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Sample records for selective oxidation reactions

  1. CHEMICAL REACTIONS OF AQUATIC HUMIC MATERIALS WITH SELECTED OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to identify the specific organic reaction products of natural aquatic humic materials with selected oxidants (KMnO4, HOCl, Cl02, O3 and monochloramine). Reaction products were identified by GC/MS after solvent extraction and derivatization. The two most reac...

  2. Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

  3. Powerful fluoroalkoxy molybdenum(V) reagent for selective oxidative arene coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Moritz; Leppin, Jana; Wehming, Kathrin; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Heinze, Katja; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2014-02-24

    We introduce the novel fluoroalkoxy molybdenum(V) reagent 1 which has superior reactivity and selectivity in comparison to MoCl5 or the MoCl5 /TiCl4 reagent mixture in the oxidative coupling reactions of aryls. Common side reactions, such as chlorination and/or oligomer formation, are drastically diminished creating a powerful and useful reagent for oxidative coupling. Theoretical treatment of the reagent interaction with 1,2-dimethoxybenzene-type substrates indicates an inner-sphere electron transfer followed by a radical cationic reaction pathway for the oxidative-coupling process. EPR spectroscopic and electrochemical studies, X-ray analyses, computational investigations, and the experimental scope provide a highly consistent picture. The substitution of chlorido ligands by hexafluoroisopropoxido moieties seems to boost both the reactivity and selectivity of the metal center which might be applied to other reagents as well. PMID:24478061

  4. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, Stephan Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo; Pohl, Marga-Martina

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  5. Implications of sterically constrained n-butane oxidation reactions on the reaction mechanism and selectivity to 1-butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Sean T.; Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A.; Getman, Rachel B.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to analyze the reaction network in n-butane oxidation to 1-butanol over a Ag/Pd alloy catalyst under steric constraints, and the implications on the ability to produce 1-butanol selectively using MOF-encapsulated catalysts are discussed. MOFs are porous crystalline solids comprised of metal nodes linked by organic molecules. Recently, they have been successfully grown around metal nanoparticle catalysts. The resulting porous networks have been shown to promote regioselective chemistry, i.e., hydrogenation of trans-1,3-hexadiene to 3-hexene, presumably by forcing the linear alkene to stand "upright" on the catalyst surface and allowing only the terminal C-H bonds to be activated. In this work, we extend this concept to alkane oxidation. Our goal is to determine if a MOF-encapsulated catalyst could be used to selectively produce 1-butanol. Reaction energies and activation barriers are presented for more than 40 reactions in the pathway for n-butane oxidation. We find that C-H bond activation proceeds through an oxygen-assisted pathway and that butanal and 1-butanol are some of the possible products.

  6. Reactions of Propylene Oxide on Supported Silver Catalysts: Insights into Pathways Limiting Epoxidation Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Apoorva; Bedolla-Pantoja, Marco; Singh, Suyash; Lobo, Raul F.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Barteau, Mark A.

    2012-02-04

    The reactions of propylene oxide (PO) on silver catalysts were studied to understand the network of parallel and sequential reactions that may limit the selectivity of propylene epoxidation by these catalysts. The products of the anaerobic reaction of PO on Ag/a-Al2O3 were propanal, acetone and allyl alcohol for PO conversions below 2–3%. As the conversion of PO was increased either by increasing the temperature or the contact time, acrolein was formed at the expense of propanal, indicating that acrolein is a secondary reaction product in PO decomposition. With addition of oxygen to the feedstream the conversion of PO increased moderately. In contrast to the experiments in absence of oxygen, CO2 was a significant product while the selectivity to propanal decreased as soon as oxygen was introduced in the system. Allyl alcohol disappeared completely from the product stream in the presence of oxygen, reacting to form acrolein and CO2. The product distribution may be explained by a network of reactions involving two types of oxametallacycles formed by ring opening of PO: one with the oxygen bonded to C1 (OMC1, linear) and the other with oxygen bonded to C2 (OMC2, branched). OMC1 reacts to form PO, propanal, and allyl alcohol.

  7. Optically active P5-deltacyclenes: selective oxidation, ligand properties, and a diastereoselective rearrangement reaction.

    PubMed

    Keller, I C; Bauer, W; Heinemann, F W; Höhn, C; Rohwer, L; Zenneck, U

    2016-04-25

    Cage-chiral tetra-tert-butyl-P5-deltacyclene is accessible as a pair of highly enriched enantiomers and . The only secondary phosphorus atom P1 of the cage can be selectively oxidized by reaction with t-BuOOH. The P1-oxo species and , allow the direct determination of their ee values. Oxidation occurs with the complete retention of the optical activity of the compounds. The chiroptical properties of and are strongly dominated by their cage chirality, the oxygen atom does not contribute significantly. Elemental sulfur and selenium oxidize P5 with high preference to yield P5-thio- and P5-seleno-P5-deltacyclenes and of the intact cages again. Longer reaction time and more than stoichiometric amounts of selenium, leads to tri-seleno-P5-tetracycloundecane , a partially opened oxidized rearrangement product. The ligand properties of racemic were determined. Diphosphetane phosphorus atom P2 of is the active donor center to bind a Cr(CO)5 fragment, but a tautomerization of takes place if [(benzene)RuCl2]2 is added. A hydrogen atom migrates from P1 to the oxygen atom to form a phosphinous acid ligand. The lone pair of P1 is regenerated and acts as the active ligand function of the cage in this case. As for , the base n-BuLi induces an efficient cage rearrangement reaction of , where P1 and the neighboring carbon atom C4 containing its t-Bu substituent change places. C4 moves to its new position without breaking the bond with P5, this way forming the novel P1-oxo-P5-norsnoutene cage in a highly diastereoselective process. PMID:27055252

  8. Reaction kinetics of selected micropollutants in ozonation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    Second-order reaction rate constants of micropollutants with ozone (k(O3)) and hydroxyl radicals (k(OH)) are essential for evaluating their removal efficiencies from water during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes. Kinetic data are unavailable for many of the emerging micropollutants. Twenty-four micropollutants with very diverse structures and applications including endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products were selected, and their k(O3) and k(OH) values were determined using bench-scale reactors (at pH 7 and T = 20 °C). Reactions with molecular ozone are highly selective as indicated by their k(O3) values ranging from 10(-2)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The general trend of ozone reactivity can be explained by micropollutant structures in conjunction with the electrophilic nature of ozone reactions. All of the studied compounds are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals as shown by their high k(OH) values (10(8)-10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) even though they are structurally very diverse. For compounds with a low reactivity toward ozone, hydroxyl radical based treatment such as O(3)/H(2)O(2) or UV/H(2)O(2) is a viable alternative. This study contributed to filling the data gap pertaining kinetic data of organic micropollutants while confirming results reported in the literature where available. PMID:23079129

  9. Effects of solar radiation on manganese oxide reactions with selected organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bertino, D.J.; Zepp, R.G. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of sunlight on aqueous redox reactions between manganese oxides (MnO{sub x}) and selected organic substances are reported. No sunlight-induced rate enhancement was observed for the MnO{sub x} oxidation of substituted phenols, anisole, o-dichlorobenzene, or p-chloroaniline. On the other hand, solar radiation did accelerate the reduction of manganese oxides by dissolved organic matter (DOM) from aquatic environments. The photoreduction of MnO{sub x} by DOM was little affected by molecular oxygen in air-saturated water (250 {mu}M), but was inhibited by 2,6-dichloroindophenol (0.5-6 {mu}M), and excellent electron acceptor. MnO{sub x} reduction also was photosensitized by anthraquinone-2-sulfonate. These results indicate that the photoreduction probably involves electron transfer from excited states of sorbed DOM to the oxide surface. Wavelength studies indicated that ultraviolet-B radiation (280-320 nm) plays an important role in this photoreduction.

  10. Electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide: selective oxidation reactions in perfluorinated alcohol solvents.

    PubMed

    Neimann, K; Neumann, R

    2000-09-01

    [reaction; see text] The catalytic electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide with transition metal compounds toward reaction with nucleophiles is a matter of very significant research and practical interest. We have now found that use of perfluorinated alcoholic solvents such as 1,1, 1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol in the absence of catalysts allowed electrophilic activation of hydrogen peroxide toward epoxidation of alkenes and the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of ketones. PMID:10964384

  11. Enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A-L

    2016-06-28

    This review highlights the use of the oxidative boron Heck reaction in enantioselective Heck-type couplings. The enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reaction overcomes several limitations of the traditional Pd(0)-catalysed Heck coupling and has subsequently allowed for intermolecular couplings of challenging systems such as cyclic enones, acyclic alkenes, and even site selectively on remote alkenes. PMID:26529247

  12. Reduced graphene oxide: firm support for catalytically active palladium nanoparticles and game changer in selective hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Manuela; Benito, Ana M.; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P.; Arenal, Raul; Maser, Wolfgang K.

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer.Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis and results. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02822d

  13. Oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions: insights from quantum chemistry calculations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hujun; Liu, Chengcheng; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Ting; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    The mechanisms for the oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5) by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the calculations, we investigated the original mechanism proposed by Hillhouse and co-workers for the activation of N2O. The calculations showed that the complex with an initial O-coordination of N2O to the coordinatively unsaturated Hf center is not a local minimum. Then we proposed a new reaction mechanism to investigate how N2O is activated and why N2O selectively oxidize phenyl and hydride ligands of . Frontier molecular orbital theory analysis indicates that N2O is activated by nucleophilic attack by the phenyl or hydride ligand. Present calculations provide new insights into the activation of N2O involving the direct oxygen atom transfer from nitrous oxide to metal-ligand bonds instead of the generally observed oxygen abstraction reaction to generate metal-oxo species. PMID:26660046

  14. Optimization of reaction conditions in selective oxidation of styrene over fine crystallite spinel-type CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} complex oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pardeshi, Satish K.; Pawar, Ravindra Y.

    2010-05-15

    The CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel-type catalyst was synthesized by citrate gel method and well characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The crystallization temperature of the spinel particle prepared by citrate gel method was 600 {sup o}C which was lower than that of ferrite prepared by other methods. CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalysts prepared by citrate gel method show better activity for styrene oxidation in the presence of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (30%) as an oxidizing agent. In this reaction the oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bond of styrene takes place selectively with 38 {+-} 2 mol% conversion. The major product of the reaction is benzaldehyde up to 91 {+-} 2 mol% and minor product phenyl acetaldehyde up to 9 {+-} 2 mol%, respectively. The products obtained in the styrene oxidation reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The influence of the catalyst, reaction time, temperature, amount of catalyst, styrene/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molar ratio and solvents on the conversion and product distribution were studied.

  15. Selective catalysts for the hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions by patterning of platinum with calix[4]arene molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Genorio, B.; Strmcnik, D.; Subbaraman, R.; Tripkovic, D.; Karapetrov, G.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Pejovnik, S.; Markovic, N. M.; Univ. Ljubljana; National Inst. of Chemistry

    2010-12-01

    The design of new catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells must be guided by two equally important fundamental principles: optimization of their catalytic behaviour as well as the long-term stability of the metal catalysts and supports in hostile electrochemical environments. The methods used to improve catalytic activity are diverse, ranging from the alloying and de-alloying of platinum to the synthesis of platinum core-shell catalysts. However, methods to improve the stability of the carbon supports and catalyst nanoparticles are limited, especially during shutdown (when hydrogen is purged from the anode by air) and startup (when air is purged from the anode by hydrogen) conditions when the cathode potential can be pushed up to 1.5 V. Under the latter conditions, stability of the cathode materials is strongly affected (carbon oxidation reaction) by the undesired oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the anode side. This emphasizes the importance of designing selective anode catalysts that can efficiently suppress the ORR while fully preserving the Pt-like activity for the hydrogen oxidation reaction. Here, we demonstrate that chemically modified platinum with a self-assembled monolayer of calix[4]arene molecules meets this challenging requirement.

  16. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  17. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates.

    PubMed

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  18. Improved reaction kinetics and selectivity by the TiO2-embedded carbon nanofiber support for electro-oxidation of ethanol on PtRu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi; Ito, Yudai; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Ishitobi, Hirokazu

    2014-02-01

    The electro-oxidation of ethanol by the catalyst of PtRu nanoparticles supported on a TiO2-embedded carbon nanofiber (PtRu/TECNF), which has recently been proposed by the authors as a highly active catalyst for methanol oxidation, is investigated by cyclic voltammetry using a glassy carbon electrode and by operating a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) with the catalyst. The mass activity obtained from the cyclic voltammogram for the ethanol oxidation is compared to that for the methanol oxidation reported in our recent paper. The mass activity for the ethanol oxidation is comparable or slightly higher than that for the methanol oxidation, and the relationship between the TECNF composition, i.e., the Ti/C mass ratio, and the activity are also similar to that for the methanol oxidation. A DEFC fabricated with the PtRu/TECNF shows a higher power output compared to that with the commercial PtRu/C catalyst. An analysis of the reaction products by a simple two-step reaction model reveals that the PtRu/TECNF increases the rate constant for the reaction steps from ethanol to acetaldehyde and subsequently to CO2, but decreases that from acetaldehyde to acetic acid. This means that the PtRu/TECNF improves not only the kinetics, but also the selectivity to acetaldehyde.

  19. Effect of Slow Aging Reactions on Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol Prepared by Oxidation of Selected Monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkorodov, S. A.; Bones, D. L.; Henricksen, D. K.; Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Pan, X.; Nguyen, T. B.; Gonsior, M.; Cooper, W.; Laskin, J.; Laskin, A.

    2009-05-01

    Organic particulate matter (PM) has a major impact on atmospheric chemistry, climate, and human health. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a rather significant fraction of organic PM; this includes SOA produced by oxidation of biogenically emitted monoterpenes. Once such SOA is formed, it is believed to undergo slow aging processes, which may have large effects on the physical and chemical properties of the particles. This presentation focuses on the effect of slow chemical aging on optical properties of SOA formed from the ozone-induced oxidation of limonene, myrcene, and other selected monoterpenes. Several complementary techniques including high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, FTIR spectroscopy, UV/vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy, and photodissociation spectroscopy are used to probe the aging-induced changes in physical properties and chemical composition of laboratory generated SOA. Limonene SOA appears to undergo a dramatic change in its absorption spectrum on a time scale of hours; it develops strong visible bands in the 400-500 nm region, and becomes fluorescent. This transformation is catalyzed by ammonium sulfate and certain amino acids. This rather unusual aging process can potentially contribute to the formation of brown carbon in biogenic SOA.

  20. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  1. A Quantitative Proteomic Profile of the Nrf2-Mediated Antioxidant Response of Macrophages to Oxidized LDL Determined by Multiplexed Selected Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kinter, Caroline S.; Lundie, Jillian M.; Patel, Halee; Rindler, Paul M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The loading of macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) is a key part of the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Oxidized LDL contains a wide ranging set of toxic species, yet the molecular events that allow macrophages to withstand loading with these toxic species are not completely characterized. The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of the cellular stress response. However, the specific parts of the Nrf2-dependent stress response are diverse, with both tissue- and treatment-dependent components. The goal of these experiments was to develop and use a quantitative proteomic approach to characterize the Nrf2-dependent response in macrophages to oxidized LDL. Cultured mouse macrophages, the J774 macrophage-like cell line, were treated with a combination of oxidized LDL, the Nrf2-stabilizing reagent tert- butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), and/or Nrf2 siRNA. Protein expression was determined using a quantitative proteomics assay based on selected reaction monitoring. The assay was multiplexed to monitor a set of 28 antioxidant and stress response proteins, 6 housekeeping proteins, and 1 non-endogenous standard protein. The results have two components. The first component is the validation of the multiplexed, quantitative proteomics assay. The assay is shown to be fundamentally quantitative, precise, and accurate. The second component is the characterization of the Nrf2-mediated stress response. Treatment with tBHQ and/or Nrf2 siRNA gave statistically significant changes in the expression of a subset of 11 proteins. Treatment with oxidized LDL gave statistically significant increases in the expression of 7 of those 11 proteins plus one additional protein. All of the oxLDL-mediated increases were attenuated by Nrf2 siRNA. These results reveal a specific, multifaceted response of the foam cells to the incoming toxic oxidized LDL. PMID:23166812

  2. Selective glycerol oxidation by electrocatalytic dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ju; Lee, Jechan; Green, Sara K; Huber, George W; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an electrochemical dehydrogenation process can be used to oxidize glycerol to glyceraldehyde and glyceric acid even without using stoichiometric chemical oxidants. A glyceric acid selectivity of 87.0 % at 91.8 % glycerol conversion was obtained in an electrocatalytic batch reactor. A continuous-flow electrocatalytic reactor had over an 80 % high glyceric acid selectivity at 10 % glycerol conversion, as well as greater reaction rates than either an electrocatalytic or a conventional catalytic batch reactor. PMID:24664518

  3. Rates and temperature dependences of the reaction of OH with isoprene, its oxidation products, and selected terpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Harris, G.W.; Pitts, J.N. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Absolute rate constants determined by using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique are reported for the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with isoprene, ..cap alpha.., and ..beta..-pinene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein in the temperature range 297-424 K, and with methylglyoxal at 297 K. These results contribute to a more quantitative understanding of the tropospheric fate of gas-phase biomass-related organics and serve as input to models of the chemistry of the natural troposphere.

  4. Role of silver current collector on the operational stability of selected cobalt-containing oxide electrodes for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yubo; Wang, Fucun; Chen, Dengjie; Dong, Feifei; Park, Hee Jung; Kwak, Chan; Shao, Zongping

    2012-07-01

    The long-term stability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of two typical perovskite cathode materials of SOFCs, i.e., Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) and Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ (SSC), is investigated in a symmetric cell configuration under air condition at 700 °C using Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (SDC) electrolyte substrate and silver current collectors. Moreover, two different methods of silver current collection are tested, i.e., whole electrode surface deposited with a diluted silver paste (CC-01) and a mesh-like current collector using concentrated silver paste (CC-02). Electrochemical impedance spectra are applied for stability investigations. With the CC-01 current collector, the performance of the electrode deteriorates significantly, although the initial performance is good. By contrast, fairly stable performance is obtained from symmetric cells with either BSCF or SSC + SDC electrodes using the CC-02 current collector, even though a phase transition is observed for BSCF. For instance, after approximately 800 h of continuous stability testing, the area-specific resistance of the BSCF electrode retains a value of approximately 0.065 Ω cm2, except for a slight fluctuation within the range of 0.06-0.07 Ω cm2. These findings reveal that both BSCF and SSC can be stably operated for ORR under symmetric cell conditions; however, an appropriate current collection method is crucial to achieving stable performance.

  5. Surface coordination number and surface redox couples on catalyst oxides, a new approach of the interpretation of activity and selectivity III. Interpretation of chemical and catalytic oxidation reactions on some oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Y. P.

    The concepts of surface coordination number n, and of surface redox couples MO [ n] /MO ( n+1) presented previously, are exploited to explain experimental results. Two cases are considered: reactions of chemical gaseous species such as CO, CO 2, H 2, H 2O,N 2O, propene and methanol on the surface of the oxides NiO, TiO 2, and Cr 2O 3, in the absence of oxygen: activated catalytic reactions of oxygen on reductive species such as CO, H 2,C 2H 6, and CH 3OH. The knowledge of the potential of surface redox couples permits a rationalization of the study of these reactions. The efficiency of the two concepts is obvious in many cases. For example, the origin of an athermal oxidative process occurring for the oxidations of CO or H 2 on TiO 2 is easily understood, as well as those of the poisoning of the catalysts or of the inactivity of a surface saturated by oxygen. In addition, the study of chemical reactions on the oxides confirms and completes the theoretical approach used. Particularly, the existence of the surface states, which are postulated in the case of Cr 2O 3, is corroborated by experimental observations concerning the number of surface states and the value of the chemical potentials. Even though the theory is based upon thermodynamical and structural data, it also leads to a better understanding of kinetic features.

  6. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  7. Ni/Fe-supported over hydrotalcites precursors as catalysts for clean and selective oxidation of Basic Yellow 11: reaction intermediates determination.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; García, J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Basic Yellow 11 (BY 11) was employed as model compound to study catalytic wet air oxidation as a pre-treatment step to the conventional biological oxidation. Ni and Fe catalysts supported over hydrotalcite (HT) were prepared by incipient wetness and excess impregnation to obtain catalysts with different metal loadings (from 1 to 10 wt.%). HTs were synthesized by co-precipitation and characterized with XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM. Results showed that dye conversion increased with Ni and Fe content up to 7 wt.% and that the most effective catalyst were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The influence of metal loading in the catalyst, and the preparation method as well as the reaction conditions was investigated. A mechanism and reaction pathways for BY 11 during catalytic liquid phase oxidation have also been proposed. PMID:22960061

  8. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  9. Uranium oxidation: characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Smyrl, N.R.; Condon, J.B.; Eager, M.H.

    1983-04-27

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. Results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. 27 figures.

