E; Ambros, Peter F; Khan, Javed

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in multimodal treatment, neuroblastoma (NB) is often fatal for children with high-risk disease and many survivors need to cope with long-term side effects from high-dose chemotherapy and radiation. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed an siRNA screen of the druggable genome combined with a small molecule screen of 465 compounds targeting 39 different mechanisms of actions in four NB cell lines. We identified 58 genes as targets, including AURKB, in at least one cell line. In the drug screen, aurora kinase inhibitors (nine molecules) and in particular the AURKB-selective compound, barasertib, were the most discriminatory with regard to sensitivity for MYCN-amplified cell lines. In an expanded panel of ten NB cell lines, those with MYCN-amplification and wild-type TP53 were the most sensitive to low nanomolar concentrations of barasertib. Inhibition of the AURKB kinase activity resulted in decreased phosphorylation of the known target, histone H3, and upregulation of TP53 in MYCN-amplified, TP53 wild-type cells. However, both wild-type and TP53 mutant MYCN-amplified cell lines arrested in G2/M phase upon AURKB inhibition. Additionally, barasertib induced endoreduplication and apoptosis. Treatment of MYCN-amplified/TP53 wild-type neuroblastoma xenografts resulted in profound growth inhibition and tumor regression. Therefore, aurora B kinase inhibition is highly effective in aggressive neuroblastoma and warrants further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:26497213

  9. Multilocus sequence typing of Salmonella strains by high-throughput sequencing of selectively amplified target genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pallavi; Foley, Steven L; Nayak, Rajesh; Kwon, Young Min

    2012-01-01

    Rapid development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies in recent years has made whole genome sequencing of bacterial genomes widely accessible. However, it is often unnecessary or not feasible to sequence the whole genome for most applications of genetic analyses in bacteria. Selectively capturing defined genomic regions followed by NGS analysis could be a promising approach for high-resolution molecular typing of a large set of strains. In this study, we describe a novel and straightforward PCR-based target-capturing method, hairpin-primed multiplex amplification (HPMA), which allows for simultaneous amplification of numerous target genes. To test the feasibility of NGS-based strain typing using HPMA, 20 target gene sequences were simultaneously amplified with barcode tagging in each of 41 Salmonella strains. The amplicons were then pooled and analyzed by 454 pyrosequencing. Analysis of the sequence data, as an extension of multilocus sequence typing (MLST), demonstrated the utility and potential of this novel typing method, MLST-seq, as a high-resolution strain typing method. With the rapidly increasing sequencing capacity of NGS, MLST-seq or its variations using different target enrichment methods can be expected to become a high-resolution typing method in the near future for high-throughput analysis of a large collection of bacterial strains. PMID:22108494

  10. Selection of Potential Pharmacological Targets in ALS Based on Whole- Genome Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Morello, Giovanna; Conforti, Francesca Luisa; Parenti, Rosalba; D'Agata, Velia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease caused by the gradual degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons. Despite continue efforts, the etiology and pathogenesis of ALS are not well understood yet. The lack of knowledge about molecular and cellular players involved in the neurodegenerative progression of ALS hinders effective therapy development. Several genomicbased studies have been conducted to identify genetic contributors to sporadic ALS (SALS) and new potential pharmacological targets, but these have resulted in short and non-overlapping lists of candidates. In the last few years, our research group has developed the largest whole-genome expression profile database of SALS human samples. We have identified several genes deregulated in the motor cortex of SALS patients and analyzed the role of these genes within deregulated pathways, providing a full molecular portrait of ALS pathogenesis. Some of deregulated genes encode for proteins that are direct or indirect targets of experimental or therapeutic drugs already applied to unrelated diseases. In this review, we focus on the potential role of candidate targets in ALS pathophysiology, highlighting their possible contribution to ALS therapy. The rational selection of the most promising drug targets and related modulatory drugs may provide a starting point for their preclinical or clinical validation and, hopefully, the development of more effective treatments for ALS patients. PMID:25850769

  11. Host Factors in Retroviral Integration and the Selection of Integration Target Sites.

    PubMed

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D

    2014-12-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the past few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking for preintegration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  12. Aurora B kinase is a potent and selective target in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Azorsa, David O.; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen; Guha, Rajarshi; Keller, Jonathan M.; Griner, Lesley A. Mathews; Ferrer, Marc; Song, Young K.; Liao, Hongling; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Gryder, Berkley E.; Sindri, Sivasish; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Zhang, Shile; Shern, John F.; Yohe, Marielle E.; Taschner-Mandl, Sabine; Shohet, Jason M.; Thomas, Craig J.; Martin, Scott E.; Ambros, Peter F.; Khan, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in multimodal treatment, neuroblastoma (NB) is often fatal for children with high-risk disease and many survivors need to cope with long-term side effects from high-dose chemotherapy and radiation. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed an siRNA screen of the druggable genome combined with a small molecule screen of 465 compounds targeting 39 different mechanisms of actions in four NB cell lines. We identified 58 genes as targets, including AURKB, in at least one cell line. In the drug screen, aurora kinase inhibitors (nine molecules) and in particular the AURKB-selective compound, barasertib, were the most discriminatory with regard to sensitivity for MYCN-amplified cell lines. In an expanded panel of ten NB cell lines, those with MYCN-amplification and wild-type TP53 were the most sensitive to low nanomolar concentrations of barasertib. Inhibition of the AURKB kinase activity resulted in decreased phosphorylation of the known target, histone H3, and upregulation of TP53 in MYCN-amplified, TP53 wild-type cells. However, both wild-type and TP53 mutant MYCN-amplified cell lines arrested in G2/M phase upon AURKB inhibition. Additionally, barasertib induced endoreduplication and apoptosis. Treatment of MYCN-amplified/TP53 wild-type neuroblastoma xenografts resulted in profound growth inhibition and tumor regression. Therefore, aurora B kinase inhibition is highly effective in aggressive neuroblastoma and warrants further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:26497213

