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Sample records for selective reflection spectroscopy

  1. [Rapid selection of white clover germplasms' crude protein traits by SPAD and Fourier transform near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Yan, Rong; Cao, Wen-juan; Shu, Bin; Zhang, Ying-jun

    2009-09-01

    White clover is one of the most important forages in the world, with high nutritive value and crude protein content. Crude protein traits of white clover germplasms was selected using SPAD and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The SPAD value was measured by Chlorophyll Meter SPAD-502, and was used to evaluate the crude protein of white clover. In the vegetative period, there was a positive relationship between SPAD value and foliar protein content (y = 0.422x + 4.984, R2 = 0.737), but in the flowering period, there was a negative relationship between the two indexes (y = -0.345x + 37.50, R2 = 0.711). Crude protein content of white clover germplasms was predicted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy with PLS regression and the model was validated by cross validation and external validation. The results showed that the correlation coefficient of cross validation, the RMSECV, and the correlation coefficient of external validation are 0.904, 0.988%, and 0.987, respectively. NIRS model of white clover crude protein content has good accuracy and precision. FT-NIRS was more accurate than SPAD. NIRS is feasible as a rapid analysis method, and can be used in the selection and breeding of white clover germplasms to improve the breeding efficiency. PMID:19950635

  2. Electronic and optical properties of selected polymers studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Tougaard, Sven

    2012-03-01

    We have determined the electronic and optical properties of six polymers: Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyester (PET), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyamide (PA6) for energy losses from 0 to 70 eV by analysis of reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. We found that the surface was easily damaged by the incident electron beam, in particular for energies above 500 eV. The damage results in new peaks in the bandgap region and the polymers become metallic. Great care was exerted to determine experimental conditions under which these effects are minimized. The REELS spectra were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons with the QUASES-XS-REELS software to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross sections. From these cross sections, we found that the band gaps for PMMA, PE, PVC, PET, PPY, and PA6 are 5.0 eV, 7.5 eV, 7.0 eV, 3.0 eV, 3.5 eV, and 5.1 eV, respectively. Quantitative analysis of the experimental cross sections was carried out by using the QUEELS-ɛ(k,ω)-REELS software to determine the dielectric function and optical properties. This is done by comparing the experimental REELS inelastic electron-scattering cross-section with a simulated cross section in which the only input is Im(-1/ɛ). The dielectric function is expressed as a sum of oscillators and the oscillator parameters are determined. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross section is achieved for all polymers. From Im(-1/ɛ), the real and imaginary parts of ɛ (ω), the refractive index, and the extinction coefficient were determined for all polymers in the energy range ћω = 0 to 70 eV. An oscillator is clearly observed for PPY, PET, and PA6 at ˜ 6.7 eV, which corresponds to the π plasmon. This oscillator is not found for PMMA, PE, and PVC. A set of oscillators in the 20-30 eV energy range corresponding to the σ+π plasmon is found for all polymers.

  3. In situ Studies of Soft- and Reactive Landing of Mass-Selected Ions Using Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qichi; Wang, Peng; Gassman, Paul L.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-09-01

    Grazing incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) for in situ and in real time characterization of substrates modified by soft- and reactive landing (SL and RL) of complex ions was implemented on a mass-selected ion deposition instrument. Ions produced by electrospray ionization were mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and deposited onto inert and reactive self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Surface composition during and after ion deposition was monitored using IRRAS. Physisorption of a cyclic peptide, Garmicidin S (GS), was studied for 8 hrs during deposition and additional 12 hrs after the end of deposition. The integrated signal of the characteristic amide bands followed a linear increase during the deposition and stayed unchanged after the deposition was finished. Similar linear increase in IRRAS signal was obtained following reactive deposition of the protonated dodecanediamine onto SAMs of dithiobis (succinimidyl undecanoate) (NHS-SAM) and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid fluoride (COF-SAM) on gold. IRRAS allowed us to monitor for the first time the formation of the amide bond between reactive SAM surfaces and the projectile molecule.

  4. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  5. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  6. Green method by diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy and spectral region selection for the quantification of sulphamethoxazole and trimethoprim in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fabiana E B da; Flores, Érico M M; Parisotto, Graciele; Müller, Edson I; Ferrão, Marco F

    2016-03-01

    An alternative method for the quantification of sulphametoxazole (SMZ) and trimethoprim (TMP) using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and partial least square regression (PLS) was developed. Interval Partial Least Square (iPLS) and Synergy Partial Least Square (siPLS) were applied to select a spectral range that provided the lowest prediction error in comparison to the full-spectrum model. Fifteen commercial tablet formulations and forty-nine synthetic samples were used. The ranges of concentration considered were 400 to 900 mg g-1SMZ and 80 to 240 mg g-1 TMP. Spectral data were recorded between 600 and 4000 cm-1 with a 4 cm-1 resolution by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The proposed procedure was compared to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results obtained from the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), during the validation of the models for samples of sulphamethoxazole (SMZ) and trimethoprim (TMP) using siPLS, demonstrate that this approach is a valid technique for use in quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations. The selected interval algorithm allowed building regression models with minor errors when compared to the full spectrum PLS model. A RMSEP of 13.03 mg g-1for SMZ and 4.88 mg g-1 for TMP was obtained after the selection the best spectral regions by siPLS. PMID:26959321

  7. Reflection spectroscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Haugen, Olav A.; Barkost, Marianne; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2006-03-01

    Heart disease is the primary cause of death in the western world. Many of these deaths are caused by the rupture of vulnerable plaque. Vulnerable plaques are characterized by a large lipid core covered by a thin fibrous cap. One method for detecting these plaques is reflection spectroscopy. Several studies have investigated this method using statistical methods. A more analytic and quantitative study might yield more insight into the sensitivity of this detection modality. This is the approach taken in this work. Reflectance spectra in the spectral region from 400 to 1700 nm are collected from 77 measurement points from 23 human aortas. A measure of lipid content in a plaque based on reflection spectra is presented. The measure of lipid content is compared with the thickness of the lipid core, determined from histology. Defining vulnerable plaque as having a lipid core >500 µm and fibrous cap <500 µm, vulnerable plaques are detected with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 94%. Although the method can detect lipid content, it is not very sensitive to the thickness of the fibrous cap. Another detection modality is necessary to detect this feature.

  8. Selected techniques in radioecology: Model development and comparison for internal dosimetry of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and feasibiltiy assessment of reflectance spectroscopy use as a tool in phytoremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Nicole

    Factors (DCFs) for whole body as well as selected organs of O. mykiss were computed using Monte Carlo modeling, and combined with the empirical models for predicting activity concentration, to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (microGy) to selected organs after several half-lives of either 131I or 99Mo. The different computational models provided similar results, especially for organs that were both the source and target of radiation (less than 30% difference between estimated doses). Part 2 considers the use of reflectance spectroscopy as a remediation tool through its potential to determine plant stress from metal contaminants. The studies in Part 2 further investigate the potential use of reflectance spectroscopy as a method for assessing metal stress in plants. In the first study, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were treated twice weekly in a laboratory setting with varying levels (0 mM, 0.5 mM, or 5 mM) of cesium chloride (CsCl) solution, and reflectance spectra were collected every week for three weeks using an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer with both a contact probe and a field of view probe at 36.8 and 66.7 cm above the plant. As metal stress is known to mimic drought stress, plants were harvested each week after spectra collection for determination of relative water content and chlorophyll content. A visual assessment of the plants was also conducted using point observations on a uniform grid of 81 points. Two-way ANOVAs were performed on selected vegetation indices (VI) to determine the significance of the effects of treatment level and length of treatment. Linear regression was used to relate the most appropriate vegetation indices to the aforementioned endpoints and to compare results provided by the three different spectra collection techniques. One-way ANOVAs were performed on selected VI at each time point to determine which, if any, indices offered a significant prediction of the overall extent of Cs toxicity. Of the

  9. High spectral resolution reflectance spectroscopy of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; King, T.V.V.; Klejwa, M.; Swayze, G.A.; Vergo, N.

    1990-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of minerals are studied as a function of spectral resolution in the range from 0.2 to 3.0 ??m. Selected absorption bands were studied at resolving powers (??/????) as high as 2240. At resolving powers of approximately 1000, many OH-bearing minerals show diagnostic sharp absorptions at the resolution limit. At low resolution, some minerals may not be distinguishable, but as the resolution is increased, most can be easily identified. As the resolution is increased, many minerals show fine structure, particularly in the OH-stretching overtone region near 1.4 ??m. The fine structure can enhance the ability to discriminate between minerals, and in some cases the fine structure can be used to determine elemental composition. The study shows that high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy of minerals may prove to be a very important tool in the laboratory, in the field using field-portable spectrometers, from aircraft, and from satellites looking at Earth or other planetary surfaces. -from Authors

  10. Validation of a model for on-line classification of U.S. Select beef carcasses for longissimus tenderness using visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to provide a validation of a previously developed model for on-line classification of U.S. Select carcasses for LM tenderness based on visible and near-infrared (VISNIR) spectroscopy and to determine if the accuracy of VISNIR-based tenderness classification could...

  11. Selected techniques in radioecology: Model development and comparison for internal dosimetry of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and feasibiltiy assessment of reflectance spectroscopy use as a tool in phytoremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Nicole

    Factors (DCFs) for whole body as well as selected organs of O. mykiss were computed using Monte Carlo modeling, and combined with the empirical models for predicting activity concentration, to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (microGy) to selected organs after several half-lives of either 131I or 99Mo. The different computational models provided similar results, especially for organs that were both the source and target of radiation (less than 30% difference between estimated doses). Part 2 considers the use of reflectance spectroscopy as a remediation tool through its potential to determine plant stress from metal contaminants. The studies in Part 2 further investigate the potential use of reflectance spectroscopy as a method for assessing metal stress in plants. In the first study, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were treated twice weekly in a laboratory setting with varying levels (0 mM, 0.5 mM, or 5 mM) of cesium chloride (CsCl) solution, and reflectance spectra were collected every week for three weeks using an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer with both a contact probe and a field of view probe at 36.8 and 66.7 cm above the plant. As metal stress is known to mimic drought stress, plants were harvested each week after spectra collection for determination of relative water content and chlorophyll content. A visual assessment of the plants was also conducted using point observations on a uniform grid of 81 points. Two-way ANOVAs were performed on selected vegetation indices (VI) to determine the significance of the effects of treatment level and length of treatment. Linear regression was used to relate the most appropriate vegetation indices to the aforementioned endpoints and to compare results provided by the three different spectra collection techniques. One-way ANOVAs were performed on selected VI at each time point to determine which, if any, indices offered a significant prediction of the overall extent of Cs toxicity. Of the

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites.

  13. Soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Nkenke, Emeka; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre

    2009-07-01

    Laser surgery gives the possibility to work remotely which leads to high precision, little trauma and high level sterility. However these advantages are coming with the lack of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Therefore additional means are required to control tissue-specific ablation during laser surgery supporting the surgeon regardless of experience and skills. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from four various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the four tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerve as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating soft tissues as guidance for tissue-specific laser surgery by means of the diffuse reflectance.

  14. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of liver tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Nilsson, Jan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Sturesson, Christian; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic contact probe is a cost-effective, rapid, and non-invasive optical method used to extract diagnosis information of tissue. By combining commercially available VIS- and NIR-spectrometers with various fiber-optic contact-probes, we have access to the full wavelength range from around 400 to 1600 nm. Using this flexible and portable spectroscopy system, we have acquired ex-vivo DRS-spectra from murine, porcine, and human liver tissue. For extracting the tissue optical properties from the measured spectra, we have employed and compared predictions from two models for light propagation in tissue, diffusion theory model (DT) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC). The focus in this work is on the capacity of this DRS-technique in discriminating metastatic tumor tissue from normal liver tissue as well as in assessing and characterizing damage to non-malignant liver tissue induced by preoperative chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastases.

  15. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  16. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-06-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  17. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of GEO Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tammaso; Lederer, Susan M.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Bedard, Donald

    2013-01-01

    We report on optical reflection spectroscopy of geosynchronous (GEO) objects in the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. These observations were obtained using imaging spectrographs on the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to determine the composition of these objects by comparing these spectral observations with ground-based laboratory measurements of spacecraft materials. The observations are all low resolution (1 nm after smoothing) obtained through a 5 arcsecond wide slit and using a grism as the dispersing element. The spectral range covered was from 450 nm to 800 nm. All spectra were flux calibrated using observations of standard stars with the exact same instrumental setup. An effort was made to obtain all observations within a limited range of topocentric phase angle, although the solar incident angle is unknown due to the lack of any knowledge of the attitude of the observed surface at the time of observation.

  18. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  19. Specular Reflection and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies on the occurrence and effects of specular reflection in mid-infrared spectra of soils have shown that distortions due to specular reflection occur for both organic (humic acid) and non-organic fractions (carbonates, silica, ashed fraction of soil). The results demonstrated explain why the s...

  20. An automatic detection software for differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Seniha Esen; Dubroca, Thierry; Hummel, Rolf E.; Gader, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    Recent terrorist attacks have sprung a need for a large scale explosive detector. Our group has developed differential reflection spectroscopy which can detect explosive residue on surfaces such as parcel, cargo and luggage. In short, broad band ultra-violet and visible light is shone onto a material (such as a parcel) moving on a conveyor belt. Upon reflection off the surface, the light intensity is recorded with a spectrograph (spectrometer in combination with a CCD camera). This reflected light intensity is then subtracted and normalized with the next data point collected, resulting in differential reflection spectra in the 200-500 nm range. Explosives show spectral finger-prints at specific wavelengths, for example, the spectrum of 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) shows an absorption edge at 420 nm. Additionally, we have developed an automated software which detects the characteristic features of explosives. One of the biggest challenges for the algorithm is to reach a practical limit of detection. In this study, we introduce our automatic detection software which is a combination of principal component analysis and support vector machines. Finally we present the sensitivity and selectivity response of our algorithm as a function of the amount of explosive detected on a given surface.

  1. Apollo 17 Soil Characterization for Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Patchen, A.; Morris, R. V.; Keller, L. P.; Wentworth, S.; McKay, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    It is the fine fractions that dominate the observed spectral signatures of bulk lunar soil, and the next to the smallest size fractions are the most similar to the overall properties of the bulk soil. Thus, our Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium has concentrated on understanding the inter-relations of compositional, mineralogical, and optical properties of the <45-micron size fraction and its component sizes (20-44 micron, 10-20 micron, and <10 micron size fractions). To be able to generalize our results beyond the particular sample set studied, it is necessary to quantitatively identify the observed effects of space weathering and evaluate the processes involved. For this, it is necessary to know the chemistry of each size fraction, modal abundances of each phase, average compositions of the minerals and glasses, I(sub s)/FeO values, reflectance spectra, and the physical makeup of the individual particles and their patinas. This characterization includes the important dissection of the pyroxene minerals into four separate populations, with data on both modes and average chemical compositions. Armed with such data, it should be possible to effectively isolate spectral effects of space weathering from spectral properties related to mineral and glass chemistry. Four mare soils from the Apollo 17 site were selected for characterization based upon similarities in bulk composition and their contrasting maturities, ranging from immature to submature to mature. The methodology of our characterization has been discussed previously. Results of the Apollo 17 mare soils, outlined herein, are being prepared for publication in MAPS. As shown, with decreasing grain size, the agglutinitic (impact) glass content profoundly increases. This is the most impressive change for the mare soils. In several soils we have examined, there is an over two-fold increase in the agglutinitic glass contents between the 90-150- micron and the 10-20-micron size fractions. Accompanying this

  2. Does Spectral Format Matter in Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near- and more recently, mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy have come to be extensively used to determine the composition of products ranging from forages to drugs. In these methods, spectra are generally collected as (Reflectance or R) and transformed to log (1/R) according to the Beer-...

  3. Estimating soil quality indicators with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid estimation of soil quality is needed for determining and mapping soil variability in site-specific management. One technology that can fulfill this need is diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, which measures light reflected from the soil in the visible and near infrared wavelength bands. Reflecta...

  4. Forensic applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungol, Mary W.; Bartick, Edward G.; Reffner, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy in forensic science are discussed. Internal reflection spectra of single fibers, hairs, paint chips, vehicle rubber bumpers, photocopy toners, carbon copies, writing ink on paper, lipstick on tissue, black electrical tape, and other types of forensic evidence have been obtained. The technique is convenient, non-destructive, and may permit smeared materials to be analyzed in situ.

  5. Reflectance spectroscopy for evaluating hair follicle cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Caihua; Guan, Yue; Wang, Jianru; Zhu, Dan

    2014-02-01

    Hair follicle, as a mini-organ with perpetually cycling of telogen, anagen and catagen, provides a valuable experimental model for studying hair and organ regeneration. The transition of hair follicle from telogen to anagen is a significant sign for successful regeneration. So far discrimination of the hair follicle stage is mostly based on canonical histological examination and empirical speculation based on skin color. Hardly a method has been proposed to quantitatively evaluate the hair follicle stage. In this work, a commercial optical fiber spectrometer was applied to monitor diffuse reflectance of mouse skin with hair follicle cycling, and then the change of reflectance was obtained. Histological examination was used to verify the hair follicle stage. In comparison with the histological examination, the skin diffuse reflectance was relatively high for mouse with telogen hair follicles; it decreased once hair follicles transited to anagen stage; then it increased reversely at catagen stage. This study provided a new method to quantitatively evaluate the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for the basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  6. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, C.; Rheault, F.; Boulay, R.; Tremblay, R.

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-Summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  7. Combined theory of reflectance and emittance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    The theory in which either or both reflected sunlight and thermally emitted radiation contribute to the power received by a detector viewing a particulate medium, such as a powder in the laboratory or a planetary regolith, is considered theoretically. This theory is of considerable interest for the interpretation of data from field or spacecraft instruments that are sensitive to the near-infrared region of the spectrum, such as NIMS (near-infrared mapping spectrometer) and VIMS (visual and infrared mapping spectrometer), as well as thermal infrared detectors.

  8. Analytical study of spacecraft deposition contamination by internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of ten individual contaminant materials and four binary mixtures of these have been studied using the internal reflection spectroscopy technique. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on these contaminants has also been studied. It has been observed that all siloxanes, silanes, and esters are drastically affected by ultraviolet irradiation. In most cases polymerization and tar formation results.

  9. Soil phosphorus and potassium estimation by reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visible and near infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has potential in site-specific measurement of soil properties. However, previous studies have reported VNIR estimates of plant available soil phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) to be of variable accuracy. In this study, we used a databa...

  10. Estimating a soil quality index with VNIR reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sensor-based approaches to assessment and quantification of soil quality are important to facilitate cost-effective, site-specific soil management. The objective of this research was to evaluate the ability of visible, near-infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to estimate multiple soil q...

  11. Instrumentation for Reflectance Spectroscopy and Microspectroscopy with Application to Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    We present instrument concepts for in-situ reflectance spectroscopy over a spatial resolution range from several meters to tens of micrometers. These have been adapted to the low mass and power requirements of rover or similar platforms. Described are a miniaturized imaging spectrometer for rover mast, a combined mast and arm point spectrometer, and an imaging microspectrometer for the rover arm.

  12. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2005-08-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  13. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    1996-05-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  14. Terahertz reflection spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy-Hoppa, Megan R.; Fitch, Michael J.; Osiander, Robert

    2008-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has been demonstrated as a promising tool for detection of explosives and is being developed for aviation screening and sensing of improvised explosive devices. THz radiation is attractive for many applications due to its ability to penetrate through a wide range of dielectric materials including clothing, paper, cardboard, plastics, and wood. Of course, metals block THz waves as is the case for microwave, IR, and visible light. Our work has involved investigating the reflection spectroscopy of a variety of materials including explosives such as RDX and PETN, plastic explosive taggants such as DMDNB, and other organic materials. We have also investigated the changes of the reflection spectra in varying grades of sucrose. Spectral differences are observed between three grades of crystalline sugar in the region from 0.1 to 1 THz. By exploiting the unique spectral features, the discrimination capabilities of THz reflection spectroscopy points to the broad applicability of identifying a wide variety of materials.

  15. Pancreatic tissue assessment using fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Malavika; Heidt, David; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Scheiman, James; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2007-07-01

    The ability of multi-modal optical spectroscopy to detect signals from pancreatic tissue was demonstrated by studying human pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice and freshly excised human pancreatic tumor tissue. Measured optical spectra and fluorescence decays were correlated with tissue morphological and biochemical properties. The measured spectral features and decay times correlated well with expected pathological differences in normal, pancreatitis and adenocarcinoma tissue states. The observed differences between the fluorescence and reflectance properties of normal, pancreatitis and adenocarcinoma tissue indicate a possible application of multi-modal optical spectroscopy to differentiating between the three tissue classifications.

  16. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Gianluca; Salza, Mario; Ferraro, Pietro; Chehura, Edmond; Tatam, Ralph P.; Gangopadhyay, Tarun K.; Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Barnes, Jack A.; Loock, Hans-Peter; Lam, Timothy T.-Y.; Chow, Jong H.; De Natale, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented. PMID:22294902

  17. Attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy with chirped-pulse upconversion.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Hideto; Duchesne, Constance; Furutani, Yuji; Fuji, Takao

    2014-12-01

    Chirped-pulse upconversion technique has been applied to attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy. An extremely broadband infrared pulse was sent to an ATR diamond prism and the reflected pulse was converted to the visible by using four-wave mixing in krypton gas. Absorption spectra of liquids in the range from 200 to 5500 cm(-1) were measured with a visible spectrometer on a single-shot basis. The system was applied to observe the dynamics of exchanging process of two solvents, water and acetone, which give clear vibrational spectral contrast. We observed that the exchange was finished within ∼ 10 ms. PMID:25606893

  18. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  19. Reflectance spectroscopy for noninvasive evaluation of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Caihua; Guan, Yue; Wang, Jianru; Zhong, Xiewei; Liu, Xiuli; Zhu, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle offers an excellent model for systems biology and regenerative medicine. So far, the stages of hair follicle growth have been evaluated by histological examination. In this work, a noninvasive spectroscopy was proposed by measuring the diffuse reflectance of mouse skin and analyzing the melanin value. Results show that the skin diffuse reflectance was relatively high when hair follicles were at the telogen stage and at the beginning of the anagen stage, and decreased with the progression of the anagen stage. When the hair follicle entered into the catagen stage, the diffuse reflectance gradually increased. The changes in the melanin content of skin had contrary dynamics. Substages of the hair follicle cycle could be distinguished by comparing the changes in melanin value with the histological examination. This study provided a new method for noninvasive evaluation of the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  20. Reflectance spectroscopy for noninvasive evaluation of hair follicle stage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Caihua; Guan, Yue; Wang, Jianru; Zhong, Xiewei; Liu, Xiuli; Zhu, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle offers an excellent model for systems biology and regenerative medicine. So far, the stages of hair follicle growth have been evaluated by histological examination. In this work, a noninvasive spectroscopy was proposed by measuring the diffuse reflectance of mouse skin and analyzing the melanin value. Results show that the skin diffuse reflectance was relatively high when hair follicles were at the telogen stage and at the beginning of the anagen stage, and decreased with the progression of the anagen stage. When the hair follicle entered into the catagen stage, the diffuse reflectance gradually increased. The changes in the melanin content of skin had contrary dynamics. Substages of the hair follicle cycle could be distinguished by comparing the changes in melanin value with the histological examination. This study provided a new method for noninvasive evaluation of the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration. PMID:25428579

  1. Selective reflection of obliquely incident polarised light

    SciTech Connect

    Fofanov, Ya A

    2009-06-30

    A series of reflection resonances formed by the hyperfine components of the D{sub 2}-lines in the spectrum of the natural mixture of rubidium isotopes is studied. Passages from resonantly frustrated total internal reflection to resonance Brewster reflection caused by the frequency tuning of the incident light are demonstrated experimentally. The contrast of the strongest refection resonances exceeds 500% at the moderate heating of reflecting cells. The intensity of the reflected light changes in this case by more than 20 times. A theory is developed which is based on a two-level model for resonance atoms and Fresnel formulas for reflection coefficients. Numerical calculations based on the proposed theory confirm main experimental results. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Catheter based mid-infrared reflectance and reflectance generated absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2013-10-29

    A method of characterizing conditions in a tissue, by (a) providing a catheter that has a light source that emits light in selected wavenumbers within the range of mid-IR spectrum; (b) directing the light from the catheter to an area of tissue at a location inside a blood vessel of a subject; (c) collecting light reflected from the location and generating a reflectance spectra; and (d) comparing the reflectance spectra to a reference spectra of normal tissue, whereby a location having an increased number of absorbance peaks at said selected wavenumbers indicates a tissue inside the blood vessel containing a physiological marker for atherosclerosis.

  3. Reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for noninvasive detection of reflective index alternations at nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuanhao; Ding, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Cancer has been one of the most serious threats to human life. However, there is no substantial improvement in overall treatment of cancer patients. One of the key reasons is the unavailability of convenient method to detect cellular alterations in ultra-early stage of carcinogenesis processes, where genetic aberrations at nano-scale have not yet resulted in histological changes. In this paper, we described an optical method based on reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for ultra-early cancer detection. According to mesoscopic light transport theory, photons propagating in one dimension (1D) within a weakly disordered medium have the non-self-averaging effect. Reflected signal after 1D propagating is sensitive to any length scale of refractive index fluctuations due to multiple interferences of light waves travelling along 1D trajectory. The principle of mesoscopic spectroscopy for perceiving reflective index fluctuations at length scale of nanometers is introduced. A system for the measurement of reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy based on spatial-incoherence broadband source and spectrometer is established. Simulations on light propagation in cell-emulating model with controlled refractive index distribution are done by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach.

  4. Reflective Leadership by Selected Community College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeckel, Pamella Rae; Davies, Timothy Gray

    2007-01-01

    This phenomenological study addressed the following question: How do community college presidents experience self-reflection in their leadership roles? Male and female community college presidents of diverse racial backgrounds were interviewed to better understand how they experienced self-reflection in their own leadership. Three themes emerged:…

  5. Model-Based Material Parameter Estimation for Terahertz Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniffin, Gabriel Paul

    Many materials such as drugs and explosives have characteristic spectral signatures in the terahertz (THz) band. These unique signatures imply great promise for spectral detection and classification using THz radiation. While such spectral features are most easily observed in transmission, real-life imaging systems will need to identify materials of interest from reflection measurements, often in non-ideal geometries. One important, yet commonly overlooked source of signal corruption is the etalon effect -- interference phenomena caused by multiple reflections from dielectric layers of packaging and clothing likely to be concealing materials of interest in real-life scenarios. This thesis focuses on the development and implementation of a model-based material parameter estimation technique, primarily for use in reflection spectroscopy, that takes the influence of the etalon effect into account. The technique is adapted from techniques developed for transmission spectroscopy of thin samples and is demonstrated using measured data taken at the Northwest Electromagnetic Research Laboratory (NEAR-Lab) at Portland State University. Further tests are conducted, demonstrating the technique's robustness against measurement noise and common sources of error.

  6. Characterization of probe contact effects on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Mayjonade, Mallory; Ahadi, Aylin; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a rapid, non-invasive optical method widely adopted to gain diagnostic information of tissue. The most flexible approach to this method is a fiber-optic contact-probe used with a spectroscopy system. A challenge of this method is that the external pressure brought by the probe can significantly affect the tissue optical properties as well as the light coupling into the probe, and thus influence the collected DRS-spectrum. In this study we investigate and characterize the effect of probe pressure on DRS-spectra obtained with a calibrated loaded-spring system used with a fiber optic probe in the range (400 - 1600) nm. A multilayer FE-model of the indentation is developed to get a better insight of the distribution of pressure and stresses inside the skin under indentation.

  7. Pancreatic tumor margin detection by oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Zou, Jun; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kuczynski, John; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In surgical treatment of pancreatic cancers, the effectiveness of the procedures largely depends on the ability to completely and precisely remove the malignant tumors. We present the ex-vivo use of oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (OIRDS) to detect and differentiate normal from neoplastic tissue. An OIRDS probe has been constructed to provide scattering and absorption information of the pancreatic tissue. To reveal the physiological origin of the difference in these optical signatures, the optical scattering coefficients were extracted along the pancreatic duct with 1-cm spacing. Experimental results show that OIDRS was able to successfully determinate the tumor margins based on the higher optical scattering on malignant tissue.

  8. Raman and infrared reflection spectroscopy in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, S.; Shirotani, I.

    1985-03-01

    The symmetry and energies of all optically active phonon modes in black phosphorous are determined by polarized Raman scattering and infrared reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The obtained energies are; 365 and 470 cm -1 for A g modes, 197 for B lg, 442 for B 2g, 223 and 440 for B 3g, 136 (TO) and 138 (LO) for B lu, and 468 (TO) and 470 (LO) for B 2u, respectively. The small TO-LO splitting is related to the charge transfer between phosphorus atoms induced by the atomic displacement.

  9. Depth sensitive oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with epithelial cancerous lesions can be challenging in the oral cavity where variable epithelial thicknesses and troublesome keratin growths are prominent. Spectroscopic methods with enhanced depth resolution would immensely aid in isolating optical properties associated with malignant transformation. Combining multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating, oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) achieves depth sensitive detection. We report promising results from a clinical trial of patients with oral lesions suspected of dysplasia or carcinoma demonstrating the potential of OPRS for the analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of multilayer, epithelial oral tissue.

  10. Multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Ohsugi, Yu; Kinjo, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    We report simultaneous determination of diffusion coefficients at different points of a cell membrane using a multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system. A system carrying seven detection areas in the evanescent field is achieved by using seven optical fibers on the image plane in the detection port of an objective-type total internal reflection FCS (TIR-FCS) system. Fluctuation of fluorescence intensity is monitored and evaluated using seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a newly constructed multichannel correlator. We demonstrate simultaneous-multipoint FCS, with a 3-mus time resolution, to investigate heterogeneous structures such as cell membranes and membrane-binding molecular dynamics near glass surfaces in live cells. PMID:19256718

  11. Analysis of remote reflection spectroscopy to monitor plant health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, R.; Heeb, M.; Berry, W.; Hoshizaki, T.; Wood, M.

    1994-11-01

    Remote non-contact reflection spectroscopy is examined as a method for detecting stress in Controlled Ecological Life Support System CELSS type crops. Lettuce (Latuca Sativa L. cv. Waldmans Green) and wheat (Triticum Aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) were grown hydroponically. Copper and zinc treatments provided toxic conditions. Nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium treatments were used for deficiency conditions. Water stress was also induced in test plants. Reflectance spectra were obtained in the visible and near infrared (400nm to 2600nm) wavebands. Numerous effects of stress conditions can be observed in the collected spectra and this technique appears to have promise as a remote monitor of plant health, but significant research remains to be conducted to realize the promise.

  12. Analysis of remote reflection spectroscopy to monitor plant health.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, R; Heeb, M; Berry, W; Hoshizaki, T; Wood, M

    1994-11-01

    Remote non-contact reflection spectroscopy is examined as a method for detecting stress in Controlled Ecological Life Support System CELSS type crops. Lettuce (Lactuca [correction of Latuca] Sativa L. cv. Waldmans Green) and wheat (Triticum Aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) were grown hydroponically. Copper and zinc treatments provided toxic conditions. Nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium treatments were used for deficiency conditions. Water stress was also induced in test plants. Reflectance spectra were obtained in the visible and near infrared (400nm to 2600nm) wavebands. Numerous effects of stress conditions can be observed in the collected spectra and this technique appears to have promise as a remote monitor of plant health, but significant research remains to be conducted to realize the promise. PMID:11540181

  13. Multiply enhanced site selective CARS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steehler, J. K.; Wright, J. C.

    1985-10-01

    Three tunable lasers are used to perform site selective coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) spectroscopy in pentacene:p-terphenyl crystals at 2 K. The vibrational and vibronic levels of pentacene in the individual substitutional sites of p-terphenyl can be selectively examined by matching the resonances of a particular site. The signals from a site and the selectivity between sites are much higher than CARS performed with two tunable lasers. The spectra are dominated by lines from processes where the vibrational and vibronic states involved in the four-wave mixing are associated with the same molecular mode. There are also important lines from processes where different vibrational and vibronic modes are involved in the nonlinear mixing. The intensities of lines from the resonant site are strongly dependent on the laser energy because of saturation of the electronic transition.

  14. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy and thermographic investigations of the Shroud of Turin.

    PubMed

    Accetta, J S; Baumgart, J S

    1980-06-15

    In this paper we present the results of the IR investigations of the controversial Turin Shroud. Reflectance spectroscopy in the 3-5- and 8-14-microm bands was attempted in situ using commercial equipment with moderate success. Spectral comparisons are made between laboratory reflectance data and selected Shroud features. Infrared thermographic imaging was accomplished with an enhanced contrast technique using external illumination. Due to the spectral similarities of most features observed, we show that the results are inconclusive. The IR imagery yielded results that are consistent with expectations with no anomalies observed. PMID:20221156

  15. Development of techniques for advanced optical contamination measurement with internal reflection spectroscopy, phase 1, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring volatile contaminants in a large space simulation chamber using techniques of internal reflection spectroscopy was demonstrated analytically and experimentally. The infrared spectral region was selected as the operational spectral range in order to provide unique identification of the contaminants along with sufficient sensitivity to detect trace contaminant concentrations. It was determined theoretically that a monolayer of the contaminants could be detected and identified using optimized experimental procedures. This ability was verified experimentally. Procedures were developed to correct the attenuated total reflectance spectra for thick sample distortion. However, by using two different element designs the need for such correction can be avoided.