  10. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions have become a powerful tool for advanced organic synthesis. This type of reaction is of significant value for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, as well as advanced materials. Both, academic as well as industrial laboratories continuously investigate new applications of the different methodologies. Clearly, this area constitutes one of the major topics in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis. Among the different palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions, several carbonylations have been developed and widely used in organic syntheses and are even applied in the pharmaceutical industry on ton-scale. Furthermore, methodologies such as the carbonylative Suzuki and Sonogashira reactions allow for the preparation of interesting building blocks, which can be easily refined further on. Although carbonylative coupling reactions of aryl halides have been well established, palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions are also interesting. Compared with the reactions of aryl halides, oxidative carbonylation reactions offer an interesting pathway. The oxidative addition step could be potentially avoided in oxidative reactions, but only few reviews exist in this area. In this Minireview, we summarize the recent development in the oxidative carbonylation reactions. PMID:23307763

  11. Direct growth of flower-like manganese oxide on reduced graphene oxide towards efficient oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Guo, Chunxian; Zhang, Lianying; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-07-18

    Three-dimensional manganese oxide is directly grown on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets, exhibiting comparable catalytic activity, higher selectivity and better stability towards oxygen reduction reaction than those of the commercial Pt/XC-72 catalyst. PMID:23745182

  12. Oxidative hemoglobin reactions: Applications to drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Hollenberg, Paul F; Ballou, David P

    2016-06-15

    Hb is a protein with multiple functions, acting as an O2 transport protein, and having peroxidase and oxidase activities with xenobiotics that lead to substrate radicals. However, there is a lack of evidence for intermediates involved in these reactions of Hb with redox-active compounds, including those with xenobiotics such as drugs, chemical carcinogens, and sulfides. In particular, questions exist as to what intermediates participate in reactions of either metHb or oxyHb with sulfides. The studies presented here elaborate kinetics and intermediates involved in the reactions of Hb with oxidants (H2O2 and mCPBA), and they demonstrate the formation of high valent intermediates, providing insights into mechanistic issues of sulfur and drug oxidations. Overall, we propose generalized mechanisms that include peroxidatic reactions using H2O2 generated from the autooxidation of oxyHb, with involvement of substrate radicals in reactions of Hb with oxidizable drugs such as metyrapone or 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and with sulfides. We identify ferryl intermediates (with a Soret band at 407 nm) in oxidative reactions with all of the above-mentioned reactions. These spectral properties are consistent with a protonated ferryl heme, such as Cpd II or Cpd ES-like species (Spolitak et al., JIB, 2006, 100, 2034-2044). Mechanism(s) of Hb oxidative reactions are discussed. PMID:27091316

  13. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  14. Production of pesticide metabolites by oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, E

    1982-08-01

    The cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system catalyzes a wide variety of oxidations of pesticide chemicals and related compounds. These reactions include epoxidation and aromatic hydroxylation, aliphatic hydroxylation, O-, N- and S-dealkylation, N-oxidation, oxidative deamination, S-oxidation, P-oxidation, desulfuration and ester cleavage and may result in either detoxication or activation of the pesticide. The current status of such reactions, relative to the production, in vivo, of biologically active intermediates in pesticide metabolism is summarized. More recently we have shown that the FAD-containing monooxygenase of mammalian liver (E.C.1.14.13.8), a xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme of broad specificity formerly known as an amine oxidase, is involved in a variety of pesticide oxidations. These include sulfoxidation of organophosphorus insecticides such as phorate and disulfoton, oxidative desulfuration of phosphonate insecticides such as fonofos and oxidation at the phosphorus atom in such compounds as the cotton defoliant, folex. The relative importance of the FAD-containing monooxygenase vis-a-vis the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system is discussed, based on in vitro studies on purified enzymes. PMID:7161848

  15. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  16. SURFACE REACTIONS OF OXIDES OF SULFUR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface reactions of several sulfur-containing molecules have been studied in order to understand the mechanism by which sulfate ions are formed on atmospheric aerosols. At 25C the heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 by NO2 to sulfuric acid and sulfate ions occurred on hydrated silica...

  17. Oxidative Dehydrogenative Couplings of Pyrazol-5-amines Selectively Forming Azopyrroles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New oxidative dehydrogenative couplings of pyrazol-5-amines for the selective synthesis of azopyrrole derivatives have been described. The former reaction simultaneously installs C–I and N–N bonds through iodination and oxidation, whereas the latter involved a copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling process. The resulting iodo-substituted azopyrroles were employed by treatment with various terminal alkynes through Sonogashira cross-coupling leading to new azo compounds. PMID:24731223

  18. Reaction of ethanol on oxidized and metallic cobalt surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Matthew P.; Vohs, John M.

    2011-02-01

    The reaction of ethanol on metallic and oxidized cobalt surfaces was studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to determine the dependence of the reaction pathways on the cobalt oxidation state. The primary reaction for ethoxide species on metallic cobalt surfaces was decarbonylation producing CO, H 2 and carbon. This reaction was facile and occurred below 400 K. In contrast, CoO x surfaces which predominantly contained Co 2+ were selective for the dehydrogenation of ethoxide groups to produce acetaldehyde at 400 K. A fraction of the acetaldehyde molecules produced by this pathway were further oxidized to acetate which decomposed to produce CO 2 at 495 K. More highly oxidized Co surfaces that contained both CO 2+ and Co 3+ were active for the complete oxidation of ethanol producing CO, CO 2, and H 2O as the primary products. The insights that these results provide for understanding the mechanism of the steam reforming of ethanol on cobalt catalysts is discussed.

  19. Hypochlorite oxidation of select androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Mash, Heath; Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura

    2010-03-01

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their synthetic analogs released from agricultural activities and wastewater discharge may be introduced into drinking water sources. The fate of androgenic steroids during drinking water treatment, specifically the use of chlorine for biological control, has not been extensively studied. As such, this study focuses on the hypochlorite oxidation of a select number of androgenic compounds that vary in their structural composition. Where a favorable reaction is observed, we also attempt to describe the product distribution. The results show compounds that possess a ketonic functional group conjugated with a double bond inhibit oxidation by hypochlorite in the absence of biological or indirect oxidative pathways. Oxidative reactivity in the presence of hypochlorite was favorably correlated with the presence of isolated unsaturated carbon bonds and resulted in various transformation products. PMID:20031185

  20. Selective Oxidizer For Removal Of Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trocciola, John C.; Schroll, Craig R.; Lesieur, Roger R.

    1996-01-01

    Catalytic apparatus selectively oxidizes most of carbon monoxide (without oxidizing hydrogen) in stream of reformed fuel gas fed to low-temperature fuel cell. Multiple catalytic stages at progressively lower temperatures operate without becoming poisoned. Catalysts used to oxidize CO selectively include platinum on alumina and commercial catalyst known as "Selectoxo."

  1. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  2. Reversibility of heme-nitric oxide reactions for use in an inhaled nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Soller, Babs R.; Rencus, Tal

    1997-06-01

    Nitric Oxide is a simple gaseous compound which serves as a regulatory molecule in a number of physiological processes. Due to its biological role as a potent local vasodilator,there has been widespread interest in the therapeutic use of gaseous nitric oxide a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Our goal is the development of a sensor for the direct and continuous measurement of inhaled nitric oxide concentrations. This study evaluated the reversibility of potential sensing compounds upon reaction with nitric oxide. Previously, absorption spectroscopy was used to study the sensitivity of the Fe II, Fe III and oxygenated forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. This study focused on the photo-reversibility of the hem's reaction with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochrome-c in the Fe III state reversibly reacted with nitric oxide. Hemoglobin and myoglobin in the Fe II state non-reversibly reacted with nitric oxide to form an unstable product. Cytochrome-c (FeII) does not react with nitric oxide. The oxy forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin react with nitric oxide to form their respective met forms, unreversible via photolysis. For all reversible reactions, photolysis was gradual and complete within five minutes.

  3. Heterogeneous reaction of ozone with aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    Rates and collision efficiencies for ozone decomposition on aluminum oxide surfaces were determined. Samples were characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, particle size, and chemical analysis. Collision efficiencies were found to be between 2 times 10 to the -10 power and 2 times 10 to the -9 power. This is many orders of magnitude below the value of 0.000001 to 0.00001 needed for appreciable long-term ozone loss in the stratosphere. An activation energy of 7.2 kcal/mole was found for the heterogeneous reaction between -40 C and 40 C. Effects of pore diffusion, outgassing and treatment of the aluminum oxide with several chemical species were also investigated.

  4. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  5. Reaction network and kinetics for the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V sub 2 O sub 5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Andersson, L.T. )

    1990-11-01

    The oxidation of three methyl-diphenylmethane isomers and of bibenzyl, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde, which are intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of toluene over V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, has been studied to elucidate the reaction network and relative importance of various reactions. Selectivity dependences reveal that the network is composed mainly of three parallel reaction routes: (1) side-chain oxidation with consecutive reactions, (2) oxidative coupling with both parallel and consecutive reactions, and (3) carbon oxide formation. Coupling products are not negligible, with an initial selectivity of 29% (400{degree}C). Anthraquinone is produced mainly from o-methyl-diphenylmethane conditions and catalyst used. Selectivity dependences suggested product lumping and a simplified network. Kinetic analysis of this reaction network indicates that higher temperatures favor route 2 over route 1. The same initial intermediates for route 1 of side-chain oxidation and for route 2 of oxidative coupling are suggested.

  6. Cooperative Catalysis for Selective Alcohol Oxidation with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Slot, Thierry K; Eisenberg, David; van Noordenne, Dylan; Jungbacker, Peter; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2016-08-22

    The activation of dioxygen for selective oxidation of organic molecules is a major catalytic challenge. Inspired by the activity of nitrogen-doped carbons in electrocatalytic oxygen reduction, we combined such a carbon with metal-oxide catalysts to yield cooperative catalysts. These simple materials boost the catalytic oxidation of several alcohols, using molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure and low temperature (80 °C). Cobalt and copper oxide demonstrate the highest activities. The high activity and selectivity of these catalysts arises from the cooperative action of their components, as proven by various control experiments and spectroscopic techniques. We propose that the reaction should not be viewed as occurring at an 'active site', but rather at an 'active doughnut'-the volume surrounding the base of a carbon-supported metal-oxide particle. PMID:27355443

  7. Manganese chlorins immobilized on silica as oxidation reaction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Castro, Kelly A D F; Pires, Sónia M G; Ribeiro, Marcos A; Simões, Mário M Q; Neves, M Graça P M S; Schreiner, Wido H; Wypych, Fernando; Cavaleiro, José A S; Nakagaki, Shirley

    2015-07-15

    Synthetic strategies that comply with the principles of green chemistry represent a challenge: they will enable chemists to conduct reactions that maximize the yield of products with commercial interest while minimizing by-products formation. The search for catalysts that promote the selective oxidation of organic compounds under mild and environmentally friendly conditions constitutes one of the most important quests of organic chemistry. In this context, metalloporphyrins and analogues are excellent catalysts for oxidative transformations under mild conditions. In fact, their reduced derivatives chlorins are also able to catalyze organic compounds oxidation effectively, although they have been still little explored. In this study, we synthesized two chlorins through porphyrin cycloaddition reactions with 1.3-dipoles and prepared the corresponding manganese chlorins (MnCHL) using adequate manganese(II) salts. These MnCHL were posteriorly immobilized on silica by following the sol-gel process and the resulting solids were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UVVIS spectroscopy, FTIR, XPS, and EDS. The catalytic activity of the immobilized MnCHL was investigated in the oxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexene and cyclohexane and the results were compared with the ones obtained under homogeneous conditions. PMID:25841060

  8. THz-Pulse-Induced Selective Catalytic CO Oxidation on Ru.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Jerry L; Katayama, Tetsuo; Lindenberg, Aaron; Fisher, Alan S; Öström, Henrik; Nilsson, Anders; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-07-17

    We demonstrate the use of intense, quasi-half-cycle THz pulses, with an associated electric field component comparable to intramolecular electric fields, to direct the reaction coordinate of a chemical reaction by stimulating the nuclear motions of the reactants. Using a strong electric field from a THz pulse generated via coherent transition radiation from an ultrashort electron bunch, we present evidence that CO oxidation on Ru(0001) is selectively induced, while not promoting the thermally induced CO desorption process. The reaction is initiated by the motion of the O atoms on the surface driven by the electric field component of the THz pulse, rather than thermal heating of the surface. PMID:26230806

  9. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  10. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes in Oxidation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčík, Václav; Cazin, Catherine S. J.

    This chapter describes applications of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) in oxidation chemistry. The strong σ-donation capabilities of the NHCs allow an efficient stabilisation of metal centres in high oxidation states, while high metal-NHC bond dissociation energies suppress their oxidative decomposition. These properties make NHCs ideal ligands for oxidation processes. The first part of this chapter is dedicated to the reactivity of NHC-metal complexes towards molecular oxygen whilst the second half highlights all oxidation reactions catalysed by such complexes. These include oxidation of alcohols and olefins, oxidative cyclisations, hydrations of alkynes and nitriles, oxidative cleavage of alkenes and the oxidation of methane.

  11. Lipase-mediated selective oxidation of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Krystof, Monika; Pérez-Sánchez, María; Domínguez de María, Pablo

    2013-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are important biomass-derived platform chemicals that can be obtained from the dehydration of lignocellulosic sugars. A possible route for the derivatization of furanics is their oxidation to afford a broad range of chemicals with promising applications (e.g., diacids, hydroxyl acids, aldehyde acids, monomers for novel polymers). Herein we explore the organic peracid-assisted oxidation of furanics under mild reaction conditions. Using lipases as biocatalysts, alkyl esters as acyl donors, and aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide (30 % v/v) added stepwise, peracids are formed in situ, which subsequently oxidize the aldehyde groups to afford carboxylic acids with high yields and excellent selectivities. Furthermore, the use of an immobilized silica-based 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) affords the selective oxidation of the hydroxymethyl group of HMF to afford 2,5-diformylfuran. That product can be subsequently oxidized using again lipases for the in situ peracid formation to yield 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid, which is considered to be a key building block for biorefineries. These lipase-mediated reactions proceeded efficiently even with high substrate loadings under still non-optimized conditions. Overall, a proof-of-concept for the oxidation of furanics (based on in situ formed organic peracids as oxidants) is provided. PMID:23576295

  12. Gold-catalyzed homogeneous oxidative cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guozhu; Peng, Yu; Cui, Li; Zhang, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Oxidizing gold? A gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycle is essential for the first oxidative cross-coupling reaction in gold catalysis. By using Selectfluor for gold(I) oxidation, this chemistry reveals the synthetic potential of incorporating gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycles into contemporary gold chemistry and promises a new area of gold research by merging powerful gold catalysis and oxidative metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. PMID:19322869

  13. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Heck Reactions between Alkyltrifluoroborates and Vinylarenes

    PubMed Central

    Liwosz, Timothy W.; Chemler, Sherry R.

    2013-01-01

    We report herein that potassium alkyltrifluoroborates can be utilized in oxidative Heck-type reactions with vinyl arenes. The reaction is catalyzed by a Cu(OTf)2/1,10-phenanthroline with MnO2 as the stoichiometric oxidant. In addition to the alkyl Heck, amination, esterification and dimerization reactions of alkyltrifluoroborates are demonstrated under analogous reaction conditions. Evidence for an alkyl radical intermediate is presented. PMID:23734764

  14. Kinetically driven instabilities and selectivities in methane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.K.; Vlachos, D.G.

    1997-08-01

    Ignitions, extinctions, and Hopf bifurcations in methane oxidation were studied as a function of pressure and inlet fuel composition. A continuous stirred-tank reactor was modeled with numerical bifurcation techniques, using the 177 reaction/31 species mechanism. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses were performed at turning points to identify the most important reactions and reactive species. Then, simulations were compared with experimental data. Multiple ignitions and extinctions as well as oscillations that are purely kinetically driven were found. Ignition to a partially ignited state with considerable reactivity of methane indicates possible narrow operation windows with high selectivities to partial oxidation products. At 0.1 atm, the authors found a selectivity of up to 80% to CO at 70% CH{sub 4} conversion. The ignition to a fully ignited branch is associated with high selectivity to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The C2 chemistry inhibits the ignition of methane to the partially ignited branch. The methane ignition temperature exhibits two branches with respect to pressure, with only the low-pressure branch being dominant. Reaction path analysis at ignition conditions shows that the preferred pathway of CH{sub 4} oxidation is to form CO and CO{sub 2} though CH{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}(s) intermediates. However, at intermediate to high pressures, the recombination of CH{sub 3} to C{sub 2}H{sub 6} also becomes quite significant.

  15. A Generalized Selection Rule for Pericyclic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Fu-Cheng; Pfeiffer, Gary V.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a convenient procedure, the Odd-Even Rule, for predicting the allowedness of forbiddenness of ground-state, pericyclic reactions. The rule is applied to a number of specific reactions. In contrast to the Woodward-Hoffman approach, the application to each reaction is always the same. (JN)

  16. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  17. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene.

  18. Concurrent Formation of Carbon–Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C–H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C–C bond formation via C–H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  19. Concurrent Formation of Carbon-Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction.

    PubMed

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C-H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C-C bond formation via C-H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  20. State- and bond-selected unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F. )

    1990-09-21

    Unimolecular reactions are crucial chemical events that have been the focus of increasingly sophisticated investigation in the past decade. Unraveling their details is one fundamental goal of experimental and theoretical studies of chemical dynamics. New techniques are revealing the possibilities, and challenges, of eigenstate- and bond-specific unimolecular reactions. These experiments clearly demonstrate the intimate connection between intramolecular processes and unimolecular reaction dynamics and suggest means of exploiting molecular properties to study and control reactions at the level of individual quantum states. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  2. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  3. Water oxidation reaction in natural and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal

    2013-12-10

    Understanding the structure and mechanism of water oxidation catalysts is an essential component for developing artificial photosynthetic devices. In the natural water oxidation catalyst, the geometric and electronic structure of its inorganic core, the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5} cluster, has been studied by spectroscopic and diffraction measurements. In inorganic systems, metal oxides seem to be good candidates for water oxidation catalysts. Understanding the reaction mechanism in both natural and oxide-based catalysts will helpin further developing efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts.

  4. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng; Yang Shengchun; You Hongjun; Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  5. Iodine Oxide Thermite Reactions: Physical and Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Pantoya, Michelle; Bless, Stephan; Clark, William

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the potential for some thermite-like material reactions to kill bacteria spores. Iodine oxides and silver oxides react vigorously with metals like aluminum, tantalum, and neodymium. These reactions theoretically produce temperatures as high as 8000K, leading to vaporization of the reactants, producing very hot iodine and/or silver gases. We performed a series of computations and experiments to characterize these reactions under both quasi-static and ballistic impact conditions. Criteria for impact reaction were established. Measurements of temperature and pressure changes and chemical evolution will be reported. Basic combustion characterizations of these reactions, such as thermal equilibrium analysis and reaction propagation rates as well as ignition sensitivity, will be discussed. Additionally, testing protocols were developed to characterize the biocidal effects of these reactive materials on B. subtilis spores. The evidence from these tests indicates that these reactions produce heat, pressure, and highly biocidal gases.

  6. Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

    2008-12-31

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using

  7. Uranium oxidation: Characterization of oxides formed by reaction with water by infrared and sorption analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, E. L.; Smyrl, N. R.; Condon, J. B.; Eager, M. H.

    1984-04-01

    Three different uranium oxide samples have been characterized with respect to the different preparation techniques. The results show that the water reaction with uranium metal occurs cyclically forming laminar layers of oxide which spall off due to the strain at the oxide/metal interface. Single laminae are released if liquid water is present due to the prizing penetration at the reaction zone. The rate of reaction of water with uranium is directly proportional to the amount of adsorbed water on the oxide product. Rapid transport is effected through the open hydrous oxide product. Dehydration of the hydrous oxide irreversibly forms a more inert oxide which cannot be rehydrated to the degree that prevails in the original hydrous product of uranium oxidation with water. Inert gas sorption analyses and diffuse reflectance infrared studies combined with electron microscopy prove valuable in defining the chemistry and morphology of the oxidic products and hydrated intermediates.

  8. Oxidant-free dehydrogenative coupling reactions via hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Ke-Han; Li, Yang

    2014-10-01

    Oxidant-free dehydrogenative coupling reactions: Recently, coupling reactions have followed a novel strategy for the construction of C==C, C==N, C==P, and S==S bonds by dehydrogenation without using any extra oxidant, via H2 evolution. These breakthroughs inspire a new direction in the construction of chemical bonds, towards more sustainable, highly atom-economical, and environmentally benign synthetic methods. PMID:25139249

  9. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  10. The pathophysiology of extracellular hemoglobin associated with enhanced oxidative reactions

    PubMed Central

    Rifkind, Joseph M.; Mohanty, Joy G.; Nagababu, Enika

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) continuously undergoes autoxidation producing superoxide which dismutates into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and is a potential source for subsequent oxidative reactions. Autoxidation is most pronounced under hypoxic conditions in the microcirculation and for unstable dimers formed at reduced Hb concentrations. In the red blood cell (RBC), oxidative reactions are inhibited by an extensive antioxidant system. For extracellular Hb, whether from hemolysis of RBCs and/or the infusion of Hb-based blood substitutes, the oxidative reactions are not completely neutralized by the available antioxidant system. Un-neutralized H2O2 oxidizes ferrous and ferric Hbs to Fe(IV)-ferrylHb and OxyferrylHb, respectively. FerrylHb further reacts with H2O2 producing heme degradation products and free iron. OxyferrylHb, in addition to Fe(IV) contains a free radical that can undergo additional oxidative reactions. Fe(III)Hb produced during Hb autoxidation also readily releases heme, an additional source for oxidative stress. These oxidation products are a potential source for oxidative reactions in the plasma, but to a greater extent when the lower molecular weight Hb dimers are taken up into cells and tissues. Heme and oxyferryl have been shown to have a proinflammatory effect further increasing their potential for oxidative stress. These oxidative reactions contribute to a number of pathological situations including atherosclerosis, kidney malfunction, sickle cell disease, and malaria. The toxic effects of extracellular Hb are of particular concern with hemolytic anemia where there is an increase in hemolysis. Hemolysis is further exacerbated in various diseases and their treatments. Blood transfusions are required whenever there is an appreciable decrease in RBCs due to hemolysis or blood loss. It is, therefore, essential that the transfused blood, whether stored RBCs or the blood obtained by an Autologous Blood Recovery System from the patient, do not further increase

  11. Mutagenicity screening of reaction products from the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of phenolic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, I.J.; Aitken, M.D.; Ball, L.M.; Heck, P.E. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Phenol-oxidizing enzymes such as peroxidases, laccases, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of a wide range of phenolic pollutants. Although the use of these enzymes in waste-treatment applications has been proposed by a number of investigators, little information exists on the toxicological characteristics of the oxidation products. The enzymes chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase were used in this study to catalyze the oxidation of phenol, several mono-substituted phenols, and pentachlorophenol. Seventeen reaction mixtures representing selected combinations of enzyme and parent phenol were subjected to mutagenicity screening using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay; five selected mixtures were also incubated with the S9 microsomal preparation to detect the possible presence of promutagens. The majority of reaction mixtures tested were not directly mutagenic, and none of those tested with S9 gave a positive response. Such lack of mutagenicity of enzymatic oxidation products provides encouragement for establishing the feasibility of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation as a waste-treatment process. The only positive responses were obtained with reaction products from the lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. Clear positive responses were observed when strain TA100 was incubated with 2-nitrophenol reaction-product mixtures, and when strain TA98 was incubated with the 4-nitrophenol reaction mixture. Additionally, 2,4-dinitrophenol was identified as a reaction product from 4-nitrophenol, and preliminary evidence indicates that both 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrophenol are produced from the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol. Possible mechanism by which these nitration reactions occur are discussed.

