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Sample records for selective oxidation reactions

  1. CHEMICAL REACTIONS OF AQUATIC HUMIC MATERIALS WITH SELECTED OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to identify the specific organic reaction products of natural aquatic humic materials with selected oxidants (KMnO4, HOCl, Cl02, O3 and monochloramine). Reaction products were identified by GC/MS after solvent extraction and derivatization. The two most reac...

  2. Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

  3. Powerful fluoroalkoxy molybdenum(V) reagent for selective oxidative arene coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Moritz; Leppin, Jana; Wehming, Kathrin; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Heinze, Katja; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2014-02-24

    We introduce the novel fluoroalkoxy molybdenum(V) reagent 1 which has superior reactivity and selectivity in comparison to MoCl5 or the MoCl5 /TiCl4 reagent mixture in the oxidative coupling reactions of aryls. Common side reactions, such as chlorination and/or oligomer formation, are drastically diminished creating a powerful and useful reagent for oxidative coupling. Theoretical treatment of the reagent interaction with 1,2-dimethoxybenzene-type substrates indicates an inner-sphere electron transfer followed by a radical cationic reaction pathway for the oxidative-coupling process. EPR spectroscopic and electrochemical studies, X-ray analyses, computational investigations, and the experimental scope provide a highly consistent picture. The substitution of chlorido ligands by hexafluoroisopropoxido moieties seems to boost both the reactivity and selectivity of the metal center which might be applied to other reagents as well. PMID:24478061

  4. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, Stephan Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  5. Implications of sterically constrained n-butane oxidation reactions on the reaction mechanism and selectivity to 1-butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Sean T.; Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Getman, Rachel B.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to analyze the reaction network in n-butane oxidation to 1-butanol over a Ag/Pd alloy catalyst under steric constraints, and the implications on the ability to produce 1-butanol selectively using MOF-encapsulated catalysts are discussed. MOFs are porous crystalline solids comprised of metal nodes linked by organic molecules. Recently, they have been successfully grown around metal nanoparticle catalysts. The resulting porous networks have been shown to promote regioselective chemistry, i.e., hydrogenation of trans-1,3-hexadiene to 3-hexene, presumably by forcing the linear alkene to stand "upright" on the catalyst surface and allowing only the terminal C-H bonds to be activated. In this work, we extend this concept to alkane oxidation. Our goal is to determine if a MOF-encapsulated catalyst could be used to selectively produce 1-butanol. Reaction energies and activation barriers are presented for more than 40 reactions in the pathway for n-butane oxidation. We find that C-H bond activation proceeds through an oxygen-assisted pathway and that butanal and 1-butanol are some of the possible products.

  6. Reactions of Propylene Oxide on Supported Silver Catalysts: Insights into Pathways Limiting Epoxidation Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Apoorva; Bedolla-Pantoja, Marco; Singh, Suyash; Lobo, Raul F.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Barteau, Mark A.

    2012-02-04

    The reactions of propylene oxide (PO) on silver catalysts were studied to understand the network of parallel and sequential reactions that may limit the selectivity of propylene epoxidation by these catalysts. The products of the anaerobic reaction of PO on Ag/a-Al2O3 were propanal, acetone and allyl alcohol for PO conversions below 2–3%. As the conversion of PO was increased either by increasing the temperature or the contact time, acrolein was formed at the expense of propanal, indicating that acrolein is a secondary reaction product in PO decomposition. With addition of oxygen to the feedstream the conversion of PO increased moderately. In contrast to the experiments in absence of oxygen, CO2 was a significant product while the selectivity to propanal decreased as soon as oxygen was introduced in the system. Allyl alcohol disappeared completely from the product stream in the presence of oxygen, reacting to form acrolein and CO2. The product distribution may be explained by a network of reactions involving two types of oxametallacycles formed by ring opening of PO: one with the oxygen bonded to C1 (OMC1, linear) and the other with oxygen bonded to C2 (OMC2, branched). OMC1 reacts to form PO, propanal, and allyl alcohol.

  7. Optically active P5-deltacyclenes: selective oxidation, ligand properties, and a diastereoselective rearrangement reaction.

    PubMed

    Keller, I C; Bauer, W; Heinemann, F W; Höhn, C; Rohwer, L; Zenneck, U

    2016-04-25

    Cage-chiral tetra-tert-butyl-P5-deltacyclene is accessible as a pair of highly enriched enantiomers and . The only secondary phosphorus atom P1 of the cage can be selectively oxidized by reaction with t-BuOOH. The P1-oxo species and , allow the direct determination of their ee values. Oxidation occurs with the complete retention of the optical activity of the compounds. The chiroptical properties of and are strongly dominated by their cage chirality, the oxygen atom does not contribute significantly. Elemental sulfur and selenium oxidize P5 with high preference to yield P5-thio- and P5-seleno-P5-deltacyclenes and of the intact cages again. Longer reaction time and more than stoichiometric amounts of selenium, leads to tri-seleno-P5-tetracycloundecane , a partially opened oxidized rearrangement product. The ligand properties of racemic were determined. Diphosphetane phosphorus atom P2 of is the active donor center to bind a Cr(CO)5 fragment, but a tautomerization of takes place if [(benzene)RuCl2]2 is added. A hydrogen atom migrates from P1 to the oxygen atom to form a phosphinous acid ligand. The lone pair of P1 is regenerated and acts as the active ligand function of the cage in this case. As for , the base n-BuLi induces an efficient cage rearrangement reaction of , where P1 and the neighboring carbon atom C4 containing its t-Bu substituent change places. C4 moves to its new position without breaking the bond with P5, this way forming the novel P1-oxo-P5-norsnoutene cage in a highly diastereoselective process. PMID:27055252

  8. Reaction kinetics of selected micropollutants in ozonation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    Second-order reaction rate constants of micropollutants with ozone (k(O3)) and hydroxyl radicals (k(OH)) are essential for evaluating their removal efficiencies from water during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes. Kinetic data are unavailable for many of the emerging micropollutants. Twenty-four micropollutants with very diverse structures and applications including endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products were selected, and their k(O3) and k(OH) values were determined using bench-scale reactors (at pH 7 and T = 20 °C). Reactions with molecular ozone are highly selective as indicated by their k(O3) values ranging from 10(-2)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The general trend of ozone reactivity can be explained by micropollutant structures in conjunction with the electrophilic nature of ozone reactions. All of the studied compounds are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals as shown by their high k(OH) values (10(8)-10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) even though they are structurally very diverse. For compounds with a low reactivity toward ozone, hydroxyl radical based treatment such as O(3)/H(2)O(2) or UV/H(2)O(2) is a viable alternative. This study contributed to filling the data gap pertaining kinetic data of organic micropollutants while confirming results reported in the literature where available. PMID:23079129

  9. Effects of solar radiation on manganese oxide reactions with selected organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bertino, D.J.; Zepp, R.G. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of sunlight on aqueous redox reactions between manganese oxides (MnO{sub x}) and selected organic substances are reported. No sunlight-induced rate enhancement was observed for the MnO{sub x} oxidation of substituted phenols, anisole, o-dichlorobenzene, or p-chloroaniline. On the other hand, solar radiation did accelerate the reduction of manganese oxides by dissolved organic matter (DOM) from aquatic environments. The photoreduction of MnO{sub x} by DOM was little affected by molecular oxygen in air-saturated water (250 {mu}M), but was inhibited by 2,6-dichloroindophenol (0.5-6 {mu}M), and excellent electron acceptor. MnO{sub x} reduction also was photosensitized by anthraquinone-2-sulfonate. These results indicate that the photoreduction probably involves electron transfer from excited states of sorbed DOM to the oxide surface. Wavelength studies indicated that ultraviolet-B radiation (280-320 nm) plays an important role in this photoreduction.

  10. Electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide: selective oxidation reactions in perfluorinated alcohol solvents.

    PubMed

    Neimann, K; Neumann, R

    2000-09-01

    [reaction; see text] The catalytic electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide with transition metal compounds toward reaction with nucleophiles is a matter of very significant research and practical interest. We have now found that use of perfluorinated alcoholic solvents such as 1,1, 1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol in the absence of catalysts allowed electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide toward epoxidation of alkenes and the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of ketones. PMID:10964384

  11. Enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A-L

    2016-06-28

    This review highlights the use of the oxidative boron Heck reaction in enantioselective Heck-type couplings. The enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reaction overcomes several limitations of the traditional Pd(0)-catalysed Heck coupling and has subsequently allowed for intermolecular couplings of challenging systems such as cyclic enones, acyclic alkenes, and even site selectively on remote alkenes. PMID:26529247

  12. Reduced graphene oxide: firm support for catalytically active palladium nanoparticles and game changer in selective hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Manuela; Benito, Ana M.; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P.; Arenal, Raul; Maser, Wolfgang K.

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer.Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis and results. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02822d

  13. Oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions: insights from quantum chemistry calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hujun; Liu, Chengcheng; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Ting; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    The mechanisms for the oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5) by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the calculations, we investigated the original mechanism proposed by Hillhouse and co-workers for the activation of N2O. The calculations showed that the complex with an initial O-coordination of N2O to the coordinatively unsaturated Hf center is not a local minimum. Then we proposed a new reaction mechanism to investigate how N2O is activated and why N2O selectively oxidize phenyl and hydride ligands of . Frontier molecular orbital theory analysis indicates that N2O is activated by nucleophilic attack by the phenyl or hydride ligand. Present calculations provide new insights into the activation of N2O involving the direct oxygen atom transfer from nitrous oxide to metal-ligand bonds instead of the generally observed oxygen abstraction reaction to generate metal-oxo species. PMID:26660046

  14. Optimization of reaction conditions in selective oxidation of styrene over fine crystallite spinel-type CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} complex oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pardeshi, Satish K.; Pawar, Ravindra Y.

    2010-05-15

    The CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel-type catalyst was synthesized by citrate gel method and well characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The crystallization temperature of the spinel particle prepared by citrate gel method was 600 {sup o}C which was lower than that of ferrite prepared by other methods. CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalysts prepared by citrate gel method show better activity for styrene oxidation in the presence of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (30%) as an oxidizing agent. In this reaction the oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bond of styrene takes place selectively with 38 {+-} 2 mol% conversion. The major product of the reaction is benzaldehyde up to 91 {+-} 2 mol% and minor product phenyl acetaldehyde up to 9 {+-} 2 mol%, respectively. The products obtained in the styrene oxidation reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The influence of the catalyst, reaction time, temperature, amount of catalyst, styrene/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molar ratio and solvents on the conversion and product distribution were studied.

  15. Selective catalysts for the hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions by patterning of platinum with calix[4]arene molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Genorio, B.; Strmcnik, D.; Subbaraman, R.; Tripkovic, D.; Karapetrov, G.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Pejovnik, S.; Markovic, N. M.; Univ. Ljubljana; National Inst. of Chemistry

    2010-12-01

    The design of new catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells must be guided by two equally important fundamental principles: optimization of their catalytic behaviour as well as the long-term stability of the metal catalysts and supports in hostile electrochemical environments. The methods used to improve catalytic activity are diverse, ranging from the alloying and de-alloying of platinum to the synthesis of platinum core-shell catalysts. However, methods to improve the stability of the carbon supports and catalyst nanoparticles are limited, especially during shutdown (when hydrogen is purged from the anode by air) and startup (when air is purged from the anode by hydrogen) conditions when the cathode potential can be pushed up to 1.5 V. Under the latter conditions, stability of the cathode materials is strongly affected (carbon oxidation reaction) by the undesired oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the anode side. This emphasizes the importance of designing selective anode catalysts that can efficiently suppress the ORR while fully preserving the Pt-like activity for the hydrogen oxidation reaction. Here, we demonstrate that chemically modified platinum with a self-assembled monolayer of calix[4]arene molecules meets this challenging requirement.

  16. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  17. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates.

    PubMed

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  18. Improved reaction kinetics and selectivity by the TiO2-embedded carbon nanofiber support for electro-oxidation of ethanol on PtRu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi; Ito, Yudai; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Ishitobi, Hirokazu

    2014-02-01

    The electro-oxidation of ethanol by the catalyst of PtRu nanoparticles supported on a TiO2-embedded carbon nanofiber (PtRu/TECNF), which has recently been proposed by the authors as a highly active catalyst for methanol oxidation, is investigated by cyclic voltammetry using a glassy carbon electrode and by operating a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) with the catalyst. The mass activity obtained from the cyclic voltammogram for the ethanol oxidation is compared to that for the methanol oxidation reported in our recent paper. The mass activity for the ethanol oxidation is comparable or slightly higher than that for the methanol oxidation, and the relationship between the TECNF composition, i.e., the Ti/C mass ratio, and the activity are also similar to that for the methanol oxidation. A DEFC fabricated with the PtRu/TECNF shows a higher power output compared to that with the commercial PtRu/C catalyst. An analysis of the reaction products by a simple two-step reaction model reveals that the PtRu/TECNF increases the rate constant for the reaction steps from ethanol to acetaldehyde and subsequently to CO2, but decreases that from acetaldehyde to acetic acid. This means that the PtRu/TECNF improves not only the kinetics, but also the selectivity to acetaldehyde.

  19. Effect of Slow Aging Reactions on Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol Prepared by Oxidation of Selected Monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S. A.; Bones, D. L.; Henricksen, D. K.; Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Pan, X.; Nguyen, T. B.; Gonsior, M.; Cooper, W.; Laskin, J.; Laskin, A.

    2009-05-01

    Organic particulate matter (PM) has a major impact on atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a rather significant fraction of organic PM; this includes SOA produced by oxidation of biogenically emitted monoterpenes. Once such SOA is formed, it is believed to undergo slow aging processes, which may have large effects on the physical and chemical properties of the particles. This presentation focuses on the effect of slow chemical aging on optical properties of SOA formed from the ozone-induced oxidation of limonene, myrcene, and other selected monoterpenes. Several complementary techniques including high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, FTIR spectroscopy, UV/vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy, and photodissociation spectroscopy are used to probe the aging-induced changes in physical properties and chemical composition of laboratory generated SOA. Limonene SOA appears to undergo a dramatic change in its absorption spectrum on a time scale of hours; it develops strong visible bands in the 400-500 nm region, and becomes fluorescent. This transformation is catalyzed by ammonium sulfate and certain amino acids. This rather unusual aging process can potentially contribute to the formation of brown carbon in biogenic SOA.

  20. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  1. A Quantitative Proteomic Profile of the Nrf2-Mediated Antioxidant Response of Macrophages to Oxidized LDL Determined by Multiplexed Selected Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kinter, Caroline S.; Lundie, Jillian M.; Patel, Halee; Rindler, Paul M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The loading of macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key part of the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Oxidized LDL contains a wide ranging set of toxic species, yet the molecular events that allow macrophages to withstand loading with these toxic species are not completely characterized. The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of the cellular stress response. However, the specific parts of the Nrf2-dependent stress response are diverse, with both tissue- and treatment-dependent components. The goal of these experiments was to develop and use a quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the Nrf2-dependent response in macrophages to oxidized LDL. Cultured mouse macrophages, the J774 macrophage-like cell line, were treated with a combination of oxidized LDL, the Nrf2-stabilizing reagent tert- butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), and/or Nrf2 siRNA. Protein expression was determined using a quantitative proteomics assay based on selected reaction monitoring. The assay was multiplexed to monitor a set of 28 antioxidant and stress response proteins, 6 housekeeping proteins, and 1 non-endogenous standard protein. The results have two components. The first component is the validation of the multiplexed, quantitative proteomics assay. The assay is shown to be fundamentally quantitative, precise, and accurate. The second component is the characterization of the Nrf2-mediated stress response. Treatment with tBHQ and/or Nrf2 siRNA gave statistically significant changes in the expression of a subset of 11 proteins. Treatment with oxidized LDL gave statistically significant increases in the expression of 7 of those 11 proteins plus one additional protein. All of the oxLDL-mediated increases were attenuated by Nrf2 siRNA. These results reveal a specific, multifaceted response of the foam cells to the incoming toxic oxidized LDL. PMID:23166812

  2. Selective glycerol oxidation by electrocatalytic dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ju; Lee, Jechan; Green, Sara K; Huber, George W; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an electrochemical dehydrogenation process can be used to oxidize glycerol to glyceraldehyde and glyceric acid even without using stoichiometric chemical oxidants. A glyceric acid selectivity of 87.0 % at 91.8 % glycerol conversion was obtained in an electrocatalytic batch reactor. A continuous-flow electrocatalytic reactor had over an 80 % high glyceric acid selectivity at 10 % glycerol conversion, as well as greater reaction rates than either an electrocatalytic or a conventional catalytic batch reactor. PMID:24664518

  3. Rates and temperature dependences of the reaction of OH with isoprene, its oxidation products, and selected terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Harris, G.W.; Pitts, J.N. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Absolute rate constants determined by using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique are reported for the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with isoprene, ..cap alpha.., and ..beta..-pinene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein in the temperature range 297-424 K, and with methylglyoxal at 297 K. These results contribute to a more quantitative understanding of the tropospheric fate of gas-phase biomass-related organics and serve as input to models of the chemistry of the natural troposphere.

  4. Role of silver current collector on the operational stability of selected cobalt-containing oxide electrodes for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yubo; Wang, Fucun; Chen, Dengjie; Dong, Feifei; Park, Hee Jung; Kwak, Chan; Shao, Zongping

    2012-07-01

    The long-term stability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of two typical perovskite cathode materials of SOFCs, i.e., Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) and Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ (SSC), is investigated in a symmetric cell configuration under air condition at 700 °C using Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (SDC) electrolyte substrate and silver current collectors. Moreover, two different methods of silver current collection are tested, i.e., whole electrode surface deposited with a diluted silver paste (CC-01) and a mesh-like current collector using concentrated silver paste (CC-02). Electrochemical impedance spectra are applied for stability investigations. With the CC-01 current collector, the performance of the electrode deteriorates significantly, although the initial performance is good. By contrast, fairly stable performance is obtained from symmetric cells with either BSCF or SSC + SDC electrodes using the CC-02 current collector, even though a phase transition is observed for BSCF. For instance, after approximately 800 h of continuous stability testing, the area-specific resistance of the BSCF electrode retains a value of approximately 0.065 Ω cm2, except for a slight fluctuation within the range of 0.06-0.07 Ω cm2. These findings reveal that both BSCF and SSC can be stably operated for ORR under symmetric cell conditions; however, an appropriate current collection method is crucial to achieving stable performance.

  5. Surface coordination number and surface redox couples on catalyst oxides, a new approach of the interpretation of activity and selectivity III. Interpretation of chemical and catalytic oxidation reactions on some oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Y. P.

    The concepts of surface coordination number n, and of surface redox couples MO [ n] /MO ( n+1) presented previously, are exploited to explain experimental results. Two cases are considered: reactions of chemical gaseous species such as CO, CO 2, H 2, H 2O,N 2O, propene and methanol on the surface of the oxides NiO, TiO 2, and Cr 2O 3, in the absence of oxygen: activated catalytic reactions of oxygen on reductive species such as CO, H 2,C 2H 6, and CH 3OH. The knowledge of the potential of surface redox couples permits a rationalization of the study of these reactions. The efficiency of the two concepts is obvious in many cases. For example, the origin of an athermal oxidative process occurring for the oxidations of CO or H 2 on TiO 2 is easily understood, as well as those of the poisoning of the catalysts or of the inactivity of a surface saturated by oxygen. In addition, the study of chemical reactions on the oxides confirms and completes the theoretical approach used. Particularly, the existence of the surface states, which are postulated in the case of Cr 2O 3, is corroborated by experimental observations concerning the number of surface states and the value of the chemical potentials. Even though the theory is based upon thermodynamical and structural data, it also leads to a better understanding of kinetic features.

  6. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  7. Ni/Fe-supported over hydrotalcites precursors as catalysts for clean and selective oxidation of Basic Yellow 11: reaction intermediates determination.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; García, J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Basic Yellow 11 (BY 11) was employed as model compound to study catalytic wet air oxidation as a pre-treatment step to the conventional biological oxidation. Ni and Fe catalysts supported over hydrotalcite (HT) were prepared by incipient wetness and excess impregnation to obtain catalysts with different metal loadings (from 1 to 10 wt.%). HTs were synthesized by co-precipitation and characterized with XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM. Results showed that dye conversion increased with Ni and Fe content up to 7 wt.% and that the most effective catalyst were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The influence of metal loading in the catalyst, and the preparation method as well as the reaction conditions was investigated. A mechanism and reaction pathways for BY 11 during catalytic liquid phase oxidation have also been proposed. PMID:22960061

  8. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  9. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-04-27

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures.

  10. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions have become a powerful tool for advanced organic synthesis. This type of reaction is of significant value for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, as well as advanced materials. Both, academic as well as industrial laboratories continuously investigate new applications of the different methodologies. Clearly, this area constitutes one of the major topics in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis. Among the different palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions, several carbonylations have been developed and widely used in organic syntheses and are even applied in the pharmaceutical industry on ton-scale. Furthermore, methodologies such as the carbonylative Suzuki and Sonogashira reactions allow for the preparation of interesting building blocks, which can be easily refined further on. Although carbonylative coupling reactions of aryl halides have been well established, palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions are also interesting. Compared with the reactions of aryl halides, oxidative carbonylation reactions offer an interesting pathway. The oxidative addition step could be potentially avoided in oxidative reactions, but only few reviews exist in this area. In this Minireview, we summarize the recent development in the oxidative carbonylation reactions. PMID:23307763

  11. Direct growth of flower-like manganese oxide on reduced graphene oxide towards efficient oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Guo, Chunxian; Zhang, Lianying; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-07-18

    Three-dimensional manganese oxide is directly grown on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets, exhibiting comparable catalytic activity, higher selectivity and better stability towards oxygen reduction reaction than those of the commercial Pt/XC-72 catalyst. PMID:23745182

  12. Oxidative hemoglobin reactions: Applications to drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Hollenberg, Paul F; Ballou, David P

    2016-06-15

    Hb is a protein with multiple functions, acting as an O2 transport protein, and having peroxidase and oxidase activities with xenobiotics that lead to substrate radicals. However, there is a lack of evidence for intermediates involved in these reactions of Hb with redox-active compounds, including those with xenobiotics such as drugs, chemical carcinogens, and sulfides. In particular, questions exist as to what intermediates participate in reactions of either metHb or oxyHb with sulfides. The studies presented here elaborate kinetics and intermediates involved in the reactions of Hb with oxidants (H2O2 and mCPBA), and they demonstrate the formation of high valent intermediates, providing insights into mechanistic issues of sulfur and drug oxidations. Overall, we propose generalized mechanisms that include peroxidatic reactions using H2O2 generated from the autooxidation of oxyHb, with involvement of substrate radicals in reactions of Hb with oxidizable drugs such as metyrapone or 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and with sulfides. We identify ferryl intermediates (with a Soret band at 407 nm) in oxidative reactions with all of the above-mentioned reactions. These spectral properties are consistent with a protonated ferryl heme, such as Cpd II or Cpd ES-like species (Spolitak et al., JIB, 2006, 100, 2034-2044). Mechanism(s) of Hb oxidative reactions are discussed. PMID:27091316

  13. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  14. Production of pesticide metabolites by oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, E

    1982-08-01

    The cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system catalyzes a wide variety of oxidations of pesticide chemicals and related compounds. These reactions include epoxidation and aromatic hydroxylation, aliphatic hydroxylation, O-, N- and S-dealkylation, N-oxidation, oxidative deamination, S-oxidation, P-oxidation, desulfuration and ester cleavage and may result in either detoxication or activation of the pesticide. The current status of such reactions, relative to the production, in vivo, of biologically active intermediates in pesticide metabolism is summarized. More recently we have shown that the FAD-containing monooxygenase of mammalian liver (E.C.1.14.13.8), a xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme of broad specificity formerly known as an amine oxidase, is involved in a variety of pesticide oxidations. These include sulfoxidation of organophosphorus insecticides such as phorate and disulfoton, oxidative desulfuration of phosphonate insecticides such as fonofos and oxidation at the phosphorus atom in such compounds as the cotton defoliant, folex. The relative importance of the FAD-containing monooxygenase vis-a-vis the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system is discussed, based on in vitro studies on purified enzymes. PMID:7161848

  15. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  16. SURFACE REACTIONS OF OXIDES OF SULFUR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface reactions of several sulfur-containing molecules have been studied in order to understand the mechanism by which sulfate ions are formed on atmospheric aerosols. At 25C the heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 by NO2 to sulfuric acid and sulfate ions occurred on hydrated silica...

  17. Oxidative Dehydrogenative Couplings of Pyrazol-5-amines Selectively Forming Azopyrroles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New oxidative dehydrogenative couplings of pyrazol-5-amines for the selective synthesis of azopyrrole derivatives have been described. The former reaction simultaneously installs C–I and N–N bonds through iodination and oxidation, whereas the latter involved a copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling process. The resulting iodo-substituted azopyrroles were employed by treatment with various terminal alkynes through Sonogashira cross-coupling leading to new azo compounds. PMID:24731223

  18. Reaction of ethanol on oxidized and metallic cobalt surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Matthew P.; Vohs, John M.

    2011-02-01

    The reaction of ethanol on metallic and oxidized cobalt surfaces was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to determine the dependence of the reaction pathways on the cobalt oxidation state. The primary reaction for ethoxide species on metallic cobalt surfaces was decarbonylation producing CO, H 2 and carbon. This reaction was facile and occurred below 400 K. In contrast, CoO x surfaces which predominantly contained Co 2+ were selective for the dehydrogenation of ethoxide groups to produce acetaldehyde at 400 K. A fraction of the acetaldehyde molecules produced by this pathway were further oxidized to acetate which decomposed to produce CO 2 at 495 K. More highly oxidized Co surfaces that contained both CO 2+ and Co 3+ were active for the complete oxidation of ethanol producing CO, CO 2, and H 2O as the primary products. The insights that these results provide for understanding the mechanism of the steam reforming of ethanol on cobalt catalysts is discussed.

  19. Hypochlorite oxidation of select androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Mash, Heath; Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura

    2010-03-01

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their synthetic analogs released from agricultural activities and wastewater discharge may be introduced into drinking water sources. The fate of androgenic steroids during drinking water treatment, specifically the use of chlorine for biological control, has not been extensively studied. As such, this study focuses on the hypochlorite oxidation of a select number of androgenic compounds that vary in their structural composition. Where a favorable reaction is observed, we also attempt to describe the product distribution. The results show compounds that possess a ketonic functional group conjugated with a double bond inhibit oxidation by hypochlorite in the absence of biological or indirect oxidative pathways. Oxidative reactivity in the presence of hypochlorite was favorably correlated with the presence of isolated unsaturated carbon bonds and resulted in various transformation products. PMID:20031185

  20. Selective Oxidizer For Removal Of Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trocciola, John C.; Schroll, Craig R.; Lesieur, Roger R.

    1996-01-01

    Catalytic apparatus selectively oxidizes most of carbon monoxide (without oxidizing hydrogen) in stream of reformed fuel gas fed to low-temperature fuel cell. Multiple catalytic stages at progressively lower temperatures operate without becoming poisoned. Catalysts used to oxidize CO selectively include platinum on alumina and commercial catalyst known as "Selectoxo."

  1. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  2. Reversibility of heme-nitric oxide reactions for use in an inhaled nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Soller, Babs R.; Rencus, Tal

    1997-06-01

    Nitric Oxide is a simple gaseous compound which serves as a regulatory molecule in a number of physiological processes. Due to its biological role as a potent local vasodilator,there has been widespread interest in the therapeutic use of gaseous nitric oxide a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Our goal is the development of a sensor for the direct and continuous measurement of inhaled nitric oxide concentrations. This study evaluated the reversibility of potential sensing compounds upon reaction with nitric oxide. Previously, absorption spectroscopy was used to study the sensitivity of the Fe II, Fe III and oxygenated forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. This study focused on the photo-reversibility of the hem's reaction with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochrome-c in the Fe III state reversibly reacted with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin and myoglobin in the Fe II state non-reversibly reacted with nitric oxide to form an unstable product. Cytochrome-c (FeII) does not react with nitric oxide. The oxy forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin react with nitric oxide to form their respective met forms, unreversible via photolysis. For all reversible reactions, photolysis was gradual and complete within five minutes.

  3. Heterogeneous reaction of ozone with aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    Rates and collision efficiencies for ozone decomposition on aluminum oxide surfaces were determined. Samples were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, particle size, and chemical analysis. Collision efficiencies were found to be between 2 times 10 to the -10 power and 2 times 10 to the -9 power. This is many orders of magnitude below the value of 0.000001 to 0.00001 needed for appreciable long-term ozone loss in the stratosphere. An activation energy of 7.2 kcal/mole was found for the heterogeneous reaction between -40 C and 40 C. Effects of pore diffusion, outgassing and treatment of the aluminum oxide with several chemical species were also investigated.

  4. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  5. Reaction network and kinetics for the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V sub 2 O sub 5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Andersson, L.T. )

    1990-11-01

    The oxidation of three methyl-diphenylmethane isomers and of bibenzyl, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde, which are intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, has been studied to elucidate the reaction network and relative importance of various reactions. Selectivity dependences reveal that the network is composed mainly of three parallel reaction routes: (1) side-chain oxidation with consecutive reactions, (2) oxidative coupling with both parallel and consecutive reactions, and (3) carbon oxide formation. Coupling products are not negligible, with an initial selectivity of 29% (400{degree}C). Anthraquinone is produced mainly from o-methyl-diphenylmethane conditions and catalyst used. Selectivity dependences suggested product lumping and a simplified network. Kinetic analysis of this reaction network indicates that higher temperatures favor route 2 over route 1. The same initial intermediates for route 1 of side-chain oxidation and for route 2 of oxidative coupling are suggested.

  6. Cooperative Catalysis for Selective Alcohol Oxidation with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Slot, Thierry K; Eisenberg, David; van Noordenne, Dylan; Jungbacker, Peter; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2016-08-22

    The activation of dioxygen for selective oxidation of organic molecules is a major catalytic challenge. Inspired by the activity of nitrogen-doped carbons in electrocatalytic oxygen reduction, we combined such a carbon with metal-oxide catalysts to yield cooperative catalysts. These simple materials boost the catalytic oxidation of several alcohols, using molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure and low temperature (80 °C). Cobalt and copper oxide demonstrate the highest activities. The high activity and selectivity of these catalysts arises from the cooperative action of their components, as proven by various control experiments and spectroscopic techniques. We propose that the reaction should not be viewed as occurring at an 'active site', but rather at an 'active doughnut'-the volume surrounding the base of a carbon-supported metal-oxide particle. PMID:27355443

  7. Manganese chlorins immobilized on silica as oxidation reaction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Castro, Kelly A D F; Pires, Sónia M G; Ribeiro, Marcos A; Simões, Mário M Q; Neves, M Graça P M S; Schreiner, Wido H; Wypych, Fernando; Cavaleiro, José A S; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2015-07-15

    Synthetic strategies that comply with the principles of green chemistry represent a challenge: they will enable chemists to conduct reactions that maximize the yield of products with commercial interest while minimizing by-products formation. The search for catalysts that promote the selective oxidation of organic compounds under mild and environmentally friendly conditions constitutes one of the most important quests of organic chemistry. In this context, metalloporphyrins and analogues are excellent catalysts for oxidative transformations under mild conditions. In fact, their reduced derivatives chlorins are also able to catalyze organic compounds oxidation effectively, although they have been still little explored. In this study, we synthesized two chlorins through porphyrin cycloaddition reactions with 1.3-dipoles and prepared the corresponding manganese chlorins (MnCHL) using adequate manganese(II) salts. These MnCHL were posteriorly immobilized on silica by following the sol-gel process and the resulting solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UVVIS spectroscopy, FTIR, XPS, and EDS. The catalytic activity of the immobilized MnCHL was investigated in the oxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexene and cyclohexane and the results were compared with the ones obtained under homogeneous conditions. PMID:25841060

  8. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  9. THz-Pulse-Induced Selective Catalytic CO Oxidation on Ru.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Jerry L; Katayama, Tetsuo; Lindenberg, Aaron; Fisher, Alan S; Öström, Henrik; Nilsson, Anders; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-07-17

    We demonstrate the use of intense, quasi-half-cycle THz pulses, with an associated electric field component comparable to intramolecular electric fields, to direct the reaction coordinate of a chemical reaction by stimulating the nuclear motions of the reactants. Using a strong electric field from a THz pulse generated via coherent transition radiation from an ultrashort electron bunch, we present evidence that CO oxidation on Ru(0001) is selectively induced, while not promoting the thermally induced CO desorption process. The reaction is initiated by the motion of the O atoms on the surface driven by the electric field component of the THz pulse, rather than thermal heating of the surface. PMID:26230806

  10. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes in Oxidation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčík, Václav; Cazin, Catherine S. J.

    This chapter describes applications of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) in oxidation chemistry. The strong σ-donation capabilities of the NHCs allow an efficient stabilisation of metal centres in high oxidation states, while high metal-NHC bond dissociation energies suppress their oxidative decomposition. These properties make NHCs ideal ligands for oxidation processes. The first part of this chapter is dedicated to the reactivity of NHC-metal complexes towards molecular oxygen whilst the second half highlights all oxidation reactions catalysed by such complexes. These include oxidation of alcohols and olefins, oxidative cyclisations, hydrations of alkynes and nitriles, oxidative cleavage of alkenes and the oxidation of methane.

  11. Lipase-mediated selective oxidation of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Krystof, Monika; Pérez-Sánchez, María; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2013-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are important biomass-derived platform chemicals that can be obtained from the dehydration of lignocellulosic sugars. A possible route for the derivatization of furanics is their oxidation to afford a broad range of chemicals with promising applications (e.g., diacids, hydroxyl acids, aldehyde acids, monomers for novel polymers). Herein we explore the organic peracid-assisted oxidation of furanics under mild reaction conditions. Using lipases as biocatalysts, alkyl esters as acyl donors, and aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide (30 % v/v) added stepwise, peracids are formed in situ, which subsequently oxidize the aldehyde groups to afford carboxylic acids with high yields and excellent selectivities. Furthermore, the use of an immobilized silica-based 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) affords the selective oxidation of the hydroxymethyl group of HMF to afford 2,5-diformylfuran. That product can be subsequently oxidized using again lipases for the in situ peracid formation to yield 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid, which is considered to be a key building block for biorefineries. These lipase-mediated reactions proceeded efficiently even with high substrate loadings under still non-optimized conditions. Overall, a proof-of-concept for the oxidation of furanics (based on in situ formed organic peracids as oxidants) is provided. PMID:23576295

  12. Gold-catalyzed homogeneous oxidative cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guozhu; Peng, Yu; Cui, Li; Zhang, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Oxidizing gold? A gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycle is essential for the first oxidative cross-coupling reaction in gold catalysis. By using Selectfluor for gold(I) oxidation, this chemistry reveals the synthetic potential of incorporating gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycles into contemporary gold chemistry and promises a new area of gold research by merging powerful gold catalysis and oxidative metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. PMID:19322869

  13. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Heck Reactions between Alkyltrifluoroborates and Vinylarenes

    PubMed Central

    Liwosz, Timothy W.; Chemler, Sherry R.

    2013-01-01

    We report herein that potassium alkyltrifluoroborates can be utilized in oxidative Heck-type reactions with vinyl arenes. The reaction is catalyzed by a Cu(OTf)2/1,10-phenanthroline with MnO2 as the stoichiometric oxidant. In addition to the alkyl Heck, amination, esterification and dimerization reactions of alkyltrifluoroborates are demonstrated under analogous reaction conditions. Evidence for an alkyl radical intermediate is presented. PMID:23734764

  14. Kinetically driven instabilities and selectivities in methane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.K.; Vlachos, D.G.

    1997-08-01

    Ignitions, extinctions, and Hopf bifurcations in methane oxidation were studied as a function of pressure and inlet fuel composition. A continuous stirred-tank reactor was modeled with numerical bifurcation techniques, using the 177 reaction/31 species mechanism. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses were performed at turning points to identify the most important reactions and reactive species. Then, simulations were compared with experimental data. Multiple ignitions and extinctions as well as oscillations that are purely kinetically driven were found. Ignition to a partially ignited state with considerable reactivity of methane indicates possible narrow operation windows with high selectivities to partial oxidation products. At 0.1 atm, the authors found a selectivity of up to 80% to CO at 70% CH{sub 4} conversion. The ignition to a fully ignited branch is associated with high selectivity to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The C2 chemistry inhibits the ignition of methane to the partially ignited branch. The methane ignition temperature exhibits two branches with respect to pressure, with only the low-pressure branch being dominant. Reaction path analysis at ignition conditions shows that the preferred pathway of CH{sub 4} oxidation is to form CO and CO{sub 2} though CH{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}(s) intermediates. However, at intermediate to high pressures, the recombination of CH{sub 3} to C{sub 2}H{sub 6} also becomes quite significant.

  15. A Generalized Selection Rule for Pericyclic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Fu-Cheng; Pfeiffer, Gary V.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a convenient procedure, the Odd-Even Rule, for predicting the allowedness of forbiddenness of ground-state, pericyclic reactions. The rule is applied to a number of specific reactions. In contrast to the Woodward-Hoffman approach, the application to each reaction is always the same. (JN)

  16. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  17. Concurrent Formation of Carbon-Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C-H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C-C bond formation via C-H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  18. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene.

  19. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  20. State- and bond-selected unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F. )

    1990-09-21

    Unimolecular reactions are crucial chemical events that have been the focus of increasingly sophisticated investigation in the past decade. Unraveling their details is one fundamental goal of experimental and theoretical studies of chemical dynamics. New techniques are revealing the possibilities, and challenges, of eigenstate- and bond-specific unimolecular reactions. These experiments clearly demonstrate the intimate connection between intramolecular processes and unimolecular reaction dynamics and suggest means of exploiting molecular properties to study and control reactions at the level of individual quantum states. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  2. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  3. Water oxidation reaction in natural and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal

    2013-12-10

    Understanding the structure and mechanism of water oxidation catalysts is an essential component for developing artificial photosynthetic devices. In the natural water oxidation catalyst, the geometric and electronic structure of its inorganic core, the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5} cluster, has been studied by spectroscopic and diffraction measurements. In inorganic systems, metal oxides seem to be good candidates for water oxidation catalysts. Understanding the reaction mechanism in both natural and oxide-based catalysts will helpin further developing efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts.

  4. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng; Yang Shengchun; You Hongjun; Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  5. Iodine Oxide Thermite Reactions: Physical and Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Pantoya, Michelle; Bless, Stephan; Clark, William

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the potential for some thermite-like material reactions to kill bacteria spores. Iodine oxides and silver oxides react vigorously with metals like aluminum, tantalum, and neodymium. These reactions theoretically produce temperatures as high as 8000K, leading to vaporization of the reactants, producing very hot iodine and/or silver gases. We performed a series of computations and experiments to characterize these reactions under both quasi-static and ballistic impact conditions. Criteria for impact reaction were established. Measurements of temperature and pressure changes and chemical evolution will be reported. Basic combustion characterizations of these reactions, such as thermal equilibrium analysis and reaction propagation rates as well as ignition sensitivity, will be discussed. Additionally, testing protocols were developed to characterize the biocidal effects of these reactive materials on B. subtilis spores. The evidence from these tests indicates that these reactions produce heat, pressure, and highly biocidal gases.

  6. Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

    2008-12-31

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using

  7. Uranium oxidation: Characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water by infrared and sorption analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, E. L.; Smyrl, N. R.; Condon, J. B.; Eager, M. H.

    1984-04-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. The results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. Inert gas sorption analyses and diffuse reflectance infrared studies combined with electron microscopy prove valuable in defining the chemistry and morphology of the oxidic products and hydrated intermediates.

  8. Oxidant-free dehydrogenative coupling reactions via hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Ke-Han; Li, Yang

    2014-10-01

    Oxidant-free dehydrogenative coupling reactions: Recently, coupling reactions have followed a novel strategy for the construction of C==C, C==N, C==P, and S==S bonds by dehydrogenation without using any extra oxidant, via H2 evolution. These breakthroughs inspire a new direction in the construction of chemical bonds, towards more sustainable, highly atom-economical, and environmentally benign synthetic methods. PMID:25139249

  9. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  10. The pathophysiology of extracellular hemoglobin associated with enhanced oxidative reactions

    PubMed Central

    Rifkind, Joseph M.; Mohanty, Joy G.; Nagababu, Enika

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC), oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV)-ferrylHb and OxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV) contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(III)Hb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers are taken up into cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease, and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern with hemolytic anemia where there is an increase in hemolysis. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that the transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or the blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, do not further increase

  11. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  12. Mutagenicity screening of reaction products from the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of phenolic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, I.J.; Aitken, M.D.; Ball, L.M.; Heck, P.E. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Phenol-oxidizing enzymes such as peroxidases, laccases, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of a wide range of phenolic pollutants. Although the use of these enzymes in waste-treatment applications has been proposed by a number of investigators, little information exists on the toxicological characteristics of the oxidation products. The enzymes chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase were used in this study to catalyze the oxidation of phenol, several mono-substituted phenols, and pentachlorophenol. Seventeen reaction mixtures representing selected combinations of enzyme and parent phenol were subjected to mutagenicity screening using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay; five selected mixtures were also incubated with the S9 microsomal preparation to detect the possible presence of promutagens. The majority of reaction mixtures tested were not directly mutagenic, and none of those tested with S9 gave a positive response. Such lack of mutagenicity of enzymatic oxidation products provides encouragement for establishing the feasibility of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation as a waste-treatment process. The only positive responses were obtained with reaction products from the lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. Clear positive responses were observed when strain TA100 was incubated with 2-nitrophenol reaction-product mixtures, and when strain TA98 was incubated with the 4-nitrophenol reaction mixture. Additionally, 2,4-dinitrophenol was identified as a reaction product from 4-nitrophenol, and preliminary evidence indicates that both 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrophenol are produced from the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol. Possible mechanism by which these nitration reactions occur are discussed.

  13. The Effect of Metal Oxide on Nanoparticles from Thermite Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lewis Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how metal oxide used in a thermite reaction can impact the production of nanoparticles. The results showed the presence of nanoparticles (less than 1 micron in diameter) of at least one type produced by each metal oxide. The typical particles were metallic spheres, which ranged from 300 nanometers in…

  14. Quinone-Catalyzed Selective Oxidation of Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Alison E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-12-01

    Quinones are common stoichiometric reagents in organic chemistry. Para-quinones with high reduction potentials, such as DDQ and chloranil, are widely used and typically promote hydride abstraction. In recent years, many catalytic applications of these methods have been achieved by using transition metals, electrochemistry, or O2 to regenerate the oxidized quinone in situ. Complementary studies have led to the development of a different class of quinones that resemble the ortho-quinone cofactors in copper amine oxidases and mediate the efficient and selective aerobic and/or electrochemical dehydrogenation of amines. The latter reactions typically proceed by electrophilic transamination and/or addition-elimination reaction mechanisms, rather than hydride abstraction pathways. The collective observations show that the quinone structure has a significant influence on the reaction mechanism and has important implications for the development of new quinone reagents and quinone-catalyzed transformations. PMID:26530485

  15. Surprisingly high activity for oxygen reduction reaction of selected oxides lacking long oxygen-ion diffusion paths at intermediate temperatures: a case study of cobalt-free BaFeO(3-δ).

    PubMed

    Dong, Feifei; Chen, Yubo; Chen, Dengjie; Shao, Zongping

    2014-07-23

    The widespread application of solid oxide fuel cell technology requires the development of innovative electrodes with high activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures. Here, we demonstrate that a cobalt-free parent oxide BaFeO(3-δ) (BF), which lacks long-range oxygen-ion diffusion paths, has surprisingly high electrocatalytic activity for ORR. Both in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis on room-temperature powder and transmission electron microscopy on quenched powder are applied to investigate the crystal structure of BF. Despite the lack of long oxygen-ion diffusion paths, the easy redox of iron cations as demonstrated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and oxygen temperature-programmed desorption and the high oxygen vacancy concentration as supported by iodometric titration and TGA benefit the reduction of oxygen to oxygen ions. Moreover, the electrical conductivity relaxation technique in conjunction with a transient thermogravimetric study reveals very high surface exchange kinetics of BF oxide. At 700 °C, the area specific resistance of BF cathode, as expressed by a symmetrical cell configuration, is only ∼0.021 Ω cm(2), and the derived single fuel cell achieves high power output with a peak power density of 870 mW cm(-2). It suggests that an undoped BF parent oxide can be used as a high-efficiency catalyst for ORR. PMID:24978102

  16. Thermal Behavior Study of the MoVTeNb Oxide Catalyst for Selective Oxidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, R.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.

    2009-06-01

    Several parameters involved in preparing the multi metal oxide (MMO) catalysts (Mo1V0.3Te0.23Nb0.12Ox) for selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid (AA) were investigated. These included the proper pre-calcined and calcinations atmosphere effect on the performance of the catalysts. It was found that each metal element plays a critical role to the performance of an effective catalyst and also the calcinations under a non-flow inert atmosphere. The characterization results from XRD, SEM, TG and DSC show the important differences depending on the activation procedures of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst. The XRD analysis is used to identify the phase inventory of the MoVTeNb oxide catalysts. The structure of orthorhombic M1, M2, TeMo5O16, V0.95Mo0.97O5 and Mo5O14 phase was investigated. The orthorhombic M1 phase is the most active and selective phase and is responsible for the major of the efficiently of the best catalyst for selective oxidation process. TGA and DTG allow the identification of the number and types, of reactions involving evaporation of small molecules from removal of ligands and water to condensation or drying processes. From all these analyses it was proven that the activation procedures would affect the performance of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst.