  16. Raman spectroscopy and polarization: Selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossikovski, Razvigor; Picardi, Gennaro; Ndong, Gérald; Chaigneau, Marc

    2012-10-01

    We show, through several selected case studies, the potential benefits that can be obtained by controlling the polarization states of the exciting and scattered radiations in a Raman scattering experiment. When coupled with polarization control, Raman spectroscopy is thus capable of providing extra information on the structural properties of the materials under investigation. The experimental examples presented in this work are taken from the area of both conventional, i.e., far-field, as well as from near-field Raman spectroscopy. They cover topics such as the stress tensor measurement in strained semiconductor structures, the vibration mode assignment in pentacene thin films and the Raman scattering tensor determination from near-field measurements on azobenzene monolayers. The basic theory necessary for modelling the far- and near-field polarized Raman responses is also given and the model efficiency is illustrated on the experimental data.

  17. Assessing human skin with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and colorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, InSeok; Liu, Yang; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2012-02-01

    Colorimetry has been used as an objective measure of perceived skin color by human eye to document and score physiological responses of the skin from external insults. CIE color space values (L*, a* and b*) are the most commonly used parameters to correlate visually perceived color attributes such as L* for pigment, a* for erythema, and b* for sallowness of the skin. In this study, we investigated the relation of Lab color scale to the amount of major skin chromophores (oxy-, deoxyhemoglobin and melanin) calculated from diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Thirty two healthy human subjects with ages from 20 to 70 years old, skin types I-VI, were recruited for the study. DRS and colorimetry measurements were taken from the left and right cheeks, and on the right upper inner arm. The melanin content calculated from 630-700 nm range of DRS measurements was shown to correlate with the lightness of skin (L*) for most skin types. For subjects with medium-to-light complexion, melanin measured at the blue part spectrum and hemoglobin interfered on the relation of lightness of the skin color to the melanin content. The sallowness of the skin that is quantified by the melanin contribution at the blue part spectrum of DRS was found to be related to b* scale. This study demonstrates the importance of documenting skin color by assessing individual skin chromophores with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, in comparison to colorimetry assessment.

  18. Surface-enhanced, multi-dimensional attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Lotti, Davide; Hamm, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) spectroscopy is performed in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) geometry with the Kretschmann configuration in order to measure femtosecond to picosecond dynamics of self-assembled monolayers on gold-coated solid-liquid interfaces. In the monolayers low-absorbing (<200 M-1 cm-1) nitrile functional groups are used as local vibrational probes to monitor vibrational relaxation and spectral diffusion in dependence of different environments of the nitrile group. By comparing spectral diffusion dynamics of the vibrational probe in bulk solution and in the monolayer we find that the dynamics are slowed down by more than a factor of 20 upon immobilization of the sample. Moreover, spectral diffusion dynamics are affected by the local environment within the monolayers as evidenced by 2D ATR IR experiments on mixed monolayers with different aliphatic and aromatic co-adsorbates. The results are interpreted in terms of absent excitation energy-transfer as well as solvation dynamics around the nitrile vibrational probe. Our results demonstrate that 2D ATR IR spectroscopy offers the possibility to obtain ultrafast dynamics from sub-monolayer coverages of even low-absorbing vibrational probes such as nitrile functional groups.

  19. Autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance patterns in cervical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Nena Maribel

    Fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy are two new optical technologies, which have shown promise to aid in the real time, non-invasive identification of cancers and precancers. Spectral patterns carry a fingerprint of scattering, absorption and fluorescence properties in tissue. Scattering, absorption and fluorescence in tissue are directly affected by biological features that are diagnostically significant, such as nuclear size, micro-vessel density, volume fraction of collagen fibers, tissue oxygenation and cell metabolism. Thus, analysis of spectral patterns can unlock a wealth of information directly related with the onset and progression of disease. Data from a Phase II clinical trial to assess the technical efficacy of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy acquired from 850 women at three clinical locations with two research grade optical devices is calibrated and analyzed. Tools to process and standardize spectra so that data from multiple spectrometers can be combined and analyzed are presented. Methodologies for calibration and quality assurance of optical systems are established to simplify design issues and ensure validity of data for future clinical trials. Empirically based algorithms, using multivariate statistical approaches are applied to spectra and evaluated as a clinical diagnostic tool. Physically based algorithms, using mathematical models of light propagation in tissue are presented. The presented mathematical model combines a diffusion theory in P3 approximation reflectance model and a 2-layer fluorescence model using exponential attenuation and diffusion theory. The resulting adjoint fluorescence and reflectance model extracts twelve optical properties characterizing fluorescence efficiency of cervical epithelium and stroma fluorophores, stromal hemoglobin and collagen absorption, oxygen saturation, and stromal scattering strength and shape. Validations with Monte Carlo simulations show that adjoint model extracted

  20. Testing black holes via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The study of the properties of the radiation emitted by gas in the inner part of the accretion disk can provide useful information on the spacetime geometry around these compact objects and test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. The iron line method is the most promising techniques to test black hole candidates. In this talk, we present a new reflection model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis. We use the formalism of the transfer function and we split the calculations into two blocks. One is the calculation of the transfer function, which takes into account all the relativistic effects and only depends on the background metric. The second block is the calculation of the intrinsic spectrum in the rest frame of the gas. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. The transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER, which is the best reflection code available today. The result is best model to test black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  1. [The research progress in determining lignocellulosic content by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; An, Dong; Xia, Tian; Huang, Yan-Hua; Li, Hong-Chao; Zhang, Yun-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology, as a new analytic method, can be used to determine the content of lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose which is faster, effective, easier to operate, and more accurate than the traditional wet chemical methods. Nowadays it has been widely used in measuring the composition of lignocelluloses in woody plant and herbaceous plant. The domestic and foreign research progress in determining the lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose content in woody plant ( wood and bamboo used as papermaking raw materials and wood served as potential biomass energy) and herbaceous plant (forage grass and energy grass) by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology is comprehensively summarized and the advances in method studies of measuring the composition of lignocelluloses by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology are summed up in three aspects, sample preparation, spectral data pretreatment and wavelength selection methods, and chemometric analysis respectively. Four outlooks are proposed combining the development statues of wood, forage grass and energy grass industry. First of all, the authors need to establish more feasible and applicable models for a variety of uses which can be used for more species from different areas, periods and anatomical parts. Secondly, comprehensive near infrared reflectance spectroscopy data base of grass products quality index needs to be improved to realize on-line quality and process control in grassproducts industry, which can guarantee the quality of the grass product. Thirdly, the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy quality index model of energy plant need to be built which can not only contribute to breed screening, but also improve the development of biomass industry. Besides, modeling approaches are required to be explored and perfected any further. Finally, the authors need to try our best to boost the advancement in the determination method of lignin, cellulose and hemi

  2. Laboratory Studies of Organic Compounds With Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchin, J. M.; Clark, R. N.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    In order to properly interpret reflectance spectra of any solar system surface from the earth to the Oort cloud, laboratory spectra of candidate materials for comparative analysis are needed. Although the common cosmochemical species (H2O, CO2, CO, NH3, and CH4) are well represented in the spectroscopic literature, comparatively little reflectance work has been done on organics from room to cryogenic temperatures at visible to near infrared wavelengths. Reflectance spectra not only enhance weak or unseen transmission features, they are also more analogous to spectra obtained by spacecraft that are imaging such bodies as giant planet moons, kuiper belt objects, centaurs, comets and asteroids, as well as remote sensing of the earth. The USGS Spectroscopy Laboratory is measuring reflectance spectra of organic compounds from room to cryogenic temperatures over the spectral range of 0.35 to 15.5 microns. This region encompasses the fundamental absorptions and many overtones and combinations of C, H, O, and N molecular bonds. Because most organic compounds belong to families whose members have similar structure and composition, individual species identification within a narrow wavelength range may be ambiguous. By measuring spectral reflectance of the pure laboratory samples from the visible through the near and mid-infrared, absorption bands unique to each can be observed, cataloged, and compared to planetary reflectance data. We present here spectra of organic compounds belonging to five families: the alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and cyanides. Common to all of these are the deep C-H stretch fundamental absorptions, which shift shortward from 3.35+ microns in alkanes to 3.25+ microns in aromatics, to 3.2+ microns in alkenes, and down to 3.0+ microns in alkynes. Mid-IR absorptions due to C-H bending deformations at 6.8+ and 7.2+ microns are also identified. In the near infrared these stretching and bending fundamentals yield a diagnostic set of combination

  3. Analysis of silage composition by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, James B., III; Blosser, Timothy H.; Colenbrander, V. F.

    1991-02-01

    Two studies were performed to investigate the feasibility of using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) with undried silages. In the first study silages were analyzed for major components (e. g. dry matter crude protein and other forms of nitrogen fiber and in vitro digestible dry matter) and short chain fatty acids (SCFA). NIRS was found to operate satisfactorily except for some forms of nitrogen and SCFA. In study two various methods of grinding spectral regions and sample presentation were examined. Undried Wiley ground samples in a rectangular cell gave the best overall results for non-dry ice undried grinds with wavelengths between 1100 and 2498 nm. Silages scanned after drying however produced the best results. Intact samples did not perform as well as ground samples and wavelengths below 1100 nm were of little use. 2 .

  4. Nanoscale Andreev Reflection Spectroscopy on Bismuth-Chalcogenide Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, C. R.; Fridman, I.; Liang, R. X.; Lei, H.; Petrovic, C.; Yang, Shuo; Wu, K. H.; Wei, J. Y. T.

    Andreev reflection (AR) is the basic mechanism underlying the superconducting proximity effect which, at the interface between a topological insulator (TI) and a spin-singlet superconductor, can induce chiral p-wave pairing in the TI. Despite this novel importance, it is not well understood how AR is affected by the unique attributes of a three-dimensional TI, namely the Dirac dispersion and helical spin-polarization of its surface states. In this work, we use both s-wave and d-wave superconducting tips to perform AR spectroscopy at 4.2 K on flux-grown Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 single crystals, as well as epitaxial Bi2Se3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. These AR measurements are complemented by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, in order to characterize the superconducting tip as well as the doping level and surface condition of the TI sample. Our data are analyzed using BTK theory, in light of the characteristic band structure of bismuth chalcogenides, to elucidate how the band structure affects the AR process. Work supported by: NSERC, CFI-OIT, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and the Department of Energy.

  5. Resonant Reflection Spectroscopy of Biomolecular Arrays in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kevin W.; Radic, Stojan; Myslivets, Evgeny; O’Connor, Shawn M.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomeres, the functional units of contraction in striated muscle, are composed of an array of interdigitating protein filaments. Direct interaction between overlapping filaments generates muscular force, which produces animal movement. When filament length is known, sarcomere length successfully predicts potential force, even in whole muscles that contain billions of sarcomere units. Inability to perform in vivo sarcomere measurements with submicrometer resolution is a long-standing challenge in the muscle physiology field and has hampered studies of normal muscle function, adaptation, injury, aging, and disease, particularly in humans. Here, we develop theory and demonstrate the feasibility of to our knowledge a new technique that measures sarcomere length with submicrometer resolution. In this believed novel approach, we examine sarcomere structure by measuring the multiple resonant reflections that are uniquely defined by Fourier decomposition of the sarcomere protein spatial framework. Using a new supercontinuum spectroscopic system, we show close agreement between sarcomere lengths measured by resonant reflection spectroscopy and laser diffraction in an ensemble of 10 distinct muscles. PMID:25418304

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of mass-selected carbocations

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael A.

    2015-01-22

    Small carbocations are of longstanding interest in astrophysics, but there are few measurements of their infrared spectroscopy in the gas phase at low temperature. There are fewer-still measurements of spectra across the full range of IR frequencies useful to obtain an IR signature of these ions to detect them in space. We have developed a pulsed-discharge supersonic nozzle ion source producing high densities of small carbocations at low temperatures (50–70K). We employ mass-selected photodissociation spectroscopy and the method of rare gas “tagging”, together with new broadly tunable infrared OPO lasers, to obtain IR spectra for a variety of small carbocations including C{sub 2}H{sub 3}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}{sup +}, protonated benzene and protonated naphthalene. Spectra in the frequency range of 600–4500 cm{sup −1} provide new IR data for these ions and evidence for the presence of co-existing isomeric structures (e.g., C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} is present as both cyclopropenyl and propargyl). Protonated naphthalene has sharp bands at 6.2, 7.7 and 8.6 microns matching prominent features in the UIR spectra.

  7. How well is Martian ozone inferred with reflectance spectroscopy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    through the entire cloud and dust abundance in order to actually see the total O3 column abundance. If reflectance spectroscopy is used, as on Mariner 9, then the cloud and the airborne dust must be traversed twice; first by the incoming solar flux down to the surface, and then once again upon reflection from the surface out to the spacecraft.

  8. Secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers as examined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. The selected harvesting points coincide with secondary cell wall (SCW) development in the fibers. Progressive but moderat...

  9. Prediction of leaf chemistry by the use of visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Don H.; Peterson, David L.; Matson, Pamela A.; Aber, John D.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical content of dry, ground leaf material sampled from deciduous and conifer tree species from sites in Alaska, Wisconsin, and California was estimated using visible and shortwave IR spectroscopy. Seven chemical components - sugar, starch, protein, cellulose, total chlorophyll, lignin, and total nitrogen - were analyzed by wet chemical methods and their concentrations regressed against log 1/rho and first and second differences of log 1/rho (where rho is measured reflectance) at wavelengths selected by stepwise regression. Predictions of chemical concentrations based on cross validation suggest that this technique may be useful for extracting vegetation canopy biochemical information by remote sensing.

  10. Isoconversion effective activation energy profiles by variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel R; White, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Thermal process characterization based on calculating effective activation energies from variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (VT-DRIFTS) measurements is demonstrated. Experimental factors that affect the accuracies of activation energy values are outlined. Infrared radiation scattering efficiency, thermal conductivity, and inertness towards chemical reactions are factors that should be considered when selecting an appropriate diluent for preparing samples. The Kubelka-Munk representation is superior to apparent absorbance when baseline variations in spectra measured at different temperatures can be minimized. Variable-temperature infrared spectral features, such as integrated absorption band area, can be used to compute isoconversion effective activation energies, provided that measured quantities are proportional to species concentrations. PMID:18230216

  11. A study on the protection to relics and the related problems with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqin; Liang, Guozheng; Dang, Gaochao

    2005-03-01

    The application of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to relic protection is studied by using a self-made fiber optics reflectance spectrophotometer. The major work done includes: (1) the composition of pigment on colored relics and its changes are identified; (2) the change on metal surface is monitored; (3) the reflectance spectrum characteristics of relic protection materials are studied. The results tell that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a new protection technique, characterized by its quickness and non-destructiveness to the relic. PMID:15683812

  12. Intramyocardial oxygen transport by quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in calves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbergh, Tobias; Larsson, Marcus; Szabó, Zoltán; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Intramyocardial oxygen transport was assessed during open-chest surgery in calves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using a small intramuscular fiber-optic probe. The sum of hemo- and myoglobin tissue fraction and oxygen saturation, the tissue fraction and oxidation of cytochrome aa3, and the tissue fraction of methemoglobin were estimated using a calibrated empirical light transport model. Increasing the oxygen content in the inhaled gas, 21%-50%-100%, in five calves (group A) gave an increasing oxygen saturation of 19+/-4%, 24+/-5%, and 28+/-8% (p<0.001, ANOVA repeated measures design) and mean tissue fractions of 1.6% (cytochrome aa3) and 1.1% (hemo- and myoglobin). Cardiac arrest in two calves gave an oxygen saturation lower than 5%. In two calves (group B), a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD pump) was implanted. Oxygen saturation in group B animals increased with LVAD pump speed (p<0.001, ANOVA) and with oxygen content in inhaled gas (p<0.001, ANOVA). The cytochrome aa3 oxidation level was above 96% in both group A and group B calves, including the two cases involving cardiac arrest. In conclusion, the estimated tissue fractions and oxygenation/oxidation levels of the myocardial chromophores during respiratory and hemodynamic provocations were in agreement with previously presented results, demonstrating the potential of the method.

  13. Noninvasive measurements of carotenoids in bovine udder by reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E.; Müller, Kerstin E.; Lademann, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    For a long time, the antioxidative status in cattle has been discussed as an indicator for stress conditions resulting from disease or exertion. Until now, invasive approaches have been necessary to obtain blood samples or biopsy materials and gain insights into the antioxidative status of cattle. Due to these efforts and the costs of the analyses, serial sampling is feasible in an experimental setting, but not for measurements on a routine basis. The present study focuses on the feasibility of an innovative, noninvasive spectroscopic technique that allows in vivo measurements of carotenoids in the skin by reflection spectroscopy. To this end, in a first trial, repeated measurements of the carotenoid concentration of the udder skin were performed on 25 healthy cattle from different breeds. Carotenoid concentrations showed highly significant differences between individual animals (P<0.001), although they were kept under the same environmental conditions and received the same diet. The carotenoid concentrations in "sensitive" and "robust" cows (evaluated by a temperament test) differed significantly (P<0.005), with higher concentrations observed in robust cows.

  14. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  15. Aerosol collection and analysis using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Wong, Diane M.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Williams, Barry R.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Manning, Christopher J.

    2004-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is routinely employed for the identification of organic molecules and, more recently, for the classification of biological materials. We have developed a sample collection method that facilitates infrared analysis of airborne particulates using a diffuse reflectance (DR) technique. Efforts are underway to extend the method to include simultaneous analysis of vapor phase organics by using adsorbent substrates compatible with the DR technique. This series of laboratory results provides proof-of-principle for both the sample collection and data collection processes. Signal processing of the DR spectra is shown to provide rapid qualitative identification of representative aerosol materials, including particulate matter commonly found in the environment. We compare the results for such materials as bacterial spores, pollens and molds, clays and dusts, smoke and soot. Background correction analysis is shown to be useful for differentiation and identification of these constituents. Issues relating to complex mixtures of environmental samples under highly variable conditions are considered. Instrumentation development and materials research are now underway with the aim of constructing a compact sampling system for near real-time monitoring of aerosol and organic pollutants. A miniature, tilt-compensated Fourier transform spectrometer will provide spectroscopic interrogation. A series of advanced digital signal processing methods are also under development to enhance the sensor package. The approach will be useful for industrial applications, chemical and biological agent detection, and environmental monitoring for chemical vapors, hazardous air pollutants, and allergens.

  16. High-order derivative spectroscopy for selecting spectral regions and channels for remote sensing algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    1999-12-01

    A remote sensing reflectance model, which describes the transfer of irradiant light within a plant canopy or water column has previously been used to simulate the nadir viewing reflectance of vegetation canopies and leaves under solar induced or an artificial light source and the water surface reflectance. Wavelength dependent features such as canopy reflectance leaf absorption and canopy bottom reflectance as well as water absorption and water bottom reflectance have been used to simulate or generate synthetic canopy and water surface reflectance signatures. This paper describes how derivative spectroscopy can be utilized to invert the synthetic or modeled as well as measured reflectance signatures with the goal of selecting the optimal spectral channels or regions of these environmental media. Specifically, in this paper synthetic and measured reflectance signatures are used for selecting vegetative dysfunction variables for different plant species. The measured reflectance signatures as well as model derived or synthetic signatures are processed using extremely fast higher order derivative processing techniques which filter the synthetic/modeled or measured spectra and automatically selects the optimal channels for automatic and direct algorithm application. The higher order derivative filtering technique makes use of a translating and dilating, derivative spectroscopy signal processing (TDDS-SPR) approach based upon remote sensing science and radiative transfer theory. Thus the technique described, unlike other signal processing techniques being developed for hyperspectral signatures and associated imagery, is based upon radiative transfer theory instead of statistical or purely mathematical operational techniques such as wavelets.

  17. Near-earth asteroids - Possible sources from reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, L. A.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mccord, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    The diversity of reflectance spectra noted among near-earth asteroids that were compared with selected asteroids, planets and satellites to determine possible source regions is indicative of different mineralogical composition and, accordingly, of more than one source region. Spectral signatures that are similar to those of main belt asteroids support models deriving some of these asteroids from the 5:2 Kirkwood gap and the Flora family, by way of gravitational perturbations. The differences in composition found between near-earth asteroids and planetary and satellite surfaces are in keeping with theoretical arguments that such bodies should not be sources. While some near-earth asteroids furnish portions of the earth's meteorite flux, other sources must also contribute.

  18. Far- and Deep-UV Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanoparticles Measured Based on Attenuated Total Reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Yamada, Yosuke; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-02-16

    Far- and deep-ultraviolet spectra (150-300 nm) of semiconductor nanoparticles (zinc oxide and zinc sulfide) are successfully measured by using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy, and analyzed using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The obtained spectra show good consistency with earlier synchrotron-radiation spectra and with theoretical calculations. The FDTD simulation results show that the present system collected the correct spectra. In the present system, the obtained spectra are affected by the real part n of the complex refractive index more strongly than the imaginary part k. It is also revealed both experimentally and theoretically that spectral intensities of the semiconductor nanoparticles are approximately one tenth those of liquid samples. These results provide insights into the far- and deep-ultraviolet spectroscopy based on the ATR system, and show the general applicability of our original ATR spectroscopy to semiconductor nanoparticles. The system needs neither high vacuum nor much space, and enables rapid and systematic investigation of the electronic states of various materials. PMID:26691240

  19. Reflectance spectroscopy with polarized light: is it sensitive to cellular and nuclear morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Gossage, Kirk; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    1999-12-01

    We present a method for selective detection of size-dependent scattering characteristics of epithelial cells in vivo based on polarized illumination and polarization sensitive detection of scattered light. We illustrate the method using phantoms designed to simulate squamous epithelial tissue and progressing to epithelial tissue in vitro and in vivo. Elastic light scattering spectroscopy with polarized illumination/detection dramatically reduces background signals due to both diffuse stromal scattering and hemoglobin absorption. Resulting spectra can be described as a linear combination of forward and backscattering components determined from Mie theory. Nuclear sizes and refractive indices extracted by fitting experimental spectra to this model agree well with previous measurements. Reflectance spectroscopy with polarized light can provide quantitative morphological information which could potentially be used for non-invasive detection of neoplastic changes.

  20. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy for Total Carbon Analysis of Hawaiian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, M. L.; Bruland, G. L.; Deenik, J. L.; Grunwald, S.; Uchida, R.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate assessment of total carbon (Ct) content is important for fertility and nutrient management of soils, as well as for carbon sequestration studies. The non-destructive analysis of soils by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a potential supplement or alternative to the traditional time-consuming and costly combustion method of Ct analysis, especially in spatial or temporal studies where sample numbers are large. We investigate the use of the visible to near-infrared (VNIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of soils coupled with chemometric analysis to determine their Ct content. Our specific focus is on Hawaiian soils of agricultural importance. Though this technique has been introduced to the soil community, it has yet to be fully tested and used in practical applications for all soil types, and this is especially true for Hawaii. In short, DRS characterizes and differentiates materials based on the variation of the light reflected by a material at certain wavelengths. This spectrum is dependent on the material’s composition, structure, and physical state. Multivariate chemometric analysis unravels the information in a set of spectra that can help predict a property such as Ct. This study benefits from the remarkably diverse soils of Hawaii. Our sample set includes 216 soil samples from 145 pedons from the main Hawaiian Islands archived at the National Soil Survey Center in Lincoln, NE, along with more than 50 newly-collected samples from Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, and Maui. In total, over 90 series from 10 of the 12 soil orders are represented. The Ct values of these samples range from < 1% - 55%. We anticipate that the diverse nature of our sample set will ensure a model with applicability to a wide variety of soils, both in Hawaii and globally. We have measured the VNIR and MIR spectra of these samples and obtained their Ct values by dry combustion. Our initial analyses are conducted using only samples obtained from the Lincoln archive. In this

  1. Near- and Mid-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for the Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several decades near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to determine the composition of a variety of agricultural products. More recently, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) has similarly been shown to be able to determine the co...

  2. Mid- Versus Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for On-Site Determination of Soil Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has demonstrated that the determination of soil C diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is often more accurate and produces more robust calibrations than near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) when analyzing ground, dry soils. DRIFTS is also not ...

  3. Selective reflection of light from Rb2 molecular vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Aleksandr; Gogyan, Anahit; Movsisyan, Marina; Papoyan, Aram

    2015-07-01

    We report the first observation of selective reflection of light from an interface of a dielectric window and molecular vapor of Rb2 dimers formed in all-sapphire sealed-off rubidium vapor cell (temperature up to 520 °C, atomic and molecular densities up to 1018 and 3 × 1016 cm-3, respectively). The selective reflection signals were recorded on various rovibronic components of 1(X) 1 Σg+ - 1(A) 1 Σu+ bound-bound electronic transition of Rb2 by scanning a diode laser frequency in a spectral range of 851-854 nm. Mainly selective reflection signals corresponding to groups of several rovibronic transitions have been recorded, which was attributed to high spectral density, large collisional broadening, and low oscillator strength of individual rovibronic transitions.

  4. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaque by reflection spectroscopy and thermography: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Haugen, Olav A.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2005-04-01

    Many methods for detecting and measuring vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques have been proposed. These include reflection spectroscopy, thermography, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This paper presents an analysis and a comparison of two of these methods, near-infrared reflection spectroscopy (NIRS) and thermography. Most of the published literature evaluate methods statistically. A more analytic approach will make it easier to compare the different methods and determine if the measured signal will be strong enough in a real measurement situation. This is the approach taken in this article. Eight samples of human aorta were examined by NIRS and subsequently prepared for histology. A total of 28 measurement points were selected. A measure of the lipid content based on reflection spectra is proposed. Comparisons of this lipid measure with histology show that the lipid content in the plaques yields relatively small changes in the value of this lipid-index. Reflectance spectra from models based on the diffusion approximation for total reflectance were simulated. Temperature measurements were performed on three Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits and one New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit with a thermistor-type intravascular temperature sensor. The measurements gave no significant signals which correlated with the subsequent histology. A simple analytic model was developed which indicates that a temperature increase of more than 0.01-0.04 °C at the surface of a vessel wall, due to inflammation in a plaque, is unlikely. Such a small temperature difference will probably be obscured by normal variation in the vessel wall temperature.

  5. Determination of plant silicon content with near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Smis, Adriaan; Ancin Murguzur, Francisco Javier; Struyf, Eric; Soininen, Eeva M.; Herranz Jusdado, Juan G.; Meire, Patrick; Bråthen, Kari Anne

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most common elements in the earth bedrock, and its continental cycle is strongly biologically controlled. Yet, research on the biogeochemical cycle of Si in ecosystems is hampered by the time and cost associated with the currently used chemical analysis methods. Here, we assessed the suitability of Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring Si content in plant tissues. NIR spectra depend on the characteristics of the present bonds between H and N, C and O, which can be calibrated against concentrations of various compounds. Because Si in plants always occurs as hydrated condensates of orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), linked to organic biomolecules, we hypothesized that NIRS is suitable for measuring Si content in plants across a range of plant species. We based our testing on 442 samples of 29 plant species belonging to a range of growth forms. We calibrated the NIRS method against a well-established plant Si analysis method by using partial least-squares regression. Si concentrations ranged from detection limit (0.24 ppmSi) to 7.8% Si on dry weight and were well predicted by NIRS. The model fit with validation data was good across all plant species (n = 141, R2 = 0.90, RMSEP = 0.24), but improved when only graminoids were modeled (n = 66, R2 = 0.95, RMSEP = 0.10). A species specific model for the grass Deschampsia cespitosa showed even slightly better results than the model for all graminoids (n = 16, R2 = 0.93, RMSEP = 0.015). We show for the first time that NIRS is applicable for determining plant Si concentration across a range of plant species and growth forms, and represents a time- and cost-effective alternative to the chemical Si analysis methods. As NIRS can be applied concurrently to a range of plant organic constituents, it opens up unprecedented research possibilities for studying interrelations between Si and other plant compounds in vegetation, and for addressing the role of Si in ecosystems across a range of Si

  6. Technique for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the kubelka-munk function

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Yang, Yuanlong

    2003-09-02

    Method and apparatus for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function. In one aspect, the method is used to determine whether a tissue sample is cancerous or not and comprises the steps of (a) measuring the diffuse reflectance from the tissue sample at a first wavelength and at a second wavelength, wherein the first wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 255-265 nm and wherein the second wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 275-285 nm; (b) using the Kubelka-Munk function to transform the diffuse reflectance measurement obtained at the first and second wavelengths; and (c) comparing a ratio or a difference of the transformed Kubelka-Munk measurements at the first and second wavelengths to appropriate standards determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous. One can use the spectral profile of KMF between 250 nm to 300 nm to determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous or precancerous. According to the value at the first and second wavelengths determine whether or not the malignant tissue is invasive or mixed invasive and in situ or carcinoma in situ.

  7. Reflections on Teaching Literacy: Selected Speeches of Margaret J. Early

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolcott, Willa, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The late Margaret J. Early was a nationally renowned educator in the field of English education and reading, a past president of the National Council of Teachers of English, an author and an editor herself, and the recipient of many awards. The book Reflections on Teaching Literacy: Selected Speeches of Margaret J. Early, edited by Willa Wolcott,…

  8. Select Higher Education Chief Diversity Officers: Roles, Realities, and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittard, Lesley-Anne

    2010-01-01

    This naturalistic inquiry sought to obtain the "essence" of select administrative chief diversity officers (CDOs), by exploring their participant profiles, organizational realities, and career reflections. Participants self-identified as their institution's senior most chief executive, were poised executively, and charged to facilitate an…

  9. Optimally designed narrowband guided-mode resonance reflectance filters for mid-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jui-Nung; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Bhargava, Rohit; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    An alternative to the well-established Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, termed discrete frequency infrared (DFIR) spectrometry, has recently been proposed. This approach uses narrowband mid-infrared reflectance filters based on guided-mode resonance (GMR) in waveguide gratings, but filters designed and fabricated have not attained the spectral selectivity (≤ 32 cm−1) commonly employed for measurements of condensed matter using FT-IR spectroscopy. With the incorporation of dispersion and optical absorption of materials, we present here optimal design of double-layer surface-relief silicon nitride-based GMR filters in the mid-IR for various narrow bandwidths below 32 cm−1. Both shift of the filter resonance wavelengths arising from the dispersion effect and reduction of peak reflection efficiency and electric field enhancement due to the absorption effect show that the optical characteristics of materials must be taken into consideration rigorously for accurate design of narrowband GMR filters. By incorporating considerations for background reflections, the optimally designed GMR filters can have bandwidth narrower than the designed filter by the antireflection equivalence method based on the same index modulation magnitude, without sacrificing low sideband reflections near resonance. The reported work will enable use of GMR filters-based instrumentation for common measurements of condensed matter, including tissues and polymer samples. PMID:22109445

  10. The view of AGN-host alignment via reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; Parker, Michael L.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lohfink, Anne M.

    2016-04-01

    The fuelling of active galactic nuclei (AGN) - via material propagated through the galactic disc or via minor mergers - is expected to leave an imprint on the alignment of the sub-pc disc relative to the host galaxy's stellar disc. Determining the inclination of the inner disc usually relies on the launching angle of the jet; here instead we use the inclination derived from reflection fits to a sample of AGN. We determine the distorting effect of unmodelled Fe XXV/XXVI features and, via extensive simulations, determine the difference in disc inclination resulting from the use of RELXILL compared to REFLIONX. We compare inner disc inclinations to those for the host galaxy stellar disc derived from the Hubble formula and, via Monte Carlo simulations, find a strong lack of a correlation (at ≫5σ) implying either widespread feeding via mergers if we assume the sample to be homogeneous, or that radiative disc warps are distorting our view of the emission. However, we find that by removing a small (˜1/5) subset of AGN, the remaining sample is consistent with random sampling of an underlying 1:1 correlation (at the 3σ level). A heterogenous sample would likely imply that our view is not dominated by radiative disc warps but instead by different feeding mechanisms with the majority consistent with coplanar accretion (although this may be the result of selection bias), whilst a smaller but not insignificant fraction may have been fuelled by minor mergers in the recent history of the host galaxy.

  11. Reflectance spectroscopy: quantitative analysis techniques for remote sensing applications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Roush, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods for the analysis of remotely sensed reflectance data are compared, including empirical methods and scattering theories, both of which are important for solving remote sensing problems. The concept of the photon mean path length and the implications for use in modeling reflectance spectra are presented.-from Authors

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy in planetary science: Review and strategy for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, Thomas B. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy is a remote sensing technique used to study the surfaces and atmospheres of solar system bodies. It provides first-order information on the presence and amounts of certain ions, molecules, and minerals on a surface or in an atmosphere. Reflectance spectroscopy has become one of the most important investigations conducted on most current and planned NASA Solar System Exploration Program space missions. This book reviews the field of reflectance spectroscopy, including information on the scientific technique, contributions, present conditions, and future directions and needs.

  13. Oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy for depth sensitive measurements in the epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Fradkin, Leonid; Nieman, Linda T.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2013-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy has shown potential as a tool for precancer detection by discriminating alterations in the optical properties within epithelial tissues. Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with the progression of epithelial cancerous lesions can be especially challenging in the oral cavity due to the variable thickness of the epithelium and the presence of keratinization. Optical spectroscopy of epithelial tissue with improved depth resolution would greatly assist in the isolation of optical properties associated with cancer progression. Here, we report a fiber optic probe for oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) that is capable of depth sensitive detection by combining the following three approaches: multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating. We analyze how probe design parameters are related to improvements in collection efficiency of scattered photons from superficial tissue layers and to increased depth discrimination within epithelium. We have demonstrated that obliquely-oriented collection fibers increase both depth selectivity and collection efficiency of scattering signal. Currently, we evaluate this technology in a clinical trial of patients presenting lesions suspicious for dysplasia or carcinoma in the oral cavity. We use depth sensitive spectroscopic data to develop automated algorithms for analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of the multilayer oral epithelial tissue. Our initial results show that OPRS has the potential to improve the detection and monitoring of epithelial precancers in the oral cavity.