  12. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  13. The Effect of Metal Oxide on Nanoparticles from Thermite Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lewis Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how metal oxide used in a thermite reaction can impact the production of nanoparticles. The results showed the presence of nanoparticles (less than 1 micron in diameter) of at least one type produced by each metal oxide. The typical particles were metallic spheres, which ranged from 300 nanometers in…

  14. Quinone-Catalyzed Selective Oxidation of Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Alison E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-12-01

    Quinones are common stoichiometric reagents in organic chemistry. Para-quinones with high reduction potentials, such as DDQ and chloranil, are widely used and typically promote hydride abstraction. In recent years, many catalytic applications of these methods have been achieved by using transition metals, electrochemistry, or O2 to regenerate the oxidized quinone in situ. Complementary studies have led to the development of a different class of quinones that resemble the ortho-quinone cofactors in copper amine oxidases and mediate the efficient and selective aerobic and/or electrochemical dehydrogenation of amines. The latter reactions typically proceed by electrophilic transamination and/or addition-elimination reaction mechanisms, rather than hydride abstraction pathways. The collective observations show that the quinone structure has a significant influence on the reaction mechanism and has important implications for the development of new quinone reagents and quinone-catalyzed transformations. PMID:26530485

  15. Surprisingly high activity for oxygen reduction reaction of selected oxides lacking long oxygen-ion diffusion paths at intermediate temperatures: a case study of cobalt-free BaFeO(3-δ).

    PubMed

    Dong, Feifei; Chen, Yubo; Chen, Dengjie; Shao, Zongping

    2014-07-23

    The widespread application of solid oxide fuel cell technology requires the development of innovative electrodes with high activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures. Here, we demonstrate that a cobalt-free parent oxide BaFeO(3-δ) (BF), which lacks long-range oxygen-ion diffusion paths, has surprisingly high electrocatalytic activity for ORR. Both in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis on room-temperature powder and transmission electron microscopy on quenched powder are applied to investigate the crystal structure of BF. Despite the lack of long oxygen-ion diffusion paths, the easy redox of iron cations as demonstrated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and oxygen temperature-programmed desorption and the high oxygen vacancy concentration as supported by iodometric titration and TGA benefit the reduction of oxygen to oxygen ions. Moreover, the electrical conductivity relaxation technique in conjunction with a transient thermogravimetric study reveals very high surface exchange kinetics of BF oxide. At 700 °C, the area specific resistance of BF cathode, as expressed by a symmetrical cell configuration, is only ∼0.021 Ω cm(2), and the derived single fuel cell achieves high power output with a peak power density of 870 mW cm(-2). It suggests that an undoped BF parent oxide can be used as a high-efficiency catalyst for ORR. PMID:24978102

  16. Thermal Behavior Study of the MoVTeNb Oxide Catalyst for Selective Oxidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, R.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.

    2009-06-01

    Several parameters involved in preparing the multi metal oxide (MMO) catalysts (Mo1V0.3Te0.23Nb0.12Ox) for selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid (AA) were investigated. These included the proper pre-calcined and calcinations atmosphere effect on the performance of the catalysts. It was found that each metal element plays a critical role to the performance of an effective catalyst and also the calcinations under a non-flow inert atmosphere. The characterization results from XRD, SEM, TG and DSC show the important differences depending on the activation procedures of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst. The XRD analysis is used to identify the phase inventory of the MoVTeNb oxide catalysts. The structure of orthorhombic M1, M2, TeMo5O16, V0.95Mo0.97O5 and Mo5O14 phase was investigated. The orthorhombic M1 phase is the most active and selective phase and is responsible for the major of the efficiently of the best catalyst for selective oxidation process. TGA and DTG allow the identification of the number and types, of reactions involving evaporation of small molecules from removal of ligands and water to condensation or drying processes. From all these analyses it was proven that the activation procedures would affect the performance of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst.

  17. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

  18. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalkylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms operative in thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes are investigated. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids is not established. It was determined that this behavior is not associated with hydrogen end groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres is dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio is reached, a steady rate appears to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, CF2OCF2CF2O2, no. CF2CF2O, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys is much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexafluoropropene derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys is very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appears to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes this takes place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  19. Overcoming the "oxidant problem": strategies to use O2 as the oxidant in organometallic C-H oxidation reactions catalyzed by Pd (and Cu).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alison N; Stahl, Shannon S

    2012-06-19

    Oxidation reactions are key transformations in organic chemistry because they can increase chemical complexity and incorporate heteroatom substituents into carbon-based molecules. This principle is manifested in the conversion of petrochemical feedstocks into commodity chemicals and in the synthesis of fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and other complex organic molecules. The utility and function of these molecules correlate directly with the presence and specific placement of oxygen and nitrogen heteroatoms and other functional groups within the molecules. Methods for selective oxidation of C-H bonds have expanded significantly over the past decade, and their role in the synthesis of organic chemicals will continue to increase. Our group's contributions to this field are linked to our broader interest in the development and mechanistic understanding of aerobic oxidation reactions. Molecular oxygen (O(2)) is the ideal oxidant. Its low cost and lack of toxic byproducts make it a highly appealing reagent that can address key "green chemistry" priorities in industry. With strong economic and environmental incentives to use O(2), the commmodity chemicals industry often uses aerobic oxidation reactions. In contrast, O(2) is seldom used to prepare more-complex smaller-volume chemicals, a limitation that reflects, in part, the limited synthetic scope and utility of existing aerobic reactions. Pd-catalyzed reactions represent some of the most versatile methods for selective C-H oxidation, but they often require stoichiometric transition-metal or organic oxidants, such as Cu(II), Ag(I), or benzoquinone. This Account describes recent strategies that we have identified to use O(2) as the oxidant in these reactions. In Pd-catalyzed C-H oxidation reactions that form carbon-heteroatom bonds, the stoichiometric oxidant is often needed to promote difficult reductive elimination steps in the catalytic mechanism. To address this challenge, we have identified new ancillary ligands for

  20. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of perfluoroalklethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Harris, D. H.; Smythe, M. E.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to investigate the mechanisms operative in thermal and thermal oxidative degradation of Fomblin Z and hexafluoropropene oxide derived fluids and the effect of alloys and additives upon these processes. The nature of arrangements responsible for the inherent thermal oxidative instability of the Fomblin Z fluids has not been established. It was determined that this behavior was not associated with hydrogen end-groups or peroxy linkages. The degradation rate of these fluids at elevated temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres was found to be dependent on the surface/volume ratio. Once a limiting ratio was reached, a steady rate appeared to be attained. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, -CF2OCF2CF2O-, not -CF2CF2O-, is one of the major arrangements present. The action of the M-50 and Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloys was found to be much more drastic in the case of Fomblin Z fluids than that observed for the hexalfuoropropane oxide derived materials. The effectiveness of antioxidation/anticorrosion additives, P-3 and phospha-s-triazine, in the presence of metal alloys was very limited at 316 C; at 288 C the additives arrested almost completely the fluid degradation. The phospha-s-triazine appeared to be at least twice as effective as the P-3 compound; it also protected the coupon better. The Ti(4 Al, 4 Mn) alloy degraded the fluid mainly by chain scission processes; this took place to a much lesser degree with M-50.

  1. Cobalt-promoted Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for the Selective Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Matthew

    Recent work has shown that both cobalt and iron oxide nanoparticles are active for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of cyclohexane to benzene, the former more active than the latter. Further study has shown that the addition of gold species as a minority component into iron oxide nanocrystals increases the selectivity of the reaction to benzene. Since a primary motivation for this work is the addition of catalysts in jet fuels to facilitate the dehydrogenation and cracking reactions preceding their combustion, a low-cost, sacrificial catalyst is sought after. In this application, catalyst nanoparticles suspended in the fuel stream will dehydrogenate cyclic alkanes (cyclohexane) to their aromatic counterparts (benzene). Alkenes and aromatics have a much higher rate of combustion, which decreases the amount of uncombusted fuel in the exhaust, thereby increasing performance. As these catalysts are not recyclable, there is significant impetus to substitute cheaper base metals for expensive noble metals. In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles are doped with varying levels of cobalt to examine the effect of cobalt content and oxidation state on the selectivity and activity of the iron oxide for the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane, used as a model cyclic alkane in jet fuel. We have shown previously that small (˜5nm) cobalt oxide nanoparticles favor the production of benzene over the partial dehydrogenation products cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene, or the complete oxidation product carbon dioxide. It is the aim of this work to examine the surface of these cobalt-iron oxide nanoparticles to determine the conditions most favorable for this selective oxidative dehydrogenation. Cobalt-doped iron nanoparticles were prepared by a surfactant-free hydrothermal co-precipitation technique that enabled a high degree of composition control and size control. These samples were characterized via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X

  2. Selective oxidation of methanol and ethanol on supported ruthenium oxide clusters at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-02-17

    RuO2 domains supported on SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 catalyze the oxidative conversion of methanol to formaldehyde, methylformate, and dimethoxymethane with unprecedented rates and high combined selectivity (>99%) and yield at low temperatures (300-400 K). Supports influence turnover rates and the ability of RuO2 domains to undergo redox cycles required for oxidation turnovers. Oxidative dehydrogenation turnover rates and rates of stoichiometric reduction of RuO2 in H2 increased in parallel when RuO2 domains were dispersed on more reducible supports. These support effects, the kinetic effects of CH3OH and O2 on reaction rates, and the observed kinetic isotope effects with CH3OD and CD3OD reactants are consistent with a sequence of elementary steps involving kinetically relevant H-abstraction from adsorbed methoxide species using lattice oxygen atoms and with methoxide formation in quasi-equilibrated CH3OH dissociation on nearly stoichiometric RuO2 surfaces. Anaerobic transient experiments confirmed that CH3OH oxidation to HCHO requires lattice oxygen atoms and that selectivities are not influenced by the presence of O2. Residence time effects on selectivity indicate that secondary HCHO-CH3OH acetalization reactions lead to hemiacetal or methoxymethanol intermediates that convert to dimethoxymethane in reactions with CH3OH on support acid sites or dehydrogenate to form methylformate on RuO2 and support redox sites. These conclusions are consistent with the tendency of Al2O3 and SiO2 supports to favor dimethoxymethane formation, while SnO2, ZrO2, and TiO2 preferentially form methylformate. These support effects on secondary reactions were confirmed by measured CH3OH oxidation rates and selectivities on physical mixtures of supported RuO2 catalysts and pure supports. Ethanol also reacts on supported RuO2 domains to form predominately acetaldehyde and diethoxyethane at 300-400 K. The bifunctional nature of these reaction pathways and the remarkable ability of Ru

  3. Selective oxidation of methanol and ethanol on supported ruthenium oxide clusters at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2004-03-04

    RuO2 domains supported on SnO2, ZrO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 catalyze the oxidative conversion of methanol to formaldehyde, methylformate, and dimethoxymethane with unprecedented rates and high combined selectivity (>99 percent) and yield at low temperatures (300-400 K). Supports influence turnover rates and the ability of RuO2 domains to undergo redox cycles required for oxidation turnovers. Oxidative dehydrogenation turnover rates and rates of stoichiometric reduction of RuO2 in H2 increased in parallel when RuO2 domains were dispersed on more reducible supports. These support effects, the kinetic effects of CH3OH and O2 on reaction rates, and the observed kinetic isotope effects with CH3OD and CD3OD reactants are consistent with a sequence of elementary steps involving kinetically relevant H-abstraction from adsorbed methoxide species using lattice oxygen atoms and with methoxide formation in quasi-equilibrated CH3OH dissociation on nearly stoichiometric RuO2 surfaces. Anaerobic transient experiments confirmed that CH3OH oxidation to HCHO requires lattice oxygen atoms and that selectivities are not influenced by the presence of O2. Residence time effects on selectivity indicate that secondary HCHO-CH3OH acetalization reactions lead to hemiacetal or methoxymethanol intermediates that convert to dimethoxymethane in reactions with CH3OH on support acid sites or dehydrogenate to form methylformate on RuO2 and support redox sites. These conclusions are consistent with the tendency of Al2O3 and SiO2 supports to favor dimethoxymethane formation, while SnO2, ZrO2, and TiO2 preferentially form methylformate. These support effects on secondary reactions were confirmed by measured CH3OH oxidation rates and selectivities on physical mixtures of supported RuO2 catalysts and pure supports. Ethanol also reacts on supported RuO2 domains to form predominately acetaldehyde and diethoxyethane at 300-400 K. The bifunctional nature of these reaction pathways and the remarkable

  4. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  5. New reaction system for hydrocarbon oxidation by chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Byung; Clark, Douglas S

    2006-05-01

    A novel reaction system was developed to maximize the catalytic efficiency of chloroperoxidase (CPO, from Caldariomyces fumago) toward the oxidation of hydrocarbons. The reaction system consisted of an organic/aqueous emulsion comprising pure substrate and aqueous buffer supplemented with the surfactant dioctyl sulfosuccinate. The emulsion system attenuated not only the destabilizing effects of the substrate and product on the enzyme by emulsifying the compounds, but also oxidant toxicity (oxidative stress) by increasing substrate availability. As a result, CPO exhibited total turnover numbers (TTNs, defined as the amount of product produced over the catalytic lifetime of the enzyme) of ca. 20,000 mol product/mol enzyme for the oxidation of styrene, toluene, and o-, m-, p-xylenes. The TTNs are over 10-fold higher than those previously reported for the oxidation of benzylic hydrocarbons by CPO. This study represents a significant step toward the development of CPO as a practical catalyst for large-scale organic syntheses. PMID:16276530

  6. A Bioorthogonal Reaction of N-Oxide and Boron Reagents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Justin; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-12-21

    The development of bioorthogonal reactions has classically focused on bond-forming ligation reactions. In this report, we seek to expand the functional repertoire of such transformations by introducing a new bond-cleaving reaction between N-oxide and boron reagents. The reaction features a large dynamic range of reactivity, showcasing second-order rate constants as high as 2.3×10(3)  M(-1)  s(-1) using diboron reaction partners. Diboron reagents display minimal cell toxicity at millimolar concentrations, penetrate cell membranes, and effectively reduce N-oxides inside mammalian cells. This new bioorthogonal process based on miniscule components is thus well-suited for activating molecules within cells under chemical control. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the metabolic diversity of nature enables the use of naturally occurring functional groups that display inherent biocompatibility alongside abiotic components for organism-specific applications. PMID:26568479

  7. Synthesis and reactions of the oxides of hexafluoropropylene trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapevalov, A.Ya.; Filyakova, T.I.; Peschanskii, N.V.; Kodess, M.I.; Kolenko, I.P.

    1986-03-10

    By the oxidation of the hexafluoropropylene trimers with an aqueous solution of sodium hypochlorite in the presence of acetonitrile the following ..cap alpha..-oxides were obtained: 2,3-Epoxyperfluoro-3-isopropyl-4-methylpentane and 2,3-epoxyperfluoro-3-ethyl-2,4-dimethylpentane. According to the /sup 19/F NMR data, the epoxidation takes place stereoselectively with the formation of only one conformer of the ..cap alpha..-oxide in each case. The determining effect of the steric factors on the reactivity of the oxides of hexafluoropropylene trimers in reaction with nucleophiles was demonstrated.

  8. Aqueous Oxidative Heck Reaction as a Protein-Labeling Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ourailidou, Maria Eleni; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Baas, Bert-Jan; Jeronimus-Stratingh, Margot; Gottumukkala, Aditya L; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Dekker, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of chemical reactions are being employed for bio-orthogonal ligation of detection labels to protein-bound functional groups. Several of these strategies, however, are limited in their application to pure proteins and are ineffective in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. Here we present the palladium-catalyzed oxidative Heck reaction as a new and robust bio-orthogonal strategy for linking functionalized arylboronic acids to protein-bound alkenes in high yields and with excellent chemoselectivity even in the presence of complex protein mixtures from living cells. Advantageously, this reaction proceeds under aerobic conditions, whereas most other metal-catalyzed reactions require inert atmosphere. PMID:24376051

  9. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-01

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity. PMID:26710326

  10. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  11. From "hemoabzymes" to "hemozymes": towards new biocatalysts for selective oxidations.

    PubMed

    Mahy, J-P; Maréchal, J-D; Ricoux, R

    2015-02-14

    The design of artificial hemoproteins that could catalyze selective oxidations using clean oxidants such as O2 or H2O2 under ecocompatible conditions constitutes a real challenge for a wide range of industrial applications. In vivo, such reactions are performed by heme-thiolate proteins, cytochromes P450, which catalyze the oxidation of substrates by dioxygen in the presence of electrons delivered from NADPH by cytochrome P450 reductase. Several strategies were used to design new artificial hemoproteins that mimic these enzymes. The first one involved the non-covalent association of synthetic hemes with monoclonal antibodies raised against these cofactors. This led to the first generation of artificial hemoproteins or "hemoabzymes" that displayed a peroxidase activity, and in some cases catalyzed the regioselective nitration of phenols by H2O2/NO2 and the stereoselective oxidation of sulfides by H2O2. The second one involved the non-covalent association of easily affordable non-relevant proteins with metalloporphyrin derivatives, using either the "Trojan Horse strategy" or the "host-guest" strategy. This led to a second generation of artificial hemoproteins or "hemozymes", some of which were found able to catalyze the stereoselective oxidation of organic compounds such as sulfides and alkenes by H2O2 and KHSO5. PMID:25493292

  12. State-to-state reaction dynamics: A selective review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teslja, Alexey; Valentini, James J.

    2006-10-01

    A selective review of state-to-state reaction dynamics experiments is presented. The review focuses on three classes of reactions that exemplify the rich history and illustrate the current state of the art in such work. These three reactions are (1) the hydrogen exchange reaction, H +H2→H2+H and its isotopomers; (2) the H +RH→H2+R reactions, where RH is an alkane, beginning with H +CH4→H2+CH3 and extending to much larger alkanes; and (3) the Cl +RH→HCl+R reactions, principally Cl +CH4→HCl+CH3. We describe the experiments, discuss their results, present comparisons with theory, and introduce heuristic models.

  13. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-12-31

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate selective oxidation as a pretreatment for the enhanced desulfurization of Illinois Basin coals using a variety of mild thermal/chemical processes. Both an Illinois No.6 and an Indiana No.5 coal were selectively oxidized with peroxyacetic acid in the pretreatment step. The products were then treated with many hydroxide and carbonate bases using either water, methanol or ethanol as the solvent system. Other reaction variables investigated include reaction temperature, reaction time, pyrolysis pressure, particle size of the coal and the level of oxidation in the pretreatment step. Throughout the study the selectively oxidized coals were compared to unoxidized control coals. Model compounds were also studied. The results of these studies overwhelmingly show that selective oxidation with peroxyacetic acid significantly enhances the level of desulfurization obtained with subsequent chemical/thermal treatments. Indeed, every process investigated, including simple pyrolysis experiments, showed sulfur removal in the pretreatment step and the subsequent step to be substantially additive. In addition, considerable enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal was obtained by the selective oxidation pretreatment. Sulfur contents lower than 0.25% were obtained for selectively oxidized coals. This represents an overall sulfur reduction of around 95%. This is beyond the level required for compliance with Clean Air Act legislation. No unoxidized coal, regardless of the desulfurization treatment, approached this level of sulfur removal.

  14. Computational studies of polysiloxanes : oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Redfern, P. C.; Zhang, Z.; Amine, K.

    2011-06-23

    Silicon-containing solvents have tremendous potential for application as electrolytes for electrical energy storage devices such as lithium-ion (air) batteries and supercapacitors. Quantum chemical methods were employed to investigate trends in oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions of a series of polysiloxanes. Various electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents can be used to tune the oxidation potential in shorter chain siloxanes but not in longer ones. Decomposition reactions of siloxanes in their oxidized states were investigated and compared against their carbon analogues. These studies suggest that the Si-O group provides added stability for siloxanes over their carbon analogues. Computational studies have also been performed for various disiloxanes and siloxanes with spacer groups to understand their thermochemical stability and oxidation potentials.

  15. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  16. Process for the oxidation of materials in water at supercritical temperatures utilizing reaction rate enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Swallow, K.C.; Killilea, W.R.; Hong, G.T.; Bourhis, A.L.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for substantially completely oxidizing combustible materials in which an aqueous stream bearing the combustible materials is reacted in the presence of an oxidant comprising diatomic oxygen and at a temperature greater than the critical temperature of water and at a pressure greater than about 25 bar, within a reactor for a period of less than about 5 minutes to produce a reaction product stream, wherein the reaction is initiated in the presence of a rate enhancer comprising at least one oxidizing agent in addition to said oxidant selected from the group consisting of ozone, hydrogen peroxide, salts containing persulfate, salts containing permanganate, nitric acid, salts containing nitrate, oxyacids of chlorine and their corresponding salts, hypochlorous acid, salts containing hypochlorite, chlorous acid, salts containing chlorite, chloric acid, salts containing chlorate, perchloric acid, and salts containing perchlorate.

  17. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  18. A Study on the Laser Spatter and the Oxidation Reactions During Selective Laser Melting of 316L Stainless Steel, Al-Si10-Mg, and Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, Marco; Tuck, Chris; Aboulkhair, Nesma T.; Maskery, Ian; Ashcroft, Ian; Wildman, Ricky D.; Hague, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The creation of an object by selective laser melting (SLM) occurs by melting contiguous areas of a powder bed according to a corresponding digital model. It is therefore clear that the success of this metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology relies on the comprehension of the events that take place during the melting and solidification of the powder bed. This study was designed to understand the generation of the laser spatter that is commonly observed during SLM and the potential effects that the spatter has on the processing of 316L stainless steel, Al-Si10-Mg, and Ti-6Al-4V. With the exception of Ti-6Al-4V, the characterization of the laser spatter revealed the presence of surface oxides enriched in the most volatile alloying elements of the materials. The study will discuss the implication of this finding on the material quality of the built parts.

  19. Oxidative Half-reaction of Arabidopsis thaliana Sulfite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Robert S.; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R.; Hille, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate forms of the molybdenum-containing enzyme sulfite oxidase possess a b-type cytochrome prosthetic group that accepts reducing equivalents from the molybdenum center and passes them on to cytochrome c. The plant form of the enzyme, on the other hand, lacks a prosthetic group other than its molybdenum center and utilizes molecular oxygen as the physiological oxidant. Hydrogen peroxide is the ultimate product of the reaction. Here, we present data demonstrating that superoxide is produced essentially quantitatively both in the course of the reaction of reduced enzyme with O2 and during steady-state turnover and only subsequently decays (presumably noncatalytically) to form hydrogen peroxide. Rapid-reaction kinetic studies directly following the reoxidation of reduced enzyme demonstrate a linear dependence of the rate constant for the reaction on [O2] with a second-order rate constant of kox = 8.7 × 104 ± 0.5 × 104 m−1s−1. When the reaction is carried out in the presence of cytochrome c to follow superoxide generation, biphasic time courses are observed, indicating that a first equivalent of superoxide is generated in the oxidation of the fully reduced Mo(IV) state of the enzyme to Mo(V), followed by a slower oxidation of the Mo(V) state to Mo(VI). The physiological implications of plant sulfite oxidase as a copious generator of superoxide are discussed. PMID:19875441

  20. Chemical coal cleaning using selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal of both mineral and organic sulfur from Illinois coals using low temperature selective oxidation. This overall objective is to develop new methods for either physical/chemical or physical/microbial cleaning of Illinois coal. Innovative approaches to achieve deep cleaned products, containing both ash and sulfur contents less than 0.5 percent, will be considered. Experiments focus on developing cost-effective methods for the removal of organic sulfur and finely disseminated mineral impurities, especially fine pyrite particles, from coal. Rates and mechanisms for organic sulfur removal will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes handling are included. Bench scale studies are performed.