  17. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

  18. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalkylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms operative in thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes are investigated. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids is not established. It was determined that this behavior is not associated with hydrogen end groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres is dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio is reached, a steady rate appears to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, CF2OCF2CF2O2, no. CF2CF2O, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys is much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexafluoropropene derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys is very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appears to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes this takes place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  19. Overcoming the "oxidant problem": strategies to use O2 as the oxidant in organometallic C-H oxidation reactions catalyzed by Pd (and Cu).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alison N; Stahl, Shannon S

    2012-06-19

    Oxidation reactions are key transformations in organic chemistry because they can increase chemical complexity and incorporate heteroatom substituents into carbon-based molecules. This principle is manifested in the conversion of petrochemical feedstocks into commodity chemicals and in the synthesis of fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other complex organic molecules. The utility and function of these molecules correlate directly with the presence and specific placement of oxygen and nitrogen heteroatoms and other functional groups within the molecules. Methods for selective oxidation of C-H bonds have expanded significantly over the past decade, and their role in the synthesis of organic chemicals will continue to increase. Our group's contributions to this field are linked to our broader interest in the development and mechanistic understanding of aerobic oxidation reactions. Molecular oxygen (O(2)) is the ideal oxidant. Its low cost and lack of toxic byproducts make it a highly appealing reagent that can address key "green chemistry" priorities in industry. With strong economic and environmental incentives to use O(2), the commmodity chemicals industry often uses aerobic oxidation reactions. In contrast, O(2) is seldom used to prepare more-complex smaller-volume chemicals, a limitation that reflects, in part, the limited synthetic scope and utility of existing aerobic reactions. Pd-catalyzed reactions represent some of the most versatile methods for selective C-H oxidation, but they often require stoichiometric transition-metal or organic oxidants, such as Cu(II), Ag(I), or benzoquinone. This Account describes recent strategies that we have identified to use O(2) as the oxidant in these reactions. In Pd-catalyzed C-H oxidation reactions that form carbon-heteroatom bonds, the stoichiometric oxidant is often needed to promote difficult reductive elimination steps in the catalytic mechanism. To address this challenge, we have identified new ancillary ligands for

  20. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalklethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Harris, D. H.; Smythe, M. E.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to investigate the mechanisms operative in thermal and thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids has not been established. It was determined that this behavior was not associated with hydrogen end-groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres was found to be dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio was reached, a steady rate appeared to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, -CF2OCF2CF2O-, not -CF2CF2O-, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys was found to be much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexalfuoropropane oxide derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation/anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys was very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appeared to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes; this took place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  1. Cobalt-promoted Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for the Selective Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Matthew

    Recent work has shown that both cobalt and iron oxide nanoparticles are active for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of cyclohexane to benzene, the former more active than the latter. Further study has shown that the addition of gold species as a minority component into iron oxide nanocrystals increases the selectivity of the reaction to benzene. Since a primary motivation for this work is the addition of catalysts in jet fuels to facilitate the dehydrogenation and cracking reactions preceding their combustion, a low-cost, sacrificial catalyst is sought after. In this application, catalyst nanoparticles suspended in the fuel stream will dehydrogenate cyclic alkanes (cyclohexane) to their aromatic counterparts (benzene). Alkenes and aromatics have a much higher rate of combustion, which decreases the amount of uncombusted fuel in the exhaust, thereby increasing performance. As these catalysts are not recyclable, there is significant impetus to substitute cheaper base metals for expensive noble metals. In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles are doped with varying levels of cobalt to examine the effect of cobalt content and oxidation state on the selectivity and activity of the iron oxide for the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane, used as a model cyclic alkane in jet fuel. We have shown previously that small (˜5nm) cobalt oxide nanoparticles favor the production of benzene over the partial dehydrogenation products cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene, or the complete oxidation product carbon dioxide. It is the aim of this work to examine the surface of these cobalt-iron oxide nanoparticles to determine the conditions most favorable for this selective oxidative dehydrogenation. Cobalt-doped iron nanoparticles were prepared by a surfactant-free hydrothermal co-precipitation technique that enabled a high degree of composition control and size control. These samples were characterized via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X

  2. Selective oxidation of methanol and ethanol on supported ruthenium oxide clusters at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-02-17

    RuO2 domains supported on SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 catalyze the oxidative conversion of methanol to formaldehyde, methylformate, and dimethoxymethane with unprecedented rates and high combined selectivity (>99%) and yield at low temperatures (300-400 K). Supports influence turnover rates and the ability of RuO2 domains to undergo redox cycles required for oxidation turnovers. Oxidative dehydrogenation turnover rates and rates of stoichiometric reduction of RuO2 in H2 increased in parallel when RuO2 domains were dispersed on more reducible supports. These support effects, the kinetic effects of CH3OH and O2 on reaction rates, and the observed kinetic isotope effects with CH3OD and CD3OD reactants are consistent with a sequence of elementary steps involving kinetically relevant H-abstraction from adsorbed methoxide species using lattice oxygen atoms and with methoxide formation in quasi-equilibrated CH3OH dissociation on nearly stoichiometric RuO2 surfaces. Anaerobic transient experiments confirmed that CH3OH oxidation to HCHO requires lattice oxygen atoms and that selectivities are not influenced by the presence of O2. Residence time effects on selectivity indicate that secondary HCHO-CH3OH acetalization reactions lead to hemiacetal or methoxymethanol intermediates that convert to dimethoxymethane in reactions with CH3OH on support acid sites or dehydrogenate to form methylformate on RuO2 and support redox sites. These conclusions are consistent with the tendency of Al2O3 and SiO2 supports to favor dimethoxymethane formation, while SnO2, ZrO2, and TiO2 preferentially form methylformate. These support effects on secondary reactions were confirmed by measured CH3OH oxidation rates and selectivities on physical mixtures of supported RuO2 catalysts and pure supports. Ethanol also reacts on supported RuO2 domains to form predominately acetaldehyde and diethoxyethane at 300-400 K. The bifunctional nature of these reaction pathways and the remarkable ability of Ru

  3. Selective oxidation of methanol and ethanol on supported ruthenium oxide clusters at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2004-03-04

    RuO2 domains supported on SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 catalyze the oxidative conversion of methanol to formaldehyde, methylformate, and dimethoxymethane with unprecedented rates and high combined selectivity (>99 percent) and yield at low temperatures (300-400 K). Supports influence turnover rates and the ability of RuO2 domains to undergo redox cycles required for oxidation turnovers. Oxidative dehydrogenation turnover rates and rates of stoichiometric reduction of RuO2 in H2 increased in parallel when RuO2 domains were dispersed on more reducible supports. These support effects, the kinetic effects of CH3OH and O2 on reaction rates, and the observed kinetic isotope effects with CH3OD and CD3OD reactants are consistent with a sequence of elementary steps involving kinetically relevant H-abstraction from adsorbed methoxide species using lattice oxygen atoms and with methoxide formation in quasi-equilibrated CH3OH dissociation on nearly stoichiometric RuO2 surfaces. Anaerobic transient experiments confirmed that CH3OH oxidation to HCHO requires lattice oxygen atoms and that selectivities are not influenced by the presence of O2. Residence time effects on selectivity indicate that secondary HCHO-CH3OH acetalization reactions lead to hemiacetal or methoxymethanol intermediates that convert to dimethoxymethane in reactions with CH3OH on support acid sites or dehydrogenate to form methylformate on RuO2 and support redox sites. These conclusions are consistent with the tendency of Al2O3 and SiO2 supports to favor dimethoxymethane formation, while SnO2, ZrO2, and TiO2 preferentially form methylformate. These support effects on secondary reactions were confirmed by measured CH3OH oxidation rates and selectivities on physical mixtures of supported RuO2 catalysts and pure supports. Ethanol also reacts on supported RuO2 domains to form predominately acetaldehyde and diethoxyethane at 300-400 K. The bifunctional nature of these reaction pathways and the remarkable

  4. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  5. New reaction system for hydrocarbon oxidation by chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Byung; Clark, Douglas S

    2006-05-01

    A novel reaction system was developed to maximize the catalytic efficiency of chloroperoxidase (CPO, from Caldariomyces fumago) toward the oxidation of hydrocarbons. The reaction system consisted of an organic/aqueous emulsion comprising pure substrate and aqueous buffer supplemented with the surfactant dioctyl sulfosuccinate. The emulsion system attenuated not only the destabilizing effects of the substrate and product on the enzyme by emulsifying the compounds, but also oxidant toxicity (oxidative stress) by increasing substrate availability. As a result, CPO exhibited total turnover numbers (TTNs, defined as the amount of product produced over the catalytic lifetime of the enzyme) of ca. 20,000 mol product/mol enzyme for the oxidation of styrene, toluene, and o-, m-, p-xylenes. The TTNs are over 10-fold higher than those previously reported for the oxidation of benzylic hydrocarbons by CPO. This study represents a significant step toward the development of CPO as a practical catalyst for large-scale organic syntheses. PMID:16276530

  6. A Bioorthogonal Reaction of N-Oxide and Boron Reagents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Justin; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-12-21

    The development of bioorthogonal reactions has classically focused on bond-forming ligation reactions. In this report, we seek to expand the functional repertoire of such transformations by introducing a new bond-cleaving reaction between N-oxide and boron reagents. The reaction features a large dynamic range of reactivity, showcasing second-order rate constants as high as 2.3×10(3)  M(-1)  s(-1) using diboron reaction partners. Diboron reagents display minimal cell toxicity at millimolar concentrations, penetrate cell membranes, and effectively reduce N-oxides inside mammalian cells. This new bioorthogonal process based on miniscule components is thus well-suited for activating molecules within cells under chemical control. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the metabolic diversity of nature enables the use of naturally occurring functional groups that display inherent biocompatibility alongside abiotic components for organism-specific applications. PMID:26568479

  7. Synthesis and reactions of the oxides of hexafluoropropylene trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapevalov, A.Ya.; Filyakova, T.I.; Peschanskii, N.V.; Kodess, M.I.; Kolenko, I.P.

    1986-03-10

    By the oxidation of the hexafluoropropylene trimers with an aqueous solution of sodium hypochlorite in the presence of acetonitrile the following ..cap alpha..-oxides were obtained: 2,3-Epoxyperfluoro-3-isopropyl-4-methylpentane and 2,3-epoxyperfluoro-3-ethyl-2,4-dimethylpentane. According to the /sup 19/F NMR data, the epoxidation takes place stereoselectively with the formation of only one conformer of the ..cap alpha..-oxide in each case. The determining effect of the steric factors on the reactivity of the oxides of hexafluoropropylene trimers in reaction with nucleophiles was demonstrated.

  8. Aqueous Oxidative Heck Reaction as a Protein-Labeling Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ourailidou, Maria Eleni; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Baas, Bert-Jan; Jeronimus-Stratingh, Margot; Gottumukkala, Aditya L; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Dekker, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of chemical reactions are being employed for bio-orthogonal ligation of detection labels to protein-bound functional groups. Several of these strategies, however, are limited in their application to pure proteins and are ineffective in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. Here we present the palladium-catalyzed oxidative Heck reaction as a new and robust bio-orthogonal strategy for linking functionalized arylboronic acids to protein-bound alkenes in high yields and with excellent chemoselectivity even in the presence of complex protein mixtures from living cells. Advantageously, this reaction proceeds under aerobic conditions, whereas most other metal-catalyzed reactions require inert atmosphere. PMID:24376051

  9. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-01

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. PMID:26710326

  10. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  11. From "hemoabzymes" to "hemozymes": towards new biocatalysts for selective oxidations.

    PubMed

    Mahy, J-P; Maréchal, J-D; Ricoux, R

    2015-02-14

    The design of artificial hemoproteins that could catalyze selective oxidations using clean oxidants such as O2 or H2O2 under ecocompatible conditions constitutes a real challenge for a wide range of industrial applications. In vivo, such reactions are performed by heme-thiolate proteins, cytochromes P450, which catalyze the oxidation of substrates by dioxygen in the presence of electrons delivered from NADPH by cytochrome P450 reductase. Several strategies were used to design new artificial hemoproteins that mimic these enzymes. The first one involved the non-covalent association of synthetic hemes with monoclonal antibodies raised against these cofactors. This led to the first generation of artificial hemoproteins or "hemoabzymes" that displayed a peroxidase activity, and in some cases catalyzed the regioselective nitration of phenols by H2O2/NO2 and the stereoselective oxidation of sulfides by H2O2. The second one involved the non-covalent association of easily affordable non-relevant proteins with metalloporphyrin derivatives, using either the "Trojan Horse strategy" or the "host-guest" strategy. This led to a second generation of artificial hemoproteins or "hemozymes", some of which were found able to catalyze the stereoselective oxidation of organic compounds such as sulfides and alkenes by H2O2 and KHSO5. PMID:25493292

  12. State-to-state reaction dynamics: A selective review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teslja, Alexey; Valentini, James J.

    2006-10-01

    A selective review of state-to-state reaction dynamics experiments is presented. The review focuses on three classes of reactions that exemplify the rich history and illustrate the current state of the art in such work. These three reactions are (1) the hydrogen exchange reaction, H +H2→H2+H and its isotopomers; (2) the H +RH→H2+R reactions, where RH is an alkane, beginning with H +CH4→H2+CH3 and extending to much larger alkanes; and (3) the Cl +RH→HCl+R reactions, principally Cl +CH4→HCl+CH3. We describe the experiments, discuss their results, present comparisons with theory, and introduce heuristic models.

  13. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-12-31

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate selective oxidation as a pretreatment for the enhanced desulfurization of Illinois Basin coals using a variety of mild thermal/chemical processes. Both an Illinois No.6 and an Indiana No.5 coal were selectively oxidized with peroxyacetic acid in the pretreatment step. The products were then treated with many hydroxide and carbonate bases using either water, methanol or ethanol as the solvent system. Other reaction variables investigated include reaction temperature, reaction time, pyrolysis pressure, particle size of the coal and the level of oxidation in the pretreatment step. Throughout the study the selectively oxidized coals were compared to unoxidized control coals. Model compounds were also studied. The results of these studies overwhelmingly show that selective oxidation with peroxyacetic acid significantly enhances the level of desulfurization obtained with subsequent chemical/thermal treatments. Indeed, every process investigated, including simple pyrolysis experiments, showed sulfur removal in the pretreatment step and the subsequent step to be substantially additive. In addition, considerable enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal was obtained by the selective oxidation pretreatment. Sulfur contents lower than 0.25% were obtained for selectively oxidized coals. This represents an overall sulfur reduction of around 95%. This is beyond the level required for compliance with Clean Air Act legislation. No unoxidized coal, regardless of the desulfurization treatment, approached this level of sulfur removal.

  14. Computational studies of polysiloxanes : oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Redfern, P. C.; Zhang, Z.; Amine, K.

    2011-06-23

    Silicon-containing solvents have tremendous potential for application as electrolytes for electrical energy storage devices such as lithium-ion (air) batteries and supercapacitors. Quantum chemical methods were employed to investigate trends in oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions of a series of polysiloxanes. Various electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents can be used to tune the oxidation potential in shorter chain siloxanes but not in longer ones. Decomposition reactions of siloxanes in their oxidized states were investigated and compared against their carbon analogues. These studies suggest that the Si-O group provides added stability for siloxanes over their carbon analogues. Computational studies have also been performed for various disiloxanes and siloxanes with spacer groups to understand their thermochemical stability and oxidation potentials.

  15. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  16. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  17. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  18. A Study on the Laser Spatter and the Oxidation Reactions During Selective Laser Melting of 316L Stainless Steel, Al-Si10-Mg, and Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, Marco; Tuck, Chris; Aboulkhair, Nesma T.; Maskery, Ian; Ashcroft, Ian; Wildman, Ricky D.; Hague, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The creation of an object by selective laser melting (SLM) occurs by melting contiguous areas of a powder bed according to a corresponding digital model. It is therefore clear that the success of this metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology relies on the comprehension of the events that take place during the melting and solidification of the powder bed. This study was designed to understand the generation of the laser spatter that is commonly observed during SLM and the potential effects that the spatter has on the processing of 316L stainless steel, Al-Si10-Mg, and Ti-6Al-4V. With the exception of Ti-6Al-4V, the characterization of the laser spatter revealed the presence of surface oxides enriched in the most volatile alloying elements of the materials. The study will discuss the implication of this finding on the material quality of the built parts.

  19. Oxidative Half-reaction of Arabidopsis thaliana Sulfite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Robert S.; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R.; Hille, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate forms of the molybdenum-containing enzyme sulfite oxidase possess a b-type cytochrome prosthetic group that accepts reducing equivalents from the molybdenum center and passes them on to cytochrome c. The plant form of the enzyme, on the other hand, lacks a prosthetic group other than its molybdenum center and utilizes molecular oxygen as the physiological oxidant. Hydrogen peroxide is the ultimate product of the reaction. Here, we present data demonstrating that superoxide is produced essentially quantitatively both in the course of the reaction of reduced enzyme with O2 and during steady-state turnover and only subsequently decays (presumably noncatalytically) to form hydrogen peroxide. Rapid-reaction kinetic studies directly following the reoxidation of reduced enzyme demonstrate a linear dependence of the rate constant for the reaction on [O2] with a second-order rate constant of kox = 8.7 × 104 ± 0.5 × 104 m−1s−1. When the reaction is carried out in the presence of cytochrome c to follow superoxide generation, biphasic time courses are observed, indicating that a first equivalent of superoxide is generated in the oxidation of the fully reduced Mo(IV) state of the enzyme to Mo(V), followed by a slower oxidation of the Mo(V) state to Mo(VI). The physiological implications of plant sulfite oxidase as a copious generator of superoxide are discussed. PMID:19875441

  20. Chemical coal cleaning using selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal of both mineral and organic sulfur from Illinois coals using low temperature selective oxidation. This overall objective is to develop new methods for either physical/chemical or physical/microbial cleaning of Illinois coal. Innovative approaches to achieve deep cleaned products, containing both ash and sulfur contents less than 0.5 percent, will be considered. Experiments focus on developing cost-effective methods for the removal of organic sulfur and finely disseminated mineral impurities, especially fine pyrite particles, from coal. Rates and mechanisms for organic sulfur removal will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes handling are included. Bench scale studies are performed.

  1. Method for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions, device for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Beuhler, Robert J.; White, Michael G.; Hrbek, Jan

    2006-08-15

    A catalytic process for the oxidation of organic. Oxygen is loaded into a metal foil by heating the foil while in contact with an oxygen-containing fluid. After cooling the oxygen-activated foil to room temperature, oxygen diffuses through the foil and oxidizes reactants exposed to the other side of the foil.

  2. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed. PMID:27077840

  3. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  4. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  5. Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Crocker

    2005-09-30

    This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3

  6. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  7. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth’s evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in “functional weightlessness” were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and

  8. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  9. Selective stabilization of aliphatic organic carbon by iron oxide

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Dinesh; Yang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of organic matter in soil is important for natural ecosystem to sequestrate carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emission. It is largely unknown what factors govern the preservation of organic carbon in soil, casting shadow on predicting the response of soil to climate change. Iron oxide was suggested as an important mineral preserving soil organic carbon. However, ferric minerals are subject to reduction, potentially releasing iron and decreasing the stability of iron-bound organic carbon. Information about the stability of iron-bound organic carbon in the redox reaction is limited. Herein, we investigated the sorptive interactions of organic matter with hematite and reductive release of hematite-bound organic matter. Impacts of organic matter composition and conformation on its sorption by hematite and release during the reduction reaction were analyzed. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic carbon was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic carbon. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil organic matter was stabilized by association with iron oxide. Selective stabilization of aliphatic over aromatic carbon can greatly contribute to the widely observed accumulation of aliphatic carbon in soil, which cannot be explained by sorptive interactions between minerals and organic matter. PMID:26061259

  10. In situ vibrational spectroscopic investigation of C{sub 4} hydrocarbon selective oxidation over vanadium-phosphorus-oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Z.Y.

    1999-05-10

    n-Butane selective oxidation over the VPO catalyst to maleic anhydride is the first and only commercialized process of light alkane selective oxidation. The mechanism of this reaction is still not well known despite over twenty years of extensive studies, which can partially be attributed to the extreme difficulties to characterize catalytic reactions real-time under typical reaction conditions. In situ spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Infrared spectroscopy and laser Raman spectroscopy were used in the current mechanistic investigations of n-butane oxidation over VPO catalysts. To identify the reaction intermediates, oxidation of n-butane, 1,3-butadiene and related oxygenates on the VPO catalyst were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy under transient conditions. n-Butane was found to adsorb on the VPO catalyst to form olefinic species, which were further oxidized to unsaturated, noncyclic carbonyl species. The open chain dicarbonyl species then experienced cycloaddition to form maleic anhydride. VPO catalyst phase transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction; Chapter 2: Literature review; and Chapter 5: Conclusion and recommendations.

  11. Peroxygenase-Catalyzed Oxyfunctionalization Reactions Promoted by the Complete Oxidation of Methanol.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Gomez Baraibar, Alvaro; Ullrich, René; Hofrichter, Martin; Yanase, Hideshi; Alcalde, Miguel; van Berkel, Willem J H; Hollmann, Frank

    2016-01-11

    Peroxygenases catalyze a broad range of (stereo)selective oxyfunctionalization reactions. However, to access their full catalytic potential, peroxygenases need a balanced provision of hydrogen peroxide to achieve high catalytic activity while minimizing oxidative inactivation. Herein, we report an enzymatic cascade process that employs methanol as a sacrificial electron donor for the reductive activation of molecular oxygen. Full oxidation of methanol is achieved, generating three equivalents of hydrogen peroxide that can be used completely for the stereoselective hydroxylation of ethylbenzene as a model reaction. Overall we propose and demonstrate an atom-efficient and easily applicable alternative to established hydrogen peroxide generation methods, which enables the efficient use of peroxygenases for oxyfunctionalization reactions. PMID:26607550

  12. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  13. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned establishing the level of selective oxidation required for successful desulfurization in subsequent treatments. Many desulfurization reactions were performed on pretreated as well as unoxidized coal. The results obtained support the following new conclusions: (1) The extent of selective oxidation in the pretreatment step does not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (2) Up to 84% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal and 86% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (3) Most desulfurizations at 250{degree}C did not produce significant levels of desulfurization. However as the temperature was increased levels of desulfurization increased considerably. (4) Although aqueous base was successful in removing sulfur from both pretreated and untreated samples, the most pronounced desulfurizations were obtained for the untreated samples. This is explained primarily by the dissolution of pyrite in the untreated samples. (5) The best desulfurizations involved SCM and base. Possible synergistic interactions between the methanol and the base are suspected. (6) Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product. The severity of desulfurization is reduced by selective oxidation pretreatment.

  14. Selenium-catalyzed oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. 2. Baeyer-Villiger reactions in homogeneous solution.

    PubMed

    ten Brink, G J; Vis, J M; Arends, I W; Sheldon, R A

    2001-04-01

    Several diselenides were tested for catalytic activity in Baeyer-Villiger reactions with 60% aqueous hydrogen peroxide. Bis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] diselenide forms the corresponding 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene seleninic acid in situ, which is a highly reactive and selective catalyst for the oxidation of carbonyl compounds in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, or dichloromethane. PMID:11281784

  15. Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics of Enargite Oxidation at Roasting Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Aracena, Alvaro; Ruiz, Maria C.

    2012-10-01

    Roasting of enargite (Cu3AsS4) in the temperature range of 648 K to 898 K (375 °C to 625 °C) in atmospheres containing variable amounts of oxygen has been studied by thermogravimetric methods. From the experimental results of weight loss/gain data and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of partially reacted samples, the reaction mechanism of the enargite oxidation was determined, which occurred in three sequential stages:

  16. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-15

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum nanoparticles. The

  17. [Current research situation of H2S selective catalytic oxidation technologies and catalysts].

    PubMed

    Hao, Zheng-ping; Dou, Guang-yu; Zhang, Xin; Qu, Si-qiu

    2012-08-01

    This review summarizes and discusses different selective catalytic oxidation technologies and various catalysts for removing H2S, the undesirable byproduct of the fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) processing. Currently the selective oxidation technologies used include Superclaus, Euroclaus, Clinsulf-Do, BSR/Hi-Activity, Selectox and Modop techniques, which have various characteristics and application areas. Catalysts for H2S selective oxidation mainly contain the following systems: carbon, supported SiC, zeolite, oxide, and pillared clay. Former studies focused on carbon and oxide systems. The research interest on zeolite system decreased in recent years, while SiC is regarded as a typical support with great potential for this reaction and continues to be attractive. Pillared clay system is at the preliminary research stage, and is still far from practical application. PMID:23213923

  18. Selective-oxidation catalyst improves Claus process

    SciTech Connect

    Lagas, J.A.; Borsboom, J. ); Berben, P.H. )

    1988-10-10

    Increased SO/sub 2/ emissions. On a worldwide scale, the exploitation and processing of crude oil and natural gas have increased significantly during the past 30 years. This expansion has caused severe pollution problems, especially from sulfur dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. A new development for the well-known Claus process improves production of elemental sulfur from H/sub 2/S. The ''SuperClaus'' process involves a modification of the process-control system and the use of a newly developed selective-oxidation catalyst in the third reactor with the objective of achieving a 99% or 99.5% overall sulfur recovery (two versions) without further tail-gas cleanup. The catalyst for the new process was developed and tested on laboratory bench scale for more than 3 years. Based on the results, it was decided to test the process directly in a commercial unit. A three-stage, 100-t/d Claus plant in a natural-gas plant in the Federal Republic of Germany has been retrofitted to SuperClause. Since Jan. 21, the process has been successfully operated.

  19. Selective effects of physical exercise on choice reaction processes.

    PubMed

    Arcelin, R; Delignieres, D; Brisswalter, J

    1998-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of an exercise of moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic power) on specific information-processing mechanisms. 22 students completed 3 10-min. exercise bouts on a bicycle ergometer. Concomitantly, participants performed six manual-choice-reaction tasks manipulating task variables (Signal Intensity, Stimulus-Response Compatibility, and Time Uncertainty) on two levels. Reaction tests, randomly ordered, were administered at rest and during exercise. A significant underadditive interaction between Time Uncertainty and exercise was found for the highest quartiles of the distribution of reaction times. No other interaction effects were obtained for the other variables. These results reasonably support that moderate aerobic exercise showed selective rather than general influences on information processing. PMID:9760644

  20. Switchable selectivity in an NHC-catalysed dearomatizing annulation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chang; Fleige, Mirco; Janssen-Müller, Daniel; Daniliuc, Constantin G.; Glorius, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The development of general catalytic methods for the regio- and stereoselective construction of chiral N-heterocycles in a diversity-oriented fashion remains a formidable challenge in organic synthesis. N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis has been shown to produce a variety of outcomes, but control of the reactivity has rarely been demonstrated. Here we report a switchable catalytic activation of enals with aromatic azomethine imines that provides high selectivity using NHC organocatalysts. The original selectivity corresponds to the acidity of the base used in the reaction. The catalytically generated chiral homoenolate or enol intermediate undergoes enantioselective annulation with electrophiles such as N-iminoquinolinium ylides, N-iminoisoquinolinium ylides and β-N-iminocarboline ylides. The good-to-high overall yields, high regioselectivities and excellent enantioselectivities observed are controlled by the catalyst and reaction conditions.

  1. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  3. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  4. Maillard reaction, mitochondria and oxidative stress: potential role of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Edeas, M; Attaf, D; Mailfert, A-S; Nasu, M; Joubet, R

    2010-06-01

    Glycation and oxidative stress are two important processes known to play a key role in complications of many disease processes. Oxidative stress, either via increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), or by depleting the antioxidants may modulate the genesis of early glycated proteins in vivo. Maillard Reactions, occur in vivo as well as in vitro and are associated with the chronic complications of diabetes, aging and age-related diseases. Hyperglycaemia causes the autoxidation of glucose, glycation of proteins, and the activation of polyol metabolism. These changes facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species and decrease the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, resulting in a remarkable increase of oxidative stress. A large body of evidence indicates that mitochondria alteration is involved and plays a central role in various oxidative stress-related diseases. The damaged mitochondria produce more ROS (increase oxidative stress) and less ATP (cellular energy) than normal mitochondria. As they are damaged, they cannot burn or use glucose or lipid and cannot provide cell with ATP. Further, glucose, amino acids and lipid will not be correctly used and will accumulate outside the mitochondria; they will undergo more glycation (as observed in diabetes, obesity, HIV infection and lipodystrophia). The objective of this paper is to discuss how to stop the vicious circle established between oxidative stress, Maillard Reaction and mitochondria. The potential application of some antioxidants to reduce glycation phenomenon and to increase the antioxidant defence system by targeting mitochondria will be discussed. Food and pharmaceutical companies share the same challenge, they must act now, urgently and energetically. PMID:20031340

  5. Kinetics, simulation and insights for CO selective oxidation in fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    The kinetics of CO preferential oxidation (PROX) was studied to evaluate various rate expressions and to simulate the performance the CO oxidation step of a methanol fuel processor for fuel cell applications. The reaction was carried out in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Engelhard Selectoxo (Pt-Fe/γ-alumina) catalyst and three self-prepared catalysts. Temperature was varied between 100 and 300 °C, and a of range feed rates and compositions were tested. A reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H 2 oxidation and the water gas shift reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. Using non-linear least squares, empirical power-law type rate expressions were found to fit the experimental data. It was critical to include all three reactions to determine good fitting results. In particular, the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Using this three reaction model, several simulation studies for a commercial PROX reactor were performed. In these simulations, the effect of O 2/CO ratio, the effect of water addition, and various non-isothermal modes of operation were evaluated. The results of the simulation were compared with corresponding experimental data and shows good agreement.

  6. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-03-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure.

  7. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-01-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure. PMID:26964764

  8. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R; Ecija, David

    2016-01-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure. PMID:26964764

  9. The Pressure Dependency of Stabilized Criegee Intermediate Yields of Selected Ozone-Alkene Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, J. P.; Donahue, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) play an important role as an oxidizing species in atmospheric reactions. The ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere, i.e. the mechanism by which the SCIs are produced, is a major pathway to the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Just how much SCIs contribute to the SOA formation is not well known and fundamental research in the kinetics of SCI formation need to be performed to shed light on this mystery. The alkene ozonolysis is highly exothermic reaction, so a third body is needed for stabilizing the SCI, thus making the SCI yield pressure dependent. We studied the production of SCIs at different pressures by studying their ability to oxidize sulfur dioxide in a pressure controlled flow reactor. We used a mixture of ultra-high purity nitrogen, oxygen, and a selective scavenger for hydroxyl radical (OH) as a carrier gas, and injected a mixture of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and selected alkene to the center of the flow for ozonolysis to take place. With the OH radical scavenged, the SCI yield of the reaction was measured by measuring the amount of sulfuric acid formed in the reaction between SCI and sulfur dioxide with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). This work was supported by NASA/ROSES grant NNX12AE54G to CMU and Academy of Finland Center of Excellence project 1118615.

  10. Biomimetic Synthesis of Moschamine-Related Indole Alkaloids via Iron-Catalyzed Selectively Oxidative Radical Coupling.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kangjiang; Yang, Jing; Tong, Xiaogang; Shang, Wenbin; Pan, Zhiqiang; Xia, Chengfeng

    2016-03-18

    An iron-catalyzed oxidative radical coupling reaction was developed to selectively construct indolofuran or bisphenolic indole cores, which exist in two types of moschamine-related indole alkaloids. Both (+)-decursivine and 4,4″-bis(N-feruloyl)serotonin were biomimetically synthesized by using coupling reactions. The proposed reassignment of the structure of montamine as 4,4″-bis(N-feruloyl)serotonin was excluded. PMID:26949004

  11. Method for catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions of simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bicker, D.; Bonaventura, J.

    1988-06-14

    A method for oxidizing carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide is described comprising: (1) contacting, together, carbon monoxide, a nitrogen-containing chelating agent and water; wherein the chelating agent is at least one member selected from the group consisting of methmeoglobin bound to a support, ferric hemoglobin bound to a support, iron-containing porphyrins bound to a support, and sperm whale myoglobin bound to a support, wherein the support is glass, a natural fiber, a synthetic fiber, a gel, charcoal, carbon ceramic material, a metal oxide, a synthetic polymer, a zeolite, a silica compound of an alumina compound; and (2) obtaining carbon dioxide.

  12. Photovoltaic-driven organic electrosynthesis and efforts toward more sustainable oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Perkins, Robert J; Smith, Jake A

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combination of visible light, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry provides a convenient, inexpensive platform for conducting a wide variety of sustainable oxidation reactions. The approach presented in this article is compatible with both direct and indirect oxidation reactions, avoids the need for a stoichiometric oxidant, and leads to hydrogen gas as the only byproduct from the corresponding reduction reaction. PMID:25815081

  13. Development of new palladium(0)-catalyzed reactions based on novel oxidative addition mode.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hirokazu

    2008-09-01

    We have developed palladium(0)/monophosphine-catalyzed trans-selective arylative, alkenylative, alkylative, and alkynylative cyclization reactions of alkyne-aldehydes and -ketones with organoboron reagents. These reactions afford six-membered allylic alcohols with endo tri- or tetra-substituted olefin groups and/or five-membered counterparts with exo olefin groups. The ratios of these products are dramatically affected by alkyne substituents as well as the phosphine ligand. The remarkable trans selectivity of the process results from the novel reaction mechanism involving 'anti-Wacker'-type oxidative addition. Although the cyclization reactions are influenced by the length of the tether between the alkyne and carbonyl group, they can be applied to a multi-component synthesis of biologically important indenes bearing three substituent groups at 1, 2, 3-positions from available o-ethynylbenzaldehyde derivatives. A two-component coupling reaction in methanol provides 1H-indenols, while a three-component reaction involving secondary aliphatic amines as the third component in DMF affords 1H-indenamines. This method allows combinatorial preparation of unsymmetrically substituted 1H-indenes that cannot be prepared via previous synthetic routes. The same catalytic system can also transform allene-carbonyl compounds into 3-cyclohexenols and -cyclopentenols with alkyl, aryl, alkenyl, alkynyl, and boryl groups at C-3. Microwave irradiation efficiently increases not only the reaction rate but also the product yield by suppressing formation of hydroarylation byproducts. Cyclization of optically active 1,3-disubstituted allene-aldehyde reveals that the reaction proceeds through not carbopalladation but 'anti-Wacker'-type oxidative addition. PMID:18758139

  14. Cysteine Oxidation Reactions Catalyzed by a Mononuclear Non-heme Iron Enzyme (OvoA) in Ovothiol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    OvoA in ovothiol biosynthesis is a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme catalyzing the oxidative coupling between histidine and cysteine. It can also catalyze the oxidative coupling between hercynine and cysteine, yet with a different regio-selectivity. Due to the potential application of this reaction for industrial ergothioneine production, in this study, we systematically characterized OvoA by a combination of three different assays. Our studies revealed that OvoA can also catalyze the oxidation of cysteine to either cysteine sulfinic acid or cystine. Remarkably, these OvoA-catalyzed reactions can be systematically modulated by a slight modification of one of its substrates, histidine. PMID:24684381

  15. Tailoring Selectivity for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution on Ruthenium Oxides by Zn Substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Petrykin, V.; Macounova, K; Shlyakhtin, O; Krtil, P

    2010-01-01

    Controlling gas emissions: Versatile control of the selectivity of an oxide electrocatalyst in the oxygen- and chlorine-evolution reactions was demonstrated by Zn substitution in RuO{sub 2}. The incorporation of Zn into the rutile structure alters the cation sequence along the [001] direction and modifies the structure of the active sites for both gas-evolution processes.

  16. Controlling bimolecular reactions: Mode and bond selected reaction of water with hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.; Hsiao, M.C.; Crim, F.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Vibrational overtone excitation prepares water molecules in the {vert bar}13{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}04{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}12{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}02{r angle}{sup {minus}}{vert bar}2{r angle}, and {vert bar}03{r angle}{sup {minus}} local mode states for a study of the influence of reagent vibration on the endothermic bimolecular reaction H+H{sub 2}O{r arrow}OH+H{sub 2}. The reaction of water molecules excited to the {vert bar}04{r angle}{sup {minus}} vibrational state predominantly produces OH({ital v}=0) while reaction from the {vert bar}13{r angle}{sup {minus}} state forms mostly OH({ital v}=1). These results support a spectator model for reaction in which the vibrational excitation of the products directly reflects the nodal pattern of the vibrational wave function in the energized molecule. Relative rate measurements for the three vibrational states {vert bar}03{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}02{r angle}{sup {minus}}{vert bar}2{r angle}, and {vert bar}12{r angle}{sup {minus}}, which have similar total energies but correspond to very different distributions of vibrational energy, demonstrate the control that initially selected vibrations exert on reaction rates. The local mode stretching state {vert bar}03{r angle}{sup {minus}} promotes the H+H{sub 2}O reaction much more efficiently than either the state having part of its energy in bending excitation ({vert bar}02{r angle}{sup {minus}}{vert bar}2{r angle}) or the stretching state with the excitation shared between the two O--H oscillators ({vert bar}12{r angle}{sup {minus}}). The localized character of the vibrational overtone excitation in water has permitted the first observation of a bond selected bimolecular reaction using this approach.

  17. Formation of phenol under conditions of the reaction of oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinovsky, I.O.; Leshcheva, A.N.; Pogorelov, V.V.; Gelbshtein, A.I.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes conditions for the oxidation of benzene to phenol. It is shown that a reaction mixture of water, carbon monoxide, and oxygen are essential to the oxidation. The oxidation is a side reaction found to occur during the oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid in a medium of trifluoroacetic acid.

  18. Complete reaction mechanisms of mercury oxidation on halogenated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Promarak, Vinich; Hannongbua, Supa; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-06-01

    The reaction mechanisms of mercury (Hg) adsorption and oxidation on halogenated activated carbon (AC) have been completely studied for the first time using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two different halogenated AC models, namely X-AC and X-AC-X (X=Cl, Br, I), were adopted. The results revealed that HgX is found to be stable-state on the AC edge since its further desorption from the AC as HgX, or further oxidation to HgX2, are energetically unfavorable. Remarkably, the halide type does not significantly affect the Hg adsorption energy but it strongly affects the activation energy barrier of HgX formation, which obviously increases in the order HgIBr-AC>Cl-AC. Thus, the study of the complete reaction mechanism is essential because the adsorption energy can not be used as a guideline for the rational material design in the halide impregnated AC systems. The activation energy is an important descriptor for the predictions of sorbent reactivity to the Hg oxidation process. PMID:26943019

  19. Deciphering Selectivity in Organic Reactions: A Multifaceted Problem.

    PubMed

    Balcells, David; Clot, Eric; Eisenstein, Odile; Nova, Ainara; Perrin, Lionel

    2016-05-17

    Computational chemistry has made a sustained contribution to the understanding of chemical reactions. In earlier times, half a century ago, the goal was to distinguish allowed from forbidden reactions (e.g., Woodward-Hoffmann rules), that is, reactions with low or high to very high activation barriers. A great achievement of computational chemistry was also to contribute to the determination of structures with the bonus of proposing a rationalization (e.g., anomeric effect, isolobal analogy, Gillespie valence shell pair electron repulsion rules and counter examples, Wade-Mingos rules for molecular clusters). With the development of new methods and the constant increase in computing power, computational chemists move to more challenging problems, close to the daily concerns of the experimental chemists, in determining the factors that make a reaction both efficient and selective: a key issue in organic synthesis. For this purpose, experimental chemists use advanced synthetic and analytical techniques to which computational chemists added other ways of determining reaction pathways. The transition states and intermediates contributing to the transformation of reactants into the desired and undesired products can now be determined, including their geometries, energies, charges, spin densities, spectroscopy properties, etc. Such studies remain challenging due to the large number of chemical species commonly present in the reactive media whose role may have to be determined. Calculating chemical systems as they are in the experiment is not always possible, bringing its own share of complexity through the large number of atoms and the associated large number of conformers to consider. Modeling the chemical species with smaller systems is an alternative that historically led to artifacts. Another important topic is the choice of the computational method. While DFT is widely used, the vast diversity of functionals available is both an opportunity and a challenge. Though

  20. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  1. Surface-oxidized carbon black as a catalyst for the water oxidation and alcohol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Carbon black (CB) is popularly used as a catalyst support for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles due to its large surface area, excellent conductivity and stability. Herein, we show that surface oxidized CB itself, after acidic treatment and electrochemical oxidation, exhibits significant catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of water and alcohols. PMID:27097802

  2. Laccase-Functionalized Graphene Oxide Assemblies as Efficient Nanobiocatalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Patila, Michaela; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2016-01-01

    Multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies were prepared through the multi-point covalent immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor (TvL) on functionalized graphene oxide (fGO). The catalytic properties of the fGO-TvL nanoassemblies were found to depend on the number of the graphene oxide-enzyme layers present in the nanostructure. The fGO-TvL nanoassemblies exhibit an enhanced thermal stability at 60 °C, as demonstrated by a 4.7-fold higher activity as compared to the free enzyme. The multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies can efficiently catalyze the oxidation of anthracene, as well as the decolorization of an industrial dye, pinacyanol chloride. These materials retained almost completely their decolorization activity after five reaction cycles, proving their potential as efficient nano- biocatalysts for various applications. PMID:26927109

  3. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Asiri, Abdullah M; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-06-01

    This Concept is aimed at describing the current state of the art in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as heterogeneous catalysts for liquid-phase oxidations, focusing on three important substrates, namely, alkenes, alkanes and alcohols. Emphases are on the nature of active sites that have been incorporated within MOFs and on future targets to be set in this area. Thus, selective alkene epoxidation with peroxides or oxygen catalyzed by constitutional metal nodes of MOFs as active sites are still to be developed. Moreover, no noble metal-free MOF has been reported to date that can act as a general catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols. In contrast, in the case of alkanes, a target should be to tune the polarity of MOF internal pores to control the outcome of the autooxidation process, resulting in the selective formation of alcohol/ketone mixtures at high conversion. PMID:27113486

  4. Reactions of oxidatively activated arylamines with thiols: reaction mechanisms and biologic implications. An overview.

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, P

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amines belong to a group of compounds that exert their toxic effects usually after oxidative biotransformation, primarily in the liver. In addition, aromatic amines also undergo extrahepatic activation to yield free arylaminyl radicals. The reactive intermediates are potential promutagens and procarcinogens, and responsible for target tissue toxicity. Since thiols react with these intermediates at high rates, it is of interest to know the underlying reaction mechanisms and the toxicologic implications. Phenoxyl radicals from aminophenols and aminyl radicals from phenylenediamines quickly disproportionate to quinone imines and quinone diimines. Depending on the structure, Michael addition or reduction reactions with thiols may prevail. Products of sequential oxidation/addition reactions (e.g., S-conjugates of aminophenols) are occasionally more toxic than the parent compounds because of their higher autoxidizability and their accumulation in the kidney. Even after covalent binding of quinone imines to protein SH groups, the resulting thioethers are able to autoxidize. The quinoid thioethers can then cross-link the protein by addition to neighboring nucleophiles. The reactions of nitrosoarenes with thiols yield a so-called "semimercaptal" from which various branching reactions detach, depending on substituents. Compounds with strong pi-donors, like 4-nitrosophenetol, give a resonance-stabilized N-(thiol-S-yl)-arylamine cation that may lead to bicyclic products, thioethers, and DNA adducts. Examples of toxicologic implications of the interactions of nitroso compounds with thiols are given for nitrosoimidazoles, heterocyclic nitroso compounds from protein pyrolysates, and nitrosoarenes. These data indicate that interactions of activated arylamines with thiols may not be regarded exclusively as detoxication reactions. PMID:7889834

  5. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and β-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ∼150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the β-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile β-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic

  6. [Inactivation of o-diphenoloxidase in the pyrocatechol oxidation reaction].

    PubMed

    Butovich, I A; Tertykh, V A

    1984-01-01

    The inactivation kinetics of o-diphenoloxidase isolated from potato tubers was studied in the process of pyrocatechol oxidation. The enzyme when saturated with the substrate is inactivated with the inactivation rate constant kin = 0.5-1.0 min-1; kin depends on the initial concentration of pyrocatechol. The ultimate yield of the enzymic reaction product increases linearly with the initial concentration of the enzyme. Introduction of ethylene-diaminosulphate, a substance which condenses with o-quinones, does not increase the operation stability of o-diphenoloxidase. The data obtained evidence for inactivation of o-diphenoloxidase either at the level of the enzyme-substrate complex or due to bimolecular reaction with the substrate. PMID:6438852

  7. Photochemical reactions of biologically important quinoxaline n-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoryantseva, G.G.; Tetenchuk, K.P.; Pol'shakov, V.I.; Elina, A.S.

    1987-02-01

    The authors study the photochemical reactions of quinoxidine, dioxidine, and a number of related derivatives of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides containing methyl, halomethyl, and carboxamide groups in the pyrazine ring. Thin-layer chromatography, UV spectrophotometry, and NMR/sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spectroscopy were used as the main methods for monitoring the photolysis process and establishing the structure of the products formed. The investigation established that two types of photochemical reactions are observed in the series of compounds discussed: photoisomerization with migration of a substitutent to the nitrogen atom of the heterocycle, and photorearrangement with elimination of a substituent and the formation of the corresponding lactams.

  8. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  9. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  10. Reduction of a phosphorus oxide and acid reaction set

    SciTech Connect

    Twarowski, A.

    1995-07-01

    It has been predicted for some time that hypersonic aircraft will suffer from diminished fuel efficiency due to the slow speed of radical recombination in the nozzle of the aircraft and the consequent expulsion of high-energy fragments during high Mach number flight. The addition of small amounts of phosphine combustion products (phosphorus oxides and acids) to water vapor has been found to result in a faster relaxation rate of OH to its equilibrium density following H{sub 2}O photolysis. This article describes the systematic construction of a reaction model of 162 phosphorus reactions among 17 phosphorus-containing species. Those reactions that contribute to the reestablishment of equilibrium following the perturbation of the system by H{sub 2}O photolysis or by an increase in temperature are identified. A thermodynamic free energy function is used to quantify the rate of system relaxation back to equilibrium for a series of 36 reaction conditions covering a temperature range of 1,500 to 3,000 K, a gas density range of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} mol/cm{sup 3} and a fuel equivalence ratio of 0.8 to 1.2.

  11. Site-Selective Reactions with Peptide-Based Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Michael W; Miller, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    The problem of catalyst-controlled site-selectivity can potentially require a catalyst to overcome energetic barriers larger than those associated with enantioselective reactions. This challenge is a signature of substrates that present reactive sites that are not of equivalent reactivity. Herein we present a narrative of our laboratory's efforts to overcome this challenge using peptide-based catalysts. We highlight the interplay between understanding the inherent reactivity preferences of a given target molecule and the development of catalysts that can overcome intrinsic preferences embedded within a substrate. PMID:26307403

  12. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  13. Selective Autooxidation of Ethanol over Titania-Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts: Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Carlos; Thirunavukkarasu, K; Anilkumar, M; Shiju, N R; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    We study the selective catalytic oxidation of ethanol with air as a sustainable alternative route to acetaldehyde. The reaction is catalysed by molybdenum oxide supported on titania, in a flow reactor under ambient pressure. High selectivity to acetaldehyde (70%–89%, depending on the Mo loading) is obtained at 150 °C. Subsequently, we investigate the structure/performance relationship for various molybdenum oxide species using a combination of techniques including diffuse reflectance UV-visible, infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed reduction. As their surface density increases, the monomeric molybdenum oxide species undergo two-dimensional and three-dimensional oligomerisation. This results in polymolybdates and molybdenum oxide crystallites. Importantly, the ethanol oxidation rate depends not only on the overall molybdenum loading and dispersion, but also on the type of molybdenum oxide species prevalent at each surface density and on the domain size. As the molybdenum oxide oligomerisation increases, electron delocalisation becomes easier. This lowers the absorption edge energy and increases the reaction rate. PMID:23396482

  14. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  15. Oxidative Degradation of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides. 2; Evidence for Reactions Occurring at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (Cp-MAS) NMR. C-13 labeling of selected sites in the polymers allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. As opposed to model compound studies, the reactions were followed directly in the polymer. The labeling experiments confirm the previously reported oxidation of the methylene carbon to ketone in the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer chain. They also show the formation of two other oxidized species, acid and ester, from this same carbon. In addition, the technique provides the first evidence of the kind of degradation reactions that are occurring in the nadic end caps. Several PMR formulations containing moieties determined to be present after oxidation, as suggested by the labeling study, were synthesized. Weight loss, FTIR, and natural abundance NMR of these derivatives were followed during aging. In this way, weight loss could be related to the observed transformations.

  16. Vapor-phase reaction of acetophenone with methanol or dimethyl carbonate on magnesium oxide and magnesium phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Aramendia, M.A.; Borau, V.; Jimenez, C.; Marinas, J.M.; Romero, F.J.

    1999-04-01

    The vapor-phase reaction of acetophenone with methanol on magnesium oxide, various magnesium phosphates, and combinations of the two types of catalysts was studied. The process was found to involve the Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reaction, aldol condensations, dehydrations, and hydrogenations. The presence of basic sites is indispensable for the reaction to develop; however, acid sites also play an active role. The selectivity for each reaction product depends on the particular catalyst used. The total conversion is maximal with the catalysts containing the largest populations of acid and basic sites. Also, catalysts with large numbers of acid sites exhibit an increased selectivity towards the corresponding alkenes. The use of dimethyl carbonate instead of methanol alters the reaction selectivity to an extent dependent on the particular catalyst and operating conditions. However, this also results in markedly decreased total conversion in some instances.

  17. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine.

  18. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  19. Copper-catalyzed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a longstanding goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective, and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. In this work we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines, and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine, and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  20. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned the investigation of the desulfurization of the selectively oxidized coals using aqueous or alcoholic base mixtures. Model compound studies were initiated. Results were: Levels of desulfurization obtained in this study are at, or very close to, the 90% removal levels required for these coals to be in compliance with the Clean Air Act legislation; Up to 89.4% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal and 88.9% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and alcoholic/base reactions; Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product than the untreated sample; Substantial enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal has been achieved by the selective oxidation pretreatment; The highest levels of desulfurization obtained so far all involve bases as additives; The water/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} combination, was superior than any of the aqueous hydroxide bases. Possible synergistic interactions between the alcohol and the base are suspected. Over 70% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal can be removed by performing vacuum pyrolysis on the selectively oxidized coal. Lower sulfur contents are obtained by lowing the pyrolysis pressure.