  14. Feasibility of quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for targeted measurement of renal ischemia during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Utsav O.; Maddox, Michael M.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Dorsey, Philip J.; Wang, Mei; McCaslin, Ian Ross; Brown, J. Quincy; Lee, Benjamin R.

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of warm ischemia time during partial nephrectomy (PN) is critical to minimizing ischemic damage and improving postoperative kidney function, while maintaining tumor resection efficacy. Recently, methods for localizing the effects of warm ischemia to the region of the tumor via selective clamping of higher-order segmental artery branches have been shown to have superior outcomes compared with clamping the main renal artery. However, artery identification can prolong operative time and increase the blood loss and reduce the positive effects of selective ischemia. Quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can provide a convenient, real-time means to aid in artery identification during laparoscopic PN. The feasibility of quantitative DRS for real-time longitudinal measurement of tissue perfusion and vascular oxygenation in laparoscopic nephrectomy was investigated in vivo in six Yorkshire swine kidneys (n=three animals). DRS allowed for rapid identification of ischemic areas after selective vessel occlusion. In addition, the rates of ischemia induction and recovery were compared for main renal artery versus tertiary segmental artery occlusion, and it was found that the tertiary segmental artery occlusion trends toward faster recovery after ischemia, which suggests a potential benefit of selective ischemia. Quantitative DRS could provide a convenient and fast tool for artery identification and evaluation of the depth, spatial extent, and duration of selective tissue ischemia in laparoscopic PN.

  15. Reflectance spectroscopy of pigmented cutaneous benign and malignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Kundurdjiev, T.; Pavlova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-10-01

    For the DRS measurements of skin benign, dysplastic and malignant lesions in vivo we applied halogen lamp (LS-1, OceanOptics Inc, Dunedin, Fl, USA) as a continuous light source in the region of 400-900 nm, optical probe (6+1 fibers) for the delivery of illumination and diffuse reflected light from the skin investigated and microspectrometer USB4000 (OceanOptics Inc., Dunedin, Fl, USA) for a storage and display of the spectra detected. As a diffuse reflectance standard Spectralon® plate was used to calibrate the spectrometer. The reflectance spectra obtained from normal skin in identical anatomic sites of different patients have similar spectral shape features, slightly differ by the reflectance intensity at different wavelengths, depending on the particular patient' skin phototype. One could find diagnostically important spectral features, related to specific intensity changes for a given wavelength due to specific pigments appearance, slope changes by value and sign for the reflectance spectra curves in a specific spectral range, disappearance or manifestation of minima, related to hemoglobin absorption at 410-420 nm, 543, 575 nm. Based on the observed peculiarities multispectral analysis of the reflectance spectra of the different lesions was used and diagnostically specific features are found. Discrimination using the DRS data obtained between benign compound and dermal nevi (45 cases), dysplastic nevi (17 cases) and pigmented malignant melanoma (41 cases) lesions is achieved with a diagnostic accuracy of 96 % for the benign nevi vs. MM, and 90 % for the dysplastic nevi vs. MM.

  16. Quantitative assessment of hydrocarbon contamination in soil using reflectance spectroscopy: a "multipath" approach.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Guy; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2013-11-01

    that predicting TPH levels at low concentrations in selected soils at high precision levels is viable. Dividing a dataset into training, validation, and test groups affects the modeling process, and different preprocessing methods, alone or in combination, need to be selected based on soil type and PHC type. MPS was found to be a better parameter for selecting the best performing model than ratio of prediction to deviation, yielding models with the same performance but less complicated and more stable. The use of the "all possibilities" system proved to be mandatory for efficient optimal modeling of reflectance spectroscopy data. PMID:24160885

  17. Quantitative characterization of traumatic bruises by combined pulsed photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Randeberg, Lise L.; Majaron, Boris

    2015-02-01

    We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for characterization of the bruise evolution process. While DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths, the PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin). In this study, we simulate experimental DRS spectra and PPTR signals using the Monte Carlo technique and focus on characterization of a suitable fitting approach for their analysis. We find inverse Monte Carlo to be superior to the diffusion approximation approach for the inverse analysis of DRS spectra. The analysis is then augmented with information obtainable by the fitting of the PPTR signal. We show that both techniques can be coupled in a combined fitting approach. The combining of two complementary techniques improves the robustness and accuracy of the inverse analysis, enabling a comprehensive quantitative characterization of the bruise evolution dynamics.

  18. Experimental analysis of bruises in human volunteers using radiometric depth profiling and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2015-07-01

    We combine pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) depth profiling with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurements for a comprehensive analysis of bruise evolution in vivo. While PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin), DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths and thus offers an additional insight into dynamics of the hemoglobin degradation products. Combining the two approaches enables us to quantitatively characterize bruise evolution dynamics. Our results indicate temporal variations of the bruise evolution parameters in the course of bruise self-healing process. The obtained parameter values and trends represent a basis for a future development of an objective technique for bruise age determination.

  19. [Application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy in grass breeding with space flight mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-Bo; Han, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yun-Wei; Guo, Hui-Qin

    2008-02-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a new fast and efficient analysis method. It has been wildly used in many areas such as evaluation of feedstuff, assessment of soil fertilizer and so on. In the present paper, the principle, technique method and merits of NIRS were introduced. The potential application of NIRS in grass breeding with space flight mutagenesis was discussed in areas such as analysis of grass nutrition, estimate of secondary metabolism compounds, forecast of disease and insects resistance, and evaluation of abiotic stress. The conclusion is that application of NIRS in grass breeding with space mutagenesis is significant in both academic and technical areas because it not only improves the efficiency of mutation selection but helps uncover the mechanism of space mutation breeding. PMID:18479009

  20. Calibration and prediction of amino acids in stevia leaf powder using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guan; Wang, Ruiguo; Quampah, Alfred Julius; Rong, Zhengqin; Shi, Chunhai; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-28

    The use of stevia as animal feed additive has been researched over the years, but how to rapidly predict its amino acid contents has not been studied yet by using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. In the present study, 301 samples of stevia leaf powder were defined as the calibration set from which calibration models were optimized, and the performance of prediction was evaluated. Compared with other mathematical treatments, the models developed with the "1, 12, 12, 1" treatment, combined with modified partial least-squares regression and standard normal variance with de-trending, had a significant potential in predicting amino acid contents, such as threonine, serine, etc. Six spectral regions were found to possess large spectrum variation and show high contribution to calibration models. From the present study, the calibration models of amino acids in stevia were successfully developed and could be applied to quality control in feed processing, breeding selection and mutant screening. PMID:22066716

  1. Improved depth resolution in near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using obliquely oriented fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilwind, Rachel Estelle; 't Hooft, Gert; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a significant improvement of depth selectivity when using obliquely oriented fibers for near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. This is confirmed by diffuse reflectance measurements of a two-layer tissue-mimicking phantom across the spectral range from 1000 to 1940 nm. The experimental proof is supported by Monte Carlo simulations. The results reveal up to fourfold reduction in the mean optical penetration depth, twofold reduction in its variation, and a decrease in the number of scattering events when a single fiber is oriented at an angle of 60 deg. The effect of reducing the mean optical penetration depth is enhanced by orienting both fibers inwardly. Using outwardly oriented fibers enables more selective probing of deeper layers, while reducing the contribution from surface layers. We further demonstrate that the effect of an inward oblique arrangement can be approximated to a decrease in fiber-to-fiber separation in the case of a perpendicular fiber arrangement. This approximation is valid in the weak- or absorption-free regime. Our results assert the advantages of using obliquely oriented fibers when attempting to specifically address superficial tissue layers, for example, for skin cancer detection, or in noninvasive glucose monitoring. Such flexibility could be further advantageous in a range of minimally invasive applications, including catheter-based interventions.

  2. Doppler-shifted reflections of X rays in beamfoil spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, E. M.; Mcintyre, L. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon foils were positioned at roughly 10 deg to the conventional perpendicular position so that the spectrometer would view the beam on emergence from the foil, with no radiation shielded by a bowed or wrinkled foil or by the foil holder. Extraneous peaks due to reflected radiation were detected in the spectrum obtained with the tilted foil. A large satellite appears longward of the spectral line and is attributed to Doppler-shifted radiation reflected from the foil surface. Special tests arranged to validate the origin of the satellites are described. The relative intensity of the reflected radiation compared with the direct radiation observed is at variance with the relative intensities reported for longer wavelengths. The reasons for this, possible effects of spectrometer geometry, and applications in the investigation or generation of polarization remain to be investigated

  3. Determination of styrene-butadiene rubber composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. S.; Kiselev, S. A.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Budeeva, A. V.; Mashukov, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    A rapid method for determining the composition of styrene-butadiene rubber using attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was proposed. PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and infrared transmission spectroscopy were used as absolute techniques for determining the compositions of calibration samples. It was shown that the method was applicable to a wide range of styrene-butadiene rubbers, did not require additional sample preparation, and was easily reproducible.

  4. Identification of thermal degradation using probabilistic models in reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criner, A. K.; Cherry, A. J.; Cooney, A. T.; Katter, T. D.; Banks, H. T.; Hu, Shuhua; Catenacci, Jared

    2015-03-01

    Different probabilistic models of molecular vibration modes are considered to model the reflectance spectra of chemical species through the dielectric constant. We discuss probability measure estimators in parametric and nonparametric models. Analyses of ceramic matrix composite samples that have been heat treated for different amounts of times are compared. We finally compare these results with the analysis of vitreous silica using nonparametric models.

  5. Monitoring bruise age using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurdy, John W.; Duffy, Susan; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    The ability to determine the age of a bruise of unknown age mechanism is important in matters of domestic and child abuse and forensics. While physicians are asked to make clinical judgment on the age of a bruise using color and tenderness, studies have shown that a physicians estimate is highly inaccurate and in cases no better than chance alone. We present here the temporal progression of reflection spectrum collected from accidentally inflicted contusions in adult and child study participants with a synopsis of the observed phenomena. Reflection spectra collected using a portable fiber optic reflection spectrometer can track the increase in extravasated hemoglobin from trauma caused blood vessel rupture and subsequent removal of this hemoglobin occurring concurrent with an increase in the absorption attributed to the breakdown product bilirubin. We hypothesize that this time dependent pattern can be used to determine the age of an unknown bruise in an individual provided rate constant information for the patient can be determined in a controlled calibration bruise. Using reflection spectra to estimate bruise age can provide a rapid and noninvasive method to improve the ability of physicians in dating the age of a contusion.

  6. Pupil diameter reflects uncertainty in attentional selection during visual search

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Joy J.; Blumenfeld, Zachary; Tyson, Terence L.; Minzenberg, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Pupil diameter has long been used as a metric of cognitive processing. However, recent advances suggest that the cognitive sources of change in pupil size may reflect LC-NE function and the calculation of unexpected uncertainty in decision processes (Aston-Jones and Cohen, 2005; Yu and Dayan, 2005). In the current experiments, we explored the role of uncertainty in attentional selection on task-evoked changes in pupil diameter during visual search. We found that task-evoked changes in pupil diameter were related to uncertainty during attentional selection as measured by reaction time (RT) and performance accuracy (Experiments 1-2). Control analyses demonstrated that the results are unlikely to be due to error monitoring or response uncertainty. Our results suggest that pupil diameter can be used as an implicit metric of uncertainty in ongoing attentional selection requiring effortful control processes. PMID:26300759

  7. NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMISSION AND REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY FOR DETERMINATION OF DIETARY FIBER IN BARLEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley. The Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and the NIR Systems 6500 monochromator were used to obtain transmission and reflectance spectra, respectiv...

  8. ChemCam Passive Reflectance Spectroscopy at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F.; Cloutis, E.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D. L.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Gasnault, O.; Kinch, K. M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rice, M. S.; Wiens, R. C.; DeFlores, L.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) portion of the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover uses 3 dispersive spectrometers to cover the ultraviolet (240-342 nm), visible (382-469 nm) and visible/near-infrared (474-906 nm) spectral regions at high spectral (<0.5nm) and spatial (0.65mrad) resolution. In active LIBS mode, light emitted from a laser-generated plasma is dispersed onto these spectrometers and used to detect elemental emission lines. Typical observations include 3 msec-exposure 'dark' spectra (acquired with the LIBS laser off) used to remove the background signal from the LIBS measurement. Similar 'passive' observations of the ChemCam calibration target holder can be made at similar times of day and at identical exposure times (to minimize variations from dark current). Because this target exhibits ~95% flat reflectance in the ~400-900 nm region, radiance spectra ratios (surface/calibration target) can be normalized to known calibration target lab spectra to produce relative reflectance spectra (400-900 nm) with an estimated accuracy of 10-20%. Initial results replicated the known spectral shape and overall reflectance values of the ChemCam calibration targets and green color chip on the Mastcam calibration target. Dust contamination was evident, although dust on the ChemCam calibration targets is minimized by their tilted placement on the rover deck. All ChemCam targets that were sunlit during LIBS acquisition (~80% of all measurements) provide 'dark' spectra for which relative reflectance spectra can be obtained. Owing to the dusty nature of the Gale landing sites, passive spectra observed to date exhibit spectral shapes indicative of ferric phases, similar to spectra of palagonitic soils. Most spectra are bracketed in reflectance by typical 'bright' and 'dark' spectra from the OMEGA and CRISM orbital spectrometers. Preliminary Mastcam reflectance spectra are similar, providing additional confidence regarding the

  9. [Rapid determination of fatty acids in soybean oils by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Feng-ping; Liu, Yao-min; Wu, Zong-wen; Suo, You-rui

    2012-08-01

    In the present research, a novel method was established for determination of five fatty acids in soybean oil by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy. The optimum conditions of mathematics model of five components (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3) were studied, including the sample set selection, chemical value analysis, the detection methods and condition. Chemical value was analyzed by gas chromatography. One hundred fifty eight samples were selected, 138 for modeling set, 10 for testing set and 10 for unknown sample set. All samples were placed in sample pools and scanned by transmission reflection-near infrared spectrum after sonicleaning for 10 minute. The 1100-2500 nm spectral region was analyzed. The acquisition interval was 2 nm. Modified partial least square method was chosen for calibration mode creating. Result demonstrated that the 1-VR of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.8839, 0.5830, 0.9001, 0.9776 and 0.9596, respectively. And the SECV of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.42, 0.29, 0.83, 0.46 and 0.21, respectively. The standard error of the calibration (SECV) of five fatty acids between the reference value of testing sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.891, 0.790, 0.900, 0.976 and 0.942, respectively. It was proved that the near infrared spectrum predictive value was linear with chemical value and the mathematical model established for fatty acids of soybean oil was feasible. For validation, 10 unknown samples were selected for analysis by near infrared spectrum. The result demonstrated that the relative standard deviation between predict value and chemical value was less than 5.50%. That was to say that transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy had a good veracity in analysis of fatty acids of soybean oil

  10. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  11. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of pre- and post-treated oral submucous fibrosis: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivabalan, S.; Ponranjini Vedeswari, C.; Jayachandran, S.; Koteeswaran, D.; Pravda, C.; Aruna, P.; Ganesan, S.

    2010-02-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a high risk precancerous condition characterized by changes in the connective tissue fibers of the lamina propria and deeper parts leading to stiffness of the mucosa and restricted mouth opening, fibrosis of the lining mucosa of the upper digestive tract involving the oral cavity, oro- and hypo-pharynx and the upper two-thirds of the oesophagus. Optical reflectance measurements have been used to extract diagnostic information from a variety of tissue types, in vivo. We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to quantitatively monitor tumour response to chemotherapy. Twenty patients with submucous fibrosis were diagnosed with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and treated with the chemotherapy drug, Dexamethasone sodium phosphate and Hyaluronidase injection for seven weeks and after the treatment they were again subjected to the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The major observed spectral alterations on pre and post treated submucous fibrosis is an increase in the diffuse reflectance from 450 to 600 nm. Normal mucosa has showed higher reflectance when compared to the pre and post-treated cases. The spectral changes were quantified and correlated to conventional diagnostic results viz., maximum mouth opening, tongue protrusion and burning sensation. The results of this study suggest that the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy may also be considered as complementary optical techniques to monitor oral tissue transformation.

  12. Investigation of select energetic materials by differential reflection spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna Marie

    The presence of explosive or energetic materials is prevalent in today's world. Terrorists continue to target buildings and mass transit systems with explosive devices. The detection of these energetic materials is necessary to insure national security and welfare. Detection techniques such as X-ray scanners, Raman spectroscopy, Terahertz spectroscopy and ion mobility spectrometry are in current use or development; however, none of these are appropriate for all necessary applications. These techniques include. The present document provides an overview of the current detection techniques and describes a new technique for detecting energetic materials called differential reflection spectrometry (DRS). DRS essentially measures the optical absorption of energetic materials. The use of DRS has led to the discovery of previously unreported optical characteristics for some energetic compounds that are unique to the individual material. These optical characteristics consist of absorption shoulders between 270 and 420 nm, e.g. near 420 nm for 2, 4, 6 trinitrotoluene (TNT). In the presented research, the origin of the differential reflection spectra obtained was investigated using several techniques including UV-Visible spectrophotometry (transmission and reflection) and computer molecular modeling. Experimental DRS spectra of TNT, hexahydro-1,3,5 trinitro-1,3,5 triazine (RDX), octahydro 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,6 tetrazocine (HMX), 18 pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2, 4, 6, n-tetranitro-n-methylaniline (Tetryl) were taken and analyzed. From the experimental results and verification by molecular modeling, it was found that the absorption features observed in the redder region of the UV range (270--420 nm) are due to molecular orbital transitions in the nitro (NO2) groups of the measured explosives. These transitions only occur in specific conditions, such as high concentration solutions and solids, where the normally forbidden transitions are allowed. The unique

  13. Early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and autofluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous preclinical study demonstrated that both visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy, each of which yields a different set of physiological information, can predict skin flap viability with high accuracy in a MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model. In this report, we further evaluated our technique for the early detection and differentiation of venous occlusion and arterial occlusion in a rat groin flap model. We performed both diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence measurements on the skin flap model and statistically differentiated between flaps with and without occlusions as well as between flaps with venous occlusion and those with arterial occlusion based on these non-invasive optical measurements. Our preliminary results suggested that visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy can be potentially used clinically to detect both venous and arterial occlusion and differentiate one from the other accurately at an early time point. PMID:26977363

  14. Early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and autofluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-02-01

    Our previous preclinical study demonstrated that both visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy, each of which yields a different set of physiological information, can predict skin flap viability with high accuracy in a MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model. In this report, we further evaluated our technique for the early detection and differentiation of venous occlusion and arterial occlusion in a rat groin flap model. We performed both diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence measurements on the skin flap model and statistically differentiated between flaps with and without occlusions as well as between flaps with venous occlusion and those with arterial occlusion based on these non-invasive optical measurements. Our preliminary results suggested that visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy can be potentially used clinically to detect both venous and arterial occlusion and differentiate one from the other accurately at an early time point. PMID:26977363

  15. Detection of propranolol in pharmaceutical formulations by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotardo, Mara Andréia; Tognolli, João Olímpio; Pezza, Helena Redigolo; Pezza, Leonardo

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes an analytical reflectometric method that has an objective not only the industrial quality control but also to detect possible falsifications and/or adulterations of propranolol in pharmaceutical formulations. The method is based on the diffuse reflectance measurements of the colored product (III) of the spot test reaction between propranolol hydrochloride (I) and 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide (II) using filter paper as solid support. Spot test conditions have been investigated using experimental design in order to identify and optimize the critical factors. The factors evaluated were DCQ concentration, propranolol solvent and DCQ solvent. The best reaction conditions were achieved with the addition of 30 μL of propranolol solution in ethanol 35% (v/v) and 30 μL of DCQ solution at 70 mg mL -1 in acetone, in this order. All reflectance measurements were carried out at 500 nm and the linear range was from 8.45 × 10 -4 to 8.45 × 10 -2 mol L -1 ( r = 0.998). The limit of detection was 1.01 × 10 -4 mol L -1. No interference was observed from the assessed excipients and drugs. The method was applied to determine propranolol in commercial brands of pharmaceuticals. The results obtained by the proposed method were favorably compared with those given by the British Pharmacopoeia procedure.

  16. MEMS-based programmable reflective slit mask for multi-object spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, Michael; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Lanzoni, Patrick; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Multi-object spectroscopy is a powerful tool for space and ground-based telescopes for the study of the formation of galaxies. This technique requires a programmable slit mask for astronomical object selection. We are developing MEMS-based programmable reflective slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy that consist of micromirror arrays on which each micromirror of size 100 x 200 μm2 is electrostatically tilted providing a precise angle. The main requirements for these arrays are cryogenic environment capabilities, precise and uniform tilt angle over the whole device, uniformity of the mirror voltage-tilt hysteresis and a low mirror deformation. A first generation of MEMS-based programmable reflective slit masks composed of 5 x 5 micromirrors was tested in cryogenic conditions at 92 K. Then, first prototypes of large arrays were microfabricated and characterized, but the reliability of these arrays had to be improved. To increase the reliability of these devices, a third generation of micromirror arrays composed of 64 x 32 micromirrors is under development. This generation was especially designed for individual actuation of each mirror, applying a line-column algorithm based on the voltage-tilt hysteresis of the actuator. The fabrication process was optimized and is now based on multiple wafer level bonding steps. Microfabricated devices have micromirror with a peak-to-valley deformation less than 3 nm. The mirrors can be tilted at 20° by an actuation voltage lower than 100 V. First experiments showed that our micromirrors are well suited for the line-column addressing of each micromirror.

  17. Using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) for qualitative examination of iron minerals formed in a hydromorphic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringer, Marianna; Kiss, Klaudia; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    The method of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) allows a large number of measurements in a rapid, non-destructive mode and does not require complex sample preparation. Based on the recorded wavelength-reflectance spectra, the simultaneous investigation of various soil parameters such as colour, mineral composition, organic matter and moisture content is possible. Several publications have presented results of the qualitative and quantitative analysis of iron-oxides containing trivalent iron (primarily hematite, goethite) by DRS. These iron minerals are usually formed in soils and sediments under surface conditions. Nevertheless in the case of hydromorhic soils water saturation can result iron mineral formation in the absence of oxygen. However, the related soil forming process leads to the appearance of ferrous iron-hydroxides (green rust) in the soil profile, in the literature no reference was found discussing the investigation of samples from reduced soil conditions by DRS method. Our aim was to reveal if DRS is suitable to perform qualitative characterization of both ferrous and ferric iron-oxide and hydroxide minerals of waterlogged soils. In the present study samples from a sandy meadow soil (calcic, gleyic Phaeozem ferric, arenic) profile were examined in the laboratory using an UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer with a diffuse reflectance attachement. Pedogenic iron minerals were characterized through spectral transformations and by comparison with spectrum database and literature data. The results were compared with data obtained from widely used routine methods. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) for the determination of mineral composition, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for total iron content and selective chemical dissolution (SCD) for the amorphous and crystalline iron content were presented. Although iron oxide minerals are usually at low concentrations (approx. 0,1%) or present in a poorly crystalline form, our results show that the presence of

  18. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a semiconductor lubricant elemental analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehabi, Abbas; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Kawai, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Photoelectron spectra from a typical hard disk storage media device (HDD) were measured at total reflection and non-total reflection at unburnished, acetone-cleaned, and argon-sputtered conditions. F, O, N, and C usually making the upper layer of a typical hard disk medium were detected. Enhancement of the photoelectron emission of the fluorocarbon lubricant was observed at total reflection. Pt and Co were only found by non-total X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) because they are constituents of a deeper region than the top and interface regions. Argon-sputtered, ultrasonic acetone-cleaned, and unburnished top layers were compared at total and non-total reflection conditions. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for storage media lubrication layer chemical state analysis, reliable for industrial quality control application , and reproducible.

  19. Analytical alignment tolerances for off-plane reflection grating spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allured, Ryan; McEntaffer, Randall T.

    2013-12-01

    Future NASA X-ray Observatories will shed light on a variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. Off-plane reflection gratings can be used to provide high throughput and spectral resolution in the 0.3-1.5 keV band, allowing for unprecedented diagnostics of energetic astrophysical processes. A grating spectrometer consists of multiple aligned gratings intersecting the converging beam of a Wolter-I telescope. Each grating will be aligned such that the diffracted spectra overlap at the focal plane. Misalignments will degrade both spectral resolution and effective area. In this paper we present an analytical formulation of alignment tolerances that define grating orientations in all six degrees of freedom. We verify our analytical results with raytrace simulations to fully explore the alignment parameter space. We also investigate the effect of misalignments on diffraction efficiency.

  20. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Optical monitoring of tissue viability using reflected spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Kraut, Ari; Manor, Tamar; Sonn, Judith; Zurovsky, Yehuda

    2001-05-01

    Only few techniques that could provide real-time continuous multiparametric physiological data have been developed. Therefore, experimental and clinical monitoring devices for organ and tissue viability evaluation are still lacking. In this study, we present the new concept of tissue vitality defined as a product of a few parameters monitored in real- time by a combined measurement of tissue blood flow and volume as well as the oxidation reduction state of the mitochondria. The hypothesis behind the new approach is that in order to evaluate in real-time tissue vitality, it is necessary to monitor both microcirculatory blood flow and volume as well as the intracellular O2 balance as reflected in the mitochondrial redox state.

  2. Modeling Icy Saturnian Satellite Compositions Using Cryogenic Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, James B.

    2006-09-01

    Surface compositions among the icy Saturnian satellites range from nearly pure water ice at Mimas and Tethys to dark, nitrile-laced compounds at Phoebe and Dione. New measurements from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) coupled with laboratory measurements of relevant compounds at cryogenic temperatures, are beginning to reveal some of the subtle variations in compounds on these worlds. By comparing spectral observations for each of these moons to the others, inferences may be drawn which help to reveal their varying formation histories. Spectral modeling of Tethys observations, for example, indicates a surface dominated by water ice with only small contributions by other materials such as carbon dioxide or amorphous carbon; yet, requires an unusual mixture of grain sizes ranging from less than ten microns to as much as 2.5 millimeters in diameter. At the other extreme, Phoebe has been shown to exhibit much clearer evidence (cf. Clark et al., 2005) for a host of compounds, including iron-bearing materials, carbon dioxide, nitriles, and organics. Comparison of Cassini VIMS spectra of Phoebe, Dione, and Hyperion indicate many of the same spectral features. Mapping of these spectral features using automated feature extraction algorithms, cryogenic laboratory reflectance measurements, and standard Hapke reflectance models allows insights into the nature and distribution of these materials on the icy Saturnian satellites. In addition, this exercise allows examination of the methods and suggests ways in which the models might be improved. These include improved formulations of phase and scattering functions, as well as laboratory investigations of both pure compounds and mixtures.

  3. Cryogenic Reflectance Spectroscopy in Support of Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Present understanding of planetary composition is based primarily on remotely-sensed data, and in particular upon ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectroscopy. Spectra acquired by telescopic and spacecraft instruments are compared to laboratory measurements of pure materials in order to identify surface components based on characteristic absorption features. Cryogenic spectral measurements are necessary for the study of worlds beyond the Earth's orbit. While some materials exhibit only small spectral changes as a function of temperature, many others are strongly temperature-dependent. For example, hydrated salts exhibit different spectral behavior under conditions appropriate to Europa than at terrestrial temperatures. The icy satellites of the outer solar system contain significant quantities of volatile ices which do not even exist at standard temperature and pressure (STP). A comprehensive spectral database of ices and minerals covering a wide temperature range will have applications ranging from the study of comets and Kuiper Belt objects to outer planet satellites and the polar regions of Mars. Efforts are presently underway at NASA-Ames to develop capabilities which will contribute to such a database. As spacecraft instruments feature increasing spatial and spectral resolution, appropriate laboratory reference spectra become increasingly critical to accurate interpretation of the spacecraft data.

  4. Standoff detection of explosive materials by differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna M.; Hummel, Rolf E.; Schöllhorn, Claus; Holloway, Paul H.

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that 2, 4, 6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct structures in differential reflectograms, near 420 nm and 250 nm. These characteristic peaks are not observed from approximately two dozen organic and inorganic substances which we tested and which may be in or on a suitcase. This exclusivity infers an ideal technique for explosives detection in mass transit and similar locations. The described technique for detection of explosives is fast, inexpensive, reliable, portable, and is applicable from some distance, that is, it does not require contact with the surveyed substance. Moreover, we have developed a curve discrimination program for field applications of the technique. Other explosives such as 1, 3, 5-trinitro-1, 3, 5 triazacyclohexane (RDX), 1, 3, 5, 7-Tetranitro-1, 3, 5, 7- tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), 2, 4, 6, N-Tetranitro-N-methylaniline (Tetryl), Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and nitroglycerin have also been investigated and demonstrate similar, but unique, characteristic spectra. The technique utilizes near-ultraviolet to visible light reflected from two spots on the same sample surface yielding a differential reflectogram corresponding to the absorption of the sample. The origin of the spectra is attributed to the highest occupied molecular orbital to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) transitions of the respective explosive molecule. Experiments using transmission spectrophotometry have also been performed to compliment and confirm the specific transitions. The results are supported by computer modeling of the molecular orbitals that yield UV and visible transitions.

  5. Mars surface composition from reflectance spectroscopy - A summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.; Clark, R. N.; Mccord, T. B.; Adams, J. B.; Huguenin, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra and multispectral maps of the Martian surface are discussed, and implications of the data for the composition of the Martian surface are considered. Spacecraft and earth-based telescopic observations have confirmed the generally bimodal albedo distribution of the planet, dividing the surface into bright and dark regions. Mars spectra are characterized by the presence of strong Fe(+3) absorption, which is attributed to various ferric oxide minerals. Interpretations of the spectra from the dark regions indicate a basaltic or ultramafic source rock. Evidence for water ice or a highly desiccated metal hydrate has been obtained, along with evidence for CO2-ice only in the south polar cap. Mariner 9 observations of Martian dust suggest the presence of rather acidic rock or mineral particles, or a montmorillonite-type clay. Prospects for the future study of Martian surface composition include continuing earth-based spectrophotometric studies, and high-spectral-resolution mapping of a significant portion of the surface by the Galileo spacecraft and the next Mars mission.

  6. Simulation of selective pulse techniques for localized NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwood, Michael; Schleich, Thomas; Robin Bendall, M.

    The results of a computer simulation investigation delineating the limits of resolution, sensitivity, and accuracy of the depth- resolved suface-coil spectroscopy (DRESS), volume-selective excitation (VSE), and image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) methods for achieving spatially localized NMR spectroscopy are presented. A computer program, which numerically solves the Bloch equations for variable input parameters, is used to simulate the spatial localization afforded by each technique. Because the numerical solution of the Bloch equations describes the behavior of the bulk magnetization with great precision, the simulations provide an objective and realistic means of evaluating the performance of the individual localization schemes and reveal nuances and limitations not discussed in the original experimental papers. The results of this computer simulation study should encourage the optimization of localization methodology for use in specific applications.

  7. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  8. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study of tuberculin skin tests reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Anne; Grande, Sophie; Dahel, Karima; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Poher, Vincent; Goujon, Catherine; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a technique widely used to determine optical properties of tissues: scattering and absorption coefficients. In this study, we present the development of a low-cost optical instrument usable in a clinical environment based upon the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy approach. This instrument has been used in a clinical study to support the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The idea is to establish a new scanning method for an early detection of inflammation due to a reagent injection, before the onset of visual signs. Results comparing the instrumental and classical clinical readings are presented.

  9. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, F.; Zhang, F.; Evertsson, J.; Carlà, F.; Pan, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Lundgren, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  10. [Application of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to the detection and identification of transgenic corn].