  13. Selection of Phage Display Peptides Targeting Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Progenitor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bignone, Paola A; Krupa, Rachel A; West, Michael D; Larocca, David

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPS) to both self-renew and differentiate into virtually any cell type makes them a promising source of cells for cell-based regenerative therapies. However, stem cell identity, purity, and scalability remain formidable challenges that need to be overcome for translation of pluripotent stem cell research into clinical applications. Directed differentiation from hPS cells is inefficient and residual contamination with pluripotent cells that have the potential to form tumors remains problematic. The derivation of scalable (self-renewing) embryonic progenitor stem cell lines offers a solution because they are well defined and clonally pure. Clonally pure progenitor stem cell lines also provide a means for identifying cell surface targeting reagents that are useful for identification, tracking, and repeated derivation of the corresponding progenitor stem cell types from additional hPS cell sources. Such stem cell targeting reagents can then be applied to the manufacture of genetically diverse banks of human embryonic progenitor cell lines for drug screening, disease modeling, and cell therapy. Here we present methods to identify human embryonic progenitor stem cell targeting peptides by selection of phage display libraries on clonal embryonic progenitor cell lines and demonstrate their use for targeting quantum dots (Qdots) for stem cell labeling. PMID:25410289

  14. MuB gives a new twist to target DNA selection

    PubMed Central

    Dramićanin, Marija; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Transposition target immunity is a phenomenon observed in some DNA transposons that are able to distinguish the host chromosome from their own DNA sequence, thus avoiding self-destructive insertions. The first molecular insight into target selection and immunity mechanisms came from the study of phage Mu transposition, which uses the protein MuB as a barrier to self-insertion. MuB is an ATP-dependent non-specific DNA binding protein that regulates the activity of the MuA transposase and captures target DNA for transposition. However, a detailed mechanistic understanding of MuB functioning was hindered by the poor solubility of the MuB-ATP complexes. Here we comment on the recent discovery that MuB is an AAA+ ATPase that upon ATP binding assembles into helical filaments that coat the DNA. Remarkably, the helical parameters of the MuB filament do not match those of the bound DNA. This intriguing mismatch symmetry led us to propose a model on how MuB targets DNA for transposition, favoring DNA bending and recognition by the transposase at the filament edge. We also speculate on a different protective role of MuB during immunity, where filament stickiness could favor the condensation of the DNA into a compact state that occludes it from the transposase. PMID:24478936

  15. Neurologic Abnormalities in Mouse Models of the Lysosomal Storage Disorders Mucolipidosis II and Mucolipidosis III γ

    PubMed Central

    Idol, Rachel A.; Wozniak, David F.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Yuede, Carla M.; Ory, Daniel S.; Kornfeld, Stuart; Vogel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II) or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β), while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ). Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments. PMID:25314316

  16. Selection of target mutation in rat gastrointestinal tract E. coli by minute dosage of enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dachuan; Chen, Kaichao; Li, Ruichao; Liu, Lizhang; Guo, Jiubiao; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that bacterial resistance is selected within a mutation selection window of antibiotics. More recent studies showed that even extremely low concentration of antibiotic could select resistant bacteria in vitro. Yet little is known about the exact antibiotic concentration range that can effectively select for resistant organisms in animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study, the effect of different dosages of enrofloxacin on resistance and mutation development in rat GI tract E. coli was investigated by determining the number of resistant E. coli recoverable from rat fecal samples. Our data showed that high dose antibiotic treatment could effectively eliminate E. coli with single gyrA mutation in the early course of treatment, yet the eradication effects diminished upon prolonged treatment. Therapeutic and sub-therapeutic dose (1/10 and 1/100 of therapeutic doses) of enrofloxacin could effectively select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment and during the cessation periods. Surprisingly, very low dose of enrofloxacin (1/1000 therapeutic dose) could also select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment, only with slightly lower efficiency. No enrofloxacin-resistant E. coli could be selected at all test levels of enrofloxacin during long term treatment and the strength of antibiotic treatment does not alter the overall level of E. coli in rat GI tract. This study demonstrated that long term antibiotic treatment seems to be the major trigger for the development of target mutations in GI tract E. coli, which provided insight into the rational use of antibiotics in animal husbandry. PMID:25237308

  17. Selection of Nearby Star Targets for the Subaru Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandori, R.; Tamura, M.; Morino, J.; Ishii, M.; Suzuki, R.; Hashimoto, J.; Kusakabe, N.; Narita, N.; Sato, B.; Yamada, T.; Enya, K.; Goto, M.; Carson, J.; Thalmann, C.; McElwain, M.; Moro-Martin, A.; Knapp, J.; Turner, E. L.