  1. Nanoporous gold catalysts for selective gas-phase oxidative coupling of methanol at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, A; Zielasek, V; Biener, J; Friend, C M; Bäumer, M

    2010-01-15

    Gold (Au) is an interesting catalytic material because of its ability to catalyze reactions, such as partial oxidations, with high selectivities at low temperatures; but limitations arise from the low O2 dissociation probability on Au. This problem can be overcome by using Au nanoparticles supported on suitable oxides which, however, are prone to sintering. Nanoporous Au, prepared by the dealloying of AuAg alloys, is a new catalyst with a stable structure that is active without any support. It catalyzes the selective oxidative coupling of methanol to methyl formate with selectivities above 97% and high turnover frequencies at temperatures below 80 degrees C. Because the overall catalytic characteristics of nanoporous Au are in agreement with studies on Au single crystals, we deduced that the selective surface chemistry of Au is unaltered but that O2 can be readily activated with this material. Residual silver is shown to regulate the availability of reactive oxygen. PMID:20075249

  2. Influence of oxygen and pH on the selective oxidation of ethanol on Pd catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbitts, David D.; Neurock, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The selective oxidation of ethanol on supported Pd is catalytically promoted by the presence of hydroxide species on the Pd surface as well as in solution. These hydroxide intermediates act as Brønsted bases which readily abstract protons from the hydroxyl groups of adsorbed or solution-phase alcohols. The C1AH bond of the resulting alkoxide is subsequently activated on the metal surface via hydride elimination to form acetaldehyde. Surface and solution-phase hydroxide intermediates can also readily react with the acetaldehyde via nucleophilic addition to form a germinal diol intermediate, which subsequently undergoes a second C1AH bond activation on Pd to form acetic acid. The role of O2 is to remove the electrons produced in the oxidation reaction via the oxygen reduction reaction over Pd. The reduction reaction also regenerates the hydroxide intermediates and removes adsorbed hydrogen that is produced during the oxidation.

  3. Outerwall-selectively oxidized, water soluble double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brozena, Alexandra H.; Moskovits, Martin; Shao, Beiyue; Deng, Shunliu; Liao, Hongwei; Gaskell, Karen L.; Wang, YuHuang

    2010-02-23

    The outer walls of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were selectively oxidized using a combination of oleum and nitric acid. Intercalation of oleum between bundled DWNTs enabled a homogeneous reaction by equally exposing all outer wall surfaces to the oxidants. At optimized reaction conditions, this double-wall chemistry enabled high water solubility through carboxylic acid functional groups introduced to the outer wall, while leaving the inner tube intact, as shown by Raman scattering and high resolution TEM. These outer wall selectively oxidized DWNTs retained electrical conductivity up to 65% better than thin films of similarly functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes, which can be attributed to enhanced electrical percolation via the nonoxidized inner tubes.

  4. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-03-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts.

  5. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-01-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts. PMID:26952517

  6. Modeling selective intergranular oxidation of binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K; Rosso, Kevin M; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 μm ahead of grain boundary crack tips was documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (∼100 s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner's model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al. PMID:25573575

  7. Release of substituents from phenolic compounds during oxidative coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Dec, Jerzy; Haider, Konrad; Bollag, Jean-Marc

    2003-07-01

    Phenolic compounds originating from plant residue decomposition or microbial metabolism form humic-like polymers during oxidative coupling reactions mediated by various phenoloxidases or metal oxides. Xenobiotic phenols participating in these reactions undergo either polymerization or binding to soil organic matter. Another effect of oxidative coupling is dehalogenation, decarboxylation or demethoxylation of the substrates. To investigate these phenomena, several naturally occurring and xenobiotic phenols were incubated with various phenoloxidases (peroxidase, laccase, tyrosinase) or with birnessite (delta-MnO(2)), and monitored for chloride release, CO(2) evolution, and methanol or methane production. The release of chloride ions during polymerization and binding ranged between 0.2% and 41.4%. Using the test compounds labeled with 14C in three different locations (carboxyl group, aromatic ring, or aliphatic chain), it was demonstrated that 14CO(2) evolution was mainly associated with the release of carboxyl groups (17.8-54.8% of the initial radioactivity). Little mineralization of 14C-labeled aromatic rings or aliphatic carbons occurred in catechol, ferulic or p-coumaric acids (0.1-0.7%). Demethoxylation ranged from 0.5% to 13.9% for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringic acid, respectively. Methylphenols showed no demethylation. In conclusion, dehalogenation, decarboxylation and demethoxylation of phenolic substrates appear to be controlled by a common mechanism, in which various substituents are released if they are attached to carbon atoms involved in coupling. Electron-withdrawing substituents, such as -COOH and -Cl, are more susceptible to release than electron-donating ones, such as -OCH(3) and -CH(3). The release of organic substituents during polymerization and binding of phenols may add to CO(2) production in soil. PMID:12738292

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-01-28

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, it was planned to investigate the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and to obtain data on the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane. The investigation of the reaction mechanism will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations. The last component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium. In the current reporting period, the screening of the promoted catalysts were completed, sufficient amount of the selected catalysts were prepared and delivered to TDA for long term deactivation testing.

  9. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

  10. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Selective Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Pérez-Alzate, D; Pérez-Sánchez, N; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres, M J; Canto, G; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used throughout the world to treat pain and inflammation; however, they can trigger several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. Although most such reactions occur through activation of the leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance), a significant number of DHRs to NSAIDs are due to immunological mechanisms (selective reactions [SRs]). SRs are thought to be induced by specific IgE antibodies or by T cells. In this manuscript, we focus on SRs, which are of great concern in children and adolescents and comprise a heterogeneous set of clinical pictures ranging from mild entities such as urticaria/angioedema to potentially life-threatening conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the most frequent elicitors of IgE-mediated SRs, although pyrazolones have also been implicated. T cell-mediated reactions are infrequent in children but have been associated with ibuprofen, naproxen, and dipyrone. In this review, we analyze the available literature on SRs in children and adolescents, with emphasis on epidemiological data, mechanisms, and drugs involved, as well as on diagnostic procedures. PMID:26817135

  11. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving an adsorbed CO species on bulk and supported platinum and copper-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.

    1991-07-01

    The proposed research is an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player -- be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2} and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools.

  12. Semiconducting Metal Oxide Based Sensors for Selective Gas Pollutant Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Sofian M.; El-Kadri, Oussama M.; Abu-Yousef, Imad A.; Kanan, Marsha C.

    2009-01-01

    A review of some papers published in the last fifty years that focus on the semiconducting metal oxide (SMO) based sensors for the selective and sensitive detection of various environmental pollutants is presented. PMID:22408500

  13. Selected oxidative stress markers in gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koźlik, Jacek; Przybyłowska, Joanna; Mikrut, Kinga; Zwoliński, Jacek; Piątek, Jacek; Sobczak, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The surgical stress response after laparoscopy is smaller when compared with open surgery, and it is expected that after minimally invasive surgery the possible development of oxidative stress will be less severe. Aim To evaluate markers of pro-oxidant activity – levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde – and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the perioperative period in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopy and to determine whether the duration of laparoscopy can affect these changes. Material and methods The study included 64 patients, divided into two groups: group 1 with duration of laparoscopy up to 20 min, and group 2 with duration of the operation over 40 min. Blood samples were collected before anesthesia, 5 min after release of pneumoperitoneum, and 10 h after surgery. Results A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde in samples collected after surgery was found in comparison with values obtained before surgery. Also statistically significant differences existed between groups of patients with different duration of surgery. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity values were significantly decreased. They were also significantly different between the two groups with different duration of surgery. Conclusions In our study, levels of the markers of pro-oxidant activity increased and levels of the markers of antioxidant enzymes decreased, suggesting development of oxidative stress. The duration of laparoscopic procedures affects the severity of the presented changes. PMID:25960799

  14. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of various alcohols is studied in liquid phase under nitrogen atmosphere over vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method are found to be suitable for the selective oxidation of a variet...

  15. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  16. Effect of size of catalytically active phases in the dehydrogenation of alcohols and the challenging selective oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghong; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye

    2011-09-01

    The size of the active phase is one of the most important factors in determining the catalytic behaviour of a heterogeneous catalyst. This Feature Article focuses on the size effects in two types of reactions, i.e., the metal nanoparticle-catalysed dehydrogenation of alcohols and the metal oxide nanocluster-catalysed selective oxidation of hydrocarbons (including the selective oxidation of methane and ethane and the epoxidation of propylene). For Pd or Au nanoparticle-catalysed oxidative or non-oxidative dehydrogenation of alcohols, the size of metal nanoparticles mainly controls the catalytic activity by affecting the activation of reactants (either alcohol or O(2)). The size of oxidic molybdenum species loaded on SBA-15 determines not only the activity but also the selectivity of oxygenates in the selective oxidation of ethane; highly dispersed molybdenum species are suitable for acetaldehyde formation, while molybdenum oxide nanoparticles exhibit higher formaldehyde selectivity. Cu(II) and Fe(III) isolated on mesoporous silica are highly efficient for the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde, while the corresponding oxide clusters mainly catalyse the complete oxidation of methane. The lattice oxygen in iron or copper oxide clusters is responsible for the complete oxidation, while the isolated Cu(I) or Fe(II) generated during the reaction can activate molecular oxygen forming active oxygen species for the selective oxidation of methane. Highly dispersed Cu(I) and Fe(II) species also function for the epoxidation of propylene by O(2) and N(2)O, respectively. Alkali metal ions work as promoters for the epoxidation of propylene by enhancing the dispersion of copper or iron species and weakening the acidity. PMID:21629889

  17. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  18. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M S; Larsen, F; Postma, D

    2001-10-15

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4 x 10(-10) mol FeS2/g x s are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate the reaction stoichiometry and partitioning of gases between the solution and the gas phase. Pyrite oxidation with concurrent calcite dissolution was found to be consistent with the experimental data while organic carbon oxidation was not. The reaction involves changes in the total volume of the gas phase. The reaction scheme predicts the volume of O2 gas consumed to be larger than of CO2 produced. In addition the solubility of CO2 in water is about 30 times larger than of O2 causing a further decrease in total gas volume. The change in total gas volume therefore also depends on the gas/water volume ratio and the lower the ratio the more pronounced the loss of volume will be. Under field conditions the change in total volume may amount up to 20% in the absence of calcite and over 10% in the presence of calcite. Such changes in gas volume during the oxidation of pyrite are expected to result in pressure gradients causing advective transport of gaseous oxygen. PMID:11686369

  19. Biotransformations Utilizing β-Oxidation Cycle Reactions in the Synthesis of Natural Compounds and Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Œwizdor, Alina; Panek, Anna; Milecka-Tronina, Natalia; Kołek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    β-Oxidation cycle reactions, which are key stages in the metabolism of fatty acids in eucaryotic cells and in processes with a significant role in the degradation of acids used by microbes as a carbon source, have also found application in biotransformations. One of the major advantages of biotransformations based on the β-oxidation cycle is the possibility to transform a substrate in a series of reactions catalyzed by a number of enzymes. It allows the use of sterols as a substrate base in the production of natural steroid compounds and their analogues. This route also leads to biologically active compounds of therapeutic significance. Transformations of natural substrates via β-oxidation are the core part of the synthetic routes of natural flavors used as food additives. Stereoselectivity of the enzymes catalyzing the stages of dehydrogenation and addition of a water molecule to the double bond also finds application in the synthesis of chiral biologically active compounds, including medicines. Recent advances in genetic, metabolic engineering, methods for the enhancement of bioprocess productivity and the selectivity of target reactions are also described. PMID:23443116

  20. Biotransformations utilizing β-oxidation cycle reactions in the synthesis of natural compounds and medicines.

    PubMed

    Swizdor, Alina; Panek, Anna; Milecka-Tronina, Natalia; Kołek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    β-Oxidation cycle reactions, which are key stages in the metabolism of fatty acids in eucaryotic cells and in processes with a significant role in the degradation of acids used by microbes as a carbon source, have also found application in biotransformations. One of the major advantages of biotransformations based on the β-oxidation cycle is the possibility to transform a substrate in a series of reactions catalyzed by a number of enzymes. It allows the use of sterols as a substrate base in the production of natural steroid compounds and their analogues. This route also leads to biologically active compounds of therapeutic significance. Transformations of natural substrates via β-oxidation are the core part of the synthetic routes of natural flavors used as food additives. Stereoselectivity of the enzymes catalyzing the stages of dehydrogenation and addition of a water molecule to the double bond also finds application in the synthesis of chiral biologically active compounds, including medicines. Recent advances in genetic, metabolic engineering, methods for the enhancement of bioprocess productivity and the selectivity of target reactions are also described. PMID:23443116

  1. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  2. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-04-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  3. Spin-selective recombination reactions of radical pairs: Experimental test of validity of reaction operators

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kiminori; Liddell, Paul; Gust, Devens; Hore, P. J.

    2013-12-21

    Spin-selective reactions of radical pairs are conventionally modelled using an approach that dates back to the 1970s [R. Haberkorn, Mol. Phys. 32, 1491 (1976)]. An alternative approach based on the theory of quantum measurements has recently been suggested [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. We present here the first experimental attempt to discriminate between the two models. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate intramolecular electron transfer in the radical pair form of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene molecular triad. The rate of spin-spin relaxation of the fullerene radical in the triad was found to be inconsistent with the quantum measurement description of the spin-selective kinetics, and in accord with the conventional model when combined with spin-dephasing caused by rotational modulation of the anisotropic g-tensor of the fullerene radical.

  4. Oxidation of humic substances supports denitrification reactions in agricultural soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Trump, J. I.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    , nitrite, Fe(II), and humic-born hydroquinones. All data were analyzed with respect to dilution factors obtained through analysis of a conservative bromide tracer present in electron donor medium. Addition of oxidized HS, reduced HS, and acetate all resulted in significant loss of nitrate from the columns. Significant nitrite accumulation was not observed. Of all the electron donor treatments, reduced HS, enriched for hydroquinone-containing functional moieties, supported the greatest degree of denitrification. The participation of excess hydroquinones in denitrification accounted for approximately 104% of the difference in nitrate reduction between reduced and oxidized HS treatments. This electron balance allowed for assignment of respiratory activity due to hydroquinone oxidation, rather than degradation of humic substances or associated electron-donating compounds. These results suggest that denitrification reactions catalyzed by microbial oxidation of reduced HS may be prevalent in agricultural soils. Likewise, these results demonstrate for the first time that respiratory behavior due to hydroquinone oxidation, as well as impact upon local geochemistry, can be analyzed in complex flow-through model systems.

  5. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  6. Tuning the selectivity of Gd3N cluster endohedral metallofullerene reactions with Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Steven; Rottinger, Khristina A; Fahim, Muska; Field, Jessica S; Martin, Benjamin R; Arvola, Kristine D

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate the manipulation of the Lewis acid strength to selectively fractionate different types of Gd3N metallofullerenes that are present in complex mixtures. Carbon disulfide is used for all Lewis acid studies. CaCl2 exhibits the lowest reactivity but the highest selectivity by precipitating only those gadolinium metallofullerenes with the lowest first oxidation potentials. ZnCl2 selectively complexes Gd3N@C88 during the first 4 h of reaction. Reaction with ZnCl2 for an additional 7 days permits a selective precipitation of Gd3N@C84 as the dominant endohedral isolated. A third fraction is the filtrate, which possesses Gd3N@C86 and Gd3N@C80 as the two dominant metallofullerenes. The order of increasing reactivity and decreasing selectivity (left to right) is as follows: CaCl2 < ZnCl2 < NiCl2 < MgCl2 < MnCl2 < CuCl2 < WCl4 ≪ WCl6 < ZrCl4 < AlCl3 < FeCl3. As a group, CaCl2, ZnCl2, and NiCl2 are the weakest Lewis acids and have the highest selectivity because of their very low precipitation onsets, which are below +0.19 V (i.e., endohedrals with first oxidation potentials below +0.19 V are precipitated). For CaCl2, the precipitation threshold is estimated at a remarkably low value of +0.06 V. Because most endohedrals possess first oxidation potentials significantly higher than +0.06 V, CaCl2 is especially useful in its ability to precipitate only a select group of gadolinium metallofullerenes. The Lewis acids of intermediate reactivity (i.e., precipitation onsets estimated between +0.19 and +0.4 V) are MgCl2, MnCl2, CuCl2, and WCl4. The strongest Lewis acids (WCl6, ZrCl4, AlCl3, and FeCl3) are the least selective and tend to precipitate the entire family of gadolinium metallofullerenes. Tuning the Lewis acid for a specific type of endohedral should be useful in a nonchromatographic purification method. The ability to control which metallofullerenes are permitted to precipitate and which endohedrals would remain in solution is a key outcome of this work. PMID

  7. Design of a metal-promoted oxide catalyst for the selective synthesis of butadiene from ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sushkevich, Vitaly L; Ivanova, Irina I; Ordomsky, Vitaly V; Taarning, Esben

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of buta-1,3-diene from ethanol has been studied over metal-containing (M=Ag, Cu, Ni) oxide catalysts (MO(x)=MgO, ZrO2, Nb2O5, TiO2, Al2O3) supported on silica. Kinetic study of a wide range of ethanol conversions (2-90%) allowed the main reaction pathways leading to butadiene and byproducts to be determined. The key reaction steps of butadiene synthesis were found to involve ethanol dehydrogenation, acetaldehyde condensation, and the reduction of crotonaldehyde with ethanol into crotyl alcohol. Catalyst design included the selection of active components for each key reaction step and merging of these components into multifunctional catalysts and adjusting the catalyst functions to achieve the highest selectivity. The best catalytic performance was achieved over the Ag/ZrO2/SiO2 catalyst, which showed the highest selectivity towards butadiene (74 mol%). PMID:25123990

  8. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications. PMID:27199184

  9. Selective Electrochemical versus Chemical Oxidation of Bulky Phenol.

    PubMed

    Zabik, Nicole L; Virca, Carolyn N; McCormick, Theresa M; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2016-09-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of selected tert-butylated phenols 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (1), 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (2), 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol (3), 2-tert-butylphenol (4), and 4-tert-butylphenol (5) was studied in an aprotic environment using cyclic voltammetry, square-wave voltammetry, and UV-vis spectroscopy. All compounds exhibited irreversible oxidation of the corresponding phenol or phenolate ion. Compound 2 was selectively electrochemically oxidized, while other phenol analogues underwent mostly chemical oxidation. The electrochemical oxidation of 2 produced a highly absorbing product, 3,5,3',5'-tetra-tert-butyl-4,4'-diphenoquinone, which was characterized by X-ray crystal diffraction. The electrochemical oxidation was monitored as a function of electrochemical parameters and concentration. Experimental and theoretical data indicated that the steric hindrance, phenoxyl radical stability, and hydrogen bonding influenced the outcome of the electrochemical oxidation. The absence of the substituent at the para position and the presence of the bulky substituents at ortho positions were structural and electrostatic requirements for the selective electrochemical oxidation. PMID:27454828

  10. Reaction progress kinetic analysis of a copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction with N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline.

    PubMed

    Scott, Martin; Sud, Abhishek; Boess, Esther; Klussmann, Martin

    2014-12-19

    The results from a kinetic investigation of a Cu-catalyzed oxidative coupling reaction between N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline and a silyl enol ether using elemental oxygen as oxidant are presented. By using reaction progress kinetic analysis as an evaluation method for the obtained data, we discovered information regarding the reaction order of the substrates and catalysts. Based on this information and some additional experiments, a refined model for the initial oxidative activation of the amine substrate and the activation of the nucleophile by the catalyst was developed. The mechanistic information also helped to understand why silyl nucleophiles have previously failed in a related Cu-catalyzed reaction using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant and how to overcome this limitation. PMID:25203932

  11. Two Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Contaminant Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Two catalysts for the selective oxidation of trace amounts of contaminant gases in air have been developed for use aboard the International Space Station. These catalysts might also be useful for reducing concentrations of fumes in terrestrial industrial facilities especially facilities that use halocarbons as solvents, refrigerant liquids, and foaming agents, as well as facilities that generate or utilize ammonia. The first catalyst is of the supported-precious-metal type. This catalyst is highly active for the oxidation of halocarbons, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates at low concentrations in air. This catalyst is more active for the oxidation of hydrocarbons and halocarbons than are competing catalysts developed in recent years. This catalyst completely converts these airborne contaminant gases to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral acids that can be easily removed from the air, and does not make any chlorine gas in the process. The catalyst is thermally stable and is not poisoned by chlorine or fluorine atoms produced on its surface during the destruction of a halocarbon. In addition, the catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to nitrogen at a temperature between 200 and 260 C, without making nitrogen oxides, which are toxic. The temperature of 260 C is higher than the operational temperature of any other precious-metal catalyst that can selectively oxidize ammonia. The purpose of the platinum in this catalyst is to oxidize hydrocarbons and to ensure that the oxidation of halocarbons goes to completion. However, the platinum exhibits little or no activity for initiating the destruction of halocarbons. Instead, the attack on the halocarbons is initiated by the support. The support also provides a high surface area for exposure of the platinum. Moreover, the support resists deactivation or destruction by halogens released during the destruction of halocarbons. The second catalyst is of the supported- metal-oxide type. This catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to

  12. Total Synthesis of Clavosolide A via Tandem Allylic Oxidation/Oxa-Conjugate Addition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joseph B.; Kim, Hyoungsu; Hong, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    The tandem allylic oxidation/oxa-conjugate addition reaction promoted by the gem-disubstituent effect in conjunction with the NHC-mediated oxidative esterification was explored for the facile synthesis of clavosolide A. PMID:26236051

  13. Method For Selective Catalytic Reduction Of Nitrogen Oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  14. Method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  15. C8-Selective Acylation of Quinoline N-Oxides with α-Oxocarboxylic Acids via Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaopei; Cui, Xiuling; Wu, Yangjie

    2016-08-01

    A facile and efficient protocol for palladium-catalyzed C8-selective acylation of quinoline N-oxides with α-oxocarboxylic acids has been developed. In this approach, N-oxide was utilized as a stepping stone for the remote C-H functionalization. The reactions proceeded efficiently under mild reaction conditions with excellent regioselectivity and broad functional group tolerance. PMID:27441527

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  17. Selective edge modification in graphene and graphite by chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Moriyama, Satoshi; Higuchi, Masayoshi

    2014-04-01

    The effect of edge structures in graphene sheets has been well investigated theoretically but most experimental demonstrations of the functionalization have been for the bulk structures because of only a few reports on chemical methods to modify the edges selectively. We herein report a chemical method using the Lemieux-von Rudloff reagent that selectively oxidizes only the edges of graphene sheets. The selective oxidation at the edges of the graphene sheet was confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman mapping measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TGA result of the oxidized graphite with different particle sizes showed a slight weight loss at approximately 350 degrees C (2.29% for the middle particles (35 microm)), which indicates thermal decomposition of the oxidized edge part. The Raman mapping measurement in the inner part of graphene sheets didn't detect any defects or translational symmetry breaking after the oxidation. The XPS data clearly showed that the total carbon atom content present as C--O, C==O, and O--C==C increased from 4.65 to 6.18% by the oxidation. Using the obtained edge-oxidized graphene as a starting material, various functionalizations of the edge structure are expected in the future. PMID:24734719

  18. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D.; Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions were studied with the aid of a mass spectrometer. A pinhole bleed system provided continuous sampling of the gas mixture in the cell during the reaction. It was found that the homogeneous reactions of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide with hydrogen peroxide are too slow to be of any significance in the upper atmosphere. However, the heterogeneous reactions may be important in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide in the case of polluted urban atmospheres.

  19. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, September 8, 1992--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sun, Q.; Sarkany, J.

    1993-01-01

    Support effects on catalytic reactions, especially of highly exothermic oxidation reactions, can be very significant. Since we had shown that a MoO{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, especially when used in a double bed configuration with a Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, can selectively oxidize methane to formaldehyde, the role of the SiO{sub 2} support was investigated. Therefore, partial oxidation of methane by oxygen to form formaldehyde, carbon oxides, and C{sub 2} products (ethane and ethene) has been studied over silica catalyst supports (fumed Cabosil and Grace 636 silica gel) in the 630-780{degrees}C temperature range under ambient pressure. When relatively high gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) were utilized, the silica catalysts exhibit high space time yields (at low conversions) for methane partial oxidation to formaldehyde, and the C{sub 2} hydrocarbons were found to be parallel products with formaldehyde. In general, the selectivities toward CO were high while those toward CO{sub 2} were low. Based on the present results obtained by a double catalyst bed experiment, the observations of product composition dependence on the variation of GHSV (i.e. gas residence time), and differences in apparent activation energies of formation of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and CH{sub 2}O, a reaction mechanism is proposed for the activation of methane over the silica surface. This mechanism can explain the observed product distribution patterns (specifically the parallel formation of formaldehyde and C{sub 2} hydrocarbons).

  20. A thermodynamically consistent surface reaction mechanism for CO oxidation on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Mhadeshwar, A.B.; Vlachos, D.G.

    2005-08-01

    The thermodynamic inconsistency of catalytic combustion reaction mechanisms has been a long-standing, fundamental, and practical problem. Here, we develop a thermodynamically consistent catalytic reaction mechanism for CO oxidation on Pt. First, we propose a modification of the bond index of the unity bond index-quadratic exponential potential (UBI-QEP) semiempirical framework for calculation of the activation energy of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type bimolecular surface reaction between co-adsorbed CO{sup *} and O{sup *}. Thermodynamic consistency is then ensured in the reaction mechanism by combining the semiempirical UBI-QEP theory, statistical mechanics, and constraint-based optimization against experimental data. Atmospheric pressure ignition and ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam experiments are selected as targets for optimization. The optimized mechanism is validated against redundant experiments, including temperature-programmed desorption, temperature-programmed reaction, and molecular beam experiments. Our microkinetic model is able to capture multiple types of data while being thermodynamically consistent over a wide range of conditions.

  1. Oxidation Reactions with Bioinspired Mononuclear Non-Heme Metal-Oxo Complexes.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Xenia; Monte-Pérez, Inés; Ray, Kallol

    2016-06-27

    The selective functionalization of strong C-H bonds and the oxidation of water by cheap and nontoxic metals are some of the key targets of chemical research today. It has been proposed that high-valent iron-, manganese-, and copper-oxo cores are involved as reactive intermediates in important oxidation reactions performed by biological systems, thus making them attractive targets for biomimetic synthetic studies. The generation and characterization of metal-oxo model complexes of iron, manganese, and copper together with detailed reactivity studies can help in understanding how the steric and electronic properties of the metal centers modulate the reactivity of the metalloenzymes. This Review provides a focused overview of the advances in the chemistry of biomimetic high-valent metal-oxo complexes from the last 5-10 years that can be related to our understanding of biological systems. PMID:27311082

  2. Utilisation of gold nanoparticles on amine-functionalised UiO-66 (NH2-UiO-66) nanocrystals for selective tandem catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Christopher S; Webb, William R; Chew, Benny K J; Tan, Hui Ru; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Hor, T S Andy; Raja, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal deposition of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) onto NH2-UiO-66 nanocrystals has been demonstrated with the resulting hybrid catalyst proving robust and versatile for one-pot, heterogeneous conversions involving the selective oxidation of primary alcohols in tandem with Knoevenagel condensation reactions. Within these systems, structure-property correlations have been established to confirm that the active sites for the oxidation and condensation reactions are intrinsically correlated with the Au NPs and pendant amine groups respectively. PMID:27104291

  3. Benzyl alcohol oxidation in supercritical carbon dioxide: spectroscopic insight into phase behaviour and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caravati, Matteo; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Baiker, Alfons

    2005-01-21

    Selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with molecular oxygen over an alumina-supported palladium catalyst was performed with high rate at about 95% selectivity in supercritical carbon dioxide. The experiments in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor showed that the pressure has a strong influence on the reaction rate. A marked increase of the rate (turnover frequency) from 900 h(-1) to 1800 h(-1) was observed when increasing the pressure from 140 to 150 bar. Video monitoring of the bulk fluid phase behavior and the simultaneous investigation by transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy at two positions of the view cell showed that the sharp increase in activity is correlated to a transition from a biphasic to a monophasic reaction mixture. In the single phase region, both oxygen and benzyl alcohol are dissolved in the supercritical CO2 phase, which leads to a reduction of the mass transport resistances (both in the external fluid film and in the catalyst pores) and thus to the high reaction rate measured in the catalytic experiments. The phase transition could be effectively and easily monitored by transmission and ATR-IR spectroscopy despite the small concentration of the dense liquid like phase. Deposition of the Pd/Al2O3 catalyst on the ATR-crystal at the bottom of the view cell allowed to gain insight into the chemical changes and mass transfer processes occurring in the solid/liquid interface region during reaction. Analyzing the shift of the upsilon2 bending mode of CO2 gave information on the fluid composition in and outside the catalyst pores. Moreover, the catalytic reaction could be investigated in situ in this spectroscopic batch reactor cell by monitoring simultaneously the reaction progress, the phase behaviour and the catalytic interface. PMID:19785149

  4. Nondestructive covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by selective oxidation of the original defects with K2FeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-yang; Xu, Xue-cheng

    2015-08-01

    Chemical oxidation is still the major approach to the covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Theoretically, the defects on CNTs are more reactive than skeletal hexagons and should be preferentially oxidized, but conventional oxidation methods, e.g., HNO3/H2SO4 treatment, have poor reaction selectivity and inevitably consume the Cdbnd C bonds in the hexagonal lattices, leading to structural damage, π-electrons loss and weight decrease. In this work, we realized the nondestructive covalent functionalization of CNTs by selective oxidation of the defects. In our method, potassium ferrate K2FeVIO4 was employed as an oxidant for CNTs in H2SO4 medium. The CNT samples, before and after K2FeO4/H2SO4 treatment, were characterized with colloid dispersibility, IR, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM and XPS. The results indicated that (i) CNTs could be effectively oxidized by Fe (VI) under mild condition (60 °C, 3 h), and hydrophilic CNTs with abundant surface sbnd COOH groups were produced; and (ii) Fe (VI) oxidation of CNTs followed a defect-specific oxidation process, that is, only the sp3-hybridized carbon atoms on CNT surface were oxidized while the Cdbnd C bonds remained unaffected. This selective/nondestructive oxidation afforded oxidized CNTs in yields of above 100 wt%. This paper shows that K2FeO4/H2SO4 is an effective, nondestructive and green oxidation system for oxidative functionalization of CNTs and probably other carbon materials as well.

  5. Protein Significance Analysis in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Measurements*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Yun; Picotti, Paola; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Jovanovic, Marko; Aebersold, Ruedi; Vitek, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a targeted mass spectrometry technique that provides sensitive and accurate protein detection and quantification in complex biological mixtures. Statistical and computational tools are essential for the design and analysis of SRM experiments, particularly in studies with large sample throughput. Currently, most such tools focus on the selection of optimized transitions and on processing signals from SRM assays. Little attention is devoted to protein significance analysis, which combines the quantitative measurements for a protein across isotopic labels, peptides, charge states, transitions, samples, and conditions, and detects proteins that change in abundance between conditions while controlling the false discovery rate. We propose a statistical modeling framework for protein significance analysis. It is based on linear mixed-effects models and is applicable to most experimental designs for both isotope label-based and label-free SRM workflows. We illustrate the utility of the framework in two studies: one with a group comparison experimental design and the other with a time course experimental design. We further verify the accuracy of the framework in two controlled data sets, one from the NCI-CPTAC reproducibility investigation and the other from an in-house spike-in study. The proposed framework is sensitive and specific, produces accurate results in broad experimental circumstances, and helps to optimally design future SRM experiments. The statistical framework is implemented in an open-source R-based software package SRMstats, and can be used by researchers with a limited statistics background as a stand-alone tool or in integration with the existing computational pipelines. PMID:22190732

  6. Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Mann, Jessica M; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of target proteins within complex biological samples is critical to a wide range of research and clinical applications. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions for the development and application of quantitative assays using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). First, likely quantotypic target peptides are identified based on numerous criteria. This includes identifying proteotypic peptides, avoiding sites of posttranslational modification, and analyzing the uniqueness of the target peptide to the target protein. Next, crude external peptide standards are synthesized and used to develop SRM assays, and the resulting assays are used to perform qualitative analyses of the biological samples. Finally, purified, quantified, heavy isotope labeled internal peptide standards are prepared and used to perform isotope dilution series SRM assays. Analysis of all of the resulting MS data is presented. This protocol was used to accurately assay the absolute abundance of proteins of the chemotaxis signaling pathway within RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line). The quantification of Gi2 (a heterotrimeric G-protein α-subunit) is described in detail. PMID:26325288

  7. Porcelain enamelled absorbers, coated by spectral selective tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, F.; Faber, A.J.; Hoogendoorn, C.J.

    1987-02-01

    The use of porcelain enamelled absorbers in flat plate collectors features longevity thanks to the durability and thermal stability of the enamel finish. The porcelain enamel can be made spectral selective by coating with doped tin oxide or indium oxide. The application procedure involves an enamelling step followed by a pyrosol process with tin or indium compounds. The optical properties of tin oxide coated enamel yield values of 0.90-0.92 absorptance and 0.13-0.18 hemispherical emittance. The temperature dependence of the emittance is very small. The thermal stability has been proved up to 400/sup 0/C in air.

  8. Deactivation of a mixed oxide catalyst of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O composition in the reaction of oxidative ethane dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishanin, I. I.; Kalenchuk, A. N.; Maslakov, K. I.; Lunin, V. V.; Koklin, A. E.; Finashina, E. D.; Bogdan, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    The operational stability of a mixed oxide catalyst of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O composition in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane (ratio of C2H6: O2 = 3: 1) is studied in a flow reactor at temperatures of 340-400°C, a pressure of 1 atm, and a WHSV of the feed mixture of 800 h-1. It is found that the selectivity toward ethylene is 98% at 340°C, but the conversion of ethane at this temperature is only 6%; when the temperature is raised to 400°C, the conversion of ethane is increased to 37%, while the selectivity toward ethylene is reduced to 85%. Using physical and chemical means (XPS, SEM), it is found that the lack of oxidant in the reaction mixture leads to irreversible changes in the catalyst, i.e., reduced selectivity and activity. Raising the reaction temperature to 400°C allows the reduction of tellurium by ethane, from the +6 oxidation state to the zerovalent state, with its subsequent sublimation and the destruction of the catalytically active and selective phase; in its characteristics, the catalyst becomes similar to the Mo-V-Nb-O system containing no tellurium.

  9. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  10. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  11. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C.; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications.Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2

  12. Niobium phosphates as new highly selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane.

    PubMed

    Weng, Weihao; Davies, Mathew; Whiting, Gareth; Solsona, Benjamin; Kiely, Christopher J; Carley, Albert F; Taylor, Stuart H

    2011-10-14

    Several niobium phosphate phases have been prepared, fully characterized and tested as catalysts for the selective oxidation of ethane to ethylene. Three distinct niobium phosphate catalysts were prepared, and each was comprised predominantly of a different bulk phase, namely Nb(2)P(4)O(15), NbOPO(4) and Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12). All of the niobium phosphate catalysts showed high selectivity towards ethylene, but the best catalyst was Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12), which was produced from the reduction of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO(4)) by hydrogen. It was particularly selective for ethylene, giving ca. 95% selectivity at 5% conversion, decreasing to ca. 90% at 15% conversion, and only produced low levels of carbon oxides. It was also determined that the only primary product from ethane oxidation over this catalyst was ethylene. Catalyst activity also increased with time-on-line, and this behaviour was ascribed to an increase of the concentration of the Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12) phase, as partially transformed NbOPO(4), formed during preparation, was converted to Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12) during use. Catalysts with predominant phases of Nb(2)P(4)O(15) and NbOPO(4) also showed appreciable activity and selectivities to ethylene with values around 75% and 85% respectively at 5% ethane conversion. The presence of phosphorous is required to achieve high ethylene selectivity, as orthorhombic and monoclinic Nb(2)O(5) catalysts showed similar activity, but displayed selectivities to ethylene that were <20% under the same reaction conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that niobium phosphates have been shown to be highly selective catalysts for the oxidation of ethane to ethylene, and demonstrates that they are worthy candidates for further study. PMID:21881631

  13. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  15. Reaction of CO2 with propylene oxide and styrene oxide catalyzed by a chromium(III) amine-bis(phenolate) complex.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca K; Devaine-Pressing, Katalin; Dawe, Louise N; Kozak, Christopher M

    2013-07-01

    A diamine-bis(phenolate) chromium(III) complex, {CrCl[O2NN'](BuBu)}2 catalyzes the copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The synthesis of this metal complex is straightforward and it can be obtained in high yields. This catalyst incorporates a tripodal amine-bis(phenolate) ligand, which differs from the salen or salan ligands typically used with Cr and Co complexes that have been employed as catalysts for the synthesis of such polycarbonates. The catalyst reported herein yields low molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities when the reaction is performed at room temperature. Performing the reaction at elevated temperatures causes the selective synthesis of propylene carbonate. The copolymerization activity for propylene oxide and carbon dioxide, as well as the coupling of carbon dioxide and styrene oxide to give styrene carbonate are presented. PMID:23192332

  16. Reactions and reactivity of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants: differential biological effects of hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acids.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2012-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is recognised to play important roles both in the immune system and during the development of numerous human pathologies. MPO is released by activated neutrophils, monocytes and some tissue macrophages, where it catalyses the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to hypohalous acids (HOX; X = Cl, Br, SCN) in the presence of halide and pseudo-halide ions. The major reactive species produced by MPO under physiological conditions are hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN), with the ratio of these oxidants critically dependent on the concentration of thiocyanate ions (SCN⁻). The reactivity and selectivity of HOCl and HOSCN for biological targets are markedly different, indicating that SCN⁻ ions have the potential to modulate both the extent and nature of oxidative damage in vivo. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the role of SCN⁻ in modulating the formation of MPO-derived oxidants, particularly in respect to the differences in reaction kinetics and targets of HOCl compared to HOSCN and the ability of these two oxidants to induce damage in biological systems. PMID:22348603

  17. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  18. Surface Reactions of Uranium Oxide Powder, Thin Films and Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Idriss, H.

    2010-01-01

    The review deals with surface reactions of the complex uranium oxide systems with relevance to catalysis and the environment. After a brief introduction on the properties of uranium oxides, the focus of the review is on surface science studies of defined structures of uranium oxides which are entirely on UO{sub 2} because of the lack of available model on other uranium oxide systems. Powder work is also included as it has given considerable information related to the dynamics between the many phases of uranium oxides. Many chemical reactions are mapped and these include water dissociative adsorption and reaction, CO oxidation and reductive coupling, as well as the reaction of oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids in addition to a few examples of sulfur and nitrogen containing compounds.

  19. Surface reactions of uranium oxide powder, thin films and single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idriss, H.

    2010-03-01

    The review deals with surface reactions of the complex uranium oxide systems with relevance to catalysis and the environment. After a brief introduction on the properties of uranium oxides, the focus of the review is on surface science studies of defined structures of uranium oxides which are entirely on UO 2 because of the lack of available model on other uranium oxide systems. Powder work is also included as it has given considerable information related to the dynamics between the many phases of uranium oxides. Many chemical reactions are mapped and these include water dissociative adsorption and reaction, CO oxidation and reductive coupling, as well as the reaction of oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids in addition to a few examples of sulfur and nitrogen containing compounds.

  20. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  1. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, wemore » show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.« less

  2. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Canlas, Christian P; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W; Winans, Randall E; Van Duyne, Richard P; Stair, Peter C; Notestein, Justin M

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al(2)O(3) (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with 'nanocavities' (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO(2) photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations. PMID:23174984

  3. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canlas, Christian P.; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A.; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A.; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.; van Duyne, Richard P.; Stair, Peter C.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al2O3 (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with ‘nanocavities’ (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO2 photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations.

  4. Computational explorations of mechanisms and ligand-directed selectivities of copper-catalyzed Ullmann-type reactions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gavin O; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2010-05-01

    Computational investigations of ligand-directed selectivities in Ullmann-type coupling reactions of methanol and methylamine with iodobenzene by beta-diketone- and 1,10-phenanthroline-ligated Cu(I) complexes are reported. Density functional theory calculations using several functionals were performed on both the nucleophile formation and aryl halide activation steps of these reactions. The origin of ligand-directed selectivities in N- versus O-arylation reactions as described in a previous publication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 3490-3491) were studied and explained. The selectivities observed experimentally are derived not from initial Cu(I)(nucleophile) complex formation but from the subsequent steps involving aryl halide activation. The arylation may occur via single-electron transfer (SET) or iodine atom transfer (IAT), depending on the electron-donating abilities of the ligand and nucleophile. Mechanisms involving either oxidative addition/reductive elimination or sigma-bond metathesis are disfavored. SET mechanisms are favored in reactions promoted by the beta-diketone ligand; N-arylation is predicted to be favored in these cases, in agreement with experimental results. The phenanthroline ligand promotes O-arylation reactions via IAT mechanisms in preference to N-arylation reactions, which occur via SET mechanisms; this result is also in agreement with experimental results. PMID:20387898

  5. Fabrication and performance of selectively oxidized vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Geib, K.M.; Figiel, J.J.; Hull, R.

    1995-11-01

    The authors report the high yield fabrication and reproducible performance of selectivity oxidized vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers. They show that liner oxidation rates of AlGaAs without an induction period allows reproducible fabrication of buried oxide current apertures within monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. The oxide layers do not induce obvious crystalline defects, and continuous wave operation in excess of 650 h has been obtained. The high yield fabrication enables relatively high laser performance over a wide wavelength span. They observe submilliamp threshold currents over a wavelength range of up to 75 nm, and power conversion efficiencies at 1 mW output power of greater than 20% over a 50-nm wavelength range.

  6. NITROGEN OXIDES REACTIONS WITHIN URBAN PLUMES TRANSPORTED OVER THE OCEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an airborne measurements program in the downwind urban plume of Boston. The variables measured included ozone, nitric oxide, oxides of nitrogen, nitric acid, peroxyacetylnitrate, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbon, freon-11, C1-C5 hydrocarbons, condensat...

  7. Oxidation of diesel-generated volatile organic compounds in the selective catalytic reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Koebel, M.; Elsener, M.

    1998-10-01

    The main part of the VOCs (volatile organic compounds) contained in diesel exhaust ({approx}80%) is oxidized to CO and CO{sub 2} over an SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst. CO is the major product of this oxidation, representing about 50--70% of the formed products (CO + CO{sub 2}). This preferential formation of CO leads to a pronounced increase of CO emissions when an SCR process is added to a diesel engine. A small fraction of the VOCs is selectively oxidized to carboxylic acids over the SCR catalyst. This selectivity is due to the acidic properties of the catalyst causing the preferential desorption at the oxidation state of the acid. The main products of these oxidation reactions are the lower monocarboxylic acids and some dicarboxylic acids forming stable anhydrides, especially maleic and phthalic acid. The highest emissions of these acids are found at low temperatures; they decrease at higher temperatures. Formic acid is preferentially decomposed into carbon monoxide and water. It must therefore be assumed that the strong increase of CO mentioned above is due to a mechanism involving the thermal decomposition of formic acid formed from various primary VOCs.

  8. Quantitation of Four Guanine Oxidation Products from Reaction of DNA with Varying Doses of Peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongbin; Venkatarangan, Lata; Wishnok, John S.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation products obtained from the reaction of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) with dG include - among others - 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), 2,2-diamino-4[(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentafuranosyl)amino]-5(2H)-oxazolone (oxazolone), spiroiminodihydantoin and N1-(β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-5-guanidinohydantoin (guanidinohydantoin). In the present work, the formation of these products from the treatment of calf thymus DNA with varying amounts of ONOO− was studied quantitatively in vitro. 13C-, 15N-labeled standards were synthesized for the nucleosides of interest, and calf thymus DNA was reacted with ONOO− and digested enzymatically down to the nucleoside level. Specific modifications in the DNA were measured by HPLC separation followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric analysis in the selected reaction-monitoring mode. Artifacts of the above four oxidation products, arising from oxidation of dG and/or 8-oxodG during DNA digestion and subsequent work-up, were evaluated with 7-15N-dG and/or stable-isotope labeled 8-oxodG as internal standards. Levels of artifactual 8-oxodG were about 5/106 nucleosides. The artifacts of spiroiminodihydantoin and guanidinohydantoin, arising from 8-oxodG, were 3.7% and 0.6% of the measured 8-oxodG values, respectively. No artifacts of oxazolone were detected. 8-OxodG and oxazolone were formed dose-dependently in DNA treated with ONOO−, while the levels of spiroiminodihydantoin and guanidinohydantoin increased significantly at low ONOO− doses, and then dropped off at higher ONOO− doses. The complexity of these dose-response relationships is likely due to the dual role of peroxynitrite as both an oxidant and a nucleophile in competition with water. PMID:16359175

  9. Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension.

    PubMed

    Che, Hyeongsu; Lee, Woojin

    2011-02-01

    Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatics by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension was investigated in a closed system. Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was used as a representative target of perchlorinated alkanes and trichloroethylene (TCE) was used as one of highly chlorinated alkenes. Degradation of CT in Fenton reaction was significantly enhanced by pyrite used as an iron source instead of soluble Fe. Pyrite Fenton showed 93% of CT removal in 140 min, while Fenton reaction with soluble Fe(II) showed 52% and that with Fe(III) 15%. Addition of 2-propanol to the pyrite Fenton system significantly inhibited degradation of TCE (99% to 44% of TCE removal), while degradation of CT was slightly improved by the 2-propanol addition (80-91% of CT removal). The result suggests that, unlike oxidative degradation of TCE by hydroxyl radical in pyrite Fenton system, an oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is not a main degradation mechanism for the degradation of CT in pyrite Fenton system but a reductive dechlorination by superoxide can rather be the one for the CT degradation. The degradation kinetics of CT in the pyrite Fenton system was decelerated (0.13-0.03 min(-1)), as initial suspension pH decreased from 3 to 2. The formation of superoxide during the CT degradation in the pyrite Fenton system was observed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The formation at initial pH 3 was greater than that at initial pH 2, which supported that superoxide was a main reductant for degradation of CT in the pyrite Fenton system. PMID:21186044

  10. Palladium and gold nanotubes as oxygen reduction reaction and alcohol oxidation reaction catalysts in base.

    PubMed

    Alia, Shaun M; Duong, Kathlynne; Liu, Toby; Jensen, Kurt; Yan, Yushan

    2014-06-01

    Palladium (PdNTs) and gold nanotubes (AuNTs) were synthesized by the galvanic displacement of silver nanowires. PdNTs and AuNTs have wall thicknesses of 6 nm, outer diameters of 60 nm, and lengths of 5-10 and 5-20 μm, respectively. Rotating disk electrode experiments showed that the PdNTs and AuNTs have higher area normalized activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than conventional nanoparticle catalysts. The PdNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 3.4, 2.2, and 3.7 times greater than that on carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/C), bulk polycrystalline palladium, and carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C), respectively. The AuNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 2.3, 9.0, and 2.0 times greater than that on carbon-supported gold nanoparticles (Au/C), bulk polycrystalline gold, and Pt/C, respectively. The PdNTs also had lower onset potentials than Pd/C and Pt/C for the oxidation of methanol (0.236 V), ethanol (0.215 V), and ethylene glycol (0.251 V). In comparison to Pt/C, the PdNTs and AuNTs further demonstrated improved alcohol tolerance during the ORR. PMID:24757078

  11. Selective oxidation of enzyme extracts for improved quantification of peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu; Penner, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    Natural components endogenous to plant material extracts often interfere with traditional peroxidase assays by reducing the oxidized product generated as a result of the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. This leads to an underestimation of peroxidase activity when the oxidized product provides the signal for enzyme activity quantification. This article describes a relatively simple way to alleviate complications arising due to the presence of such confounding compounds. The method is based on using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as the reducing substrate. The oxidized product of the reaction is ABTS(+), the accumulation of which can be followed spectrophotometrically. It is shown here that one can selectively inactivate the endogenous compounds that confound the peroxidase assay by treating the enzyme preparation with the oxidized product itself, ABTS(+), prior to initiating the quantification assay. This approach is selective for those compounds likely to interfere with peroxidase quantification. The presented method is shown to alleviate the complications associated with lag phases typical of plant extract peroxidase assays and, thus, to more accurately reflect total peroxidase activity. The presented assay is expected to be applicable to the wide range of biological systems for which the determination of peroxidase activity is desired. PMID:25640588

  12. Selective enrichment and desalting of hydrophilic peptides using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Qi, Linyu; Liu, Peiru; Wang, Zijun; Duan, Zhigui; Wang, Ying; Liu, Zhonghua; Chen, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The wide variety and low abundance of peptides in tissue brought great difficulties to the separation and identification of peptides, which is not in favor of the development of peptidomics. RP-HPLC, which could purify small molecules based on their hydrophobicity, has been widely used in the separation and enrichment of peptide due to its fast, good reproducibility and high resolution. However, RP-HPLC requires the instrument and expensive C18 column and its sample capacity is also limited. Recently, graphene oxide has been applied to the adsorption of amino acids. However, the enrichment efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide for peptides remain unclear. In this study, the adsorption efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide and RP-C18 matrix were compared on trypsinized α-actin and also on tissue extracts from pituitary gland and hippocampus. For α-actin, there exhibit similar elution peaks for total trypsinized products and those adsorpted by GO and C18 matrix. But peptides adsorbed by GO showed the higher hydrophilic peaks than which adsorbed by C18 matrix. The resulted RP-HPLC profile showed that most of peptides enriched by graphene oxide were eluted at low concentration of organic solvent, while peptides adsorbed by RP-C18 matrix were mostly eluted at relatively high concentration. Moreover, mass spectrometry analysis suggested that, in pituitary sample, there were 495 peptides enriched by graphene oxide, 447 peptides enriched by RP-C18 matrix while in hippocampus sample 333 and 243 peptides respectively. The GRAVY value analysis suggested that the graphene oxide has a stronger adsorption for highly hydrophilic peptides compared to the RP-C18 matrix. Furthermore, the combination of these two methods could notably increase the number of identification peptides but also the number of predicted protein precursors. Our study provided a new thought to the role of graphene oxide during the enrichment of peptides from tissue which should be useful for

  13. The detection for hypochlorite by UV-Vis and fluorescent spectra based on oxidized ring opening and successive hydrolysis reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kangming; Yin, Caixia; Chao, Jianbin; Zhang, Yongbin; Huo, Fangjun

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two high selective and sensitive fluorescent probes for ClO(-), 7-Hydroxycoumarin and 4-Hydroxycoumarin were designed. The reaction mechanism that we speculated was the oxidized ring opening reaction and hydrolysis. The detection could be realized in quasi-aqueous phase and the detection limits of probe [7] and probe [4] for ClO(-) were found to be 56.8nM and 70.5nM. Furthermore, the probes can be used to cell imagings. PMID:27214272

  14. The detection for hypochlorite by UV-Vis and fluorescent spectra based on oxidized ring opening and successive hydrolysis reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Kangming; Yin, Caixia; Chao, Jianbin; Zhang, Yongbin; Huo, Fangjun

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two high selective and sensitive fluorescent probes for ClO-, 7-Hydroxycoumarin and 4-Hydroxycoumarin were designed. The reaction mechanism that we speculated was the oxidized ring opening reaction and hydrolysis. The detection could be realized in quasi-aqueous phase and the detection limits of probe [7] and probe [4] for ClO- were found to be 56.8 nM and 70.5 nM. Furthermore, the probes can be used to cell imagings.