  1. Method for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions, device for facilitating catalyzed oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Beuhler, Robert J.; White, Michael G.; Hrbek, Jan

    2006-08-15

    A catalytic process for the oxidation of organic. Oxygen is loaded into a metal foil by heating the foil while in contact with an oxygen-containing fluid. After cooling the oxygen-activated foil to room temperature, oxygen diffuses through the foil and oxidizes reactants exposed to the other side of the foil.

  2. Iron(III) Fluorinated Porphyrins: Greener Chemistry from Synthesis to Oxidative Catalysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Susana L H; Silva, André M N; Medforth, Craig J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Iron(III) fluorinated porphyrins play a central role in the biomimetics of heme enzymes and enable cleaner routes to the oxidation of organic compounds. The present work reports significant improvements in the eco-compatibility of the synthesis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-pentafluorophenylporphyrin (H₂TPFPP) and the corresponding iron complex [Fe(TPFPP)Cl], and the use of [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] as an oxidation catalyst in green conditions. The preparations of H₂TPFPP and [Fe(TPFPP)Cl] typically use toxic solvents and can be made significantly greener and simpler using microwave heating and optimization of the reaction conditions. In the optimized procedure it was possible to eliminate nitrobenzene from the porphyrin synthesis and replace DMF by acetonitrile in the metalation reaction, concomitant with a significant reduction of reaction time and simplification of the purification procedure. The Fe(III)porphyrin is then tested as catalyst in the selective oxidation of aromatics at room temperature using a green oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and green solvent (ethanol). Efficient epoxidation of indene and selective oxidation of 3,5-dimethylphenol and naphthalene to the corresponding quinones is observed. PMID:27077840

  3. Selective oxidation of cyclohexene through gold functionalized silica monolith microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed T.; Taylor, Martin J.; Liu, Dan; Beaumont, Simon K.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Two simple, reproducible methods of preparing evenly distributed Au nanoparticle containing mesoporous silica monoliths are investigated. These Au nanoparticle containing monoliths are subsequently investigated as flow reactors for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene. In the first strategy, the silica monolith was directly impregnated with Au nanoparticles during the formation of the monolith. The second approach was to pre-functionalize the monolith with thiol groups tethered within the silica mesostructure. These can act as evenly distributed anchors for the Au nanoparticles to be incorporated by flowing a Au nanoparticle solution through the thiol functionalized monolith. Both methods led to successfully achieving even distribution of Au nanoparticles along the length of the monolith as demonstrated by ICP-OES. However, the impregnation method led to strong agglomeration of the Au nanoparticles during subsequent heating steps while the thiol anchoring procedure maintained the nanoparticles in the range of 6.8 ± 1.4 nm. Both Au nanoparticle containing monoliths as well as samples with no Au incorporated were tested for the selective oxidation of cyclohexene under constant flow at 30 °C. The Au free materials were found to be catalytically inactive with Au being the minimum necessary requirement for the reaction to proceed. The impregnated Au-containing monolith was found to be less active than the thiol functionalized Au-containing material, attributable to the low metal surface area of the Au nanoparticles. The reaction on the thiol functionalized Au-containing monolith was found to depend strongly on the type of oxidant used: tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was more active than H2O2, likely due to the thiol induced hydrophobicity in the monolith.

  4. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  5. Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Crocker

    2005-09-30

    This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3

  6. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  7. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth’s evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in “functional weightlessness” were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and

  8. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  9. Selective stabilization of aliphatic organic carbon by iron oxide

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Dinesh; Yang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of organic matter in soil is important for natural ecosystem to sequestrate carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emission. It is largely unknown what factors govern the preservation of organic carbon in soil, casting shadow on predicting the response of soil to climate change. Iron oxide was suggested as an important mineral preserving soil organic carbon. However, ferric minerals are subject to reduction, potentially releasing iron and decreasing the stability of iron-bound organic carbon. Information about the stability of iron-bound organic carbon in the redox reaction is limited. Herein, we investigated the sorptive interactions of organic matter with hematite and reductive release of hematite-bound organic matter. Impacts of organic matter composition and conformation on its sorption by hematite and release during the reduction reaction were analyzed. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic carbon was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic carbon. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil organic matter was stabilized by association with iron oxide. Selective stabilization of aliphatic over aromatic carbon can greatly contribute to the widely observed accumulation of aliphatic carbon in soil, which cannot be explained by sorptive interactions between minerals and organic matter. PMID:26061259

  10. In situ vibrational spectroscopic investigation of C{sub 4} hydrocarbon selective oxidation over vanadium-phosphorus-oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Z.Y.

    1999-05-10

    n-Butane selective oxidation over the VPO catalyst to maleic anhydride is the first and only commercialized process of light alkane selective oxidation. The mechanism of this reaction is still not well known despite over twenty years of extensive studies, which can partially be attributed to the extreme difficulties to characterize catalytic reactions real-time under typical reaction conditions. In situ spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Infrared spectroscopy and laser Raman spectroscopy were used in the current mechanistic investigations of n-butane oxidation over VPO catalysts. To identify the reaction intermediates, oxidation of n-butane, 1,3-butadiene and related oxygenates on the VPO catalyst were monitored using FTIR spectroscopy under transient conditions. n-Butane was found to adsorb on the VPO catalyst to form olefinic species, which were further oxidized to unsaturated, noncyclic carbonyl species. The open chain dicarbonyl species then experienced cycloaddition to form maleic anhydride. VPO catalyst phase transformations were investigated using in situ laser Raman spectroscopy. This report contains Chapter 1: General introduction; Chapter 2: Literature review; and Chapter 5: Conclusion and recommendations.

  11. Peroxygenase-Catalyzed Oxyfunctionalization Reactions Promoted by the Complete Oxidation of Methanol.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Gomez Baraibar, Alvaro; Ullrich, René; Hofrichter, Martin; Yanase, Hideshi; Alcalde, Miguel; van Berkel, Willem J H; Hollmann, Frank

    2016-01-11

    Peroxygenases catalyze a broad range of (stereo)selective oxyfunctionalization reactions. However, to access their full catalytic potential, peroxygenases need a balanced provision of hydrogen peroxide to achieve high catalytic activity while minimizing oxidative inactivation. Herein, we report an enzymatic cascade process that employs methanol as a sacrificial electron donor for the reductive activation of molecular oxygen. Full oxidation of methanol is achieved, generating three equivalents of hydrogen peroxide that can be used completely for the stereoselective hydroxylation of ethylbenzene as a model reaction. Overall we propose and demonstrate an atom-efficient and easily applicable alternative to established hydrogen peroxide generation methods, which enables the efficient use of peroxygenases for oxyfunctionalization reactions. PMID:26607550

  12. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  13. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned establishing the level of selective oxidation required for successful desulfurization in subsequent treatments. Many desulfurization reactions were performed on pretreated as well as unoxidized coal. The results obtained support the following new conclusions: (1) The extent of selective oxidation in the pretreatment step does not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (2) Up to 84% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal and 86% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (3) Most desulfurizations at 250{degree}C did not produce significant levels of desulfurization. However as the temperature was increased levels of desulfurization increased considerably. (4) Although aqueous base was successful in removing sulfur from both pretreated and untreated samples, the most pronounced desulfurizations were obtained for the untreated samples. This is explained primarily by the dissolution of pyrite in the untreated samples. (5) The best desulfurizations involved SCM and base. Possible synergistic interactions between the methanol and the base are suspected. (6) Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product. The severity of desulfurization is reduced by selective oxidation pretreatment.

  14. Selenium-catalyzed oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. 2. Baeyer-Villiger reactions in homogeneous solution.

    PubMed

    ten Brink, G J; Vis, J M; Arends, I W; Sheldon, R A

    2001-04-01

    Several diselenides were tested for catalytic activity in Baeyer-Villiger reactions with 60% aqueous hydrogen peroxide. Bis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] diselenide forms the corresponding 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene seleninic acid in situ, which is a highly reactive and selective catalyst for the oxidation of carbonyl compounds in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, or dichloromethane. PMID:11281784

  15. Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics of Enargite Oxidation at Roasting Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Aracena, Alvaro; Ruiz, Maria C.

    2012-10-01

    Roasting of enargite (Cu3AsS4) in the temperature range of 648 K to 898 K (375 °C to 625 °C) in atmospheres containing variable amounts of oxygen has been studied by thermogravimetric methods. From the experimental results of weight loss/gain data and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of partially reacted samples, the reaction mechanism of the enargite oxidation was determined, which occurred in three sequential stages:

  16. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-15

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum nanoparticles. The

  17. [Current research situation of H2S selective catalytic oxidation technologies and catalysts].

    PubMed

    Hao, Zheng-ping; Dou, Guang-yu; Zhang, Xin; Qu, Si-qiu

    2012-08-01

    This review summarizes and discusses different selective catalytic oxidation technologies and various catalysts for removing H2S, the undesirable byproduct of the fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) processing. Currently the selective oxidation technologies used include Superclaus, Euroclaus, Clinsulf-Do, BSR/Hi-Activity, Selectox and Modop techniques, which have various characteristics and application areas. Catalysts for H2S selective oxidation mainly contain the following systems: carbon, supported SiC, zeolite, oxide, and pillared clay. Former studies focused on carbon and oxide systems. The research interest on zeolite system decreased in recent years, while SiC is regarded as a typical support with great potential for this reaction and continues to be attractive. Pillared clay system is at the preliminary research stage, and is still far from practical application. PMID:23213923

  18. Selective-oxidation catalyst improves Claus process

    SciTech Connect

    Lagas, J.A.; Borsboom, J. ); Berben, P.H. )

    1988-10-10

    Increased SO/sub 2/ emissions. On a worldwide scale, the exploitation and processing of crude oil and natural gas have increased significantly during the past 30 years. This expansion has caused severe pollution problems, especially from sulfur dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. A new development for the well-known Claus process improves production of elemental sulfur from H/sub 2/S. The ''SuperClaus'' process involves a modification of the process-control system and the use of a newly developed selective-oxidation catalyst in the third reactor with the objective of achieving a 99% or 99.5% overall sulfur recovery (two versions) without further tail-gas cleanup. The catalyst for the new process was developed and tested on laboratory bench scale for more than 3 years. Based on the results, it was decided to test the process directly in a commercial unit. A three-stage, 100-t/d Claus plant in a natural-gas plant in the Federal Republic of Germany has been retrofitted to SuperClause. Since Jan. 21, the process has been successfully operated.

  19. Selective effects of physical exercise on choice reaction processes.

    PubMed

    Arcelin, R; Delignieres, D; Brisswalter, J

    1998-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of an exercise of moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic power) on specific information-processing mechanisms. 22 students completed 3 10-min. exercise bouts on a bicycle ergometer. Concomitantly, participants performed six manual-choice-reaction tasks manipulating task variables (Signal Intensity, Stimulus-Response Compatibility, and Time Uncertainty) on two levels. Reaction tests, randomly ordered, were administered at rest and during exercise. A significant underadditive interaction between Time Uncertainty and exercise was found for the highest quartiles of the distribution of reaction times. No other interaction effects were obtained for the other variables. These results reasonably support that moderate aerobic exercise showed selective rather than general influences on information processing. PMID:9760644

  20. Switchable selectivity in an NHC-catalysed dearomatizing annulation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chang; Fleige, Mirco; Janssen-Müller, Daniel; Daniliuc, Constantin G.; Glorius, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The development of general catalytic methods for the regio- and stereoselective construction of chiral N-heterocycles in a diversity-oriented fashion remains a formidable challenge in organic synthesis. N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysis has been shown to produce a variety of outcomes, but control of the reactivity has rarely been demonstrated. Here we report a switchable catalytic activation of enals with aromatic azomethine imines that provides high selectivity using NHC organocatalysts. The original selectivity corresponds to the acidity of the base used in the reaction. The catalytically generated chiral homoenolate or enol intermediate undergoes enantioselective annulation with electrophiles such as N-iminoquinolinium ylides, N-iminoisoquinolinium ylides and β-N-iminocarboline ylides. The good-to-high overall yields, high regioselectivities and excellent enantioselectivities observed are controlled by the catalyst and reaction conditions.

  1. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The reaction kinetics were studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principle result of the study was the determination of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k sub 1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles.

  2. Reaction between nitric oxide and ozone in solid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, D.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is produced when nitric oxide, NO, and ozone, O3, are suspended in a nitrogen matrix at 11-20 K. The NO2 is formed with first-order kinetics, a 12 K rate constant of (1.4 + or - 0.2) x 0.00001/sec, and an apparent activation energy of 106 + or - 10 cal/mol. Isotopic labeling, variation of concentrations, and cold shield experiments show that the growth of NO2 is due to reaction between ozone molecules and NO monomers, and that the reaction is neither infrared-induced nor does it seem to be a heavy atom tunneling process. Reaction is attributed to nearest-neighbor NO.O3 pairs probably held in a specific orientational relationship that affects the kinetic behavior. When the temperature is raised, more such reactive pairs are generated, presumably by local diffusion. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  4. Maillard reaction, mitochondria and oxidative stress: potential role of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Edeas, M; Attaf, D; Mailfert, A-S; Nasu, M; Joubet, R

    2010-06-01

    Glycation and oxidative stress are two important processes known to play a key role in complications of many disease processes. Oxidative stress, either via increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), or by depleting the antioxidants may modulate the genesis of early glycated proteins in vivo. Maillard Reactions, occur in vivo as well as in vitro and are associated with the chronic complications of diabetes, aging and age-related diseases. Hyperglycaemia causes the autoxidation of glucose, glycation of proteins, and the activation of polyol metabolism. These changes facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species and decrease the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, resulting in a remarkable increase of oxidative stress. A large body of evidence indicates that mitochondria alteration is involved and plays a central role in various oxidative stress-related diseases. The damaged mitochondria produce more ROS (increase oxidative stress) and less ATP (cellular energy) than normal mitochondria. As they are damaged, they cannot burn or use glucose or lipid and cannot provide cell with ATP. Further, glucose, amino acids and lipid will not be correctly used and will accumulate outside the mitochondria; they will undergo more glycation (as observed in diabetes, obesity, HIV infection and lipodystrophia). The objective of this paper is to discuss how to stop the vicious circle established between oxidative stress, Maillard Reaction and mitochondria. The potential application of some antioxidants to reduce glycation phenomenon and to increase the antioxidant defence system by targeting mitochondria will be discussed. Food and pharmaceutical companies share the same challenge, they must act now, urgently and energetically. PMID:20031340

  5. Kinetics, simulation and insights for CO selective oxidation in fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek; Stenger, Harvey G.

    The kinetics of CO preferential oxidation (PROX) was studied to evaluate various rate expressions and to simulate the performance the CO oxidation step of a methanol fuel processor for fuel cell applications. The reaction was carried out in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Engelhard Selectoxo (Pt-Fe/γ-alumina) catalyst and three self-prepared catalysts. Temperature was varied between 100 and 300 °C, and a of range feed rates and compositions were tested. A reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H 2 oxidation and the water gas shift reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. Using non-linear least squares, empirical power-law type rate expressions were found to fit the experimental data. It was critical to include all three reactions to determine good fitting results. In particular, the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Using this three reaction model, several simulation studies for a commercial PROX reactor were performed. In these simulations, the effect of O 2/CO ratio, the effect of water addition, and various non-isothermal modes of operation were evaluated. The results of the simulation were compared with corresponding experimental data and shows good agreement.

  6. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-01-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure. PMID:26964764

  7. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M.; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M.; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R.; Ecija, David

    2016-03-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure.

  8. Thermal selectivity of intermolecular versus intramolecular reactions on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Borja; Giménez-Agulló, Nelson; Björk, Jonas; Martínez-Peña, Francisco; Martin-Jimenez, Alberto; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Jonathan; Pizarro, Ana M; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M; Ballester, Pablo; Galan-Mascaros, José R; Ecija, David

    2016-01-01

    On-surface synthesis is a promising strategy for engineering heteroatomic covalent nanoarchitectures with prospects in electronics, optoelectronics and photovoltaics. Here we report the thermal tunability of reaction pathways of a molecular precursor in order to select intramolecular versus intermolecular reactions, yielding monomeric or polymeric phthalocyanine derivatives, respectively. Deposition of tetra-aza-porphyrin species bearing ethyl termini on Au(111) held at room temperature results in a close-packed assembly. Upon annealing from room temperature to 275 °C, the molecular precursors undergo a series of covalent reactions via their ethyl termini, giving rise to phthalocyanine tapes. However, deposition of the tetra-aza-porphyrin derivatives on Au(111) held at 300 °C results in the formation and self-assembly of monomeric phthalocyanines. A systematic scanning tunnelling microscopy study of reaction intermediates, combined with density functional calculations, suggests a [2+2] cycloaddition as responsible for the initial linkage between molecular precursors, whereas the monomeric reaction is rationalized as an electrocyclic ring closure. PMID:26964764

  9. The Pressure Dependency of Stabilized Criegee Intermediate Yields of Selected Ozone-Alkene Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, J. P.; Donahue, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) play an important role as an oxidizing species in atmospheric reactions. The ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere, i.e. the mechanism by which the SCIs are produced, is a major pathway to the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Just how much SCIs contribute to the SOA formation is not well known and fundamental research in the kinetics of SCI formation need to be performed to shed light on this mystery. The alkene ozonolysis is highly exothermic reaction, so a third body is needed for stabilizing the SCI, thus making the SCI yield pressure dependent. We studied the production of SCIs at different pressures by studying their ability to oxidize sulfur dioxide in a pressure controlled flow reactor. We used a mixture of ultra-high purity nitrogen, oxygen, and a selective scavenger for hydroxyl radical (OH) as a carrier gas, and injected a mixture of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and selected alkene to the center of the flow for ozonolysis to take place. With the OH radical scavenged, the SCI yield of the reaction was measured by measuring the amount of sulfuric acid formed in the reaction between SCI and sulfur dioxide with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). This work was supported by NASA/ROSES grant NNX12AE54G to CMU and Academy of Finland Center of Excellence project 1118615.

  10. Biomimetic Synthesis of Moschamine-Related Indole Alkaloids via Iron-Catalyzed Selectively Oxidative Radical Coupling.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kangjiang; Yang, Jing; Tong, Xiaogang; Shang, Wenbin; Pan, Zhiqiang; Xia, Chengfeng

    2016-03-18

    An iron-catalyzed oxidative radical coupling reaction was developed to selectively construct indolofuran or bisphenolic indole cores, which exist in two types of moschamine-related indole alkaloids. Both (+)-decursivine and 4,4″-bis(N-feruloyl)serotonin were biomimetically synthesized by using coupling reactions. The proposed reassignment of the structure of montamine as 4,4″-bis(N-feruloyl)serotonin was excluded. PMID:26949004

  11. Photovoltaic-driven organic electrosynthesis and efforts toward more sustainable oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Perkins, Robert J; Smith, Jake A

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combination of visible light, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry provides a convenient, inexpensive platform for conducting a wide variety of sustainable oxidation reactions. The approach presented in this article is compatible with both direct and indirect oxidation reactions, avoids the need for a stoichiometric oxidant, and leads to hydrogen gas as the only byproduct from the corresponding reduction reaction. PMID:25815081

  12. Method for catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions of simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bicker, D.; Bonaventura, J.

    1988-06-14

    A method for oxidizing carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide is described comprising: (1) contacting, together, carbon monoxide, a nitrogen-containing chelating agent and water; wherein the chelating agent is at least one member selected from the group consisting of methmeoglobin bound to a support, ferric hemoglobin bound to a support, iron-containing porphyrins bound to a support, and sperm whale myoglobin bound to a support, wherein the support is glass, a natural fiber, a synthetic fiber, a gel, charcoal, carbon ceramic material, a metal oxide, a synthetic polymer, a zeolite, a silica compound of an alumina compound; and (2) obtaining carbon dioxide.

  13. Development of new palladium(0)-catalyzed reactions based on novel oxidative addition mode.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hirokazu

    2008-09-01

    We have developed palladium(0)/monophosphine-catalyzed trans-selective arylative, alkenylative, alkylative, and alkynylative cyclization reactions of alkyne-aldehydes and -ketones with organoboron reagents. These reactions afford six-membered allylic alcohols with endo tri- or tetra-substituted olefin groups and/or five-membered counterparts with exo olefin groups. The ratios of these products are dramatically affected by alkyne substituents as well as the phosphine ligand. The remarkable trans selectivity of the process results from the novel reaction mechanism involving 'anti-Wacker'-type oxidative addition. Although the cyclization reactions are influenced by the length of the tether between the alkyne and carbonyl group, they can be applied to a multi-component synthesis of biologically important indenes bearing three substituent groups at 1, 2, 3-positions from available o-ethynylbenzaldehyde derivatives. A two-component coupling reaction in methanol provides 1H-indenols, while a three-component reaction involving secondary aliphatic amines as the third component in DMF affords 1H-indenamines. This method allows combinatorial preparation of unsymmetrically substituted 1H-indenes that cannot be prepared via previous synthetic routes. The same catalytic system can also transform allene-carbonyl compounds into 3-cyclohexenols and -cyclopentenols with alkyl, aryl, alkenyl, alkynyl, and boryl groups at C-3. Microwave irradiation efficiently increases not only the reaction rate but also the product yield by suppressing formation of hydroarylation byproducts. Cyclization of optically active 1,3-disubstituted allene-aldehyde reveals that the reaction proceeds through not carbopalladation but 'anti-Wacker'-type oxidative addition. PMID:18758139

  14. Cysteine Oxidation Reactions Catalyzed by a Mononuclear Non-heme Iron Enzyme (OvoA) in Ovothiol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    OvoA in ovothiol biosynthesis is a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme catalyzing the oxidative coupling between histidine and cysteine. It can also catalyze the oxidative coupling between hercynine and cysteine, yet with a different regio-selectivity. Due to the potential application of this reaction for industrial ergothioneine production, in this study, we systematically characterized OvoA by a combination of three different assays. Our studies revealed that OvoA can also catalyze the oxidation of cysteine to either cysteine sulfinic acid or cystine. Remarkably, these OvoA-catalyzed reactions can be systematically modulated by a slight modification of one of its substrates, histidine. PMID:24684381

  15. Tailoring Selectivity for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution on Ruthenium Oxides by Zn Substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Petrykin, V.; Macounova, K; Shlyakhtin, O; Krtil, P

    2010-01-01

    Controlling gas emissions: Versatile control of the selectivity of an oxide electrocatalyst in the oxygen- and chlorine-evolution reactions was demonstrated by Zn substitution in RuO{sub 2}. The incorporation of Zn into the rutile structure alters the cation sequence along the [001] direction and modifies the structure of the active sites for both gas-evolution processes.