    2009-08-01

    SEEDS (the Subaru Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Hi-CIAO/AO188) is a strategic five-year campaign of direct imaging surveys of exoplanets/disks using the Subaru telescope equipped with the new adaptive optics system AO188 and our new high-contrast instrument, HiCIAO. The goals of the survey are to address the following key issues in exoplanet/disk sciences: (1) the detection and census of exoplanets; (2) the evolution of protoplanetary and debris disks; and (3) the link between exoplanets and disks. Targets prepared for the SEEDS exoplanet searches are in four categories, including nearby stars. We present our scientific motivations and current status of the SEEDS target selection in the nearby stars category.

  18. Pathogenic LRRK2 mutations, through increased kinase activity, produce enlarged lysosomes with reduced degradative capacity and increase ATP13A2 expression.

    PubMed

    Henry, Anastasia G; Aghamohammadzadeh, Soheil; Samaroo, Harry; Chen, Yi; Mou, Kewa; Needle, Elie; Hirst, Warren D

    2015-11-01

    Lysosomal dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Several genes linked to genetic forms of PD, including leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), functionally converge on the lysosomal system. While mutations in LRRK2 are commonly associated with autosomal-dominant PD, the physiological and pathological functions of this kinase remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that LRRK2 regulates lysosome size, number and function in astrocytes, which endogenously express high levels of LRRK2. Expression of LRRK2 G2019S, the most common pathological mutation, produces enlarged lysosomes and diminishes the lysosomal capacity of these cells. Enlarged lysosomes appears to be a common phenotype associated with pathogenic LRRK2 mutations, as we also observed this effect in cells expressing other LRRK2 mutations; R1441C or Y1699C. The lysosomal defects associated with these mutations are dependent on both the catalytic activity of the kinase and autophosphorylation of LRRK2 at serine 1292. Further, we demonstrate that blocking LRRK2's kinase activity, with the potent and selective inhibitor PF-06447475, rescues the observed defects in lysosomal morphology and function. The present study also establishes that G2019S mutation leads to a reduction in lysosomal pH and increased expression of the lysosomal ATPase ATP13A2, a gene linked to a parkinsonian syndrome (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome), in brain samples from mouse and human LRRK2 G2019S carriers. Together, these results demonstrate that PD-associated LRRK2 mutations perturb lysosome function in a kinase-dependent manner, highlighting the therapeutic promise of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors in the treatment of PD. PMID:26251043

  19. Margin selection to compensate for loss of target dose coverage due to target motion during external-beam radiation therapy of the lung.

    PubMed

    Foster, W Kyle; Osei, Ernest; Barnett, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide guidelines for the selection of external-beam radiation therapy target margins to compensate for target motion in the lung during treatment planning. A convolution model was employed to predict the effect of target motion on the delivered dose distribution. The accuracy of the model was confirmed with radiochromic film measurements in both static and dynamic phantom modes. 502 unique patient breathing traces were recorded and used to simulate the effect of target motion on a dose distribution. A 1D probability density function (PDF) representing the position of the target throughout the breathing cycle was generated from each breathing trace obtained during 4D CT. Changes in the target D95 (the minimum dose received by 95% of the treatment target) due to target motion were analyzed and shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. Furthermore, the amount of target D95 recovered per millimeter of increased field width was also shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. The sensitivity of changes in dose coverage with respect to target size was also determined. Margin selection recommendations that can be used to compensate for loss of target D95 were generated based on the simulation results. These results are discussed in the context of clinical plans. We conclude that, for PDF standard deviations less than 0.4 cm with target sizes greater than 5 cm, little or no additional margins are required. Targets which are smaller than 5 cm with PDF standard deviations larger than 0.4 cm are most susceptible to loss of coverage. The largest additional required margin in this study was determined to be 8 mm. PMID:25679166

  20. Ten Years of Science: Lessons on Target Selection for the Whole Earth Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, D. E.

    1998-03-01

    The Whole Earth Telescope is an extremely powerful scientific tool. It involves a large group of people and telescopes comprising a significant fraction of the total astronomical resources of our planet. It must therefore be used sparingly and wisely. Our best guide to the use of the WET comes from a critical examination of the results of our first decade: we must consider what worked, what did not, and why. Building on Nather's assessments in the last workshop, we can derive some general principles for selection of WET targets and operation. Armed with this knowledge we can proceed confidently into the next decade of WET science.