  15. High-temperature oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. T.; Singh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics was investigated in the temperature range of 1100 to 1400 C. The oxidation weight change was recorded by TGA; the oxidized materials were examined by light and electron microscopy, and the oxidation product by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The materials exhibited initial weight loss, followed by passive weight gain (with enhanced parabolic rates, k(sub p)), and ending with a negative (logarithmic) deviation from the parabolic law. The weight loss arose from the oxidation of residual carbon, and the enhanced k(sub p) values from internal oxidation and the oxidation of residual silicon, while the logarithmic kinetics is thought to have resulted from crystallization of the oxide. The presence of a small amount of MoSi, in the RFSC material caused a further increase in the oxidation rate. The only solid oxidation product for all temperatures studied was silica.

  16. Aerobic oxidation reactions catalyzed by vanadium complexes of bis(phenolate) ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqi; Scott, Brian L; Wu, Ruilian; Silks, L A Pete; Hanson, Susan K

    2012-07-01

    Vanadium(V) complexes of the tridentate bis(phenolate)pyridine ligand H(2)BPP (H(2)BPP = 2,6-(HOC(6)H(2)-2,4-(t)Bu(2))(2)NC(5)H(3)) and the bis(phenolate)amine ligand H(2)BPA (H(2)BPA = N,N-bis(2-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylbenzyl)propylamine) have been synthesized and characterized. The ability of the complexes to mediate the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of pinacol was tested. Reaction of the complex (BPP)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (4) with pinacol afforded the monomeric vanadium(IV) product (BPP)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr) (6) and acetone. Vanadium(IV) complex 6 was oxidized rapidly by air at room temperature in the presence of NEt(3), yielding the vanadium(V) cis-dioxo complex [(BPP)V(V)(O)(2)]HNEt(3). Complex (BPA)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (5) reacted with pinacol at room temperature, to afford acetone and the vanadium(IV) dimer [(BPA)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr)](2). Complexes 4 and 5 were evaluated as catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol and arylglycerol β-aryl ether lignin model compounds. Although both 4 and 5 catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol, complex 4 was found to be a more active and robust catalyst for oxidation of the lignin model compounds. The catalytic activities and selectivities of the bis(phenolate) complexes are compared to previously reported catalysts. PMID:22708725

  17. Thermochemistry and reaction paths in the oxidation reaction of benzoyl radical: C6H5C•(═O).

    PubMed

    Sebbar, Nadia; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Bockhorn, Henning

    2011-10-27

    Alkyl substituted aromatics are present in fuels and in the environment because they are major intermediates in the oxidation or combustion of gasoline, jet, and other engine fuels. The major reaction pathways for oxidation of this class of molecules is through loss of a benzyl hydrogen atom on the alkyl group via abstraction reactions. One of the major intermediates in the combustion and atmospheric oxidation of the benzyl radicals is benzaldehyde, which rapidly loses the weakly bound aldehydic hydrogen to form a resonance stabilized benzoyl radical (C6H5C(•)═O). A detailed study of the thermochemistry of intermediates and the oxidation reaction paths of the benzoyl radical with dioxygen is presented in this study. Structures and enthalpies of formation for important stable species, intermediate radicals, and transition state structures resulting from the benzoyl radical +O2 association reaction are reported along with reaction paths and barriers. Enthalpies, ΔfH298(0), are calculated using ab initio (G3MP2B3) and density functional (DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) calculations, group additivity (GA), and literature data. Bond energies on the benzoyl and benzoyl-peroxy systems are also reported and compared to hydrocarbon systems. The reaction of benzoyl with O2 has a number of low energy reaction channels that are not currently considered in either atmospheric chemistry or combustion models. The reaction paths include exothermic, chain branching reactions to a number of unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates along with formation of CO2. The initial reaction of the C6H5C(•)═O radical with O2 forms a chemically activated benzoyl peroxy radical with 37 kcal mol(-1) internal energy; this is significantly more energy than the 21 kcal mol(-1) involved in the benzyl or allyl + O2 systems. This deeper well results in a number of chemical activation reaction paths, leading to highly exothermic reactions to phenoxy radical + CO2 products. PMID:21942384

  18. Ruthenium-Immobilized Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica: Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Application for Selective Oxidation of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ishito, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2015-10-26

    Periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) is a unique material that has a crystal-like wall structure with coordination sites for metal complexes. A Ru complex, [RuCl2 (CO)3 ]2 , is successfully immobilized onto 2,2'-bipyridine (BPy) units of PMO to form a single-site catalyst, which has been confirmed by various physicochemical analyses. Using NaClO as an oxidant, the Ru-immobilized PMO oxidizes the tertiary C-H bonds of adamantane to the corresponding alcohols at 57 times faster than the secondary C-H bonds, thereby exhibiting remarkably high regioselectivity. Moreover, the catalyst converts cis-decalin to cis-9-decalol in a 63 % yield with complete retention of the substrate stereochemistry. The Ru catalyst can be separated by simple filtration and reused without loss of the original activity and selectivity for the oxidation reactions. PMID:26330333

  19. The technology and applications of selective oxidation of AlGaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hou, H.Q.; Mathes, D.; Hull, R.

    1998-08-01

    Wet oxidation of AlGaAs alloys, pioneered at the University of Illinois a decade ago, recently has been used to fabricate high performance vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). The superior properties of oxide-confined VCSELs has stimulated interest in understanding the fundamental of wet oxidation. The authors briefly review the technology of selective oxidation of III-V alloys, including the oxide microstructure and oxidation processing as well as describe its application to selectively oxidized VCSELs.

  20. Microporous polyurethane material for size selective heterogeneous catalysis of the Knoevenagel reaction.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sandeep Kumar; de Sousa Amadeu, Nader; Janiak, Christoph

    2016-06-14

    The first polyurethane material which is microporous (BET surface area of 312 m(2) g(-1)) is prepared by solvothermal synthesis and acts as highly efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst in the Knoevenagel condensation showing size selectivity, and in the Henry reaction showing substrate selectivity under mild reaction conditions. PMID:27240738

  1. Sporicidal effects of iodine-oxide thermite reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Bless, Stephan; Blinkova, Alexandra; Chen, Tiffany

    2012-03-01

    Iodine pentoxide-aluminum thermite reactions have been driven by impacts at 1000 m/s on steel plates 3 mm or thicker. This reaction releases iodine gas that is known to be a sporicide. To test the impact reactions for sporicidal effects, reactions took place in closed chambers containing dried Bacillus subtilis spores. The reduction in colony-forming units was dependent on the exposure time; long exposure times resulted in a 105 decrease in germination rate. This was shown to be due to the gas exposure rather than the heat or turbulence. Sporicidal effectiveness was increased by adding neodymium and saran resin.

  2. Compound I reactivity defines alkene oxidation selectivity in cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Richard; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2010-01-21

    Prediction of the chemoselectivity of drug oxidation by the human cytochrome P450 enzymes will aid in the avoidance of adverse drug reactions. The chemoselectivity of alkene oxidation is an important problem to address, as it can result in the formation of epoxides, which can have toxic effects. In this paper the epoxidation and hydroxylation of cyclohexene and propene by the bacterial P450(cam) isoform are modeled with hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods. Snapshots for QM/MM modeling are chosen from molecular dynamics trajectories, to sample the different conformations of the enzyme-substrate complex. The energy barriers obtained for these processes are in qualitative agreement with experimental work, supporting the use of QM/MM methods in the study of selectivity for this class of enzyme. This work highlights the complexity involved in modeling these systems with QM/MM and the importance in the selection of starting geometries. PMID:20014756

  3. Manganese Triazacyclononane Oxidation Catalysts Grafted under Reaction Conditions on Solid Co-Catalytic Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeldt, Nicholas J.; Ni, Zhenjuan; Korinda, Andrew W.; Meyer, Randall J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-01-23

    Manganese complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tmtacn) are highly active and selective alkene oxidation catalysts with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Here, carboxylic acid-functionalized SiO{sub 2} simultaneously immobilizes and activates these complexes under oxidation reaction conditions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the functionalized support are both necessary to transform the inactive [(tmtacn)Mn{sup IV}({mu}-O)3Mn{sup IV}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+} into the active, dicarboxylate-bridged [(tmtacn)Mn{sup III}({mu}-O)({mu}-RCOO){sub 2}Mn{sup III}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+}. This transformation is assigned on the basis of comparison of diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra to known soluble models, assignment of oxidation state by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, the dependence of rates on the acid/Mn ratios, and comparison of the surface structures derived from density functional theory with extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Productivity in cis-cyclooctene oxidation to epoxide and cis-diol with 2-10 equiv of solid cocatalytic supports is superior to that obtained with analogous soluble valeric acid cocatalysts, which require 1000-fold excess to reach similar levels at comparable times. Cyclooctene oxidation rates are near first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and near zero order in all other species, including H{sub 2}O. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of substrate oxidation following rate-limiting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation on the hydrated, supported complex. This general mechanism and the observed alkene oxidation activation energy of 38 {+-} 6 kJ/mol are comparable to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation by related soluble catalysts. Undesired decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a limiting factor for these solid catalysts, and as such, productivity remains high up to 25 C and initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.5 M, increasing reactor throughput. These results show that immobilized carboxylic acids can be utilized and understood

  4. Knocking on wood: base metal complexes as catalysts for selective oxidation of lignin models and extracts.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Susan K; Baker, R Tom

    2015-07-21

    This work began as part of a biomass conversion catalysis project with UC Santa Barbara funded by the first NSF Chemical Bonding Center, CATSB. Recognizing that catalytic aerobic oxidation of diol C-C bonds could potentially be used to break down lignocellulose, we began to synthesize oxovanadium complexes and explore their fundamental reactivity. Of course there were theories regarding the oxidation mechanism, but our mechanistic studies soon revealed a number of surprises of the type that keep all chemists coming back to the bench! We realized that these reactions were also exciting in that they actually used the oxygen-on-every-carbon property of biomass-derived molecules to control the selectivity of the oxidation. When we found that these oxovanadium complexes tended to convert sugars predominantly to formic acid and carbon dioxide, we replaced one of the OH groups with an ether and entered the dark world of lignin chemistry. In this Account, we summarize results from our collaboration and from our individual labs. In particular, we show that oxidation selectivity (C-C vs C-O bond cleavage) of lignin models using air and vanadium complexes depends on the ancillary ligands, the reaction solvent, and the substrate structure (i.e., phenolic vs non-phenolic). Selected vanadium complexes in the presence of added base serve as effective alcohol oxidation catalysts via a novel base-assisted dehydrogenation pathway. In contrast, copper catalysts effect direct C-C bond cleavage of these lignin models, presumably through a radical pathway. The most active vanadium catalyst exhibits unique activity for the depolymerization of organosolv lignin. After Weckhuysen's excellent 2010 review on lignin valorization, the number of catalysis studies and approaches on both lignin models and extracts has expanded rapidly. Today we are seeing new start-ups and lignin production facilities sprouting up across the globe as we all work to prove wrong the old pulp and paper chemist

  5. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  6. Influence of Alumina Reaction Tube Impurities on the Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Pure coupons of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were oxidized for 100 h in dry flowing oxygen at 1300 C. The oxidation kinetics were monitored using thermogravimetry (TGA). The experiments were first performed using high-purity alumina reaction tubes. The experiments were then repeated using fused quartz reaction tubes. Differences in oxidation kinetics, scale composition, and scale morphology were observed. These differences were attributed to impurities in the alumina tubes. Investigators interested in high-temperature oxidation of silica formers should be aware that high-purity alumina can have significant effects on experiment results.

  7. The synthesis of a bifunctional copper metal organic framework and its application in the aerobic oxidation/Knoevenagel condensation sequential reaction.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zongcheng; Luan, Yi; Qi, Chao; Ramella, Daniele

    2016-09-21

    A novel one-pot aerobic oxidation/Knoevenagel condensation reaction system was developed employing a Cu(ii)/amine bifunctional, basic metal-organic framework (MOF) as the catalyst. The sequential aerobic alcohol oxidation/Knoevenagel condensation reaction was efficiently promoted by the Cu3TATAT MOF catalyst in the absence of basic additives. The benzylidenemalononitrile product was produced in high yield and selectivity from an inexpensive benzyl alcohol starting material under an oxygen atmosphere. The role of the basic functionality was studied to demonstrate its role in the aerobic oxidation and Knoevenagel condensation reactions. The reaction progress was monitored in order to identify the reaction intermediate and follow the accumulation of the desired product. Lastly, results showed that the yield was not significantly compromised by the reuse of a batch of catalyst, even after more than five cycles. PMID:27523776

  8. Influence of a reaction medium on the oxidation of aromatic nitrogen-containing compounds by peroxyacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, V. S.; Matsyuk, N. V.; Dutka, Yu. V.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of different solvents on the oxidation reaction rate of pyridine (Py), quinoline (QN), acridine (AN), α-oxyquinoline (OQN) and α-picolinic acid (APA) by peroxydecanoic acid (PDA) was studied. It was found that the oxidation rate grows in the series Py < QN < AN, and the rate of the oxidation reaction of compounds containing a substituent in the α position from a reactive center is significantly lower than for unsubstituted analogues. The effective energies of activation of the oxidation reaction were found. It was shown that in the first stage, the reaction mechanism includes the rapid formation of an intermediate complex nitrogen-containing compound, peroxyacid, which forms products upon decomposing in the second stage. A kinetic equation that describes the studied process is offered. The constants of equilibrium of the intermediate complex formation ( K eq) and its decomposition constant ( k 2) in acetone and benzene were calculated. It was shown that the nature of the solvent influences the numerical values of both K p and k 2. It was established that introduction of acetic acid (which is able to form compounds with Py) into the reaction medium slows the rate of the oxidation process drastically. Correlation equations linking the polarity, polarizability, electrophilicity, and basicity of solvents with the constant of the PDA oxidation reaction rate for Py were found. It was concluded that the basicity and polarity of the solvent have a decisive influence on the oxidation reaction rate, while the polarizability and electrophilicity of the reaction medium do not influence the oxidation reaction rate.

  9. Thermodynamically driven, syn-selective vinylogous aldol reaction of tetronamides.

    PubMed

    Karak, Milandip; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Acosta, Jaime A M; Sarotti, Ariel M; Boukouvalas, John

    2016-06-01

    A stereoselective vinylogous aldol reaction of N-monosubstituted tetronamides with aldehydes is described. The procedure is simple and scalable, works well with both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, and affords mainly the corresponding syn-aldol adducts. In many cases, the latter are obtained essentially free of their anti-isomers (dr > 99 : 1) in high yields (70-90%). Experimental and computational studies suggest that the observed diastereoselectivity arises through anti-syn isomer interconversion, enabled by an iterative retro-aldol/aldol reaction. PMID:27163151

  10. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of linear perfluoroalky lethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Paciorek, K. J. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal and thermal oxidative stability studies were performed on linear perfluoro alkyl ether fluids. The effect on degradation by metal catalysts and degradation inhibitors are reported. The liner perfluoro alkylethers are inherently unstable at 316 C in an oxidizing atmosphere. The metal catalysts greatly increased the rate of degradation in oxidizing atmospheres. In the presence of these metals in an oxidizing atmosphere, the degradation inhibitors were highly effective in arresting degradation at 288 C. However, the inhibitors had only limited effectiveness at 316 C. The metals promote degradation by chain scission. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, the linear perfluoro alkylether fluids have a structural arrangement based on difluoroformyl and tetrafluoroethylene oxide units, with the former predominating.

  11. Comparative temporal analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotube oxidation reactions: Evaluating chemical modifications on true nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Flávia G.; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Gorgulho, Honória F.; Santos, Adelina P.; Macedo, Waldemar A. A.; Furtado, Clascídia A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of extensive purification on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube surface composition was studied through the characterization and differentiation of the actual surface submitted to three oxidation methods: microwave-assisted acid oxidation, hydrogen peroxide reflux, and Fenton reaction. The oxidized samples were purified by a multi-step procedure including the sequential use of basic reflux and dispersion in dimethylformamide (DMF). The results showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidation debris with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction times longer than 8 h and strong surface characteristic modification. With regard to sample purification, basic reflux led to a reduction in oxygenated group concentration of only 10% in the samples treated by acid oxidation. On the other hand, the subsequent use of DMF led to a further decrease in concentration of 39%, proving to be a more efficient method for the removal of oxidation debris.

  12. Influence of size-induced oxidation state of platinum nanoparticles on selectivity and activity in catalytic methanol oxidation in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailiang; Wang, Yihai; Zhu, Zhongwei; Sapi, Andras; An, Kwangjin; Kennedy, Griffin; Michalak, William D; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2013-06-12

    Pt nanoparticles with various sizes of 1, 2, 4, and 6 nm were synthesized and studied as catalysts for gas-phase methanol oxidation reaction toward formaldehyde and carbon dioxide under ambient pressure (10 Torr of methanol, 50 Torr of oxygen, and 710 Torr of helium) at a low temperature of 60 °C. While the 2, 4, and 6 nm nanoparticles exhibited similar catalytic activity and selectivity, the 1 nm nanoparticles showed a significantly higher selectivity toward partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde, but a lower total turnover frequency. The observed size effect in catalysis was correlated to the size-dependent structure and oxidation state of the Pt nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared vibrational spectroscopy using adsorbed CO as molecular probes revealed that the 1 nm nanoparticles were predominantly oxidized while the 2, 4, and 6 nm nanoparticles were largely metallic. Transmission electron microscopy imaging witnessed the transition from crystalline to quasicrystalline structure as the size of the Pt nanoparticles was reduced to 1 nm. The results highlighted the important impact of size-induced oxidation state of Pt nanoparticles on catalytic selectivity as well as activity in gas-phase methanol oxidation reactions. PMID:23701488

  13. Control of laser induced reactions in solids using selected photon energies and pulse pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Wayne; Joly, Alan; Beck, Kenneth; Gerrity, Daniel; Dickinson, J. Thomas; Sushko, Peter; Shluger, Alexander

    2002-03-01

    Laser control of reaction dynamics is an intensely studied area of chemical physics. Sophisticated quantum and optimal control schemes have been developed to overcome difficulties associated with rapid energy redistribution from laser-prepared initial states. Experiment and theory have demonstrated how specific product pathways can be selected by irradiation with one or more laser beams. Although most laser control research has focused on small gas-phase molecules, product and quantum state control of laser desorption from solids is possible using delayed pulse pairs, selected pulse duration or by judicious choice of laser wavelength. Theory indicates that it is possible to excite the surface of ionic crystals, over the bulk, using tunable laser sources.[1] We recently demonstrated control of ion emission from MgO surfaces[2] using femtosecond pulse pairs and nearly exclusive emission of hyperthermal Br (2P3/2) from laser excited KBr.[3] Here, we explore the mechanism of laser desorption in experiments using delayed pulse pairs and tunable single pulses. The first laser pulse induces formation of transient species and the second pulse then excites the intermediate state to induce desorption of selected species or quantum states. Selective desorption raises the intriguing prospect of selective surface modification. The principles described here should be extendable to other alkali halides and metal oxides. References: [1] A.L. Shluger, P.V. Sushko, and L.N. Kantorovich, Phys. Rev. B. 59, (1999) 2417. [2] K.M. Beck, A.G. Joly, and W.P. Hess, Sur. Sci. 451, 166 (2000). [3] W. P. Hess, A. G. Joly, K. M. Beck, D. P. Gerrity, P. V. Sushko, and A. L. Shluger, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 9463 (2001).

  14. Sporicidal Effects of Iodine-oxide Thermite Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Bless, Stephan; Blinkova, Alexandra; Chen, Tiffany; InstituteAdvanced Tehnology Collaboration; Dept of Molecular Genetics; Microbiology-UT Austin Collaboration; Chemistry; Biochemistry-UT Austin Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Iodine pentoxide-aluminum thermite reactions have been driven by impacts at 1000 m/s on steel plates 3 mm or thicker. The activation energy of this material reaction is 197 J/g. The reactivity is increased by reducing grain size. This reaction releases iodine gas that is known to be a sporicide. In order to test the impact reactions for sporicidal effects, reactions took place in closed chambers containing dried Bacillus subtilis spores. The reduction in colony-forming units was dependent on the exposure time; long exposure times resulted in a 105 decrease in germination rate. This was shown to be due to the gas exposure and not the heat or turbulence. Sporicidal effectiveness was increased by adding neodymium and saran resin. The sporicidal effect is very dependent on exposure time, ranging from about 90% kill for times on the order of a second to 99.99% for one-hour times.

  15. Kinetic study of the reaction of vanadium and vanadium-titanium oxide cluster anions with SO2.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Ewald; Lang, Sandra M; Brümmer, Mathias; Niedziela, Andrzej; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Asmis, Knut R; Sauer, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    The reactivity of mass-selected V(4)O(10)(-) cluster anions towards sulphur dioxide is investigated in an ion trap under multi-collision conditions. Gas phase reaction kinetics are studied as a function of temperature (T(R) = 150-275 K). The binding energy of SO(2) to V(4)O(10)(-) is obtained by analyzing the experimental low pressure rate constants, employing the Lindemann energy transfer model for association reactions in conjunction with statistical RRKM theory. In addition, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy is used in conjunction with density functional theory for the structural assignment of the [V(4)O(10)(-), SO(2)] complex, revealing a square pyramidal structure with the SO(2) molecule incorporated in the vanadium oxide framework. Energy profiles are calculated for the reaction between V(4)O(10)(-) and V(6)O(15)(-) with SO(2). Whereas the transition structures along the reaction pathway of V(4)O(10)(-) with SO(2) have energies below those of the separated partners, the reaction of V(6)O(15)(-) with SO(2) proceeds via a transition structure with energy higher than the educts. The role of cluster size and composition is investigated by studying the reaction kinetics of larger (V(6)O(15)(-) and V(8)O(20)(-)) and titanium doped (V(3)TiO(10)(-) and V(2)Ti(2)O(10)(-)) vanadium oxide clusters with SO(2). The observed cluster size and composition dependencies are discussed. PMID:23008835

  16. Intrinsic selectivity in some prebiotic reactions of urazole with sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Colloton, Patricia A.

    2004-02-01

    Urazole (1,2,4-triazolidine-3,5-dione) (1), 4-methylurazole (12), and its carbon analog, 4,4-dimethylpyrazolidine-3,5-dione (18), react with 2-deoxy-D-ribose (2-deoxy-D-erythro-pentose; 6) in an aqueous solution at room temperature in a regioselective manner (a single substitution on a hydrazidic nitrogen, no reaction on the imide nitrogen) to give a mixture of four nucleosides. These are α and β pyranosides (p) and α and β furanosides (f). The α p forms in a stereoselective manner. A crystalline precipitate is formed in each of the above reactions, which is an exclusive enantiospecific product, 1R, 2R α p. 1 with 2-deoxy-L-ribose (10) gives a precipitate with the exclusive 1S, 2S α p stereochemistry. With 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-deoxy-D-arabino-hexose; 7) the reaction with 1 is stereospecific, since only one isomer, β p, forms in the solution. Causes of enhanced reactivity of 1 with sugars were also studied. It was found that cyclic hydrazide analogs of 1, such as 12 and 18, are reactive, but open-chain analogs, 1,2,-diacetylhydrazine (21) and 1,2-dicarbethoxyhydrazine (22), are not. Although this reactivity assessment was done qualitatively and under restrictive reaction conditions, it still may be valuable for understanding α -effect of hydrazide nucleophiles. The prebiotic significance of our results is discussed.

  17. Sensitive and selective electrochemical detection of artemisinin based on its reaction with p-aminophenylboronic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zholudov, Yuriy T; Nsabimana, Anaclet; Xu, Guobao; Li, Jianping

    2016-09-21

    The electrochemical detection of artemisinin generally requires high oxidation potential or the use of complex electrode modification. We find that artemisinin can react with p-aminophenylboronic acid to produce easily electrochemically detectable aminophenol for the first time. By making use of the new reaction, we report an alternative method to detect artemisinin through the determination of p-aminophenol. The calibration curve for the determination of artemisinin is linear in the range of 2 μmol L(-1) to 200 μmol L(-1) with the detection limit of 0.8 μmol L(-1), which is more sensitive than other reported electrochemical methods. The relative standard deviation is 4.83% for the determination of 10 μM artemisinin. Because the oxidation potential of p-aminophenol is around 0 V, the present method is high selective. When 40 μM, 90 μM and 140 μM of artemisinin were spiked to compound naphthoquine phosphate tablet samples, the recoveries are 107.6%, 105.4% and 101.7%, respectively. This detection strategy is attractive for the detection of artemisinin and its derivatives. The finding that artemisinin can react with aromatic boronic acid has the potential to be exploited for the development of other sensors, such as fluorescence artemisinin sensors. PMID:27590543

  18. Diffusion - Reaction: The Oxidation of Silicides in Electronics and Elsewhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Heurle, F. M.

    1995-11-01

    The present article is a review of the up-to-date state of knowledge about the oxidation of silicide in film and “bulk" forms. The oxidation of silicides is analyzed with due respect to thermodynamics but the emphasis is placed on the kinetics of the process. A distinction is made between what occurs with silicide thin films used as conductors in the electronic industry, where the silicides are always in presence of excess silicon, and in the oxidation of “bulk" silicide structural parts where this condition is not encountered. Use is made of a graphical approach that was originally used to illustrate the oxidation of Si itself. The kinetic analysis provides at least a qualitative explanation of the conditions that must be met in the electronic industry to maintain the integrity of silicide layers in oxidizing atmospheres, and of the conditions that cause the occurrence of the “pest" phenomenon in structural parts. Although attention is directed mostly to silicides, it is clear that the approach and the model used are valid for other refractory compounds, so that allusions are made also to aluminides and beryllides, etc. Marker experiments to probe the motion of atoms in the silicides during oxidation are analyzed. It is suggested that the relation between electron concentrations and oxidation rates is related to the decomposition of oxygen molecules.

  19. PALLADIUM-CATALYZED OXIDATION OF STYRENE AND ALKENES IN PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS (WACKER REACTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ionic liquids in various synthetic transformations is gaining significance due to the enhanced reaction rates, potential for recycling and compatibility with various organic compounds and organometallic catalysts. Palladium-catalyzed oxidation of styrene and other alk...

  20. Carbon-coated magnetic palladium: applications in partial oxidation of alcohols and coupling reactions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic carbon supported Pd catalyst has been synthesized via in situ generation of nanoferrites and incorporation of carbon from renewable cellulose via calcination; catalyst can be used for oxidation of alcohols, amination reaction and arylation of aryl halides (cross coupli...

  1. Bulk Gold-Catalyzed Reactions of Isocyanides, Amines, and Amine N-Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Klobukowski, Erik; Angelici, Robert; Woo, Keith L.

    2012-01-26

    Bulk gold powder (5–50 μm particles) catalyzes the reactions of isocyanides with amines and amine N-oxides to produce ureas. The reaction of n-butyl isocyanide (nBu–N≡C) with di-n-propylamine and N-methylmorpholine N-oxide in acetonitrile, which was studied in the greatest detail, produced 3-butyl-1,1-dipropylurea (O═C(NHnBu)(NnPr2)) in 99% yield at 60 °C within 2 h. Sterically and electronically different isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides react successfully under these conditions. Detailed studies support a two-step mechanism that involves a gold-catalyzed reaction of adsorbed isocyanide with the amine N-oxide to form an isocyanate (RN═C═O), which rapidly reacts with the amine to give the urea product. These investigations show that bulk gold, despite its reputation for poor catalytic activity, is capable of catalyzing these reactions.

  2. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  3. Reaction mechanism for methanol oxidation on Au(1 1 1): A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuping; Jin, Peng; Zhang, Donghui; Hao, Ce; Yang, Xueming

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic reaction mechanism for methanol oxidation on Au(1 1 1) surface has been thoroughly investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations. The adsorption geometries and energies were obtained for all the adsorbates, including the reactants, the products, and various possible intermediates on the metal. According to different oxygen conditions, we propose two possible reaction pathways for methanol oxidation on Au(1 1 1): (1) HCHO esterification: the intermediate formaldehyde and methoxy couple to yield methyl formate at low oxygen coverage or without the presence of oxygen atoms; (2) HCHO oxidation: the formaldehyde is oxidized to form formate at high oxygen coverage, which further dissociates to give CO2. Our study emphasizes the critical role of oxygen coverage during the methanol oxidation reaction, and can perfectly explain the difference in product distributions observed in previous experiments.

  4. A kinetics study of the atmospheric pressure CVD reaction of silane and nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chapple-Sokol, J.D.; Giunta, C.J.; Gordon, R.G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-10-01

    A mechanistic study of oxide deposition from silane and nitrous oxide between 495{sup 0}C and 690{sup 0}C was performed in a laminar flow, cool wall reactor. Results indicate the existence of two distinct chemical pathways. At high nitrous oxide concentrations, the deposition reaction is dominated by radical chain chemistry initiated by the decomposition of N/sub 2/O. At lower N/sub 2/O concentrations, the decomposition of silane to form silylene (SiH/sub 2/) initiates the deposition. Studies of the reaction of disilane and nitrous oxide confirmed the role of SiH/sub 2/ in the deposition. Reactions involving SiH/sub 2/ are used to explain the observed growth of sub-stoichiometric oxides under low N/sub 2/O conditions.

  5. Reactive lattice oxygen sites for C sub 4 -hydrocarbon selective oxidation over. beta. -VOPO sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lashier, M.E.; Schrader, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The role of lattice oxygen species in the catalytic oxidation of n-butene to maleic anhydride has been investigated using {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} labeled with {sup 18}O. The catalyst was prepared by stoichiometric reaction of (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} with {sup 18}O{sub 2} using solid state preparation techniques. The {beta}-VOPO{sub 7/2} {sup 18}O{sub 1/2} was characterized using laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies: preferential incorporation at P-O-V sites was observed. A pulse reactor was used to react n-butane, 1-butene, 1,3-butadiene, furan, {gamma}-butyrolactone, and maleic anhydride with the catalyst in the absence of gas-phase O{sub 2}. Incorporation of {sup 18}O into the products was monitored by mass spectrometry. Specific lattice oxygen sites could be associated with the reaction pathways for selective or nonselective oxidation. The results of this study also indicate that the initial interaction of n-butane with {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} is fundamentally different from the initial interaction of olefins or oxygenated species. The approach used in this research-referred to as Isotopic Reactive-Site Mapping-is a potentially powerful method for probing the reactive lattice sites of other selective oxidation catalysts.

  6. Selective Alkane Oxidation by Manganese Oxide: Site Isolation of MnOx Chains at the Surface of MnWO4 Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Pfeifer, Verena; Jastak, Mateusz; Nielsen, Pia Kjaer; Girgsdies, Frank; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Rosowski, Frank; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2016-03-14

    The electronic and structural properties of vanadium-containing phases govern the formation of isolated active sites at the surface of these catalysts for selective alkane oxidation. This concept is not restricted to vanadium oxide. The deliberate use of hydrothermal techniques can turn the typical combustion catalyst manganese oxide into a selective catalyst for oxidative propane dehydrogenation. Nanostructured, crystalline MnWO4 serves as the support that stabilizes a defect-rich MnOx surface phase. Oxygen defects can be reversibly replenished and depleted at the reaction temperature. Terminating MnOx zigzag chains on the (010) crystal planes are suspected to bear structurally site-isolated oxygen defects that account for the unexpectedly good performance of the catalyst in propane activation. PMID:26913704

  7. Fast and Efficient Oxidative Cycloreversion Reaction of a π-Extended Photochromic Terarylene.

    PubMed

    Calupitan, Jan Patrick; Nakashima, Takuya; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-11

    We report herein a dramatic improvement in the kinetics and efficiency of an oxidative cycloreversion reaction of photochromic dithiazolylthiazoles. The cycloreversion reaction of a colored isomer of dithiazolylthiazole proceeds not only by photo-irradiation, but also through chemical oxidation with a net efficiency far exceeding 100 % owing to a chain reaction mechanism. By introducing aromatic groups on the reactive carbon atoms at the ends of a photoreactive 6π system in a dithiazolylthiazole, the net bleaching reaction rates were increased by up to 1300-fold, and turnover rates increased by two orders of magnitude. Based on a combination of classical kinetic analyses and DFT calculations, we attribute this improvement to acceleration of the rate-determining step to produce the active species in the chain-reaction oxidative cycloreversion. PMID:27380748

  8. Oxides reactions with a high-chrome sesquioxide refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Collins, W. Keith; Peck, M.

    2001-10-01

    In slagging coal-gasifier systems, the combination of oxides present as impurities in coal and combustion temperatures that can exceed 1650 degrees C restrict the use of liner materials in the coal combustion chambers to refractories. In this study, the slag-refractory interactions of a new high chrome sesquioxide refractory was characterized. High-temperature cup tests showed that the molten oxides infused into the refractory and that the sesquioxide refractory reacts with the oxides in a manner similar to spinel phase refractories. Studies of the coal slag’s individual oxide components showed CaO reacts with the chrome refractory to form a low melting Ca(CrO2)2. FeO reacts with the sesquioxide to form a interface layer of (Cr,Fe)3O4 spinel phase. Results of this study now make it possible to design studies for improving corrosion resistance to increase refractory life.

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF SURFACE REDOX REACTIONS WITH MANGANESE OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox reactions involving soil minerals and materials are important processes in environmental chemistry, but unfortunately they only have been characterized in the solution phase. he lack of a suitable method has prevented investigations of the mineral surface component of redox...

  10. Polyhedral Interpolation for Optimal Reaction Control System Jet Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gefert, Leon P.; Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is described for interpolating optimal values for spacecraft Reaction Control System jet firing duty cycles. The algorithm uses the symmetrical geometry of the optimal solution to reduce the number of calculations and data storage requirements to a level that enables implementation on the small real time flight control systems used in spacecraft. The process minimizes acceleration direction errors, maximizes control authority, and minimizes fuel consumption.

  11. Photo-SRM: laser-induced dissociation improves detection selectivity of Selected Reaction Monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Simon, Romain; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Redon, Sébastien; Ayhan, Mehmet Menaf; Darbour, Florence; Chambert, Stéphane; Bretonnière, Yann; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2011-11-30

    Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) carried out on triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers coupled to liquid chromatography has been a reference method to develop quantitative analysis of small molecules in biological or environmental matrices for years and is currently emerging as a promising tool in clinical proteomic. However, sensitive assays in complex matrices are often hampered by the presence of co-eluted compounds that share redundant transitions with the target species. On-the-fly better selection of the precursor ion by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) or increased quadrupole resolution is one way to escape from interferences. In the present work we document the potential interest of substituting classical gas-collision activation mode by laser-induced dissociation in the visible wavelength range to improve the specificity of the fragmentation step. Optimization of the laser beam pathway across the different quadrupoles to ensure high photo-dissociation yield in Q2 without detectable fragmentation in Q1 was assessed with sucrose tagged with a push-pull chromophore. Next, the proof of concept that photo-SRM ensures more specific detection than does conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based SRM was carried out with oxytocin peptide. Oxytocin was derivatized by the thiol-reactive QSY® 7 C(5)-maleimide quencher on cysteine residues to shift its absorption property into the visible range. Photo-SRM chromatograms of tagged oxytocin spiked in whole human plasma digest showed better detection specificity and sensitivity than CID, that resulted in extended calibration curve linearity. We anticipate that photo-SRM might significantly improve the limit of quantification of classical SRM-based assays targeting cysteine-containing peptides. PMID:22002689

  12. Bond-selected chemistry: Vibrational state control of photodissociation and bimolecular reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F.

    1996-08-01

    Controlling chemical reactions with light rests on the idea of exciting a vibration that becomes the reaction coordinate in subsequent chemistry. Vibrational excitation techniques such as infrared or stimulated Raman excitation of fundamental vibrations or vibrational overtone excitation of higher levels permit the preferential cleavage of a bond in a photodissociation or bimolecular reaction. The key to bond-selected chemistry is the initial preparation of a suitable vibrational state followed, in the case of bond-selected photodissociation, by electronic excitation or, in the case of bond-selected bimolecular reaction, by collision with a reactive atom. Such experiments demonstrate bond-selected chemistry, permit detailed comparison to theory, and reveal general principles of vibrational state control of chemical reactions. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Influence of the support on the activity and selectivity of high dispersion Fe catalysts in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cagnoli, M.V.; Marchetti, S.G.; Gallegos, N.G.; Alvarez, A.M.; Mercader, R.C.; Yeramian, A.A. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata )

    1990-05-01

    In order to study the influence of the support on high dispersion catalysts used for the CO hydrogenation reaction, two catalysts, Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were prepared by the dry impregnation method. Selective chemisorption of CO, volumetric oxidation, and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to determine the Fe species present as well as the metallic crystal size, the degree of dispersion, and the reduction percentage. The presence of small Fe{sup 0} crystallites with high dispersion was determined in both catalysts. Reaction rates were measured in a differential reactor and significant differences, about one order of magnitude less for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} than for the SiO{sub 2} supported catalysts, were found in the methane turnover frequencies. They are attributed to the interaction between the metal and the supports. The selectivity differences is also discussed in connection with distinct surface properties.

  14. New Insights into the Diels-Alder Reaction of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Patrick P; Kuss, Christian; Schougaard, Steen B; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Siaj, Mohamed

    2016-04-18

    Graphene oxide is regarded as a major precursor for graphene-based materials. The development of graphene oxide based derivatives with new functionalities requires a thorough understanding of its chemical reactivity, especially for canonical synthetic methods such as the Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Diels-Alder reaction has been successfully extended with graphene oxide as a source of diene by using maleic anhydride as a dienophile, thereby outlining the presence of the cis diene present in the graphene oxide framework. This reaction provides fundamental information for understanding the exact structure and chemical nature of graphene oxide. On the basis of high-resolution (13) C-SS NMR spectra, we show evidence for the formation of new sp(3) carbon centers covalently bonded to graphene oxide following hydrolysis of the reaction product. DFT calculations are also used to show that the presence of a cis dihydroxyl and C vacancy on the surface of graphene oxide are promoting the reaction with significant negative reaction enthalpies. PMID:26953926

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-11-30

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane was investigated. Unpromoted and promoted catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than the other metals (Rh, Li, K, Na, Zn, and Sn) for the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study. The effectiveness of the promoter increased with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. Among the catalysts tested, the Cu1Ce3 catalyst promoted with 1 weight % Mn was found to be the best catalyst for the SCR of NO with methane. This catalyst was subjected to long-term testing at the facilities of our industrial partner TDA Research. TDA report indicated that the performance of this catalyst did not deteriorate during 100 hours of operation and the activity and selectivity of the catalyst was not affected by the presence of SO{sub 2}. The conversions obtained by TDA were significantly lower than those obtained at Hampton University due to the transport limitations on the reaction rate in the TDA reactor, in which 1/8th inch pellets were used while the Hampton University reactor contained 250-425-{micro}m catalyst particles. The selected catalyst was also tested at the TDA facilities with high-sulfur heavy oil as the reducing agent. Depending on the heavy oil flow rate, up to 100% NO conversions were obtained. The

  16. Heterogeneous photochemical reactions of a propylene-nitrogen dioxide-metal oxide-dry air system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ibusuki, Takashi

    Photochemical reactions of a C 3H 6-NO 2-air system in the presence of metal oxide were investigated. The metal oxides showing strong photooxidation activity were found to be n-type semiconductor oxides with the energy band gap around 3 eV. Formation of cyano-compounds (HCN and CH 3CN) was also observed and the activity can be explained in terms of the adsorptivity of NO onto metal oxides. Coalfired fly ash as a model of mixed metal oxides was also examined and their photocatalytic action was discussed.

  17. Size-dependent selectivity and activity of silver nanoclusters in the partial oxidation of propylene to propylene oxide and acrolein : A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, L M.; Lee, S.; Sell, K.; Barcaro, G.; Fortunelli, A.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Barke, I.; von Oeynhausen, V.; Lei, Y.; Meyer, R. J.; Alonso, J. A.; Fraile-Rodriguez, A.; Kleibert, A.; Giorgio, S.; Henry, C. R.; Heinz Meiwes-Broer, K.; Vadja, S.; Univ. de Valladolid; Univ. Rostock; IPCF-CNR; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Swiss Light Source; CINaM-CNRS and Aix-Marseille Univ.; Yale Univ.

    2011-02-02

    Model silver nanocatalysts between 9 and 23 nm in size were prepared by size-selected cluster deposition from a free cluster beam on amorphous alumina films and their size-dependent catalytic performance studied in the partial oxidation of propylene under realistic reaction conditions. Smaller clusters preferentially produced acrolein, while the 23 nm particles were considerably more selective towards the formation of propylene oxide, at reaction rates far exceeding those previously reported for larger silver particles. The activity of clusters dropped significantly with increasing particle size. First-principle calculations, of the activation energies for oxygen adsorption and its dissociation, at variable surface coverage yielded surface energies which resulted in particle shapes resembling the experimentally observed shapes of partially oxidized silver clusters. The calculated activation barriers for propylene oxide and acrolein formation on various facets and on the edges of the nanoparticles provided detailed information about the energetics of the competing reaction pathways. The size- and corresponding morphology dependent theoretical activity and selectivity are in good accord with experimental observations.

  18. Directing reaction pathways by catalyst active-site selection using self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pang, Simon H; Schoenbaum, Carolyn A; Schwartz, Daniel K; Medlin, J Will

    2013-01-01

    One key route for controlling reaction selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is to prepare catalysts that exhibit only specific types of sites required for desired product formation. Here we show that alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers with varying surface densities can be used to tune selectivity to desired hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation products during the reaction of furfural on supported palladium catalysts. Vibrational spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the selectivity improvement is achieved by controlling the availability of specific sites for the hydrogenation of furfural on supported palladium catalysts through the selection of an appropriate alkanethiolate. Increasing self-assembled monolayer density by controlling the steric bulk of the organic tail ligand restricts adsorption on terrace sites and dramatically increases selectivity to desired products furfuryl alcohol and methylfuran. This technique of active-site selection simultaneously serves both to enhance selectivity and provide insight into the reaction mechanism. PMID:24025780

  19. Controlling Catalytic Selectivity via Adsorbate Orientation on the Surface: From Furfural Deoxygenation to Reactions of Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Pang, Simon H; Medlin, J Will

    2015-04-16

    Specificity to desired reaction products is the key challenge in designing solid catalysts for reactions involving addition or removal of oxygen to/from organic reactants. This challenge is especially acute for reactions involving multifunctional compounds such as biomass-derived aromatic molecules (e.g., furfural) and functional epoxides (e.g., 1-epoxy-3-butene). Recent surface-level studies have shown that there is a relationship between adsorbate surface orientation and reaction selectivity in the hydrogenation pathways of aromatic oxygenates and the ring-opening or ring-closing pathways of epoxides. Control of the orientation of reaction intermediates on catalytic surfaces by modifying the surface or near-surface environment has been shown to be a promising method of affecting catalytic selectivity for reactions of multifunctional molecules. In this Perspective, we review recent model studies aimed at understanding the surface chemistry for these reactions and studies that utilize this insight to rationally design supported catalysts. PMID:26263134

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-05-31

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures

  1. Investigating the mechanism of the selective hydrogenation reaction of cinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Laicai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CAL) belongs to the group of aromatic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes; the selective hydrogenation of CAL plays an important role in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Using Ptn clusters as catalytic models, we studied the selective hydrogenation reaction mechanism for CAL catalyzed by Ptn (n = 6, 10, 14, 18) clusters by means of B3LYP in density functional theory at the 6-31+ G(d) level (the LanL2DZ extra basis set was used for the Pt atom). The rationality of the transition state was proved by vibration frequency analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinate computation. Moreover, atoms in molecules theory and nature bond orbital theory were applied to discuss the interaction among orbitals and the bonding characteristics. The results indicate that three kinds of products, namely 3-phenylpropyl aldehyde, 3-phenyl allyl alcohol and cinnamyl alcohol, are produced in the selective hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by Ptn clusters; each pathway possesses two reaction channels. Ptn clusters are more likely to catalyze the activation and hydrogenation of the C = O bond in CAL molecules, eventually producing cinnamic alcohol, which proves that Ptn clusters have a strong reaction selectivity to catalyze CAL. The reaction selectivity of the catalyzer cluster is closely related to the size of the Ptn cluster, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity. Graphical Abstract The reaction mechanism for the selective hydrogenation reaction ofcinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters was studied by densityfunctional theory. The reactionselectivity of cluster catalyzer was concluded to be closely related to the size of Ptn clusters, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity. PMID:27444877

  2. Conversion Reaction-Based Oxide Nanomaterials for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seung-Ho; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Sung, Yung-Eun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-04-01

    Developing high-energy-density electrodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) is of primary importance to meet the challenges in electronics and automobile industries in the near future. Conversion reaction-based transition metal oxides are attractive candidates for LIB anodes because of their high theoretical capacities. This review summarizes recent advances on the development of nanostructured transition metal oxides for use in lithium ion battery anodes based on conversion reactions. The oxide materials covered in this review include oxides of iron, manganese, cobalt, copper, nickel, molybdenum, zinc, ruthenium, chromium, and tungsten, and mixed metal oxides. Various kinds of nanostructured materials including nanowires, nanosheets, hollow structures, porous structures, and oxide/carbon nanocomposites are discussed in terms of their LIB anode applications. PMID:26627913

  3. Ceramic oxide reactions with V2O5 and SO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Williams, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic oxides are not inert in combustion environments, but can react with, inter alia, SO3, and Na2SO4 to yield low melting mixed sulfate eutectics, and with vanadium compounds to produce vanadates. Assuming ceramic degradation to become severe only when molten phases are generated in the surface salt (as found for metallic hot corrosion), the reactivity of ceramic oxides can be quantified by determining the SO3 partial pressure necessary for molten mixed sulfate formation with Na2SO3. Vanadium pentoxide is an acidic oxide that reacts with Na2O, SO3, and the different ceramic oxides in a series of Lux-Flood type of acid-base displacement reactions. To elucidate the various possible vanadium compound-ceramic oxide interactions, a study was made of the reactions of a matrix involving, on the one axis, ceramix oxides of increasing acidity, and on the other axis, vanadium compounds of increasing acidity. Resistance to vanadium compound reaction increased as the oxide acidity increased. Oxides more acidic than ZrO2 displaced V2O5. Examination of Y2O3- and CeO2-stabilized ZrO2 sintered ceramics which were degraded in 700 C NaVO3 has shown good agreement with the reactions predicted above, except that the CeO2-ZrO2 ceramic appears to be inexplicably degraded by NaVO3.