  16. Controlling bimolecular reactions: Mode and bond selected reaction of water with hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.; Hsiao, M.C.; Crim, F.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Vibrational overtone excitation prepares water molecules in the {vert bar}13{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}04{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}12{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}02{r angle}{sup {minus}}{vert bar}2{r angle}, and {vert bar}03{r angle}{sup {minus}} local mode states for a study of the influence of reagent vibration on the endothermic bimolecular reaction H+H{sub 2}O{r arrow}OH+H{sub 2}. The reaction of water molecules excited to the {vert bar}04{r angle}{sup {minus}} vibrational state predominantly produces OH({ital v}=0) while reaction from the {vert bar}13{r angle}{sup {minus}} state forms mostly OH({ital v}=1). These results support a spectator model for reaction in which the vibrational excitation of the products directly reflects the nodal pattern of the vibrational wave function in the energized molecule. Relative rate measurements for the three vibrational states {vert bar}03{r angle}{sup {minus}}, {vert bar}02{r angle}{sup {minus}}{vert bar}2{r angle}, and {vert bar}12{r angle}{sup {minus}}, which have similar total energies but correspond to very different distributions of vibrational energy, demonstrate the control that initially selected vibrations exert on reaction rates. The local mode stretching state {vert bar}03{r angle}{sup {minus}} promotes the H+H{sub 2}O reaction much more efficiently than either the state having part of its energy in bending excitation ({vert bar}02{r angle}{sup {minus}}{vert bar}2{r angle}) or the stretching state with the excitation shared between the two O--H oscillators ({vert bar}12{r angle}{sup {minus}}). The localized character of the vibrational overtone excitation in water has permitted the first observation of a bond selected bimolecular reaction using this approach.

  17. Formation of phenol under conditions of the reaction of oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinovsky, I.O.; Leshcheva, A.N.; Pogorelov, V.V.; Gelbshtein, A.I.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes conditions for the oxidation of benzene to phenol. It is shown that a reaction mixture of water, carbon monoxide, and oxygen are essential to the oxidation. The oxidation is a side reaction found to occur during the oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid in a medium of trifluoroacetic acid.

  18. Complete reaction mechanisms of mercury oxidation on halogenated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Promarak, Vinich; Hannongbua, Supa; Kungwan, Nawee; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-06-01

    The reaction mechanisms of mercury (Hg) adsorption and oxidation on halogenated activated carbon (AC) have been completely studied for the first time using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two different halogenated AC models, namely X-AC and X-AC-X (X=Cl, Br, I), were adopted. The results revealed that HgX is found to be stable-state on the AC edge since its further desorption from the AC as HgX, or further oxidation to HgX2, are energetically unfavorable. Remarkably, the halide type does not significantly affect the Hg adsorption energy but it strongly affects the activation energy barrier of HgX formation, which obviously increases in the order HgIBr-AC>Cl-AC. Thus, the study of the complete reaction mechanism is essential because the adsorption energy can not be used as a guideline for the rational material design in the halide impregnated AC systems. The activation energy is an important descriptor for the predictions of sorbent reactivity to the Hg oxidation process. PMID:26943019

  19. Kinetics of the reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, W. L.; Hanson, R. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reaction of nitric oxide with hydrogen has been studied in the temperature range 2400-4500 K using a shock-tube technique. Mixtures of NO and H2 diluted in argon or krypton were heated by incident shock waves, and the infrared emission from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO at 5.3 microns was used to monitor the time-varying NO concentration. The decomposition of nitric oxide behind the shock was found to be modeled well by a fifteen-reaction system. A principal result of the study was the determination of the rate constant k1 for the reaction H + NO yields N + OH, which may be the rate-limiting step for NO removal in some combustion systems. Experimental values of k1 were obtained for each test through comparisons of measured and numerically predicted NO profiles. The data are fit closely by the expression k1 = 1.34 times 10 to the fourteenth power exp(-49 200/RT) cu cm/mole-sec. These data appear to be the first available for this rate constant.

  20. Deciphering Selectivity in Organic Reactions: A Multifaceted Problem.

    PubMed

    Balcells, David; Clot, Eric; Eisenstein, Odile; Nova, Ainara; Perrin, Lionel

    2016-05-17

    Computational chemistry has made a sustained contribution to the understanding of chemical reactions. In earlier times, half a century ago, the goal was to distinguish allowed from forbidden reactions (e.g., Woodward-Hoffmann rules), that is, reactions with low or high to very high activation barriers. A great achievement of computational chemistry was also to contribute to the determination of structures with the bonus of proposing a rationalization (e.g., anomeric effect, isolobal analogy, Gillespie valence shell pair electron repulsion rules and counter examples, Wade-Mingos rules for molecular clusters). With the development of new methods and the constant increase in computing power, computational chemists move to more challenging problems, close to the daily concerns of the experimental chemists, in determining the factors that make a reaction both efficient and selective: a key issue in organic synthesis. For this purpose, experimental chemists use advanced synthetic and analytical techniques to which computational chemists added other ways of determining reaction pathways. The transition states and intermediates contributing to the transformation of reactants into the desired and undesired products can now be determined, including their geometries, energies, charges, spin densities, spectroscopy properties, etc. Such studies remain challenging due to the large number of chemical species commonly present in the reactive media whose role may have to be determined. Calculating chemical systems as they are in the experiment is not always possible, bringing its own share of complexity through the large number of atoms and the associated large number of conformers to consider. Modeling the chemical species with smaller systems is an alternative that historically led to artifacts. Another important topic is the choice of the computational method. While DFT is widely used, the vast diversity of functionals available is both an opportunity and a challenge. Though

  1. Surface-oxidized carbon black as a catalyst for the water oxidation and alcohol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-05-11

    Carbon black (CB) is popularly used as a catalyst support for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles due to its large surface area, excellent conductivity and stability. Herein, we show that surface oxidized CB itself, after acidic treatment and electrochemical oxidation, exhibits significant catalytic activity for the electrochemical oxidation of water and alcohols. PMID:27097802

  2. Laccase-Functionalized Graphene Oxide Assemblies as Efficient Nanobiocatalysts for Oxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Patila, Michaela; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2016-01-01

    Multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies were prepared through the multi-point covalent immobilization of laccase from Trametes versicolor (TvL) on functionalized graphene oxide (fGO). The catalytic properties of the fGO-TvL nanoassemblies were found to depend on the number of the graphene oxide-enzyme layers present in the nanostructure. The fGO-TvL nanoassemblies exhibit an enhanced thermal stability at 60 °C, as demonstrated by a 4.7-fold higher activity as compared to the free enzyme. The multi-layer graphene oxide-enzyme nanoassemblies can efficiently catalyze the oxidation of anthracene, as well as the decolorization of an industrial dye, pinacyanol chloride. These materials retained almost completely their decolorization activity after five reaction cycles, proving their potential as efficient nano- biocatalysts for various applications. PMID:26927109

  3. Metal-Organic Frameworks as Catalysts for Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Asiri, Abdullah M; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-06-01

    This Concept is aimed at describing the current state of the art in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as heterogeneous catalysts for liquid-phase oxidations, focusing on three important substrates, namely, alkenes, alkanes and alcohols. Emphases are on the nature of active sites that have been incorporated within MOFs and on future targets to be set in this area. Thus, selective alkene epoxidation with peroxides or oxygen catalyzed by constitutional metal nodes of MOFs as active sites are still to be developed. Moreover, no noble metal-free MOF has been reported to date that can act as a general catalyst for the aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary aliphatic alcohols. In contrast, in the case of alkanes, a target should be to tune the polarity of MOF internal pores to control the outcome of the autooxidation process, resulting in the selective formation of alcohol/ketone mixtures at high conversion. PMID:27113486

  4. Reactions of oxidatively activated arylamines with thiols: reaction mechanisms and biologic implications. An overview.

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, P

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amines belong to a group of compounds that exert their toxic effects usually after oxidative biotransformation, primarily in the liver. In addition, aromatic amines also undergo extrahepatic activation to yield free arylaminyl radicals. The reactive intermediates are potential promutagens and procarcinogens, and responsible for target tissue toxicity. Since thiols react with these intermediates at high rates, it is of interest to know the underlying reaction mechanisms and the toxicologic implications. Phenoxyl radicals from aminophenols and aminyl radicals from phenylenediamines quickly disproportionate to quinone imines and quinone diimines. Depending on the structure, Michael addition or reduction reactions with thiols may prevail. Products of sequential oxidation/addition reactions (e.g., S-conjugates of aminophenols) are occasionally more toxic than the parent compounds because of their higher autoxidizability and their accumulation in the kidney. Even after covalent binding of quinone imines to protein SH groups, the resulting thioethers are able to autoxidize. The quinoid thioethers can then cross-link the protein by addition to neighboring nucleophiles. The reactions of nitrosoarenes with thiols yield a so-called "semimercaptal" from which various branching reactions detach, depending on substituents. Compounds with strong pi-donors, like 4-nitrosophenetol, give a resonance-stabilized N-(thiol-S-yl)-arylamine cation that may lead to bicyclic products, thioethers, and DNA adducts. Examples of toxicologic implications of the interactions of nitroso compounds with thiols are given for nitrosoimidazoles, heterocyclic nitroso compounds from protein pyrolysates, and nitrosoarenes. These data indicate that interactions of activated arylamines with thiols may not be regarded exclusively as detoxication reactions. PMID:7889834

  5. Predicting gold-mediated catalytic oxidative-coupling reactions from single crystal studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-03-18

    Though metallic gold is chemically inert under ambient conditions, its surface is extremely reactive and selective for many key oxidative chemical transformations when activated by atomic oxygen. A molecular-level understanding of the mechanism of these processes could allow researchers to design "green" catalytic processes mediated by gold-based materials. This Account focuses on the mechanistic framework for oxidative-coupling reactions established by fundamental studies on oxygen-activated Au(111) and the application of these principles to steady-state catalytic conditions. We also discuss the importance of the paradigms discovered both for predicting new oxidative-coupling reactions and for understanding existing literature. The mechanistic framework for the oxidative coupling of alcohols on gold surfaces predicts that new oxidative-coupling reactions should occur between amines and aldehydes and amines and alcohols as well as through alcohol carbonylation. Adsorbed atomic oxygen on the gold surface facilitates the activation of the substrates, and nucleophilic attack and β-H elimination are the two fundamental reactions that propagate the versatile chemistry that ensues. In the self-coupling of primary alcohols, adsorbed atomic oxygen first activates the O-H bond in the hydroxyl group at ∼150 K, which forms the corresponding adsorbed alkoxy groups. The rate-limiting step of the self-coupling reaction is the β-H elimination reaction of alkoxy groups to form the corresponding aldehydes and occurs with an activation barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol. The remaining alkoxy groups nucleophilically attack the electron-deficient aldehyde carbonyl carbon to yield the adsorbed "hemiacetal". This intermediate undergoes facile β-H elimination to produce the final coupling products, esters with twice the number of carbon atoms as the starting alcohols. This mechanistic insight suggests that cross-coupling occurs between alcohols and aldehydes, based on the logic

  6. Photochemical reactions of biologically important quinoxaline n-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoryantseva, G.G.; Tetenchuk, K.P.; Pol'shakov, V.I.; Elina, A.S.

    1987-02-01

    The authors study the photochemical reactions of quinoxidine, dioxidine, and a number of related derivatives of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides containing methyl, halomethyl, and carboxamide groups in the pyrazine ring. Thin-layer chromatography, UV spectrophotometry, and NMR/sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spectroscopy were used as the main methods for monitoring the photolysis process and establishing the structure of the products formed. The investigation established that two types of photochemical reactions are observed in the series of compounds discussed: photoisomerization with migration of a substitutent to the nitrogen atom of the heterocycle, and photorearrangement with elimination of a substituent and the formation of the corresponding lactams.

  7. [Inactivation of o-diphenoloxidase in the pyrocatechol oxidation reaction].

    PubMed

    Butovich, I A; Tertykh, V A

    1984-01-01

    The inactivation kinetics of o-diphenoloxidase isolated from potato tubers was studied in the process of pyrocatechol oxidation. The enzyme when saturated with the substrate is inactivated with the inactivation rate constant kin = 0.5-1.0 min-1; kin depends on the initial concentration of pyrocatechol. The ultimate yield of the enzymic reaction product increases linearly with the initial concentration of the enzyme. Introduction of ethylene-diaminosulphate, a substance which condenses with o-quinones, does not increase the operation stability of o-diphenoloxidase. The data obtained evidence for inactivation of o-diphenoloxidase either at the level of the enzyme-substrate complex or due to bimolecular reaction with the substrate. PMID:6438852

  8. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  9. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  10. Reduction of a phosphorus oxide and acid reaction set

    SciTech Connect

    Twarowski, A.

    1995-07-01

    It has been predicted for some time that hypersonic aircraft will suffer from diminished fuel efficiency due to the slow speed of radical recombination in the nozzle of the aircraft and the consequent expulsion of high-energy fragments during high Mach number flight. The addition of small amounts of phosphine combustion products (phosphorus oxides and acids) to water vapor has been found to result in a faster relaxation rate of OH to its equilibrium density following H{sub 2}O photolysis. This article describes the systematic construction of a reaction model of 162 phosphorus reactions among 17 phosphorus-containing species. Those reactions that contribute to the reestablishment of equilibrium following the perturbation of the system by H{sub 2}O photolysis or by an increase in temperature are identified. A thermodynamic free energy function is used to quantify the rate of system relaxation back to equilibrium for a series of 36 reaction conditions covering a temperature range of 1,500 to 3,000 K, a gas density range of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} mol/cm{sup 3} and a fuel equivalence ratio of 0.8 to 1.2.

  11. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  12. Site-Selective Reactions with Peptide-Based Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Michael W; Miller, Scott J

    2016-01-01

    The problem of catalyst-controlled site-selectivity can potentially require a catalyst to overcome energetic barriers larger than those associated with enantioselective reactions. This challenge is a signature of substrates that present reactive sites that are not of equivalent reactivity. Herein we present a narrative of our laboratory's efforts to overcome this challenge using peptide-based catalysts. We highlight the interplay between understanding the inherent reactivity preferences of a given target molecule and the development of catalysts that can overcome intrinsic preferences embedded within a substrate. PMID:26307403

  13. Selective Autooxidation of Ethanol over Titania-Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts: Structure and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Carlos; Thirunavukkarasu, K; Anilkumar, M; Shiju, N R; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    We study the selective catalytic oxidation of ethanol with air as a sustainable alternative route to acetaldehyde. The reaction is catalysed by molybdenum oxide supported on titania, in a flow reactor under ambient pressure. High selectivity to acetaldehyde (70%–89%, depending on the Mo loading) is obtained at 150 °C. Subsequently, we investigate the structure/performance relationship for various molybdenum oxide species using a combination of techniques including diffuse reflectance UV-visible, infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed reduction. As their surface density increases, the monomeric molybdenum oxide species undergo two-dimensional and three-dimensional oligomerisation. This results in polymolybdates and molybdenum oxide crystallites. Importantly, the ethanol oxidation rate depends not only on the overall molybdenum loading and dispersion, but also on the type of molybdenum oxide species prevalent at each surface density and on the domain size. As the molybdenum oxide oligomerisation increases, electron delocalisation becomes easier. This lowers the absorption edge energy and increases the reaction rate. PMID:23396482

  14. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  15. Vapor-phase reaction of acetophenone with methanol or dimethyl carbonate on magnesium oxide and magnesium phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Aramendia, M.A.; Borau, V.; Jimenez, C.; Marinas, J.M.; Romero, F.J.

    1999-04-01

    The vapor-phase reaction of acetophenone with methanol on magnesium oxide, various magnesium phosphates, and combinations of the two types of catalysts was studied. The process was found to involve the Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reaction, aldol condensations, dehydrations, and hydrogenations. The presence of basic sites is indispensable for the reaction to develop; however, acid sites also play an active role. The selectivity for each reaction product depends on the particular catalyst used. The total conversion is maximal with the catalysts containing the largest populations of acid and basic sites. Also, catalysts with large numbers of acid sites exhibit an increased selectivity towards the corresponding alkenes. The use of dimethyl carbonate instead of methanol alters the reaction selectivity to an extent dependent on the particular catalyst and operating conditions. However, this also results in markedly decreased total conversion in some instances.

  16. Oxidative Degradation of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides. 2; Evidence for Reactions Occurring at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (Cp-MAS) NMR. C-13 labeling of selected sites in the polymers allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. As opposed to model compound studies, the reactions were followed directly in the polymer. The labeling experiments confirm the previously reported oxidation of the methylene carbon to ketone in the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer chain. They also show the formation of two other oxidized species, acid and ester, from this same carbon. In addition, the technique provides the first evidence of the kind of degradation reactions that are occurring in the nadic end caps. Several PMR formulations containing moieties determined to be present after oxidation, as suggested by the labeling study, were synthesized. Weight loss, FTIR, and natural abundance NMR of these derivatives were followed during aging. In this way, weight loss could be related to the observed transformations.

  17. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine.

  18. Copper-catalysed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a long-standing goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. Here, we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  19. Copper-catalyzed selective hydroamination reactions of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of selective reactions that utilize easily available and abundant precursors for the efficient synthesis of amines is a longstanding goal of chemical research. Despite the centrality of amines in a number of important research areas, including medicinal chemistry, total synthesis and materials science, a general, selective, and step-efficient synthesis of amines is still needed. In this work we describe a set of mild catalytic conditions utilizing a single copper-based catalyst that enables the direct preparation of three distinct and important amine classes (enamines, α-chiral branched alkylamines, and linear alkylamines) from readily available alkyne starting materials with high levels of chemo-, regio-, and stereoselectivity. This methodology was applied to the asymmetric synthesis of rivastigmine and the formal synthesis of several other pharmaceutical agents, including duloxetine, atomoxetine, fluoxetine, and tolterodine. PMID:25515888

  20. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned the investigation of the desulfurization of the selectively oxidized coals using aqueous or alcoholic base mixtures. Model compound studies were initiated. Results were: Levels of desulfurization obtained in this study are at, or very close to, the 90% removal levels required for these coals to be in compliance with the Clean Air Act legislation; Up to 89.4% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal and 88.9% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and alcoholic/base reactions; Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product than the untreated sample; Substantial enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal has been achieved by the selective oxidation pretreatment; The highest levels of desulfurization obtained so far all involve bases as additives; The water/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} combination, was superior than any of the aqueous hydroxide bases. Possible synergistic interactions between the alcohol and the base are suspected. Over 70% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal can be removed by performing vacuum pyrolysis on the selectively oxidized coal. Lower sulfur contents are obtained by lowing the pyrolysis pressure.

  1. Nanoporous gold catalysts for selective gas-phase oxidative coupling of methanol at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, A; Zielasek, V; Biener, J; Friend, C M; Bäumer, M

    2010-01-15

    Gold (Au) is an interesting catalytic material because of its ability to catalyze reactions, such as partial oxidations, with high selectivities at low temperatures; but limitations arise from the low O2 dissociation probability on Au. This problem can be overcome by using Au nanoparticles supported on suitable oxides which, however, are prone to sintering. Nanoporous Au, prepared by the dealloying of AuAg alloys, is a new catalyst with a stable structure that is active without any support. It catalyzes the selective oxidative coupling of methanol to methyl formate with selectivities above 97% and high turnover frequencies at temperatures below 80 degrees C. Because the overall catalytic characteristics of nanoporous Au are in agreement with studies on Au single crystals, we deduced that the selective surface chemistry of Au is unaltered but that O2 can be readily activated with this material. Residual silver is shown to regulate the availability of reactive oxygen. PMID:20075249

  2. Influence of oxygen and pH on the selective oxidation of ethanol on Pd catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbitts, David D.; Neurock, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The selective oxidation of ethanol on supported Pd is catalytically promoted by the presence of hydroxide species on the Pd surface as well as in solution. These hydroxide intermediates act as Brønsted bases which readily abstract protons from the hydroxyl groups of adsorbed or solution-phase alcohols. The C1AH bond of the resulting alkoxide is subsequently activated on the metal surface via hydride elimination to form acetaldehyde. Surface and solution-phase hydroxide intermediates can also readily react with the acetaldehyde via nucleophilic addition to form a germinal diol intermediate, which subsequently undergoes a second C1AH bond activation on Pd to form acetic acid. The role of O2 is to remove the electrons produced in the oxidation reaction via the oxygen reduction reaction over Pd. The reduction reaction also regenerates the hydroxide intermediates and removes adsorbed hydrogen that is produced during the oxidation.

  3. Outerwall-selectively oxidized, water soluble double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brozena, Alexandra H.; Moskovits, Martin; Shao, Beiyue; Deng, Shunliu; Liao, Hongwei; Gaskell, Karen L.; Wang, YuHuang

    2010-02-23

    The outer walls of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were selectively oxidized using a combination of oleum and nitric acid. Intercalation of oleum between bundled DWNTs enabled a homogeneous reaction by equally exposing all outer wall surfaces to the oxidants. At optimized reaction conditions, this double-wall chemistry enabled high water solubility through carboxylic acid functional groups introduced to the outer wall, while leaving the inner tube intact, as shown by Raman scattering and high resolution TEM. These outer wall selectively oxidized DWNTs retained electrical conductivity up to 65% better than thin films of similarly functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes, which can be attributed to enhanced electrical percolation via the nonoxidized inner tubes.

  4. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-01-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts. PMID:26952517

  5. Tuning selectivity of electrochemical reactions by atomically dispersed platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Minho; Kwon, Han Chang; Cho, Sung June; Yun, Seongho; Kim, Hee-Tak; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Kim, Hyungjun; Choi, Minkee

    2016-03-01

    Maximum atom efficiency as well as distinct chemoselectivity is expected for electrocatalysis on atomically dispersed (or single site) metal centres, but its realization remains challenging so far, because carbon, as the most widely used electrocatalyst support, cannot effectively stabilize them. Here we report that a sulfur-doped zeolite-templated carbon, simultaneously exhibiting large sulfur content (17 wt% S), as well as a unique carbon structure (that is, highly curved three-dimensional networks of graphene nanoribbons), can stabilize a relatively high loading of platinum (5 wt%) in the form of highly dispersed species including site isolated atoms. In the oxygen reduction reaction, this catalyst does not follow a conventional four-electron pathway producing H2O, but selectively produces H2O2 even over extended times without significant degradation of the activity. Thus, this approach constitutes a potentially promising route for producing important fine chemical H2O2, and also offers opportunities for tuning the selectivity of other electrochemical reactions on various metal catalysts.