  1. Lysosomal Sequestration Determines Intracellular Imatinib Levels.

    PubMed

    Burger, Herman; den Dekker, Alexander T; Segeletz, Sandra; Boersma, Antonius W M; de Bruijn, Peter; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Taguchi, Takahiro; Sleijfer, Stefan; Sparreboom, Alex; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2015-09-01

    The intracellular uptake and retention (IUR) of imatinib is reported to be controlled by the influx transporter SLC22A1 (organic cation transporter 1). We recently hypothesized that alternative uptake and/or retention mechanisms exist that determine intracellular imatinib levels. Here, we systematically investigate the nature of these mechanisms. Imatinib uptake in cells was quantitatively determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Fluorescent microscopy was used to establish subcellular localization of imatinib. Immunoblotting, cell cycle analyses, and apoptosis assays were performed to evaluate functional consequences of imatinib sequestration. Uptake experiments revealed high intracellular imatinib concentrations in HEK293, the leukemic cell lines K562 and SD-1, and a gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell line GIST-T1. We demonstrated that imatinib IUR is time-, dose-, temperature-, and energy-dependent and provide evidence that SLC22A1 and other potential imatinib transporters do not substantially contribute to the IUR of imatinib. Prazosin, amantadine, NH4Cl, and the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 significantly decreased the IUR of imatinib and likely interfere with lysosomal retention and accumulation of imatinib. Costaining experiments with LysoTracker Red confirmed lysosomal sequestration of imatinib. Inhibition of the lysosomal sequestration had no effect on the inhibition of c-Kit signaling and imatinib-mediated cell cycle arrest but significantly increased apoptosis in imatinib-sensitive GIST-T1 cells. We conclude that intracellular imatinib levels are primarily determined by lysosomal sequestration and do not depend on SLC22A1 expression. PMID:26108972

  2. Target selection and mass estimation for manned NEO exploration using a baseline mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, Ralf C.; Hein, Andreas M.; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2015-06-01

    In recent years Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) have received an increased amount of interest as a target for human exploration. NEOs offer scientifically interesting targets, and at the same time function as a stepping stone for achieving future Mars missions. The aim of this research is to identify promising targets from the large number of known NEOs that qualify for a manned sample-return mission with a maximum duration of one year. By developing a baseline mission design and a mass estimation model, mission opportunities are evaluated based on on-orbit mass requirements, safety considerations, and the properties of the potential targets. A selection of promising NEOs is presented and the effects of mission requirements and restrictions are discussed. Regarding safety aspects, the use of free-return trajectories provides the lowest on-orbit mass, when compared to an alternative design that uses system redundancies to ensure return of the spacecraft to Earth. It is discovered that, although a number of targets are accessible within the analysed time frame, no NEO offers both easy access and high incentive for its exploration. Under the discussed aspects a first human exploration mission going beyond the vicinity of Earth will require a trade off between targets that provide easy access and those that are of scientific interest. This lack of optimal mission opportunities can be seen in the small number of only 4 NEOs that meet all requirements for a sample-return mission and remain below an on-orbit mass of 500 metric Tons (mT). All of them require a mass between 315 and 492 mT. Even less ideal, smaller asteroids that are better accessible require an on-orbit mass that exceeds the launch capability of future heavy lift vehicles (HLV) such as SLS by at least 30 mT. These mass requirements show that additional efforts are necessary to increase the number of available targets and reduce on-orbit mass requirements through advanced mission architectures. The need for on-orbit assembly also becomes apparent, as availability of a HLV alone does not provide sufficient payload capabilities for any manned mission targeting NEOs.

  3. The gaia survey contribution to EChO target selection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzetti, Alessandro; Damasso, Mario

    2015-12-01

    The scientific output of the proposed EChO mission (in terms of spectroscopic characterization of the atmospheres of transiting extrasolar planets) will be maximized by a careful selection of targets and by a detailed characterization of the main physical parameters (such as masses and radii) of both the planets and their stellar hosts. To achieve this aim, the availability of high-quality data from other space-borne and ground-based programs will play a crucial role. Here we identify and discuss the elements of the Gaia catalogue that will be of utmost relevance for the selection and characterization of transiting planet systems to be observed by the proposed EChO mission.

  4. Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Michael H.; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is worldwide interest in newborn screening for lysosomal storage diseases because of the development of treatment options that give better results when carried out early in life. Screens with high differentiation between affected and nonaffected individuals are critical because of the large number of potential false positives. CONTENT This review summarizes 3 screening methods: (a) direct assay of enzymatic activities using tandem mass spectrometry or fluorometry, (b) immunocapture-based measurement of lysosomal enzyme abundance, and (c) measurement of biomarkers. Assay performance is compared on the basis of small-scale studies as well as on large-scale pilot studies of mass spectrometric and fluorometric screens. SUMMARY Tandem mass spectrometry and fluorometry techniques for direct assay of lysosomal enzymatic activity in dried blood spots have emerged as the most studied approaches. Comparative mass spectrometry vs fluorometry studies show that the former better differentiates between nonaffected vs affected individuals. This in turn leads to a manageable number of screen positives that can be further evaluated with second-tier methods. PMID:25477536

  5. The influence of synesthesia on eye movements: no synesthetic pop-out in an oculomotor target selection task.

    PubMed

    Nijboer, Tanja C W; Satris, Gabriela; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Recent research on grapheme-colour synesthesia has focused on whether visual attention is necessary to induce a synesthetic percept. The current study investigated the influence of synesthesia on overt visual attention during an oculomotor target selection task. Chromatic and achromatic stimuli were presented with one target among distractors (e.g. a '2' (target) among multiple '5's (distractors)). Participants executed an eye movement to the target. Synesthetes and controls showed a comparable target selection performance across conditions and a 'pop-out effect' was only seen in the chromatic condition. As a pop-out effect was absent for the synesthetes in the achromatic condition, a synesthetic element appears not to elicit a synesthetic colour, even when it is the target. The synesthetic percepts are not pre-attentively available to distinguish the synesthetic target from synesthetic distractors when elements are presented in the periphery. Synesthesia appears to require full recognition to bind form and colour. PMID:21531581