  4. Copper N-Heterocyclic Carbene: A Catalyst for Aerobic Oxidation or Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Le-Wu; Han, Lei; Xing, Ping; Jiang, Biao

    2015-12-18

    Copper N-heterocyclic carbene complexes can be readily used as catalysts for both aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and reduction of imines to amines. Our methodology is universal for aromatic substrates and shows versatile tolerance to potential cascade reactions. A one-pot tandem synthetic strategy could afford useful imines and secondary amines via an oxidation-reduction strategy. PMID:26633757

  5. Highly-Efficient Buried-Oxide-Waveguide Laser by selective Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GAO,YING

    2000-02-15

    An edge-emitting buried-oxide waveguide (BOW) laser structure employing lateral selective oxidation of AlGaAs layers above and below the active region for waveguiding and current confinement is presented. This laser configuration has the potential for very small lateral optical mode size and high current confinement and is well suited for integrated optics applications where threshold current and overall efficiency are paramount. Optimization of the waveguide design, oxide layer placement, and bi-parabolic grading of the heterointerfaces on both sides of the AlGaAs oxidation layers has yielded 95% external differential quantum efficiency and 40% wall-plug efficiency from a laser that is very simple to fabricate and does not require epitaxial regrowth of any kind.

  6. The gas chromatographic analysis of the reaction products of the partial isobutane oxidation as a two phase process.

    PubMed

    Willms, Thomas; Kryk, Holger; Hampel, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The partial oxidation of isobutane to t-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) has been studied analytically for the first time as a two-phase process in a capillary micro reactor. In order to obtain detailed information on products, yields, selectivities and reaction pathways, the products have been investigated by GC/MS. An Rxi-5ms column and a PTV-injector have been used to analyze the liquid products. TBHP, di-t-butyl peroxide (DTBP), t-butanol (TBA), and propanone as main products as well as further by-products e.g. methanal, isopropanol, isobutanol and isobutanal in minor quantities have been identified by MS. The liquid products have been obtained by quenching the reaction and vaporizing the isobutane afterwards by pressure reduction using a mass flow controller allowing a constant mass flow. For all liquid reaction products calibrations, a validation of the method including limits of quantification and detection as well as calculation of uncertainties has been performed. The results have been applied successfully for the investigation of the selectivities of the main products (TBHP, DTBP, TBA, propanone) of the isobutane oxidation. In the frame of the analytical investigation of this reaction a correlation coefficient of r(2)>0.999 for TBHP and DTBP, which is necessary to perform a validation, has been obtained for the first time. The gaseous phase has been analyzed using a GASPRO column, a DEANS switch, a mole sieve column and a TCD detector. Apart from the gaseous reactants, isobutene has been found. PMID:27378248

  7. Lipid oxidation volatiles absent in milk after selected ultrasound processing.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Pablo; Torkamani, Amir Ehsan; Leong, Thomas; Kolb, Veronika; Watkins, Peter; Ajlouni, Said; Singh, Tanoj Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonic processing can suit a number of potential applications in the dairy industry. However, the impact of ultrasound treatment on milk stability during storage has not been fully explored under wider ranges of frequencies, specific energies and temperature applications. The effect of ultrasonication on lipid oxidation was investigated in various types of milk. Four batches of raw milk (up to 2L) were sonicated at various frequencies (20, 400, 1000, 1600 and 2000kHz), using different temperatures (4, 20, 45 and 63°C), sonication times and ultrasound energy inputs up to 409kJ/kg. Pasteurized skim milk was also sonicated at low and high frequency for comparison. In selected experiments, non-sonicated and sonicated samples were stored at 4°C and were drawn periodically up to 14days for SPME-GCMS analysis. The cavitational yield, characterized in all systems in water, was highest between 400kHz and 1000kHz. Volatile compounds from milk lipid oxidation were detected and exceeded their odor threshold values at 400kHz and 1000kHz at specific energies greater than 271kJ/kg in raw milk. However, no oxidative volatile compounds were detected below 230kJ/kg in batch systems at the tested frequencies under refrigerated conditions. Skim milk showed a lower energy threshold for oxidative volatile formation. The same oxidative volatiles were detected after various passes of milk through a 0.3L flow cell enclosing a 20kHz horn and operating above 90kJ/kg. This study showed that lipid oxidation in milk can be controlled by decreasing the sonication time and the temperature in the system depending on the fat content in the sample among other factors. PMID:24704065

  8. 4-N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine promoted selective oxidation of methyl aromatics with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Gao, Jin; Wang, Feng; Xu, Jie

    2012-01-01

    4-N,N-Dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as catalyst in combination with benzyl bromide was developed for the selective oxidation of methyl aromatics. DMAP exhibited higher catalytic activity than other pyridine analogues, such as 4-carboxypyridine, 4-cyanopyridine and pyridine. The sp3 hybrid carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds of different methyl aromatics were successfully oxygenated with molecular oxygen. The real catalyst is due to the formation of a pyridine onium salt from the bromide and DMAP. The onium salt was well characterized by NMR and the reaction mechanism was discussed. PMID:22466855

  9. The Psychophysiological Reactions of Film Viewers While Viewing Selected Cinemagraphic Elements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeltzer, Dennis K.

    This study focused on the psychophysiological reactions of viewers seeing such selected cinemagraphic elements as varying camera distances, tracking shots, panning shots, and zooming shots. Subjects (N=29), randomly selected from introductory speech courses, viewed five films that varied in the presence or absence of the selected filmic elements.…

  10. Impact-Driven Thermite Reactions with Iodine Pentoxide and Silver Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R.; Bless, S.; Pantoya, M.

    2011-04-01

    Thermite reactions using aluminum (Al) fuel and either iodine pentoxide (I2O5) or silver oxide (Ag2O) were initiated by high-velocity impact or thermal initiation and examined for their flame propagation behavior. In the impact-ignition experiments, the Al-Ag2O reaction produced more energy than the Al-I2O5 reaction; in the thermal-ignition experiments, the I2O5 reaction produced higher flame propagation rates (1,305 m/s compared with 531 m/s). The energy released from impact-initiated reactions is significantly enhanced by reducing the size of the oxide particles. Results suggest that the reaction propagation mechanisms may be the same, even though ignition is spurred by two different stimuli (mechanically induced compaction versus thermal).

  11. Analysis of selected allergic reactions among psoriatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Filipowska-Grońska, Agata; Kalemba, Michał; Krajewska, Anna; Grzanka, Alicja; Bożek, Andrzej; Jarząb, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a chronic and recurrent inflammatory skin disease. The aetiology is still unknown in spite of numerous scientific researches. There is very little evidence which does not provide enough knowledge about allergic reactions in psoriatic patients. Based on the fact that the epidermal barrier damage allows different allergen types to penetrate into deep layers of epidermis and skin, we can assume that it may lead to immunological reactions. Aim To investigate the allergic reaction indicators and hypersensitivity assessment about contact, inhalant and food allergens. The results were analysed with regard to clinical disease indicators and progression stage of dermal lesions. Material and methods Eighty patients with psoriasis were examined. The concentration of total IgE antibodies and allergen specific IgE antibodies (asIgE) were analysed. Standard epidermal tests and atopy patch tests were performed. All the patients were estimated for their dermatological condition based on the PASI scale. The control group consisted of 50 patients without psoriasis and allergic history. Results Significantly higher concentration of total E immunoglobulin has been stated in the patients with psoriasis. Higher concentrations of specific allergic IgE antibodies were more often observed in the examined group but the most frequently observed values were present in 1–3 class. The most common airborne allergens were birch, artemisia, timothy and rye pollens. There have not been any significant statistical differences in the case of positive epidermal test results. Conclusions There is slightly expressed hypersensitivity in psoriatic patients. This hypersensitivity degree correlates with the intensification of symptoms. PMID:26985174

  12. Structure sensitive selectivity of the NO-CO reaction over rhodium single crystal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, C.H.F.; Belton, D.N.; Schmieg, S.J.

    1995-05-01

    The control of automotive emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) in passenger cars is accomplished by a heavy reliance on after-treatment of the engine exhaust using catalytic converters that contain a mixture of platinum (Pt), rhodium (Rh), and sometimes palladium (Pd). In this paper we examine the effect of surface structure on the NO-CO activity and selectivity by comparing the reactivity of Rh(110) and Rh(111) single crystal catalysts. Selectivity for the two possible nitrogen containing products from NO reduction, N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}, is particularly interesting. Here we report that the selectivity of the NO-CO reaction is quite sensitive to the structure of the Rh catalyst metal surface. (A more complete description of these studies will be published elsewhere.) The more open Rh(110) surface tends to make significantly less N{sub 2}O than Rh(111) under virtually all conditions that we probed with these experiments. Furthermore, under the conditions used in this study, the NO-CO activity over Rh(110), as measured by the rate of NO loss, is somewhat faster than over Rh(111) with a lower apparent activation energy (Ea), 27.6 vs. 35.4 kcal/mol. We attribute these results to the greater tendency of the more open (110) surface to dissociate NO. Notably, more facile NO dissociation on Rh(110) would lead to greater steady-state concentrations of adsorbed N-atoms; thus, the (110) surface favors N-atom recombination over the surface reaction between adsorbed NO and N-atoms to make N{sub 2}O. In support of this, post-reaction surface analysis shows only NO on the Rh(111) surface while the Rh(110) surface contains predominantly N-atoms and much lower concentrations of adsorbed NO. NO dissociation on Rh(110) is more favorable than on Rh(111), in part, because it is less-severely poisoned by high surface concentrations of NO. In addition, the more-open (110) surface may be intrinsically more active for the elementary process of dissociating adsorbed NO.

  13. Determination of carbon by the oxidation reduction reaction with chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashkovich, L.; Kuteynikov, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Free carbon was determined in silicon and boron carbides in ash, oxides, and other materials by oxidation to carbon dioxide with a mixture of K2Cr2O7 + H2SO4. The determination was made from the amount of CR(6) consumed, by adding excess Mohr's salt and titrating with a standard solution of KMnO4. The amount of Cr(6) self reduced was determined in a blank test. Optimum oxidation and conditions were achieved when the volumes of 5% k2Cr2Oz and H2SO4 were equal. The mixture was boiled for 1-2 hours using a reflex condenser. The volume should not be reduced, in order to avoid an increase in the sulfuric acid concentration. The relative error was 4-7% for 0.005-0.04 g C and less than or equal to 3.5% for 0.1 g C.

  14. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen oxidation reaction in solid oxide fuel cell anode based on species territory adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    A modified reaction model of hydrogen oxidation around a triple phase boundary (TPB) is proposed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a Ni/oxide ion conductor cermet anode containing proton conductor particles in order to describe the mechanism of anode overpotential reduction. In this model, three kinds of TPBs consisting of nickel metal, oxide ion conductors, proton conductors, and gas phases were considered. It was assumed that the chemical species could be adsorbed within a finite narrow area on each material around the TPB. The reaction rate in the anode was controlled by the surface reaction between the adsorbed hydrogen and adsorbed oxygen; all other reactions took place under chemical equilibrium. Based on the reaction model, analytical expressions of current density with oxygen activity and anode overpotential with current density could be obtained. The latter could combine the anode overpotential at low- and high-current-density regions, which were conventionally expressed independently. The analytical results were in good agreement with the experimental results for both the conventional anode and the new anode incorporating a proton conductor. Especially, the anode overpotential reduction could be explained by the additional supply of adsorbed hydrogen from the proton conductor to the TPB.

  15. Fluorine-Doped and Partially Oxidized Tantalum Carbides as Nonprecious Metal Electrocatalysts for Methanol Oxidation Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xin; He, Chunyong; Zhong, Chengyong; Chen, Yuanping; Jiang, San Ping; Shen, Pei Kang

    2016-03-16

    A nonprecious metal electrocatalyst based on fluorine-doped tantalum carbide with an oxidative surface on graphitized carbon (TaCx FyOz/(g)C) is developed by using a simple one-pot in situ ion exchange and adsorption method, and the TaCxFyOz/(g)C shows superior performance and durability for methanol oxidation reaction and extreme tolerance to CO poisoning in acidic media. PMID:26779940

  16. Synthesis of multisubstituted pyrroles from doubly activated cyclopropanes using an iron-mediated oxidation domino reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junlong; Liu, Qingfeng; Liu, Tongxin; Zhang, Guisheng

    2014-11-21

    An alternative route has been developed for the construction of multisubstituted pyrrole derivatives from readily available, doubly activated cyclopropanes and anilines using an iron-mediated oxidation domino reaction (i.e., sequential ring-opening, cyclization, and dehydrogenation reactions). This reaction uses readily available reactants and is tolerant of a broad range of substrates, with the desired products being formed in good to excellent yields. PMID:25330125

  17. Irrelevance of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in the Methanol Oxidation Reaction on a PtRu Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Jun; Tong, YuYe J

    2015-08-01

    Based on detailed in situ attenuated total-reflection-surface-enhanced IR reflection absorption spectroscopy (ATR-SEIRAS) studies of the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on Ru/Pt thin film and commercial Johnson-Matthey PtRu/C, a revised MOR enhancement mechanism is proposed in which CO on Pt sites is irrelevant but instead Pt-Ru boundary sites catalyze the oxygen insertion reaction that leads to the formation of formate and enhances the direct reaction pathway. PMID:26148459

  18. Selectively oxidized vertical-cavity laser performance and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-02-01

    The authors discuss revolutionary performance advances in selectively oxidized vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), which have enabled low operating power laser diodes appropriate for aerospace applications. Incorporating buried oxide layers converted from AIGaAs layers within the laser cavity produces enhanced optical and electrical confinement enabling superior laser performance, such as high efficiency and modulation bandwidth. VCSELs also shown to be viable over varied environmental conditions such as ambient temperature and ionized radiation. The development of novel VCSEL technologies for advanced system applications is also described. Two dimensional individually addressable VCSEL arrays exhibit uniform threshold and operating characteristics. Bottom emitting 850 nm VCSEL arrays fabricated using wafer fusion are also reported.

  19. Graphitic-Carbon Layers on Oxides: Toward Stable Heterogeneous Catalysts for Biomass Conversion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haifeng; Schwartz, Thomas J; Andersen, Nalin I; Dumesic, James A; Datye, Abhaya K

    2015-06-26

    Conversion of biomass-derived molecules involves catalytic reactions under harsh conditions in the liquid phase (e.g., temperatures of 250 °C and possibly under either acidic or basic conditions). Conventional oxide-supported catalysts undergo pore structure collapse and surface area reduction leading to deactivation under these conditions. Here we demonstrate an approach to deposit graphitic carbon to protect the oxide surface. The heterogeneous catalysts supported on the graphitic carbon/oxide composite exhibit excellent stability (even under acidic conditions) for biomass conversion reactions. PMID:25973732

  20. In situ observation of surface species on iridium oxide nanoparticles during the oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Casalongue, Hernan G; Ng, May Ling; Kaya, Sarp; Friebel, Daniel; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nilsson, Anders

    2014-07-01

    An iridium oxide nanoparticle electrocatalyst under oxygen evolution reaction conditions was probed in situ by ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under OER conditions, iridium undergoes a change in oxidation state from Ir(IV) to Ir(V) that takes place predominantly at the surface of the catalyst. The chemical change in iridium is coupled to a decrease in surface hydroxide, providing experimental evidence which strongly suggests that the oxygen evolution reaction on iridium oxide occurs through an OOH-mediated deprotonation mechanism. PMID:24889896

  1. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts. PMID:26808458

  2. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  3. Selective Silicidation of Co Using Silane or Disilane for Anti-Oxidation Barrier Layer in Cu Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Suguru; Hirai, Rika; Komiyama, Hiroshi; Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    2004-09-01

    Aiming to realize a conductive passivation layer for copper interconnection, the solid-gas reactions of cobalt films with silane and with disilane to form cobalt silicides are experimentally investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that cobalt silicides layers of up to 6 nm thickness can be selectively formed in the reaction at 473-673 K within 5 min without detectable silicon deposition on silicon dioxide, a common inter-metal dielectric layer. Rapid thermal oxidation experiments revealed that the silicided cobalt layers had better anti-oxidation performance than untreated cobalt layers, and the effect of silicidation was to suppress copper out-diffusion through the cobalt layers. Because cobalt-based alloys can be selectively electroless-plated on copper, selective silicidation of cobalt layers will be easily incorporated into device processing.

  4. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  5. Selective oxidation of carbon monoxide in fuel processor gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasilp, Akkarat

    The trace amount of CO present in the hydrogen-rich stream coming from fuel reformers poisons the platinum anode electrode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and reduces the power output. Removal of low levels of CO present in the reformed gas must take place before the gas enters the fuel cell. The tolerable level of CO is around 10 ppm. We investigated the performance of single step sol-gel prepared Pt/alumina catalyst and Pt supported on sol gel made alumina. The effect of water vapor, carbon dioxide, CO and oxygen concentrations, temperature, and Pt loading on the activity and selectivity are presented. Our results showed that a 2%Pt/alumina sol-gel catalyst can selectively oxide CO down to a few ppm with constant selectivity and high space velocity. Water vapor in the feed increases the activity of catalysts dramatically and in the absence of water vapor, CO2 in the feed stream decreases the activity of the catalysts significantly. We also found that the presence of potassium as an electron donor did not improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalyst to the selective CO oxidation. For Pt supported on sol gel made alumina, we found that the combination of CO2 and H2O in the gas feed has a strong effect on selective CO oxidation over Pt/Al2O3. It could be a positive or negative effect depending upon Pt loading in the catalyst. With high Pt loading, the CO2 effect tends to dominate the H2O effect resulting in the decrease in CO conversion. Moreover, the presence of CeO2 as an oxygen storage compound promotes the performance of Pt supported on alumina at low temperature ˜90°C when Pt loading was 5%. Amongst the examined catalysts, the 5%Pt/15%CeO2/Al 2O3 catalyst showed the highest selectivity, with high CO conversion at a low temperature ˜90°C. The beneficial effect of the addition of CeO2 is most likely due to spillover of O2 from CeO2 to Pt at the Pt sites at the interface of Pt and CeO 2.

  6. A facile process to prepare copper oxide thin films as solar selective absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiudi; Miao, Lei; Xu, Gang; Lu, Limei; Su, Zhanmin; Wang, Ning; Tanemura, Sakae

    2011-10-01

    Copper oxide thin films as solar selective absorbers were conveniently prepared by one-step chemical conversion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis-NIR spectra and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were employed to characterize the composition, structure and optical properties of thin films. The results indicated that the composition, structure and optical properties of thin films were greatly influenced by reaction temperature, time and concentration of NaOH. When reaction temperature was fixed at 40 °C, the as-prepared films consist of pure cubic Cu 2O. The surface morphology of thin films was changed from square-like structure (reaction time ≤ 25 min) to porous belt-like structure (reaction time ≥ 30 min) with the elongation of reaction time. While for thin films prepared at 60 °C and 80 °C, single Cu 2O was observed after 5 min reaction. When reaction time is longer than 5 min, CuO appears and the content of CuO is increasing with the elongation of reaction time. With the increase of reaction temperature, the belt-like structure was easily formed for 60 °C/10 min and 80 °C/5 min. Decreasing concentration of NaOH also could result in the formation of CuO and porous belt-like structure. Simultaneously, the film thickness is increasing with the increase of reaction time, temperature and concentration. Films containing CuO with belt-like structure exhibited high absorptance (>0.9), and the emissivity of films increased with elongation of reaction time. Combination of the composition, structure and optical properties, it can be deduced that the porous belt-like structure like as a light trap can greatly enhance absorbance ( α), while the composition, thickness and roughness of thin films can greatly influence the emissivity ( ɛ). The highest photo-thermal conversion efficiency was up to 0.86 ( α/ ɛ = 0.94/0.08) for thin films prepared at 80 °C/5 min, which proved that the CuO x thin films can be served as

  7. The reactions of imidogen with nitric oxide and molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Melius, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    Using potential energy surface information from BAC-MP4 calculations and statistical-dynamical methods, we have calculated the branching fraction for the NH + NO reaction, NH + NO {r arrow} N{sub 2} + H (1) NH + NO {r arrow} N{sub 2}O + H (2). We find that reaction (2) dominates over the entire temperature range considered, 300 K < T < 3500 K, with f=k{sub 1}/(k{sub 1} + K{sub 2}) varying from about 0.07 at room temperature to about 0.20 at 3500 K. In addition, we have calculated rate coefficients for the two-channel process, NH + O{sub 2} {r arrow} HNO + O (3) NH + O{sub 2} {r arrow} NO + OH (4). In this case we find that reaction (4) dominates at low temperature, reaction (3) at high temperature. All these results are discussed in terms of the experimental results available and compared with previous theoretical investigations where appropriate. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The reactions of imidogen with nitric oxide and molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Melius, C.F.

    1991-12-31

    Using potential energy surface information from BAC-MP4 calculations and statistical-dynamical methods, we have calculated the branching fraction for the NH + NO reaction, NH + NO {r_arrow} N{sub 2} + H (1) NH + NO {r_arrow} N{sub 2}O + H (2). We find that reaction (2) dominates over the entire temperature range considered, 300 K < T < 3500 K, with f=k{sub 1}/(k{sub 1} + K{sub 2}) varying from about 0.07 at room temperature to about 0.20 at 3500 K. In addition, we have calculated rate coefficients for the two-channel process, NH + O{sub 2} {r_arrow} HNO + O (3) NH + O{sub 2} {r_arrow} NO + OH (4). In this case we find that reaction (4) dominates at low temperature, reaction (3) at high temperature. All these results are discussed in terms of the experimental results available and compared with previous theoretical investigations where appropriate. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  10. Vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen industrial catalysts for C/sub 4/ hydrocarbon selective oxidation to maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Wenig, R.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride by vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen (V-P-O) industrial catalysts varying in P-to-V ratio has been studied in a fixed bed integral reactor system. Catalyst characterization studies including x-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and BET surface area measurements were used. A strong effect of P-to-V synthesis ratio on catalyst structure, catalyst morphology, vanadium oxidation state, and reactivity in n-butane selective oxidation was observed. A slight ''excess'' of catalyst phosphorus (P/V = 1.1 catalyst) was found to stabilize an active and selective (VO)/sub 2/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/ phase. The mechanism of n-butane selective oxidation to maleic anhydride was studied by in situ infrared spectroscopy using n-butane, 1-butene, 1,3-butadiene, crotyl alcohol, maleic acid, crotonic acid, and maleic anhydride feeds. During paraffin selective oxidation, highly reactive olefin species and maleic acid were observed on the surfaces of V-P-O catalysts. Further evidence in support of conjugated or possibly strained olefin and maleic acid reaction intermediates in n-butane and 1-butene partial oxidation to maleic anhydride was gathered.

  11. Entropic factors provide unusual reactivity and selectivity in epoxide-opening reactions promoted by water

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Jeffery A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the myriad of selective enzymatic reactions that occur in water, chemists have rarely capitalized on the unique properties of this medium to govern selectivity in reactions. Here we report detailed mechanistic investigations of a water-promoted reaction that displays high selectivity for what is generally a disfavored product. A combination of structural and kinetic data indicates not only that synergy between substrate and water suppresses undesired pathways but also that water promotes the desired pathway by stabilizing charge in the transition state, facilitating proton transfer, doubly activating the substrate for reaction, and perhaps most remarkably, reorganizing the substrate into a reactive conformation that leads to the observed product. This approach serves as an outline for a general strategy of exploiting solvent-solute interactions to achieve unusual reactivity in chemical reactions. These findings may also have implications in the biosynthesis of the ladder polyether natural products, such as the brevetoxins and ciguatoxins. PMID:24046369

  12. Entropic factors provide unusual reactivity and selectivity in epoxide-opening reactions promoted by water.

    PubMed

    Byers, Jeffery A; Jamison, Timothy F

    2013-10-15

    Despite the myriad of selective enzymatic reactions that occur in water, chemists have rarely capitalized on the unique properties of this medium to govern selectivity in reactions. Here we report detailed mechanistic investigations of a water-promoted reaction that displays high selectivity for what is generally a disfavored product. A combination of structural and kinetic data indicates not only that synergy between substrate and water suppresses undesired pathways but also that water promotes the desired pathway by stabilizing charge in the transition state, facilitating proton transfer, doubly activating the substrate for reaction, and perhaps most remarkably, reorganizing the substrate into a reactive conformation that leads to the observed product. This approach serves as an outline for a general strategy of exploiting solvent-solute interactions to achieve unusual reactivity in chemical reactions. These findings may also have implications in the biosynthesis of the ladder polyether natural products, such as the brevetoxins and ciguatoxins. PMID:24046369

  13. Mode specificity in bond selective reactions F + HOD → HF + OD and DF + OH

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hongwei; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The influence of vibrational excitations in the partially deuterated water (HOD) reactant on its bond selective reactions with F is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method on an accurate global potential energy surface. Despite the decidedly early barrier of the F + H{sub 2}O reaction, reactant vibrational excitation in each local stretching mode of HOD is found to significantly enhance the reaction which breaks the excited bond. In the mean time, excitation of the HOD bending mode also enhances the reaction, but with much lower efficacy and weaker bond selectivity. Except for low collision energies, all vibrational modes are more effective in promoting the bond selective reactions than the translational energy. These results are compared with the predictions of the recently proposed sudden vector projection model.

  14. Comprehensive mechanism and structure-sensitivity of ethanol oxidation on platinum: new transition-state searching method for resolving the complex reaction network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Fang; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2008-08-20

    Ethanol oxidation on Pt is a typical multistep and multiselectivity heterogeneous catalytic process. A comprehensive understanding of this fundamental reaction would greatly benefit design of catalysts for use in direct ethanol fuel cells and the degradation of biomass-derived oxygenates. In this work, the reaction network of ethanol oxidation on different Pt surfaces, including close-packed Pt{111}, stepped Pt{211}, and open Pt{100}, is explored thoroughly with an efficient reaction path searching method, which integrates our new transition-state searching technique with periodic density functional theory calculations. Our new technique enables the location of the transition state and saddle points for most surface reactions simply and efficiently by optimization of local minima. We show that the selectivity of ethanol oxidation on Pt depends markedly on the surface structure, which can be attributed to the structure-sensitivity of two key reaction steps: (i) the initial dehydrogenation of ethanol and (ii) the oxidation of acetyl (CH3CO). On open surface sites, ethanol prefers C-C bond cleavage via strongly adsorbed intermediates (CH2CO or CHCO), which leads to complete oxidation to CO2. However, only partial oxidizations to CH3CHO and CH3COOH occur on Pt{111}. Our mechanism points out that the open surface Pt{100} is the best facet to fully oxidize ethanol at low coverages, which sheds light on the origin of the remarkable catalytic performance of Pt tetrahexahedra nanocrystals found recently. The physical origin of the structure-selectivity is rationalized in terms of both thermodynamics and kinetics. Two fundamental quantities that dictate the selectivity of ethanol oxidation are identified: (i) the ability of surface metal atoms to bond with unsaturated C-containing fragments and (ii) the relative stability of hydroxyl at surface atop sites with respect to other sites. PMID:18642913

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-09-01

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments

  16. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt₇Ru₃ NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication of crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.

  17. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt₇Ru₃ NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication ofmore » crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.« less

  18. Evaluation of Salivary Nitric Oxide Levels in Smokers, Tobacco Chewers and Patients with Oral Lichenoid Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Joy Idiculla; Sivapathasundharam, B.; Sabarinath, B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nitric oxide (NO), a free radical, acts as a signalling molecule affecting numerous physiological and pathological processes. Role of nitric oxide as a mediator in tobacco related habits and the resultant oral lichenoid reactions was assessed. Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the salivary nitric oxide levels in normal patients with that of smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in the study which included 30 healthy patients without any chronic inflammatory lesion and habit as controls (group I), 30 smokers without the habit of tobacco/betel nut chewing and any oral lesion (group II), 30 tobacco chewers without the habit of smoking and any oral lesion (group III) and 30 histologically confirmed cases of oral lichenoid reaction with the habit of tobacco usage (group IV). Saliva from these patients was collected and the nitrite concentration was assessed. Results Our results concluded that there was highly significant increase in the nitric oxide levels in smokers, tobacco chewers and patients with oral lichenoid reactions compared to that of controls. Also, there was a significant increase in nitric oxide levels in patients with smoking associated oral lichenoid reactions in comparison with smokers and in patients with lichenoid reactions associated with tobacco chewing in comparison with tobacco chewers. Conclusion Estimation of salivary nitric oxide levels is a simple, non-invasive procedure and could be analysed to suggest the role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of these lesions. The increased activity of the enzyme may indicate that nitric oxide has a pathophysiological role in these lesions. PMID:26894179

  19. Generation of Oxidants From the Reaction of Nanoparticulate Zero-Valent Iron and Oxygen for the use in Contaminant Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, C. R.; Lee, C.; Sedlak, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    The reaction of zero-valent iron (ZVI) with oxygen can lead to the formation of oxidants, which may be used to transform recalcitrant contaminants including non-polar organics and certain metals. Nanoparticulate iron might provide a practical mechanism of remediating oxygen-containing groundwater and contaminated soil. To gain insight into the reaction mechanism and to quantify the yield of oxidants, experiments were performed with model organic compounds in the presence of nanoparticulate zero-valent iron and oxygen. At pH values below 5, ZVI nanoparticles were oxidized within 30 minutes with a stoichiometry of approximately two Fe0 oxidized per O2 consumed. Using the oxidation of methanol and ethanol to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, respectively, we found that less than 2% of the consumed oxygen was converted to reactive oxidants under acidic conditions. The yield of aldehydes increased with pH up to pH 7, with maximum oxidant yields of around 5% relative to the mass of ZVI added. The increase of aldehyde yield with pH was attributable to changes in the processes responsible for oxidant production. At pH values below 5, the corrosion of ZVI by oxygen produces hydrogen peroxide, which subsequently reacts with ferrous iron [Fe(II)] via the Fenton reaction. At higher pH values, the aldehydes are produced when Fe(II), the initial product of ZVI oxidation, reacts with oxygen. The decrease in oxidant yield at pH values above 7 may be attributable to precipitation of Fe(II). The oxidation of benzoic acid and 2-propanol to para-hydroxybenzoic acid and acetone, respectively, followed a very different trend compared to the primary alcohols. In both cases, the highest product yields (approximately 2% with respect to ZVI added) were observed at pH 3. Yields decreased with increasing pH, with no oxidized product detected at neutral pH. These results suggest that two different oxidants may be produced by the system: hydroxyl radical (OH-·) at acidic pH and a more selective

  20. Isomeric Selective Studies of the Dominant Addition Channel in OH Initiated Oxidation of Isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, B.; Bugarin, A.; Connell, B.; North, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    We report the first isomeric selective study of the dominant isomeric pathway in the OH initiated oxidation of isoprene in the presence of O2 and NO using the Laser Photolysis-Laser Induced Fluorescence (LP-LIF) technique. The photolysis of monodeuterated/non deuterated 2-iodo-2-methyl-but-3-en-1-ol results exclusively in the dominant OH-isoprene addition product, providing important insight into the oxidation mechanism. Based on kinetic analysis of OH cycling experiments we have determined the rate constant for O2 addition to the hydroxy alkyl radical to be (1.0±0.5) × 10^(-12) cm^(3) s^(-1) and we find a value of (8.05±2.3) × 10^(-12) cm^(3) s^(-1) for the overall reaction rate constant of the hydroxy peroxy radical with NO. We also report the first clear experimental evidence of the (E-) form of the δ-hydroxyalkoxy channel through isotopic labeling experiments and quantify its branching ratio to be 0.1±0.025. Since it corresponds to missing carbon balance in isoprene oxidation, we have been able to identify some of the missing carbon balance. Since our measured isomeric selective rate constants for the dominant outer channel in OH initiated isoprene chemistry are similar to the overall rate constants derived from non isomeric kinetics, we predict that the remaining outer addition channel will have similar reactivity. We have extended this study to the OH initiated oxidation of 1,3-butadiene. We have obtained isomeric selective rate constants on the dominant channel of the butadiene oxidation chemistry and measured the branching ratio for the δ-hydroxyalkoxy channel. These results on butadiene studies will be discussed.

  1. Source of Selectivity in Oxidative Cross-Coupling of Aryls by Solvent Effect of 1,1,1,3,3,3-Hexafluoropropan-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Elsler, Bernd; Wiebe, Anton; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Dyballa, Katrin M; Franke, Robert; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2015-08-24

    Solvents such as 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) with a high capacity for donating hydrogen bonds generate solvates that enter into selective cross-coupling reactions of aryls upon oxidation. When electric current is employed for oxidation, reagent effects can be excluded and a decoupling of nucleophilicity from oxidation potential can be achieved. The addition of water or methanol to the electrolyte allows a shift of oxidation potentials in a specific range, creating suitable systems for selective anodic cross-coupling reactions. The shift in the redox potentials depends on the substitution pattern of the substrate employed. The concept has been expanded from arene-phenol to phenol-phenol as well as phenol-aniline cross-coupling. This driving force for selectivity in oxidative coupling might also explain previous findings using HFIP and hypervalent iodine reagents. PMID:26189655

  2. Chiral polymerization in open systems from chiral-selective reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Nelson, Bradley J; Walker, Sara Imari

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the possibility that prebiotic homochirality can be achieved exclusively through chiral-selective reaction rate parameters without any other explicit mechanism for chiral bias. Specifically, we examine an open network of polymerization reactions, where the reaction rates can have chiral-selective values. The reactions are neither autocatalytic nor do they contain explicit enantiomeric cross-inhibition terms. We are thus investigating how rare a set of chiral-selective reaction rates needs to be in order to generate a reasonable amount of chiral bias. We quantify our results adopting a statistical approach: varying both the mean value and the rms dispersion of the relevant reaction rates, we show that moderate to high levels of chiral excess can be achieved with fairly small chiral bias, below 10%. Considering the various unknowns related to prebiotic chemical networks in early Earth and the dependence of reaction rates to environmental properties such as temperature and pressure variations, we argue that homochirality could have been achieved from moderate amounts of chiral selectivity in the reaction rates. PMID:22610131

  3. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  4. Photocycloaddition reaction of atropisomeric maleimides: mechanism and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xue-Ping; Zheng, Yiying; Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Wei-Hai; Thiel, Walter

    2016-09-21

    We report a density functional study on the mechanism of the [2+2] photocyclization of atropisomeric maleimides. Experimentally, the reaction is known to proceed through the triplet state. We have located all relevant S0 and T1 minima and transition states, as well as the T1/S0 crossing points, and mapped eight stepwise photocyclization pathways for four different conformers in the T1 state that lead to distinct regioisomers. In the preferred four pathways (one for each conformer) the initially formed C-C bond involves the terminal carbon atom of the alkene moiety. This regioselectivity originates from electrostatic preferences (arising from the charge distribution in the polarized C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bonds) and from the different thermodynamic stability of the resulting triplet diradical intermediates (caused by electron donation effects that stabilize the radical centers). The formation of the second C-C bond is blocked in the T1 state by prohibitively high barriers and thus occurs after intersystem crossing to the ground state. Furthermore, we rationalize substitution effects on enantioselectivity and diastereoselectivity and identify their origin. PMID:27545206

  5. Oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexene on size selected subnanometer cobalt clusters: improved catalytic performance via evolution of cluster-assembled nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Di Vece, Marcel; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Sönke; Winans, Randall E; Vajda, Stefan

    2012-07-14

    The catalytic activity of oxide-supported metal nanoclusters strongly depends on their size and support. In this study, the origin of morphology transformation and chemical state changes during the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexene was investigated in terms of metal-support interactions. Model catalyst systems were prepared by deposition of size selected subnanometer Co(27±4) clusters on various metal oxide supports (Al(2)O(3), ZnO and TiO(2) and MgO). The oxidation state and reactivity of the supported cobalt clusters were investigated by temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) and in situ grazing incidence X-ray absorption (GIXAS) during oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexene, while the sintering resistance monitored with grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). The activity and selectivity of cobalt clusters shows strong dependence on the support. GIXAS reveals that metal-support interaction plays a key role in the reaction. The most pronounced support effect is observed for MgO, where during the course of the reaction in its activity, composition and size dynamically evolving nanoassembly is formed from subnanometer cobalt clusters. PMID:22419008

  6. Selective oxidation of bromide in wastewater brines from hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Lowry, Gregory V; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-07-01

    Brines generated from oil and natural gas production, including flowback water and produced water from hydraulic fracturing of shale gas, may contain elevated concentrations of bromide (~1 g/L). Bromide is a broad concern due to the potential for forming brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment. Conventional treatment processes for bromide removal is costly and not specific. Selective bromide removal is technically challenging due to the presence of other ions in the brine, especially chloride as high as 30-200 g/L. This study evaluates the ability of solid graphite electrodes to selectively oxidize bromide to bromine in flowback water and produced water from a shale gas operation in Southwestern PA. The bromine can then be outgassed from the solution and recovered, as a process well understood in the bromine industry. This study revealed that bromide may be selectively and rapidly removed from oil and gas brines (~10 h(-1) m(-2) for produced water and ~60 h(-1) m(-2) for flowback water). The electrolysis occurs with a current efficiency between 60 and 90%, and the estimated energy cost is ~6 kJ/g Br. These data are similar to those for the chlor-alkali process that is commonly used for chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide production. The results demonstrate that bromide may be selectively removed from oil and gas brines to create an opportunity for environmental protection and resource recovery. PMID:23726709

  7. Metabolic alkene labeling and in vitro detection of histone acylation via the aqueous oxidative Heck reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ourailidou, Maria E.; Dockerty, Paul; Witte, Martin; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of protein lysine acylations remains a challenge due to a lack of specific antibodies for acylations with various chain lengths. This problem can be addressed by metabolic labeling techniques using carboxylates with reactive functionalities. Subsequent chemoselective reactions with a complementary moiety connected to a detection tag enable the visualization and quantification of the protein lysine acylome. In this study, we present EDTA-Pd(II) as a novel catalyst for the oxidative Heck reaction on protein-bound alkenes, which allows employment of fully aqueous reaction conditions. We used this reaction to monitor histone lysine acylation in vitro after metabolic incorporation of olefinic carboxylates as chemical reporters. PMID:25672493

  8. The general mathematical model of CO oxidation reaction over Pd-zeolite catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkina, E. S.; Tolstunova, E. D.

    2001-10-01

    A new distributed mathematical model of reaction of CO oxidation over Pd-zeolite catalyst is presented. The model takes into account passing of the reactant flow through the catalyst layer, diffusion in pores of zeolite matrix, reaction on the surface of embedded Pd clusters, heat effect of the reaction, heat and mass transfer across the catalyst layer. Reaction on the Pd clusters is described by the new point model suggested herein. The model admits the existence of regular, chaotic and mixed-mode oscillations at the values of the parameters close to the experimental conditions.

  9. Surface Selective Oxidation of Sn-Added CMnSi TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Lawrence; Seo, Eun Jung; Jung, Geun Su; Suh, Dong Woo; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the addition of Sn on the selective oxidation and the reactive wetting of CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by means of galvanizing simulator tests. A reference TRIP steel and TRIP steels containing Sn in the range of 0.05 to 1 wt pct were intercritically annealed at 1093 K (820 °C) in an N2+ 5 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point of -60 °C. The thin-film oxides formed on the surface of the Sn-added CMnSi TRIP steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. The addition of Sn (≥0.05 wt pct) changed the morphology of the xMnO·SiO2 surface oxides from a continuous film morphology to a lens-shaped island morphology. It also suppressed the formation of the Mn-rich oxides of MnO and 2MnO·SiO2. The changes in the morphology and chemistry of the surface oxides were clearly related to the surface segregation of Sn, which appeared to result in a decrease of the oxygen permeability at the surface. The formation of lens-shaped oxides improved the wettability of the CMnSi TRIP steel surface by the molten Zn. The improved wetting effect was attributed to an increased area fraction of the surface where the oxide layer was thinner. This enabled a direct, unhindered reaction between Fe and the Al in the liquid Zn and the formation of the inhibition layer in the initial stages of the hot dipping. The addition of a small amount of Sn was also found to decrease significantly the density of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steel.

  10. The oxidant and laser power-dependent plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis reaction of p-aminothiophenol dimerizing into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Enzhong; Yin, Penggang; Yu, Chunna; Yu, Ge; Zhao, Chang

    2016-09-01

    Recently, plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis (PDSPC) reactions have attracted more and more attention by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) because we can in situ monitor the reaction process and determine the final products and their quantities by the real-time SERS spectrum. In this work, self-assembly AuNPs with both high catalytic activity and strong SERS effect were used as a bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of PDSPC reactions. p-Aminothiophenol (PATP), a famous model molecule, was selected as a probe molecule and FeCl3 and NaClO were selected as oxidants. In this way, oxidation reaction of PATP dimerizing into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) has been investigated by SERS, and the results show that oxidant and laser power can alter the conversion rate of the reaction. This work provides a novel approach for controlling PDSPC reaction rate, which may be useful for understanding the mechanism of PDSPC reactions. PMID:27179296

  11. The oxidant and laser power-dependent plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis reaction of p-aminothiophenol dimerizing into p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene on Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Enzhong; Yin, Penggang; Yu, Chunna; Yu, Ge; Zhao, Chang

    2016-09-01

    Recently, plasmon-driven surface photocatalysis (PDSPC) reactions have attracted more and more attention by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) because we can in situ monitor the reaction process and determine the final products and their quantities by the real-time SERS spectrum. In this work, self-assembly AuNPs with both high catalytic activity and strong SERS effect were used as a bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of PDSPC reactions. p-Aminothiophenol (PATP), a famous model molecule, was selected as a probe molecule and FeCl3 and NaClO were selected as oxidants. In this way, oxidation reaction of PATP dimerizing into p,p‧-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) has been investigated by SERS, and the results show that oxidant and laser power can alter the conversion rate of the reaction. This work provides a novel approach for controlling PDSPC reaction rate, which may be useful for understanding the mechanism of PDSPC reactions.

  12. Weighted next reaction method and parameter selection for efficient simulation of rare events in biochemical reaction systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The weighted stochastic simulation algorithm (wSSA) recently developed by Kuwahara and Mura and the refined wSSA proposed by Gillespie et al. based on the importance sampling technique open the door for efficient estimation of the probability of rare events in biochemical reaction systems. In this paper, we first apply the importance sampling technique to the next reaction method (NRM) of the stochastic simulation algorithm and develop a weighted NRM (wNRM). We then develop a systematic method for selecting the values of importance sampling parameters, which can be applied to both the wSSA and the wNRM. Numerical results demonstrate that our parameter selection method can substantially improve the performance of the wSSA and the wNRM in terms of simulation efficiency and accuracy. PMID:21910924

  13. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  14. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Selective Reactions of Donor-Acceptor Cyclopropanes with 2-Naphthols.

    PubMed

    Kaicharla, Trinadh; Roy, Tony; Thangaraj, Manikandan; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-08-16

    Lewis acid-catalyzed reactions of 2-substituted cyclopropane 1,1-dicarboxylates with 2-naphthols is reported. The reaction exhibits tunable selectivity depending on the nature of Lewis acid employed and proceed as a dearomatization/rearomatization sequence. With Bi(OTf)3 as the Lewis acid, a highly selective dehydrative [3+2] cyclopentannulation takes place leading to the formation of naphthalene-fused cyclopentanes. Interestingly, engaging Sc(OTf)3 as the Lewis acid, a Friedel-Crafts-type addition of 2-naphthols to cyclopropanes takes place, thus affording functionalized 2-naphthols. Both reactions furnished the target products in high regioselectivity and moderate to high yields. PMID:27391792

  15. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  16. Evaluation of reaction mechanism of coal-metal oxide interactions in chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Poston, James; Tian, Hanjing; Miller, Duane; Simonyi, Thomas

    2010-11-15

    The knowledge of reaction mechanism is very important in designing reactors for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of coal. Recent CLC studies have considered the more technically difficult problem of reactions between abundant solid fuels (i.e. coal and waste streams) and solid metal oxides. A definitive reaction mechanism has not been reported for CLC reaction of solid fuels. It has often been assumed that the solid/solid reaction is slow and therefore requires that reactions be conducted at temperatures high enough to gasify the solid fuel, or decompose the metal oxide. In contrast, data presented in this paper demonstrates that solid/solid reactions can be completed at much lower temperatures, with rates that are technically useful as long as adequate fuel/metal oxide contact is achieved. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations as well as experimental techniques such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), flow reactor studies, in situ X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate how the proximal interaction between solid phases proceeds. The data indicate that carbon induces the Cu-O bond breaking process to initiate the combustion of carbon at temperatures significantly lower than the spontaneous decomposition temperature of CuO, and the type of reducing medium in the vicinity of the metal oxide influences the temperature at which the oxygen release from the metal oxide takes place. Surface melting of Cu and wetting of carbon may contribute to the solid-solid contacts necessary for the reaction. (author)

  17. Catalytic activity of bimetallic nickel alloys for solid-oxide fuel cell anode reactions from density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Wei; Gatewood, Daniel; Dunlap, Brett; Turner, C. Heath

    2011-05-01

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the chemisorption of atomic species O, S, C, H and reaction intermediates OH, SH, and CHn (n = 1, 2, and 3) on M/Ni alloy model catalysts (M = Bi, Mo, Fe, Co, and Cu). The activity of the Ni alloy catalysts for solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode oxidation reactions is predicted, based on a simple descriptor, i.e., the binding energy of oxygen. First, we find that the binding of undesirable intermediates, such as C and S, can be inhibited and the catalytic activity of planar Ni-based anodes can be tuned towards oxidation by selectively forming a bimetallic surface alloy. In particular, Cu/Ni, Fe/Ni, and Co/Ni anode catalysts are found to be most active towards anode oxidation. On the other hand, the Mo/Ni alloy surface is predicted to be the most effective catalyst in terms of inhibiting the deposition of C and S (while still preserving relatively high catalytic activity). The formation of a surface alloy, which has the alloy element enriched on the topmost surface, was found to be critical to the activity of the Ni alloy catalysts.

  18. Platinum Metal-Free Catalysts for Selective Soft Oxidative Methane → Ethylene Coupling. Scope and Mechanistic Observations.