    PubMed

    Rui, Yu-kui; Luo, Yun-bo; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhang, Lu-da

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of the GMO, more and more GMO food has been pouring into the market. Much attention has been paid to GMO labeling under the controversy of GMO safety. Transgenic corns and their parents were scanned by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy range of 12000-4000 cm(-1); the resolution was 4 cm(-1); scanning was carried out for 64 times; BP algorithm was applied for data processing. The GMO food was easily resolved. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is unpolluted and inexpensive compared with PCR and ELISA, so it is a very promising detection method for GMO food. PMID:16395887

  11. In vivo soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Schmidt, Michael; Douplik, Alexandre

    Remote laser surgery does not provide haptic feedback to operate layer by layer and preserve vulnerable anatomical structures like nerve tissue or blood vessels. The aim of this study is identification of soft tissue in vivo by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to set the base for a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Various soft tissues can be identified by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo. The results may set the base for a feedback system to prevent nerve damage during oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  12. Polarization-dependent differential reflectance spectroscopy for real-time monitoring of organic thin film growth.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Quezada, A; Aiglinger, M; Ghanbari, E; Wagner, Th; Zeppenfeld, P

    2015-11-01

    By monitoring the reflectance of a sample surface during deposition of a thin organic film, one can obtain information with submonolayer resolution in real-time. A special kind of optical spectroscopy is Differential Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS), which compares the reflectance before and during deposition of a thin film or any other change of the surface optical properties. In this work, we present an extended DRS setup that allows monitoring simultaneously both linear polarization states (s and p) of the reflected light. We implement polarization-dependent DRS to monitor the growth of perflouropentacene thin films on a Ag(110) single crystal. The setup allows us to deduce the optical anisotropy of the sample and, in particular, the preferred orientation of the molecules on the surface. PMID:26628122

  13. Exemplar selectivity reflects perceptual similarities in the human fusiform cortex.

    PubMed

    Davidesco, Ido; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Bickel, Stephan; Harel, Michal; Groppe, David M; Keller, Corey J; Schevon, Catherine A; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Goelman, Gadi; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    While brain imaging studies emphasized the category selectivity of face-related areas, the underlying mechanisms of our remarkable ability to discriminate between different faces are less understood. Here, we recorded intracranial local field potentials from face-related areas in patients presented with images of faces and objects. A highly significant exemplar tuning within the category of faces was observed in high-Gamma (80-150 Hz) responses. The robustness of this effect was supported by single-trial decoding of face exemplars using a minimal (n = 5) training set. Importantly, exemplar tuning reflected the psychophysical distance between faces but not their low-level features. Our results reveal a neuronal substrate for the establishment of perceptual distance among faces in the human brain. They further imply that face neurons are anatomically grouped according to well-defined functional principles, such as perceptual similarity. PMID:23438448

  14. Detection and identification of explosive RDX by THz diffuse reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Bo; Chen, Yunqing; Bastiaans, Glenn J; Zhang, X-C

    2006-01-01

    The reflection spectrum of the explosive RDX was acquired from a diffuse reflection measurement using a THz time-domain spectroscopy system in combination with a diffuse reflectance accessory. By applying the Kramers-Kronig transform to the reflection spectrum, the absorption spectrum (0.2-1.8 THz) was obtained. It agrees with the result from a transmission measurement and distinguishes RDX from other materials. The effect of the reference spectrum was examined by using both a Teflon pellet and a copper plate as references. The strong absorption of RDX at 0.82 THz allowed it to be identified by the diffuse reflection measurement even when the RDX sample was covered with certain optically opaque materials. Our investigation demonstrates that THz technique is capable of detecting and identifying hidden RDX-related explosives in a diffuse reflection mode, which is crucial for the standoff detection in the real world applications. PMID:19503355

  15. Reflectance and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Mars: Relationship Between ISM and TES for Compositional Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor); Mustard, John

    2004-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy has demonstrated that high albedo surfaces on Mars contain heavily altered materials with some component of hematite, poorly crystalline ferric oxides, and an undefined silicate matrix. The spectral properties of many low albedo regions indicate crystalline basalts containing both low and high calcium pyroxene, a mineralogy consistent with the basaltic SNC meteorites. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) experiment on the Mars Geochemical Surveyor has acquired critical new data relevant to surface composition and mineralogy, but in a wavelength region that is complementary to reflectance spectroscopy. The essence of the completed research was to analyze TES data in the context of reflectance data obtained by the French ISM imaging spectrometer experiment in 1989. This approach increased our understanding of the complementary nature of these wavelength regions for mineralogic determinations using actual observations of the martian surface. The research effort focused on three regions of scientific importance: Syrtis Major-Isidis Basin, Oxia Palus-Arabia, and Valles Marineris. In each region distinct spatial variations related to reflectance, and in derived mineralogic information and interpreted compositional units were analyzed. In addition, specific science questions related to the composition of volcanics and crustal evolution, soil compositions and pedogenic processes, and the relationship between pristine lithologies and weathering provided an overall science-driven framework for the work. The detailed work plan involved colocation of TES and ISM data, extraction of reflectance and emissivity spectra from areas of known reflectance variability, and quantitative analysis using factor analysis and statistical techniques to determine the degree of correspondence between these different wavelength regions. Identified coherent variations in TES spectroscopy were assessed against known atmospheric effects to validate that the variations

  16. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Human Skin Using a Commercial Fiber Optic Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, J. A. Delgado; Rodriguez, M. Cunill; Montiel, S. Vazquez y; Castro, Jorge; Rodriguez, A. Cornejo; Gutierrez, J. L.; Martinez, F.; Gutierrez, B.; Orozco, E.

    2008-08-11

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a reliable and easy to implement technique in human tissue characterization. In this work we evaluate the performance of the commercial USB4000 miniature fiber optic spectrometer in the in-vivo measurement of the diffuse reflectance spectra of different healthy skin sites and lesions in a population of 54 volunteers. Results show, that this spectrometer reproduces well the typical signatures of skin spectra over the 400-1000 nm region. Remarkable spectral differences exist between lesions and normal surrounding skin. A diffusion-based model was used to simulate reflectance spectra collected by the optical probe of the system.

  17. INVESTIGATING ULTRASONIC DIFFRACTION GRATING SPECTROSCOPY AND REFLECTION TECHNIQUES FOR CHARACTERIZING SLURRY PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the project are to investigate the use of (1) ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy (UDGS) for measuring the particle size of a slurry and (2) shear wave reflection techniques to measure the viscosity of a slurry. For the first topic, the basic principle...

  18. Nondestructive Olive Quality Detection Using FT-NIR Spectroscopy in Reflectance Mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality features (firmness, oil content and color in terms of hue and chroma) of two olive (Olea europaea L) varieties (‘Ayvalik’ and ‘Gemlik’) were predicted using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Reflectance measurements of intact olives were performed using a bifurcated fibe...

  19. Reflectance spectroscopy detects management and landscape differences in soil carbon and nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many studies document the successful calibration of visible and near infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) to various soil properties. However, few studies have reported on the use of VNIR DRS to detect treatment differences in controlled experiments. Therefore, our objective in thi...

  20. Prediction of olive quality using FT-NIR spectroscopy in reflectance and transmittance modes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to use FT-NIR spectroscopy to predict the firmness, oil content and color of two olive (Olea europaea L) varieties (‘Ayvalik’ and ‘Gemlik’). Spectral measurements were performed on the intact olives for the wavelengths of 780-2500 nm in reflectance and for 800-1725...

  1. Near-infrared transmission and reflectance spectroscopy for the measurement of dietary fiber in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars. A Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and an NIR Systems 6500 spectrometer were used to obtain transmission and ref...

  2. Real time, in-situ temperature monitoring using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.L.; Beard, B.T.; Pearsall, T.P.; Wang, Z.Z.; Stevens, J.E.; Blain, M.G.; Meisenheimer, T.L.

    1996-11-01

    Real time temperature measurements have been performed on both GaAs and silicon substrates during wafer processing using a technique based upon diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Good temperature resolution ({+-}O.4 {degrees}C) and rapid updates have enabled the process control potential of the device to be demonstrated.

  3. Measurement of Trans-Fatty Acids in Cereal Products Without Oil Extraction Using NIR Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was evaluated as a rapid technique, to determine the trans-fatty acid content of ground cereal products. NIR spectra were obtained with a dispersive spectrometer and trans-fatty acids determined by modified AOAC Method 996.01. First derivative PLS1 mode...

  4. Absorption and Scattering Coefficients: A Biophysical-Chemistry Experiment Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Gabriela B.; Lagorio, M. Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A biophysical-chemistry experiment, based on the reflectance spectroscopy for calculating the absorption and scattering coefficients of leaves is described. The results show that different plants species exhibit different values for both the coefficients because of their different pigment composition.

  5. Analysis of total oil and fatty acids composition by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy in edible nuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Chari V.; Sundaram, Jaya

    2014-10-01

    Near Infrared (NIR) Reflectance spectroscopy has established itself as an important tool in quantifying water and oil present in various food materials. It is rapid and nondestructive, easier to use, and does not require processing the samples with corrosive chemicals that would render them non-edible. Earlier, the samples had to be ground into powder form before making any measurements. With the development of new soft ware packages, NIR techniques could now be used in the analysis of intact grain and nuts. While most of the commercial instruments presently available work well with small grain size materials such as wheat and corn, the method present here is suitable for large kernel size products such as shelled or in-shell peanuts. Absorbance spectra were collected from 400 nm to 2500 nm using a NIR instrument. Average values of total oil contents (TOC) of peanut samples were determined by standard extraction methods, and fatty acids were determined using gas chromatography. Partial least square (PLS) analysis was performed on the calibration set of absorption spectra, and models were developed for prediction of total oil and fatty acids. The best model was selected based on the coefficient of determination (R2), Standard error of prediction (SEP) and residual percent deviation (RPD) values. Peanut samples analyzed showed RPD values greater than 5.0 for both absorbance and reflectance models and thus could be used for quality control and analysis. Ability to rapidly and nondestructively measure the TOC, and analyze the fatty acid composition, will be immensely useful in peanut varietal improvement as well as in the grading process of grain and nuts.

  6. Immunoglobulin surface-binding kinetics studied by total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, N L; Axelrod, D

    1983-01-01

    An experimental application of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR/FCS) is presented. TIR/FCS is a new technique for measuring the binding and unbinding rates and surface diffusion coefficient of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules in equilibrium at a surface. A laser beam totally internally reflects at the solid-liquid interface, selectively exciting surface-adsorbed molecules. Fluorescence collected by a microscope from a small, well-defined surface area approximately 5 micron2 spontaneously fluctuates as solute molecules randomly bind to, unbind from, and/or diffuse along the surface in chemical equilibrium. The fluorescence is detected by a photomultiplier and autocorrelated on-line by a minicomputer. The shape of the autocorrelation function depends on the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the binding rate constants, and the shape of the illuminated and observed region. The normalized amplitude of the autocorrelation function depends on the average number of molecules bound within the observed area. TIR/FCS requires no spectroscopic or thermodynamic change between dissociated and complexed states and no extrinsic perturbation from equilibrium. Using TIR/FCS, we determine that rhodamine-labeled immunoglobulin and insulin each nonspecifically adsorb to serum albumin-coated fused silica with both reversible and irreversible components. The characteristic time of the most rapidly reversible component measured is approximately 5 ms and is limited by the rate of bulk diffusion. Rhodamine-labeled bivalent antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) bind to DNP-coated fused silica virtually irreversibly. Univalent Fab fragments of these same antibodies appear to specifically bind to DNP-coated fused silica, accompanied by a large amount of nonspecific binding. TIR/FCS is shown to be a feasible technique for measuring absorption/desorption kinetic rates at equilibrium. In suitable systems where nonspecific binding is low, TIR

  7. Recent progress in noninvasive diabetes screening by diffuse reflectance near-infrared skin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Haiber, S.; Licht, M.; Ihrig, D. F.; Moll, C.; Stuecker, M.

    2006-02-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy exhibits a tremendous potential for clinical chemistry and tissue pathology. Owing to its penetration depth into human skin, near infrared radiation can probe chemical and structural information non-invasively. Metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus increase nonenzymatic glycation with the effect of glucose molecules bonding chemically to proteins. In addition, glycation accumulates on tissue proteins with the clearest evidence found in extracellular skin collagen, affecting also covalent crosslinking between adjacent protein strands, which reduces their flexibility, elasticity, and functionality. Non-enzymatically glycated proteins in human skin and following chemical and structural skin changes were our spectroscopic target. We carried out measurements on 109 subjects using two different NIR-spectrometers equipped with diffuse reflection accessories. Spectra of different skin regions (finger and hand/forearm skin) were recorded for comparison with clinical blood analysis data and further patient information allowing classification into diabetics and non-diabetics. Multivariate analysis techniques for supervised classification such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied using broad spectral interval data or a number of optimally selected wavelengths. Based on fingertip skin spectra recorded by fiber-optics, it was possible to classify diabetics and non-diabetics with a maximum accuracy of 87.8 % using leave-5-out cross-validation (sensitivity of 87.5. %, specificity of 88.2 %). With the results of this study, it can be concluded that ageing and glycation at elevated levels cannot always be separated from each other.

  8. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  9. In vivo detection of epileptic brain tissue using static fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Nitin; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Mehta, Rupal; Jayakar, Prasanna; Yong, William; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to detect histopathological abnormalities of an epileptic brain in a human subject study. Static diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra are acquired from normal and epileptic brain areas, defined by electrocorticography (ECoG), from pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Biopsy specimens are taken from the investigated sites within an abnormal brain. Spectral analysis reveals significant differences in diffuse reflectance spectra and the ratio of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra from normal and epileptic brain areas defined by ECoG and histology. Using these spectral differences, tissue classification models with accuracy above 80% are developed based on linear discriminant analysis. The differences between the diffuse reflectance spectra from the normal and epileptic brain areas observed in this study are attributed to alterations in the static hemodynamic characteristics of an epileptic brain, suggesting a unique association between the histopathological and the hemodynamic abnormalities in an epileptic brain.

  10. Use of visible and infrared reflectance and luminescence imaging spectroscopy to study illuminated manuscripts: pigment identification and visualization of underdrawings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, Paola; Delaney, John K.; Glinsman, Lisha; Thoury, Mathieu; Facini, Michelle; de la Rie, E. René

    2009-07-01

    Site specific, in situ techniques such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy are commonly used to identify pigments on illuminated manuscripts. With both techniques, spectra are usually acquired on visually identified sites thought to be representative of the pigments and mixtures used for the illumination. Such visual inspection may not always ensure an adequate representation of the pigment diversity. Here we report on the application of multispectral (MSI) visible/infrared reflectance and luminescence imaging spectroscopy, along with fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) to help determine and map the primary pigments in a late 14th century miniature on vellum, attributed to Niccolo da Bologna and representing the birth of John the Baptist. XRF analyses of visually selected sites found elements consistent with azurite, ultramarine, vermillion, lead white, "mosaic gold" and yellow earth pigments. Visible/infrared FORS analyses confirmed these assignments and showed evidence for the use of organic dyes. The spectral analysis of the MSI-reflectance images gave distribution maps for these pigments (i.e., regions of azurite, ultramarine, vermillion) along with some indication of pigment layering not identified visually. The luminescence image gave a probable map of the organic dye(s). Images acquired in the near- and shortwave-infrared (NIR and SWIR, 750 to 2400 nm) revealed preparatory sketches and illumination techniques. These results show, like those of a prior study carried out on another 14th century Italian miniature, that the combination of low light multi-spectral imaging spectroscopy with FORS provides improved in situ mapping and identification of pigments on illuminated manuscripts.

  11. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements for tissue-type discrimination during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsson, Johan; Eriksson, Ola; Blomstedt, Patric; Bergenheim, A. Tommy; Hariz, Marwan I.; Richter, Johan; Zsigmond, Peter; Wårdell, Karin

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a method for improving intracerebral guidance during functional neurosurgery has been investigated. An optical probe was developed for measurements during stereotactic and functional neurosurgery in man. The aim of the study was to investigate the spectral differences between white and grey matter and between white matter and functional targets. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements in ten patients were recorded at incremental steps towards and in three different functional targets (STN, GPi and Zi). The recorded spectra along the trajectory were sorted into white or grey matter, based on preoperative MRI images or the recorded spectral shape and intensity. The difference between tissue types was calculated as a quotient. Significant intensity differences between white and grey matter were found to be at least 14% (p < 0.05) and 20% (p < 0.0001) for MRI and spectral-sorted data respectively. The reflectance difference between white matter and the functional targets of GPi was higher than for STN and Zi. The results indicate that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has a potential to be developed to a suitable complement to other intracerebral guidance methods.

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite clay mixtures: Implications for the surface composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Handy, J.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the power of remote sensing reflectance spectroscopy in determining mineralogy, it was used as the major method of identifying possible mineral analogs of the Martian surface. A summary of proposed Martian surface compositions from reflectance spectroscopy before 1979 was presented. Since that time, iron-rich montmorillonite clay, nanocrystalline or nanophase hematite, and palagonite were suggested as Mars soil analog materials.

  13. Prediction of alpaca fibre quality by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canaza-Cayo, A W; Alomar, D; Quispe, E

    2013-07-01

    Rapid and efficient methods to evaluate variables associated with fibre quality are essential in animal breeding programs and fibre trade. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with multivariate analysis was evaluated to predict textile quality attributes of alpaca fibre. Raw samples of fibres taken from male and female Huacaya alpacas (n = 291) of different ages and colours were scanned and their visible-near-infrared (NIR; 400 to 2500 nm) reflectance spectra were collected and analysed. Reference analysis of the samples included mean fibre diameter (MFD), standard deviation of fibre diameter (SDFD), coefficient of variation of fibre diameter (CVFD), mean fibre curvature (MFC), standard deviation of fibre curvature (SDFC), comfort factor (CF), spinning fineness (SF) and staple length (SL). Patterns of spectral variation (loadings) were explored by principal component analysis (PCA), where the first four PC's explained 99.97% and the first PC alone 95.58% of spectral variability. Calibration models were developed by modified partial least squares regression, testing different mathematical treatments (derivative order, subtraction gap, smoothing segment) of the spectra, with or without applying spectral correction algorithms (standard normal variate and detrend). Equations were selected through one-out cross-validation according to the proportion of explained variance (R 2CV), root mean square error in cross-validation (RMSECV) and the residual predictive deviation (RPD), which relates the standard deviation of the reference data to RMSECV. The best calibration models were accomplished when using the NIR region (1100 to 2500 nm) for the prediction of MFD and SF, with R 2CV = 0.90 and 0.87; RMSECV = 1.01 and 1.08 μm and RPD = 3.13 and 2.73, respectively. Models for SDFD, CVFD, MFC, SDFC, CF and SL had lower predictive quality with R 2CV < 0.65 and RPD < 1.5. External validation performed for MFD and SF on 91 samples was slightly poorer than cross

  14. Evaluation of contact status between probe and skin for noninvasive blood sensing with NIR reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qingjun; Xu, Kexin; Jiang, Jingying; Chen, Wen Liang

    2004-07-01

    In non-invasive blood sensing with near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy, optical probe usually directly contacts skin to eliminate specular reflection. Due to the direct contact, changes in contact pressure can lead to changes in internal structure and components distribution of the measured site, and thus introduces great interference into the final results. In this paper, we use self-made AOTF spectrophotometer to investigate the changes of reflectance spectrum with changing contact status for tissues in vitro (fresh porcine skin) and in vivo (two volunteers' left palms) at wavelengths ranging from 1100 nm to 1700 nm. The results show that with increasing degree of contact, energy of reflectance spectrum gradually decreases and the trend goes stable with time. However, the decreasing degree is related to wavelengths, which potentially suggests an indirect relevance with changes of components in tissues. Meanwhile, the results provide a practical solution to determining the optimum contact status between probe and skin.

  15. Majorana Zero Mode Detected with Spin Selective Andreev Reflection in the Vortex of a Topological Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Wang, Guan-Yong; Ma, Hai-Yang; Xu, Zhu-An; Gao, Chun-Lei; Guan, Dan-Dan; Li, Yao-Yi; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yi; Fu, Liang; Li, Shao-Chun; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Recently, theory has predicted a Majorana zero mode (MZM) to induce spin selective Andreev reflection (SSAR), a novel magnetic property which can be used to detect the MZM. Here, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy or spectroscopy has been applied to probe SSAR of MZMs in a topological superconductor of the Bi2 Te3 /NbSe2 heterostructure. The zero-bias peak of the tunneling differential conductance at the vortex center is observed substantially higher when the tip polarization and the external magnetic field are parallel rather than antiparallel to each other. This spin dependent tunneling effect provides direct evidence of MZM and reveals its magnetic property in addition to the zero energy modes. Our work will stimulate MZM research on these novel physical properties and, hence, is a step towards experimental study of their statistics and application in quantum computing.

  16. Majorana Zero Mode Detected with Spin Selective Andreev Reflection in the Vortex of a Topological Superconductor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Wang, Guan-Yong; Ma, Hai-Yang; Xu, Zhu-An; Gao, Chun-Lei; Guan, Dan-Dan; Li, Yao-Yi; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yi; Fu, Liang; Li, Shao-Chun; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2016-06-24

    Recently, theory has predicted a Majorana zero mode (MZM) to induce spin selective Andreev reflection (SSAR), a novel magnetic property which can be used to detect the MZM. Here, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy or spectroscopy has been applied to probe SSAR of MZMs in a topological superconductor of the Bi_{2}Te_{3}/NbSe_{2} heterostructure. The zero-bias peak of the tunneling differential conductance at the vortex center is observed substantially higher when the tip polarization and the external magnetic field are parallel rather than antiparallel to each other. This spin dependent tunneling effect provides direct evidence of MZM and reveals its magnetic property in addition to the zero energy modes. Our work will stimulate MZM research on these novel physical properties and, hence, is a step towards experimental study of their statistics and application in quantum computing. PMID:27391745

  17. [Reflectance spectroscopy study of low-frequency ultrasound and glycerol on skin optical clearing].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hui-Qing; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Wei, Hua-Jiang; Zhang, Zu-De; Yang, Hong-Qin; Xie, Shu-Sen

    2009-12-01

    In order to find a non-invasive way to improve the efficacy of skin optical clearing with topically applied optical clearing agents, the authors researched the changes of reflectance spectroscopy of skin tissues before and after being dealt by low-frequency ultrasound and osmotic active chemical agents within the wavelength range of 400-860 nm, and the degree of changes in reflectance spectroscopy of each group skin during 0-15 min and 15-30 min at 580 nm. The measurements were performed using a AvaSpec-2048 optical fiber spectrometer with integrating-sphere setup. The results of measurements showed that there were a few changes of the reflectance spectroscopy of skin tissues in the control group (Group 1) (The skin tissue was dealt with nothing. ) during the whole observation; But in the Group 2 (The skin tissue was dealt with only low-frequency ultrasound), it was found that the reflectance of the skin tissue showed a significant increase comparing 15 min with 0 min, but the changes in reflectance of the tissues slowly restored the original form following the longer time since the ultrasound stopping; There was also a very fast changes in reflectance of the skins in the Group 3 (the skin were dealt with only 80% glycerol) compared with that in the Group 1. The authors also found that there was a very distinct decrease in the reflectance of skin tissues dealt with both low-frequency ultrasound and 80% glycerol group (Group 4), especially during the 0-15 min, and its speed was 4.0 times that of the Group 1 and 2. 3 times that of Group 3 (During 0-15 min, the reflectance of skin tissues in the Group 1 decreased 1.896%; the reflectance of skin tissue in the Group 3 decreased 3.316%; the reflectance of skin tissues in the Group 4 decreased 7.551%). From the above results, it can be clearly seen that the low-frequency ultrasound and 80% glycerol not only have synergistic effect on optical clearing of skin tissue in vitro, but can change the optical clearing of the skin

  18. Diagnostics of pigmented skin tumors based on laser-induced autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, E; Avramov, L; Troyanova, P; Pavlova, P

    2008-06-30

    Results of investigation of cutaneous benign and malignant pigmented lesions by laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) are presented. The autofluorescence of human skin was excited by a 337-nm nitrogen laser. A broadband halogen lamp (400-900 nm) was used for diffuse reflectance measurements. A microspectrometer detected in vivo the fluorescence and reflectance signals from human skin. The main spectral features of benign (dermal nevi, compound nevi, dysplastic nevi) and malignant (melanoma) lesions are discussed. The combined usage of the fluorescence and reflectance spectral methods to determine the type of the lesion, which increases the total diagnostic accuracy, is compared with the usage of LIAFS or DRS only. We also applied colorimetric transformation of the reflectance spectra detected and received additional evaluation criteria for determination of type of the lesion under study. Spectra from healthy skin areas near the lesion were detected and changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra were revealed. The influence of the main skin pigments on the detected spectra is discussed and evaluation of possibilities for differentiation between malignant and benign lesions is performed based on their spectral properties. This research shows that the non-invasive and high-sensitive in vivo detection by means of appropriate light sources and detectors should be possible, related to the real-time determination of existing pathological conditions. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  19. Exploiting Optical Contrasts for Cervical Precancer Diagnosis via Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Vivide Tuan-Chyan

    collagen without altering the amount of collagen present. Further work would be required to elucidate the exact sources of scattering contrast observed. Common confounding variables that limit the accuracy and clinical acceptability of optical spectroscopic systems are calibration requirements and variable probe-tissue contact pressures. Our results suggest that using a real-time self-calibration channel, as opposed to conventional post-experiment diffuse reflectance standard calibration measurements, significantly improved data integrity for the extraction of scattering contrast. Extracted [total Hb] and scattering were also significantly associated with applied contact probe pressure in colposcopically normal sites. Hence, future contact probe spectroscopy or imaging systems should incorporate a self-calibration channel and ensure spectral acquisition at a consistent contact pressure to collect reliable data with enhanced absorption and scattering contrasts. Another method to enhance optical contrast is to selectively interrogate different depths in the dysplastic cervix. For instance, scattering has been shown to increase in the epithelium (increase in nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio) while decrease in the stroma (re-organization of the extra-cellular matrix and changes in of collagen fiber cross-links). A fiber-optic probe with 45° illumination and collection fibers with a separation distance of 330 μm was designed and constructed to selectively interrogate the cervical epithelium. Mean extraction errors from liquid phantoms with optical properties mimicking the cervical epithelium for μa and μs' were 11.3 % and 12.7 %, respectively. Diffuse reflectance spectra from 9 sites in four loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) patients were analyzed. Preliminary data demonstrate the utility of the oblique fiber geometry in extracting scattering contrast in the cervical epithelium. Further work is needed to study the systematic error in optical property extraction and

  20. [Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and its application in the determination for the quality of animal feed and products].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Meng, Qing-Xiang; Ren, Li-Ping; Yang, Jian-Song

    2010-06-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been the most rapidly developing and noticeable spectrographic analytical technique in recent years. The determining principle and progresses of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy are presented briefly. It mainly includes the progresses in pre-processing technique and analyzing model of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Two pre-processing techniques, including differential coefficient-dealt with technique, the signal-smoothing technique, and four analyzing models of near-infrared spectroscopy, including the multiplied lined regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS), and artificial nerve network (ANN). The application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to the first time. The investigation of reviewed papers shows that the near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy is widely applied in feed analysis and animal products analysis because of its rapidness, non-destruction and non-pollution. The near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has been used to determine the feed common ingredient, such as dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, crude fat and so on, micro-components including amino acid, vitamin, and noxious components, and to determine the physical and chemical properties of animal products which including egg, mutton, beef and pork. Details of the analytical characteristics of feed and animal products described in the reviewed papers are given. New trends and limits to the application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy in these fields are also discussed. PMID:20707134

  1. A model for testing strong gravity via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The X-ray radiation produced in the inner part of the accretion disk can be a powerful tool to test the Kerr nature of these objects. In this talk, we present a new model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis via X-ray reflection spectroscopy. We employ the formalism of the transfer function proposed by Cunningham 40 years ago. The transfer function acts as an integration kernel and takes into account all the relativistic effects. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. These transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER. The result is best model that we can have today for testing black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  2. Influence of contact state on NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenliang; Liu, Rong; Xu, Kexin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    In the practice of non-invasive blood glucose measurement by near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, an optical probe usually directly contacts skin in order to eliminate specular reflection. In this paper, the influence of contact state on the diffuse reflectance in vivo and the variation trend of diffuse reflectance with contact time under the same contact pressure, are investigated at wavelengths ranging from 1100 to 1700 nm. The result shows that the diffuse reflectance decreases with increasing contact pressure under the contact state. At a certain applied pressure, the diffuse reflectance fluctuates significantly at the beginning of contact, and the fluctuation becomes stable with elapsing contacting time. It is our aim in this paper to find out the optimal contact state and optimal measuring time, in order to reduce the influence of contact pressure on diffuse reflectance measurements. It is found from our experiments that, for in vivo measurement, the optimal contact state appears when the skin is pressed to about 0.5 mm by the probe, where the probe contacts the palm entirely, and that the optimal measuring time is at the 30th second since the probe contacting with the measuring site. Putting the above conclusions into practice, the repeatability of spectra is improved greatly.

  3. Microscopic reflection difference spectroscopy for strain field of GaN induced by Berkovich nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H. S.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H. Y.; Wu, S. J.; Jiang, C. Y.; Yu, J. L.; Zhu, L. P.; Li, Y.; Huang, W.; Chen, Y. H.

    2014-02-01

    We have measured strain field of Berkovich nanoindentation by Raman mapping technique and microscopic reflection difference spectroscopy (μ-RDS). The validity of the μ-RDS method is verified by the accordance between the theoretical simulated result and the rotated measurement result. Comparing the two different methods, it is concluded that μ-RDS is sensitive and effective to measure anisotropic strain zone in the plane.

  4. Detection of human colonic adenoma by laser-induced autofluorescence integrated with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guilin; Lu, Haibao; Zhang, Yangde; Yan, Shuhua; Chen, Zhifeng

    2000-10-01

    A combined in vivo measurement system integrating laser- induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurement was developed and investigated for detecting colonic adenoma. The system could work with regular endoscopy examination. A three- layer backpropagating neural network (BNN) was built to differentiate the two tissue classes. The preliminary results gave the mean predictive accuracy, sensitivity and specificity better than either of the two methods used alone.

  5. TOTAL INTERNAL REFLECTION WITH FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY: APPLICATIONS TO SUBSTRATE-SUPPORTED PLANAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Nancy L.; Wang, Xiang; Navaratnarajah, Punya

    2009-01-01

    In this review paper, the conceptual basis and experimental design of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS) is described. The few applications to date of TIR-FCS to supported membranes are discussed, in addition to a variety of applications not directly involving supported membranes. Methods related, but not technically equivalent, to TIR-FCS are also summarized. Future directions for TIR-FCS are outlined. PMID:19269331

  6. [Application of Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy in analysis of pulp and paper industry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Cao, Chun-yu; Feng, Wen-ying; Xu, Ming; Su, Zhen-hua; Liu, Xiao-meng; Lü, Wei-jun

    2011-03-01

    As one of the most powerful tools to investigate the compositions of raw materials and the property of pulp and paper, infrared spectroscopy has played an important role in pulp and paper industry. However, the traditional transmission infrared spectroscopy has not met the requirements of the producing processes because of its disadvantages of time consuming and sample destruction. New technique would be needed to be found. Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is an advanced spectroscopic tool for nondestructive evaluation and could rapidly, accurately estimate the production properties of each process in pulp and paper industry. The present review describes the application of ATR-FTIR in analysis of pulp and paper industry. The analysis processes will include: pulping, papermaking, environmental protecting, special processing and paper identifying. PMID:21595211

  7. Prediction of erodibility in Oxisols using iron oxides, soil color and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantes Camargo, Livia; Marques, José, Jr.

    2015-04-01

    The prediction of erodibility using indirect methods such as diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could facilitate the characterization of the spatial variability in large areas and optimize implementation of conservation practices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prediction of interrill erodibility (Ki) and rill erodibility (Kr) by means of iron oxides content and soil color using multiple linear regression and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) using regression analysis by least squares partial (PLSR). The soils were collected from three geomorphic surfaces and analyzed for chemical, physical and mineralogical properties, plus scanned in the spectral range from the visible and infrared. Maps of spatial distribution of Ki and Kr were built with the values calculated by the calibrated models that obtained the best accuracy using geostatistics. Interrill-rill erodibility presented negative correlation with iron extracted by dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, hematite, and chroma, confirming the influence of iron oxides in soil structural stability. Hematite and hue were the attributes that most contributed in calibration models by multiple linear regression for the prediction of Ki (R2 = 0.55) and Kr (R2 = 0.53). The diffuse reflectance spectroscopy via PLSR allowed to predict Interrill-rill erodibility with high accuracy (R2adj = 0.76, 0.81 respectively and RPD> 2.0) in the range of the visible spectrum (380-800 nm) and the characterization of the spatial variability of these attributes by geostatistics.

  8. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy of buddingtonite from the Cuprite mining district, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Felzer, B.; Hauff, P.; Goetz, A.F.H.

    1994-02-01

    Buddingtonite, an ammonium-bearing feldspar diagnostic of volcanic-hosted alteration, can be identified and, in some cases, quantitatively measured using short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectance spectroscopy. In this study over 200 samples from Cuprite, Nevada, were evaluated by X ray diffraction, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and SWIR reflectance spectroscopy with the objective of developing a quantitative remote-sensing technique for rapid determination of the amount of ammonium or buddingtonite present, and its distribution across the site. Based upon the Hapke theory of radiative transfer from particulate surfaces, spectra from quantitative, physical mixtures were compared with computed mixture spectra. We hypothesized that the concentration of ammonium in each sample is related to the size and shape of the ammonium absorption bands and tested this hypothesis for samples of relatively pure buddingtonite. We found that the band depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 feature is linearly related to the NH4 concentration for the Cuprite buddingtonite, and that the relationship is approximately exponential for a larger range of NH4 concentrations. Associated minerals such as smectite and jarosite suppress the depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 absorption band. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy is possible when the effects of these associated minerals are also considered.