  6. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Adam D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe; Dawson, Kyle S.; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Armengaud, Eric; Brownstein, Joel; Burtin, Etienne; Cai, Zheng; Comparat, Johan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; Miller, Adam A.; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Schneider, Donald P.; Sesar, Branimir; Streblyanska, Alina; Surace, Jason

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will improve measurements of the cosmological distance scale by applying the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to quasar samples. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over 7500 deg2. First, a “CORE” quasar sample will combine the optical selection in ugriz using a likelihood-based routine called XDQSOz, with a mid-IR-optical color cut. eBOSS CORE selection (to g < 22 or r < 22) should return ˜70 deg-2 quasars at redshifts 0.9 < z < 2.2 and ˜7 deg-2z > 2.1 quasars. Second, a selection based on variability in multi-epoch imaging from the Palomar Transient Factory should recover an additional ˜3-4 deg-2z > 2.1 quasars to g < 22.5. A linear model of how imaging systematics affect target density recovers the angular distribution of eBOSS CORE quasars over 96.7% (76.7%) of the SDSS north (south) Galactic Cap area. The eBOSS CORE quasar sample should thus be sufficiently dense and homogeneous over 0.9 < z < 2.2 to yield the first few-percent-level BAO constraint near \\bar{z}˜ 1.5.eBOSS quasars at z > 2.1 will be used to improve BAO measurements in the Lyα Forest. Beyond its key cosmological goals, eBOSS should be the next-generation quasar survey, comprising >500,000 new quasars and >500,000 uniformly selected spectroscopically confirmed 0.9 < z < 2.2 quasars. At the conclusion of eBOSS, the SDSS will have provided unique spectra for more than 800,000 quasars.

  7. Selection and characterization of Anticalins targeting human prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA).

    PubMed

    Barinka, Cyril; Ptacek, Jakub; Richter, Antonia; Novakova, Zora; Morath, Volker; Skerra, Arne

    2016-03-01

    Although prostate carcinoma (PCa) is by far the most commonly diagnosed neoplasia in men, corresponding diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have limited efficacy at present. Anticalins comprise a novel class of binding proteins based on a non-immunoglobulin scaffold that can be engineered to specifically address molecular targets of interest. Here we report the selection and characterization of Anticalins that recognize human prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a membrane-tethered metallopeptidase constituting a disease-related target for imaging and therapy of PCa as well as solid malignancies in general. We used a randomized lipocalin library based on the human lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) scaffold together with phage display and ELISA screening to select PSMA-specific variants. Five Anticalin candidates from the original panning were expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble monomeric proteins, revealing affinities toward PSMA down to the low nanomolar range. Binding characteristics of the most promising candidate were further improved via affinity maturation by applying error-prone PCR followed by selection via phage display as well as bacterial surface display under more stringent conditions. In BIAcore measurements, the dissociation constant of the best Anticalin was determined as ∼500 pM, with a substantially improved dissociation rate compared with the first-generation candidate. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed specific staining of PSMA-positive tumor cell lines while flow cytometric analysis confirmed the ability of the selected Anticalins to detect PSMA on live cells. Taken together, Anticalins resulting from this study offer a viable alternative to antibody-based PSMA binders for biomedical applications, including in vivo imaging of PCa or neovasculature of solid tumors. PMID:26802163

  8. Rapid and targeted introgression of genes into popular wheat cultivars using marker-assisted background selection.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Harpinder S; Mutti, Jasdeep S; Kidwell, Kim; Morris, Craig F; Chen, Xianming; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2009-01-01

    A marker-assisted background selection (MABS)-based gene introgression approach in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was optimized, where 97% or more of a recurrent parent genome (RPG) can be recovered in just two backcross (BC) generations. A four-step MABS method was developed based on 'Plabsim' computer simulations and wheat genome structure information. During empirical optimization of this method, double recombinants around the target gene were selected in a step-wise fashion during the two BC cycles followed by selection for recurrent parent genotype on non-carrier chromosomes. The average spacing between carrier chromosome markers was <4 cM. For non-carrier chromosome markers that flanked each of the 48 wheat gene-rich regions, this distance was approximately 12 cM. Employed to introgress seedling stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) resistance gene Yr15 into the spring wheat cultivar 'Zak', marker analysis of 2,187 backcross-derived progeny resulted in the recovery of a BC(2)F(2ratio3) plant with 97% of the recurrent parent genome. In contrast, only 82% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in phenotypically selected BC(4)F(7) plants developed without MABS. Field evaluation results from 17 locations indicated that the MABS-derived line was either equal or superior to the recurrent parent for the tested agronomic characteristics. Based on these results, MABS is recommended as a strategy for rapidly introgressing a targeted gene into a wheat genotype in just two backcross generations while recovering 97% or more of the recurrent parent genotype. PMID:19484121

  9. Targeted insertion of foreign genes into the tobacco plastid genome without physical linkage to the selectable marker gene

    SciTech Connect

    Carrer, H.; Maliga, P.