    PubMed

    Peter, Matthias; Marks, Tobin J

    2015-12-01

    Using abundant soft oxidants, a high methane-to-ethylene conversion might be achievable due to the low thermodynamic driving force for over-oxidation. Here we report on the oxidative coupling of methane by gaseous S2 (SOCM). The catalytic properties of Pd/Fe3O4 are compared with those of Fe3O4, and it is found that high ethylene selectivities can be achieved without noble metals; conversion and selectivity on Fe3O4 are stable for at least 48 h at SOCM conditions. SOCM data for 10 oxides are compared, and ethylene selectivities as high as 33% are found; the C2H4/C2H6 ratios of 9-12 observed at the highest S2 conversions are significantly higher than the C2H4/C2H6 ratios usually found in the CH4 coupling with O2. Complementary in-detail analytical studies show that, on Mg, Zr, Sm, W, and La catalysts, which strongly coke during the reaction, lower ethylene selectivities are observed than on Fe, Ti, and Cr catalysts, which only coke to a minor extent. Further catalyst-dependent changes during SOCM in surface area, surface composition, and partial conversion to oxysulfides and sulfides are discussed. Evidence concerning the reaction mechanism is obtained taking into account the selectivity for the different reaction products versus the contact time. CH4 coupling proceeds non-oxidatively with the evolution of H2 on some catalysts, and evidence is presented that C2H4 and C2H2 formation occur via C2H6 and C2H4 dehydrogenation, respectively. PMID:26551955

  19. Metal Azolate/Carboxylate Frameworks as Catalysts in Oxidative and C-C Coupling Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tăbăcaru, Aurel; Xhaferaj, Nertil; Martins, Luísa M D R S; Alegria, Elisabete C B A; Chay, Rogério S; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Domasevitch, Konstantin V; Pombeiro, Armando J L; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio

    2016-06-20

    The five metal azolate/carboxylate (MAC) compounds [Cd(dmpzc)(DMF)(H2O)] (Cd-dmpzc), [Pd(H2dmpzc)2Cl2] (Pd-dmpzc), [Cu(Hdmpzc)2] (Cu-dmpzc), [Zn4O(dmpzc)3]·Solv (Zn-dmpzc·S), and [Co4O(dmpzc)3]·Solv (Co-dmpzc·S) were isolated by coupling 3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-carboxylic acid (H2dmpzc) to cadmium(II), palladium(II), copper(II), zinc(II), and cobalt(II) salts. While Cd-dmpzc and Pd-dmpzc had never been prepared in the past, for Cu-dmpzc, Zn-dmpzc·S, and Co-dmpzc·S we optimized alternative synthetic paths that, in the case of the copper(II) and cobalt(II) derivatives, are faster and grant higher yields than the previously reported ones. The crystal structure details were determined ab initio (Cd-dmpzc and Pd-dmpzc) or refined (Cu-dmpzc, Zn-dmpzc·S, and Co-dmpzc·S) by means of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). While Cd-dmpzc is a nonporous 3D MAC framework, Pd-dmpzc shows a 3D hybrid coordination/hydrogen-bonded network, in which Pd(H2dmpzc)2Cl2 monomers are present. The thermal behavior of the five MAC compounds was investigated by coupling thermal analysis to variable-temperature PXRD. Their catalytic activity was assessed in oxidative and C-C coupling reactions, with the copper(II) and cadmium(II) derivatives being the first nonporous MAC frameworks to be tested as catalysts. Cu-dmpzc is the most active catalyst in the partial oxidation of cyclohexane by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in acetonitrile (yields up to 12% after 9 h) and is remarkably active in the solvent-free microwave-assisted oxidation of 1-phenylethanol to acetophenone (yields up to 99% at 120 °C in only 0.5 h). On the other hand, activated Zn-dmpzc·S (Zn-dmpzc) is the most active catalyst in the Henry C-C coupling reaction of aromatic aldehydes with nitroethane, showing appreciable diastereoselectivity toward the syn-nitroalkanol isomer (syn:anti selectivity up to 79:21). PMID:27266480

  20. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Joshua J.; Davis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  1. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  2. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen–Popper, Dion–Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  3. Development of Safe and Scalable Continuous-Flow Methods for Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuan; Johnson, Martin D; Diao, Tianning; Yates, Matthew H; Stahl, Shannon S

    2010-01-01

    The synthetic scope and utility of Pd-catalyzed aerobic oxidation reactions has advanced significantly over the past decade, and these reactions have potential to address important green-chemistry challenges in the pharmaceutical industry. This potential has been unrealized, however, because safety concerns and process constraints hinder large-scale applications of this chemistry. These limitations are addressed by the development of a continuous-flow tube reactor, which has been demonstrated on several scales in the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Use of a dilute oxygen gas source (8% O(2) in N(2)) ensures that the oxygen/organic mixture never enters the explosive regime, and efficient gas-liquid mixing in the reactor minimizes decomposition of the homogeneous catalyst into inactive Pd metal. These results provide the basis for large-scale implementation of palladium-catalyzed (and other) aerobic oxidation reactions for pharmaceutical synthesis. PMID:20694169

  4. Oxidation reaction of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fangming; Moriya, Takehiko; Enomoto, Heiji

    2003-07-15

    Stearic acid, being a model compound of high molecular weight carboxylic acids, was oxidized in a batch reactor by changing the oxygen supply with an insufficient oxygen supply at a constant reaction time at 420 degrees C. On the basis of the intermediate products identified by GC/MS, NMR, and HPLC analyses and the free-radical reaction mechanism, the oxidation pathways of high molecular weight carboxylic acids in supercritical water are discussed. The reaction of carboxylic acids in supercritical water proceeds with the consecutive oxidation of higher molecular weight carboxylic acids to lower molecular weight carboxylic acids through several major pathways. The attack of the hydroxyl radical occurs not only at the carbons in alpha-, beta-, gamma-positions to a --COOH group but also at the carbons ((omega-1)-carbon and/or omega-carbon) far in the alkyl chain from a --COOH group, which may lead to the formation of dicarboxylic acids. PMID:12901673

  5. Catalytic oxidation of ammonia on RuO2(110) surfaces: mechanism and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Jacobi, K; Schöne, W-D; Ertl, G

    2005-04-28

    The selective oxidation of ammonia to either N2 or NO on RuO2(110) single-crystal surfaces was investigated by a combination of vibrational spectroscopy (HREELS), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and steady-state rate measurements under continuous flow conditions. The stoichiometric RuO2(110) surface exposes coordinatively unsaturated (cus) Ru atoms onto which adsorption of NH3 (NH3-cus) or dissociative adsorption of oxygen (O-cus) may occur. In the absence of O-cus, ammonia desorbs completely thermally without any reaction. However, interaction between NH3-cus and O-cus starts already at 90 K by hydrogen abstraction and hydrogenation to OH-cus, leading eventually to N-cus and H2O. The N-cus species recombine either with each other to N2 or with neighboring O-cus leading to strongly held NO-cus which desorbs around 500 K. The latter reaction is favored by higher concentrations of O-cus. Under steady-state flow condition with constant NH3 partial pressure and varying O2 pressure, the rate for N2 formation takes off first, passes through a maximum and then decreases again, whereas that for NO production exhibits an S-shape and rises continuously. In this way at 530 K almost 100% selectivity for NO formation (with fairly high reaction probability for NH3) is reached. PMID:16851919

  6. Heterobifunctional PEG Ligands for Bioconjugation Reactions on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bloemen, Maarten; Van Stappen, Thomas; Willot, Pieter; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Koeckelberghs, Guy; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Ever since iron oxide nanoparticles have been recognized as promising scaffolds for biomedical applications, their surface functionalization has become even more important. We report the synthesis of a novel polyethylene glycol-based ligand that combines multiple advantageous properties for these applications. The ligand is covalently bound to the surface via a siloxane group, while its polyethylene glycol backbone significantly improves the colloidal stability of the particle in complex environments. End-capping the molecule with a carboxylic acid introduces a variety of coupling chemistry possibilities. In this study an antibody targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was coupled to the surface and its presence and binding activity was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance experiments. The results indicate that the ligand has high potential towards biomedical applications where colloidal stability and advanced functionality is crucial. PMID:25275378

  7. Cavitands as Reaction Vessels and Blocking Groups for Selective Reactions in Water.

    PubMed

    Masseroni, Daniele; Mosca, Simone; Mower, Matthew P; Blackmond, Donna G; Rebek, Julius

    2016-07-11

    The majority of reactions currently performed in the chemical industry take place in organic solvents, compounds that are generally derived from petrochemicals. To promote chemical processes in water, we examined the use of synthetic, deep water-soluble cavitands in the Staudinger reduction of long-chain aliphatic diazides (C8 , C10 , and C12 ). The diazide substrates are taken up by the cavitand in D2 O in folded, dynamic conformations. The reduction of one azide group to an amine gives a complex in which the substrate is fixed in an unsymmetrical conformation, with the amine terminal exposed and the azide terminal deep and inaccessible within the cavitand. Accordingly, the reduction of the second azide group is inhibited, even with excess phosphine, and good yields of the monofunctionalized products are obtained. In contrast, the reduction of the free diazides in bulk solution yields diamine products. PMID:27254667

  8. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  9. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  10. Acidity-controlled selective oxidation of alpha-pinene, isolated from Indonesian pine's turpentine oils (pinus merkusii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masruri; Farid Rahman, Mohamad; Nurkam Ramadhan, Bagus

    2016-02-01

    Alpha-pinene was isolated in high purity from turpentine oil harvested from Pinus merkusii plantation. The recent investigation on selective oxidation of alpha-pinene using potassium permanganate was undertaken under acidic conditions. The result taught the selective oxidation of alpha-pinene in acidic using potassium permanganate lead to the formation of 2-(3-acetyl-2,2-dimethylcyclobutyl)acetaldehyde or pinon aldehyde. The study method applied reaction in various different buffer conditions i.e. pH 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively, and each reaction product was monitored using TLC every hour. Product determination was undertaken on spectrometry basis such as infrared, ultra violet-visible, gas chromatography- and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  11. Bimolecular Coupling Reactions through Oxidatively Generated Aromatic Cations: Scope and Stereocontrol

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yubo; Villafane, Louis A.; Clausen, Dane J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromenes, isochromenes, and benzoxathioles react with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone to form stable aromatic cations that react with a range of nucleophiles. These oxidative fragment coupling reactions provide rapid access to structurally diverse heterocycles. Conducting the reactions in the presence of a chiral Brønsted acid results in the formation of an asymmetric ion pair that can provide enantiomerically enriched products in a rare example of a stereoselective process resulting from the generation of a chiral electrophile through oxidative carbon–hydrogen bond cleavage. PMID:23913987

  12. Optical modulation spectroscopy: a study of the self-reaction of benzophenone oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, M.; Griller, D.

    1986-12-18

    The bimolecular self-reaction of benzophenone oxide was investigated by optical modulation spectroscopy and by product studies. The transient decayed to give benzophenone and oxygen and the rate constants for its disappearance, 2k, are described by the expression log (2k) = (9.1 +/- 0.2) - (1.8 +/- 0.3)/theta where theta = 2.30RT kcal mol/sup -1/. The significance of these parameters is discussed in terms of the orientational requirements for self-reaction. Benzophenone oxide was found to react with octanal with a rate constant 2.0 x 10/sup 4/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/.

  13. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. PMID:26334187

  14. Organo-Iodine(III)-Catalyzed Oxidative Phenol-Arene and Phenol-Phenol Cross-Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Koji; Sakamoto, Kazuma; Ohshika, Takao; Dohi, Toshifumi; Kita, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    The direct oxidative coupling reaction has been an attractive tool for environmentally benign chemistry. Reported herein is that the hypervalent iodine catalyzed oxidative metal-free cross-coupling reaction of phenols can be achieved using Oxone as a terminal oxidant in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropan-2-ol (HFIP). This method features a high efficiency and regioselectivity, as well as functional-group tolerance under very mild reaction conditions without using metal catalysts. PMID:26879796

  15. Enantiomerically pure bithiophene diphosphine oxides as catalysts for direct double aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Genoni, Andrea; Benaglia, Maurizio; Rossi, Sergio; Celentano, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    The direct aldol reaction between aryl methyl ketones with aromatic aldehydes in the presence of tetrachlorosilane and a catalytic amount of a chiral bithiophene diphosphine oxide was studied; the product of double aldol addition was isolated as diacetate in good diastereoselectivity (up to 95:5) and enantioselectivities up to 91%. The reaction with heteroaromatic aldehydes was also investigated leading to the corresponding 1,3 diols, in some cases with excellent stereoselectivities. PMID:23744602

  16. Increased Oxidative Stress as a Selective Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Zhichong

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to tumorgenesis. Under hypoxic environment, increased levels of ROS induce the expression of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) in cancer stem cells (CSCs), resulting in the promotion of the upregulation of CSC markers, and the reduction of intracellular ROS level, thus facilitating CSCs survival and proliferation. Although the ROS level is regulated by powerful antioxidant defense mechanisms in cancer cells, it is observed to remain higher than that in normal cells. Cancer cells may be more sensitive than normal cells to the accumulation of ROS; consequently, it is supposed that increased oxidative stress by exogenous ROS generation therapy has an effect on selectively killing cancer cells without affecting normal cells. This paper reviews the mechanisms of redox regulation in CSCs and the pivotal role of ROS in anticancer treatment. PMID:26273420

  17. Materials selection for oxide-based resistive random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-01

    The energies of atomic processes in resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are calculated for four typical oxides, HfO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to define a materials selection process. O vacancies have the lowest defect formation energy in the O-poor limit and dominate the processes. A band diagram defines the operating Fermi energy and O chemical potential range. It is shown how the scavenger metal can be used to vary the O vacancy formation energy, via controlling the O chemical potential, and the mean Fermi energy. The high endurance of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} RRAM is related to its more stable amorphous phase and the adaptive lattice rearrangements of its O vacancy.

  18. A Highly Selective Vanadium Catalyst for Benzylic C-H Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ji-Bao; Cormier, Kevin W; Chen, Chuo

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium complexes have been used extensively to catalyze olefin and alcohol oxidation. However, their application in C-H oxidation has not been well-studied. We report herein that commercially available Cp(2)VCl(2) catalyzes benzylic C-H oxidation selectively and effectively, giving no aromatic oxidation products. PMID:22712051

  19. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braten, Miles N.

    Nanostructured metal oxide materials are found in many products and processes in our society today, but they play a particularly important role in the conversion and storage of energy. The materials are used as catalysts and redox active supports in devices such as dye sensitized solar cells, solid oxide fuel cells, and flow batteries, where they transfer and store electrons and charge balancing cations. Oftentimes electron transfer is modulated by the cations and when the cation is a proton, these redox reactions are known as proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. The work described in this dissertation focuses on understanding the PCET reactivity of nanocrystalline metal oxide materials. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of PCET and provides background information on the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) which the majority of the research is focused on. Chapter 2 examines the chemistry that occurs during the photoreduction of ZnO NCs. Chapter 3 describes experiments probing how ZnO NC capping ligand concentration and NC size modulate PCET reaction rates. Chapter 4 describes experiments that compare the PCET reactivity of ZnO NCs with different numbers of electrons and protons stored on them. Chapter 5 describes attempts to observe the electrochemical reduction of ZnO NCs attached to gold electrodes. Finally, Chapter 6 contains attempts to identify a nanostructured metal oxide alkane oxidation catalyst for use in fuel cell.

  20. Efficient processing of reaction-sintered silicon carbide by anodically oxidation-assisted polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qunzhang; Shen, Xinmin; Zhou, Jianzhao; He, Xiaohui; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) is a promising optical material for the space telescope systems. Anodically oxidation-assisted polishing is a method to machine RS-SiC. The electrolyte used in this study is a mixture of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydrochloric acid (HCl), and the oxidation potential has two modes: constant potential and high-frequency-square-wave potential. Oxide morphologies are compared by scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning white-light interferometer. The results indicate that anodic oxidation under constant potential can not only obtain a relatively smooth surface but also be propitious to obtain high material removal rate. The oxidation depth in anodic oxidation under constant potential is calculated by comparing surface morphologies before and after hydrofluoric acid etching. The theoretical oxidation rate is 5.3 nm/s based on the linear Deal-Grove model. Polishing of the oxidized RS-SiC is conducted to validate the machinability of the oxide layer. The obtained surface roughness root-mean-square is around 4.5 nm. Thus, anodically oxidation-assisted polishing can be considered as an efficient method, which can fill the performance gap between the rough figuring and fine finishing of RS-SiC. It can improve the machining quality of RS-SiC parts and promote the application of RS-SiC products.

  1. High-temperature catalytic oxidative conversion of propane to propylene and ethylene involving coupling of exothermic and endothermic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, V.R.; Rane, V.H.; Rajput, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    Coupling of the exothermic catalytic oxidative conversion and endothermic thermal cracking (noncatalytic) reactions of propane to propylene and ethylene over the SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SA5205 catalyst in the presence of steam and limited oxygen was investigated at different process conditions (temperature, 700--850 C; C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} ratio in feed, 2.0--8.0; H{sub 2}O/C{sub 3}H{sub 8} ratio, 0.5--2.5; space velocity, 2,000--15,000 cm{sup 3}/g h). In the presence of steam and limited O{sub 2}, the endothermic thermal cracking and exothermic oxidative conversion reactions occur simultaneously and there is no coke formation on the catalyst. Because of the direct coupling of exothermic and endothermic reactions, this process occurs in a most energy efficient and safe manner. The propane conversion, selectivity for propylene, and net heat of reaction ({Delta}H{sub r}) in the process are strongly influenced by the temperature and concentration of O{sub 2} relative to the propane in the feed. The C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} product ratio is also strongly influenced by the temperature, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} feed ratio, and space velocity. The net heat of reaction can be controlled by manipulating the reaction temperature and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} ratio in the feed; the process exothermicity is reduced drastically with increasing the temperature and/or C{sub 3}H{sub 8}/O{sub 2} feed ratio.

  2. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  3. H2 oxidation versus organic substrate oxidation in non-heme iron mediated reactions with H2O2.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Azin; Acuña-Parés, Ferran; Luis, Josep M; Cusso, Olaf; Morales de la Rosa, Silvia; Campos-Martín, José Miguel; Fierro, Jose L G; Costas, Miquel; Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén

    2015-10-18

    Herein we show that species generated upon reaction of α-[Fe(CF3SO3)2(BPMCN)] (BPMCN = N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane) with H2O2 (putatively [Fe(V)(O)(OH)(BPMCN)]) is able to efficiently oxidize H2 to H2O even in the presence of organic substrates, while species formed in the presence of acetic acid (putatively [Fe(V)(O)(OAc)(BPMCN)]) prefer organic substrate oxidation over H2 activation. Mechanistic implications have been analysed with the aid of computational methods. PMID:26311021

  4. Highly Selective Oxidation of Carbohydrates in an Efficient Electrochemical Energy Converter: Cogenerating Organic Electrosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holade, Yaovi; Servat, Karine; Napporn, Teko W; Morais, Cláudia; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Kokoh, Kouakou B

    2016-02-01

    The selective electrochemical conversion of highly functionalized organic molecules into electricity, heat, and added-value chemicals for fine chemistry requires the development of highly selective, durable, and low-cost catalysts. Here, we propose an approach to make catalysts that can convert carbohydrates into chemicals selectively and produce electrical power and recoverable heat. A 100% Faradaic yield was achieved for the selective oxidation of the anomeric carbon of glucose and its related carbohydrates (C1-position) without any function protection. Furthermore, the direct glucose fuel cell (DGFC) enables an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V in 0.5 m NaOH to be reached, a record. The optimized DGFC delivers an outstanding output power Pmax =2 mW cm(-2) with the selective conversion of 0.3 m glucose, which is of great interest for cogeneration. The purified reaction product will serve as a raw material in various industries, which thereby reduces the cost of the whole sustainable process. PMID:26777210

  5. Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of NO2 on a Chromium (III) Oxide Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, N.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Chromium oxide (Cr2O3) is a major component of the oxide layer on stainless steel surfaces. It is also widely used as pigment in paints and roofs and as a protective coating on various surfaces. While many studies have focused on the catalytic activity of Cr2O3 surfaces for selective catalytic reduction (SCR), less attention has been paid to its surface chemistry involving atmospherically important species such as NO2 under atmospheric conditions. In this study, we have investigated thermal and photochemical reactions of NO2 in the presence and the absence of water vapor, using a thin layer of Cr2O3 as a model for the surface of stainless steel as well as other similarly coated surfaces in the boundary layer. A 30 nm thick Cr2O3 film was deposited on a germanium attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystal, and the changes in the surface species were monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Upon NO2 adsorption, nitrate (NO3-) ions appeared likely coordinated to Cr3+ ion(s). The NO3- peaks reversibly shifted when water vapor was added, suggesting that NO3- become solvated. Irradiation at 311 nm led to a decrease in NO3- ions under both dry and humid conditions. The major gas-phase species formed by the irradiation was NO under dry conditions, while NO2 was mainly formed in the presence of H2O. Possible mechanisms and the implications for heterogeneous NO2 chemistry in the boundary layer will be discussed. The results will also be compared to similar chemistry on other surfaces.

  6. Chemical properties which control selectivity and efficacy of aromatic N-oxide bioreductive drugs.

    PubMed

    Wardman, P; Priyadarsini, K I; Dennis, M F; Everett, S A; Naylor, M A; Patel, K B; Stratford, I J; Stratford, M R; Tracy, M

    1996-07-01

    Pulse radiolysis was used to generate radicals from one electron reduction of 1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-dioxides (derivatives of tirapazamine), and of imidazo [1,2-a]quinoxaline-4-oxides (analogues of RB90740), which have selective toxicity towards hypoxic cells. Radicals from the mono N-oxides (from the latter compounds) react with oxygen approximately 10-40 times faster than does the tirapazamine radical. Radicals from the tirapazamine analogues studied react with oxygen up to approximately 10 times slower than tirapazamine radicals. The quinoxaline N-oxide radicals are involved in prototropic equilibria with pK(a) values (5.5 to 7.4) spanning that reported for tirapazamine (6.0). Generation of radicals radiolytically in the presence of H donors (formate, 2-propanol, deoxyribose) indicate a chain reaction ascribed to H abstraction by the drug radical. The protonated drug radical is much more reactive than the radical anion (H abstraction rate constant approximately equal to 10(2) - 10(3) dm3 mol-1 s-1). Chain termination is ascribed to drug radical-radical reactions, i.e. radical stability in anoxia, with rate constants 2k approximately equal to 1 x 10(7) to 2 x 10(8) dm3 mol-1 s-1 at pH approximately 7.4. Estimates of the reduction potentials of the drug-radical couples in water at pH 7 for two of the mono-N-oxides were in the range-0.7 to 0.8 V vs NHE at pH 7. PMID:8763850

  7. Selectivity to olefins of Fe/SiO{sub 2}-MgO catalysts in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, N.G.; Alvarez, A.M.; Cagnoli, M.V.; Bengoa, J.F.

    1996-06-01

    SiO{sub 2} covered with MgO has been used as support of iron catalysts in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Catalysts of 5% (w/w) iron concentration and 2, 4, and 8% (w/w) of MgO on SiO{sub 2} were prepared. Selective chemisorption of CO, volumetric oxidation, and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to characterize the type of iron species and the metallic crystal sizes. MgO covers the SiO{sub 2} surface and modifies the metallic crystal size. The activity to total hydrocarbons increases with the amount of MgO added. An optimal concentration of about 4% (w/w) was found to have the highest selectivity to olefins. 45 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria: Environmental selection and diversification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria oxidize reduced inorganic compounds to sulfuric acid. Lithotrophic sulfur oxidizer use the energy obtained from oxidation for microbial growth. Heterotrophic sulfur oxidizers obtain energy from the oxidation of organic compounds. In sulfur-oxidizing mixotrophs energy are derived either from the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are usually located within the sulfide/oxygen interfaces of springs, sediments, soil microenvironments, and the hypolimnion. Colonization of the interface is necessary since sulfide auto-oxidizes and because both oxygen and sulfide are needed for growth. The environmental stresses associated with the colonization of these interfaces resulted in the evolution of morphologically diverse and unique aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  9. Exceptionally Active and Stable Spinel Nickel Manganese Oxide Electrocatalysts for Urea Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Sivakumar; Subramanian, Palaniappan; Levi, Elena; Aurbach, Doron; Gedanken, Aharon; Schechter, Alex

    2016-05-18

    Spinel nickel manganese oxides, widely used materials in the lithium ion battery high voltage cathode, were studied in urea oxidation catalysis. NiMn2O4, Ni1.5Mn1.5O4, and MnNi2O4 were synthesized by a simple template-free hydrothermal route followed by a thermal treatment in air at 800 °C. Rietveld analysis performed on nonstoichiometric nickel manganese oxide-Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 revealed the presence of three mixed phases: two spinel phases with different lattice parameters and NiO unlike the other two spinels NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4. The electroactivity of nickel manganese oxide materials toward the oxidation of urea in alkaline solution is evaluated using cyclic voltammetric measurements. Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 exhibits excellent redox characteristics and lower charge transfer resistances in comparison with other compositions of nickel manganese oxides and nickel oxide prepared under similar conditions.The Ni1.5Mn1.5O4modified electrode oxidizes urea at 0.29 V versus Ag/AgCl with a corresponding current density of 6.9 mA cm(-2). At a low catalyst loading of 50 μg cm(-2), the urea oxidation current density of Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 in alkaline solution is 7 times higher than that of nickel oxide and 4 times higher than that of NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4, respectively. PMID:27123873

  10. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10375 - Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, copolymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed C8-Selective C–H Arylation of Quinoline N-Oxides: Insights into the Electronic, Steric, and Solvation Effects on the Site Selectivity by Mechanistic and DFT Computational Studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report herein a palladium-catalyzed C–H arylation of quinoline N-oxides that proceeds with high selectivity in favor of the C8 isomer. This site selectivity is unusual for palladium, since all of the hitherto described methods of palladium-catalyzed C–H functionalization of quinoline N-oxides are highly C2 selective. The reaction exhibits a broad synthetic scope with respect to quinoline N-oxides and iodoarenes and can be significantly accelerated to subhour reaction times under microwave irradiation. The C8-arylation method can be carried out on a gram scale and has excellent functional group tolerance. Mechanistic and density functional theory (DFT) computational studies provide evidence for the cyclopalladation pathway and describe key parameters influencing the site selectivity. PMID:25580364

  14. Chemiluminescence spectra of the reaction products of gallium, indium and thallium vapors with nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, M.V.; Koryazhkin, V.A.; Mal'tsev, A.A.; Popov, A.D.

    1983-03-01

    The search for active media for chemical lasers generating in the visible range has led to numerous investigations of the chemiluminescence of oxidation reactions of metals in the gas phase. In the present work, the chemiluminescence spectra of flames of gallium, indium, and thallium vapors in nitrous oxide in an argon flux are investigated. The chemiluminescence intensity was studied as a function of the total pressure in the reactor, the rate of admission of the nitrous oxide, the rate of admission of argon and the cell temperature. The oxide molecules formed are in vibrational levels of the electronic ground state that are close to the dissociational limit. As a result of collisions with argon atoms, the oxide molecule passes to the excited electronic state. The thermal effects of the above reaction and the equal dissociational energies of the oxide molecules are sufficient for excitation of the vibrational levels 10 and 2 of the excited electronic states of the GaO and InO molecules, respectively. Atomic chemiluminescence is evidently a consequence of collision of metal oxide molecules with metal atoms in the electronic ground states.

  15. Tunable Orbital-Selective Magnetic Interaction in Tricolor Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanwei; Kareev, Michael; Liu, Xiaoran; Choudhury, Debraj; Middey, Srimanta; Meyers, Derek; Chakhalian, Jak

    2015-03-01

    Recently, several theoretical scenarios of orbital-selective magnetic interactions were proposed to understand the emergence of the unexpected interfacial magnetism in the archetypical SrTiO3-based two-dimensional electron gas systems, the origin of which is still intriguing and not an entirely understood phenomenon in oxide interface physics. Experimentally, however, there thus far lacks a material system to directly demonstrate the magnetic interaction with orbital-selection (dxy vs. dxz/dyz) and eventually manipulate this magnetic interaction. To address this, here we induced 2DEG and localized magnetism into the same SrTiO3 layer by devising the heterostructure LaTiO3/SrTiO3/YTiO3. Combined electrical transport and atomic-resolved scanning transmission electron microscope with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that the magnetic localized electrons are formed by the spin transfer from the YTiO3 layer into 2DEG formed at the LaTiO3 /SrTiO3 interface, with the orbital occupancy and strength of the magnetic interaction controlled by the SrTiO3 layer thickness. Our work provides an ideal platform to explore the orbital physics driven by the interfacial magnetism with prospects for exciting spintronic applications.

  16. Strong and Selective Adsorption of Lysozyme on Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biosensing methods and devices using graphene oxide (GO) have recently been explored for detection and quantification of specific biomolecules from body fluid samples, such as saliva, milk, urine, and serum. For a practical diagnostics application, any sensing system must show an absence of nonselective detection of abundant proteins in the fluid matrix. Because lysozyme is an abundant protein in these body fluids (e.g., around 21.4 and 7 μg/mL of lysozyme is found in human milk and saliva from healthy individuals, and more than 15 or even 100 μg/mL in patients suffering from leukemia, renal disease, and sarcoidosis), it may interfere with detections and quantification if it has strong interaction with GO. Therefore, one fundamental question that needs to be addressed before any development of GO based diagnostics method is how GO interacts with lysozyme. In this study, GO has demonstrated a strong interaction with lysozyme. This interaction is so strong that we are able to subsequently eliminate and separate lysozyme from aqueous solution onto the surface of GO. Furthermore, the strong electrostatic interaction also renders the selective adsorption of lysozyme on GO from a mixture of binary and ternary proteins. This selectivity is confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), fluorescence spectroscopy, and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. PMID:24684375

  17. Harnessing the Versatility of Continuous-Flow Processes: Selective and Efficient Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mándity, István M; Ötvös, Sándor B; Szőlősi, György; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    There is a great need for effective transformations and a broad range of novel chemical entities. Continuous-flow (CF) approaches are of considerable current interest: highly efficient and selective reactions can be performed in CF reactors. The reaction setup of CF reactors offers a wide variety of possible points where versatility can be introduced. This article presents a number of selective and highly efficient gas-liquid-solid and liquid-solid reactions involving a range of reagents and immobilized catalysts. Enantioselective transformations through catalytic hydrogenation and organocatalytic reactions are included, and isotopically labelled compounds and pharmaceutically relevant 1,2,3-triazoles are synthesized in CF reactors. Importantly, the catalyst bed can be changed to a solid-phase peptide synthesis resin, with which peptide synthesis can be performed with the utilization of only 1.5 equivalents of the amino acid. PMID:26997251

  18. Literature information applicable to the reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine to prepare uranium tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.

    1992-02-01

    The reaction of uranium oxides and chlorine to prepare anhydrous uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}) are important to more economical preparation of uranium metal. The most practical reactions require carbon or carbon monoxide (CO) to give CO or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as waste gases. The chemistry of U-O-Cl compounds is very complex with valances of 3, 4, 5, and 6 and with stable oxychlorides. Literature was reviewed to collect thermochemical data, phase equilibrium information, and results of experimental studies. Calculations using thermodynamic data can identify the probable reactions, but the results are uncertain. All the U-O-Cl compounds have large free energies of formation and the calculations give uncertain small differences of large numbers. The phase diagram for UCl{sub 4}-UO{sub 2} shows a reaction to form uranium oxychloride (UOCl{sub 2}) that has a good solubility in molten UCl{sub 4}. This appears more favorable to good rates of reaction than reaction of solids and gases. There is limited information on U-O-Cl salt properties. Information on the preparation of titanium, zirconium, silicon, and thorium tetrachlorides (TiCl{sub 4}, ZrCl{sub 4}, SiCl{sub 4}, ThCl{sub 4}) by reaction of oxides with chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and carbon has application to the preparation of UCl{sub 4}.

  19. Effect of electrochemical redox reaction on biochemical ammonium oxidation and chemical nitrite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bo Young; Seo, Ha Na; Kang, Seung Won; Park, Doo Hyun

    2010-03-01

    A modified graphite felt electrode with neutral red (NRelectrode) was shown to catalyze the chemical oxidation of nitrite to nitrate under aerobic conditions. The electrochemically oxidized NR-electrode (EO-NR-electrode) and reduced NR-electrode (ER-NR-electrode) catalyzed the oxidation of 1,094+/-39 mg/l and 382+/-45 mg/l of nitrite, respectively, for 24 h. The electrically uncharged NRelectrode (EU-NR-electrode) catalyzed the oxidation of 345+/-47 mg/l of nitrite for 24 h. The aerobic bacterial community immobilized in the EO-NR-electrode did not oxidize ammonium to nitrite; however, the aerobic bacterial community immobilized in the ER-NR-electrode bioelectrochemically oxidized 1,412+/-39 mg/l of ammonium for 48 h. Meanwhile, the aerobic bacterial community immobilized on the EU-NR-electrode biochemically oxidized 449+/-22 mg/l of ammonium for 48 h. In the continuous culture system, the aerobic bacterial community immobilized on the ER-NR-electrode bioelectrochemically oxidized a minimal 1,337+/-38 mg/l to a maximal 1,480+/-38 mg/l of ammonium to nitrate, and the community immobilized on the EU-NR-electrode biochemically oxidized a minimal 327+/-23 mg/l to a maximal 412+/-26 mg/l of ammonium to nitrate every two days. The bacterial communities cultivated in the ER-NR-electrode and EU-NR-electrode in the continuous culture system were analyzed by TGGE on the 20th and 50th days of incubation. Some ammoniumoxidizing bacteria were enriched on the ER-NR-electrode, but not on the EU-NR-electrode. PMID:20372016

  20. The reactions of O(ID) and OH with CH3OH, oxidation of the HCO radial, and the photochemical oxidation of formaldehyde. [photochemical reactions in stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osif, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental, laboratory study of the various photochemical reactions that can occur in the mesosphere and stratosphere is presented. N2O was photolyzed at 2139 A in the presence of CH3OH and CO. The O(id) produced in the photolysis reacted with CH3OH to produce OH radicals, and thus the reactions of both O(id) and OH were able to be studied. Also considered was the oxidation of the HCO radical. Mixtures of Cl2, O2, H2CO, and sometimes N2 or He were irradiated at 3660 A at several temperatures to photodecompose the Cl2. The photochemical oxidation of formaldehyde was studied as follows: formaldehyde in the presence of N2 and/or O2 (usually dry air) was photolyzed with a medium pressure Hg lamp used in conjunction with various filters which transmit different relative amounts of Hg lines from 2894 A to 3660 A. Results are presented and discussed, along with a description of experimental procedures and apparatus, and chemical reaction kinetics.

  1. Metamorphosis of palladium and its relation to selectivity in the Rosenmund reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, W.F.; Chettle, S.J.; Rai, R.S.; Thomas, G.

    1986-05-14

    Drastic changes in morphology and particle sizes of the Pd particles were detected during the classical catalyst pretreatment. These changes are connected to the increase in selectivity as well as to the problems encountered in the Rosenmund reaction. A major action of the poison in Rosenmund reactions was found to be the acceleration of the initial reconstruction of the surface of fresh catalysts to prevent overreduction. The instability of the Pd under reaction conditions appears to be responsible for typical problems encountered with the Rosenmund reaction such as irreproducibility and catalyst deactivation during the reaction. With the use of Pd single crystals stepped and kinked surfaces were found to be active for hydrogenolysis of acid chlorides to aldehydes. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction have been employed to characterize the change in dispersion and structure of Pd particles on carbon supports after various pretreatments.

  2. Oxidative degradation of nalidixic acid by nano-magnetite via Fe2+/O2-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ardo, Sandy G; Nélieu, Sylvie; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Delarue, Ghislaine; Brest, Jessica; Pironin, Elsa; Morin, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    Organic pollution has become a critical issue worldwide due to the increasing input and persistence of organic compounds in the environment. Iron minerals are potentially able to degrade efficiently organic pollutants sorbed to their surfaces via oxidative or reductive transformation processes. Here, we explored the oxidative capacity of nano-magnetite (Fe3O4) having ∼ 12 nm particle size, to promote heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions for the removal of nalidixic acid (NAL), a recalcitrant quinolone antibacterial agent. Results show that NAL was adsorbed at the surface of magnetite and was efficiently degraded under oxic conditions. Nearly 60% of this organic contaminant was eliminated after 30 min exposure to air bubbling in solution in the presence of an excess of nano-magnetite. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed a partial oxidation of magnetite to maghemite during the reaction, and four byproducts of NAL were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (UHPLC-MS/MS). We also provide evidence that hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) were involved in the oxidative degradation of NAL, as indicated by the quenching of the degradation reaction in the presence of ethanol. This study points out the promising potentialities of mixed valence iron oxides for the treatment of soils and wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants. PMID:25756496

  3. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces. PMID:27396288

  4. Selective and Serial Suzuki-Miyaura Reactions of Polychlorinated Aromatics with Alkyl Pinacol Boronic Esters.

    PubMed

    Laulhé, Sébastien; Blackburn, J Miles; Roizen, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Among cross-coupling reactions, the Suzuki-Miyaura transformation stands out because of its practical advantages, including the commercial availability and low toxicity of the required reagents, mild reaction conditions, and functional group compatibility. Nevertheless, few conditions can be used to cross-couple alkyl boronic acids or esters with aryl halides, especially 2-pyridyl halides. Herein, we describe two novel Suzuki-Miyaura protocols that enable selective conversion of polychlorinated aromatics, with a focus on reactions to convert 2,6-dichloropyridines to 2-chloro-6-alkylpyridines or 2-aryl-6-alkylpyridines. PMID:27537216

  5. Vibrational Control of Bimolecular Reactions with Methane by Mode, Bond, and Stereo Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kopin

    2016-05-27

    Vibrational motions of a polyatomic molecule are multifold and can be as simple as stretches or bends or as complex as concerted motions of many atoms. Different modes of excitation often possess different capacities in driving a bimolecular chemical reaction, with distinct dynamic outcomes. Reactions with vibrationally excited methane and its isotopologs serve as a benchmark for advancing our fundamental understanding of polyatomic reaction dynamics. Here, some recent progress in this area is briefly reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the key concepts developed from those studies. The interconnections among mode and bond selectivity, Polanyi's rules, and newly introduced vibrational-induced steric phenomena are highlighted. PMID:26980310

  6. Selective Functionalization of Antimycin A Through an N-Transacylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Zhang, Yanmin; Khdour, Omar M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-05-20

    Acylation of 3-(N-formylamino)salicylic acids resulted in transacylation with loss of the formyl moiety. The reaction proceeds through a bis-N-acylated intermediate, which undergoes facile deformylation. This transacylation reaction has been employed for the site-specific functionalization of the mitochondrial poison antimycin A, affording several novel derivatives. The selective cytotoxicity of some of these derivatives toward cultured A549 human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells, in comparison with WI-38 normal human lung fibroblasts, illustrates one application of this transacylation reaction. PMID:27168333

  7. Methanol oxidation and hydrogen reactions on NiZr in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, C. C.; Manoharan, R.; Goodenough, J. B.

    The electrochemical properties of a Ni 50Zr 50 (at.%) alloy have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and steady-state polarization measurements. The alloy forms a passivating oxyhydroxide film that makes it electrochemically stable in an acid solution. The oxyhydroxide film is shown to be an electrocatalyst for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The reaction proceeds at surface O 2- ions neighboring a Ni 3+ ion of a thicker passivating film; electron transfer from the surface to the electrode occurs diffusively by the nickel atoms of the film. A reaction pathway is presented that accounts for the observation of an optimum thickness for the passivating film. The NiZr alloy was also found to catalyze both hydrogen-oxidation and proton-reduction reactions (HOR and PRR) if it has a thinner surface oxyhydroxide film. The alloy appears to form mixed NiZrH and NiZrH 3- x hydrides on cycling negative of the normal hydrogen potential. The activity of the hydrogen-oxidation reaction on a hydride surface was found to increase in the presence of streaming hydrogen gas and also with increasing negative initial potential. Although the hydride is unstable in acid, it may be an attractive candidate for use as a rechargeable negative electrode in an alkaline metal/air or nickel-metal hydride secondary battery.

  8. Branched Arylalkenes from Cinnamates: Selectivity Inversion in Heck Reactions by Carboxylates as Deciduous Directing Groups.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Hackenberger, Dagmar; Goossen, Lukas J

    2016-09-01

    A decarboxylative Mizoroki-Heck coupling of aryl halides with cinnamic acids has been developed in which the carboxylate group directs the arylation into its β-position before being tracelessly removed through protodecarboxylation. In the presence of a copper/palladium catalyst, both electron-rich and electron-deficient aryl bromides and chlorides bearing numerous functionalities were successfully coupled with broadly available cinnamates, with selective formation of 1,1-disubstituted alkenes. This reaction concept, in which the carboxylate acts as a deciduous directing group, ideally complements traditional 1,2-selective Heck reactions of styrenes. PMID:27485163

  9. The selection reaction of homogeneous catalyst in soy-epoxide hydroxylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvistia Firdaus, Flora

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxylation reaction of soy-epoxide has resulted soy-polyol; a prepolymeric material for polyurethane. The conversion and selectivity of soy-epoxide butanol based to hydroxylation was found higher than soy-ethylene glycol (EG) based. These reactions were performed by sulfur acid which commonly known as homogeneous catalyst. Conversion and selectivity of homogeneous catalyst compared to bentonite; a heteregeneous catalyst was lower as in fact the mixtures were more viscous. The catalysis were significantly effected to cell morphology. Foams were conducted by heterogeneous catalyst resulted an irregular form of windows while homogeneous catalyst are more ordered.

  10. Oxidation and dechlorination of chlorophenols in dilute aqueous suspensions of manganese oxides: Reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Ukrainczyk, L.; McBride, M.B. . Dept.of Soil, Crop, and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-11-01

    Some monomeric and dimeric oxidation products of para- and/or ortho-chlorinated phenols in dilute (1 mmol/L phenol), acidified, aqueous suspensions of manganese oxide (Na-buserite) were identified by MS, Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy and UV/visible spectroscopy. The para-chlorinated phenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 4-chloro-2-methylphenol) gave corresponding p-benzoquionones (benzoquinone, 2-chlorobenzoquinone, 2,6-dichlorobenzoquinone, 2-methylbenzoquinone) as the detectable water-soluble oxidation products. Dimeric products were present in the extracts obtained by washing the oxide with methylene chloride. Michael addition of phenolate to quinone seems to be the predominant mode of coupling. Chlorinated phenols without chlorine in the para-position (2-chlorophenol, 2,6-dichlorophenol) were more difficult to oxidize and afforded diphenoquinones as the only detectable water-soluble products. For all studied phenols, with the exception of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, the amount of water-soluble products accounts only for a small fraction of oxidized phenol. The quinone and diphenoquinone products readily couple with phenols into humus like materials.

  11. Chemical reaction at ferromagnet/oxide interface and its influence on anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Teng, Jiao E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xi; Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Wang, Hai-Cheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2014-09-08

    Chemical reactions at the ferromagnet/oxide interface in [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO and [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayers before and after annealing were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that Fe atoms at the Fe/MgO interface were completely oxidized in the as-grown state and significantly deoxidized after vacuum annealing. However, only some of the Fe atoms at the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interface were oxidized and rarely deoxidized after annealing. The anomalous Hall effect was modified by this interfacial chemical reaction. The saturation anomalous Hall resistance (R{sub xy}) was greatly increased in the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO multilayers after annealing and was 350% higher than that in the as-deposited film, while R{sub xy} of the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer only increased 10% after annealing.

  12. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    PubMed

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system. PMID:22483836

  13. Polydopamine-Coated TiO2 Nanotubes for Selective Photocatalytic Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol to Benzaldehyde Under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Jyotsna; Loget, Gabriel; Altomare, Marco; Schmuki, Patrik

    2016-05-01

    TiO2 nanotube arrays grown by anodization were coated with thin layers of polydopamine as visible light sensitizer. The PDA-coated TiO2 scaffolds were used as photocatalyst for selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol under monochromatic irradiation at 473 nm. Benzaldehyde was selectively formed and no by-products could be detected. A maximized reaction yield was obtained in O2-saturated acetonitrile. A mechanism is proposed that implies firstly the charge carrier generation in polydopamine as a consequence of visible light absorption. Secondly, photo-promoted electrons are injected in TiO2 conduction band, and subsequently transferred to dissolved O2 to form O*2- radicals. These radicals react with benzyl alcohol and lead to its selective dehydrogenation oxidation towards benzaldehyde. PMID:27483930

  14. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  15. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Jonathan D.; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NOy) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO2, HNO3, N2O5 and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NOy onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO2 or N2O5 on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO2 in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist. PMID:19620710

  16. Chemical oxidation of anthracite with hydrogen peroxide via the Fenton reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heard, I.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Solutions of 30% H2O2 ranging from pH = 0 to pH = 11.5 have been used to oxidize anthracite at room temperature. The inorganic impurities, primarily pyrite, catalysed the oxidation and reduction of H2O2 (the Fenton reaction) to form the hydroxyl radical; the oxidation of the organic matter was minimal and was observed only in strong acidic solutions (pH < 1.5). After acid demineralization, samples of the same anthracite underwent a significant enhancement of oxidation in both acid and alkaline solutions (pH = 0.4-11.5). As all the iron had been removed from the surface and the reactions were completed in a much shorter time, the oxidation mechanism must have been of a different nature than that for the untreated anthracite. A qualitative model based on the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 by activated carbon sites in the coal surface is used to explain the oxidation of the demineralized anthracite. ?? 1984.

  17. Application of graphene oxide/lanthanum-modified carbon paste electrode for the selective determination of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fengying; Feng, Chenqi; Fu, Ning; Wu, Huihui; Jiang, Jibo; Han, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    A home-made carbon paste electrode (CPE) was reformed by graphene oxide (GO)/lanthanum (La) complexes, and a modified electrode, called GO-La/CPE, was fabricated for the selective determination of dopamine (DA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Several factors affecting the electrocatalytic performance of the modified sensor were investigated. Owning to the combination of GO and La ions, the GO-La/CPE sensor exhibited large surface area, well selectivity, good repeatability and stability in the oxidation reaction of DA. At optimal conditions, the response of the GO-La/CPE electrode for determining DA was linear in the region of 0.01-0.1 μM and 0.1-400.0 μM. The limit of detection was down to 0.32 nM (S/N = 3). In addition, this modified electrode was successfully applied to the detection of DA in real urine and serum samples by using standard adding method, showing its promising application in the electroanalysis of real samples.

  18. Mathematical modeling of an exothermic leaching reaction system: pressure oxidation of wide size arsenopyrite participates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papangelakis, V. G.; Berk, D.; Demopoulos, G. P.

    1990-10-01

    In the design of processes involving exothermic reactions, as is the case of several sulfide leaching systems, it is desirable to utilize the energy liberated by the reaction to drive the reactor toward autogenous operation. For optimal reactor design, models which couple leaching kinetics and heat effects are needed. In this paper, the principles of modeling exothermic leaching reactions are outlined. The system investigated is the high-temperature (160 °C to 200 °C) pressure (O2) oxidation of arsenopyrite (FeAsS). The reaction system is characterized by three consecutive reactions: (1) heterogeneous dissolution of arsenopyrite particles, (2) homogeneous oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III), and (3) precipitation of scorodite (FeAsO4-2H2O). The overall kinetics is controlled by the arsenopyrite surface reaction. There was good agreement between laboratory-scale batch tests and model predictions. The model was expanded to simulate the performance of large-scale batch and single-stage continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the same rate-limiting regime. Emphasis is given to the identification of steady-state temperatures for autogenous processing. The effects of operating variables, such as feed temperature, slurry density, and retention time, on reactor operation and yield of leaching products are discussed.

  19. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  20. Selective oxidation of buried AlGaAs for fabrication of vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Chui, H.C.; Hou, H.Q.; Hull, R.

    1996-06-01

    The authors discuss the selective conversion of buried layers of AlGaAs to a stable oxide and the implementation of this oxide into high performance vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). The rate of lateral oxidation is shown to be linear with an Arrhenius temperature dependence. The measured activation energies vary with Al composition, providing a high degree of oxidation selectivity between AlGaAs alloys. Thus buried oxide layers can be selectively fabricated within the VCSEL through small compositional variations in the AlGaAs layers. The oxidation of AlGaAs alloys, as opposed to AlAs, is found to provide robust processing of reliable lasers. The insulating and low refractive index oxide provides enhanced electrical and optical confinement for ultralow threshold currents in oxide-apertured VCSELs.

  1. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1 : 10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 → 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  2. Use of nanostructured oxides for selective gas-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gönüllü, Y.; Saruhan, B.

    2014-06-01

    Titania nanotubular layers (TiO2-NTs) are better known with their use in dye-synthesized solar cells. In the field of gas sensors, the best known application of TiO2-NT layers is given with H2 sensing. TiO2-NT structures are commonly synthesized from pure titanium by anodic oxidation method. As literature indicates, gas sensing with titania can be modified by doping to obtain p- or n-type semiconductor behaviour. As undoped titania is widely used for CO and H2- sensing, Al- and Cr-doped titania is reported to be effective for NO2-sensing. Nanostructuring of TiO2 yields faster and more stable response toward CO and NO2 with almost no drift in sensor signal. Dopants are introduced by wet-chemistry method or by simultaneous anodization in an alloy. We introduced Cr3+ to TiO2 NT-layers by soaking in nitrate salt and Al3+ by anodization of Ti6Al4V alloy. All doped TiO2 NTs are tested for NO2 sensing at temperatures up to 500°C in the presence of CO. The characteristics of doping are investigated by XRD, EDX-TEM methods. Cr-doping of nanotubular TiO2 sensors displays p-type semiconductor behaviour and a considerably increased NO2-selectivity, while Aldoping emphasizes the CO-selectivity. Effect of Cr-doping on sensing is further investigated by means of impedance spectroscopic measurements and equivalent circuit modeling in order to optimize the sensors for real-time measurements.

  3. Water-gas Shift Reaction on oxide/Cu(111): Rational Catalyst Screening from Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.