  9. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I–VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  10. [Component analysis of complex mixed solution based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiong, Chan; Zhao, Li-ying; Lin, Ling; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2012-02-01

    In the present paper, the authors proposed a method for component analysis of complex mixed solutions based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy by analyzing the information carried by spectrum signals from various optical properties of various components of the analyte. The experiment instrument was designed with supercontinuum laser source, the motorized precision translation stage and the spectrometer. The Intralipid-20% was taken as an analyte, and was diluted over a range of 1%-20% in distilled water. The diffuse reflectance spectrum signal was measured at 24 points within the distance of 1.5-13 mm (at an interval of 0.5 mm) above the incidence point. The partial least squares algorithm model was used to perform a modeling and forecasting analysis for the spectral analysis data collected from single-point and multi-point. The results showed that the most accurate calibration model was created by the spectral data acquired from the nearest 1-13 points above the incident point; the most accurate prediction model was created by the spectral signal acquired from the nearest 1-7 points above the incident point. It was proved that multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can improve the spectral signal to noise ratio. Compared with the traditional spectrum technology using a single optical property such as absorbance or reflectance, this method increased the impact of scattering characteristics of the analyte. So the use of a variety of optical properties of the analytes can make an improvement of the accuracy of the modeling and forecasting, and also provide a basis for component analysis of the complex mixed solution based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. PMID:22512196

  11. Quantitative determination of molecular structure in multilayered thin films of biaxial and lower symmetry from photon spectroscopies. I. Reflection infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Atul N.; Allara, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A semitheoretical formalism based on classical electromagnetic wave theory has been developed for application to the quantitative treatment of reflection spectra from multilayered anisotropic films on both metallic and nonmetallic substrates. Both internal and external reflection experiments as well as transmission can be handled. The theory is valid for all wavelengths and is appropriate, therefore, for such experiments as x-ray reflectivity, uv-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry, and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Further, the theory is applicable to multilayered film structures of variable number of layers, each with any degree of anisotropy up to and including full biaxial symmetry. The reflectivities (and transmissivities) are obtained at each frequency by solving the wave propagation equations using a rigorous 4×4 transfer matrix method developed by Yeh in which the optical functions of each medium are described in the form of second rank (3×3) tensors. In order to obtain optical tensors for materials not readily available in single crystal form, a method has been developed to evaluate tensor elements from the complex scalar optical functions (n̂) obtained from the isotropic material with the limitations that the molecular excitations are well characterized and obey photon-dipole selection rules. This method is intended primarily for infrared vibrational spectroscopy and involves quantitative decomposition of the isotropic imaginary optical function (k) spectrum into a sum of contributions from fundamental modes, the assignment of a direction in molecular coordinates to the transition dipole matrix elements for each mode, the appropriate scaling of each k vector component in surface coordinates according to a selected surface orientation of the molecule to give a diagonal im(n̂) tensor, and the calculation of the real(n̂) spectrum tensor elements by the Kramers-Kronig transformation. Tensors for other surface orientations are generated by an

  12. Spectral reflectance of selected aqueous solutions for water quality applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querr, M. R.; Waring, R. C.; Holland, W. E.; Nijm, W.; Hale, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    The relative specular reflectances of individual aqueous solutions having a particular chemical salt content were measured in the 2 to 20 micrometers region of the infrared component or radiant flux. Distilled water was the reflectance standard. The angle of incidence was 70.03 deg plus or minus 0.23 deg. Absolute reflectances of the solutions for the same polarization and angle of incidence were computed by use of the measured relative reflectances, one of the Fresnel equations, and the optical constants of distilled water. Phase shift and phase difference spectra were obtained by respectively applying a Kramers-Kronig dispersion analysis to the absolute and relative reflectance spectra. The optical constants of the solutions were determined by algorithms commonly associated with the Kramers-Kronig analysis. Spectral signatures that qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the solute and that show structure of the infrared bands of water were noted in the phase difference spectra. The relative and absolute reflectances, the phase shift and phase difference spectra and the optical constants are presented in graphical form. Application of these results to remote sensing of the chemical quality of natural waters is discussed briefly.

  13. Combined reflectance spectroscopy and stochastic modeling approach for noninvasive hemoglobin determination via palpebral conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oleg; McMurdy, John; Jay, Gregory; Lines, Collin; Crawford, Gregory; Alber, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A combination of stochastic photon propagation model in a multilayered human eyelid tissue and reflectance spectroscopy was used to study palpebral conjunctiva spectral reflectance for hemoglobin (Hgb) determination. The developed model is the first biologically relevant model of eyelid tissue, which was shown to provide very good approximation to the measured spectra. Tissue optical parameters were defined using previous histological and microscopy studies of a human eyelid. After calibration of the model parameters the responses of reflectance spectra to Hgb level and blood oxygenation variations were calculated. The stimulated reflectance spectra in adults with normal and low Hgb levels agreed well with experimental data for Hgb concentrations from 8.1 to 16.7 g/dL. The extracted Hgb levels were compared with in vitro Hgb measurements. The root mean square error of cross‐validation was 1.64 g/dL. The method was shown to provide 86% sensitivity estimates for clinically diagnosed anemia cases. A combination of the model with spectroscopy measurements provides a new tool for noninvasive study of human conjunctiva to aid in diagnosing blood disorders such as anemia. PMID:24744871

  14. Determination of Cellulose Fiber Structure Using IR Reflectance Spectroscopy of Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and non-destructive method for analyzing the structure of cellulose fibers using IR reflectance spectroscopy from a paper surface was developed and verified for correctness. IR absorption and reflectance spectra of standard paper samples of known composition (sheets made of four fibers of different origin without additives and with additives of kaolin and chalk) were analyzed. Good correlations between these two spectral methods were found for the studied samples. Calibration curves were useful for assessing the structure of cellulose samples from XVIth century historical paper. Data on the degree of cellulose ordering that were obtained from the paper reflectance spectra indicated that the studied sheets consisted mainly of flax fibers with added cotton. This agreed fully with the historical fact that the studied samples were rag papers.

  15. Particular features of the application of IR reflection spectroscopy methods in studies in archeology and paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarev, V. M.; Khlopachev, G. A.

    2013-06-01

    We have considered an optical model of a porous rough surface with optical properties of objects (bone, flint) that are typical of archeology and paleontology. We have formulated an approach that makes it possible to perform mathematical processing of the IR reflection spectra of objects of this kind using standard algorithms and determine criteria that ensure obtaining reliable information on objects with a rough surface in the course of interpretation of frequencies in their IR reflection spectra. The potential of the approach has been demonstrated using as an example an investigation by the IR Fourier-transform reflection spectroscopy of mineralization processes of mammoth tusks from two paleolithic sites (14000 and 16000 BCE) located by the town of Yudinovo, Bryansk oblast, Russia.

  16. Transmission and Reflection Terahertz Spectroscopy of Insensitive Melt-Cast High-Explosive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Szala, Mateusz

    2016-05-01

    Currently, artillery shells and grenades that are introduced into the market are based on melt-castable insensitive high explosives (IHEs), which do not explode while they run a risk of impact, heat or shrapnel. Particles of explosives (such as hexogen, nitroguanidine and nitrotriazolone) are suspended in different proportions in a matrix of 2.4-dinitroanisole. In this paper, we investigated samples of commonly used IHEs: PAX-41, IMX-104 and IMX-101, whose internal structures were determined by a scanning electron microscope. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy was applied in both transmission and reflection configurations. At first, the complex refraction indices of four pure constituents creating IHEs were determined and became the basis of further calculations. Next, the experimentally determined transmission and reflection spectra of IHEs and pure constituents were compared with theoretical considerations. The influence of the grain size of constituent material and scattering on the reflection spectra was analysed, and good agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was achieved.

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy properties of the selected engine oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shouming; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Tian; Zhao, Songqing; Zhou, Qingli; Shi, Yulei; Zhao, Dongmei; Zhang, Cunlin

    2010-11-01

    Engine oil, most of which is extracted from petroleum, consist of complex mixtures of hydrocarbons of molecular weights in the range of 250-1000. Variable amounts of different additives are put into them to inhibit oxidation, improve the viscosity index, decrease the fluidity point and avoid foaming or settling of solid particles among others. Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy contains rich physical, chemical, and structural information of the materials. Most low-frequency vibrational and rotational spectra of many petrochemicals lie in this frequency range. In recent years, much attention has been paid to the THz spectroscopic studies of petroleum products. In this paper, the optical properties and spectroscopy of selected kinds of engine oil consisting of shell HELIX 10W-40, Mobilube GX 80W-90, GEELY ENGINE OIL SG 10W-30, SMA engine oil SG 5W-30, SMA engine oil SG 10W-30, SMA engine oil SG 75W-90 have been studied by the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the spectral range of 0.6-2.5 THz. Engine oil with different viscosities in the terahertz spectrum has certain regularity. In the THz-TDS, with the increase of viscosity, time delay is greater and with the increase of viscosity, refractive indexes also grow and their rank is extremely regular. The specific kinds of engine oil can be identified according to their different spectral features in the THz range. The THz-TDS technology has potentially significant impact on the engine oil analysis.

  18. Identifying water on our Moon and organics in the outer Solar System with active reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C. A.; Spiers, G. D.; Hansen, G. B.

    2005-08-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy has successfully characterized H2O and identified organic molecules on many Solar System objects. However, passive reflectance spectroscopy cannot detect water in the permanently shadowed regions of the Moon. Similarly, the mid-IR fingerprints of organics on the surfaces of outer solar system objects cannot be detected passively because the sunlight is too dim and the surfaces are too cold. The strongest absorption band for condensed water and ice is near 3 microns. Organic molecules have strong absorptions near 3.4 microns, with spectral fingerprints necessary for unique identification present from approximately 5 to 10 microns. Given a sufficiently strong source of illumination, water hidden in shadows on the Moon and organic molecules in the outer solar system would be detectable and identifiable. Quantum Cascade (QC) laser technology is now becoming sufficiently capable to support reflectance spectroscopy at some of these wavelengths from orbit. Conceived under the HCIPE program in support of Prometheus missions, this technique is intrinsically very scalable. For instance, water can be detected using only two wavelengths and its physical state can be characterized with only five. Requiring an optical power of 2W per wavelength for sufficient signal-to-noise, the total power consumption by the lasing system would be approximately 80 and 200W, respectively. Currently, a continuous power output at 3 μm of 200 mWatts has been demonstrated. With beam combining, an optical power of 2 Watts is currently achievable. On the Moon, this would enable the detection of as little as 100ppm water. Radar and neutron spectroscopy measurements suggest there may be > 1000 ppm of water-ice present in permanent crater shadows on the Moon [Feldman et al., 1998; 2000; Nozette et al., 1996] which, if present the surface regolith would stabily exist adsorbed on the grains [Hodges, 2002; Cocks et al., 2002].

  19. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method

    PubMed Central

    Kaniber, M.; Schraml, K.; Regler, A.; Bartl, J.; Glashagen, G.; Flassig, F.; Wierzbowski, J.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  20. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method.

    PubMed

    Kaniber, M; Schraml, K; Regler, A; Bartl, J; Glashagen, G; Flassig, F; Wierzbowski, J; Finley, J J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  1. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for monitoring diabetic foot ulcer - A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Sujatha, N.; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, Richa

    2014-02-01

    Foot ulceration due to diabetes mellitus is a major problem affecting 12-25% of diabetic subjects in their lifetime. An untreated ulcer further gets infected which causes necrosis leading to amputation of lower extremities. Early identification of risk factors and treatment for these chronic wounds would reduce health care costs and improve the quality of life for people with diabetes. Recent clinical investigations have shown that a series of factors including reduced oxygen delivery and disturbed metabolism have been observed on patients with foot ulceration due to diabetes. Also, these factors can impair the wound healing process. Optical techniques based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provide characteristic spectral finger prints shed light on tissue oxygenation levels and morphological composition of a tissue. This study deals with the application of diffuse reflectance intensity ratios based on oxyhemoglobin bands (R542/R580), ratios of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin bands (R580/R555), total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation between normal and diabetic foot ulcer sites. Preliminary results obtained are found to be promising indicating the application of reflectance spectroscopy in the assessment of foot ulcer healing.

  2. Application of multibounce attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics for determination of aspartame in soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Harpreet Kaur; Cho, Il Kyu; Shim, Jae Yong; Li, Qing X; Jun, Soojin

    2008-02-13

    Aspartame is a low-calorie sweetener commonly used in soft drinks; however, the maximum usage dose is limited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance sampling accessory and partial least-squares regression (PLS) was used for rapid determination of aspartame in soft drinks. On the basis of spectral characterization, the highest R2 value, and lowest PRESS value, the spectral region between 1600 and 1900 cm(-1) was selected for quantitative estimation of aspartame. The potential of FTIR spectroscopy for aspartame quantification was examined and validated by the conventional HPLC method. Using the FTIR method, aspartame contents in four selected carbonated diet soft drinks were found to average from 0.43 to 0.50 mg/mL with prediction errors ranging from 2.4 to 5.7% when compared with HPLC measurements. The developed method also showed a high degree of accuracy because real samples were used for calibration, thus minimizing potential interference errors. The FTIR method developed can be suitably used for routine quality control analysis of aspartame in the beverage-manufacturing sector. PMID:18181572

  3. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  4. Point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy on Bi2Se3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, C. R.; Fridman, I.; Lei, H.-C.; Petrovic, C.; Wei, J. Y. T.

    2016-04-01

    To study how Andreev reflection (AR) occurs between a superconductor and a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), we use superconducting Nb tips to perform point-contact AR spectroscopy at 4.2 K on as-grown single crystals of Bi2Se3. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy are also used to characterize the superconducting tip and both the doping level and surface condition of the TI sample. The point-contact measurements show clear spectral signatures of AR, as well as a depression of zero-bias conductance with decreasing junction impedance. The latter observation can be attributed to interfacial Rashba spin-orbit coupling, and the presence of bulk bands at the Fermi level in our samples suggests that bulk states of Bi2Se3 are involved in the observed AR.

  5. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  6. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  7. Phthalocyanine identification in paintings by reflectance spectroscopy. A laboratory and in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poldi, G.; Caglio, S.

    2013-06-01

    The importance of identifying pigments using non invasive (n.i.) analyses has gained increasing importance in the field of spectroscopy applied to art conservation and art studies. Among the large set of pigments synthesized and marketed during 20th century, surely phthalocyanine blue and green pigments occupy an important role in the field of painting (including restoration) and printing, thanks to their characteristics like brightness and fastness. This research focused on the most used phthalocyanine blue (PB15:1 and PB15:3) and green pigments (PG7), and on the possibility to identify these organic compounds using a methodology like reflectance spectroscopy in the UV, visible and near IR range (UV-vis-NIR RS), performed easily through portable instruments. Laboratory tests and three examples carried out on real paintings are discussed.

  8. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lastras-Martínez, A. E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F.; Lastras-Montaño, L. A.; Lastras-Montaño, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  9. Infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy: an innovative strategy for analyzing mineral components in energy relevant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Delle Piane, Claudio; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  10. [Nondestructive analysis and identification of pigments on colored relics by fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-qin; Dang, Gao-chao; Zhao, Jing

    2008-08-01

    and reliable, and verified by XRF analysis. Fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy is a new quick analytical technique to identify pigments on colored relics. PMID:18975788

  11. Sorting of polypropylene resins by color in MSW using visible reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Safavi, S M; Masoumi, H; Mirian, S S; Tabrizchi, M

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, an automated sorter is proposed for distinguishing polypropylene (PP) plastics based on their color. This sorting system uses visible (VIS) reflectance spectroscopy to separate PP resins according to their colors. A "Three-Filter" identification algorithm was developed to recognize the PP color (blue, red, green, white or yellow), and accordingly, give the command for throwing or not throwing PP to a series of electro pneumatic valves. The proposed sorting system was demonstrated to be fast and accurate, despite the presence of different labels and surface contamination on the PP resins. PMID:20674323

  12. Improvement of photon correlation spectroscopy method for measuring nanoparticle size by using attenuated total reflectance.

    PubMed

    Krishtop, Victor; Doronin, Ivan; Okishev, Konstantin

    2012-11-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy is an effective method for measuring nanoparticle sizes and has several advantages over alternative methods. However, this method suffers from a disadvantage in that its measuring accuracy reduces in the presence of convective flows of fluid containing nanoparticles. In this paper, we propose a scheme based on attenuated total reflectance in order to reduce the influence of convection currents. The autocorrelation function for the light-scattering intensity was found for this case, and it was shown that this method afforded a significant decrease in the time required to measure the particle sizes and an increase in the measuring accuracy. PMID:23187387

  13. Preliminary Method for Direct Quantification of Colistin Methanesulfonate by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Niece, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin use has increased in response to the advent of infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. It is administered parenterally as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS). Various formulations of CMS and labeling conventions can lead to confusion about colistin dosing, and questions remain about the pharmacokinetics of CMS. Since CMS does not have strong UV absorbance, current methods employ a laborious process of chemical conversion to colistin followed by precolumn derivatization to detect formed colistin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Here, we report a method for direct quantification of colistin methanesulfonate by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR). PMID:26124160

  14. Frequency-selective analysis of multichannel magnetic resonance spectroscopy data.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Niclas; Stoica, Petre

    2005-01-01

    In several practical magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) applications the user is interested only in the spectral content of a specific frequency band of the spectrum. A frequency-selective (or sub-band) method estimates only the parameters of those spectroscopic components that lie in a pre-selected frequency band of the spectrum in a computationally efficient manner. Multichannel MRS is a technique that employs phased-array receive coils to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the spectra by combining several simultaneous measurements of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation of an excited sample. In this paper we suggest a frequency-selective multichannel parameter estimation approach that combines the appealing features (high speed and improved SNR) of the two techniques above. The presented method shows parameter estimation accuracies comparable to those of existing fullband multichannel techniques in the high SNR case, but at a considerably lower computational complexity, and significantly better parameter estimation accuracies in low SNR scenarios. PMID:17282712

  15. Infrared reflectance and photoemission spectroscopy studies across the phase transition boundary in thin film vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Zawilski, Kevin; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2008-01-01

    Optical properties and valence band density of states near the Fermi level of high-quality VO2 thin films have been investigated by mid-infrared reflectometry and hard-UV (h = 150 eV) photoemission spectroscopy. An exceptionally large change in reflectance from 2 to 94% is found upon the thermally driven metal insulator transition (MIT). The infrared dispersion spectra of the reflectance across the MIT are presented and evidence for the percolative nature of the MIT is pointed out. The discrepancy between the MIT temperatures defined from the electrical and optical properties is found and its origin is discussed. The manifestation of the MIT is observed in the photoemission spectra of the V 3d levels. The analysis of the changes of the V 3d density of states is done and the top valence band shift upon the MIT is measured to be 0.6 eV.

  16. Sediment mineralogy based on visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrard, R.D.; Vanden Berg, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIS) can be used to measure reflectance spectra (wavelength 350-2500 nm) for sediment cores and samples. A local ground-truth calibration of spectral features to mineral percentages is calculated by measuring reflectance spectra for a suite of samples of known mineralogy. This approach has been tested on powders, core plugs and split cores, and we conclude that it works well on all three, unless pore water is present. Initial VNIS studies have concentrated on determination of relative proportions of carbonate, opal, smectite and illite in equatorial Pacific sediments. Shipboard VNIS-based determination of these four components was demonstrated on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 199. ?? The Geological Society of London 2006.

  17. High Resolution K-Band Spectroscopy of Selected M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Tadashi

    2013-06-01

    We propose to obtain high-resolution K-band spectra of selected M dwarfs to study stellar properties such as effective temperature and metallicity. M dwarfs are under scrutiny as potential planet hosts. They have sufficiently low masses and small radii that exoplanets induce considerably larger reflex velocities and transit depths than an identical planet would around larger, more massive hosts. The low temperatures of M dwarfs imply short-period planets are in the habitable zone. However, due to the cool atmosphere, the characterization of M dwarfs at visible wavelengths has been rather difficult and the previously known stellar parameters have been rather crude. Recently a new method to use medium resolution K-band spectroscopy to determine the effective temperature and metallicity was devised. The purposes of this proposal is to examine the validity of the new method with a spectral resolution one order of magnitude higher and, if possible, to find a better method to determine the stellar properties.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of mass-selected metal carbonyl cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricks, A. M.; Reed, Z. E.; Duncan, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    Metal carbonyl cations of the form M(CO)n+ are produced in a molecular beam by laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source. These ions, and their corresponding rare gas atom "tagged" analogs, M(CO)n(RG)m+, are studied with mass-selected infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the carbonyl stretching region and with density functional theory computations. The number of infrared-active bands, their frequency positions, and their relative intensities provide distinctive patterns allowing determination of the geometries and electronic structures of these complexes. Cobalt penta carbonyl and manganese hexacarbonyl cations are compared to isoelectronic iron pentacarbonyl and chromium hexacarbonyl neutrals. Gold and copper provide examples of "non-classical" carbonyls. Seven-coordinate carbonyls are explored for the vanadium group metal cations (V +, Nb + and Ta +), while uranium cations provide an example of an eight-coordinate carbonyl.

  19. Mass-selective Neutron Spectroscopy Beyond the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, M.; Seel, A. G.; Richards, S. E.; Gutmann, M. J.; Fernandez-Alonso, F.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss ongoing methodological developments underpinning the determination of nuclear-momentum distributions from mass-resolved neutron Compton data of lightweight materials. To this end, two systems are considered in detail, namely, lithium hydride (including its deuterated counterpart) and squaric acid, an organic antiferroelectric material containing hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Beyond the usual case of the proton, our approach enables direct access to detailed line shape information associated with the underlying nuclear-momentum distributions of both deuterium and lithium. For oxygen and carbon, mean kinetic energies can also be obtained directly from the neutron data, as demonstrated by a detailed analysis of mass- resolved data from squaric acid. From an instrumentation point of view, this work provides a suitable platform for a detailed assessment of existing capabilities and future developments in mass-selective neutron spectroscopy on the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS.

  20. Evaluating Reflectance Spectroscopy as a Method of Rapid Cryptotephra Identification using Component Analysis: Tephrochronology of the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The reactivation of Montserrat's South Soufrière-Soufrière Hills volcanic complex has impelled the creation of tephrochronologic records in the Lesser Antilles Arc in order to assess volcanic hazards to human safety. Developing an eruptive history of Montserrat by recording tephra layers preserved in marine sediment is hindered by the lack of a rapid, non-destructive method for detecting cryptotephra, tephra deposits invisible to the naked eye, in marine cores. Identifying cryptotephra is important because some cryptotephra layers represent primary tephra emplacement from small proximal eruptions, events that if excluded from a volcanic record could mischaracterize a volcano's eruptive frequency over time. VSWIR [0.4-2.5 μm] reflectance spectroscopy is a candidate for rapid, non-destructive cryptotephra detection in marine sediment cores because it can detect tephra in hemipelagic sediment using summary parameters sensitive to iron content and clay minerals (McCanta et al. 2014, AGU abstract OS53D-1086). Spectra from marine cores U1396C-1H-1A through U1396C-1H-5A, collected during International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) mission 340, reveal 29 potential cryptotephra layers (McCanta et al. 2014, AGU abstract OS53D-1086). This study seeks to determine the effectiveness of reflectance spectroscopy at identifying cryptotephra by measuring the abundance of volcanic materials (i.e., glass shards/vesicular pumice and non-vesicular lava clasts) in these layers ( LeFriant et al. 2008; Cassidy et al. 2014). Component analysis was conducted on select core intervals with both cryptotephra-identifying peaks in reflectance parameters, and tephra-indicative peaks in core scanning XRF and magnetic susceptibility parameters (McCanta et al. 2014, AGU abstract OS53D-1086). Samples in this subset show abundances of non-vesicular lava and vesicular pumice clasts above expected background abundances, supporting the existence of cryptotephra at these locations (Fig. 1; LeFriant et

  1. High-Throughput Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for Predicting Quantitative and Qualitative Composition Phenotypes of Individual Maize Kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy can be used for fast and reliable prediction of organic compounds in complex biological samples. We used a recently developed NIR spectroscopy instrument to predict starch, protein, oil, and weight of individual maize (Zea mays) seeds. The starch, prote...

  2. Modeling changes in the hemoglobin concentration of skin with total diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, Diana L.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Farrell, Thomas J.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to monitor changes in the concentration of hemoglobin in the blood of the skin in real time is a key component to personalized patient care. Since hemoglobin has a unique absorption spectrum in the visible light range, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is the most common approach. Although the collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an integrating sphere (IS) has several calibration challenges, this collection method is sufficiently user-friendly that it may be worth overcoming the initial difficulty. Once the spectrum is obtained, it is commonly interpreted with a log-inverse-reflectance (LIR) or "absorbance" analysis that can only accurately monitor changes in the hemoglobin concentration when there are no changes to the nonhemoglobin chromophore concentrations which is not always the case. We address the difficulties associated with collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an IS and propose a model capable of retrieving relative changes in hemoglobin concentration from the visible light spectrum. The model is capable of accounting for concentration changes in the nonhemoglobin chromophores and is first characterized with theoretical spectra and liquid phantoms. The model is then used in comparison with a common LIR analysis on temporal measurements from blanched and reddened human skin.

  3. Multitemporal spectroscopy for crop stress detection using band selection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Thorsten; Franke, Jonas; Menz, Gunter

    2008-08-01

    A fast and precise sensor-based identification of pathogen infestations in wheat stands is essential for the implementation of site-specific fungicide applications. Several works have shown possibilities and limitations for the detection of plant stress using spectral sensor data. Hyperspectral data provide the opportunity to collect spectral reflectance in contiguous bands over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Individual phenomena like the light absorption of leaf pigments can be examined in detail. The precise knowledge of stress-dependent shifting in certain spectral wavelengths provides great advantages in detecting fungal infections. This study focuses on band selection techniques for hyperspectral data to identify relevant and redundant information in spectra regarding a detection of plant stress caused by pathogens. In a laboratory experiment, five 1 sqm boxes with wheat were multitemporarily measured by a ASD Fieldspec® 3 FR spectroradiometer. Two stands were inoculated with Blumeria graminis - the pathogen causing powdery mildew - and one stand was used to simulate the effect of water deficiency. Two stands were kept healthy as control stands. Daily measurements of the spectral reflectance were taken over a 14-day period. Three ASD Pro Lamps were used to illuminate the plots with constant light. By applying band selection techniques, the three types of different wheat vitality could be accurately differentiated at certain stages. Hyperspectral data can provide precise information about pathogen infestations. The reduction of the spectral dimension of sensor data by means of band selection procedures is an appropriate method to speed up the data supply for precision agriculture.

  4. Identification of mineral composition and weathering product of tuff using reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, C.; Park, H.

    2009-12-01

    Tuff is intricately composed of various types of rock blocks and ash matrixes during volcanic formation processes. Qualitative identification and quantitative assessment of mineral composition of tuff usually have been done using manual inspection with naked-eyes and various chemical analyses. Those conventional methods are destructive to objects, time consuming and sometimes carry out biased results from subjective decision making. To overcome limits from conventional methods, assessment technique using reflectance spectroscopy was applied to tuff specimens. Reflectance spectroscopy measures electromagnetic reflectance on rock surface and can extract diagnostic absorption features originated from chemical composition and crystal structure of constituents in the reflectance curve so mineral species can be discriminated qualitatively. The intrinsic absorption feature from particular mineral can be converted to absorption depth representing relative coverage of the mineral in the measurement area by removing delineated convex hull from raw reflectance curve. The spectral measurements were performed with field spectrometer FieldSpec®3 of ASD Inc. and the wavelength range of measurement was form 350nm to 2500nm. Three types of tuff blocks, ash tuff, green lapilli tuff and red lapilli tuff, were sampled from Hwasun County in Korea and the types of tuffs. The differences between green tuff and red tuff are from the color of their matrixes. Ash tuff consists of feldspars and quartz and small amount of chalcedony, calcite, dolomite, epidote and basalt fragments. Green lapilli tuff consists of feldspar, quartz and muscovite and small amount of calcite, chalcedony, sericite, chlorite, quartzite and basalt fragments. Red lapilli tuff consists of feldspar, quartz and muscovite and small amount of calcite, chalcedony, limonite, zircon, chlorite, quartzite and basalt fragments. The tuff rocks were coarsely crushed and blocks and matrixes were separated to measure standard

  5. Characterizing the Moisture Content of Tea with Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy Using Wavelet Transform and Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Xie, Chuanqi; He, Yong; Qiu, Zhengjun; Zhang, Yanchao

    2012-01-01

    Effects of the moisture content (MC) of tea on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were investigated by integrated wavelet transform and multivariate analysis. A total of 738 representative samples, including fresh tea leaves, manufactured tea and partially processed tea were collected for spectral measurement in the 325–1,075 nm range with a field portable spectroradiometer. Then wavelet transform (WT) and multivariate analysis were adopted for quantitative determination of the relationship between MC and spectral data. Three feature extraction methods including WT, principal component analysis (PCA) and kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) were used to explore the internal structure of spectral data. Comparison of those three methods indicated that the variables generated by WT could efficiently discover structural information of spectral data. Calibration involving seeking the relationship between MC and spectral data was executed by using regression analysis, including partial least squares regression, multiple linear regression and least square support vector machine. Results showed that there was a significant correlation between MC and spectral data (r = 0.991, RMSEP = 0.034). Moreover, the effective wavelengths for MC measurement were detected at range of 888–1,007 nm by wavelet transform. The results indicated that the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of tea is highly correlated with MC. PMID:23012574

  6. Evaluation of thermal stability of indinavir sulphate using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parul; Premkumar, L; Mehrotra, Ranjana; Kandpal, H C; Bakhshi, A K

    2008-06-01

    Indinavir sulphate is a potent and specific protease inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is used for the treatment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). At elevated temperature the drug which otherwise remains crystalline undergoes a phase transition to an amorphous phase to form degradation products. In the present study, thermal stability of indinavir sulphate is evaluated using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of the drug before and after the exposure to thermal radiation at different temperatures were acquired in the diffuse reflectance mode using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were used as complimentary techniques to adequately implement and assist the interpretation of the infrared spectroscopy results. The DRIFT spectra reveal that the drug remains stable up to 100 degrees C, degrades slightly at 125 degrees C and undergoes complete degradation at about 150 degrees C to produce degradation products. The degradation products can easily be characterized using the infrared spectra. PMID:18280078

  7. Time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy for nondestructive assessment of fruit and vegetable quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Vanoli, Maristella; Rizzolo, Anna; Eccher Zerbini, Paola

    2007-09-01

    In the majority of food and feed, due to the microscopic spatial changes in the refractive index, visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) light undergoes multiple scattering events and the overall light distribution is determined more by scattering rather than absorption. Conventional steady state VIS/NIR reflectance spectroscopy can provide information on light attenuation, which depends both on light absorption and light scattering, but cannot discriminate these two effects. On the contrary, time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy (TRS) provides a complete optical characterisation of diffusive media in terms of their absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient. From the assessment of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, information can then be derived on the composition and internal structure of the medium. Main advantages of the technique are the absolute non-invasiveness, the potentiality for non-contact measurements, and the capacity to probe internal properties with no influence from the skin. In this work we review the physical and technical issues related to the use of TRS for nondestructive quality assessment of fruit and vegetable. A laboratory system for broadband TRS, based on tunable mode-locked lasers and fast microchannel plate photomultiplier, and a portable setup for TRS measurements, based on pulsed diode lasers and compact metal-channel photomultiplier, will be described. Results on broadband optical characterisation of fruits and applications of TRS to the detection of internal defects in pears and to maturity assessment in nectarines will be presented.

  8. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers. PMID:26385430

  9. Classification of the waxy condition of durum wheat by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy using wavelets and a genetic algorithm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been applied to the problem of differentiating four genotypes of durum wheat: ‘waxy’, wx-A1 null, wx-B1 null and wild type. The test data consisted of 95 NIR reflectance spectra of wheat samples obtained from a USDA-ARS wheat breeding program. A two...

  10. The Use of UV-Visible Reflectance Spectroscopy as an Objective Tool to Evaluate Pearl Quality

    PubMed Central

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the quality of pearls involves the use of various tools and methods, which are mainly visual and often quite subjective. Pearls are normally classified by origin and are then graded by luster, nacre thickness, surface quality, size, color and shape. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to classify and estimate the quality of 27 different pearls from their UV-Visible spectra. Due to the opaque nature of pearls, spectroscopy measurements were performed using the Diffuse Reflectance UV-Visible spectroscopy technique. The spectra were acquired at two different locations on each pearl sample in order to assess surface homogeneity. The spectral data (inputs) were smoothed to reduce the noise, fed into ANNs and correlated to the pearl’s quality/grading criteria (outputs). The developed ANNs were successful in predicting pearl type, mollusk growing species, possible luster and color enhancing, donor condition/type, recipient/host color, donor color, pearl luster, pearl color, origin. The results of this study shows that the developed UV-Vis spectroscopy-ANN method could be used as a more objective method of assessing pearl quality (grading) and may become a valuable tool for the pearl grading industry. PMID:22851919

  11. Evaluation of vitamin C content in kiwifruit by diffuse reflectance FT-NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin; Lu, Huishan; Yu, Haiyan; Liu, Yande

    2005-11-01

    Vitamin C is considered an important nutrition component of fruits, especially of kiwifruit. Traditional destructive method for vitamin C measurement is very complex and fussy. Near Infrared (NIR)spectroscopy is a promising technique for nondestructive measurement of fruit internal qualities, such as soluble solid content (SSC), valid acidity (VA). The objective of this research was to study the potential of NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a way for nondestructive measurement of vitamin C content in "Qinmei" kiwifruit. NIR spectral data were collected in the spectral range of 800-2500 nm with different combinations of resolution (4 cm-1, 16 cm-1 and 32 cm-1) and scan number (32, 64 and 128). Statistical models were developed using partial least square (PLS) method. The combination with resolution of 4 cm-1 and scan number of 64 gave the best result when all samples were used in calibration sample set. Then two spectral pretreatments multiplicative signal correction (MSC) and standard normal variate (SNV), and three kinds of mathematical treatment of original spectra, first derivative spectra and second derivative spectra were discussed. The PLS model of second derivative spectra using SNV pretreatment turned out better prediction results: correlation coefficient (r) of 0. 93, root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 9.24 mg/100g and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 10.3 mg/100g. The results of this study showed that NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could be used for kiwifruit vitamin C prediction. The higher the resolution, the better the results, but longer time will be taken, which may not be suitable for on-line use. Therefore, further research still needs to be done.

  12. On the prediction of threshold friction velocity of wind erosion using soil reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Flagg, Cody; Okin, Gregory S.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dintwe, Kebonye; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-12-01

    Current approaches to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of soil particle movement, including both experimental and empirical methods, suffer from various disadvantages, and they are particularly not effective to estimate TFVs at regional to global scales. Reflectance spectroscopy has been widely used to obtain TFV-related soil properties (e.g., moisture, texture, crust, etc.), however, no studies have attempted to directly relate soil TFV to their spectral reflectance. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil TFV and soil reflectance in the visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR, 350-2500 nm) spectral region, and to identify the best range of wavelengths or combinations of wavelengths to predict TFV. Threshold friction velocity of 31 soils, along with their reflectance spectra and texture were measured in the Mojave Desert, California and Moab, Utah. A correlation analysis between TFV and soil reflectance identified a number of isolated, narrow spectral domains that largely fell into two spectral regions, the VIS area (400-700 nm) and the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) area (1100-2500 nm). A partial least squares regression analysis (PLSR) confirmed the significant bands that were identified by correlation analysis. The PLSR further identified the strong relationship between the first-difference transformation and TFV at several narrow regions around 1400, 1900, and 2200 nm. The use of PLSR allowed us to identify a total of 17 key wavelengths in the investigated spectrum range, which may be used as the optimal spectral settings for estimating TFV in the laboratory and field, or mapping of TFV using airborne/satellite sensors.