    1995-08-01

    To determine whether targeted DNA insertion into the tobacco plastid genome can be obtained without physical linkage to a selectable marker gene, we carried out biolistic transformation of chloroplasts in tobacco leaf segments with a 1:1 mix of two independently targeted antibiotic resistance genes. Plastid transformants were selected by spectinomycin resistance due to expression of an integrated aadA gene. Integration of the unselected kanamycin resistance (kan) gene into the same plastid genome was established by Southern probing in {approx}20% of the spectinomycin-selected clones. Efficient cotransformation will facilitate targeted plastid genome modification without physical linkage to a marker gene. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. In Vivo Selection Against Human Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Identifies an Aptamer That Targets RNA Helicase Protein DHX9.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jing; Ray, Partha; Liu, Jenny; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Xu, Jennifer; Hsu, David; Sullenger, Bruce A; White, Rebekah R; Clary, Bryan M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to selectively target disease-related tissues with molecules is critical to the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic reagents. Recognizing the differences between the in vivo environment and in vitro conditions, we employed an in vivo selection strategy to identify RNA aptamers (targeting motifs) that could localize to tumor in situ. One of the selected molecules is an aptamer that binds to the protein DHX9, an RNA helicase that is known to be upregulated in colorectal cancer. Upon systemic administration, the aptamer preferentially localized to the nucleus of cancer cells in vivo and thus has the potential to be used for targeted delivery. PMID:27115840

  11. Selective pressures for accurate altruism targeting: evidence from digital evolution for difficult-to-test aspects of inclusive fitness theory

    PubMed Central

    Clune, Jeff; Goldsby, Heather J.; Ofria, Charles; Pennock, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive fitness theory predicts that natural selection will favour altruist genes that are more accurate in targeting altruism only to copies of themselves. In this paper, we provide evidence from digital evolution in support of this prediction by competing multiple altruist-targeting mechanisms that vary in their accuracy in determining whether a potential target for altruism carries a copy of the altruist gene. We compete altruism-targeting mechanisms based on (i) kinship (kin targeting), (ii) genetic similarity at a level greater than that expected of kin (similarity targeting), and (iii) perfect knowledge of the presence of an altruist gene (green beard targeting). Natural selection always favoured the most accurate targeting mechanism available. Our investigations also revealed that evolution did not increase the altruism level when all green beard altruists used the same phenotypic marker. The green beard altruism levels stably increased only when mutations that changed the altruism level also changed the marker (e.g. beard colour), such that beard colour reliably indicated the altruism level. For kin- and similarity-targeting mechanisms, we found that evolution was able to stably adjust altruism levels. Our results confirm that natural selection favours altruist genes that are increasingly accurate in targeting altruism to only their copies. Our work also emphasizes that the concept of targeting accuracy must include both the presence of an altruist gene and the level of altruism it produces. PMID:20843843

  12. Aptamers selected for higher-affinity binding are not more specific for the target ligand

    PubMed Central

    Carothers, James M.; Oestreich, Stephanie C.; Szostak, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Previous study of eleven different in vitro-selected RNA aptamers that bind guanosine triphosphate (GTP) with Kds ranging from 8µM to 9nM showed that more information is required to specify the structures of the higher-affinity aptamers. We are interested in understanding how the more complex aptamers achieve higher affinities for the ligand. In vitro selection produces structural solutions to a functional problem that are are as simple as possible in terms of the information content needed to define them. It has long been assumed that the simplest way to improve the affinity of an aptamer is to increase the shape and functional group complementarity of the RNA binding pocket for the ligand. This argument underlies the hypothesis that selection for higher-affinity aptamers automatically leads to structures that bind more specifically to the target molecule. Here, we examined the binding specificities of the eleven GTP aptamers by carrying out competition binding studies with sixteen different chemical analogs of GTP. The aptamers have distinct patterns of specificity, implying that each RNA is a structurally-unique solution to the problem of GTP binding. However, these experiments failed to provide evidence that higher-affinity aptamers bind more specifically to GTP. We suggest that the simplest way to improve aptamer Kds may be to increase the stability of the RNA tertiary structure with additional intramolecular RNA-RNA interactions; increasingly-specific ligand binding may emerge only in response to direct selection for specificity. PMID:16771507

  13. The Role of Microscopy in Understanding Atherosclerotic Lysosomal Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Yancey, Patricia G.

    2003-02-01

    Microscopy has played a critical role in first identifying and then defining the role of lysosomes in formation of atherosclerotic foam cells. We review the evidence implicating lysosomal lipid accumulation as a factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with reference to the role of microscopy. In addition, we explore mechanisms by which lysosomal lipid engorgement occurs. Low density lipoproteins which have become modified are the major source of lipid for foam cell formation. These altered lipoproteins are taken into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes. Under normal conditions, lipids from these lipoproteins are metabolized and do not accumulate in lysosomes. In the atherosclerotic foam cell, this normal metabolism is inhibited so that cholesterol and cholesteryl esters accumulate in lysosomes. Studies of cultured cells incubated with modified lipoproteins suggests this abnormal metabolism occurs in two steps. Initially, hydrolysis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters occurs normally, but the resultant free cholesterol cannot exit the lysosome. Further lysosomal cholesterol accumulation inhibits hydrolysis, producing a mixture of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within swollen lysosomes. Various lipoprotein modifications can produce this lysosomal engorgement in vitro and it remains to be seen which modifications are most important in vivo.