    2010-11-28

    Developing improved catalysts based on a fundamental understanding of reaction mechanism has become one of the grand challenges in catalysis. A theoretical understanding and screening the metal-oxide composite catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is presented here. Density functional theory was employed to identify the key step for the WGS reaction on the Au, Cu-oxide catalysts, where the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation correlates well with the experimental measured WGS activity. Accordingly, the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation was used as the scaling descriptor to screen the inverse model catalysts, oxide/Cu(111), for the better WGS activity. Our calculations predict that the WGS activity increases in a sequence: Cu(111), ZnO/Cu(111) < TiO{sub 2}/Cu(111), ZrO{sub 2}/Cu(111) < MoO{sub 3}/Cu(111). Our results imply that the high performances of Au, Cu-oxide nanocatalysts in the WGS reaction rely heavily on the direct participation of both oxide and metal sites. The degree that the oxide is reduced by Cu plays an important role in determining the WGS activity of oxide/Cu catalysts. The reducible oxide can be transformed from the fully oxidized form to the reduced form due to the interaction with Cu and, therefore, the transfer of electron density from Cu, which helps in releasing the bottleneck water dissociation and, therefore, facilitating the WGS reaction on copper.

  4. Water-gas shift reaction on oxide/Cu(111): Rational catalyst screening from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping

    2010-11-01

    Developing improved catalysts based on a fundamental understanding of reaction mechanism has become one of the grand challenges in catalysis. A theoretical understanding and screening the metal-oxide composite catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is presented here. Density functional theory was employed to identify the key step for the WGS reaction on the Au, Cu-oxide catalysts, where the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation correlates well with the experimental measured WGS activity. Accordingly, the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation was used as the scaling descriptor to screen the inverse model catalysts, oxide/Cu(111), for the better WGS activity. Our calculations predict that the WGS activity increases in a sequence: Cu(111), ZnO/Cu(111) < TiO2/Cu(111), ZrO2/Cu(111) < MoO3/Cu(111). Our results imply that the high performances of Au, Cu-oxide nanocatalysts in the WGS reaction rely heavily on the direct participation of both oxide and metal sites. The degree that the oxide is reduced by Cu plays an important role in determining the WGS activity of oxide/Cu catalysts. The reducible oxide can be transformed from the fully oxidized form to the reduced form due to the interaction with Cu and, therefore, the transfer of electron density from Cu, which helps in releasing the bottleneck water dissociation and, therefore, facilitating the WGS reaction on copper.

  5. The surface of iron molybdate catalysts used for the selective oxidation of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Benjamin R.; Pudge, Geoffrey J. F.; Bugler, Keith G.; Rushby, Alice V.; Kondrat, Simon; Bartley, Jonathan; Golunski, Stanislaw; Taylor, Stuart H.; Gibson, Emma; Wells, Peter. P.; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2016-06-01

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde is a major chemical process carried out catalytically and iron molybdate is one of the major catalysts for this process. In this paper we explore the nature of the active and selective surfaces of iron molybdate catalysts and show that the effective catalysts comprise molybdenum rich surfaces. We conclude that it is therefore important to maximise the surface area of these active catalysts and to this end we have studied catalysts made using a new physical grinding method with oxalic acid. For super-stoichiometric materials (Fe:Mo = 1:2.2) the reaction data show that physical mixing produces effective catalysts, possibly offering an improvement over the conventional co-precipitation method.

  6. Kinetic study of the hydrogen oxidation reaction on sub-stoichiometric titanium oxide-supported platinum electrocatalyst in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić, B.; Gulicovski, J.; Gajić-Krstajić, Lj.; Elezović, N.; Radmilović, V. R.; Krstajić, N. V.; Vračar, Lj. M.

    The kinetics and mechanism of the hydrogen oxidation reaction were studied in 0.5 mol dm -3 HClO 4 solution on an electrode based on titanium oxide with Magneli phase structure-supported platinum electrocatalyst applied on rotation Au disk electrode. Pt catalyst was prepared by impregnation method from 2-propanol solution of Pt(NH 3) 2(NO 2) 2 and sub-stoichiometric titanium oxide powder. Sub-stiochiometric titanium oxide support was characterized by X-ray diffraction and BET techniques. The synthesized catalyst was analyzed by TEM technique. Based on Tafel-Heyrovsky-Volmer mechanism the corresponding kinetic equations were derived to describe the hydrogen oxidation current-potential behavior on RDE over the entire potential region. The polarization RDE curves were fitted with derived polarization equations according to proposed model. The fitting shows that the HOR on Pt proceeds most likely via the Tafel-Volmer (TV) pathway in the lower potential region, while the Heyrovsky-Volmer (HV) pathway is operative in the higher potential region. It is pointed out that Tafel equation that has been frequently used for the kinetics analysis in the HOR, can not reproduce the polarization curves measured with high mass-transport rates. Polarization measurements on RDE revealed that the Pt catalyst deposited on titanium suboxide support showed equal specific activity for the HOR compared to conventional carbon-supported Pt fuel cell catalyst.

  7. Selective laser sintering of MA956 oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan M.; Kramer, Kevin J.; El-Dasher, Bassem

    2015-09-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels' qualities of radiation damage resistance and high strength at high temperature make them promising nuclear structural materials. However, the dispersed yttria that gives ODS steel its beneficial qualities are generally compromised during joining processes, making fabrication difficult and expensive. The selective laser sintering process offers a potential path through this barrier by which net-shape parts can feasibly be built via additive manufacturing without fully melting the structure. Rastering a 400 W laser over a 110 μm MA956 ODS steel powder bed, we additively built parts with varying build conditions. Although density was achieved to within 97% of the wrought MA956, ultimate tensile strengths achieved only 65% of the wrought strength. Spectroscopy analysis points to the agglomeration of the yttria nano-particles as a possible explanation for the loss in strength. Further study might benefit from exploration of other parameters such as thinner powder build layers which would require less energy input to achieve sintering while minimizing time above the melting temperature.

  8. Aqueous nitrite ion determination by selective reduction and gas phase nitric oxide chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, A. J.; Barkley, R. M.; Sievers, R. E.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    An improved method of flow injection analysis for aqueous nitrite ion exploits the sensitivity and selectivity of the nitric oxide (NO) chemilluminescence detector. Trace analysis of nitrite ion in a small sample (5-160 microL) is accomplished by conversion of nitrite ion to NO by aqueous iodide in acid. The resulting NO is transported to the gas phase through a semipermeable membrane and subsequently detected by monitoring the photoemission of the reaction between NO and ozone (O3). Chemiluminescence detection is selective for measurement of NO, and, since the detection occurs in the gas-phase, neither sample coloration nor turbidity interfere. The detection limit for a 100-microL sample is 0.04 ppb of nitrite ion. The precision at the 10 ppb level is 2% relative standard deviation, and 60-180 samples can be analyzed per hour. Samples of human saliva and food extracts were analyzed; the results from a standard colorimetric measurement are compared with those from the new chemiluminescence method in order to further validate the latter method. A high degree of selectivity is obtained due to the three discriminating steps in the process: (1) the nitrite ion to NO conversion conditions are virtually specific for nitrite ion, (2) only volatile products of the conversion will be swept to the gas phase (avoiding turbidity or color in spectrophotometric methods), and (3) the NO chemiluminescence detector selectively detects the emission from the NO + O3 reaction. The method is free of interferences, offers detection limits of low parts per billion of nitrite ion, and allows the analysis of up to 180 microL-sized samples per hour, with little sample preparation and no chromatographic separation. Much smaller samples can be analyzed by this method than in previously reported batch analysis methods, which typically require 5 mL or more of sample and often need chromatographic separations as well.

  9. Reaction rate constant for dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J.

    1998-04-29

    The rate of oxidation of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K Basin water is an important parameter when assessing the processes and accident scenarios for preparing the fuel for dry storage. The literature provides data and rate laws for the oxidation of unirradiated uranium in various environments. Measurement data for the dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel is compared to the literature data for linear oxidation in dry air. Equations for the correlations and statistical bounds to the K Basin fuel data and the literature data are selected for predicting nominal and bounding rates for the dry air oxidation of the K Basin fuel. These rate equations are intended for use in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Technical Data book.

  10. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.

  11. Bio-inspired immobilization of metal oxides on monolithic microreactor for continuous Knoevenagel reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Wentong; Shi, Da; Tao, Shengyang; Li, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yuchao; Yu, Yongxian; Qiu, Jieshan; Ji, Min; Wang, Xinkui

    2016-11-01

    A facile method is reported to construct monolithic microreactor with high catalytic performance for Knoevenagel reaction. The microreactor is based on hierarchically porous silica (HPS) which has interconnected macro- and mesopores. Then the HPS is surface modified by pyrogallol (PG) polymer. Al(NO3)3 and Mg(NO3)2 are loaded on the surface of HPS through coordination with -OH groups of PG. After thermal treatment, Al(NO3)3 and Mg(NO3)2 are converted Al2O3 and MgO. The as-synthesized catalytic microreactor shows a high and stable performance in Knoevenagel reaction. The microreactor possess large surface area and interconnected pore structures which are beneficial for reactions. Moreover, this economic, facile and eco-friendly surface modification method can be used in loading more metal oxides for more reactions. PMID:27459172

  12. Stable stoichiometry of gas-phase cerium oxide cluster ions and their reactions with CO.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Toshiaki; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2015-03-12

    Cerium oxide cluster ions, Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) (n = 2-9, x = -1 to +2), were prepared in the gas phase by laser ablation of a cerium oxide rod in the presence of oxygen diluted in He as the carrier gas. The stable stoichiometry of the cluster ions was investigated using a mass spectrometer in combination with a newly developed post heating device. The oxygen-rich clusters, Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) (x = 1, 2), were found to release oxygen molecules, and Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) (x = -1, 0) were exclusively formed by post heating treatment at 573 K. The Ce(n)O(2n-1)(+) and Ce(n)O(2n)(+) clusters were found to be thermally stable, and the oxygen-rich clusters consisted of robust Ce(n)O(2n-1)(+) and Ce(n)O(2n)(+) and weakly bound oxygen atoms. Evaluation of the reactivity of Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) with CO molecules demonstrated that Ce(n)O(2n)(+) oxidized CO to form Ce(n)O(2n-1)(+) and CO2, and the rate constants of the reaction were in the range of 10(-12)-10(-16) cm(3) s(-1). The CO oxidation reaction was distinct for n = 5, which occurred in parallel with the CO attachment reaction. PMID:25651032

  13. Oxidation of flavonoids by hypochlorous acid: reaction kinetics and antioxidant activity studies.

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Stawowska, Katarzyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2016-08-01

    Flavonoids, plant polyphenols, ubiquitous components of human diet, are excellent antioxidants. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by activated neutrophils, is highly reactive chlorinating and oxidizing species. It has been reported earlier that flavonoids are chlorinated by HOCl. Here we show that flavonoids from flavonol subclass are also oxidized by HOCl, but only if the latter is in a large molar excess (≥ 10). The kinetics of this reaction was studied by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, at different pH. We found that flavonols were oxidized by HOCl with the rate constants of the order of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.5. Antioxidant activity of HOCl-modified flavonoids was measured by 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) method. Slightly higher antioxidant activity, compared to parent compounds, was observed for flavonols after their reaction with equimolar or moderate excess of HOCl whereas flavonols treated with high molar excess of HOCl exhibited decrease in antioxidant activity. The mechanism of flavonoid reaction with HOCl at physiological pH is proposed, and biological consequences of this reaction are discussed. PMID:27225705

  14. Supercritical water oxidation of Quinazoline: Effects of conversion parameters and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan

    2016-09-01

    The supercritical water oxidation reaction of quinazoline and a set of related reaction products were investigated in batch reactors by varying the temperature (T, 400-600 °C), time (t, 0-400 s), water density (ρ, 70.79-166.28  kg m(-3)) and oxidation coefficient (OC, 0-4.0). The TOC removal efficiency (CRE) increased significantly as the OC increased, whereas this effect was very limited at high OC (>2.0). Lack of oxygen resulted in low CRE and TN removal efficiency (NRE), also cause coke-formation, and giving high yield of NH3 and nitrogenous organic intermediates. Prolonging reaction time did not provide an appreciable improvement on CRE but remarkably increased NRE at temperature higher than 500 °C. Pyrimidines and pyridines as the nitrogenous intermediates were largely found in GC-MS spectrum. Polymerization among benzene, phenyl radical and benzyl radical played important roles in the formation of PAHs, such as naphthalene, biphenyl, phenanthrene. These collective results showed how the yield of intermediate products responded to changes in the process variables, which permitted the development of a potential reaction network for supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline. PMID:27179598

  15. The preparation of large surface area lanthanum based perovskite supports for AuPt nanoparticles: tuning the glycerol oxidation reaction pathway by switching the perovskite B site.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher D; Kondrat, Simon A; Smith, Paul J; Manning, Troy D; Miedziak, Peter J; Brett, Gemma L; Armstrong, Robert D; Bartley, Jonathan K; Taylor, Stuart H; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-07-01

    Gold and gold alloys, in the form of supported nanoparticles, have been shown over the last three decades to be highly effective oxidation catalysts. Mixed metal oxide perovskites, with their high structural tolerance, are ideal for investigating how changes in the chemical composition of supports affect the catalysts' properties, while retaining similar surface areas, morphologies and metal co-ordinations. However, a significant disadvantage of using perovskites as supports is their high crystallinity and small surface area. We report the use of a supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation methodology to prepare large surface area lanthanum based perovskites, making the deposition of 1 wt% AuPt nanoparticles feasible. These catalysts were used for the selective oxidation of glycerol. By changing the elemental composition of the perovskite B site, we dramatically altered the reaction pathway between a sequential oxidation route to glyceric or tartronic acid and a dehydration reaction pathway to lactic acid. Selectivity profiles were correlated to reported oxygen adsorption capacities of the perovskite supports and also to changes in the AuPt nanoparticle morphologies. Extended time on line analysis using the best oxidation catalyst (AuPt/LaMnO3) produced an exceptionally high tartronic acid yield. LaMnO3 produced from alternative preparation methods was found to have lower activities, but gave comparable selectivity profiles to that produced using the supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation methodology. PMID:27074316

  16. Water oxidation by a cytochrome p450: mechanism and function of the reaction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Brinda; Mah, Derrick J; Lewis, Andrew R; Plettner, Erika

    2013-01-01

    P450(cam) (CYP101A1) is a bacterial monooxygenase that is known to catalyze the oxidation of camphor, the first committed step in camphor degradation, with simultaneous reduction of oxygen (O2). We report that P450(cam) catalysis is controlled by oxygen levels: at high O2 concentration, P450(cam) catalyzes the known oxidation reaction, whereas at low O2 concentration the enzyme catalyzes the reduction of camphor to borneol. We confirmed, using (17)O and (2)H NMR, that the hydrogen atom added to camphor comes from water, which is oxidized to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This is the first time a cytochrome P450 has been observed to catalyze oxidation of water to H2O2, a difficult reaction to catalyze due to its high barrier. The reduction of camphor and simultaneous oxidation of water are likely catalyzed by the iron-oxo intermediate of P450(cam) , and we present a plausible mechanism that accounts for the 1:1 borneol:H2O2 stoichiometry we observed. This reaction has an adaptive value to bacteria that express this camphor catabolism pathway, which requires O2, for two reasons: 1) the borneol and H2O2 mixture generated is toxic to other bacteria and 2) borneol down-regulates the expression of P450(cam) and its electron transfer partners. Since the reaction described here only occurs under low O2 conditions, the down-regulation only occurs when O2 is scarce. PMID:23634216

  17. Oxidation of triclosan by ferrate: reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Zhang, Li-Juan; Fang, Yi-Xiang; Nghiem, Long Duc

    2011-02-15

    The oxidation of triclosan by commercial grade aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) was investigated and the reaction kinetics as a function of pH (7.0-10.0) were experimentally determined. Intermediate products of the oxidation process were characterized using both GC-MS and RRLC-MS/MS techniques. Changes in toxicity during the oxidation process of triclosan using Fe(VI) were investigated using Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata growth inhibition tests. The results show that triclosan reacted rapidly with Fe(VI), with the apparent second-order rate constant, k(app), being 754.7 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7. At a stoichiometric ratio of 10:1 (Fe(VI):triclosan), complete removal of triclosan was achieved. Species-specific rate constants, k, were determined for reaction of Fe(VI) with both the protonated and deprotonated triclosan species. The value of k determined for neutral triclosan was 6.7(±1.9)×10(2) M(-1) s(-1), while that measured for anionic triclosan was 7.6(±0.6)×10(3) M(-1) s(-1). The proposed mechanism for the oxidation of triclosan by the Fe(VI) involves the scission of ether bond and phenoxy radical addition reaction. Coupling reaction may also occur during Fe(VI) degradation of triclosan. Overall, the degradation processes of triclosan resulted in a significant decrease in algal toxicity. The toxicity tests showed that Fe(VI) itself dosed in the reaction did not inhibit green algae growth. PMID:21093982

  18. A novel label-free optical cysteine sensor based on the competitive oxidation reaction catalyzed by G-quadruplex halves.

    PubMed

    Su, Haichao; Qiao, Fengmin; Duan, Ruihuan; Chen, Lijian; Ai, Shiyun

    2013-05-15

    A sensitive and selective colorimetric detection method for Cysteine (Cys) was established in this paper. The detection mechanism is based on the oxidation of Cys by H2O2, which prevents the catalysis of the 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS)-H2O2 reaction by G-quadruplex halves. With the addition of Cys, the amount of the blue-green-colored free-radical cation (ABTS(·+)) was reduced. The absorbance of ABTS(+) at 421nm weakened as the color of the solution changed from blue-green to colorless. The concentration of Cys can be determined by monitoring this competitive reaction with the naked eye or using a UV-vis spectrometer. The calibration curve showed that the net absorption value at 421nm linearly increased over the Cys concentration range of 0.005-100μM with a detection limit of 5nM. Furthermore, amino acids other than Cys cannot mediate the color change under the identical conditions because of the absence of thiol groups, thereby suggesting the selectivity towards Cys of the proposed method. The optical sensor is high selective, which is important for the determination of Cys in serum samples. The assay shows great potential for its practical application as a disease-associated indicator which could satisfy the need for amino acid determination in fields such as food processing, biochemistry, pharmaceuticals, and clinical analysis. PMID:23333922

  19. Competing reactions of selected atmospheric gases on Fe3O4 nanoparticles surfaces.

    PubMed

    Eltouny, N; Ariya, Parisa A

    2014-11-14

    Heterogeneous reactions on atmospheric aerosol surfaces are increasingly considered important in understanding aerosol-cloud nucleation and climate change. To understand potential reactions in polluted atmospheres, the co-adsorption of NO2 and toluene to magnetite (Fe3O4i.e. FeO·Fe2O3) nanoparticles at ambient conditions was investigated for the first time. The surface area, size distribution, and morphology of Fe3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by BET method and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Adsorption isotherms, collected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, showed that the presence of NO2 decreased the adsorption of toluene. The analyses of the surface chemical composition of Fe3O4 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal that, upon the addition of NO2, the surface is oxidized and a contribution at 532.5 ± 0.4 eV in the O1s spectrum appears, showing that NO2 likely competes with toluene by dissociating on Fe(2+) sites and forming NO3(-). Different competing effects were observed for oxidized Fe3O4; oxidation occurred when exposed solely to NO2, whereas, the mixture of toluene and NO2 resulted in a reduction of the surface i.e. increased Fe(2+)/Fe(3+). Analyses by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry further suggest toluene reacts with Fe(3+) sites forming oxygenated organics. Our results indicate that on reduced magnetite, NO2 is more reactive and competes with toluene; in contrast, on oxidized Fe3O4, toluene is more reactive. Because magnetite can assume a range of oxidation ratios in the environment, different competing interactions between pollutants like NO2 and toluene could influence atmospheric processes, namely, the formation of Fe(2+) and the formation of atmospheric oxidants. PMID:25247461

  20. Understanding the role of gold nanoparticles in enhancing the catalytic activity of manganese oxides in water oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Hao; Li, Weikun; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha; El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M; Kriz, David; Genz, Nina; Guild, Curtis; Ressler, Thorsten; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2015-02-16

    The Earth-abundant and inexpensive manganese oxides (MnOx) have emerged as an intriguing type of catalysts for the water oxidation reaction. However, the overall turnover frequencies of MnOx catalysts are still much lower than that of nanostructured IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate that doping MnOx polymorphs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can result in a strong enhancement of catalytic activity for the water oxidation reaction. It is observed that, for the first time, the catalytic activity of MnOx/AuNPs catalysts correlates strongly with the initial valence of the Mn centers. By promoting the formation of Mn(3+) species, a small amount of AuNPs (<5%) in α-MnO2/AuNP catalysts significantly improved the catalytic activity up to 8.2 times in the photochemical and 6 times in the electrochemical system, compared with the activity of pure α-MnO2. PMID:25284796

  1. In situ FTIR study of n-butane selective oxidation to maleic anhydride on V-P-O catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wenig, R.W.; Schrader, G.L.

    1986-11-20

    The selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride on vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen (V-P-O) catalysts having P to V ratios of 0.9, 1.0, and 1.1 was studied by transmission infrared spectroscopy. Catalysts were exposed to mixtures of 1.5% n-butane in air at temperatures from 100 to 500/sup 0/C. Adsorbed n-butane, maleic anhydride, and carbon oxide species were observed on the catalyst surfaces. In addition, adsorbed maleic acid and highly reactive olefinic species could be detected. The nature of the adsorbed species present on the catalyst surface was dependent on the catalyst phosphorus loading, the reaction temperature, and the time of exposure under reaction conditions.

  2. Reaction of low-molecular-mass organoselenium compounds (and their sulphur analogues) with inflammation-associated oxidants.

    PubMed

    Carroll, L; Davies, M J; Pattison, D I

    2015-06-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element in mammals, with the majority specifically encoded as seleno-L-cysteine into a range of selenoproteins. Many of these proteins play a key role in modulating oxidative stress, via either direct detoxification of biological oxidants, or repair of oxidised residues. Both selenium- and sulphur-containing residues react readily with the wide range of oxidants (including hydrogen peroxide, radicals, singlet oxygen and hypochlorous, hypobromous, hypothiocyanous and peroxynitrous acids) that are produced during inflammation and have been implicated in the development of a range of inflammatory diseases. Whilst selenium has similar properties to sulphur, it typically exhibits greater reactivity with most oxidants, and there are considerable differences in the subsequent reactivity and ease of repair of the oxidised species that are formed. This review discusses the chemistry of low-molecular-mass organoselenium compounds (e.g. selenoethers, diselenides and selenols) with inflammatory oxidants, with a particular focus on the reaction kinetics and product studies, with the differences in reactivity between selenium and sulphur analogues described in the selected examples. These data provide insight into the therapeutic potential of low-molecular-mass selenium-containing compounds to modulate the activity of both radical and molecular oxidants and provide protection against inflammation-induced damage. Progress in their therapeutic development (including modulation of potential selenium toxicity by strategic design) is demonstrated by a brief summary of some recent studies where novel organoselenium compounds have been used as wound healing or radioprotection agents and in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25854915

  3. Formation of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films by substitution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. S.; Lin, Y. H.; Wei, Y. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    2012-02-15

    Conductive Ti-oxide thin films are produced using a reactive sputtering and post-annealing process. The lowest resistivity of Ti-oxide thin films (2.30 x 10{sup -2}{Omega}-cm) can be achieved after annealing for 1 h at 400 deg. C in ambient O{sub 2}. Additionally, the Hall measurement results indicate that the carrier concentration increases during the initial 1-h annealing process before decreasing during subsequent annealing. By curve fitting the O{sub ls} core-level peaks in the x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrum of the annealed Ti-oxide thin films, we found that the oxygen (O) vacancy concentration monotonically increases with annealing time, which differs from the behavior of the carrier concentration regarding annealing time. This means that the O-vacancy mechanism alone cannot explain the formation of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films. By curve-fitting core-level Ti peaks in the XPS spectrum of annealed Ti-oxide thin films, a Ti{sup 3+}-to-Ti{sup 4+} substitution reaction in the TiO{sub 2} phase of the Ti-oxide thin film after annealing plays the dominant role in the formation of conduction carriers. Instead of the O-vacancy mechanism, the Ti{sup 3+}-to-Ti{sup 4+} substitution mechanism can explain the concentration of carriers in Ti-oxide thin films following annealing.

  4. Oxidation of LDL by myeloperoxidase and reactive nitrogen species: reaction pathways and antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Carr, A C; McCall, M R; Frei, B

    2000-07-01

    Oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) appears to play an important role in atherogenesis. Although the precise mechanisms of LDL oxidation in vivo are unknown, several lines of evidence implicate myeloperoxidase and reactive nitrogen species, in addition to ceruloplasmin and 15-lipoxygenase. Myeloperoxidase generates a number of reactive species, including hypochlorous acid, chloramines, tyrosyl radicals, and nitrogen dioxide. These reactive species oxidize the protein, lipid, and antioxidant components of LDL. Modification of apolipoprotein B results in enhanced uptake of LDL by macrophages with subsequent formation of lipid-laden foam cells. Nitric oxide synthases produce nitric oxide and, under certain conditions, superoxide radicals. Numerous other sources of superoxide radicals have been identified in the arterial wall, including NAD(P)H oxidases and xanthine oxidase. Nitric oxide and superoxide readily combine to form peroxynitrite, a reactive nitrogen species capable of modifying LDL. In this review, we examine the reaction pathways involved in LDL oxidation by myeloperoxidase and reactive nitrogen species and the potential protective effects of the antioxidant vitamins C and E. PMID:10894808

  5. Rate Equations and Kinetic Parameters of the Reactions Involved in Pyrite Oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Lizama, H M; Suzuki, I

    1989-11-01

    Rate equations and kinetic parameters were obtained for various reactions involved in the bacterial oxidation of pyrite. The rate constants were 3.5 muM Fe per min per FeS(2) percent pulp density for the spontaneous pyrite dissolution, 10 muM Fe per min per mM Fe for the indirect leaching with Fe, 90 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidation of washed pyrite, and 250 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the T. ferrooxidans oxidation of unwashed pyrite. The K(m) values for pyrite concentration were similar and were 1.9, 2.5, and 2.75% pulp density for indirect leaching, washed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, and unwashed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, respectively. The last reaction was competitively inhibited by increasing concentrations of cells, with a K(i) value of 0.13 mg of wet cells per ml. T. ferrooxidans cells also increased the rate of Fe production from Fe plus pyrite. PMID:16348054

  6. Direct determination of the activation energy for the reaction of nitric oxide with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Borders, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The activation energy for the reaction of nitric oxide with ozone has been directly measured as a function of temperature. The instrument constructed for this study consisted of two flow tubes that are connected together at each end, where the reaction zone temperature of each flow tube was controlled independently. The reaction of nitric oxide and ozone was pseudo-first order ((NO)/(O/sub 3/) greater than or equal to 250) and studied by following the reduction of the chemiluminescence of one of the products (NO/sup *//sub 2/(/sup 2/B/sub 1,2/)) of the reaction. The chemiluminescence was measured using a microcomputer-controlled photon counter designed for these studies. The activation energy has been found to vary with temperature. The activation energy varies from 2390 +/- 10 calories at 216 K to 2970 +/- 60 calories at 333 K. The variation over the complete temperature range studied (204-353 K) is large enough (650 calories) that the errors associated with the method cannot account for all of the variation. There are other pathways for this reaction other than ground state reactants going to ground state products, and their contribution to the activation energy (approx.500 calories) has been found to be sufficient to account for the observed variation with temperature when added to the variation predicted by either transition state (180 calories) or collision (150 calories) theory.

  7. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  8. Development of Ag dendrites-reduced graphene oxide composite catalysts via galvanic replacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Li; Sokiransky, Mika Matsunaka; Wang, James; Lai, Guosong; Yu, Aimin

    2016-09-01

    Silver dendrites/reduced graphene oxide (AgD/RGO) composites were synthesized via a facile galvanic replacement method. The successful formation of Ag dendrites and the graphene oxide reduction were proved by a series of characterization techniques. The possible formation mechanism of Ag dendrites during the galvanic replacement reaction was discussed. The catalytic activity of the as-synthesized AgD/RGO composite was evaluated by its performance on the chemical reduction of an organic dye methylene blue. The AgD/RGO composite showed a much higher catalytic performance and stability than that of Ag dendrites.

  9. Selective Growth of Noble Gases at Metal/Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Oka, Hiroshi; Ohnuki, Somei

    2016-02-17

    The locations and roles of noble gases at an oxide/metal interface in oxide dispersed metal are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Oxide dispersed metal consisting of FCC Fe and Y2Hf2O7 (Y2Ti2O7) is synthesized by mechanical alloying under a saturated Ar gas environment. Transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory observes the strain field at the interface of FCC Fe {111} and Y2Hf2O7 {111} whose physical origin emerges from surface reconstruction due to charge transfer. Noble gases are experimentally observed at the oxide (Y2Ti2O7) site and calculations reveal that the noble gases segregate the interface and grow toward the oxide site. In general, the interface is defined as the trapping site for noble gases; however, transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory found evidence which shows that noble gases grow toward the oxide, contrary to the generally held idea that the interface is the final trapping site for noble gases. Furthermore, calculations show that the inclusion of He/Ar hardens the oxide, suggesting that material fractures could begin from the noble gas bubble within the oxides. Thus, experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that noble gases grow from the interface toward the oxide and that oxides behave as a trapping site for noble gases. PMID:26840881

  10. Photoemission and reaction study of mass-selected Pt clusters on TiO2(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2008-03-01

    Metal cluster has been speculated to have strong size dependence in catalytic activity. The clusters on surfaces would give further specificity because of the interaction between the clusters and the surface. Catalytic properties of mass-selected metal clusters on well-defined oxide surfaces have been investigated using the new ultra high vacuum cluster deposition apparatus. In this study, we have examined catalytic and electronic properties of platinum clusters used as a composition of automotive exhaust catalysts, and used titanium dioxide as the support. Pt cluster ions were produced by a DC magnetron-sputter cluster ion source [1] with an ion funnel [2], mass-selected by a quadrupole mass filter, and then deposited on TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces. The catalytic oxidation of CO on Ptn/TiO2 (n<10) was investigated using the high-pressure reaction cell with quartz linings, which was connected to the external recirculation loop with a stainless steel bellows pump. The catalytic activity was suggested to be dependent on the size (n) of Ptn clusters. It was expected to be due to the electronic properties of the clusters. The size specificity will be discussed with the results of photoemission spectroscopy. [1] H. Haberland et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 3266 (1992). [2] S.A. Shaffer el al., Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 11, 1813 (1997).

  11. Factors affecting the selectivity of the oxidation of methyl p-toluate by cobalt(III).

    PubMed

    Sumner, Charles E; Morrill, Kent A; Howell, Jeff S; Little, James

    2008-03-17

    The anaerobic oxidation of methyl p-toluate by cobalt(III) in acetic acid was investigated. Observed products were 4-carbomethoxybenzaldehyde (2), 4-carbomethoxybenzoic acid (3), 4-carbomethoxybenzyl acetate (1), 4,4'-dicarbomethoxybibenzyl (6), methyl 2,4-dimethylbenzoate (8), and methyl 3,4-dimethylbenzoate (9). Deuterium isotope labeling showed that 2 was not formed from 1, but appeared to be formed directly from methyl p-toluate via 4-carbomethoxybenzyl alcohol (5). The ratio of (2 + 3) to 1 was 0.5 with [py3Co3O(OAc)5OH[PF6] and 1.0 with cobaltic acetate. Cobaltic acetate was generated in situ by the reaction of cobaltous acetate and peracetic acid. When the oxidation was carried out in the presence of chromium (0.05 equiv based on cobalt), the ratio increased dramatically and no 6 was observed. Other transition metals such as vanadium, molybdenum, and manganese had a similar effect, but were not as effective as chromium. Chromium was observed to form a mixed-metal cluster complex with cobalt. Treatment of an acetic acid solution of cobaltous acetate and methyl isonicotinate with K2CrO4 produced a solid tentatively identified as [(MIN)3Co2CrO(OAc)6][CrO4H] (MIN = methyl isonicotinate). The selectivity for the oxidation of methyl p-toluate exhibited by the mixed-metal cluster complex was similar to that observed by the addition of chromium to oxidations using [py3Co3O(OAc)5OH[PF6]. PMID:18225893

  12. Improving the hydrogen selectivity of graphene oxide membranes by reducing non-selective pores with intergrown ZIF-8 crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuerui; Chi, Chenglong; Tao, Jifang; Peng, Yongwu; Ying, Shaoming; Qian, Yuhong; Dong, Jinqiao; Hu, Zhigang; Gu, Yuandong; Zhao, Dan

    2016-06-21

    We report the intergrowth of ZIF-8 crystals on ultrathin graphene oxide (GO) membranes, which helps to reduce the non-selective pores of pristine GO membranes leading to gas selectivities as high as 406, 155, and 335 for H2/CO2, H2/N2, and H2/CH4 mixtures, respectively. PMID:27181340

  13. Thiol adsorption on metal oxides: an approach for selective deposition on zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Jason W.; Steeves, Diane M.; Singh, Jagdeep; Im, Jisun; Whitten, James E.

    2011-02-01

    We have previously discovered a novel, facile approach to encapsulate ZnO nanorods within thiol complexes. This approach results in a thiol uptake of 30-40% and a 400-500 nm thick thiol-Zn-thiol complex encapsulation layer surrounding ZnO nanorods. By controlling experimental parameters, it is possible to control the thiol deposition, enabling less uptake, which results in a surface monolayer instead of encapsulation. Through this approach, thiol modification of other metal oxide materials, namely TiO2, Al2O3, and MgO, has been attempted. FTIR analysis indicates that thiol adsorption occurs only on ZnO; chemisorption of thiols on other nanoparticles is not evident. Ultrahigh vacuum single crystal adsorption studies demonstrate that ZnO(0001) is also more susceptible to thiol monolayer formation, as evidenced by lack of methanethiol adsorption on TiO2(110) and MgO(0001). These results indicate that the facile thiol modification approach opens a new avenue for surface modification of multi-component metal oxide materials by enabling selective thiol modification of ZnO. This work has potential applicability for creating multiple ligand-functionalized materials, which could be useful for the design of novel multiplexing sensors and photovoltaics.

  14. Ion dynamics in the pseudocapacitive reaction of hydrous ruthenium oxide. Effect of the temperature pre-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopčić, Suzana; Mandić, Zoran; Inzelt, György; Roković, Marijana Kraljić; Meštrović, Ernest

    2011-05-01

    Pseudocapacitive redox reaction of hydrous ruthenium oxide was investigated by the combined electrochemical and quartz crystal nanobalance measurements on gold support in H2SO4 and Na2SO4 solutions. The results show that the pseudocapacitance arises from at least two different Faradaic reactions with significant influence of double layer capacitance. All three processes simultaneously take place during charging/discharging reaction, but their contribution vary depending on the electrolyte used, the temperature pre-treatment and on the potential range. One Faradaic reaction releases protons during oxidation reaction resulting in the electrode mass decrease, while another Faradaic reaction results in the chemical binding of water leading to the mass gain during the oxidation reaction. The former reaction is favoured in acidic electrolyte and at lower anodic potentials, and the latter reaction proceeds predominantly in neutral media and at higher anodic potentials. The influence of annealing temperatures on the characteristics of the redox reaction of hydrous ruthenium oxide, as well as on its capacitance, was confirmed. It was demonstrated that specific capacitances of hydrous ruthenium oxide could achieve values as high as 1500 F g-1, provided that conditions of good electronic conductivity among RuO2 particles, as well as good electrical contact between gold and RuO2, are met.

  15. Reactions of calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate with oxides and sulfates of various elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate were evaluated as the insulation layer of thermal barrier coatings for air cooled gas turbine components. Their reactions with various oxides and sulfates were studied at 1100 C and 1300 C for times ranging up to 400 and 200 hours, respectively. These oxides and sulfates represent potential impurities or additives in gas turbine fuels and in turbine combustion air, as well as elements of potential bond coat alloys. The phase compositions of the reaction products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. BaZrO3 and 2CaO-SiO2 both reacted with P2O5, V2O5, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and SiO2. In addition, 2CaO-SiO2 reacted with Na2O, BaO, MgO, and CoO and BaZrO3 reacted with Fe2O3.

  16. Synthesis of size-selected Pt nanoparticles supported on sulfonated graphene with polyvinyl alcohol for methanol oxidation in alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Ming; Wang, Sheng-An; Sun, Chia-Liang; Ger, Ming-Der

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the size-selected platinum (Pt) nanoparticles are loaded on sulfonated graphene with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the conductive polymer for fuel-cell applications. Methanol oxidation reactions and reliability of various catalysts based on carbon black, graphene, and sulfonated graphene catalyst supports are compared under alkaline conditions. When PVA is used as the conductive polymer in place of Nafion, both the electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and the methanol oxidation property were superior, irrespective of the catalyst and support. On the other hand, the catalyst with Pt on sulfonated graphene (Pt/sG) outperforms those on other supports. For methanol oxidation, the catalyst decay occurs with a decay of only 9.06% for Pt/sG. It is suggested that the sulfonate functional group on graphene not only improves catalytic activity but can also enhance catalyst reliability.

  17. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  18. Isotopomeric characterization of nitrous oxide produced by reaction of enzymes extracted from nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Hozuki, T.; Arai, K.; Toyoda, S.; Koba, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, N.

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and produced in denitrification and nitrification by various microorganisms. Site preference (SP) of 15N in N2O, which is defined as the difference in the natural abundance of isotopomers 14N15NO and 15N14NO relative to 14N14NO, has been reported to be a useful tool to quantitatively distinguish N2O production pathways. To determine representative SP values for each microbial process, we firstly measured SP of N2O produced in the enzyme reaction of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) purified from two species of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus oceani, and that of nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans. The SP value for NOR reaction (-5.9 ± 2.1‰) showed nearly the same value as that reported for N2O produced by P. denitrificans in pure culture. In contrast, SP value for HAO reaction (36.3 ± 2.3‰) was a little higher than the values reported for N2O produced by AOB in aerobic pure culture. Using the SP values obtained by HAO and NOR reactions, we calculated relative contribution of the nitrite (NO2-) reduction (which is followed by NO reduction) to N2O production by N. oceani incubated under different O2 availability. Our calculations revealed that previous in vivo studies might have underestimated the SP value for the NH2OH oxidation pathway possibly due to a small contribution of NO2- reduction pathway. Further evaluation of isotopomer signatures of N2O using common enzymes of other processes related to N2O would improve the isotopomer analysis of N2O in various environments.

  19. Isotopomeric characterization of nitrous oxide produced by reaction of enzymes extracted from nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Hozuki, T.; Arai, K.; Toyoda, S.; Koba, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, N.

    2013-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and produced in denitrification and nitrification in environmental nitrogen cycle by various microorganism. Site preference (SP) of 15N in N2O, which is defined as the difference in the natural abundance of isotopomers 14N15NO and 15N14NO relative to 14N14NO, has been reported to be a useful tool to quantitatively distinguish N2O production pathway. To determine representative SP value for each microbial process, we firstly measured SP of N2O produced in the enzyme reaction of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) purified from two species of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus oceani, and that of nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans, respectively. The SP value for NOR reaction (-5.9 ± 2.1‰) showed nearly the same value as that reported for N2O produced by P. denitrificans in pure culture. In contrast, SP value for HAO reaction (36.3 ± 2.3‰) was a little higher than the values reported for N2O produced by AOB in aerobic pure culture. Using the SP values obtained by HAO and NOR reactions, we calculated relative contribution of the nitrite (NO2-) reduction (which is followed by NO reduction) to N2O production by N. oceani incubated under different O2 availability. Our calculations revealed that previous in vivo studies might have underestimated the SP value for NH2OH oxidation pathway possibly due to a small contribution of NO2- reduction pathway. Further evaluation of isotopomer signatures of N2O using common enzymes of other processes related to N2O would improve the isotopomer analysis of N2O in various environments.

  20. Oxidation of butane to butanol coupled to electrochemical redox reaction of NAD+/NADH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye Sun; Na, Byung Kwan; Park, Doo Hyun

    2007-08-01

    A crude cell extract from a butane-utilizing bacterium, Alcaligenes sp., catalyzed the oxidation of butane to butanol coupled to NADH. A graphite electrode modified with Neutral Red (NR-electrode) catalyzed the reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. About 4.9 mM butanol was produced from 50% n-butane/O(2) mixture through the combined reactions of the crude enzyme and the NR-electrode in 250 ml reactor for 3 h. PMID:17549436

  1. Proteins and protein complexes involved in the biochemical reactions of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Naomi M; Maalcke, Wouter J; Keltjens, Jan T; Jetten, Mike S M; Kartal, Boran

    2011-01-01

    It has been less than two decades since anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) coupled to nitrite reduction has been discovered. Already, this process has been recognized as an important sink for fixed nitrogen in the natural environment and has been implemented as a cost-effective ammonium removal technology. Still, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this remarkable reaction. In this mini review, we present an insight into how ammonium and nitrite are combined to form dinitrogen gas. PMID:21265793

  2. Mechanochemical reactions and strengthening in epoxy-cast aluminum iron-oxide mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranti, Louis, Jr.

    2007-12-01

    -viscoplastic deformation and brittle fracture behaviors. Significant elastic and plastic deformation during both loading and unloading stages is observed, with approximately 50% elastic recovery of total axial strain occurring rapidly (tens of microseconds) after impact. Coupling high-speed camera images and velocity interferometry measurements shows that the elastic recovery coincides with peak axial strain and the elastic and plastic wave interaction. The incorporation of nano-scale aluminum particles enhances the dynamic stress-strain response and significantly improves the composites' resilience to impact as compared to pure epoxy, and with the use of micron-scale aluminum particles. Post-mortem analysis of recovered Taylor impacted specimens indicates evidence of early stages of strain-induced reactions occurring at select stress, strain, and strain rates. The observed reaction products correlate with results of thermal analysis, which include DTA and in situ high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Central to this study was the interaction of metal-oxide powder mixtures with the epoxy matrix and how their chemical and mechanical properties balance to form a structural energetic material system. The study focuses on describing the underlying principles governing the deformation and fracture behavior, processing characteristics of epoxy-cast Al+Fe2O3 powder mixtures, mechanochemical sensitivity, and reaction response. In order to accomplish this, the effects of size, morphology, and distribution of particles were evaluated based on mechanical and chemical response to high pressures and combined stress-strain states using time-resolved measurements.

  3. Quantum Diffusion-Controlled Chemistry: Reactions of Atomic Hydrogen with Nitric Oxide in Solid Parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2015-12-17

    Our group has been working to develop parahydrogen (pH2) matrix isolation spectroscopy as a method to study low-temperature condensed-phase reactions of atomic hydrogen with various reaction partners. Guided by the well-defined studies of cold atom chemistry in rare-gas solids, the special properties of quantum hosts such as solid pH2 afford new opportunities to study the analogous chemical reactions under quantum diffusion conditions in hopes of discovering new types of chemical reaction mechanisms. In this study, we present Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the 193 nm photoinduced chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) isolated in solid pH2 over the 1.8 to 4.3 K temperature range. Upon short-term in situ irradiation the NO readily undergoes photolysis to yield HNO, NOH, NH, NH3, H2O, and H atoms. We map the postphotolysis reactions of mobile H atoms with NO and document first-order growth in HNO and NOH reaction products for up to 5 h after photolysis. We perform three experiments at 4.3 K and one at 1.8 K to permit the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics to be quantified. We observe Arrhenius-type behavior with a pre-exponential factor of A = 0.036(2) min(-1) and Ea = 2.39(1) cm(-1). This is in sharp contrast to previous H atom reactions we have studied in solid pH2 that display definitively non-Arrhenius behavior. The contrasting temperature dependence measured for the H + NO reaction is likely related to the details of H atom quantum diffusion in solid pH2 and deserves further study. PMID:26317154

  4. Activity and stability of the oxygen evolution reaction on electrodeposited Ru and its thermal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Choi, Jihui; Kim, Ho Young; Hwang, Eunkyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2015-12-01

    The activity and stability of Ru metal and its thermal oxide films for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) were investigated. The metallic Ru films were prepared by electrodeposition on a Ti substrate and then thermally oxidized at various temperatures under atmospheric conditions. During long-term operation of the OER with cyclic voltammetry (CV) in H2SO4 electrolyte, changes in the properties of the Ru and its thermal oxides were monitored in terms of their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic structure. In the initial stages of the OER, all of the Ru thermal oxide films underwent an activation process that was related to the continuous removal of low-activity Ru oxides from the surface. With further cycling, the OER activity decreased. The rate of decrease was different for each Ru film and was related to the annealing temperatures. Monitoring of material properties indicates that the amount of stable anhydrous RuO2 is important for OER stability because it prevents both the severe dissolution of metallic Ru beneath the oxide surface and the formation of a less active hydrous RuO2 at the surface.

  5. Adsorption and Reaction of Methanethiol on Thin-Film Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; McDonald, Tom S

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and reaction of methanethiol, CH{sub 3}SH, have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The behavior of the CH{sub 3}SH was examined as a function of the Ce oxidation state. CH{sub 3}SH weakly interacts with fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(1 1 1) forming both chemisorbed CH{sub 3}SH and CH{sub 3}S + OH. OH forms through the reaction of the sulfhydrol H with the surface O. These species recombine and desorb near 180 K leaving the surface virtually clean. When the ceria is ca. 50% reduced, the chemisorbed CH{sub 3}SH desorbs near 150 K while the CH{sub 3}S + OH are stable to 400 K. These species react above 450 K to produce predominantly CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}SH. A small amount of CH{sub 2}O and water are also formed through reaction with the O in the ceria. Atomic S is left on the surface. S 2p, C 1s and O 1s soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the nature of the chemisorbed species and the adsorption site of the CH{sub 3}S or S.

  6. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on thin-film cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, D. R.; McDonald, T. S.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption and reaction of methanethiol, CH 3SH, have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The behavior of the CH 3SH was examined as a function of the Ce oxidation state. CH 3SH weakly interacts with fully oxidized CeO 2(1 1 1) forming both chemisorbed CH 3SH and CH 3S + OH. OH forms through the reaction of the sulfhydrol H with the surface O. These species recombine and desorb near 180 K leaving the surface virtually clean. When the ceria is ca. 50% reduced, the chemisorbed CH 3SH desorbs near 150 K while the CH 3S + OH are stable to 400 K. These species react above 450 K to produce predominantly CH 4 and CH 3SH. A small amount of CH 2O and water are also formed through reaction with the O in the ceria. Atomic S is left on the surface. S 2p, C 1s and O 1s soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the nature of the chemisorbed species and the adsorption site of the CH 3S or S.

  7. Stable platinum nanoclusters on genomic DNA–graphene oxide with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Jitendra N.; Nath, Krishna; Kumar, Susheel; Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Kemp, K. Christian; Le, Nhien H.; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kwang S.

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize platinum clusters with small diameters of 2–4 nm are known to be excellent catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The inherent catalytic activity of smaller platinum clusters has not yet been reported due to a lack of preparation methods to control their size (<2 nm). Here we report the synthesis of platinum clusters (diameter ≤1.4 nm) deposited on genomic double-stranded DNA–graphene oxide composites, and their high-performance electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. The electrochemical behaviour, characterized by oxygen reduction reaction onset potential, half-wave potential, specific activity, mass activity, accelerated durability test (10,000 cycles) and cyclic voltammetry stability (10,000 cycles) is attributed to the strong interaction between the nanosize platinum clusters and the DNA–graphene oxide composite, which induces modulation in the electronic structure of the platinum clusters. Furthermore, we show that the platinum cluster/DNA–graphene oxide composite possesses notable environmental durability and stability, vital for high-performance fuel cells and batteries. PMID:23900456

  8. Investigation of the Transformation of a Modified Iron Oxide Structure During Redox Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anh, Luu Thi Lan; Trung, Nguyen Ngoc; Tho, Van Dinh Son

    Iron oxides can be used for the storage of hydrogen based on their redox reaction. Iron oxides were synthesized by the sol-gel method was a structure transformation of maghemite γ-Fe2O3 into hematite α-Fe2O3 during calcinations process could be observed. The addition of a Mo6+ cation by the preparation method results in the substitution of Mo6+ into the Fe2O3 structure and formation of Fe2(MoO4)3. There was a formation of two crystalline phases Fe2O3 and ZrO2 separately incase of the addition of Zr4+cation into Fe2O3.During redox reaction, the structure of Fe2O3 was converted into Fe and regenerated Fe3O4. There was a transformation of Fe2 (MoO4)3 into Fe2Mo3O8 phases after reduction. However ZrO2 was did not change its structure during redox reaction. The Zr-Fe2O3 very easy to be reduced into Fe and convenience formed hydrogen in the oxidation.