  13. On the prediction of threshold friction velocity of wind erosion using soil reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Junran; Flagg, Cody B.; Okin, Gregory S.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dintwe, Kebonye; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of soil particle movement, including both experimental and empirical methods, suffer from various disadvantages, and they are particularly not effective to estimate TFVs at regional to global scales. Reflectance spectroscopy has been widely used to obtain TFV-related soil properties (e.g., moisture, texture, crust, etc.), however, no studies have attempted to directly relate soil TFV to their spectral reflectance. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil TFV and soil reflectance in the visible and near infrared (VIS–NIR, 350–2500 nm) spectral region, and to identify the best range of wavelengths or combinations of wavelengths to predict TFV. Threshold friction velocity of 31 soils, along with their reflectance spectra and texture were measured in the Mojave Desert, California and Moab, Utah. A correlation analysis between TFV and soil reflectance identified a number of isolated, narrow spectral domains that largely fell into two spectral regions, the VIS area (400–700 nm) and the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) area (1100–2500 nm). A partial least squares regression analysis (PLSR) confirmed the significant bands that were identified by correlation analysis. The PLSR further identified the strong relationship between the first-difference transformation and TFV at several narrow regions around 1400, 1900, and 2200 nm. The use of PLSR allowed us to identify a total of 17 key wavelengths in the investigated spectrum range, which may be used as the optimal spectral settings for estimating TFV in the laboratory and field, or mapping of TFV using airborne/satellite sensors.

  14. Ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells in atomic spectroscopy: reflection, transmission, fluorescence, and nonadiabatic transitions at the walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazgalev, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Cartaleva, S.; Przhibelskii, S.; Vartanyan, T.

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-narrow cells with the thicknesses in the range from several wavelengths to the small fractions of the wavelength brought a number of new opportunities for atomic spectroscopy. Depending on the cell thickness, spectral lines recorded in ultra-narrow cells are either Doppler-free or Doppler-broadened. With careful selection of the cell thickness hyperfine structure may be easily resolved without resorting on the multibeam nonlinear optical techniques. Moreover, frequent collisions with the walls leads to the important modifications of velocity selective optical pumping resonances. Finally, ultra-narrow cells provide with the unique opportunity to study collisions of the excited atoms with the solid surfaces. In this contribution several examples of the use of the ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells filled with the alkali atomic vapour is presented. First, we discuss general aspects of the transient polarisation that defines all peculiarities of an ultra-narrow cell as a spectroscopic tool. Second, we demonstrate the resolution of the magnetic sublevels in the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime in the Cs hyperfine structure. Third, new aspects of velocity selective optical pumping resonances in reflection and transmission of resonant radiation by the 6 wavelengths thick cell filled with Cs are discussed. Forth, the experimental evidences of the nonadiabatic transitions between excited states of Rb atoms in the course of collisions with the sapphire surface are presented.

  15. Reflectance spectroscopy for the assessment of soil salt content in soils of the yellow river delta of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weng, Yongling; Gong, P.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of reflectance spectroscopy as a rapid and inexpensive tool for soil characterization. In this study, we collected 95 soil samples from the Yellow River Delta of China to investigate the level of soil salinity in relation to soil spectra. Sample plots were selected based on a field investigation and the corresponding soil salinity classification map to maximize variations of saline characteristics in the soil. Spectral reflectances of air-dried soil samples were measured using an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer (350-2500 nm) with an artificial light source. In the Yellow River Delta, the dominant chemical in the saline soil was NaCl and MgCl2. Soil spectra were analysed using two-thirds of the available samples, with the remaining one-third withheld for validation purposes. The analysis indicated that with some preprocessing, the reflectance at 1931-2123 nm and 2153-2254 nm was highly correlated with soil salt content (SSC). In the spectral region of 1931-2123 nm, the correlation R ranged from -0.80 to -0.87. In the region of 2153-2254 nm, the SSC was positively correlated with preprocessed reflectance (0.79-0.88). The preprocessing was done by fitting a convex hull to the reflectance curve and dividing the spectral reflectance by the value of the corresponding convex hull band by band. This process is called continuum removal, and the resulting ratio is called continuum removed reflectance (CR reflectance). However, the SSC did not have a high correlation with the unprocessed reflectance, and the correlation was always negative in the entire spectrum (350-2500 nm) with the strongest negative correlation at 1981 nm (R = -0.63). Moreover, we found a strong correlation (R=0.91) between a soil salinity index (SSI: Constructed using CR reflectance at 2052 nm and 2203 nm) and SSC. We estimated SSC as a function of SSI and SSI' (SSI': Constructed using unprocessed reflectance at 2052 nm and 2203 nm) using

  16. Spoilage of foods monitored by native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    The modern food processing and storage environments require the real-time monitoring and rapid microbiological testing. Optical spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelengths can be the basis of a novel, rapid, reagent less, noncontact and non-destructive technique for monitoring the food spoilage. The native fluorescence spectra of muscle foods stored at 2-4°C (in refrigerator) and 20-24°C (in room temperature) were measured as a function of time with a selective excitation wavelength of 340nm. The contributions of the principal molecular components to the native fluorescence spectra of meat were measured spectra of each fluorophore: collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. The responsible components were extracted using a method namely Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares (MCR-ALS). The native fluorescence combined with MCR-ALS can be used directly on the surface of meat to produce biochemically interpretable "fingerprints", which reflects the microbial spoilage of foods involved with the metabolic processes. The results show that with time elapse, the emission from NADH in meat stored at 24°C increases much faster than that at 4°C. This is because multiplying of microorganisms and catabolism are accompanied by the generation of NADH. This study presents changes of relative content of NADH may be used as criterion for detection of spoilage degree of meat using native fluorescence spectroscopy.

  17. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Edwards, J. O.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Froschl, H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mossbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mossbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mossbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the water

  18. Coherence selection in double CP MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Hsien; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tzou, Der-Lii M.

    2008-11-01

    Applications of double cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, via 1H/ 15N and then 15N/ 13C coherence transfers, for 13C coherence selection are demonstrated on a 15N/ 13C-labeled N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) compound. The 15N/ 13C coherence transfer is very sensitive to the settings of the experimental parameters. To resolve explicitly these parameter dependences, we have systematically monitored the 13C{ 15N/ 1H} signal as a function of the rf field strength and the MAS frequency. The data reveal that the zero-quantum coherence transfer, with which the 13C effective rf field is larger than that of the 15N by the spinning frequency, would give better signal sensitivity. We demonstrate in one- and two-dimensional double CP experiments that spectral editing can be achieved by tailoring the experimental parameters, such as the rf field strengths and/or the MAS frequency.

  19. {ital In} {ital situ} wafer temperature monitoring of silicon etching using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.L.; Beard, B.T.; Stevens, J.E.; Blain, M.G.; Meisenheimer, T.L.

    1996-07-01

    Real time, {ital in} {ital situ} temperature measurements during chemical downstream etching of silicon wafers have been performed using a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy based sensor [Weilmeier {ital et} {ital al}., Can. J. Phys. {bold 69}, 422 (1991)]. The spectrometer has a spatial resolution of 1 cm{sup 2}, updates the temperature every 2 s, and has a temperature resolution of better than 1{degree}C. The thermal time constant the wafers and the thermally regulated electrostatic chuck (10{degree}C{lt}{ital T}{lt}90{degree}C) varied between 7 and 30 s depending on clamping and backside gas pressure. The exothermic etch process is accompanied by increases in the silicon wafer temperature consistent with the thermal conductivity conditions and with the etch chemistry. The temperature uniformity across the wafers was better than 2{degree}C during the entire etch process. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  20. Applications of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.C.; Noel, D.; Hechler, J.J.

    1988-12-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to obtain infrared spectra directly from the surface of composite materials, with little or no sample preparation. It is thus of interest as a nondestructive method for industrial inspection. In many cases, the IR spectra provide detailed information concerning the chemical composition and molecular structure of the material. The technique works particularly well for carbon-fiber composites. This paper describes the principles involved, some factors which influence the quality of the spectra, and a number of examples of applications. These include the characterization of epoxy matrices (composition, curing, degradation), the detection of surface contamination, and the determination of the degree of crystallinity in poly(phenylene sulfide)-based composites. 24 references.

  1. [Use of visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to identify the cashmere and wool].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Ru; Zhang, Li-Ping; Wang, Jian-Fu; Wu, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Rong

    2013-08-01

    The wool and cashmere samples (n = 130) from different areas of Gansu province were identified by visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (Vis/NIRs). The result shows that principal component-mahalanobis distance pattern can identify the wool and cashmere, and the boundary between two categories was clear; The calibration set samples were used to establish calibration qualitative model using PCR combined with the best pretreatment of the spectra and math, including multivariate scattering correction (MSC), first derivative, eight for the best principal component factor, one for uncertainty factor, this calibration model of the predicted was the best, and the result of the external validation was correct completely. Results from this experiment indicate that Vis/NIRs can be utilized to identify the wool and cashmere. PMID:24159853

  2. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  3. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy of thin films using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with <1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  4. Combining total internal reflection sum frequency spectroscopy spectral imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allgeyer, Edward S; Sterling, Sarah M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Hess, Samuel T; Neivandt, David J; Mason, Michael D

    2015-01-27

    Understanding surface and interfacial lateral organization in material and biological systems is critical in nearly every field of science. The continued development of tools and techniques viable for elucidation of interfacial and surface information is therefore necessary to address new questions and further current investigations. Sum frequency spectroscopy (SFS) is a label-free, nonlinear optical technique with inherent surface specificity that can yield critical organizational information on interfacial species. Unfortunately, SFS provides no spatial information on a surface; small scale heterogeneities that may exist are averaged over the large areas typically probed. Over the past decade, this has begun to be addressed with the advent of SFS microscopy. Here we detail the construction and function of a total internal reflection (TIR) SFS spectral and confocal fluorescence imaging microscope directly amenable to surface investigations. This instrument combines, for the first time, sample scanning TIR-SFS imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25506739

  5. Estimation of blood alcohol concentration by horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kakali; Sharma, Shiba P; Lahiri, Sujit C

    2010-06-01

    Numerous methods like distillation followed by iodometric titrations, gas chromatograph (GC)-flame ionization detector, gas chromatograph-mass spectrophotometer, GC-Headspace, Breath analyzer, and biosensors including alcohol dehydrogenase (enzymatic) have been used to determine blood alcohol concentration (BAC). In the present study, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy had been used to determine BAC in whole blood. The asymmetric stretching frequency of C-C-O group of ethanol in water (1,045 cm(-1)) had been used to calculate BAC using Beer's Law. A seven-point calibration curve of ethanol was drawn in the concentration range 24-790 mg dL(-1). The curve showed good linearity over the concentration range used (r(2)=0.999, standard deviation=0.0023). The method is accurate, reproducible, rapid, simple, and nondestructive in nature. PMID:20541351

  6. Strategies for Detecting Organic Liquids on Soils Using Mid-Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Neal B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2008-06-25

    Stand-off monitoring for chemical spills can provide timely information for clean-up efforts and mid-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy is one approach being investigated. Anomaly and target detection strategies were examined for detection of four different low-volatility organic liquids on two different soil types. Several preprocessing and signal weighting strategies were studied. Anomaly detection for C-H bands was very good using second derivative preprocessing and provided similar performance to target detection approaches such as generalized least squares (GLS) and partial least squares (PLS) with detections at soil loads of approximately 0.6 to 1.5 mg/cm2. Good performance was also found for detection of P=O, O–H and C=O bands but the optimal strategy varied. The simplicity and generality of anomaly detection is attractive, however target detection provides more capability for classification.

  7. Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Lipid-Protein Interaction in Langmuir Films

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  8. Detection of whitening agents in illegal cosmetics using attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Bothy, J L; Desmedt, B; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O

    2014-09-01

    Cosmetic products containing illegal whitening agents are still found on the European market. They represent a considerable risk to public health, since they are often characterised by severe side effects when used chronically. The detection of such products at customs is not always simple, due to misleading packaging and the existence of products containing only legal components. Therefore there is a need for easy to use equipment and techniques to perform an initial screening of samples. The use of attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, combined with chemometrics, was evaluated for that purpose. It was found that the combination of ATR-IR with the simple chemometric technique k-nearest neighbours gave good results. A model was obtained in which a minimum of illegal samples was categorised as legal. The correctly classified illegal samples could be attributed to the illegal components present. PMID:24927403

  9. Andreev Reflection Spectroscopy of Nb-doped Bi2Se3 Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurter, C.; Finck, A. D. K.; Qiu, Y.; Huemiller, E.; Weis, A.; Atkinson, J.; Medvedeva, J.; Hor, Y. S.; van Harlingen, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    Doped topological insulators are speculated to realize p-wave superconductivity with unusual low energy quasiparticles, such as surface Andreev bound states. We present point contact spectroscopy of thin exfoliated flakes of Nb-doped Bi2Se3 where superconductivity persists up to ~ 1 K, compared to 3.2 K in bulk crystals. The critical magnetic field is strongly anisotropic, consistent with quasi-2D behavior. Andreev reflection measurements of devices with low resistance contacts result in prominent BTK-like behavior with an enhanced conductance plateau at low bias. For high resistance contacts, we observe a split zero bias conductance anomaly and additional features at the superconducting gap. Our results suggest that this material is a promising platform for studying topological superconductivity. We acknowledge support from Microsoft Project Q.

  10. [Quantitative analysis of contents in compound fertilizer and application research using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Le; Zhang, Hong; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Bin-Mei; Yu, Li-Xiang; Wang, Qi; Wu, Yue-Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a new approach to fast determining the content of urea, biuret and moisture in compound fertilizer composed of urea, ammonium dihydrogenphosphate and potassium chloride was proposed by using near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. After preprocessing the original spectrum, partial least squares (PLS) models of urea, biuret and moisture were built with the R2 values of 0.9861, 0.9770 and 0.9713 respectively, the root mean square errors of cross validation were 2.59, 0.38, 0.132 respectively. And the prediction correlation factors were 0.9733, 0.9215 and 0.9679 respectively. The authors detected six kinds of compound fertilizer in market for the model verification, the correlation factors were 0.9237, 0.9786 and 0.9874 respectively. The data implied that the new method can be used for situ quality control in the production process of compound fertilizer. PMID:24783536

  11. Electrostatic Interactions of Fluorescent Molecules with Dielectric Interfaces Studied by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Chmyrov, Andriy; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between dielectric surfaces and different fluorophores used in ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy are investigated using objective-based Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). The interfacial dynamics of cationic rhodamine 123 and rhodamine 6G, anionic/dianionic fluorescein, zwitterionic rhodamine 110 and neutral ATTO 488 are monitored at various ionic strengths at physiological pH. As analyzed by means of the amplitude and time-evolution of the autocorrelation function, the fluorescent molecules experience electrostatic attraction or repulsion at the glass surface depending on their charges. Influences of the electrostatic interactions are also monitored through the triplet-state population and triplet relaxation time, including the amount of detected fluorescence or the count-rate-per-molecule parameter. These TIR-FCS results provide an increased understanding of how fluorophores are influenced by the microenvironment of a glass surface, and show a promising approach for characterizing electrostatic interactions at interfaces. PMID:20386645

  12. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy: principles and applications to lipid-protein interaction in Langmuir films.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R

    2010-04-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins, and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  13. Structural charge transfer in the aluminophosphate molecular sieves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjanchi, M. A.; Rashidi, M. K.

    1999-05-01

    Influence of water adsorption in AlPO-5, SAPO-5, AlPO-11 and SAPO-11 has been studied with UV diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The observed UV absorption spectra in the as-synthesized, template free and hydrated materials are related to the charge transfer processes between aluminum and oxygen atoms of the aluminophosphate and water molecules. As-synthesised materials show two distinct and well-defined bands at about 220 and 260-280 nm correlated to framework aluminum and organic templates, respectively. Upon calcination, the band of occluded template disappears and the band assigned to the framework aluminum shifts at about 240 nm. When the calcined samples are completely hydrated, broadening of the aluminum charge transfer band is observed. This is due to coordination of water molecules to the part of the framework aluminum. Broadening occurs more in AlPO-5 possibly because of higher water capacity and homogenity with respect to SAPO-5.

  14. Monitoring laser cleaning of titanium alloys by probe beam reflection and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, D. J.; Crouse, P. L.; Schmidt, M. J. J.; Li, L.; Turner, M. W.; Smith, A. J. E.

    2008-10-01

    Studies have shown excimer laser cleaning to be an effective non-chemical alternative method for removing contaminants from surfaces of titanium alloys in preparation for electron beam welding and diffusion bonding, with reference to aerospace applications. Among several important criteria for process acceptability, is the absence of oxide formation. This paper investigates the viability of using a probe beam reflection (PBR) system and laser plume emission spectroscopy (PES) for detection of incipient oxide formation on three typical aerospace titanium alloys, viz. Ti64, Ti6246, and IMI834. These diagnostic techniques have been shown to be capable of sensing different components in the emission plume and yield quantitative results. Results from this work correlate closely with previously reported cleaning mechanisms. The oxidation threshold, as well as the operating window for successful decontamination, is discussed.

  15. Fast determination of total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-cai; Chen, Xing-dan; Lu, Yong-jun; Cao, Zhi-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was used to develop a fast determination method for total ginsenosides in Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) powder. The spectra were analyzed with multiplicative signal correction (MSC) correlation method. The best correlative spectra region with the total ginsenosides content was 1660 nm~1880 nm and 2230nm~2380 nm. The NIR calibration models of ginsenosides were built with multiple linear regression (MLR), principle component regression (PCR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression respectively. The results showed that the calibration model built with PLS combined with MSC and the optimal spectrum region was the best one. The correlation coefficient and the root mean square error of correction validation (RMSEC) of the best calibration model were 0.98 and 0.15% respectively. The optimal spectrum region for calibration was 1204nm~2014nm. The result suggested that using NIR to rapidly determinate the total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder were feasible.

  16. Study of Spectral Modifications in Acidified Ignitable Liquids by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martín-Alberca, Carlos; Ojeda, Fernando Ernesto Ortega; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the spectral characteristics of two types of acidified gasoline and acidified diesel fuel are discussed. Neat and acidified ignitable liquids (ILs) infrared absorption spectra obtained by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were compared in order to identify the modifications produced by the reaction of the ILs with sulfuric acid. Several bands crucial for gasoline identification were modified, and new bands appeared over the reaction time. In the case of acidified diesel fuel, no significant modifications were observed. Additionally, the neat and acidified ILs spectra were used to perform a principal components analysis in order to confirm objectively the results. The complete discrimination among samples was successfully achieved, including the complete differentiation among gasoline types. Taking into account the results obtained in this work, it is possible to propose spectral fingerprints for the identification of non-burned acidified ILs in forensic investigations related with arson or the use of improvised incendiary devices (IIDs). PMID:26810182

  17. Depth profile characterization technique for electron density in GaN films by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijoh, Takaaki; Ma, Bei; Morita, Ken; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a noncontact measurement method for carrier density and mobility. In this article, the model determination procedure of layer-type nonuniform electron distribution is investigated, since the spectrum fitting hitherto has been conducted on the basis of a multilayer model defined in advance. A simplified case of a high-electron-density GaN layer embedded in a GaN matrix is mainly studied. The following procedure is found to be applicable. The first step is the determination of the high-density layer position in the vicinity of the surface, in the middle region, or in the vicinity of the interface. This is followed by the specification of the sheet electron density and the layer thickness of the high-density region. It is found that this procedure is also applicable to the characterization of two-dimensional electron gases in the vicinity of AlGaN/GaN heterointerfaces.

  18. Determination of in vivo skin moisture level by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saknite, Inga; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has a potential for noninvasive determination of skin moisture level due to high water absorption. In this study, diffuse reflectance spectra of in vivo skin were acquired in the spectral range of 900 nm to 1700 nm by using near-infrared spectrometer, optical fiber and halogen bulb light source. Absorption changes after applying skin moisturizers were analyzed over time at different body sites. Results show difference in absorption when comparing dry and normal skin. Comparison of absorption changes over time after applying moisturizer at different body sites is analyzed and discussed. Some patterns of how skin reacts to different skin moisturizers are shown, although no clear pattern can be seen due to signal noise.

  19. In-vivo reflection spectroscopy measurements in pig brain during stereotactic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsson, Johan; Eriksson, Ola; Wardell, Karin

    2003-07-01

    Radio frequency (RF) lesioning in the human brain is a common surgical therapy for relieving severe pain as well as for movement disorders such as Parkinsonia. During the procedure a small electrode is introduced by stereotactic means towards a target area localized by CT or MRI. An RF-current is applied through the electrode tip when positioned in the target area. The tissue in the proximity of the tip is heated by the current and finally coagulated. The overall aim of this study was to improve the RF-technique and its ability to estimate lesion size by means of optical methods. Therefore, the optical differences between white and gray matter, as well as lesioned and unlesioned tissue were investigated. Reflection spectroscopy measurements in the range of 450-800 nm were conducted on fully anesthetized pigs during stereotactic RF-lesioning (n=6). Light from a tungsten lamp was guided to the electrode tip through optical fibers, inserted along a 2 mm in diameter monopolar RF-electrode. Measurements were performed in steps of 0-10 mm from the target in each hemisphere towards the entry point of the skull. In the central gray of the porcine brain measurements were performed both before and after the creation of a lesion. A total of 55 spectra were collected during this study. Correlation to tissue type was done using post-operative MR-images. The spectral signature for white and gray matter differs significantly for the entire spectral range of 450-800 nm. Pre- and post-lesioning reflection spectroscopy showed the largest differences below 600 and above 620 nm, which implies that lasers within this wavelength range may be useful for in-vivo measurements of tissue optical changes during RF-lesioning.

  20. Quantifying suspended sediment sources during flood events in headwater catchments using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legout, Cédric; Poulenard, Jérôme; Nemery, Julien; Navratil, Oldrich; Grangeon, Thomas; Evrard, Olivier; Esteves, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Increasing the understanding of the hydro-sedimentary dynamics at the catchment scale requires data on the origin of suspended sediments in addition to the classical measurements of suspended sediment concentrations and discharge. In mountainous environments the extremely high spatial and temporal variability of suspended sediment fluxes suggests that the proportions of suspended sediment sources transiting at outlets may also exhibit strong variations during flood events. However, conventional fingerprinting techniques based on geochemical and radionuclide measurements are time-consuming and rather expensive. They constitute a major limitation to conduct routine characterisation of the source of suspended sediment transiting at outlets that would require the analysis of a large number of samples. We investigated how visible or infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy coupled with partial least squares chemometrics techniques could be used to predict the proportion of source material in suspended sediment samples and how it could help understanding the hydro-sedimentary processes occurring during floods. The studied catchment is located in the southern French Alps, draining an area of 22-km². It is composed of black marls, limestones, molasses, undifferentiated deposits and gypsum. Forty-eight source material samples were collected in badlands areas and 328 suspended sediment samples were collected at the outlet during 23 flood events. Spectroscopic measurements were carried out on dried samples. Given that the erosion processes are particle size selective, five size fractions of source material were measured in order to assess the potential alteration of the signatures. As the biogeochemical processes occurring in the river such as iron oxidation could also affect the signatures, source materials that were immersed in the river for durations ranging from 1 day to 9 weeks were analysed. Finally, partial least-squares regression models were constructed on 81

  1. Brain tumour differentiation: rapid stratified serum diagnostics via attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hands, James R; Clemens, Graeme; Stables, Ryan; Ashton, Katherine; Brodbelt, Andrew; Davis, Charles; Dawson, Timothy P; Jenkinson, Michael D; Lea, Robert W; Walker, Carol; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity is essential to exploit advances in new treatments to lead significant reductions in mortality and morbidity. Current cancer diagnostic tests observing tissue architecture and specific protein expression for specific cancers suffer from inter-observer variability, poor detection rates and occur when the patient is symptomatic. A new method for the detection of cancer using 1 μl of human serum, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and pattern recognition algorithms is reported using a 433 patient dataset (3897 spectra). To the best of our knowledge, we present the largest study on serum mid-infrared spectroscopy for cancer research. We achieve optimum sensitivities and specificities using a Radial Basis Function Support Vector Machine of between 80.0 and 100 % for all strata and identify the major spectral features, hence biochemical components, responsible for the discrimination within each stratum. We assess feature fed-SVM analysis for our cancer versus non-cancer model and achieve 91.5 and 83.0 % sensitivity and specificity respectively. We demonstrate the use of infrared light to provide a spectral signature from human serum to detect, for the first time, cancer versus non-cancer, metastatic cancer versus organ confined, brain cancer severity and the organ of origin of metastatic disease from the same sample enabling stratified diagnostics depending upon the clinical question asked. PMID:26874961

  2. Total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy for the detection of β-hematin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Samson, Edward B.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran D.; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Evanescent field sensing methods are currently used to detect many different types of disease markers and biologically important chemicals such as the HER2 breast cancer receptor. Hinoue et al. used Total Internal Reflection Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (TIRPAS) as a method of using the evanescent field to detect an optically opaque dye at a sample interface. Although their methods were successful at detecting dyes, the results at that time did not show a very practical spectroscopic technique, which was due to the less than typical sensitivity of TIRPAS as a spectroscopy modality given the low power (~1 to 2 W) lasers being used. Contrarily, we have used an Nd:YAG laser with a five nanosecond pulse that gives peak power of 1 MW coupled with the TIRPAS system to increase the sensitivity of this technique for biological material sensing. All efforts were focused on the eventual detection of the optically absorbing material, hemozoin, which is created as a byproduct of a malarial infection in blood. We used an optically analogous material, β-hematin, to determine the potential for detection in the TIRPAS system. In addition, four properties which control the sensitivity were investigated to increase understanding about the sensor's function as a biosensing method.

  3. On-site variety discrimination of tomato plant using visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-rong; Yu, Peng; Fu, Xia-ping; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2009-02-01

    The use of visible-near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was explored as a tool to discriminate two new tomato plant varieties in China (Zheza205 and Zheza207). In this study, 82 top-canopy leaves of Zheza205 and 86 top-canopy leaves of Zheza207 were measured in visible-NIR reflectance mode. Discriminant models were developed using principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis (DA), and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) regression methods. After outliers detection, the samples were randomly split into two sets, one used as a calibration set (n=82) and the remaining samples as a validation set (n=82). When predicting the variety of the samples in validation set, the classification correctness of the DPLS model after optimizing spectral pretreatment was up to 93%. The DPLS model with raw spectra after multiplicative scatter correction and Savitzky-Golay filter smoothing pretreatments had the best satisfactory calibration and prediction abilities (correlation coefficient of calibration (R(c))=0.920, root mean square errors of calibration=0.196, and root mean square errors of prediction=0.216). The results show that visible-NIR spectroscopy might be a suitable alternative tool to discriminate tomato plant varieties on-site. PMID:19235271

  4. Investigating Ultrasonic Diffraction Grating Spectroscopy and Reflection Techniques for Characterizing Slurry Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, L.W.; Brodsky, A.M.

    2005-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks. This waste, in the form of slurries, must be transferred and processed to a final form, such as glass logs. On-line instrumentation to measure the properties of these slurries in real-time during transport is needed in order to prevent plugging and reduce excessive dilution. The results, describes a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington to develop a completely new method for using ultrasonics to measure the particle size and viscosity of a slurry. The concepts are based on work in optics on grating-light-reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) at the University of Washington and work on ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy (UDGS) carried out at PNNL. The objective of the research was to extend the GLRS theory for optics to ultrasonics, and to demonstrate its capabilities of UDGS. The proposed ultrasonic method could result in an instrument that would be simple, rugged, and very compact, allowing it to be implemented as part of a pipeline wall at facilities across the DOE complex

  5. Total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy for the detection of β-hematin

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Samson, Edward B.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Evanescent field sensing methods are currently used to detect many different types of disease markers and biologically important chemicals such as the HER2 breast cancer receptor. Hinoue et al. used Total Internal Reflection Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (TIRPAS) as a method of using the evanescent field to detect an optically opaque dye at a sample interface. Although their methods were successful at detecting dyes, the results at that time did not show a very practical spectroscopic technique, which was due to the less than typical sensitivity of TIRPAS as a spectroscopy modality given the low power (∼1 to 2 W) lasers being used. Contrarily, we have used an Nd:YAG laser with a five nanosecond pulse that gives peak power of 1 MW coupled with the TIRPAS system to increase the sensitivity of this technique for biological material sensing. All efforts were focused on the eventual detection of the optically absorbing material, hemozoin, which is created as a byproduct of a malarial infection in blood. We used an optically analogous material, β-hematin, to determine the potential for detection in the TIRPAS system. In addition, four properties which control the sensitivity were investigated to increase understanding about the sensor’s function as a biosensing method. PMID:22734742

  6. Rapid estimation of nutritional elements on citrus leaves by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Sola, Luis; García-Sánchez, Francisco; Pérez-Pérez, Juan G.; Gimeno, Vicente; Navarro, Josefa M.; Moral, Raul; Martínez-Nicolás, Juan J.; Nieves, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient nutrient application is one of the most important factors in producing quality citrus fruits. One of the main guides in planning citrus fertilizer programs is by directly monitoring the plant nutrient content. However, this requires analysis of a large number of leaf samples using expensive and time-consuming chemical techniques. Over the last 5 years, it has been demonstrated that it is possible to quantitatively estimate certain nutritional elements in citrus leaves by using the spectral reflectance values, obtained by using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS). This technique is rapid, non-destructive, cost-effective and environmentally friendly. Therefore, the estimation of macro and micronutrients in citrus leaves by this method would be beneficial in identifying the mineral status of the trees. However, to be used effectively NIRS must be evaluated against the standard techniques across different cultivars. In this study, NIRS spectral analysis, and subsequent nutrient estimations for N, K, Ca, Mg, B, Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn concentration, were performed using 217 leaf samples from different citrus trees species. Partial least square regression and different pre-processing signal treatments were used to generate the best estimation against the current best practice techniques. It was verified a high proficiency in the estimation of N (Rv = 0.99) and Ca (Rv = 0.98) as well as achieving acceptable estimation for K, Mg, Fe, and Zn. However, no successful calibrations were obtained for the estimation of B, Cu, and Mn. PMID:26257767

  7. Near IR Scanning Angle Total Internal Reflection Raman Spectroscopy at Smooth Gold Films

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, Kristopher; Meyer, Matthew; Smith, Emily

    2012-04-13

    Total internal reflection (TIR) Raman and reflectivity spectra were collected for nonresonant analytes as a function of incident angle at sapphire or sapphire/smooth 50 nm gold interfaces using 785 nm excitation. For both interfaces, the Raman signal as a function of incident angle is well-modeled by the calculated interfacial mean square electric field (MSEF) relative to the incident field times the thickness of the layer being probed in the Raman measurement (D{sub RS}). The Raman scatter was reproducibly enhanced at the interface containing a gold film relative to the sapphire interface by a factor of 4.3–4.6 for aqueous pyridine or 2.2–3.7 for neat nitrobenzene, depending on the analyzed vibrational mode. The mechanism for the increased Raman signal is the enhanced MSEF at incident angles where propagating surface plasmons are excited in the metal film. The background from the TIR prism was reduced by 89–95% with the addition of the gold film, and the percent relative uncertainty in peak area was reduced from 15 to 1.7% for the 1347 cm–1 mode of nitrobenzene. Single monolayers of benzenethiol (S/N = 6.8) and 4-mercaptopyridine (S/N = 16.5) on gold films were measured by TIR Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm excitation (210 mW) without resonant enhancement in 1 min.