  6. Modeling selective intergranular oxidation of binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K; Rosso, Kevin M; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 μm ahead of grain boundary crack tips was documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (∼100 s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner's model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al. PMID:25573575

  7. Release of substituents from phenolic compounds during oxidative coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Dec, Jerzy; Haider, Konrad; Bollag, Jean-Marc

    2003-07-01

    Phenolic compounds originating from plant residue decomposition or microbial metabolism form humic-like polymers during oxidative coupling reactions mediated by various phenoloxidases or metal oxides. Xenobiotic phenols participating in these reactions undergo either polymerization or binding to soil organic matter. Another effect of oxidative coupling is dehalogenation, decarboxylation or demethoxylation of the substrates. To investigate these phenomena, several naturally occurring and xenobiotic phenols were incubated with various phenoloxidases (peroxidase, laccase, tyrosinase) or with birnessite (delta-MnO(2)), and monitored for chloride release, CO(2) evolution, and methanol or methane production. The release of chloride ions during polymerization and binding ranged between 0.2% and 41.4%. Using the test compounds labeled with 14C in three different locations (carboxyl group, aromatic ring, or aliphatic chain), it was demonstrated that 14CO(2) evolution was mainly associated with the release of carboxyl groups (17.8-54.8% of the initial radioactivity). Little mineralization of 14C-labeled aromatic rings or aliphatic carbons occurred in catechol, ferulic or p-coumaric acids (0.1-0.7%). Demethoxylation ranged from 0.5% to 13.9% for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringic acid, respectively. Methylphenols showed no demethylation. In conclusion, dehalogenation, decarboxylation and demethoxylation of phenolic substrates appear to be controlled by a common mechanism, in which various substituents are released if they are attached to carbon atoms involved in coupling. Electron-withdrawing substituents, such as -COOH and -Cl, are more susceptible to release than electron-donating ones, such as -OCH(3) and -CH(3). The release of organic substituents during polymerization and binding of phenols may add to CO(2) production in soil. PMID:12738292

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-01-28

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, it was planned to investigate the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and to obtain data on the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane. The investigation of the reaction mechanism will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations. The last component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium. In the current reporting period, the screening of the promoted catalysts were completed, sufficient amount of the selected catalysts were prepared and delivered to TDA for long term deactivation testing.

  9. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

  10. Kinetics and dynamics of oxidation reactions involving an adsorbed CO species on bulk and supported platinum and copper-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.

    1991-07-01

    The proposed research is an integrated experimental and modeling study of oxidation reactions involving CO as a key player -- be it a reactant, adsorbed intermediate, and/or partial oxidation product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The reaction systems of interest in the project include CO, formaldehyde, and methanol oxidation by O{sub 2} and CO oxidation by NO, on both Pt and copper oxide catalysts. These reactions are of importance in automobile exhaust catalysis. There is a paucity of rate data in the literature for these important environmental control reactions. The goal of this research is to better understand the catalytic chemistry and kinetics of oxidations reactions involving CO as an adsorbed intermediate. Successfully meeting this goal requires an integration of basic kinetic measurements, in situ catalyst surface monitoring, kinetic modeling, and nonlinear mathematical tools.

  11. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Children and Adolescents: Selective Reactions.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Cornejo-García, J A; Pérez-Alzate, D; Pérez-Sánchez, N; Plaza-Serón, M C; Doña, I; Torres, M J; Canto, G; Kidon, M; Perkins, J R; Blanca, M

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used throughout the world to treat pain and inflammation; however, they can trigger several types of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) in all age groups. Although most such reactions occur through activation of the leukotriene pathway without specific immunological recognition (cross-intolerance), a significant number of DHRs to NSAIDs are due to immunological mechanisms (selective reactions [SRs]). SRs are thought to be induced by specific IgE antibodies or by T cells. In this manuscript, we focus on SRs, which are of great concern in children and adolescents and comprise a heterogeneous set of clinical pictures ranging from mild entities such as urticaria/angioedema to potentially life-threatening conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the most frequent elicitors of IgE-mediated SRs, although pyrazolones have also been implicated. T cell-mediated reactions are infrequent in children but have been associated with ibuprofen, naproxen, and dipyrone. In this review, we analyze the available literature on SRs in children and adolescents, with emphasis on epidemiological data, mechanisms, and drugs involved, as well as on diagnostic procedures. PMID:26817135

  12. Semiconducting Metal Oxide Based Sensors for Selective Gas Pollutant Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Sofian M.; El-Kadri, Oussama M.; Abu-Yousef, Imad A.; Kanan, Marsha C.

    2009-01-01

    A review of some papers published in the last fifty years that focus on the semiconducting metal oxide (SMO) based sensors for the selective and sensitive detection of various environmental pollutants is presented. PMID:22408500

  13. Selected oxidative stress markers in gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koźlik, Jacek; Przybyłowska, Joanna; Mikrut, Kinga; Zwoliński, Jacek; Piątek, Jacek; Sobczak, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The surgical stress response after laparoscopy is smaller when compared with open surgery, and it is expected that after minimally invasive surgery the possible development of oxidative stress will be less severe. Aim To evaluate markers of pro-oxidant activity – levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde – and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the perioperative period in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopy and to determine whether the duration of laparoscopy can affect these changes. Material and methods The study included 64 patients, divided into two groups: group 1 with duration of laparoscopy up to 20 min, and group 2 with duration of the operation over 40 min. Blood samples were collected before anesthesia, 5 min after release of pneumoperitoneum, and 10 h after surgery. Results A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde in samples collected after surgery was found in comparison with values obtained before surgery. Also statistically significant differences existed between groups of patients with different duration of surgery. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity values were significantly decreased. They were also significantly different between the two groups with different duration of surgery. Conclusions In our study, levels of the markers of pro-oxidant activity increased and levels of the markers of antioxidant enzymes decreased, suggesting development of oxidative stress. The duration of laparoscopic procedures affects the severity of the presented changes. PMID:25960799

  14. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of various alcohols is studied in liquid phase under nitrogen atmosphere over vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method are found to be suitable for the selective oxidation of a variet...

  15. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  16. Effect of size of catalytically active phases in the dehydrogenation of alcohols and the challenging selective oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghong; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye

    2011-09-01

    The size of the active phase is one of the most important factors in determining the catalytic behaviour of a heterogeneous catalyst. This Feature Article focuses on the size effects in two types of reactions, i.e., the metal nanoparticle-catalysed dehydrogenation of alcohols and the metal oxide nanocluster-catalysed selective oxidation of hydrocarbons (including the selective oxidation of methane and ethane and the epoxidation of propylene). For Pd or Au nanoparticle-catalysed oxidative or non-oxidative dehydrogenation of alcohols, the size of metal nanoparticles mainly controls the catalytic activity by affecting the activation of reactants (either alcohol or O(2)). The size of oxidic molybdenum species loaded on SBA-15 determines not only the activity but also the selectivity of oxygenates in the selective oxidation of ethane; highly dispersed molybdenum species are suitable for acetaldehyde formation, while molybdenum oxide nanoparticles exhibit higher formaldehyde selectivity. Cu(II) and Fe(III) isolated on mesoporous silica are highly efficient for the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde, while the corresponding oxide clusters mainly catalyse the complete oxidation of methane. The lattice oxygen in iron or copper oxide clusters is responsible for the complete oxidation, while the isolated Cu(I) or Fe(II) generated during the reaction can activate molecular oxygen forming active oxygen species for the selective oxidation of methane. Highly dispersed Cu(I) and Fe(II) species also function for the epoxidation of propylene by O(2) and N(2)O, respectively. Alkali metal ions work as promoters for the epoxidation of propylene by enhancing the dispersion of copper or iron species and weakening the acidity. PMID:21629889

  17. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  18. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M S; Larsen, F; Postma, D

    2001-10-15

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4 x 10(-10) mol FeS2/g x s are measured, and the rates are only weakly correlated with the sediment pyrite content. The reactivity of pyrite, including the inhibition by FeOOH layers formed on its surface, apparently has a major effect on the rate of oxidation. The code PHREEQC 2.0 was used to calculate the reaction stoichiometry and partitioning of gases between the solution and the gas phase. Pyrite oxidation with concurrent calcite dissolution was found to be consistent with the experimental data while organic carbon oxidation was not. The reaction involves changes in the total volume of the gas phase. The reaction scheme predicts the volume of O2 gas consumed to be larger than of CO2 produced. In addition the solubility of CO2 in water is about 30 times larger than of O2 causing a further decrease in total gas volume. The change in total gas volume therefore also depends on the gas/water volume ratio and the lower the ratio the more pronounced the loss of volume will be. Under field conditions the change in total volume may amount up to 20% in the absence of calcite and over 10% in the presence of calcite. Such changes in gas volume during the oxidation of pyrite are expected to result in pressure gradients causing advective transport of gaseous oxygen. PMID:11686369

  19. Biotransformations Utilizing β-Oxidation Cycle Reactions in the Synthesis of Natural Compounds and Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Œwizdor, Alina; Panek, Anna; Milecka-Tronina, Natalia; Kołek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    β-Oxidation cycle reactions, which are key stages in the metabolism of fatty acids in eucaryotic cells and in processes with a significant role in the degradation of acids used by microbes as a carbon source, have also found application in biotransformations. One of the major advantages of biotransformations based on the β-oxidation cycle is the possibility to transform a substrate in a series of reactions catalyzed by a number of enzymes. It allows the use of sterols as a substrate base in the production of natural steroid compounds and their analogues. This route also leads to biologically active compounds of therapeutic significance. Transformations of natural substrates via β-oxidation are the core part of the synthetic routes of natural flavors used as food additives. Stereoselectivity of the enzymes catalyzing the stages of dehydrogenation and addition of a water molecule to the double bond also finds application in the synthesis of chiral biologically active compounds, including medicines. Recent advances in genetic, metabolic engineering, methods for the enhancement of bioprocess productivity and the selectivity of target reactions are also described. PMID:23443116

  20. Biotransformations utilizing β-oxidation cycle reactions in the synthesis of natural compounds and medicines.

    PubMed

    Swizdor, Alina; Panek, Anna; Milecka-Tronina, Natalia; Kołek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    β-Oxidation cycle reactions, which are key stages in the metabolism of fatty acids in eucaryotic cells and in processes with a significant role in the degradation of acids used by microbes as a carbon source, have also found application in biotransformations. One of the major advantages of biotransformations based on the β-oxidation cycle is the possibility to transform a substrate in a series of reactions catalyzed by a number of enzymes. It allows the use of sterols as a substrate base in the production of natural steroid compounds and their analogues. This route also leads to biologically active compounds of therapeutic significance. Transformations of natural substrates via β-oxidation are the core part of the synthetic routes of natural flavors used as food additives. Stereoselectivity of the enzymes catalyzing the stages of dehydrogenation and addition of a water molecule to the double bond also finds application in the synthesis of chiral biologically active compounds, including medicines. Recent advances in genetic, metabolic engineering, methods for the enhancement of bioprocess productivity and the selectivity of target reactions are also described. PMID:23443116

  1. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  2. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-04-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  3. Spin-selective recombination reactions of radical pairs: Experimental test of validity of reaction operators

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kiminori; Liddell, Paul; Gust, Devens; Hore, P. J.

    2013-12-21

    Spin-selective reactions of radical pairs are conventionally modelled using an approach that dates back to the 1970s [R. Haberkorn, Mol. Phys. 32, 1491 (1976)]. An alternative approach based on the theory of quantum measurements has recently been suggested [J. A. Jones and P. J. Hore, Chem. Phys. Lett. 488, 90 (2010)]. We present here the first experimental attempt to discriminate between the two models. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate intramolecular electron transfer in the radical pair form of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene molecular triad. The rate of spin-spin relaxation of the fullerene radical in the triad was found to be inconsistent with the quantum measurement description of the spin-selective kinetics, and in accord with the conventional model when combined with spin-dephasing caused by rotational modulation of the anisotropic g-tensor of the fullerene radical.

  4. Oxidation of humic substances supports denitrification reactions in agricultural soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Trump, J. I.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    , nitrite, Fe(II), and humic-born hydroquinones. All data were analyzed with respect to dilution factors obtained through analysis of a conservative bromide tracer present in electron donor medium. Addition of oxidized HS, reduced HS, and acetate all resulted in significant loss of nitrate from the columns. Significant nitrite accumulation was not observed. Of all the electron donor treatments, reduced HS, enriched for hydroquinone-containing functional moieties, supported the greatest degree of denitrification. The participation of excess hydroquinones in denitrification accounted for approximately 104% of the difference in nitrate reduction between reduced and oxidized HS treatments. This electron balance allowed for assignment of respiratory activity due to hydroquinone oxidation, rather than degradation of humic substances or associated electron-donating compounds. These results suggest that denitrification reactions catalyzed by microbial oxidation of reduced HS may be prevalent in agricultural soils. Likewise, these results demonstrate for the first time that respiratory behavior due to hydroquinone oxidation, as well as impact upon local geochemistry, can be analyzed in complex flow-through model systems.

  5. Oxidation Numbers, Oxidants, and Redox Reactions: Variants of the Electrophilic Bromination of Alkenes and Variants of the Application of Oxone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eissen, Marco; Strudthoff, Merle; Backhaus, Solveig; Eismann, Carolin; Oetken, Gesa; Kaling, Soren; Lenoir, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation-state and donor-acceptor concepts are important areas in the chemical education. Student worksheets containing problems that emphasize oxidation numbers, redox reactions of organic compounds, and stoichiometric reaction equations are presented. All of the examples are incorporated under one unifying topic: the production of vicinal…

  6. Tuning the selectivity of Gd3N cluster endohedral metallofullerene reactions with Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Steven; Rottinger, Khristina A; Fahim, Muska; Field, Jessica S; Martin, Benjamin R; Arvola, Kristine D

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate the manipulation of the Lewis acid strength to selectively fractionate different types of Gd3N metallofullerenes that are present in complex mixtures. Carbon disulfide is used for all Lewis acid studies. CaCl2 exhibits the lowest reactivity but the highest selectivity by precipitating only those gadolinium metallofullerenes with the lowest first oxidation potentials. ZnCl2 selectively complexes Gd3N@C88 during the first 4 h of reaction. Reaction with ZnCl2 for an additional 7 days permits a selective precipitation of Gd3N@C84 as the dominant endohedral isolated. A third fraction is the filtrate, which possesses Gd3N@C86 and Gd3N@C80 as the two dominant metallofullerenes. The order of increasing reactivity and decreasing selectivity (left to right) is as follows: CaCl2 < ZnCl2 < NiCl2 < MgCl2 < MnCl2 < CuCl2 < WCl4 ≪ WCl6 < ZrCl4 < AlCl3 < FeCl3. As a group, CaCl2, ZnCl2, and NiCl2 are the weakest Lewis acids and have the highest selectivity because of their very low precipitation onsets, which are below +0.19 V (i.e., endohedrals with first oxidation potentials below +0.19 V are precipitated). For CaCl2, the precipitation threshold is estimated at a remarkably low value of +0.06 V. Because most endohedrals possess first oxidation potentials significantly higher than +0.06 V, CaCl2 is especially useful in its ability to precipitate only a select group of gadolinium metallofullerenes. The Lewis acids of intermediate reactivity (i.e., precipitation onsets estimated between +0.19 and +0.4 V) are MgCl2, MnCl2, CuCl2, and WCl4. The strongest Lewis acids (WCl6, ZrCl4, AlCl3, and FeCl3) are the least selective and tend to precipitate the entire family of gadolinium metallofullerenes. Tuning the Lewis acid for a specific type of endohedral should be useful in a nonchromatographic purification method. The ability to control which metallofullerenes are permitted to precipitate and which endohedrals would remain in solution is a key outcome of this work. PMID

  7. Design of a metal-promoted oxide catalyst for the selective synthesis of butadiene from ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sushkevich, Vitaly L; Ivanova, Irina I; Ordomsky, Vitaly V; Taarning, Esben

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of buta-1,3-diene from ethanol has been studied over metal-containing (M=Ag, Cu, Ni) oxide catalysts (MO(x)=MgO, ZrO2, Nb2O5, TiO2, Al2O3) supported on silica. Kinetic study of a wide range of ethanol conversions (2-90%) allowed the main reaction pathways leading to butadiene and byproducts to be determined. The key reaction steps of butadiene synthesis were found to involve ethanol dehydrogenation, acetaldehyde condensation, and the reduction of crotonaldehyde with ethanol into crotyl alcohol. Catalyst design included the selection of active components for each key reaction step and merging of these components into multifunctional catalysts and adjusting the catalyst functions to achieve the highest selectivity. The best catalytic performance was achieved over the Ag/ZrO2/SiO2 catalyst, which showed the highest selectivity towards butadiene (74 mol%). PMID:25123990

  8. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications. PMID:27199184

  9. Selective Electrochemical versus Chemical Oxidation of Bulky Phenol.

    PubMed

    Zabik, Nicole L; Virca, Carolyn N; McCormick, Theresa M; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2016-09-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of selected tert-butylated phenols 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (1), 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (2), 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol (3), 2-tert-butylphenol (4), and 4-tert-butylphenol (5) was studied in an aprotic environment using cyclic voltammetry, square-wave voltammetry, and UV-vis spectroscopy. All compounds exhibited irreversible oxidation of the corresponding phenol or phenolate ion. Compound 2 was selectively electrochemically oxidized, while other phenol analogues underwent mostly chemical oxidation. The electrochemical oxidation of 2 produced a highly absorbing product, 3,5,3',5'-tetra-tert-butyl-4,4'-diphenoquinone, which was characterized by X-ray crystal diffraction. The electrochemical oxidation was monitored as a function of electrochemical parameters and concentration. Experimental and theoretical data indicated that the steric hindrance, phenoxyl radical stability, and hydrogen bonding influenced the outcome of the electrochemical oxidation. The absence of the substituent at the para position and the presence of the bulky substituents at ortho positions were structural and electrostatic requirements for the selective electrochemical oxidation. PMID:27454828

  10. Reaction progress kinetic analysis of a copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction with N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline.

    PubMed

    Scott, Martin; Sud, Abhishek; Boess, Esther; Klussmann, Martin

    2014-12-19

    The results from a kinetic investigation of a Cu-catalyzed oxidative coupling reaction between N-phenyl tetrahydroisoquinoline and a silyl enol ether using elemental oxygen as oxidant are presented. By using reaction progress kinetic analysis as an evaluation method for the obtained data, we discovered information regarding the reaction order of the substrates and catalysts. Based on this information and some additional experiments, a refined model for the initial oxidative activation of the amine substrate and the activation of the nucleophile by the catalyst was developed. The mechanistic information also helped to understand why silyl nucleophiles have previously failed in a related Cu-catalyzed reaction using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant and how to overcome this limitation. PMID:25203932

  11. Two Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Contaminant Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Two catalysts for the selective oxidation of trace amounts of contaminant gases in air have been developed for use aboard the International Space Station. These catalysts might also be useful for reducing concentrations of fumes in terrestrial industrial facilities especially facilities that use halocarbons as solvents, refrigerant liquids, and foaming agents, as well as facilities that generate or utilize ammonia. The first catalyst is of the supported-precious-metal type. This catalyst is highly active for the oxidation of halocarbons, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates at low concentrations in air. This catalyst is more active for the oxidation of hydrocarbons and halocarbons than are competing catalysts developed in recent years. This catalyst completely converts these airborne contaminant gases to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral acids that can be easily removed from the air, and does not make any chlorine gas in the process. The catalyst is thermally stable and is not poisoned by chlorine or fluorine atoms produced on its surface during the destruction of a halocarbon. In addition, the catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to nitrogen at a temperature between 200 and 260 C, without making nitrogen oxides, which are toxic. The temperature of 260 C is higher than the operational temperature of any other precious-metal catalyst that can selectively oxidize ammonia. The purpose of the platinum in this catalyst is to oxidize hydrocarbons and to ensure that the oxidation of halocarbons goes to completion. However, the platinum exhibits little or no activity for initiating the destruction of halocarbons. Instead, the attack on the halocarbons is initiated by the support. The support also provides a high surface area for exposure of the platinum. Moreover, the support resists deactivation or destruction by halogens released during the destruction of halocarbons. The second catalyst is of the supported- metal-oxide type. This catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to

  12. Total Synthesis of Clavosolide A via Tandem Allylic Oxidation/Oxa-Conjugate Addition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joseph B.; Kim, Hyoungsu; Hong, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    The tandem allylic oxidation/oxa-conjugate addition reaction promoted by the gem-disubstituent effect in conjunction with the NHC-mediated oxidative esterification was explored for the facile synthesis of clavosolide A. PMID:26236051

  13. Method For Selective Catalytic Reduction Of Nitrogen Oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  14. Method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  15. C8-Selective Acylation of Quinoline N-Oxides with α-Oxocarboxylic Acids via Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaopei; Cui, Xiuling; Wu, Yangjie

    2016-08-01

    A facile and efficient protocol for palladium-catalyzed C8-selective acylation of quinoline N-oxides with α-oxocarboxylic acids has been developed. In this approach, N-oxide was utilized as a stepping stone for the remote C-H functionalization. The reactions proceeded efficiently under mild reaction conditions with excellent regioselectivity and broad functional group tolerance. PMID:27441527

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  17. Selective edge modification in graphene and graphite by chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Moriyama, Satoshi; Higuchi, Masayoshi

    2014-04-01

    The effect of edge structures in graphene sheets has been well investigated theoretically but most experimental demonstrations of the functionalization have been for the bulk structures because of only a few reports on chemical methods to modify the edges selectively. We herein report a chemical method using the Lemieux-von Rudloff reagent that selectively oxidizes only the edges of graphene sheets. The selective oxidation at the edges of the graphene sheet was confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman mapping measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TGA result of the oxidized graphite with different particle sizes showed a slight weight loss at approximately 350 degrees C (2.29% for the middle particles (35 microm)), which indicates thermal decomposition of the oxidized edge part. The Raman mapping measurement in the inner part of graphene sheets didn't detect any defects or translational symmetry breaking after the oxidation. The XPS data clearly showed that the total carbon atom content present as C--O, C==O, and O--C==C increased from 4.65 to 6.18% by the oxidation. Using the obtained edge-oxidized graphene as a starting material, various functionalizations of the edge structure are expected in the future. PMID:24734719

  18. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D.; Lissi, E.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions were studied with the aid of a mass spectrometer. A pinhole bleed system provided continuous sampling of the gas mixture in the cell during the reaction. It was found that the homogeneous reactions of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide with hydrogen peroxide are too slow to be of any significance in the upper atmosphere. However, the heterogeneous reactions may be important in the conversion of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide in the case of polluted urban atmospheres.