  14. The anticancer effect of cytotoxin 1 from Naja atra Cantor venom is mediated by a lysosomal cell death pathway involving lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin B release.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minyan; Ming, Wei; Tang, Ya; Zhou, Shengming; Kong, Tianhan; Dong, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    The cytotoxin family of cobra venom proteins, also called cardiotoxins, can activate both necrotic and apoptotic cell death pathways in cancer cells. Cytotoxin 1 (CTX1)from Naja atra Cantor venom is a 60 amino acid, 6698 Da protein with as yet untested anticancer efficacy and cell selectivity. We tested the toxicity of CTX1 on a number of cancer cell lines (MCF-7, P388, K562, and H22) and on one normal human cell line (16HBE). The rank order of cytotoxicity was MCF-7 > P388 ≈ K562 >H22 ≈ 16HBE, indicating that the effect of CTX1 on certain cancer cell types was relatively selective.Treatment with CTX1 greatly prolonged the survival of P388 ascites tumors bearing KM mice compared to cyclophosphamide treatment. Cell viability, apoptosis, and lysosomal permeability assays all demonstrated that CTX1 induced dose- and time-dependent cell death, with most cells exhibiting the morphological and biochemical features of late apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial membrane potential was lost in CTX1-treated P388 cells. In addition, CTX1 induced an increase in both lysosomal membrane permeability and cathepsin B protease activity. These analyses reveal that CTX1 possesses significant and selective anticancer activity, likely by inducing programmed cell death through mitochondrial and/or lysosomal pathways. PMID:23711147

  15. Getting to the source: selective drug targeting of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Fatima; Winkler, David A

    2014-05-01

    Cancers are among the most important and most difficult to treat diseases of the 21st century. Conventional therapies include surgery, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy, as well many forms of drug treatments such as tamoxifen and Gleevec. However, these forms of treatment often do not eradicate the cancer stem cells, only managing to decrease the size of the tumor, allowing the cancer to return. The cancer stem cell hypothesis stipulates that malignancy is maintained through self-renewal of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which generate rapidly dividing progeny that comprise the tumors, and that are largely untouched by conventional therapies. Evidence for the central role of CSCs in many tumors has provided a paradigm shift in the way cancer chemotherapy may be addressed. Recent discoveries regarding the nature of the stem cell niche, and the key signaling pathways involved in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation from regenerative medicine, have provided key information that facilitates selective targeting of CSCs by small-molecule drugs. The growing body of biochemical knowledge on the nature of CSCs, and differences between them and normal adult stem cells essential for maintaining organisms, has augmented the increasing number of small molecules shown to control normal and aberrant stem cells. Here, we review small-molecule approaches to the selective targeting of CSCs. PMID:24760779

  16. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)—also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)—has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the pg/mL to low ng/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in the cells or tissues. Herein we review recent advances in methods and technologies, including front-end immunoaffinity depletion, fractionation, selective enrichment of target proteins/peptides or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs), as well as advances in MS instrumentation, which have significantly enhanced the overall sensitivity of SRM assays and enabled the detection of low-abundance proteins at low to sub- ng/mL level in human blood plasma or serum. General perspectives on the potential of achieving sufficient sensitivity for detection of pg/mL level proteins in plasma are also discussed.

  17. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the low ng/mL to pg/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in cells or tissues. Herein we review recent advances in methods and technologies, including front-end immunoaffinity depletion, fractionation, selective enrichment of target proteins/peptides including posttranslational modifications (PTMs), as well as advances in MS instrumentation which have significantly enhanced the overall sensitivity of SRM assays and enabled the detection of low-abundance proteins at low to sub- ng/mL level in human blood plasma or serum. General perspectives on the potential of achieving sufficient sensitivity for detection of pg/mL level proteins in plasma are also discussed. PMID:22577010

  18. Does Angling Technique Selectively Target Fishes Based on Their Behavioural Type?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Brownscombe, Jacob W.; Sullivan, Brittany; Jain-Schlaepfer, Sofia; Cooke, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing recognition that fish harvesting practices can have important impacts on the phenotypic distributions and diversity of natural populations through a phenomenon known as fisheries-induced evolution. Here we experimentally show that two common recreational angling techniques (active crank baits versus passive soft plastics) differentially target wild largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) based on variation in their behavioural tendencies. Fish were first angled in the wild using both techniques and then brought back to the laboratory and tested for individual-level differences in common estimates of personality (refuge emergence, flight-initiation-distance, latency-to-recapture and with a net, and general activity) in an in-lake experimental arena. We found that different angling techniques appear to selectively target these species based on their boldness (as characterized by refuge emergence, a standard measure of boldness in fishes) but not other assays of personality. We also observed that body size was independently a significant predictor of personality in both species, though this varied between traits and species. Our results suggest a context-dependency for vulnerability to capture relative to behaviour in these fish species. Ascertaining the selective pressures angling practices exert on natural populations is an important area of fisheries research with significant implications for ecology, evolution, and resource management. PMID:26284779