  8. Simultaneous determination of hemolysis and hematocrit in extracorporeal circulation by plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Kani, Yuki; Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    To achieve quantitative non-invasive optical diagnosis of blood abnormalities during extracorporeal circulation therapies, plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy was developed by implementing oblique-incidence optical fiber reflectometry on the surface of circulating blood. The reflected light in the wavelength range from 450 to 600 nm changed with respect to the plasma free hemoglobin level and could be used to quantify the free hemoglobin at an accuracy of 5.7 ± 3.5 mg/dL. In contrast, the spectrum did not changed by varying the hematocrit. In the wavelength range from 600 to 800 nm, the obtained spectrum was affected by both the hematocrit change and hemolysis. The linear correlation between the hematocrit value and the spectrum was confirmed at R(2) = 0.99. The feasibility of determining of the hematocrit of arbitrary hemolyzed blood was confirmed. The developed system permits the extraction of the optical characteristics of both plasma and red blood cells without centrifugation. The study establishes non-invasive optical diagnostics capable of analyzing the optical properties of both plasma and red blood cells. PMID:24111296

  9. [Rapid quantitative analysis of hydrocarbon composition of furfural extract oils using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yuan, Hong-Fu; Hu, Ai-Qin; Liu, Wei; Song, Chun-Feng; Li, Xiao-Yu; Song, Yi-Chang; He, Qi-Jun; Liu, Sha; Xu, Xiao-Xuan

    2014-07-01

    A set of rapid analysis system for hydrocarbon composition of heavy oils was designed using attenuated total reflection FTIR spectrometer and chemometrics to determine the hydrocarbon composition of furfural extract oils. Sixty two extract oil samples were collected and their saturates and aromatics content data were determined according to the standard NB/SH/T0509-2010, then the total contents of resins plus asphaltenes were calculated by the subtraction method in the percentage of weight. Based on the partial least squares (PLS), calibration models for saturates, aromatics, and resin+asphaltene contents were established using attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy, with their SEC, 1.43%, 0.91% and 1.61%, SEP, 1.56%, 1.24% and 1.81%, respectively, meeting the accuracy and repeatability required for the standard. Compared to the present standard method, the efficiency of hydrocarbon composition analysis for furfural extract oils is significantly improved by the new method which is rapid and simple. The system could also be used for other heavy oil analysis, with excellent extension and application foreground. PMID:25269288

  10. Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Pires, Layla; Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I Alex; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Kurachi, Cristina; Wilson, Brian C

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with significant risk of fatality. Due to its pigmentation, light-based imaging and treatment techniques are limited to near the tumor surface, which is inadequate, for example, to evaluate the microvascular density that is associated with prognosis. White-light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and near-infrared optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to evaluate the effect of a topically applied optical clearing agent (OCA) in melanoma in vivo and to image the microvascular network. DRS was performed using a contact fiber optic probe in the range from 450 to 650 nm. OCT imaging was performed using a swept-source system at 1310 nm. The OCT image data were processed using speckle variance and depth-encoded algorithms. Diffuse reflectance signals decreased with clearing, dropping by ∼ 90% after 45 min. OCT was able to image the microvasculature in the pigmented melanoma tissue with good spatial resolution up to a depth of ∼ 300 μm without the use of OCA; improved contrast resolution was achieved with optical clearing to a depth of ∼ 750 μm in tumor. These findings are relevant to potential clinical applications in melanoma, such as assessing prognosis and treatment responses. Optical clearing may also facilitate the use of light-based treatments such as photodynamic therapy. PMID:27300502

  11. Toward reliable retrieval of functional information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-02-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase function cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. To accurately recover the optical properties and functional information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis. PMID:26977361

  12. Impact of one-layer assumption on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Ricky; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can be used to noninvasively measure skin properties. To extract skin properties from DRS spectra, you need a model that relates the reflectance to the tissue properties. Most models are based on the assumption that skin is homogenous. In reality, skin is composed of multiple layers, and the homogeneity assumption can lead to errors. In this study, we analyze the errors caused by the homogeneity assumption. This is accomplished by creating realistic skin spectra using a computational model, then extracting properties from those spectra using a one-layer model. The extracted parameters are then compared to the parameters used to create the modeled spectra. We used a wavelength range of 400 to 750 nm and a source detector separation of 250 μm. Our results show that use of a one-layer skin model causes underestimation of hemoglobin concentration [Hb] and melanin concentration [mel]. Additionally, the magnitude of the error is dependent on epidermal thickness. The one-layer assumption also causes [Hb] and [mel] to be correlated. Oxygen saturation is overestimated when it is below 50% and underestimated when it is above 50%. We also found that the vessel radius factor used to account for pigment packaging is correlated with epidermal thickness.

  13. Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface studied by ex-situ FTIR internal reflection spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Drelich, J.; Miller, J.D.

    1998-06-15

    Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface was investigated by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared internal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR/IRS). Adsorption isotherms have been determined using an apatite internal reflection element (IRE) and it has been found that pH has a significant influence on oleate adsorption by apatite. At pH 8.0 and 20 C, oleate adsorption density increases monotonically as equilibrium oleate concentration increases from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M. These results are in contrast to the results at pH 9.5 and 20 C in which case the adsorption density is limited to that corresponding to approximately monolayer coverage. Oleate adsorption by apatite was compared to oleate adsorption by fluorite and calcite and the different adsorption behavior at these three mineral surfaces is attributed to the differences in the densities of surface calcium sites and to the differences in the solubilities of these minerals. Contact angles have been measured at the apatite IRE surface and it has been demonstrated that both the amount and the nature of the adsorbed species influence the hydrophobic state of the surface.

  14. Rapid estimation of nutritional elements on citrus leaves by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Sola, Luis; García-Sánchez, Francisco; Pérez-Pérez, Juan G; Gimeno, Vicente; Navarro, Josefa M; Moral, Raul; Martínez-Nicolás, Juan J; Nieves, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient nutrient application is one of the most important factors in producing quality citrus fruits. One of the main guides in planning citrus fertilizer programs is by directly monitoring the plant nutrient content. However, this requires analysis of a large number of leaf samples using expensive and time-consuming chemical techniques. Over the last 5 years, it has been demonstrated that it is possible to quantitatively estimate certain nutritional elements in citrus leaves by using the spectral reflectance values, obtained by using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS). This technique is rapid, non-destructive, cost-effective and environmentally friendly. Therefore, the estimation of macro and micronutrients in citrus leaves by this method would be beneficial in identifying the mineral status of the trees. However, to be used effectively NIRS must be evaluated against the standard techniques across different cultivars. In this study, NIRS spectral analysis, and subsequent nutrient estimations for N, K, Ca, Mg, B, Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn concentration, were performed using 217 leaf samples from different citrus trees species. Partial least square regression and different pre-processing signal treatments were used to generate the best estimation against the current best practice techniques. It was verified a high proficiency in the estimation of N (Rv = 0.99) and Ca (Rv = 0.98) as well as achieving acceptable estimation for K, Mg, Fe, and Zn. However, no successful calibrations were obtained for the estimation of B, Cu, and Mn. PMID:26257767

  15. Toward reliable retrieval of functional information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase function cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. To accurately recover the optical properties and functional information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis. PMID:26977361

  16. The importance of environmental conditions in reflectance spectroscopy of laboratory analogs for Mars surface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.; Murchie, S.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Pieters, C.

    Reflectance spectra are presented here for a variety of particulate, ferric-containing analogs to Martian soil (Fe(3+)-doped smectites and palagonites) to facilitate interpretation of remotely acquired spectra. The analog spectra were measured under differing environmental conditions to evaluate the influence of exposure history on water content and absorption features due to H2O in these samples. Each of these materials contains structural OH bonded to metal cations, adsorbed H2O, and bound H2O (either in a glass, structural site, or bound to a cation). Previous experiments involving a variety of Mars analogs have shown that the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of palagonites is more resistant to drying than the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of montmorillonites. Other experiments have shown that spectra of ferrihydrite and montmorillonites doped with ferric sulfate also contain sufficient bound H2O to retain a strong 3 micron band under dry conditions. Once the effects of the environment on bound water in clays, oxides, and salts are better understood, the hydration bands measured via reflectance spectroscopy can be used to gain information about the chemical composition and moisture content of real soil systems. Such information would be especially useful in interpreting observations of Mars where subtle spatial variations in the strengths of metal-OH and H2O absorptions have been observed in telescopic and ISM spectra. We measured bidirectional reflectance spectra of several Mars soil analogs under controlled environmental conditions to assess the effects of moisture content on the metal-OH and H2O absorptions. The samples analyzed include chemically altered montmorillonites, ferrihydrite. and palagonites from Hawaii and Iceland. Procedures for preparation of the cation-exchanged montmorillonites, ferric-salt doped montmorillonites, and ferric oxyhydroxides are described in detail elsewhere.

  17. The importance of environmental conditions in reflectance spectroscopy of laboratory analogs for Mars surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J.; Murchie, S.; Pratt, S.; Mustard, J.; Pieters, C.

    1993-01-01

    Reflectance spectra are presented here for a variety of particulate, ferric-containing analogs to Martian soil (Fe(3+)-doped smectites and palagonites) to facilitate interpretation of remotely acquired spectra. The analog spectra were measured under differing environmental conditions to evaluate the influence of exposure history on water content and absorption features due to H2O in these samples. Each of these materials contains structural OH bonded to metal cations, adsorbed H2O, and bound H2O (either in a glass, structural site, or bound to a cation). Previous experiments involving a variety of Mars analogs have shown that the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of palagonites is more resistant to drying than the 3 micron H2O band in spectra of montmorillonites. Other experiments have shown that spectra of ferrihydrite and montmorillonites doped with ferric sulfate also contain sufficient bound H2O to retain a strong 3 micron band under dry conditions. Once the effects of the environment on bound water in clays, oxides, and salts are better understood, the hydration bands measured via reflectance spectroscopy can be used to gain information about the chemical composition and moisture content of real soil systems. Such information would be especially useful in interpreting observations of Mars where subtle spatial variations in the strengths of metal-OH and H2O absorptions have been observed in telescopic and ISM spectra. We measured bidirectional reflectance spectra of several Mars soil analogs under controlled environmental conditions to assess the effects of moisture content on the metal-OH and H2O absorptions. The samples analyzed include chemically altered montmorillonites, ferrihydrite. and palagonites from Hawaii and Iceland. Procedures for preparation of the cation-exchanged montmorillonites, ferric-salt doped montmorillonites, and ferric oxyhydroxides are described in detail elsewhere.

  18. Assessing Salinity in Cotton and Tomato Plants by Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly

    2016-04-01

    Irrigated lands in semi-arid and arid areas are subjected to salinization processes. An example of this phenomenon is the Jezreel Valley in northern Israel where soil salinity has increased over the years. The increase in soil salinity results in the deterioration of the soil structure and crops damage. In this experiment we quantified the relation between the chemical and spectral features of cotton and tomato plants and their mutual relationship to soil salinity. The experiment was carried out as part of ongoing research aiming to detect and monitor saline soils and vegetation by combining different remote sensing methods. The aim of this study was to use vegetation reflectance measurements to predict foliar Cl and Na concentration and assess salinity in the soil and in vegetation by their reflectance measurements. The model developed for determining concentrations of chlorine and sodium in tomato and cotton produced good results ( R2 = 0.92 for sodium and 0.85 for chlorine in tomato and R2 = 0.84 for sodium and 0.82 for chlorine in cotton). Lately, we extend the method to calculate vegetation salinity, by doing correlation between the reflectance slopes of the tested crops CL and Na from two research areas. The developed model produced a good results for all the data (R2=0.74) Our method can be implemented to assess vegetation salinity ahead of planting, and developed as a generic tool for broader use for agriculture in semi-arid regions. In our opinion these results show the possibility of monitoring for a threshold level of salinity in tomato and cotton leaves so remedial action can be taken in time to prevent crop damage. Our results strongly suggest that future imaging spectroscopy remote sensing measurements collected by airborne and satellite platforms could measure the salinity of soil and vegetation over larger areas. These results can be the first steps for generic a model which includes more vegetation for salinity measurements.

  19. Nondestructive inspection of organic films on sandblasted metals using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Cox, R.L.; Barber, T.E.; Neu, J.T.

    1996-07-08

    Diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy is a very useful tool for the determination of surface contamination and characterization of films in manufacturing applications. Spectral data from the surfaces of a host of practical materials may be obtained with sufficient insensitivity to characterize relatively thick films, such as paint, and the potential exists to detect very thin films, such as trace oil contamination on metals. The SOC 400 Surface Inspection Machine/InfraRed (SIMIR) has been developed as a nondestructive inspection tool to exploit this potential in practical situations. This SIMIR is a complete and ruggidized Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with a very efficient and robust barrel ellipse diffuse reflectance optical collection system and operating software system. The SIMIR weighs less than 8 Kg, occupies less than 14 L volume, and may be manipulated into any orientation during operation. The surface to be inspected is placed at the focal point of the SIMIR by manipulating the SIMIR or the surface. The SIMIR may or may not contact the surface being inspected. For flat or convex items, there are no size limits to items being inspected. For concave surfaces, the SIMIR geometry limits the surface to those having a radius of curvature greater than 0.2 m. For highly reflective metal surfaces, the SIMIR has a noise level approaching 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} absorbance units, which is sufficient for detecting nanometer thick organic film residues on metals. The use of this nondestructive inspection tool is demonstrated by the spatial mapping of organic stains on sand blasted metals in which organic stains such as silicone oils, mineral oils, and triglycerides are identified both qualitatively and quantitatively over the surface of the metal specimen.

  20. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy of carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for water quantification and primary composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garenne, A.; Beck, P.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Brissaud, O.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.; Bonal, L.; Beck, C.; Howard, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured bidirectional reflectance spectra (0.5-4.0 μm) of 24 CMs, five CRs, one CI, one CV, and one C2 carbonaceous chondrites. These meteorites are known to have experienced an important variability in their relative degrees of aqueous alteration degree (Rubin et al. [2007]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2361-2382; Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2011]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 2735-2751; Alexander et al. [2013]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 123, 244-260). These measurements were performed on meteorite powders inside an environmental cell under a primary vacuum and heated at 60 °C in order to minimize adsorbed terrestrial water. This protocol allows controlling of atmospheric conditions (i.e. humidity) in order to avoid contamination by terrestrial water. We discuss various spectral metrics (e.g. reflectance, band depth, single-scattering albedo, …) in the light of recent bulk composition characterization (Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2015]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 149, 206-222; Alexander et al. [2012]. Science 337, 721; Beck et al. [2014]. Icarus 229, 263-277; Garenne et al. [2014]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 137, 93-112). This study reveals variability of reflectance among meteorite groups. The reflectance is not correlated with carbon or hydrogen abundance neither with measured grain size distribution. We suggest that it is rather controlled by the nature of accreted components, in particular the initial matrix/chondrule proportion. Band depth, integrated band depth, mean optical path length, normalized optical path length, effective single-particle absorption thickness were calculated on the so called 3-μm band for reflectance spectra and for single scattering albedo spectra. They were compared with hydrated phase proportions from previous study on the same meteorites by thermogravimetric analyses and infrared spectroscopy in transmission. We find

  1. In situ, time-resolved normal incidence reflectance spectroscopy of polycrystalline platinum microelectrodes in aqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Fromondi, Iosif; Shi, Ping; Mineshige, Atsushi; Scherson, Daniel A

    2005-01-13

    In situ normal incidence reflectance spectra of polycrystalline Pt microelectrodes have been monitored as a function of the applied potential in aqueous 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) using a He-Ne laser source (633 nm) and a beam splitter/microscope objective arrangement. Data recorded during voltammetric cycles in Ar-purged solutions revealed a linear correlation between the normalized change in reflectance, DeltaR/R = (R(s) - R(ref))/R(ref) (where R(s) and R(ref) are the light intensities measured by the detector at the sampling, s, and reference potentials, ref, respectively), and the extent of oxidation of the Pt surface over a wide coverage range. Reflectance spectra were also collected in CO-saturated 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) during chronocoulometric measurements involving judiciously selected limits for both the potential step and duty cycle parameters. Analysis of these results made it possible to extract contributions to the current derived from oxide formation during oxidation of adsorbed and bulk CO, based strictly on the optical response. PMID:16850980

  2. In vivo skin absorption dynamics of topically applied pharmaceuticals monitored by fiber-optic diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hong; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2007-03-01

    A simple non-invasive ultra-violet/visible (UV/vis) diffusive reflectance spectroscopy combined with fiber-optics was investigated to elicit the dynamics of skin penetration in vivo of a pharmaceutical, aminolevulinic acid polyethylene glycol cream (5-ALA-PEG cream). Temporal data of the reflectance, R( λ), were measured from a bare skin region and from a skin region treated with 5-ALA cream. The difference in apparent optical density [(ΔAOD) = Δ log[1/ R( λ)

  3. Reflectance and transmittance characteristics of several selected green and blue-green unialgae.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramms, L. C.; Boyle, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Obtained reflectance properties of green and blue-green unialgae are evaluated for determining the feasibility of using selected wavelengths in differentiating between green and blue-green algae. The attempt is made to establish selected wavelengths and ratios that would delineate relative concentrations of the algal suspensions. The results should prove helpful in the selection of spectral bands usable in conjunction with multispectrum scanners for qualitative and quantitative studies of algae in bodies of water.

  4. The clinical effectiveness of reflectance optical spectroscopy for the in vivo diagnosis of oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Messadi, Diana V; Younai, Fariba S; Liu, Hong-Hu; Guo, Gao; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2014-09-01

    Optical spectroscopy devices are being developed and tested for the screening and diagnosis of oral precancer and cancer lesions. This study reports a device that uses white light for detection of suspicious lesions and green-amber light at 545 nm that detect tissue vascularity on patients with several suspicious oral lesions. The clinical grading of vascularity was compared to the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific biomarkers. Such a device, in the hands of dentists and other health professionals, could greatly increase the number of oral cancerous lesions detected in early phase. The purpose of this study is to correlate the clinical grading of tissue vascularity in several oral suspicious lesions using the Identafi(®) system with the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific vascular markers. Twenty-one patients with various oral lesions were enrolled in the study. The lesions were visualized using Identafi(®) device with white light illumination, followed by visualization of tissue autofluorescence and tissue reflectance. Tissue biopsied was obtained from the all lesions and both histopathological and immunohistochemical studies using a vascular endothelial biomarker (CD34) were performed on these tissue samples. The clinical vascular grading using the green-amber light at 545 nm and the expression pattern and intensity of staining for CD34 in the different biopsies varied depending on lesions, grading ranged from 1 to 3. The increase in vascularity was observed in abnormal tissues when compared to normal mucosa, but this increase was not limited to carcinoma only as hyperkeratosis and other oral diseases, such as lichen planus, also showed increase in vascularity. Optical spectroscopy is a promising technology for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further investigations with a larger population group is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from

  5. The clinical effectiveness of reflectance optical spectroscopy for the in vivo diagnosis of oral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Messadi, Diana V; Younai, Fariba S; Liu, Hong-Hu; Guo, Gao; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy devices are being developed and tested for the screening and diagnosis of oral precancer and cancer lesions. This study reports a device that uses white light for detection of suspicious lesions and green–amber light at 545 nm that detect tissue vascularity on patients with several suspicious oral lesions. The clinical grading of vascularity was compared to the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific biomarkers. Such a device, in the hands of dentists and other health professionals, could greatly increase the number of oral cancerous lesions detected in early phase. The purpose of this study is to correlate the clinical grading of tissue vascularity in several oral suspicious lesions using the Identafi® system with the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific vascular markers. Twenty-one patients with various oral lesions were enrolled in the study. The lesions were visualized using Identafi® device with white light illumination, followed by visualization of tissue autofluorescence and tissue reflectance. Tissue biopsied was obtained from the all lesions and both histopathological and immunohistochemical studies using a vascular endothelial biomarker (CD34) were performed on these tissue samples. The clinical vascular grading using the green–amber light at 545 nm and the expression pattern and intensity of staining for CD34 in the different biopsies varied depending on lesions, grading ranged from 1 to 3. The increase in vascularity was observed in abnormal tissues when compared to normal mucosa, but this increase was not limited to carcinoma only as hyperkeratosis and other oral diseases, such as lichen planus, also showed increase in vascularity. Optical spectroscopy is a promising technology for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further investigations with a larger population group is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions

  6. Quantification of bovine immunoglobulin G using transmission and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsohaby, Ibrahim; McClure, J Trenton; Riley, Christopher B; Shaw, R Anthony; Keefe, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated and compared the performance of transmission and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopic methods (in combination with quantification algorithms previously developed using partial least squares regression) for the rapid measurement of bovine serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration, and detection of failure of transfer of passive immunity (FTPI) in dairy calves. Serum samples (n = 200) were collected from Holstein calves 1-11 days of age. Serum IgG concentrations were measured by the reference method of radial immunodiffusion (RID) assay, transmission IR (TIR) and ATR-IR spectroscopy-based assays. The mean IgG concentration measured by RID was 17.22 g/L (SD ±9.60). The mean IgG concentrations predicted by TIR and ATR-IR spectroscopy methods were 15.60 g/L (SD ±8.15) and 15.94 g/L (SD ±8.66), respectively. RID IgG concentrations were positively correlated with IgG levels predicted by TIR (r = 0.94) and ATR-IR (r = 0.92). The correlation between 2 IR spectroscopic methods was 0.94. Using an IgG concentration <10 g/L as the cut-point for FTPI cases, the overall agreement between TIR and ATR-IR methods was 94%, with a corresponding kappa value of 0.84. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for identifying FTPI by TIR were 0.87, 0.97, 0.91, 0.95, and 0.94, respectively. Corresponding values for ATR-IR were 0.87, 0.95, 0.86, 0.95, and 0.93, respectively. Both TIR and ATR-IR spectroscopic approaches can be used for rapid quantification of IgG level in neonatal bovine serum and for diagnosis of FTPI in dairy calves. PMID:26699522

  7. Prostate cancer detection using combined auto-fluorescence and light reflectance spectroscopy: ex vivo study of human prostates

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vikrant; Olweny, Ephrem O.; Kapur, Payal; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Roehrborn, Claus G.; Liu, Hanli

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using auto-fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy (AFLS) and light reflectance spectroscopy (LRS). AFLS used excitation at 447 nm with four emission wavelengths (532, 562, 632, and 684 nm), where their lifetimes and weights were analyzed using a double exponent model. LRS was measured between 500 and 840 nm and analyzed by a quantitative model to determine hemoglobin concentrations and light scattering. Both AFLS and LRS were taken on n = 724 distinct locations from both prostate capsular (nc = 185) and parenchymal (np = 539) tissues, including PCa tissue, benign peripheral zone tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), of fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens from 37 patients with high volume, intermediate-to-high-grade PCa (Gleason score, GS ≥7). AFLS and LRS parameters from parenchymal tissues were analyzed for statistical testing and classification. A feature selection algorithm based on multinomial logistic regression was implemented to identify critical parameters in order to classify high-grade PCa tissue. The regression model was in turn used to classify PCa tissue at the individual aggressive level of GS = 7,8,9. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated and used to determine classification accuracy for each tissue type. We show that our dual-modal technique resulted in accuracies of 87.9%, 90.1%, and 85.1% for PCa classification at GS = 7, 8, 9 within parenchymal tissues, and up to 91.1%, 91.9%, and 94.3% if capsular tissues were included for detection. Possible biochemical and physiological mechanisms causing signal differences in AFLS and LRS between PCa and benign tissues were also discussed. PMID:24877012

  8. Monitoring longitudinal changes in irradiated head and neck cancer xenografts using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Jiang, Shudong; Gunn, Jason R.; Marra, Kayla; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation therapy is often used as the preferred clinical treatment for control of localized head and neck cancer. However, during the course of treatment (6-8 weeks), feedback about functional and/or physiological changes within impacted tissue are not obtained, given the onerous financial and/or logistical burdens of scheduling MRI, PET or CT scans. Diffuse optical sensing is well suited to address this problem since the instrumentation can be made low-cost and portable while still being able to non-invasively provide information about vascular oxygenation in vivo. Here we report results from studies that employed an optical fiber-based portable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system to longitudinally monitor changes in tumor vasculature within two head and neck cancer cell lines (SCC-15 and FaDu) xenografted in the flanks of nude mice, in two separate experiments. Once the tumor volumes were 100mm3, 67% of animals received localized (electron beam) radiation therapy in five fractions (8Gy/day, for 5 days) while 33% of the animals served as controls. DRS measurements were obtained from each animal on each day of treatment and then for two weeks post-treatment. Reflectance spectra were parametrized to extract total hemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen-saturation and the resulting time-trends of optical parameters appear to be dissimilar for the two cell-lines. These findings are also compared to previous animal experiments (using the FaDu line) that were irradiated using a photon beam radiotherapy protocol. These results and implications for the use of fiber-based DRS measurements made at local (irradiated) tumor site as a basis for identifying early radiotherapy-response are presented and discussed.

  9. Total reflection infrared spectroscopy of water-ice and frozen aqueous NaCl solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Rachel L.; Searles, Keith; Willard, Jesse A.; Michelsen, Rebecca R. H.

    2013-12-28

    Liquid-like and liquid water at and near the surface of water-ice and frozen aqueous sodium chloride films were observed using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The concentration of NaCl ranged from 0.0001 to 0.01 M and the temperature varied from the melting point of water down to 256 K. The amount of liquid brine at the interface of the frozen films with the germanium ATR crystal increased with salt concentration and temperature. Experimental spectra are compared to reflection spectra calculated for a simplified morphology of a uniform liquid layer between the germanium crystal and the frozen film. This morphology allows for the amount of liquid observed in an experimental spectrum to be converted to the thickness of a homogenous layer with an equivalent amount of liquid. These equivalent thickness ranges from a nanometer for water-ice at 260 K to 170 nm for 0.01 M NaCl close to the melting point. The amounts of brine observed are over an order of magnitude less than the total liquid predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic models, implying that the vast majority of the liquid fraction of frozen solutions may be found in internal inclusions, grain boundaries, and the like. Thus, the amount of liquid and the solutes dissolved in them that are available to react with atmospheric gases on the surfaces of snow and ice are not well described by thermodynamic equilibrium models which assume the liquid phase is located entirely at the surface.

  10. Plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy for non-invasive and continuous monitoring of extracellular component of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, Daisuke; Takatani, Setsuo

    2012-04-01

    To achieve the quantitative optical non-invasive diagnosis of blood during extracorporeal circulation therapies, the instrumental technique to extract extracellular spectra from whole blood was developed. In the circuit, the continuous blood flow was generated by a centrifugal blood pump. The oxygen saturation was maintained 100% by an oxygenator. The developed glass optical flow cell was attached to the outlet tubing of the oxygenator. The halogen lamp including the light from 400 to 900 nm wavelength was used for the light source. The light was guided into an optical fiber. The light emitted by the fiber was collimated and emitted to the flow cell flat surface at the incident angle of 45 degrees. The light just reflected on the boundary between inner surface of the flow cell and plasma at 45 degrees was detected by the detection fiber. The detected light was analyzed by a spectral photometer. The obtained spectrum from 400 to 600nm wavelength was not changed with respect to the hematocrit. In contrast, the signal in the spectral range was changed when the plasma free hemoglobin increased. By using two spectral range, 505+/-5 nm and 542.5+/-2.5 nm, the differential spectrum was correlated with the free hemoglobin at R2=0.99. On the other hand, as for the hematocrit, the differential spectrum was not correlated at R2=0.01. Finally, the plasma free hemoglobin was quantified with the accuracy of 22+/-19mg/dL. The result shows that the developed plasma surface reflectance spectroscopy (PSRS) can extract the plasma spectrum from flowing whole blood.

  11. Field spectroscopy sampling strategies for improved measurement of Earth surface reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Arthur, A.; Alonso, L.; Malthus, T. J.; Moreno, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last two decades extensive networks of research sites have been established to measure the flux of carbon compounds and water vapour between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere using eddy covariance (EC) techniques. However, contributing Earth surface components cannot be determined and (as the ';footprints' are spatially constrained) these measurements cannot be extrapolated to regional cover using this technique. At many of these EC sites researchers have been integrating spectral measurements with EC and ancillary data to better understand light use efficiency and carbon dioxide flux. These spectroscopic measurements could also be used to assess contributing components and provide support for imaging spectroscopy, from airborne or satellite platforms, which can provide unconstrained spatial cover. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest in ';smart' database and information retrieval systems such as that proposed by EcoSIS and OPTIMISE to store, analyse, QA and merge spectral and biophysical measurements and provide information to end users. However, as Earth surfaces are spectrally heterogeneous and imaging and field spectrometers sample different spatial extents appropriate field sampling strategies require to be adopted. To sample Earth surfaces spectroscopists adopt either single; random; regular grid; transect; or 'swiping' point sampling strategies, although little comparative work has been carried out to determine the most appropriate approach; the work by Goetz (2012) is a limited exception. Mac Arthur et al (2012) demonstrated that, for two full wavelength (400 nm to 2,500 nm) field spectroradiometers, the measurement area sampled is defined by each spectroradiometer/fore optic system's directional response function (DRF) rather than the field-of-view (FOV) specified by instrument manufacturers. Mac Arthur et al (2012) also demonstrated that each reflecting element within the sampled area was not weighted equally in the integrated

  12. Improving the prediction of arsenic contents in agricultural soils by combining the reflectance spectroscopy of soils and rice plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tiezhu; Wang, Junjie; Chen, Yiyun; Wu, Guofeng

    2016-10-01

    Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy provides a beneficial tool for investigating soil heavy metal contamination. This study aimed to investigate mechanisms of soil arsenic prediction using laboratory based soil and leaf spectra, compare the prediction of arsenic content using soil spectra with that using rice plant spectra, and determine whether the combination of both could improve the prediction of soil arsenic content. A total of 100 samples were collected and the reflectance spectra of soils and rice plants were measured using a FieldSpec3 portable spectroradiometer (350-2500 nm). After eliminating spectral outliers, the reflectance spectra were divided into calibration (n = 62) and validation (n = 32) data sets using the Kennard-Stone algorithm. Genetic algorithm (GA) was used to select useful spectral variables for soil arsenic prediction. Thereafter, the GA-selected spectral variables of the soil and leaf spectra were individually and jointly employed to calibrate the partial least squares regression (PLSR) models using the calibration data set. The regression models were validated and compared using independent validation data set. Furthermore, the correlation coefficients of soil arsenic against soil organic matter, leaf arsenic and leaf chlorophyll were calculated, and the important wavelengths for PLSR modeling were extracted. Results showed that arsenic prediction using the leaf spectra (coefficient of determination in validation, Rv2 = 0.54; root mean square error in validation, RMSEv = 12.99 mg kg-1; and residual prediction deviation in validation, RPDv = 1.35) was slightly better than using the soil spectra (Rv2 = 0.42, RMSEv = 13.35 mg kg-1, and RPDv = 1.31). However, results also showed that the combinational use of soil and leaf spectra resulted in higher arsenic prediction (Rv2 = 0.63, RMSEv = 11.94 mg kg-1, RPDv = 1.47) compared with either soil or leaf spectra alone. Soil spectral bands near 480, 600, 670, 810, 1980, 2050 and

  13. Extracting Complex Refractive Index from Polycrystalline Glucose with Self-Referenced Method for Terahertz Time-Domain Reflection Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Lin; Sun, Ping; He, Yingfeng; Zou, Yun; Deng, Yuqiang

    2016-07-01

    A self-referenced method for extracting the complex refractive index of material was proposed. The method utilized signals reflected from the front and rear surfaces of a slice sample as reference and sample signals, respectively. Before using the self-referenced method, a hybrid filtering technique for eliminating systematic and random noises of time-domain terahertz reflection spectroscopy was used. A terahertz reflection spectrum of crystalline glucose was measured and three feature absorption peaks were obtained from 0.2 to 2.0 THz. We suggest that intermolecular vibrational modes may contribute to the observed absorption spectra in the THz frequency range. PMID:27412185

  14. In-situ measurement of epithelial tissue optical properties: Development and implementation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quanzeng

    Cancer is a severe threat to human health. Early detection is considered the best way to increase the chance for survival. While the traditional cancer detection method, biopsy, is invasive, noninvasive optical diagnostic techniques are revolutionizing the way that cancer is diagnosed. Reflectance spectroscopy is one of these optical spectroscopy techniques showing promise as a diagnostic tool for pre-cancer detection. When a neoplasia occurs in tissue, morphologic and biochemical changes happen in the tissue, which in turn results in the change of optical properties and reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, a pre-cancer can be detected by extracting optical properties from reflectance spectroscopy. This dissertation described the construction of a fiberoptic based reflectance system and the development of a series of modeling studies. This research is aimed at establishing an improved understanding of the optical properties of mucosal tissues by analyzing reflectance signals at different wavelengths. The ultimate goal is to reveal the potential of reflectance-based optical diagnosis of pre-cancer. The research is detailed in Chapter 3 through Chapter 5. Although related with each other, each chapter was designed to become a journal paper ultimately. In Chapter 3, a multi-wavelength, fiberoptic system was constructed, evaluated and implemented to determine internal tissue optical properties at ultraviolet A and visible wavelengths. A condensed Monte Carlo model was deployed to simulate light-tissue interaction and generate spatially distributed reflectance data. These data were used to train an inverse neural network model to extract tissue optical properties from reflectance. Optical properties of porcine mucosal and liver tissues were finally measured. In Chapter 4, the condensed Monte Carlo method was extended so that it can rapidly simulate reflectance from a single illumination-detection fiber thus enabling the calculation of large data sets. The model was

  15. Extraordinary reflection and transmission with direction dependent wavelength selectivity based on parity-time-symmetric multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shulin; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-14

    In this paper, we present a kind of periodical ternary parity-time (PT) -symmetric multilayers to realize nearly 100% reflectance and transmittance simultaneously when light is incident from a certain direction. This extraordinary reflection and transmission is original from unidirectional Bragg reflection of PT-symmetric systems as the symmetry spontaneous breaking happens at PT thresholds. The extra energy involved in reflection and transmission lights is obtained from pumping light to the gain regions of the structure. Moreover, we find that our PT-symmetric structure shows direction dependent wavelength selectivity. When the illumination light is incident from two opposite directions into the multilayer structure, such extraordinary reflection and transmission appear at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, respectively. Such distinguishing properties may provide these structures with attractive applications as beam splitters, laser mirrors, narrow band filters, and multiband PT-symmetric optical devices.

  16. Analysis of selective reflection spectrum in cholesteric liquid crystal cells for solar-ray controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells are fabricated by varying the concentration of various chiral dopants and liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers. The wavelength and bandwidth of selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells are measured by a spectroscopic technique. The variation of the selective reflection spectrum in CLC cells is investigated by doping the different kinds of liquid crystal (LC) diacrylate monomers which stabilize a helical twisting structure by photopolymerization. The effects of the selective reflection spectrum on the visible and infrared lights in spectral solar irradiance are explained by the performance for a solar-ray controller based on the spectral solar irradiance for air mass 1.5 and the standard luminous efficiency function for photopic vision.

  17. Use of visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to assess soil quality related to long-term tillage effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visible-near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIRDRS) is emerging as an effective method for rapid evaluation of soil properties and may be promising for the simultaneous determination of soil quality indicators. This study employed VNIRDRS to analyze treatment effects associated with lo...

  18. Application of Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy on Determination of Moisture, Total oil and Protein Contents of In-shell Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moisture, total oil and protein content of peanuts are important factors in peanut grading. A method that could rapidly and nondestructively measure these parameters for in-shell peanuts would be extremely useful. NIR reflectance spectroscopy was used to analyze the moisture, total oil and protein ...