  19. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, September 8, 1992--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sun, Q.; Sarkany, J.

    1993-01-01

    Support effects on catalytic reactions, especially of highly exothermic oxidation reactions, can be very significant. Since we had shown that a MoO{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, especially when used in a double bed configuration with a Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, can selectively oxidize methane to formaldehyde, the role of the SiO{sub 2} support was investigated. Therefore, partial oxidation of methane by oxygen to form formaldehyde, carbon oxides, and C{sub 2} products (ethane and ethene) has been studied over silica catalyst supports (fumed Cabosil and Grace 636 silica gel) in the 630-780{degrees}C temperature range under ambient pressure. When relatively high gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) were utilized, the silica catalysts exhibit high space time yields (at low conversions) for methane partial oxidation to formaldehyde, and the C{sub 2} hydrocarbons were found to be parallel products with formaldehyde. In general, the selectivities toward CO were high while those toward CO{sub 2} were low. Based on the present results obtained by a double catalyst bed experiment, the observations of product composition dependence on the variation of GHSV (i.e. gas residence time), and differences in apparent activation energies of formation of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and CH{sub 2}O, a reaction mechanism is proposed for the activation of methane over the silica surface. This mechanism can explain the observed product distribution patterns (specifically the parallel formation of formaldehyde and C{sub 2} hydrocarbons).

  20. A thermodynamically consistent surface reaction mechanism for CO oxidation on Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Mhadeshwar, A.B.; Vlachos, D.G.

    2005-08-01

    The thermodynamic inconsistency of catalytic combustion reaction mechanisms has been a long-standing, fundamental, and practical problem. Here, we develop a thermodynamically consistent catalytic reaction mechanism for CO oxidation on Pt. First, we propose a modification of the bond index of the unity bond index-quadratic exponential potential (UBI-QEP) semiempirical framework for calculation of the activation energy of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type bimolecular surface reaction between co-adsorbed CO{sup *} and O{sup *}. Thermodynamic consistency is then ensured in the reaction mechanism by combining the semiempirical UBI-QEP theory, statistical mechanics, and constraint-based optimization against experimental data. Atmospheric pressure ignition and ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam experiments are selected as targets for optimization. The optimized mechanism is validated against redundant experiments, including temperature-programmed desorption, temperature-programmed reaction, and molecular beam experiments. Our microkinetic model is able to capture multiple types of data while being thermodynamically consistent over a wide range of conditions.

  1. Oxidation Reactions with Bioinspired Mononuclear Non-Heme Metal-Oxo Complexes.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Xenia; Monte-Pérez, Inés; Ray, Kallol

    2016-06-27

    The selective functionalization of strong C-H bonds and the oxidation of water by cheap and nontoxic metals are some of the key targets of chemical research today. It has been proposed that high-valent iron-, manganese-, and copper-oxo cores are involved as reactive intermediates in important oxidation reactions performed by biological systems, thus making them attractive targets for biomimetic synthetic studies. The generation and characterization of metal-oxo model complexes of iron, manganese, and copper together with detailed reactivity studies can help in understanding how the steric and electronic properties of the metal centers modulate the reactivity of the metalloenzymes. This Review provides a focused overview of the advances in the chemistry of biomimetic high-valent metal-oxo complexes from the last 5-10 years that can be related to our understanding of biological systems. PMID:27311082

  2. Utilisation of gold nanoparticles on amine-functionalised UiO-66 (NH2-UiO-66) nanocrystals for selective tandem catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Christopher S; Webb, William R; Chew, Benny K J; Tan, Hui Ru; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Hor, T S Andy; Raja, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal deposition of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) onto NH2-UiO-66 nanocrystals has been demonstrated with the resulting hybrid catalyst proving robust and versatile for one-pot, heterogeneous conversions involving the selective oxidation of primary alcohols in tandem with Knoevenagel condensation reactions. Within these systems, structure-property correlations have been established to confirm that the active sites for the oxidation and condensation reactions are intrinsically correlated with the Au NPs and pendant amine groups respectively. PMID:27104291

  3. Benzyl alcohol oxidation in supercritical carbon dioxide: spectroscopic insight into phase behaviour and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caravati, Matteo; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Baiker, Alfons

    2005-01-21

    Selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with molecular oxygen over an alumina-supported palladium catalyst was performed with high rate at about 95% selectivity in supercritical carbon dioxide. The experiments in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor showed that the pressure has a strong influence on the reaction rate. A marked increase of the rate (turnover frequency) from 900 h(-1) to 1800 h(-1) was observed when increasing the pressure from 140 to 150 bar. Video monitoring of the bulk fluid phase behavior and the simultaneous investigation by transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy at two positions of the view cell showed that the sharp increase in activity is correlated to a transition from a biphasic to a monophasic reaction mixture. In the single phase region, both oxygen and benzyl alcohol are dissolved in the supercritical CO2 phase, which leads to a reduction of the mass transport resistances (both in the external fluid film and in the catalyst pores) and thus to the high reaction rate measured in the catalytic experiments. The phase transition could be effectively and easily monitored by transmission and ATR-IR spectroscopy despite the small concentration of the dense liquid like phase. Deposition of the Pd/Al2O3 catalyst on the ATR-crystal at the bottom of the view cell allowed to gain insight into the chemical changes and mass transfer processes occurring in the solid/liquid interface region during reaction. Analyzing the shift of the upsilon2 bending mode of CO2 gave information on the fluid composition in and outside the catalyst pores. Moreover, the catalytic reaction could be investigated in situ in this spectroscopic batch reactor cell by monitoring simultaneously the reaction progress, the phase behaviour and the catalytic interface. PMID:19785149

  4. Nondestructive covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by selective oxidation of the original defects with K2FeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-yang; Xu, Xue-cheng

    2015-08-01

    Chemical oxidation is still the major approach to the covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Theoretically, the defects on CNTs are more reactive than skeletal hexagons and should be preferentially oxidized, but conventional oxidation methods, e.g., HNO3/H2SO4 treatment, have poor reaction selectivity and inevitably consume the Cdbnd C bonds in the hexagonal lattices, leading to structural damage, π-electrons loss and weight decrease. In this work, we realized the nondestructive covalent functionalization of CNTs by selective oxidation of the defects. In our method, potassium ferrate K2FeVIO4 was employed as an oxidant for CNTs in H2SO4 medium. The CNT samples, before and after K2FeO4/H2SO4 treatment, were characterized with colloid dispersibility, IR, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM and XPS. The results indicated that (i) CNTs could be effectively oxidized by Fe (VI) under mild condition (60 °C, 3 h), and hydrophilic CNTs with abundant surface sbnd COOH groups were produced; and (ii) Fe (VI) oxidation of CNTs followed a defect-specific oxidation process, that is, only the sp3-hybridized carbon atoms on CNT surface were oxidized while the Cdbnd C bonds remained unaffected. This selective/nondestructive oxidation afforded oxidized CNTs in yields of above 100 wt%. This paper shows that K2FeO4/H2SO4 is an effective, nondestructive and green oxidation system for oxidative functionalization of CNTs and probably other carbon materials as well.

  5. Protein Significance Analysis in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) Measurements*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Yun; Picotti, Paola; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Jovanovic, Marko; Aebersold, Ruedi; Vitek, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a targeted mass spectrometry technique that provides sensitive and accurate protein detection and quantification in complex biological mixtures. Statistical and computational tools are essential for the design and analysis of SRM experiments, particularly in studies with large sample throughput. Currently, most such tools focus on the selection of optimized transitions and on processing signals from SRM assays. Little attention is devoted to protein significance analysis, which combines the quantitative measurements for a protein across isotopic labels, peptides, charge states, transitions, samples, and conditions, and detects proteins that change in abundance between conditions while controlling the false discovery rate. We propose a statistical modeling framework for protein significance analysis. It is based on linear mixed-effects models and is applicable to most experimental designs for both isotope label-based and label-free SRM workflows. We illustrate the utility of the framework in two studies: one with a group comparison experimental design and the other with a time course experimental design. We further verify the accuracy of the framework in two controlled data sets, one from the NCI-CPTAC reproducibility investigation and the other from an in-house spike-in study. The proposed framework is sensitive and specific, produces accurate results in broad experimental circumstances, and helps to optimally design future SRM experiments. The statistical framework is implemented in an open-source R-based software package SRMstats, and can be used by researchers with a limited statistics background as a stand-alone tool or in integration with the existing computational pipelines. PMID:22190732

  6. Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry for Absolute Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Mann, Jessica M; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of target proteins within complex biological samples is critical to a wide range of research and clinical applications. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions for the development and application of quantitative assays using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry (MS). First, likely quantotypic target peptides are identified based on numerous criteria. This includes identifying proteotypic peptides, avoiding sites of posttranslational modification, and analyzing the uniqueness of the target peptide to the target protein. Next, crude external peptide standards are synthesized and used to develop SRM assays, and the resulting assays are used to perform qualitative analyses of the biological samples. Finally, purified, quantified, heavy isotope labeled internal peptide standards are prepared and used to perform isotope dilution series SRM assays. Analysis of all of the resulting MS data is presented. This protocol was used to accurately assay the absolute abundance of proteins of the chemotaxis signaling pathway within RAW 264.7 cells (a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line). The quantification of Gi2 (a heterotrimeric G-protein α-subunit) is described in detail. PMID:26325288

  7. Porcelain enamelled absorbers, coated by spectral selective tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, F.; Faber, A.J.; Hoogendoorn, C.J.

    1987-02-01

    The use of porcelain enamelled absorbers in flat plate collectors features longevity thanks to the durability and thermal stability of the enamel finish. The porcelain enamel can be made spectral selective by coating with doped tin oxide or indium oxide. The application procedure involves an enamelling step followed by a pyrosol process with tin or indium compounds. The optical properties of tin oxide coated enamel yield values of 0.90-0.92 absorptance and 0.13-0.18 hemispherical emittance. The temperature dependence of the emittance is very small. The thermal stability has been proved up to 400/sup 0/C in air.

  8. Deactivation of a mixed oxide catalyst of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O composition in the reaction of oxidative ethane dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishanin, I. I.; Kalenchuk, A. N.; Maslakov, K. I.; Lunin, V. V.; Koklin, A. E.; Finashina, E. D.; Bogdan, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    The operational stability of a mixed oxide catalyst of Mo-V-Te-Nb-O composition in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane (ratio of C2H6: O2 = 3: 1) is studied in a flow reactor at temperatures of 340-400°C, a pressure of 1 atm, and a WHSV of the feed mixture of 800 h-1. It is found that the selectivity toward ethylene is 98% at 340°C, but the conversion of ethane at this temperature is only 6%; when the temperature is raised to 400°C, the conversion of ethane is increased to 37%, while the selectivity toward ethylene is reduced to 85%. Using physical and chemical means (XPS, SEM), it is found that the lack of oxidant in the reaction mixture leads to irreversible changes in the catalyst, i.e., reduced selectivity and activity. Raising the reaction temperature to 400°C allows the reduction of tellurium by ethane, from the +6 oxidation state to the zerovalent state, with its subsequent sublimation and the destruction of the catalytically active and selective phase; in its characteristics, the catalyst becomes similar to the Mo-V-Nb-O system containing no tellurium.

  9. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  10. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  11. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C.; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications.Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2

  12. Niobium phosphates as new highly selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane.

    PubMed

    Weng, Weihao; Davies, Mathew; Whiting, Gareth; Solsona, Benjamin; Kiely, Christopher J; Carley, Albert F; Taylor, Stuart H

    2011-10-14

    Several niobium phosphate phases have been prepared, fully characterized and tested as catalysts for the selective oxidation of ethane to ethylene. Three distinct niobium phosphate catalysts were prepared, and each was comprised predominantly of a different bulk phase, namely Nb(2)P(4)O(15), NbOPO(4) and Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12). All of the niobium phosphate catalysts showed high selectivity towards ethylene, but the best catalyst was Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12), which was produced from the reduction of niobium oxide phosphate (NbOPO(4)) by hydrogen. It was particularly selective for ethylene, giving ca. 95% selectivity at 5% conversion, decreasing to ca. 90% at 15% conversion, and only produced low levels of carbon oxides. It was also determined that the only primary product from ethane oxidation over this catalyst was ethylene. Catalyst activity also increased with time-on-line, and this behaviour was ascribed to an increase of the concentration of the Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12) phase, as partially transformed NbOPO(4), formed during preparation, was converted to Nb(1.91)P(2.82)O(12) during use. Catalysts with predominant phases of Nb(2)P(4)O(15) and NbOPO(4) also showed appreciable activity and selectivities to ethylene with values around 75% and 85% respectively at 5% ethane conversion. The presence of phosphorous is required to achieve high ethylene selectivity, as orthorhombic and monoclinic Nb(2)O(5) catalysts showed similar activity, but displayed selectivities to ethylene that were <20% under the same reaction conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that niobium phosphates have been shown to be highly selective catalysts for the oxidation of ethane to ethylene, and demonstrates that they are worthy candidates for further study. PMID:21881631

  13. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10574 - Alkylcarboxy polyester acrylate reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... reaction products with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10574 Section 721.10574 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF...

  15. Reaction of CO2 with propylene oxide and styrene oxide catalyzed by a chromium(III) amine-bis(phenolate) complex.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca K; Devaine-Pressing, Katalin; Dawe, Louise N; Kozak, Christopher M

    2013-07-01

    A diamine-bis(phenolate) chromium(III) complex, {CrCl[O2NN'](BuBu)}2 catalyzes the copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The synthesis of this metal complex is straightforward and it can be obtained in high yields. This catalyst incorporates a tripodal amine-bis(phenolate) ligand, which differs from the salen or salan ligands typically used with Cr and Co complexes that have been employed as catalysts for the synthesis of such polycarbonates. The catalyst reported herein yields low molecular weight polymers with narrow polydispersities when the reaction is performed at room temperature. Performing the reaction at elevated temperatures causes the selective synthesis of propylene carbonate. The copolymerization activity for propylene oxide and carbon dioxide, as well as the coupling of carbon dioxide and styrene oxide to give styrene carbonate are presented. PMID:23192332

  16. Reactions and reactivity of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants: differential biological effects of hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acids.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2012-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is recognised to play important roles both in the immune system and during the development of numerous human pathologies. MPO is released by activated neutrophils, monocytes and some tissue macrophages, where it catalyses the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to hypohalous acids (HOX; X = Cl, Br, SCN) in the presence of halide and pseudo-halide ions. The major reactive species produced by MPO under physiological conditions are hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN), with the ratio of these oxidants critically dependent on the concentration of thiocyanate ions (SCN⁻). The reactivity and selectivity of HOCl and HOSCN for biological targets are markedly different, indicating that SCN⁻ ions have the potential to modulate both the extent and nature of oxidative damage in vivo. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the role of SCN⁻ in modulating the formation of MPO-derived oxidants, particularly in respect to the differences in reaction kinetics and targets of HOCl compared to HOSCN and the ability of these two oxidants to induce damage in biological systems. PMID:22348603

  17. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  18. Surface Reactions of Uranium Oxide Powder, Thin Films and Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Idriss, H.

    2010-01-01

    The review deals with surface reactions of the complex uranium oxide systems with relevance to catalysis and the environment. After a brief introduction on the properties of uranium oxides, the focus of the review is on surface science studies of defined structures of uranium oxides which are entirely on UO{sub 2} because of the lack of available model on other uranium oxide systems. Powder work is also included as it has given considerable information related to the dynamics between the many phases of uranium oxides. Many chemical reactions are mapped and these include water dissociative adsorption and reaction, CO oxidation and reductive coupling, as well as the reaction of oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids in addition to a few examples of sulfur and nitrogen containing compounds.

  19. Surface reactions of uranium oxide powder, thin films and single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idriss, H.

    2010-03-01

    The review deals with surface reactions of the complex uranium oxide systems with relevance to catalysis and the environment. After a brief introduction on the properties of uranium oxides, the focus of the review is on surface science studies of defined structures of uranium oxides which are entirely on UO 2 because of the lack of available model on other uranium oxide systems. Powder work is also included as it has given considerable information related to the dynamics between the many phases of uranium oxides. Many chemical reactions are mapped and these include water dissociative adsorption and reaction, CO oxidation and reductive coupling, as well as the reaction of oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids in addition to a few examples of sulfur and nitrogen containing compounds.

  20. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, wemore » show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.« less

  1. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A.; Norskov, Jens K.

    2015-10-08

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e– water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e– oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. Furthermore, we present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  2. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Canlas, Christian P; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W; Winans, Randall E; Van Duyne, Richard P; Stair, Peter C; Notestein, Justin M

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al(2)O(3) (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with 'nanocavities' (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO(2) photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations. PMID:23174984

  3. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canlas, Christian P.; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A.; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A.; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.; van Duyne, Richard P.; Stair, Peter C.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al2O3 (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with ‘nanocavities’ (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO2 photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations.

  4. Computational explorations of mechanisms and ligand-directed selectivities of copper-catalyzed Ullmann-type reactions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gavin O; Liu, Peng; Houk, K N; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2010-05-01

    Computational investigations of ligand-directed selectivities in Ullmann-type coupling reactions of methanol and methylamine with iodobenzene by beta-diketone- and 1,10-phenanthroline-ligated Cu(I) complexes are reported. Density functional theory calculations using several functionals were performed on both the nucleophile formation and aryl halide activation steps of these reactions. The origin of ligand-directed selectivities in N- versus O-arylation reactions as described in a previous publication (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 3490-3491) were studied and explained. The selectivities observed experimentally are derived not from initial Cu(I)(nucleophile) complex formation but from the subsequent steps involving aryl halide activation. The arylation may occur via single-electron transfer (SET) or iodine atom transfer (IAT), depending on the electron-donating abilities of the ligand and nucleophile. Mechanisms involving either oxidative addition/reductive elimination or sigma-bond metathesis are disfavored. SET mechanisms are favored in reactions promoted by the beta-diketone ligand; N-arylation is predicted to be favored in these cases, in agreement with experimental results. The phenanthroline ligand promotes O-arylation reactions via IAT mechanisms in preference to N-arylation reactions, which occur via SET mechanisms; this result is also in agreement with experimental results. PMID:20387898

  5. NITROGEN OXIDES REACTIONS WITHIN URBAN PLUMES TRANSPORTED OVER THE OCEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an airborne measurements program in the downwind urban plume of Boston. The variables measured included ozone, nitric oxide, oxides of nitrogen, nitric acid, peroxyacetylnitrate, carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbon, freon-11, C1-C5 hydrocarbons, condensat...

  6. Fabrication and performance of selectively oxidized vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Lear, K.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Geib, K.M.; Figiel, J.J.; Hull, R.

    1995-11-01

    The authors report the high yield fabrication and reproducible performance of selectivity oxidized vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers. They show that liner oxidation rates of AlGaAs without an induction period allows reproducible fabrication of buried oxide current apertures within monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. The oxide layers do not induce obvious crystalline defects, and continuous wave operation in excess of 650 h has been obtained. The high yield fabrication enables relatively high laser performance over a wide wavelength span. They observe submilliamp threshold currents over a wavelength range of up to 75 nm, and power conversion efficiencies at 1 mW output power of greater than 20% over a 50-nm wavelength range.

  7. Oxidation of diesel-generated volatile organic compounds in the selective catalytic reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Koebel, M.; Elsener, M.

    1998-10-01

    The main part of the VOCs (volatile organic compounds) contained in diesel exhaust ({approx}80%) is oxidized to CO and CO{sub 2} over an SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst. CO is the major product of this oxidation, representing about 50--70% of the formed products (CO + CO{sub 2}). This preferential formation of CO leads to a pronounced increase of CO emissions when an SCR process is added to a diesel engine. A small fraction of the VOCs is selectively oxidized to carboxylic acids over the SCR catalyst. This selectivity is due to the acidic properties of the catalyst causing the preferential desorption at the oxidation state of the acid. The main products of these oxidation reactions are the lower monocarboxylic acids and some dicarboxylic acids forming stable anhydrides, especially maleic and phthalic acid. The highest emissions of these acids are found at low temperatures; they decrease at higher temperatures. Formic acid is preferentially decomposed into carbon monoxide and water. It must therefore be assumed that the strong increase of CO mentioned above is due to a mechanism involving the thermal decomposition of formic acid formed from various primary VOCs.

  8. Quantitation of Four Guanine Oxidation Products from Reaction of DNA with Varying Doses of Peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongbin; Venkatarangan, Lata; Wishnok, John S.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation products obtained from the reaction of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) with dG include - among others - 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), 2,2-diamino-4[(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentafuranosyl)amino]-5(2H)-oxazolone (oxazolone), spiroiminodihydantoin and N1-(β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-5-guanidinohydantoin (guanidinohydantoin). In the present work, the formation of these products from the treatment of calf thymus DNA with varying amounts of ONOO− was studied quantitatively in vitro. 13C-, 15N-labeled standards were synthesized for the nucleosides of interest, and calf thymus DNA was reacted with ONOO− and digested enzymatically down to the nucleoside level. Specific modifications in the DNA were measured by HPLC separation followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric analysis in the selected reaction-monitoring mode. Artifacts of the above four oxidation products, arising from oxidation of dG and/or 8-oxodG during DNA digestion and subsequent work-up, were evaluated with 7-15N-dG and/or stable-isotope labeled 8-oxodG as internal standards. Levels of artifactual 8-oxodG were about 5/106 nucleosides. The artifacts of spiroiminodihydantoin and guanidinohydantoin, arising from 8-oxodG, were 3.7% and 0.6% of the measured 8-oxodG values, respectively. No artifacts of oxazolone were detected. 8-OxodG and oxazolone were formed dose-dependently in DNA treated with ONOO−, while the levels of spiroiminodihydantoin and guanidinohydantoin increased significantly at low ONOO− doses, and then dropped off at higher ONOO− doses. The complexity of these dose-response relationships is likely due to the dual role of peroxynitrite as both an oxidant and a nucleophile in competition with water. PMID:16359175

  9. Palladium and gold nanotubes as oxygen reduction reaction and alcohol oxidation reaction catalysts in base.

    PubMed

    Alia, Shaun M; Duong, Kathlynne; Liu, Toby; Jensen, Kurt; Yan, Yushan

    2014-06-01

    Palladium (PdNTs) and gold nanotubes (AuNTs) were synthesized by the galvanic displacement of silver nanowires. PdNTs and AuNTs have wall thicknesses of 6 nm, outer diameters of 60 nm, and lengths of 5-10 and 5-20 μm, respectively. Rotating disk electrode experiments showed that the PdNTs and AuNTs have higher area normalized activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) than conventional nanoparticle catalysts. The PdNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 3.4, 2.2, and 3.7 times greater than that on carbon-supported palladium nanoparticles (Pd/C), bulk polycrystalline palladium, and carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C), respectively. The AuNTs produced an ORR area activity that was 2.3, 9.0, and 2.0 times greater than that on carbon-supported gold nanoparticles (Au/C), bulk polycrystalline gold, and Pt/C, respectively. The PdNTs also had lower onset potentials than Pd/C and Pt/C for the oxidation of methanol (0.236 V), ethanol (0.215 V), and ethylene glycol (0.251 V). In comparison to Pt/C, the PdNTs and AuNTs further demonstrated improved alcohol tolerance during the ORR. PMID:24757078

  10. Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension.