  19. Photothermal nanotherapeutics and nanodiagnostics for selective killing of bacteria targeted with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zharov, Vladimir P; Mercer, Kelly E; Galitovskaya, Elena N; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2006-01-15

    We describe a new method for selective laser killing of bacteria targeted with light-absorbing gold nanoparticles conjugated with specific antibodies. The multifunctional photothermal (PT) microscope/spectrometer provides a real-time assessment of this new therapeutic intervention. In this integrated system, strong laser-induced overheating effects accompanied by the bubble-formation phenomena around clustered gold nanoparticles are the main cause of bacterial damage. PT imaging and time-resolved monitoring of the integrated PT responses assessed these effects. Specifically, we used this technology for selective killing of the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus by targeting the bacterial surface using 10-, 20-, and 40-nm gold particles conjugated with anti-protein A antibodies. Labeled bacteria were irradiated with focused laser pulses (420-570 nm, 12 ns, 0.1-5 J/cm(2), 100 pulses), and laser-induced bacterial damage observed at different laser fluences and nanoparticle sizes was verified by optical transmission, electron microscopy, and conventional viability testing. PMID:16239330

  20. Update on the Pfam5000 Strategy for Selection of StructuralGenomics Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-06-27

    Structural Genomics is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy that is medically and biologically relevant, of good financial value, and tractable. In 2003, we presented the ''Pfam5000'' strategy, which involves selecting the 5,000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. In this update, we show that although both the Pfam database and the number of sequenced genomes have increased in size, the expected benefits of the Pfam5000 strategy have not changed substantially. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5,000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 65 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 54 percent of residues) and 63 percent of eukaryotic proteins (42 percent of residues). Fewer than 2,300 of the largest families on this list remain to be solved, making the project feasible in the next five years given the expected throughput to be achieved in the production phase of the Protein Structure Initiative.

  1. Sensitive and Specific Target Sequences Selected from Retrotransposons of Schistosoma japonicum for the Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Xia, Chao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica is a serious debilitating and sometimes fatal disease. Accurate diagnostic tests play a key role in patient management and control of the disease. However, currently available diagnostic methods are not ideal, and the detection of the parasite DNA in blood samples has turned out to be one of the most promising tools for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis. In our previous investigations, a 230-bp sequence from the highly repetitive retrotransposon SjR2 was identified and it showed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting Schistosoma japonicum DNA in the sera of rabbit model and patients. Recently, 29 retrotransposons were found in S. japonicum genome by our group. The present study highlighted the key factors for selecting a new perspective sensitive target DNA sequence for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis, which can serve as example for other parasitic pathogens. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrated that the key factors based on the bioinformatic analysis for selecting target sequence are the higher genome proportion, repetitive complete copies and partial copies, and active ESTs than the others in the chromosome genome. New primers based on 25 novel retrotransposons and SjR2 were designed and their sensitivity and specificity for detecting S. japonicum DNA were compared. The results showed that a new 303-bp sequence from non-long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon (SjCHGCS19) had high sensitivity and specificity. The 303-bp target sequence was amplified from the sera of rabbit model at 3 d post-infection by nested-PCR and it became negative at 17 weeks post-treatment. Furthermore, the percentage sensitivity of the nested-PCR was 97.67% in 43 serum samples of S. japonicum-infected patients. Conclusions/Significance Our findings highlighted the key factors based on the bioinformatic analysis for selecting target sequence from S. japonicum genome, which provide basis for establishing powerful molecular diagnostic techniques that can be used for monitoring early infection and therapy efficacy to support schistosomiasis control programs. PMID:22479661

  2. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  3. Scientific objectives and selection of targets for the SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basilevsky, A.T.; Keller, H.U.; Nathues, A.; Mall, U.; Hiesinger, H.; Rosiek, M.

    2004-01-01

    The European SMART-1 mission to the Moon, primarily a testbed for innovative technologies, was launched in September 2003 and will reach the Moon in 2005. On board are several scientific instruments, including the point-spectrometer SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR). Taking into account the capabilities of the SMART-1 mission and the SIR instrument in particular, as well as the open questions in lunar science, a selection of targets for SIR observations has been compiled. SIR can address at least five topics: (1) Surface/regolith processes; (2) Lunar volcanism; (3) Lunar crust structure; (4) Search for spectral signatures of ices at the lunar poles; and (5) Ground truth and study of geometric effects on the spectral shape. For each topic we will discuss specific observation modes, necessary to achieve our scientific goals. The majority of SIR targets will be observed in the nadir-tracking mode. More than 100 targets, which require off-nadir pointing and off-nadir tracking, are planned. It is expected that results of SIR observations will significantly increase our understanding of the Moon. Since the exact arrival date and the orbital parameters of the SMART-1 spacecraft are not known yet, a more detailed planning of the scientific observations will follow in the near future. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphatidylserine-selective targeting and anticancer effects of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles on brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Víctor M; Chu, Zhengta