  9. Oxidative cyclization reaction of 2-aryl-substituted cinnamates to form phenanthrene carboxylates by using MoCl5.

    PubMed

    Wehming, Kathrin; Schubert, Moritz; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2014-09-22

    The oxidative cyclization reaction of 2-aryl cinnamates and derivatives thereof can be easily performed with MoCl5 as the oxidant. This powerful reagent allows oxidative coupling reactions for which other reagents fail. The best results are obtained when the 2-phenyl substituent of the cinnamate is equipped with two methoxy groups. Even iodo moieties in the bay region of phenanthrene are tolerated under the reaction conditions. If naphthalene moieties are involved, a rearrangement of the skeleton occurs, providing an elegant route to highly functionalized angular arenes. The cyclization is demonstrated for 15 example substrates with isolated yields of up to 99 % for the phenanthrene derivative. The broad scope of the reaction underlines the usefulness of MoCl5 and MoCl5 /TiCl4 in the oxidative coupling reaction. PMID:25043751

  10. Effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage.

    PubMed

    Lu, F S H; Bruheim, I; Haugsgjerd, B O; Jacobsen, C

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature towards lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reactions in krill oil upon storage. Krill oil was incubated at two different temperatures (20 and 40 °C) for 28 or 42 days. The oxidative stability of krill oil was assessed by peroxide value and anisidine value, measurement of lipid derived volatiles, lipid classes and antioxidants. The non-enzymatic browning reactions were assessed through the measurement of pyrroles, free amino acids content and Strecker-derived volatiles. The increase of incubation temperature firstly increased the lipid oxidation in krill oil and subsequently the non-enzymatic browning reactions. The occurrence of these reactions was most likely due to the reaction between α-dicarbonyl or carbonyl compounds with amino acids or ammonia. In addition to tocopherol and astaxanthin esters, the formation of pyrroles might help to protect the krill oil against lipid oxidation. PMID:24679797

  11. Nitric oxide is consumed, rather than conserved, by reaction with oxyhemoglobin under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Mahesh S.; Ferguson, T. Bruce, Jr.; Han, Tae H.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Liao, James C.; Rassaf, Tienush; Bryan, Nathan; Feelisch, Martin; Lancaster, Jack R., Jr.

    2002-08-01

    Although irreversible reaction of NO with the oxyheme of hemoglobin (producing nitrate and methemoglobin) is extremely rapid, it has been proposed that, under normoxic conditions, NO binds preferentially to the minority deoxyheme to subsequently form S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNOHb). Thus, the primary reaction would be conservation, rather than consumption, of nitrogen oxide. Data supporting this conclusion were generated by using addition of a small volume of a concentrated aqueous solution of NO to a normoxic hemoglobin solution. Under these conditions, however, extremely rapid reactions can occur before mixing. We have thus compared bolus NO addition to NO generated homogeneously throughout solution by using NO donors, a more physiologically relevant condition. With bolus addition, multiple hemoglobin species are formed (as judged by visible spectroscopy) as well as both nitrite and nitrate. With donor, only nitrate and methemoglobin are formed, stoichiometric with the amount of NO liberated from the donor. Studies with increasing hemoglobin concentrations reveal that the nitrite-forming reaction (which may be NO autoxidation under these conditions) competes with reaction with hemoglobin. SNOHb formation is detectable with either bolus or donor; however, the amounts formed are much smaller than the amount of NO added (less than 1%). We conclude that the reaction of NO with hemoglobin under normoxic conditions results in consumption, rather than conservation, of NO.

  12. Selective oxidation of glycerol by using a hydrotalcite-supported platinum catalyst under atmospheric oxygen pressure in water.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiro; Rao, Kasanneni Tirumala Venkateswara; Nishimura, Shun; Takagaki, Atsushi; Ebitani, Kohki

    2011-04-18

    A hydrotalcite-supported platinum (Pt/HT) catalyst was found to be a highly active and selective heterogeneous catalyst for glycerol oxidation in pure water under atmospheric oxygen pressure in a high glycerol/metal molar ratio up to 3125. High selectivity toward glyceric acid (78 %) was obtained even at room temperature under air atmosphere. The Pt/HT catalyst selectively oxidized the primary hydroxyl group of 1,2-propandiol to give the corresponding carboxylic acid (lactic acid) as well as glycerol. The activity of the catalyst was greatly influenced by the Mg/Al ratio of hydrotalcite. Glycerol conversion increased with increasing the Mg/Al ratio of hydrotalcite (from trace to 56 %). X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements indicated that the catalytic oxidation activity was proportional to the metallic platinum concentration, and more than 35 % of metallic platinum was necessary for this reaction. TEM measurements and titration analysis by using benzoic acid suggested that the solid basicity of hydrotalcite plays important roles in the precise control of platinum size and metal concentration as well as the initial promotion of alcohol oxidation. PMID:21271683

  13. Synthesis and structure characterization of chromium oxide prepared by solid thermal decomposition reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yan, Zi F; Lu, Gao Q; Zhu, Zhong H

    2006-01-12

    Mesoporous chromium oxide (Cr2O3) nanocrystals were first synthesized by the thermal decomposition reaction of Cr(NO3)3.9H2O using citric acid monohydrate (CA) as the mesoporous template agent. The texture and chemistry of chromium oxide nanocrystals were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis, and thermoanalytical methods. It was shown that the hydrate water and CA are the crucial factors in influencing the formation of mesoporous Cr2O3 nanocrystals in the mixture system. The decomposition of CA results in the formation of a mesoporous structure with wormlike pores. The hydrate water of the mixture provides surface hydroxyls that act as binders, making the nanocrystals aggregate. The pore structures and phases of chromium oxide are affected by the ratio of precursor-to-CA, thermal temperature, and time. PMID:16471518

  14. Adsorption and Reaction of Methanol on Thin-film Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins,D.; Robbins, M.; Zhou, J.

    2006-01-01

    Formaldehyde adsorption and reaction have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The formaldehyde behavior was examined as a function of temperature, exposure and Ce oxidation state. Formaldehyde chemisorbs on fully oxidized CeO{sub 2} as dioxymethylene, CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The dioxymethylene decomposes and desorbs as formaldehyde between 200 K and 400 K. No other products are formed. On reduced ceria, formaldehyde also adsorbs as dioxymethylene. In addition to the formaldehyde desorption between 200 K and 400 K, a more strongly bound form of dioxymethylene is formed that produces formaldehyde at 440 K. Above 400 K, some of the dioxymethylene reacts to form formate and methoxy on the surface. These species decompose to produce H{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 2}O above 500 K.

  15. Adsorption and Reaction of Formaldehyde on Thin-film Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,J.; Mullins, D.

    2006-01-01

    Formaldehyde adsorption and reaction have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The formaldehyde behavior was examined as a function of temperature, exposure and Ce oxidation state. Formaldehyde chemisorbs on fully oxidized CeO{sub 2} as dioxymethylene, CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The dioxymethylene decomposes and desorbs as formaldehyde between 200 K and 400 K. No other products are formed. On reduced ceria, formaldehyde also adsorbs as dioxymethylene. In addition to the formaldehyde desorption between 200 K and 400 K, a more strongly bound form of dioxymethylene is formed that produces formaldehyde at 440 K. Above 400 K, some of the dioxymethylene reacts to form formate and methoxy on the surface. These species decompose to produce H{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 2}O above 500 K.

  16. Iron Oxides from Volcanic Soils as Potential Catalysts in the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pizarro, C.; Escudey, M.; Moya, S.A.; Fabris, J.D.

    2005-04-26

    This study was focused on changes of the iron oxide mineralogy with temperature of two Chilean soils (Andisol and Ultisol) derived from volcanic materials and their use as iron-based catalysts in the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). Ultisol materials produced about twice as much hydrogen than did those from Andisol upon WGSR, but in both cases hydrogen yielding increased as the heating temperature of the soil materials increased from 124 deg. C to 500 deg. C. The room temperature Moessbauer spectra showed an increase of the relative proportion of the magnetically ordered components as temperature increased. Higher heating temperature produced a negative effect on the catalytic activity, whereas the organic matter destruction led to a positive effect, due to an increasing exposition of the iron oxide surfaces; heating the soil sample at 600 deg. C induced changes on the iron oxide mineralogy with a significant decrease of the catalytic activity.

  17. Iron Oxides from Volcanic Soils as Potential Catalysts in the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, C.; Escudey, M.; Moya, S. A.; Fabris, J. D.

    2005-04-01

    This study was focused on changes of the iron oxide mineralogy with temperature of two Chilean soils (Andisol and Ultisol) derived from volcanic materials and their use as iron-based catalysts in the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). Ultisol materials produced about twice as much hydrogen than did those from Andisol upon WGSR, but in both cases hydrogen yielding increased as the heating temperature of the soil materials increased from 124°C to 500°C. The room temperature Mössbauer spectra showed an increase of the relative proportion of the magnetically ordered components as temperature increased. Higher heating temperature produced a negative effect on the catalytic activity, whereas the organic matter destruction led to a positive effect, due to an increasing exposition of the iron oxide surfaces; heating the soil sample at 600 °C induced changes on the iron oxide mineralogy with a significant decrease of the catalytic activity.

  18. Construction materials for reaction unit in the liquid-phase synthesis of propylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritskii, V.I.D.

    1987-09-01

    The main components of the reaction medium in equipment for the synthesis of propylene oxide by liquid-phase oxidation of gaseous propylene with peracetic acid are propylene, peracetic acid, ethyl acetate, acetic acid, propylene oxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen, methane, and propylene glycol acetates. The operating conditions of the equipment and content of the main components of the medium are shown. Results are given for the investigation of the corrosion behavior of 12Kh18N10T, 10Kh17N13M2T, 08Kh22N6T, and 08Kh21N6M2T steels, AD0 and AD1 aluminum, and VT1-0 titanium. VSt3 carbon steel was tested for comparison.

  19. Insight into the Mechanism of Graphene Oxide Degradation via the Photo-Fenton Reaction.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Jiang, Wentao; Kotchey, Gregg P; Saidi, Wissam A; Bythell, Benjamin J; Jarvis, Jacqueline M; Marshall, Alan G; Robinson, Renã A S; Star, Alexander

    2014-05-15

    Graphene represents an attractive two-dimensional carbon-based nanomaterial that holds great promise for applications such as electronics, batteries, sensors, and composite materials. Recent work has demonstrated that carbon-based nanomaterials are degradable/biodegradable, but little work has been expended to identify products formed during the degradation process. As these products may have toxicological implications that could leach into the environment or the human body, insight into the mechanism and structural elucidation remain important as carbon-based nanomaterials become commercialized. We provide insight into a potential mechanism of graphene oxide degradation via the photo-Fenton reaction. We have determined that after 1 day of treatment intermediate oxidation products (with MW 150-1000 Da) were generated. Upon longer reaction times (i.e., days 2 and 3), these products were no longer present in high abundance, and the system was dominated by graphene quantum dots (GQDs). On the basis of FTIR, MS, and NMR data, potential structures for these oxidation products, which consist of oxidized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are proposed. PMID:24860637

  20. Insight into the Mechanism of Graphene Oxide Degradation via the Photo-Fenton Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene represents an attractive two-dimensional carbon-based nanomaterial that holds great promise for applications such as electronics, batteries, sensors, and composite materials. Recent work has demonstrated that carbon-based nanomaterials are degradable/biodegradable, but little work has been expended to identify products formed during the degradation process. As these products may have toxicological implications that could leach into the environment or the human body, insight into the mechanism and structural elucidation remain important as carbon-based nanomaterials become commercialized. We provide insight into a potential mechanism of graphene oxide degradation via the photo-Fenton reaction. We have determined that after 1 day of treatment intermediate oxidation products (with MW 150–1000 Da) were generated. Upon longer reaction times (i.e., days 2 and 3), these products were no longer present in high abundance, and the system was dominated by graphene quantum dots (GQDs). On the basis of FTIR, MS, and NMR data, potential structures for these oxidation products, which consist of oxidized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are proposed. PMID:24860637

  1. Redox reactions in mammalian spermatogenesis and the potential targets of reactive oxygen species under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Imai, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (Redox) reactions are ubiquitous mechanisms for vital activities in all organisms, and they play pivotal roles in the regulation of spermatogenesis as well. Here we focus on 3 redox-involved processes that have drawn much recent attention: the regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide, oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and sulfoxidation of protamines during sperm chromatin condensation. The first 2 of these processes are emerging topics in cell biology and are applicable to most living cells, which includes spermatogenic cells. The roles of ROS in signal transduction have been elucidated in the last 2 decades and have received broad attention, most notably from the viewpoint of the proper control of mitotic signals. Redox processes in the ER are important because this is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and proceed toward their functional structure, so that malfunction of the ER affects not only the involved cells but also the accepting cells of the secreted proteins in multicellular organisms. Sulfoxidation is the third of these processes, and the sulfoxidation of chromatin is a unique process in sperm maturation. During recent sulfoxidase research, GPX4 has emerged as a promising enzyme that plays essential roles in the production of fertile sperm, but the involvement of other redox proteins is also becoming evident. Because the molecules involved in the redox reactions are prone to oxidation, they can be sensitive to oxidative damage, which makes them potential targets for antioxidant therapy. PMID:26413390

  2. Multiscale Informatics for Low-Temperature Propane Oxidation: Further Complexities in Studies of Complex Reactions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Welz, Oliver; Huang, Haifeng; Antonov, Ivan O; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Zádor, Judit; Taatjes, Craig A; Sheps, Leonid

    2015-07-16

    The present paper describes further development of the multiscale informatics approach to kinetic model formulation of Burke et al. (Burke, M. P.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B. Proc. Combust. Inst. 2013, 34, 547-555) that directly incorporates elementary kinetic theories as a means to provide reliable, physics-based extrapolation of kinetic models to unexplored conditions. Here, we extend and generalize the multiscale informatics strategy to treat systems of considerable complexity-involving multiwell reactions, potentially missing reactions, nonstatistical product branching ratios, and non-Boltzmann (i.e., nonthermal) reactant distributions. The methodology is demonstrated here for a subsystem of low-temperature propane oxidation, as a representative system for low-temperature fuel oxidation. A multiscale model is assembled and informed by a wide variety of targets that include ab initio calculations of molecular properties, rate constant measurements of isolated reactions, and complex systems measurements. Active model parameters are chosen to accommodate both "parametric" and "structural" uncertainties. Theoretical parameters (e.g., barrier heights) are included as active model parameters to account for parametric uncertainties in the theoretical treatment; experimental parameters (e.g., initial temperatures) are included to account for parametric uncertainties in the physical models of the experiments. RMG software is used to assess potential structural uncertainties due to missing reactions. Additionally, branching ratios among product channels are included as active model parameters to account for structural uncertainties related to difficulties in modeling sequences of multiple chemically activated steps. The approach is demonstrated here for interpreting time-resolved measurements of OH, HO2, n-propyl, i-propyl, propene, oxetane, and methyloxirane from photolysis-initiated low-temperature oxidation of propane at pressures from 4 to 60 Torr and

  3. Sub-micrometer sized yttrium oxide fibers prepared through hydrothermal reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nan; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers were synthesized by hydrothermal reaction followed by calcination. {yields} Y(OH){sub x}Cl{sub 3-x}.yH{sub 2}O was received from hydrothermal reaction. {yields} Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers showed outstanding high-temperature stability. -- Abstract: Yttrium oxide fibers have been synthesized via hydrothermal reaction and subsequent thermal treatment using yttrium chloride as precursor. The products before and after the thermal treatment were characterized by powder X-ray diffractions (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ion-chromatograph analysis, and thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The fiber diameter ranged from 100 to 300 nm, while the length was up to tens of microns. It was found that the chemical composition and morphology of the products were closely related to the pH value of reaction solution, and fibrous products could be obtained at pH 9.5-10.25. These oxide fibers exhibited outstanding high-temperature stability, which maintained their morphology at temperature up to 1400 {sup o}C.

  4. Heterogeneous oxidation reactions relevant to tropospheric aerosol chemistry studied by sum frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Grace; Buchbinder, Avram; Gibbs-Davis, Julianne; Scheidt, Karl; Geiger, Franz

    2008-03-01

    Unsaturated organic molecules (terpenes) that commonly form molecular films on tropospheric aerosols can be oxidized by ozone, influencing the microphysics of cloud formation and thus the earth's climate. Using a laboratory approach that combines organic synthesis with surface spectroscopy, we track the ozone oxidation reactions of tropospherically relevant terpenes bound to glass surfaces that serve as mimics for mineral dust. Specifically, vibrational broadband sum frequency generation (SFG) is used to study a number of tailor-made terpene-modified glass surfaces and to track their interactions with ozone in real time. Exposure of these surfaces to ppm levels of ozone at 1 atm and 300 K yield initial reaction probabilities that are significantly higher than corresponding gas phase reactions. SFG spectra help elucidate the molecular orientations of the surface-bound terpenes and the accessibility of reactive C=C bonds. Our work shows the successful use of SFG spectroscopy to determine heterogeneous atmospheric reaction probabilities and bridges the gap between atmospheric aerosol science and surface spectroscopy.

  5. Autocatalysis and selective oxidative etching induced synthesis of platinum-copper bimetallic alloy nanodendrites electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mingxing; Fu, Gengtao; Chen, Yu; Tang, Yawen; Lu, Tianhong

    2014-05-28

    The controllable synthesis of noble metal alloy nanostructures with highly branched morphology has attracted much attention because of their specific physical and chemical properties. This article reports the synthesis of platinum-copper bimetallic alloy nanodendrites (Pt-Cu BANDs) by a facile, one-pot, templateless, and seedless hydrothermal method in the presence of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and formaldehyde (HCHO). The morphology, composition, and structure of Pt-Cu BANDs are fully characterized by various physical techniques, demonstrating Pt-Cu BANDs are highly alloying, porous, and self-supported nanostructures. The formation/growth mechanism of Pt-Cu BANDs is explored and discussed based on the experimental observations. The autocatalytic growth and interdiffusion are responsible for the formation of Pt-Cu alloy whereas selective oxidative etching results in dendritic morphology of Pt-Cu alloy nanostructures. In addition, the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pt-Cu BANDs for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are investigated by various electrochemical techniques. The synthesized Pt-Cu BANDs show higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pt black. PMID:24801265

  6. Selective oxidation of ethane using the Au|YSZ|Ag electrochemical membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamakawa, Satoshi; Sato, Koichi; Hayakawa, Takashi; York, A.P.E.; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Kunio; Shimizu, Masao; Takehira, Katsuomi

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of ethane to acetaldehyde on an inert gold electrode has been studied using the electrochemical membrane reactor with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid electrolyte at 475 C. On applying a direct current to the reaction cell, 5% ethane in N{sub 2}, Au|YSZ|Ag, 100% O{sub 2}, acetaldehyde was formed and the formation rate increased linearly with increasing current. Selectivities to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide were 45 and 55%, respectively. The addition of oxygen to the ethane-mixed gas in the anode space did not affect the acetaldehyde formation. The use of YSZ powder as a fixed bed catalyst under the mixed gas flow of ethane and oxygen at 450 to 600 C resulted in the formation of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ethene. Even the use of N{sub 2}O instead of oxygen resulted in no formation of acetaldehyde. Hence, it is likely that partial oxidation of ethane to acetaldehyde was carried out by the oxygen species transferred electrochemically through the YSZ which appeared at the gold-YSZ-gas triple-phase boundary. From the results of ethanol oxidation over the Au|YSZ|Ag system, the following mechanism was proposed: ethane is dehydrogenated to an ethyl radical, then converted to ethoxide, and finally to acetaldehyde by the oxygen species transferred through the YSZ.

  7. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation. PMID:25660883

  8. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  9. Solid-State Thermal Reaction of a Molecular Material and Solventless Synthesis of Iron Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debasis; Roy, Madhusudan; Zubko, Maciej; Kusz, Joachim; Bhattacharjee, Ashis

    2016-09-01

    Solid-state thermal decomposition reaction of a molecular material {As}({C}6{H}5)4[{Fe}^{II}{Fe}^{III} ({C}2{O}4)3]}n has been studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetry (TG) in an inert atmosphere. By analyzing the TG data collected at multiple heating rates in 300 K-1300 K range, the kinetic parameters (activation energy, most probable reaction mechanism function and frequency factor) are determined using different multi-heating rate analysis programs. Activation energy and the frequency factor are found to be strongly dependent on the extent of decomposition. The decomposed material has been characterized to be hematite using physical techniques (FT-IR and powder XRD). Particle morphology has been checked by TEM. A solid-state reaction pathway leading the molecular precursor to hematite has been proposed illustrating an example of solventless synthesis of iron oxides utilizing thermal decomposition as a technique using innocuous materials.

  10. Kinetics of phyllosemiquinone oxidation in the Photosystem I reaction centre of Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Bailleul, Benjamin; Redding, Kevin; Barber, James; Rappaport, Fabrice; Telfer, Alison

    2012-02-01

    Light-induced electron transfer reactions in the chlorophyll a/d-binding Photosystem I reaction centre of Acaryochloris marina were investigated in whole cells by pump-probe optical spectroscopy with a temporal resolution of ~5ns at room temperature. It is shown that phyllosemiquinone, the secondary electron transfer acceptor anion, is oxidised with bi-phasic kinetics characterised by lifetimes of 88±6ns and 345±10ns. These lifetimes, particularly the former, are significantly slower than those reported for chlorophyll a-binding Photosystem I, which typically range in the 5-30ns and 200-300ns intervals. The possible mechanism of electron transfer reactions in the chlorophyll a/d-binding Photosystem I and the slower oxidation kinetics of the secondary acceptors are discussed. PMID:22037394

  11. Effect of atmospheric oxidative plasma treatments on polypropylenic fibers surface: Characterization and reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Magnacca, Giuliana; Faga, Maria Giulia; Gautier, Giovanna; D'Angelo, Domenico; Ciancio, Emanuele; Lamberti, Roberta; Martorana, Selanna

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma-dielectric barrier discharge (APP-DBD, open chamber configuration) was used to functionalize polypropylene (PP) fibers surface in order to generate oxidized-reactive groups such as hydroperoxides, alcohols and carbonyl species (i.e. ketones and others). Such a species increased the surface polarity, without causing material degradation. Three different types of plasma mixture (He, He/O2, He/O2/H2O) under three different values of applied power (750, 1050, 1400 W) were investigated. The formed plasma species (O2+, O single atom and OH radical) and their distribution were monitored via optical emission spectrometry (OES) measurements, and the plasma effects on PP surface species formation were followed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Results allowed to better understand the reaction pathways between plasma phase and PP fibers. In fact, two reaction mechanisms were proposed, the first one concerning the plasma phase reactions and the second one involving material surface modifications.

  12. Octahedral Ni-nanocluster (Ni85) for Efficient and Selective Reduction of Nitric Oxide (NO) to Nitrogen (N2).

    PubMed

    Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Choudhuri, Indrani; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) reduction pathways are systematically studied on a (111) facet of the octahedral nickel (Ni85) nanocluster in the presence/absence of hydrogen. Thermodynamic (reaction free energies) and kinetic (free energy barriers, and temperature dependent reaction rates) parameters are investigated to find out the most favoured reduction pathway for NO reduction. The catalytic activity of the Ni-nanocluster is investigated in greater detail toward the product selectivity (N2 vs. N2O vs. NH3). The previous theoretical (catalyzed by Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) and experimental reports (catalyzed by Pt, Ag, Pd) show that direct N-O bond dissociation is very much unlikely due to the high-energy barrier but our study shows that the reaction is thermodynamically and kinetically favourable when catalysed by the octahedral Ni-nanocluster. The catalytic activity of the Ni-nanocluster toward NO reduction reaction is very much efficient and selective toward N2 formation even in the presence of hydrogen. However, N2O (one of the major by-products) formation is very much unlikely due to the high activation barrier. Our microkinetic analysis shows that even at high hydrogen partial pressures, the catalyst is very much selective toward N2 formation over NH3. PMID:27157072

  13. Octahedral Ni-nanocluster (Ni85) for Efficient and Selective Reduction of Nitric Oxide (NO) to Nitrogen (N2)

    PubMed Central

    Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Choudhuri, Indrani; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) reduction pathways are systematically studied on a (111) facet of the octahedral nickel (Ni85) nanocluster in the presence/absence of hydrogen. Thermodynamic (reaction free energies) and kinetic (free energy barriers, and temperature dependent reaction rates) parameters are investigated to find out the most favoured reduction pathway for NO reduction. The catalytic activity of the Ni-nanocluster is investigated in greater detail toward the product selectivity (N2 vs. N2O vs. NH3). The previous theoretical (catalyzed by Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) and experimental reports (catalyzed by Pt, Ag, Pd) show that direct N-O bond dissociation is very much unlikely due to the high-energy barrier but our study shows that the reaction is thermodynamically and kinetically favourable when catalysed by the octahedral Ni-nanocluster. The catalytic activity of the Ni-nanocluster toward NO reduction reaction is very much efficient and selective toward N2 formation even in the presence of hydrogen. However, N2O (one of the major by-products) formation is very much unlikely due to the high activation barrier. Our microkinetic analysis shows that even at high hydrogen partial pressures, the catalyst is very much selective toward N2 formation over NH3. PMID:27157072

  14. Octahedral Ni-nanocluster (Ni85) for Efficient and Selective Reduction of Nitric Oxide (NO) to Nitrogen (N2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Choudhuri, Indrani; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) reduction pathways are systematically studied on a (111) facet of the octahedral nickel (Ni85) nanocluster in the presence/absence of hydrogen. Thermodynamic (reaction free energies) and kinetic (free energy barriers, and temperature dependent reaction rates) parameters are investigated to find out the most favoured reduction pathway for NO reduction. The catalytic activity of the Ni-nanocluster is investigated in greater detail toward the product selectivity (N2 vs. N2O vs. NH3). The previous theoretical (catalyzed by Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) and experimental reports (catalyzed by Pt, Ag, Pd) show that direct N-O bond dissociation is very much unlikely due to the high-energy barrier but our study shows that the reaction is thermodynamically and kinetically favourable when catalysed by the octahedral Ni-nanocluster. The catalytic activity of the Ni-nanocluster toward NO reduction reaction is very much efficient and selective toward N2 formation even in the presence of hydrogen. However, N2O (one of the major by-products) formation is very much unlikely due to the high activation barrier. Our microkinetic analysis shows that even at high hydrogen partial pressures, the catalyst is very much selective toward N2 formation over NH3.

  15. System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

    2014-04-08

    A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

  16. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation reaction on Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs hybrid electro-catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouralishahi, Amideddin; Rashidi, Ali Morad; Mortazavi, Yadollah; Khodadadi, Abbas Ali; Choolaei, Mohammadmehdi

    2015-04-01

    The electro-catalytic behavior of Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs in methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) is investigated and compared to that of Pt/MWCNTs. The electro-catalysts were synthesized by an impregnation method using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. The morphological and physical characteristics of samples are examined by XRD, TEM, ICP and EDS techniques. In the presence of CoOx, Pt nanoparticles were highly distributed on the support with an average particle size of 2 nm, an obvious decrease from 5.1 nm for Pt/MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry, CO-stripping, Chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are used to study the electrochemical behavior of the electro-catalysts. The results revealed a considerable enhancement in the oxidation kinetics of COads on Pt active sites by the participation of CoOx. Compared to Pt/MWCNTs, Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs sample has a larger electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and higher electro-catalytic activity and stability toward methanol electro-oxidation. According to the results of cyclic voltammetry, the forward anodic peak current density enhances more than 89% at the optimum atomic ratio of Pt:Co = 2:1. Furthermore, inclusion of cobalt oxide species causes the onset potential of methanol electro-oxidation reaction to shift 84 mV to negative values compared to that on Pt/MWCNTs. Based on EIS data, dehydrogenation of methanol is the rate-determining step of MOR on both Pt/MWCNTs and Pt-CoOx/MWCNTs, at small overpotentials. However, at higher overpotentials, the oxidation of adsorbed oxygen-containing groups controls the total rate of MOR process.

  17. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

  18. Selective Heterogeneous C-H Activation/Halogenation Reactions Catalyzed by Pd@MOF Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pascanu, Vlad; Carson, Fabian; Solano, Marta Vico; Su, Jie; Zou, Xiaodong; Johansson, Magnus J; Martín-Matute, Belén

    2016-03-01

    A directed heterogeneous C-H activation/halogenation reaction catalyzed by readily synthesized Pd@MOF nanocatalysts was developed. The heterogeneous Pd catalysts used were a novel and environmentally benign Fe-based metal-organic framework (MOF) (Pd@MIL-88B-NH2 (Fe)) and the previously developed Pd@MIL-101-NH2 (Cr). Very high conversions and selectivities were achieved under very mild reaction conditions and in short reaction times. A wide variety of directing groups, halogen sources, and substitution patterns were well tolerated, and valuable polyhalogenated compounds were synthesized in a controlled manner. The synthesis of the Pd-functionalized Fe-based MOF and the recyclability of the two catalysts are also presented. PMID:26481867

  19. Use of Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry to Deduce Selectivity of Reaction in Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kai; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Chemically synthesized nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) probes derivatized with tetrasaccharides were used to study the reactivity of representative Clostridium thermocellum β-glucosidase, endoglucanases, and cellobiohydrolase. Diagnostic patterns for reactions of these different classes of enzymes were observed. Results show sequential removal of glucose by the β-glucosidase and a progressive increase in specificity of reaction from endoglucanases to cellobiohydrolase. Time-dependent reactions of these polysaccharide-selective enzymes were modeled by numerical integration, which provides a quantitative basis to make functional distinctions among a continuum of naturally evolved catalytic properties. Consequently, our method, which combines automated protein translation with high-sensitivity and time-dependent detection of multiple products, provides a new approach to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic trees with functional measurements. PMID:26579511

  20. Use of Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry to Deduce Selectivity of Reaction in Glycoside Hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Takasuka, Taichi E; Bianchetti, Christopher M; Bergeman, Lai F; Adams, Paul D; Northen, Trent R; Fox, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Chemically synthesized nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) probes derivatized with tetrasaccharides were used to study the reactivity of representative Clostridium thermocellum β-glucosidase, endoglucanases, and cellobiohydrolase. Diagnostic patterns for reactions of these different classes of enzymes were observed. Results show sequential removal of glucose by the β-glucosidase and a progressive increase in specificity of reaction from endoglucanases to cellobiohydrolase. Time-dependent reactions of these polysaccharide-selective enzymes were modeled by numerical integration, which provides a quantitative basis to make functional distinctions among a continuum of naturally evolved catalytic properties. Consequently, our method, which combines automated protein translation with high-sensitivity and time-dependent detection of multiple products, provides a new approach to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic trees with functional measurements. PMID:26579511

  1. Effects of aminosalicylates and immunosuppressive agents on nitric oxide-dependent N-nitrosation reactions.

    PubMed

    Grisham, M B; Miles, A M

    1994-05-18

    Recent studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) rapidly and spontaneously decomposes in oxygenated solutions to generate potent N-nitrosating agents. These electrophilic substances have been shown to mediate mutagenesis and carcinogenesis via the formation of aliphatic and aromatic nitrosamines. We have also demonstrated that extravasated neutrophils and macrophages produce significant amounts of N-nitrosating agents derived exclusively from NO. During the course of these studies, we found that certain antioxidants, including 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), inhibited the leukocyte-mediated N-nitrosation reaction. Because 5-ASA and other anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs are used to treat inflammatory bowel disease, we wondered if any of these other compounds might also modulate N-nitrosation reactions in vitro. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to assess the ability of aminosalicylates and certain immunosuppressive agents to inhibit NO-dependent N-nitrosation of a model aromatic amine (2,3-diaminonaphthalene) and to determine whether this inhibitory activity correlated with their oxidation potential. We found that the concentrations necessary to inhibit the N-nitrosation reaction by 50% (IC50) were 25, 50 and 100 microM for 5-ASA, olsalazine (dimeric 5-ASA) and sulfasalazine, respectively. In contrast, sulfapyridine, 4-ASA, N-acetyl-5-ASA, 6-mercaptopurine, azathioprine, and methotrexate were either much less effective or inactive at inhibiting the N-nitrosation reaction. Although 5-ASA was able to fully scavenge the stable free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, neither olsalazine nor sulfasalazine was found to be effective at scavenging this weak oxidant. We did find that olsalazine possessed an oxidation potential substantially less than that of sulfasalazine, suggesting that it may, in fact, scavenge more potent oxidizing agents such as the N-nitrosating agent. We conclude that 5-ASA and olsalazine inhibit NO-dependent N

  2. A study of ethanol reactions on O2-treated Au/TiO2. Effect of support and metal loading on reaction selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, M. A.; Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Idriss, H.

    2016-08-01

    The reactions of ethanol have been studied on bare and Au supported TiO2 polymorphs (anatase and rutile) in order to understand the effect of Au loading and prior O2 treatment on the reaction selectivity and conversion using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Although O2 treatment has negligible effect on the reaction selectivity of ethanol on TiO2 alone it considerably affects the reaction on Au/TiO2. Au/TiO2 had three main effects on the reaction when compared to TiO2 alone. First, it switches the reaction selectivity of the dehydration (to ethylene) in favor of dehydrogenation (to acetaldehyde) on both polymorphs. Second, it decreases the desorption temperature of the main reaction products. Third, it increases secondary reaction products (mainly C4 (crotonaldehyde, butene, furan) reaching ca. 78% of the overall carbon selectivity for the 8 wt.% Au/TiO2 anatase. These effects are more pronounced on the anatase phase when compared to that on the rutile phase. Reasons for these are discussed.

  3. Fabrication of Ultrafine Soft-Matter Arrays by Selective Contact Thermochemical Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cai, X.; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xiaowei; Ji, Junhui; Hong, Jian; Pan, Feng; Chen, Jitao; Xue, Mianqi

    2013-01-01

    Patterning of functional soft matters at different length scales is important for diverse research fields including cell biology, tissue engineering and medicinal science and the development of optics and electronics. Here we have further improved a simple but very efficient method, selective contact thermochemical reaction (SCTR), for patterning soft matters over large area with a sub-100 nm resolution. By selecting contact between different precursors through a topographically patterned PDMS stamp and subsequently any heating way for thermalchemical reaction, thermal-related soft matters can be patterned to form controllable micro or nano structures, even three-dimensional structures. The fine tunability and controllability of as-prepared micro and nano structures demonstrate this versatile approach a far wide range of uses than the merely academic.

  4. Interconversion, reactivity and thermal stability of polyaniline in selected oxidation states

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (i) to determine if the base form of the conducting polymer, polyaniline, existed in a continuum of oxidation states ranging from the completely reduced leucoemeraldine oxidation state, (1 [minus] y) = 0, to the completely oxidized pernigraniline oxidation state, (1 [minus] y = 1). (ii) To investigate a novel type of reductive ring amination reaction of protonated polyaniline, of oxidation state 1 [minus] y = 0.50. (iii) Tascertain whether certain forms of polyaniline exhibited thermochromic behavior. (iv) To study factors responsible for enhancing the thermal/oxidative stability of [open quotes]doped[close quotes] polyaniline. (v) To study the reaction between polyaniline and C[sub 60]. The significant results and conclusions are: (a) In the oxidation state range between 1 [minus] y = 0.0 and 1 [minus] y = 1.0, polyaniline base exists in only three discrete oxidation states at the molecular level in the solid state and also in N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP) solution. (b) Equimolar quantities of the two extreme oxidation states of polyaniline in the base form, leucoemeraldine, (1 [minus] y = 0.0), and pernigraniline, (1 [minus] y = 1.0), undergo a [open quotes]mutual[close quotes] oxidation and reduction when mixed in NMP solution. (c) In the oxidation state range between 1 [minus] y = 0.0 and 1 [minus] y = 0.50, only two species are observed in NMP solution of the polymer after the addition of excess aq. HCl, viz., fully protonated emeraldine salt and non-protonated leucoemeraldine base. (d) Protonation of emeraldine base, (1 [minus] y = 0.50), with nonvolatile acids has allowed the determination of the intrinsic thermal stability of the [open quotes]doped[close quotes] polymer. (e) A new reaction between emeraldine HCl and anhydrous amines results in reductive ring amination to produce leucoemeraldine base derivatives. (f) Reactions of the bases gave reversible thermochromic behavior and the formation of insoluble fullerenes.

  5. State and catalytic activity of iridium compounds in the reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Khomutova, E.G.; Rysev, A.P.; Romanovskaya, L.E.; Malysheva, N.M.

    1995-12-01

    Kinetic methods of determining Ir are insufficiently selective and sensitive as compared to the methods of determining Os and Ru. These characteristics may be improved by increasing the catalytic activity of iridium. All other factors being equal, catalytic activity depends on the state and form of iridium that enters the catalytic process. This is why one of the ways of improving the performance characteristics of a method of determining iridium involves searching for forms of the catalyst with higher catalytic activity. The aim of this work was to study the state and catalytic activity of iridium compounds. The method based on the iridium-catalyzed reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV) was chosen for the investigation. This method is most commonly used for analyzing complex samples. It was found previously that both the catalytic activity and selectivity of iridium determination increase when the reaction is conducted in the medium of perchloric acid or the sample is pretreated with nitric acid.

  6. [Spectral Study on Coordination Reaction Between metMyoglobin and Nitric Oxide].

    PubMed

    Tang, Qian; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Hong-yu; Shi, Shan-shan; Zheng, Xue-fang

    2015-07-01

    As we all known, the instantaneous reaction between protein and ligands are very important to adjust the normal playing of biological function. And nitric oxide interactions with iron are the most important biological reactions in which NO participates. Unlike carbon monoxide or oxygen, NO can also bind reversibly to ferric iron. In this paper, UV-Vis absorption and CD spectra were used to study coordination reaction process between horse heart metMb and NO, to demonstrate the coordination reaction mechanism and to explore the influencing factors of metMb with NO. The experimental results showed that metMb could react with NO, and obtained three new peaks at 420 nm, 534 and 568 nm, respectively, which implied metMb and NO have reacted and generated a new complex-nitrosylmetmyoglobin (metMbNO). Then as time went on, NO concentration decreased in the solution, and the Fe-N bond fractured under the attack of H2O, then NO leaves slowly from metMbNO, and met-Mb was regenerated. In this experiment, we also found that external conditions such as buffer medium, ionic strength, pH, temperature, etc, had an important influence on the coordination reaction between metMb and NO. It was favorable for the coordination reaction, when the 0.01 mol x L(-1) phosphate buffer. solution is near neutral condition, the temperature is 280 K, the coordination reaction could reach equilibrium at a fastest speed. In addition, the CD date show that NO only reacts with Fe atom in the center of heme and has less effect on the secondary structuers of protein. The research of metMb and NO played an important role to further study the function of NO. Especially the establish of equilibrium reaction mechanism between NO and heme protein has an important research value on maintaining the balance of NO in vivo and keeping the normal function in the body's cells. PMID:26717761

  7. Amperometric Nitric Oxide Sensors with Enhanced Selectivity Over Carbon Monoxide via Platinum Oxide Formation Under Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    An improved planar amperometric nitric oxide (NO) sensor with enhanced selectivity over carbon monoxide (CO), a volatile interfering species for NO sensors that has been largely overlooked until recently, is described. Formation of an oxide film on the inner platinum working electrode via anodic polarization using an inner alkaline electrolyte solution provides the basis for improved selectivity. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that formation of oxidized Pt film inhibits adsorption of CO to the electrode surface, which is a necessary initial step in the electrocatalytic oxidation of CO on Pt. Previous NO gas sensors that employ internal electrolyte solutions have been assembled using acidic internal solutions, that inhibit the formation of a dense platinum oxide film on the working electrode surface. It is demonstrated herein that increasing the internal electrolyte pH promotes oxidized platinum film formation, resulting in improved selectivity over CO. Selectivity coefficients (log KNO,j) for sensors assembled with internal solutions at various pH values range from −0.08 at pH 2.0 to −2.06 at pH 11.7 with average NO sensitivities of 1.24 nA/μM and LOD of <1 nM. PMID:24067100

  8. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Roitsch, Carolyn Ann; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60-80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  9. Unconventional application of the Mitsunobu reaction: Selective flavonolignan dehydration yielding hydnocarpins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guozheng; Schramm, Simon; Heilmann, Jörg; Biedermann, David; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Summary Various Mitsunobu conditions were investigated for a series of flavonolignans (silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, and silychristin A) to achieve either selective esterification in position C-23 or dehydration in a one-pot reaction yielding the biologically important enantiomers of hydnocarpin D, hydnocarpin and isohydnocarpin, respectively. This represents the only one-pot semi-synthetic method to access these flavonolignans in high yields. PMID:27340458

  10. Unconventional application of the Mitsunobu reaction: Selective flavonolignan dehydration yielding hydnocarpins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guozheng; Schramm, Simon; Heilmann, Jörg; Biedermann, David; Křen, Vladimír; Decker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Various Mitsunobu conditions were investigated for a series of flavonolignans (silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, and silychristin A) to achieve either selective esterification in position C-23 or dehydration in a one-pot reaction yielding the biologically important enantiomers of hydnocarpin D, hydnocarpin and isohydnocarpin, respectively. This represents the only one-pot semi-synthetic method to access these flavonolignans in high yields. PMID:27340458

  11. Rapid Bacterial Identification, Resistance, Virulence and Type Profiling using Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Charretier, Yannick; Dauwalder, Olivier; Franceschi, Christine; Degout-Charmette, Elodie; Zambardi, Gilles; Cecchini, Tiphaine; Bardet, Chloe; Lacoux, Xavier; Dufour, Philippe; Veron, Laurent; Rostaing, Hervé; Lanet, Veronique; Fortin, Tanguy; Beaulieu, Corinne; Perrot, Nadine; Dechaume, Dominique; Pons, Sylvie; Girard, Victoria; Salvador, Arnaud; Durand, Géraldine; Mallard, Frédéric; Theretz, Alain; Broyer, Patrick; Chatellier, Sonia; Gervasi, Gaspard; Van Nuenen, Marc; Ann Roitsch, Carolyn; Van Belkum, Alex; Lemoine, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Charrier, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode is proposed for in-depth characterisation of microorganisms in a multiplexed analysis. Within 60–80 minutes, the SRM method performs microbial identification (I), antibiotic-resistance detection (R), virulence assessment (V) and it provides epidemiological typing information (T). This SRM application is illustrated by the analysis of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating its promise for rapid characterisation of bacteria from positive blood cultures of sepsis patients. PMID:26350205

  12. Theoretical study on the reaction mechanism and thermodynamics of tin oxidation by oxygen species and chlorine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lai-Cai; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Yuan-Qiang; Zha, Dong; Tian, An-Min; Xu, Ming-Hou; Wong, Ning-Bew

    In this work ab initio molecular orbital methods were employed to study the coal combustion reaction mechanisms of tin oxidized by different oxidants, including HOCl, HCl, ClO, ClO2, NO3, CO2, and O2. Eleven reaction pathways were identified. The results show that Sn can react with HCl, ClOO, CO2, O2, and NO3 to form SnO and SnCl. SnO can be oxidized into SnCl by HOCl and HCl. SnCl can be further oxidized into a soluble compound, SnCl2.

  13. Evaluation of the catalytic activity of Pd-Ag alloys on ethanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. C.; Rego, R.; Fernandes, L. S.; Tavares, P. B.

    2011-08-01

    Pd-Ag alloys containing different amounts of Ag (8, 21 and 34 at.%) were prepared in order to evaluate their catalytic activity towards the ethanol oxidation (EOR) and oxygen reduction (ORR) reactions. A sequential electroless deposition of Ag and Pd on a stainless steel disc, followed by annealing at 650 °C under Ar stream, was used as the alloy electrode deposition process. From half-cell measurements in a 1.0 M NaOH electrolyte at ≅20 °C, it was found that alloying Pd with Ag leads to an increases of the ORR and EOR kinetics, relative to Pd. Among the alloys under study, the 21 at.% Ag content alloy presents the highest catalytic activity for the EOR and the lowest Ag content alloy (8 at.% Ag) shows the highest ORR activity. Moreover, it was found that the selectivity of Pd-Ag alloys towards ORR is sustained when ethanol is present in the electrolyte.

  14. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS - COMPARING DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alc...

  15. Ammonia and ethylene oxide permeation through selected protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, S P; Moyer, E S; Hall, R C

    1990-11-01

    An automated permeation test system was developed to collect permeation data. Three test specimens were evaluated simultaneously versus a challenge gas. The study evaluated chemical protective clothing garment materials for use by emergency response personnel confronted by ammonia or ethylene oxide in the gas phase. A total of 13 encapsulating suit materials and 2 glove materials were tested. Surgical latex material is not recommended for use in handling ammonia or ethylene oxide; other materials offer much greater protection. PMID:2085165

  16. Dehydrogenative Coupling Reactions with Oxidized Guanidino-Functionalized Aromatic Compounds: Novel Options for σ-Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Wild, Ute; Federle, Stefanie; Wagner, Arne; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-08-16

    We present a new option for metal-free σ-bond activation, making use of oxidized, guanidino-functionalized aromatic compounds (GFAs). We demonstrate this new option by the homocoupling reactions of thiols and phosphines. The kinetics and the reaction pathway were studied by a number of experiments (including heterocoupling of thiols and phosphines), supported by quantum-chemical computations. Reaction of the oxidized GFA with p-dihydrobenzoquinone to give p-benzoquinone shows that typical proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions are also possible. PMID:27430589

  17. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Reaction mechanism of WGS and PROX reactions catalyzed by Pt/oxide catalysts revealed by an FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingshun; Wu, Zongfang; Jin, Yuekang; Ma, Yunsheng; Huang, Weixin

    2013-08-01

    We have employed XPS and TDS to study the adsorption and surface reactions of H2O, CO and HCOOH on an FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst. The FeO(111)-Pt(111) interface of the FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst exposes coordination-unsaturated Fe(II) cations (Fe(II)CUS) and the Fe(II)CUS cations are capable of modifying the reactivity of neighbouring Pt sites. Water facilely dissociates on the Fe(II)CUS cations at the FeO(111)-Pt(111) interface to form hydroxyls that react to form both water and H2 upon heating. Hydroxyls on the Fe(II)CUS cations can react with CO(a) on the neighbouring Pt(111) sites to produce CO2 at low temperatures. Hydroxyls act as the co-catalyst in the CO oxidation by hydroxyls to CO2 (PROX reaction), while they act as one of the reactants in the CO oxidation by hydroxyls to CO2 and H2 (WGS reaction), and the recombinative reaction of hydroxyls to produce H2 is the rate-limiting step in the WGS reaction. A comparison of reaction behaviors between the interfacial CO(a) + OH reaction and the formate decomposition reaction suggest that formate is the likely surface intermediate of the CO(a) + OH reaction. These results provide some solid experimental evidence for the associative reaction mechanism of WGS and PROX reactions catalyzed by Pt/oxide catalysts. PMID:23576093

  19. Oxygen radical-mediated oxidation reactions of an alanine peptide motif - density functional theory and transition state theory study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxygen-base (O-base) oxidation in protein backbone is important in the protein backbone fragmentation due to the attack from reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, an alanine peptide was used model system to investigate this O-base oxidation by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations combining with continuum solvent model. Detailed reaction steps were analyzed along with their reaction rate constants. Results Most of the O-base oxidation reactions for this alanine peptide are exothermic except for the bond-breakage of the Cα-N bond to form hydroperoxy alanine radical. Among the reactions investigated in this study, the activated energy of OH α-H abstraction is the lowest one, while the generation of alkylperoxy peptide radical must overcome the highest energy barrier. The aqueous situation facilitates the oxidation reactions to generate hydroxyl alanine peptide derivatives except for the fragmentations of alkoxyl alanine peptide radical. The Cα-Cβ bond of the alkoxyl alanine peptide radical is more labile than the peptide bond. Conclusion the rate-determining step of oxidation in protein backbone is the generation of hydroperoxy peptide radical via the reaction of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2. The stabilities of alkylperoxy peptide radical and complex of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2 are crucial in this O-base oxidation reaction. PMID:22524792

  20. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Manivannan, A; Balasubramanian, M; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.