    PubMed

    Che, Hyeongsu; Lee, Woojin

    2011-02-01

    Selective redox degradation of chlorinated aliphatics by Fenton reaction in pyrite suspension was investigated in a closed system. Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was used as a representative target of perchlorinated alkanes and trichloroethylene (TCE) was used as one of highly chlorinated alkenes. Degradation of CT in Fenton reaction was significantly enhanced by pyrite used as an iron source instead of soluble Fe. Pyrite Fenton showed 93% of CT removal in 140 min, while Fenton reaction with soluble Fe(II) showed 52% and that with Fe(III) 15%. Addition of 2-propanol to the pyrite Fenton system significantly inhibited degradation of TCE (99% to 44% of TCE removal), while degradation of CT was slightly improved by the 2-propanol addition (80-91% of CT removal). The result suggests that, unlike oxidative degradation of TCE by hydroxyl radical in pyrite Fenton system, an oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is not a main degradation mechanism for the degradation of CT in pyrite Fenton system but a reductive dechlorination by superoxide can rather be the one for the CT degradation. The degradation kinetics of CT in the pyrite Fenton system was decelerated (0.13-0.03 min(-1)), as initial suspension pH decreased from 3 to 2. The formation of superoxide during the CT degradation in the pyrite Fenton system was observed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The formation at initial pH 3 was greater than that at initial pH 2, which supported that superoxide was a main reductant for degradation of CT in the pyrite Fenton system. PMID:21186044

  11. Selective oxidation of enzyme extracts for improved quantification of peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu; Penner, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    Natural components endogenous to plant material extracts often interfere with traditional peroxidase assays by reducing the oxidized product generated as a result of the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. This leads to an underestimation of peroxidase activity when the oxidized product provides the signal for enzyme activity quantification. This article describes a relatively simple way to alleviate complications arising due to the presence of such confounding compounds. The method is based on using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as the reducing substrate. The oxidized product of the reaction is ABTS(+), the accumulation of which can be followed spectrophotometrically. It is shown here that one can selectively inactivate the endogenous compounds that confound the peroxidase assay by treating the enzyme preparation with the oxidized product itself, ABTS(+), prior to initiating the quantification assay. This approach is selective for those compounds likely to interfere with peroxidase quantification. The presented method is shown to alleviate the complications associated with lag phases typical of plant extract peroxidase assays and, thus, to more accurately reflect total peroxidase activity. The presented assay is expected to be applicable to the wide range of biological systems for which the determination of peroxidase activity is desired. PMID:25640588

  12. Selective enrichment and desalting of hydrophilic peptides using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Qi, Linyu; Liu, Peiru; Wang, Zijun; Duan, Zhigui; Wang, Ying; Liu, Zhonghua; Chen, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The wide variety and low abundance of peptides in tissue brought great difficulties to the separation and identification of peptides, which is not in favor of the development of peptidomics. RP-HPLC, which could purify small molecules based on their hydrophobicity, has been widely used in the separation and enrichment of peptide due to its fast, good reproducibility and high resolution. However, RP-HPLC requires the instrument and expensive C18 column and its sample capacity is also limited. Recently, graphene oxide has been applied to the adsorption of amino acids. However, the enrichment efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide for peptides remain unclear. In this study, the adsorption efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide and RP-C18 matrix were compared on trypsinized α-actin and also on tissue extracts from pituitary gland and hippocampus. For α-actin, there exhibit similar elution peaks for total trypsinized products and those adsorpted by GO and C18 matrix. But peptides adsorbed by GO showed the higher hydrophilic peaks than which adsorbed by C18 matrix. The resulted RP-HPLC profile showed that most of peptides enriched by graphene oxide were eluted at low concentration of organic solvent, while peptides adsorbed by RP-C18 matrix were mostly eluted at relatively high concentration. Moreover, mass spectrometry analysis suggested that, in pituitary sample, there were 495 peptides enriched by graphene oxide, 447 peptides enriched by RP-C18 matrix while in hippocampus sample 333 and 243 peptides respectively. The GRAVY value analysis suggested that the graphene oxide has a stronger adsorption for highly hydrophilic peptides compared to the RP-C18 matrix. Furthermore, the combination of these two methods could notably increase the number of identification peptides but also the number of predicted protein precursors. Our study provided a new thought to the role of graphene oxide during the enrichment of peptides from tissue which should be useful for

  13. The detection for hypochlorite by UV-Vis and fluorescent spectra based on oxidized ring opening and successive hydrolysis reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Kangming; Yin, Caixia; Chao, Jianbin; Zhang, Yongbin; Huo, Fangjun

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two high selective and sensitive fluorescent probes for ClO-, 7-Hydroxycoumarin and 4-Hydroxycoumarin were designed. The reaction mechanism that we speculated was the oxidized ring opening reaction and hydrolysis. The detection could be realized in quasi-aqueous phase and the detection limits of probe [7] and probe [4] for ClO- were found to be 56.8 nM and 70.5 nM. Furthermore, the probes can be used to cell imagings.

  14. The detection for hypochlorite by UV-Vis and fluorescent spectra based on oxidized ring opening and successive hydrolysis reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kangming; Yin, Caixia; Chao, Jianbin; Zhang, Yongbin; Huo, Fangjun

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two high selective and sensitive fluorescent probes for ClO(-), 7-Hydroxycoumarin and 4-Hydroxycoumarin were designed. The reaction mechanism that we speculated was the oxidized ring opening reaction and hydrolysis. The detection could be realized in quasi-aqueous phase and the detection limits of probe [7] and probe [4] for ClO(-) were found to be 56.8nM and 70.5nM. Furthermore, the probes can be used to cell imagings. PMID:27214272

  15. High-temperature oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. T.; Singh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics was investigated in the temperature range of 1100 to 1400 C. The oxidation weight change was recorded by TGA; the oxidized materials were examined by light and electron microscopy, and the oxidation product by x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The materials exhibited initial weight loss, followed by passive weight gain (with enhanced parabolic rates, k(sub p)), and ending with a negative (logarithmic) deviation from the parabolic law. The weight loss arose from the oxidation of residual carbon, and the enhanced k(sub p) values from internal oxidation and the oxidation of residual silicon, while the logarithmic kinetics is thought to have resulted from crystallization of the oxide. The presence of a small amount of MoSi, in the RFSC material caused a further increase in the oxidation rate. The only solid oxidation product for all temperatures studied was silica.

  16. Aerobic oxidation reactions catalyzed by vanadium complexes of bis(phenolate) ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqi; Scott, Brian L; Wu, Ruilian; Silks, L A Pete; Hanson, Susan K

    2012-07-01

    Vanadium(V) complexes of the tridentate bis(phenolate)pyridine ligand H(2)BPP (H(2)BPP = 2,6-(HOC(6)H(2)-2,4-(t)Bu(2))(2)NC(5)H(3)) and the bis(phenolate)amine ligand H(2)BPA (H(2)BPA = N,N-bis(2-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylbenzyl)propylamine) have been synthesized and characterized. The ability of the complexes to mediate the oxidative C-C bond cleavage of pinacol was tested. Reaction of the complex (BPP)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (4) with pinacol afforded the monomeric vanadium(IV) product (BPP)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr) (6) and acetone. Vanadium(IV) complex 6 was oxidized rapidly by air at room temperature in the presence of NEt(3), yielding the vanadium(V) cis-dioxo complex [(BPP)V(V)(O)(2)]HNEt(3). Complex (BPA)V(V)(O)(O(i)Pr) (5) reacted with pinacol at room temperature, to afford acetone and the vanadium(IV) dimer [(BPA)V(IV)(O)(HO(i)Pr)](2). Complexes 4 and 5 were evaluated as catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol and arylglycerol β-aryl ether lignin model compounds. Although both 4 and 5 catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol, complex 4 was found to be a more active and robust catalyst for oxidation of the lignin model compounds. The catalytic activities and selectivities of the bis(phenolate) complexes are compared to previously reported catalysts. PMID:22708725

  17. Thermochemistry and reaction paths in the oxidation reaction of benzoyl radical: C6H5C•(═O).

    PubMed

    Sebbar, Nadia; Bozzelli, Joseph W; Bockhorn, Henning

    2011-10-27

    Alkyl substituted aromatics are present in fuels and in the environment because they are major intermediates in the oxidation or combustion of gasoline, jet, and other engine fuels. The major reaction pathways for oxidation of this class of molecules is through loss of a benzyl hydrogen atom on the alkyl group via abstraction reactions. One of the major intermediates in the combustion and atmospheric oxidation of the benzyl radicals is benzaldehyde, which rapidly loses the weakly bound aldehydic hydrogen to form a resonance stabilized benzoyl radical (C6H5C(•)═O). A detailed study of the thermochemistry of intermediates and the oxidation reaction paths of the benzoyl radical with dioxygen is presented in this study. Structures and enthalpies of formation for important stable species, intermediate radicals, and transition state structures resulting from the benzoyl radical +O2 association reaction are reported along with reaction paths and barriers. Enthalpies, ΔfH298(0), are calculated using ab initio (G3MP2B3) and density functional (DFT at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p)) calculations, group additivity (GA), and literature data. Bond energies on the benzoyl and benzoyl-peroxy systems are also reported and compared to hydrocarbon systems. The reaction of benzoyl with O2 has a number of low energy reaction channels that are not currently considered in either atmospheric chemistry or combustion models. The reaction paths include exothermic, chain branching reactions to a number of unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates along with formation of CO2. The initial reaction of the C6H5C(•)═O radical with O2 forms a chemically activated benzoyl peroxy radical with 37 kcal mol(-1) internal energy; this is significantly more energy than the 21 kcal mol(-1) involved in the benzyl or allyl + O2 systems. This deeper well results in a number of chemical activation reaction paths, leading to highly exothermic reactions to phenoxy radical + CO2 products. PMID:21942384

  18. Ruthenium-Immobilized Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica: Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Application for Selective Oxidation of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ishito, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2015-10-26

    Periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) is a unique material that has a crystal-like wall structure with coordination sites for metal complexes. A Ru complex, [RuCl2 (CO)3 ]2 , is successfully immobilized onto 2,2'-bipyridine (BPy) units of PMO to form a single-site catalyst, which has been confirmed by various physicochemical analyses. Using NaClO as an oxidant, the Ru-immobilized PMO oxidizes the tertiary C-H bonds of adamantane to the corresponding alcohols at 57 times faster than the secondary C-H bonds, thereby exhibiting remarkably high regioselectivity. Moreover, the catalyst converts cis-decalin to cis-9-decalol in a 63 % yield with complete retention of the substrate stereochemistry. The Ru catalyst can be separated by simple filtration and reused without loss of the original activity and selectivity for the oxidation reactions. PMID:26330333

  19. The technology and applications of selective oxidation of AlGaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hou, H.Q.; Mathes, D.; Hull, R.

    1998-08-01

    Wet oxidation of AlGaAs alloys, pioneered at the University of Illinois a decade ago, recently has been used to fabricate high performance vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). The superior properties of oxide-confined VCSELs has stimulated interest in understanding the fundamental of wet oxidation. The authors briefly review the technology of selective oxidation of III-V alloys, including the oxide microstructure and oxidation processing as well as describe its application to selectively oxidized VCSELs.

  20. Microporous polyurethane material for size selective heterogeneous catalysis of the Knoevenagel reaction.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sandeep Kumar; de Sousa Amadeu, Nader; Janiak, Christoph

    2016-06-14

    The first polyurethane material which is microporous (BET surface area of 312 m(2) g(-1)) is prepared by solvothermal synthesis and acts as highly efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst in the Knoevenagel condensation showing size selectivity, and in the Henry reaction showing substrate selectivity under mild reaction conditions. PMID:27240738

  1. Sporicidal effects of iodine-oxide thermite reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rod; Bless, Stephan; Blinkova, Alexandra; Chen, Tiffany

    2012-03-01

    Iodine pentoxide-aluminum thermite reactions have been driven by impacts at 1000 m/s on steel plates 3 mm or thicker. This reaction releases iodine gas that is known to be a sporicide. To test the impact reactions for sporicidal effects, reactions took place in closed chambers containing dried Bacillus subtilis spores. The reduction in colony-forming units was dependent on the exposure time; long exposure times resulted in a 105 decrease in germination rate. This was shown to be due to the gas exposure rather than the heat or turbulence. Sporicidal effectiveness was increased by adding neodymium and saran resin.

  2. Manganese Triazacyclononane Oxidation Catalysts Grafted under Reaction Conditions on Solid Co-Catalytic Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeldt, Nicholas J.; Ni, Zhenjuan; Korinda, Andrew W.; Meyer, Randall J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-01-23

    Manganese complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tmtacn) are highly active and selective alkene oxidation catalysts with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Here, carboxylic acid-functionalized SiO{sub 2} simultaneously immobilizes and activates these complexes under oxidation reaction conditions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the functionalized support are both necessary to transform the inactive [(tmtacn)Mn{sup IV}({mu}-O)3Mn{sup IV}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+} into the active, dicarboxylate-bridged [(tmtacn)Mn{sup III}({mu}-O)({mu}-RCOO){sub 2}Mn{sup III}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+}. This transformation is assigned on the basis of comparison of diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra to known soluble models, assignment of oxidation state by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, the dependence of rates on the acid/Mn ratios, and comparison of the surface structures derived from density functional theory with extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Productivity in cis-cyclooctene oxidation to epoxide and cis-diol with 2-10 equiv of solid cocatalytic supports is superior to that obtained with analogous soluble valeric acid cocatalysts, which require 1000-fold excess to reach similar levels at comparable times. Cyclooctene oxidation rates are near first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and near zero order in all other species, including H{sub 2}O. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of substrate oxidation following rate-limiting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation on the hydrated, supported complex. This general mechanism and the observed alkene oxidation activation energy of 38 {+-} 6 kJ/mol are comparable to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation by related soluble catalysts. Undesired decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a limiting factor for these solid catalysts, and as such, productivity remains high up to 25 C and initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.5 M, increasing reactor throughput. These results show that immobilized carboxylic acids can be utilized and understood

  3. Compound I reactivity defines alkene oxidation selectivity in cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Richard; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2010-01-21

    Prediction of the chemoselectivity of drug oxidation by the human cytochrome P450 enzymes will aid in the avoidance of adverse drug reactions. The chemoselectivity of alkene oxidation is an important problem to address, as it can result in the formation of epoxides, which can have toxic effects. In this paper the epoxidation and hydroxylation of cyclohexene and propene by the bacterial P450(cam) isoform are modeled with hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods. Snapshots for QM/MM modeling are chosen from molecular dynamics trajectories, to sample the different conformations of the enzyme-substrate complex. The energy barriers obtained for these processes are in qualitative agreement with experimental work, supporting the use of QM/MM methods in the study of selectivity for this class of enzyme. This work highlights the complexity involved in modeling these systems with QM/MM and the importance in the selection of starting geometries. PMID:20014756

  4. Knocking on wood: base metal complexes as catalysts for selective oxidation of lignin models and extracts.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Susan K; Baker, R Tom

    2015-07-21

    This work began as part of a biomass conversion catalysis project with UC Santa Barbara funded by the first NSF Chemical Bonding Center, CATSB. Recognizing that catalytic aerobic oxidation of diol C-C bonds could potentially be used to break down lignocellulose, we began to synthesize oxovanadium complexes and explore their fundamental reactivity. Of course there were theories regarding the oxidation mechanism, but our mechanistic studies soon revealed a number of surprises of the type that keep all chemists coming back to the bench! We realized that these reactions were also exciting in that they actually used the oxygen-on-every-carbon property of biomass-derived molecules to control the selectivity of the oxidation. When we found that these oxovanadium complexes tended to convert sugars predominantly to formic acid and carbon dioxide, we replaced one of the OH groups with an ether and entered the dark world of lignin chemistry. In this Account, we summarize results from our collaboration and from our individual labs. In particular, we show that oxidation selectivity (C-C vs C-O bond cleavage) of lignin models using air and vanadium complexes depends on the ancillary ligands, the reaction solvent, and the substrate structure (i.e., phenolic vs non-phenolic). Selected vanadium complexes in the presence of added base serve as effective alcohol oxidation catalysts via a novel base-assisted dehydrogenation pathway. In contrast, copper catalysts effect direct C-C bond cleavage of these lignin models, presumably through a radical pathway. The most active vanadium catalyst exhibits unique activity for the depolymerization of organosolv lignin. After Weckhuysen's excellent 2010 review on lignin valorization, the number of catalysis studies and approaches on both lignin models and extracts has expanded rapidly. Today we are seeing new start-ups and lignin production facilities sprouting up across the globe as we all work to prove wrong the old pulp and paper chemist

  5. The synthesis of a bifunctional copper metal organic framework and its application in the aerobic oxidation/Knoevenagel condensation sequential reaction.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zongcheng; Luan, Yi; Qi, Chao; Ramella, Daniele

    2016-09-21

    A novel one-pot aerobic oxidation/Knoevenagel condensation reaction system was developed employing a Cu(ii)/amine bifunctional, basic metal-organic framework (MOF) as the catalyst. The sequential aerobic alcohol oxidation/Knoevenagel condensation reaction was efficiently promoted by the Cu3TATAT MOF catalyst in the absence of basic additives. The benzylidenemalononitrile product was produced in high yield and selectivity from an inexpensive benzyl alcohol starting material under an oxygen atmosphere. The role of the basic functionality was studied to demonstrate its role in the aerobic oxidation and Knoevenagel condensation reactions. The reaction progress was monitored in order to identify the reaction intermediate and follow the accumulation of the desired product. Lastly, results showed that the yield was not significantly compromised by the reuse of a batch of catalyst, even after more than five cycles. PMID:27523776

  6. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  7. Influence of Alumina Reaction Tube Impurities on the Oxidation of Chemically-Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    Pure coupons of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were oxidized for 100 h in dry flowing oxygen at 1300 C. The oxidation kinetics were monitored using thermogravimetry (TGA). The experiments were first performed using high-purity alumina reaction tubes. The experiments were then repeated using fused quartz reaction tubes. Differences in oxidation kinetics, scale composition, and scale morphology were observed. These differences were attributed to impurities in the alumina tubes. Investigators interested in high-temperature oxidation of silica formers should be aware that high-purity alumina can have significant effects on experiment results.

  8. Influence of a reaction medium on the oxidation of aromatic nitrogen-containing compounds by peroxyacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, V. S.; Matsyuk, N. V.; Dutka, Yu. V.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of different solvents on the oxidation reaction rate of pyridine (Py), quinoline (QN), acridine (AN), α-oxyquinoline (OQN) and α-picolinic acid (APA) by peroxydecanoic acid (PDA) was studied. It was found that the oxidation rate grows in the series Py < QN < AN, and the rate of the oxidation reaction of compounds containing a substituent in the α position from a reactive center is significantly lower than for unsubstituted analogues. The effective energies of activation of the oxidation reaction were found. It was shown that in the first stage, the reaction mechanism includes the rapid formation of an intermediate complex nitrogen-containing compound, peroxyacid, which forms products upon decomposing in the second stage. A kinetic equation that describes the studied process is offered. The constants of equilibrium of the intermediate complex formation ( K eq) and its decomposition constant ( k 2) in acetone and benzene were calculated. It was shown that the nature of the solvent influences the numerical values of both K p and k 2. It was established that introduction of acetic acid (which is able to form compounds with Py) into the reaction medium slows the rate of the oxidation process drastically. Correlation equations linking the polarity, polarizability, electrophilicity, and basicity of solvents with the constant of the PDA oxidation reaction rate for Py were found. It was concluded that the basicity and polarity of the solvent have a decisive influence on the oxidation reaction rate, while the polarizability and electrophilicity of the reaction medium do not influence the oxidation reaction rate.

  9. Comparative temporal analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotube oxidation reactions: Evaluating chemical modifications on true nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Flávia G.; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Gorgulho, Honória F.; Santos, Adelina P.; Macedo, Waldemar A. A.; Furtado, Clascídia A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of extensive purification on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube surface composition was studied through the characterization and differentiation of the actual surface submitted to three oxidation methods: microwave-assisted acid oxidation, hydrogen peroxide reflux, and Fenton reaction. The oxidized samples were purified by a multi-step procedure including the sequential use of basic reflux and dispersion in dimethylformamide (DMF). The results showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidation debris with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction times longer than 8 h and strong surface characteristic modification. With regard to sample purification, basic reflux led to a reduction in oxygenated group concentration of only 10% in the samples treated by acid oxidation. On the other hand, the subsequent use of DMF led to a further decrease in concentration of 39%, proving to be a more efficient method for the removal of oxidation debris.

  10. Thermal oxidative degradation reactions of linear perfluoroalky lethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Paciorek, K. J. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal and thermal oxidative stability studies were performed on linear perfluoro alkyl ether fluids. The effect on degradation by metal catalysts and degradation inhibitors are reported. The liner perfluoro alkylethers are inherently unstable at 316 C in an oxidizing atmosphere. The metal catalysts greatly increased the rate of degradation in oxidizing atmospheres. In the presence of these metals in an oxidizing atmosphere, the degradation inhibitors were highly effective in arresting degradation at 288 C. However, the inhibitors had only limited effectiveness at 316 C. The metals promote degradation by chain scission. Based on elemental analysis and oxygen consumption data, the linear perfluoro alkylether fluids have a structural arrangement based on difluoroformyl and tetrafluoroethylene oxide units, with the former predominating.