  19. Diffuse-Reflectance Fourier-Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Method of Characterizing Changes in Soil Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffuse-Reflectance Fourier-Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) can be used quickly and non destructively to identify and quantify the presence of important organic functional groups in environmental samples. However, soils contain myriad organic and inorganic components that absorb in the M...

  20. Diffuse-reflectance fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy as a method of characterizing changes in soil organic matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffuse-Reflectance Fourier-Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (MidIR) can identify the presence of important organic functional groups in soil organic matter (SOM). Soils contain myriad organic and inorganic components that absorb in the MidIR so spectral interpretation needs to be validated in or...

  1. PREDICTION OF COLOR, TENDERNESS, AND SENSORY CHARACTERISTICS OF BEEF STEAKS BY VISIBLE AND NEAR INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY. A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color, texture and sensory attributes of 24 beef carcasses at 2, 4, 8, 14, and 21 days post mortem were predicted by visible/near infrared (visible/NIR) reflectance spectroscopy in 400-1080 nm region. Predicting the Hunter a*, b*, and E* values yielded the coefficient of determination (R**2) in cal...

  2. Enhanced single seed trait predictions in soybean (Glycine max) and robust calibration model transfer with near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single seed near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy predicts soybean (Glycine max) seed quality traits of moisture, oil, and protein. We tested the accuracy of transferring calibrations between different single seed NIR analyzers of the same design by collecting NIR spectra and analytical trait...

  3. Determination of In-shell Peanuts Moisture, Oil and Fatty Acids Composition Using Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil and moisture content of peanuts are important factors in peanut grading. A method that could rapidly and nondestructively measure these parameters for in-shell peanuts would be extremely useful. NIR reflectance spectroscopy was used to analyze the moisture, total oil and fatty acid content of V...

  4. Simultaneous determination of CRP and D-dimer in human blood plasma samples with White Light Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koukouvinos, Georgios; Petrou, Panagiota; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Drygiannakis, Dimitris; Raptis, Ioannis; Stefanitsis, Gerasimos; Martini, Spyridoula; Nikita, Dimitra; Goustouridis, Dimitrios; Moser, Isabella; Jobst, Gerhard; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2016-10-15

    A dual-analyte assay for the simultaneous determination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer in human blood plasma based on a white light interference spectroscopy sensing platform is presented. Measurement is accomplished in real-time by scanning the sensing surface, on which distinct antibody areas have been created, with a reflection probe used both for illumination of the surface and collection of the reflected interference spectrum. The composition of the transducer, the sensing surface chemical activation and biofunctionalization procedures were optimized with respect to signal magnitude and repeatability. The assay format involved direct detection of CRP whereas for D-dimer a two-site immunoassay employing a biotinylated reporter antibody and reaction with streptavidin was selected. The assays were sensitive with detection limits of 25ng/mL for both analytes, precise with intra- and inter-assay CV values ranging from 3.6% to 7.7%, and from 4.8% to 9.5%, respectively, for both assays, and accurate with recovery values ranging from 88.5% to 108% for both analytes. Moreover, the values determined for the two analytes in 35 human plasma samples were in excellent agreement with those received for the same samples by standard diagnostic laboratory instrumentation employing commercial kits. The excellent agreement of the results supported the validity of the proposed system for clinical application for the detection of multiple analytes since it was demonstrated that up to seven antibody areas can be created on the sensing surface and successfully interrogated with the developed optical set-up. PMID:26675113

  5. Diffuse near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy during heatstroke in a mouse model: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Zafrir, Elad; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Sternklar, Shmuel; Mathews, Marlon S.

    2012-10-01

    Heatstroke, a form of hyperthermia, is a life-threatening condition characterized by an elevated core body temperature that rises above 40°C (104°F) and central nervous system dysfunction that results in delirium, convulsions, or coma. Without emergency treatment, the victim lapses into a coma and death soon follows. The study presented was conducted with a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) setup to assess the effects of brain dysfunction that occurred during heatstroke in mice model (n=6). It was hypothesized that DRS can be utilized in small animal studies to monitor change in internal brain tissue temperature during heatstroke injury since it induces a sequence of pathologic changes that change the tissue composition and structure. Heatstroke was induced by exposure of the mice body under general anesthesia, to a high ambient temperature. A type of DRS in which the brain tissue was illuminated through the intact scalp with a broadband light source and diffuse reflected spectra was employed, taking in the spectral region between 650 and 1000 nm and acquired at an angle of 90 deg at a position on the scalp ˜12 mm from the illumination site. The temperature at the onset of the experiment was ˜34°C (rectal temperature) with increasing intervals of 1°C until mouse death. The increase in temperature caused optical scattering signal changes consistent with a structural alteration of brain tissue, ultimately resulting in death. We have found that the peak absorbance intensity and its second derivative at specific wavelengths correlate well with temperature with an exponential dependence. Based on these findings, in order to estimate the influence of temperature on the internal brain tissue a reflectance-temperature index was established and was seen to correlate as well with measured temperature. Overall, results indicate variations in neural tissue properties during heatstroke and the feasibility to monitor and assess internal temperature variations using

  6. Assessment of biophysical tumor response to PDT in pancreatic cancer using localized reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, Martin; Klubben, William; He, Ting; Laughney, Ashley M.; Glaser, Adam; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-02-01

    Biophysical changes such as inflammation and necrosis occur immediately following PDT and may be used to assess the treatment response to PDT treatment in-vivo. This study uses localized reflectance measurements to quantify the scatter changes in tumor tissue occurring in response to verteporfin-based PDT treatment in xenograft pancreas tumors. Nude mice were implanted with subcutaneous AsPC-1 pancreatic tumors cells in matrigel, and allowed to establish solid tumors near 100mm3 volume. The mice were sensitized with 1mg/kg of the active component of verteporfin (benzoporphryin derivative, BPD), one hour before light delivery. The optical irradiation was performed using a 1 cm cylindrical interstitial diffusing tip fiber with 20J of red light (690nm). Tumor tissue was excised progressively and imaged, from 1 day to 4 weeks, after PDT treatment. The tissue sections were stained and analyzed by an expert veterinary pathologist, who provided information on tissue regions of interest. This information was correlated with variations in scattering and absorption parameters elucidated from the spectral images and the degree of necrosis and inflammation involvement was identified. Areas of necrosis and dead cells exhibited the lowest average scatter irradiance signature (3.78 and 4.07 respectively) compared to areas of viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (5.81 and 7.19 respectively). Bilirubin absorbance parameters also showed a lower absorbance value in necrotic tissue and areas of dead cells (0.05 and 0.1 respectively) compared to tissue areas for viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (0.28 and 0.35). These results demonstrate that localized reflectance spectroscopy is an imaging modality that can be used to identify tissue features associated with PDT treatment (e.g. necrosis and inflammation) that can be correlated with histopathologically-reviewed H&E stained slides. Further study of this technique may provide means for automated

  7. Detection of High Explosives Using Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy with Fiber Coupled Grazing Angle Probe/FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2009-06-01

    Fiber Optic Coupled Reflection/Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) has been investigated as a potential technique for developing methodologies of detection and quantification of explosive residues on metallic surfaces. TNT, DNT, HMX, PETN, and Tetryl were detected at loading concentrations less than 400 ng/cm2. Data were analyzed using Chemometrics statistical analysis routines. In particular, partial least squares multivariate analysis (PLS) was used for quantification studies. Peak areas were also used for data analysis to compare with linear multivariate analysis. The measurements resulted in intense absorption bands in the fingerprint region of the infrared spectrum that were used to quantify the target threat chemicals and to calculate the limit of detection for each compound. Micro-RAIRS vibrational imaging was also used for characterization of the distribution and form of layers of explosives deposited on stainless steel sheets. The degree of homogeneity depended strongly on the method of deposition. The images were generated by calculating the area under vibrational signals of 15 μm × 15 μm grids with a separation of 15 μm. Histograms of the maps were generated and the homogeneity was evaluated by using standard deviations, mean kurtosis, skewness, and moments of distributions obtained. Methanol solutions of High Explosives (HE) resulted in the optimum distributions on the stainless steel surfaces tested and therefore, Methanol selected as the preferred solvent for the Fiber Optics Coupled-RAIRS experiments.

  8. Large MEMS-based programmable reflective slit mask for multi-object spectroscopy fabricated using multiple wafer-level bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, Michael; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Lanzoni, Patrick; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2012-03-01

    Multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) allows measuring infrared spectra of faint astronomical objects that provides information on the evolution of the Universe. MOS requires a slit mask for object selection at the focal plane of the telescope. We are developing MEMS-based programmable reflective slit masks composed of 2048 individually addressable micromirrors. Each micromirror measures 100 × 200 μm2 and is electrostatically tilted by a precise angle of at least 20°. The main requirements for these arrays are precise and uniform tilt angle over the whole device, uniformity of the mirror electromechanical behavior, a flat mirror deformation and individual addressing capability of each mirror. This capability of our array is achieved using a line-column algorithm based on an optimized tilt angle/voltage hysteresis of the electrostatic actuator. Micromirror arrays composed of 2048 micromirrors (32 × 64) and modeled for individual addressing were fabricated using fusion and eutectic wafer-level bonding. These micromirrors without coating demonstrated a peak-to-valley deformation less than 8 nm and a tilt angle of 24° for an actuation voltage of 130 V. A first experiment of the linecolumn algorithm was demonstrated by actuating individually 2 × 2 micromirrors. In order, to avoid spoiling of the optical source by the thermal emission of the instrument, the micromirror array has to work in a cryogenic environment. Therefore, these devices were characterized in a cryogenic environment at -111°C and several lines of micromirrors were tilted successfully under these conditions.

  9. Forensic Hair Differentiation Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Jeremy; Doty, Kyle C; McLaughlin, Gregory; Lednev, Igor K

    2016-07-01

    Hair and fibers are common forms of trace evidence found at crime scenes. The current methodology of microscopic examination of potential hair evidence is absent of statistical measures of performance, and examiner results for identification can be subjective. Here, attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to analyze synthetic fibers and natural hairs of human, cat, and dog origin. Chemometric analysis was used to differentiate hair spectra from the three different species, and to predict unknown hairs to their proper species class, with a high degree of certainty. A species-specific partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) model was constructed to discriminate human hair from cat and dog hairs. This model was successful in distinguishing between the three classes and, more importantly, all human samples were correctly predicted as human. An external validation resulted in zero false positive and false negative assignments for the human class. From a forensic perspective, this technique would be complementary to microscopic hair examination, and in no way replace it. As such, this methodology is able to provide a statistical measure of confidence to the identification of a sample of human, cat, and dog hair, which was called for in the 2009 National Academy of Sciences report. More importantly, this approach is non-destructive, rapid, can provide reliable results, and requires no sample preparation, making it of ample importance to the field of forensic science. PMID:27412186

  10. Determination of soil content in chlordecone (organochlorine pesticide) using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS).

    PubMed

    Brunet, Didier; Woignier, Thierry; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie; Achard, Raphaël; Rangon, Luc; Barthès, Bernard G

    2009-11-01

    Chlordecone is a toxic organochlorine insecticide that was used in banana plantations until 1993 in the French West Indies. This study aimed at assessing the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) for determining chlordecone content in Andosols, Nitisols and Ferralsols from Martinique. Using partial least square regression, chlordecone content conventionally determined through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry could be correctly predicted by NIRS (Q(2) = 0.75, R(2) = 0.82 for the total set), especially for samples with chlordecone content <12 mg kg(-1) or when the sample set was rather homogeneous (Q(2) = 0.91, R(2) = 0.82 for the Andosols). Conventional measures and NIRS predictions were poorly correlated for chlordecone content >12 mg kg(-1), nevertheless ca. 80% samples were correctly predicted when the set was divided into three or four classes of chlordecone content. Thus NIRS could be considered a time- and cost-effective method for characterising soil contamination by chlordecone. PMID:19493598

  11. Attenuated total reflectance-FT-IR spectroscopy for gunshot residue analysis: potential for ammunition determination.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Justin; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2013-08-01

    The ability to link a suspect to a particular shooting incident is a principal task for many forensic investigators. Here, we attempt to achieve this goal by analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) through the use of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with statistical analysis. The firearm discharge process is analogous to a complex chemical process. Therefore, the products of this process (GSR) will vary based upon numerous factors, including the specific combination of the firearm and ammunition which was discharged. Differentiation of FT-IR data, collected from GSR particles originating from three different firearm-ammunition combinations (0.38 in., 0.40 in., and 9 mm calibers), was achieved using projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The technique was cross (leave-one-out), both internally and externally, validated. External validation was achieved via assignment (caliber identification) of unknown FT-IR spectra from unknown GSR particles. The results demonstrate great potential for ATR-FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of GSR for forensic purposes. PMID:23745950

  12. Measurement of the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin in intact detached pea nodules by reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D.; Owens, T.G. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    A method is presented for the rapid measurement of the spectral properties of detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle) by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. After correcting the spectra for surface light scattering, the spectrum of leghemoglobin is obtained. From this, the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin and the internal O{sub 2} concentration can be calculated. With this method, we determined internal O{sub 2} while measuring nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) in detached pea nodules over a range of external O{sub 2} concentrations. Nitrogenase activity was maximum when leghemoglobin was 25% oxygenated, corresponding to a calculated free O{sub 2} concentration of 45 nanomolar in infected cells. Advantages of this method over previous methods which employed transmitted light are: (a) many nodules can be assayed simultaneously, (b) nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) can be determined at the same time as spectra are recorded, and (c) spectra can be obtained from nodules submerged in buffer containing metabolic effectors.

  13. Detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors by visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugmas, Blaž; Plavec, Tanja; Bregar, Maksimilijan; Naglič, Peter; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is the main cause of canine morbidity and mortality. The existing evaluation of tumors requires an experienced veterinarian and usually includes invasive procedures (e.g., fine-needle aspiration) that can be unpleasant for the dog and the owner. We investigate visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) as a noninvasive optical technique for evaluation and detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors ex vivo and in vivo. The optical properties of tumors and skin were calculated in a spectrally constrained manner, using a lookup table-based inverse model. The obtained optical properties were analyzed and compared among different tumor groups. The calculated parameters of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were subsequently used for detection of malignant skin and subcutaneous tumors. The detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors ex vivo were 90.0% and 73.5%, respectively, while corresponding detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors in vivo were 88.4% and 54.6%, respectively. The obtained results show that the DRS is a promising noninvasive optical technique for detection and classification of malignant and benign canine skin and subcutaneous tumors. The method should be further investigated on tumors with common origin.

  14. Non-invasive detection of periodontal disease using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Subhash, Narayanan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Prasanthila, Janam

    2012-03-01

    In clinical diagnostic procedures, gingival inflammation is considered as the initial stage of periodontal breakdown. This is often detected clinically by bleeding on probing as it is an objective measure of inflammation. Since conventional diagnostic procedures have several inherent drawbacks, development of novel non-invasive diagnostic techniques assumes significance. This clinical study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy for quantification and discrimination of various stages of inflammatory conditions in periodontal disease. The DR spectra of diseased lesions recorded using a point monitoring system consisting of a tungsten halogen lamp and a fiber-optic spectrometer showed oxygenated hemoglobin absorption dips at 545 and 575 nm. Mean DR spectra on normalization shows marked differences between healthy and different stages of gingival inflammation. Among the various DR intensity ratios investigated, involving oxy Hb absorption peaks, the R620/R575 ratio was found to be a good parameter of gingival inflammation. In order to screen the entire diseased area and its surroundings instantaneously, DR images were recorded with an EMCCD camera at 620 and 575 nm. We have observed that using the DR image intensity ratio R620/R575 mild inflammatory tissues could be discriminated from healthy with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%, and from moderate with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 96%. The sensitivity and specificity obtained between moderate and severe inflammation are 82% and 76% respectively.

  15. Optical characterization of thin nickel films on polymer substrates using reflectance difference spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rinnerbauer, V.; Schmidegg, K.; Hohage, M.; Sun, L. D.; Flores-Camacho, J. M.; Zeppenfeld, P.

    2009-06-15

    We have used reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) and its extension, azimuth-dependent RDS (ADRDS), to study the properties of sputtered and evaporated nickel films on biaxially oriented poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) films in a roll to roll web-coating process. From the full set of ADRDS spectra we extract and analyze both the intrinsic RDS spectra and the azimuthal orientation of the effective optical anisotropy of the samples. From the latter, contributions to the RDS spectra arising from the nickel layer and the PET substrate with different orientations of the optical eigenaxes can be inferred. We find an attenuation of the characteristic RDS signal of the PET substrate with increasing nickel film thickness which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. For film thicknesses above 20 nm another contribution to the RDS signal attributed to the optical anisotropy of the deposited nickel layers can be observed. Its strength depends on the deposition method, and is considerably larger for evaporated films than for sputtered ones. With increasing nickel film thickness, the azimuthal orientation of the sample anisotropy changes from the initial value of the PET substrate by about 20 deg.toward the machine direction of the foil. We demonstrate that RDS is also a valuable tool for inline monitoring in the roll to roll process, as the attenuation of the RDS signal, under proper consideration of the orientation of the effective anisotropy, is a function of the film thickness and characteristic for the deposited material.

  16. Interaction of ester functional groups with aluminum oxide surfaces studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, J; Blajiev, O; Beentjes, P C J; Terryn, H; de Wit, J H W

    2004-07-20

    The bonding of two types of ester group-containing molecules with a set of different oxide layers on aluminum has been investigated using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The different oxide layers were made by giving typical surface treatments to the aluminum substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to find out what type of ester-oxide bond is formed and whether this is influenced by changes in the composition and chemistry of the oxide. The extent by which these bonded ester molecules resisted disbondment in water or substitution by molecules capable of chemisorption was also investigated. The ester groups were found to show hydrogen bonding with hydroxyls on the oxide surfaces through their carbonyl oxygens. For all oxides, the ester groups showed the same nu(C = O) carbonyl stretching vibration after adsorption, indicating very similar bonding occurs. However, the oxides showed differences in the amount of molecules bonded to the oxide surface, and a clear relation was observed with the hydroxyl concentration present on the oxide surface, which was determined from XPS measurements. The two compounds showed differences in the free to bonded nu(C = O) infrared peak shift, indicating differences in bonding strength with the oxide surface between the two types of molecules. The bonding of the ester groups with the oxide surfaces was found to be not stable in the presence of water and also not in the presence of a compound capable of chemisorption with the aluminum oxide surface. PMID:15248718

  17. [Study on germination rate of zoysia (Zoysia japonica Steud.) seeds using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Li-Juan; Fan, Bo; Mao, Wen-Hua; Mao, Wen-Hua; Puyang, Xue-Hua; Han, Lie-Bao

    2013-10-01

    With 37 zoysia seed samples with different germination rates ranging from 58.5% to 92%, harvested in different years from 2009 to 2011 and from different locations of China, a model for determining germination rate of zoysia seeds was tried to be built by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy with quantitative partial least squares (QPLS). All the seeds samples were divided into two groups: calibration set (including 28 samples) and validation set (including 9 samples). The results showed that with the spectral range from 6 000 to 7 000 cm(-1) and 6 main components, there was a better fitting between the predictive value and true value. Determination coefficients (R2) of calibration and validation sets are 90.73% and 91.80%, the coefficients of correlation are 0.986 6 and 0.987 2, the standard errors are 9.80 and 9.47, and the average absolute errors are 7.64% and 6.98% respectively. Even with different calibration samples, the models have a high determination coefficient (R2 over building of NIR model for determining 90%), low standard errors (about 10.00) and low absolute errors (about 8.00%). The building of NIR model for determining germination rate of zoysia seeds could promote the application of high quality seeds in production. PMID:24409708

  18. [Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy analytic model established for the IVDMD of Cichorium intybus L].

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Bai, Shi-qie; Zhang, Yu; Yan, Jia-jun; You, Ming-hong; Li, Da-xu; Bai, Ling; Zhang Jin

    2014-08-01

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a new type of forage grasses of high yield and quality with a great value of popularization and utilization. In vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) is one of the important indicators of the nutritional value of forage evaluation. For the study of establishment of Chicory IVDMD NIRS quantitative analysis model, seventy-two species with different genotypes, different growth stages of 204 chicory samples of aboveground material were collected, and by Fourier transform near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, through the use of different regression algorithms, can comparing different spectral ranges and spectral pretreatment methods, eight chicory IVDMD NIRS calibration models were established, and the best calibration model parameters were chosen. Its calibration coefficient of determination (Ri) and external validation coefficient of determination (Rval2) were 0.95317 and 0.90455, calibration standard deviation (RMSEC) and predictive standard deviation (RMSEP) was 1.977 99% and 2.008 82%, and the correlation coefficient (r) between predicted values and chemical values was 0.95108. The results show that using NIRS to determine chicory IVDMD is feasible, and provided a rapid analysis method for the determination IVDMD of chicory. PMID:25474939

  19. [Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy analytic model established for the IVDMD of Cichorium intybus L].

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Bai, Shi-qie; Zhang, Yu; Yan, Jia-jun; You, Ming-hong; Li, Da-xu; Bai, Ling; Zhang Jin

    2014-08-01

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a new type of forage grasses of high yield and quality with a great value of popularization and utilization. In vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) is one of the important indicators of the nutritional value of forage evaluation. For the study of establishment of Chicory IVDMD NIRS quantitative analysis model, seventy-two species with different genotypes, different growth stages of 204 chicory samples of aboveground material were collected, and by Fourier transform near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, through the use of different regression algorithms, can comparing different spectral ranges and spectral pretreatment methods, eight chicory IVDMD NIRS calibration models were established, and the best calibration model parameters were chosen. Its calibration coefficient of determination (Ri) and external validation coefficient of determination (Rval2) were 0.95317 and 0.90455, calibration standard deviation (RMSEC) and predictive standard deviation (RMSEP) was 1.977 99% and 2.008 82%, and the correlation coefficient (r) between predicted values and chemical values was 0.95108. The results show that using NIRS to determine chicory IVDMD is feasible, and provided a rapid analysis method for the determination IVDMD of chicory. PMID:25508718

  20. Detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors by visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugmas, Blaž; Plavec, Tanja; Bregar, Maksimilijan; Naglič, Peter; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is the main cause of canine morbidity and mortality. The existing evaluation of tumors requires an experienced veterinarian and usually includes invasive procedures (e.g., fine-needle aspiration) that can be unpleasant for the dog and the owner. We investigate visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) as a noninvasive optical technique for evaluation and detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors ex vivo and in vivo. The optical properties of tumors and skin were calculated in a spectrally constrained manner, using a lookup table-based inverse model. The obtained optical properties were analyzed and compared among different tumor groups. The calculated parameters of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were subsequently used for detection of malignant skin and subcutaneous tumors. The detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors ex vivo were 90.0% and 73.5%, respectively, while corresponding detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors in vivo were 88.4% and 54.6%, respectively. The obtained results show that the DRS is a promising noninvasive optical technique for detection and classification of malignant and benign canine skin and subcutaneous tumors. The method should be further investigated on tumors with common origin. PMID:25751030

  1. Detection of sibutramine in adulterated dietary supplements using attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Cauwenbergh, T; Bothy, J L; Custers, D; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O

    2014-11-01

    Sibutramine is one of the most occurring adulterants encountered in dietary supplements with slimming as indication. These adulterated dietary supplements often contain a herbal matrix. When customs intercept these kind of supplements it is almost impossible to discriminate between the legal products and the adulterated ones, due to misleading packaging. Therefore in most cases these products are confiscated and send to laboratories for analysis. This results inherently in the confiscation of legal, non-adulterated products. Therefore there is a need for easy to use equipment and techniques to perform an initial screening of samples. Attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy was evaluated for the detection of sibutramine in adulterated dietary supplements. Data interpretation was performed using different basic chemometric techniques. It was found that the use of ATR-IR combined with the k-Nearest Neighbours (k-NN) was able to detect all adulterated dietary supplements in an external test set and this with a minimum of false positive results. This means that a small amount of legal products will still be confiscated and analyzed in a laboratory to be found negative, but no adulterated samples will pass the initial ATR-IR screening. PMID:25173110

  2. Characterization of early stage cartilage degradation using diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. P.; Jayadev, C.; Glyn-Jones, S.; Carr, A. J.; Murray, D. W.; Price, A. J.; Gill, H. S.

    2011-04-01

    Interest in localized and early stage treatment technologies for joint conditions such as osteoarthritis is growing rapidly. It has therefore become important to develop objective measures capable of characterizing the earliest (non-visible) changes associated with degeneration to aid treatment procedures. In addition to assessing tissue before treatment, it is further important to develop an effective, non-destructive means of monitoring post-treatment tissue healing, and of providing the high-quality data needed for trials of developing treatment methods. To investigate its ability to detect the early stages of degeneration in cartilage-on-bone, diffuse reflectance near infrared spectroscopy was applied to normal and osteoarthritic joints. A discriminating function was developed to relate absorbance peaks of interest and track degradation around focal osteoarthritic defects. The function could distinguish between normal and degraded tissue (100% separation of normal tissue from that within 25 mm of a defect) and between different stages of osteoarthritic progression (p < 0.05). This technique allows simple, practical and non-destructive assessment of component-level properties over the full depth of the tissue. It has the potential to increase our understanding of the underlying etiologic and pathogenic processes in early stage degeneration, to assist classification and the development of new treatment methods.

  3. Identification and estimation of extra-framework aluminium in acidic mazzite by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjanchi, M. A.; Razavi, A.

    2001-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been used to investigate structural modification of mazzite zeolite subjected to calcination, acid leaching and acetylacetone treatments. Extra-framework aluminium species, formed upon expulsion of aluminium from the framework, are detected by DRS because they are involved in aluminium-oxygen charge transfer transitions. Impregnation of the calcined ammonium-exchanged and acid leached samples with ethanolic acetylacetone will convert the broadened 260-280 nm band of extra-framework aluminium with distorted symmetry to a distinct well-defined 285 nm band. The appearance of this band is due to the transformation of the aluminium atoms with a different coordination number to structures with highly ordered octahedral symmetry. Washing the acetylacetone treated samples with hot ethanol leads to extraction of some of the complexed aluminium. The presence of an extracted aluminium triacetylacetonate complex in the eluant is verified by the same spectrophotometer used in its conventional mode. This suggests that a dual DR and UV-VIS spectrophotometry is an appropriate approach to study such topics.

  4. Spectral characteristics of chlorites and Mg-serpentines using high- resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.V.V.; Clark, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    The present laboratory study using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy (0.25-2.7 ??m) focuses on two primary phyllosilicate groups, serpentines and chlorites. The results show that it is possible to spectrally distinguish between isochemical end-members of the Mg-rich serpentine group (chrysotile, antigorite, and lizardite) and to recognize spectral variations in chlorites as a function of Fe/Mg ratio (~8-38 wt% Fe). The position and relative strength of the 1.4-??m absorption feature in the trioctahedral chlorites appear to be correlated to the total iron content and/or the Mg/Si ratio and the loss on ignition values of the sample. Spectral differences in the 2.3-??m wavelength region can be attributed to differences in lattice environments and are characteristic for specific trioctahedral chlorites. The 1.4-??m feature in the isochemical Mg-rich serpentines (total iron content ~1.5-7.0 wt%) show marked spectral differences, apparently due to structural differences. -Authors

  5. Inverse Monte Carlo method in a multilayered tissue model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2012-04-01

    Model based data analysis of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy data enables the estimation of optical and structural tissue parameters. The aim of this study was to present an inverse Monte Carlo method based on spectra from two source-detector distances (0.4 and 1.2 mm), using a multilayered tissue model. The tissue model variables include geometrical properties, light scattering properties, tissue chromophores such as melanin and hemoglobin, oxygen saturation and average vessel diameter. The method utilizes a small set of presimulated Monte Carlo data for combinations of different levels of epidermal thickness and tissue scattering. The path length distributions in the different layers are stored and the effect of the other parameters is added in the post-processing. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of tissue-like models containing discrete blood vessels, evaluating blood tissue fraction and oxygenation. It was also compared to a homogeneous model. The multilayer model performed better than the homogeneous model and all tissue parameters significantly improved spectral fitting. Recorded in vivo spectra were fitted well at both distances, which we previously found was not possible with a homogeneous model. No absolute intensity calibration is needed and the algorithm is fast enough for real-time processing. PMID:22559695

  6. Laser spectroscopy of francium isotopes at the borders of the region of reflection asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinčević, I.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; De Schepper, S.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Procter, T. J.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Strashnov, I.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2014-07-01

    The magnetic dipole moments and changes in mean-square charge radii of the neutron-rich 218m,219,229,231Fr isotopes were measured with the newly installed Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) beam line at the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator (ISOLDE), CERN, probing the 7s2S1/2 to 8p2P3/2 atomic transition. The δA,221 values for 218m,219Fr and 229,231Fr follow the observed increasing slope of the charge radii beyond N =126. The charge radii odd-even staggering in this neutron-rich region is discussed, showing that 220Fr has a weakly inverted odd-even staggering while 228Fr has normal staggering. This suggests that both isotopes reside at the borders of a region of inverted staggering, which has been associated with reflection-asymmetric shapes. The g(219Fr )=+0.69(1) value supports a π1h9/2 shell-model configuration for the ground state. The g(229,231Fr ) values support the tentative Iπ(229,231Fr)=(1/2+) spin and point to a πs1/2-1 intruder ground-state configuration.

  7. Quantitative orientation measurements in thin lipid films by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, F; Buffeteau, T; Desbat, B; Auger, M; Pézolet, M

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative orientation measurements by attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy require the accurate knowledge of the dichroic ratio and of the mean-square electric fields along the three axes of the ATR crystal. In this paper, polarized ATR spectra of single supported bilayers of the phospholipid dimyristoylphosphatidic acid covered by either air or water have been recorded and the dichroic ratio of the bands due to the methylene stretching vibrations has been calculated. The mean-square electric field amplitudes were calculated using three formalisms, namely the Harrick thin film approximation, the two-phase approximation, and the thickness- and absorption-dependent one. The results show that for dry bilayers, the acyl chain tilt angle varies with the formalism used, while no significant variations are observed for the hydrated bilayers. To test the validity of the different formalisms, s- and p-polarized ATR spectra of a 40-A lipid layer were simulated for different acyl chain tilt angles. The results show that the thickness- and absorption-dependent formalism using the mean values of the electric fields over the film thickness gives the most accurate values of acyl chain tilt angle in dry lipid films. However, for lipid monolayers or bilayers, the tilt angle can be determined with an acceptable accuracy using the Harrick thin film approximation. Finally, this study shows clearly that the uncertainty on the determination of the tilt angle comes mostly from the experimental error on the dichroic ratio and from the knowledge of the refractive index. PMID:9876167

  8. Fast Pyrolysis of Wood for Biofuels: Spatiotemporally Resolved Diffuse Reflectance In situ Spectroscopy of Particles.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Alex D; Hough, Blake R; Williams, C Luke; Teixeira, Andrew R; Schwartz, Daniel T; Pfaendtner, Jim; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2014-02-20

    Fast pyrolysis of woody biomass is a promising process capable of producing renewable transportation fuels to replace gasoline, diesel, and chemicals currently derived from nonrenewable sources. However, biomass pyrolysis is not yet economically viable and requires significant optimization before it can contribute to the existing oil-based transportation system. One method of optimization uses detailed kinetic models for predicting the products of biomass fast pyrolysis, which serve as the basis for the design of pyrolysis reactors capable of producing the highest value products. The goal of this work is to improve upon current pyrolysis models, usually derived from experiments with low heating rates and temperatures, by developing models that account for both transport and pyrolysis decomposition kinetics at high heating rates and high temperatures (>400 °C). A new experimental technique is proposed herein: spatiotemporally resolved diffuse reflectance in situ spectroscopy of particles (STR-DRiSP), which is capable of measuring biomass composition during fast pyrolysis with high spatial (10 μm) and temporal (1 ms) resolution. Compositional data were compared with a comprehensive 2D single-particle model, which incorporated a multistep, semiglobal reaction mechanism, prescribed particle shrinkage, and thermophysical properties that varied with temperature, composition, and orientation. The STR-DRiSP technique can be used to determine the transport-limited kinetic parameters of biomass decomposition for a wide variety of biomass feedstocks. PMID:24678023

  9. Crop/weed discrimination using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; He, Yong

    2006-09-01

    The traditional uniform herbicide application often results in an over chemical residues on soil, crop plants and agriculture produce, which have imperiled the environment and food security. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) offers a promising means for weed detection and site-specific herbicide application. In laboratory, a total of 90 samples (30 for each species) of the detached leaves of two weeds, i.e., threeseeded mercury (Acalypha australis L.) and fourleafed duckweed (Marsilea quadrfolia L.), and one crop soybean (Glycine max) was investigated for NIRS on 325- 1075 nm using a field spectroradiometer. 20 absorbance samples of each species after pretreatment were exported and the lacked Y variables were assigned independent values for partial least squares (PLS) analysis. During the combined principle component analysis (PCA) on 400-1000 nm, the PC1 and PC2 could together explain over 91% of the total variance and detect the three plant species with 98.3% accuracy. The full-cross validation results of PLS, i.e., standard error of prediction (SEP) 0.247, correlation coefficient (r) 0.954 and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) 0.245, indicated an optimum model for weed identification. By predicting the remaining 10 samples of each species in the PLS model, the results with deviation presented a 100% crop/weed detection rate. Thus, it could be concluded that PLS was an available alternative of for qualitative weed discrimination on NTRS.

  10. [Differential Reflectance Spectroscopy for In-Situ Monitoring of Organic Thin Films Growth in Vacuum Environment].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Hu, Chun-guang; Xu, Zhen-yuan; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiao-tang

    2015-05-01

    For realizing the real-time monitoring of organic thin film preparation process in vacuum environment, the present paper proposes a high precision measurement approach based on differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). An optical system was constructed with off the shelf optical components, such as off-axis parabolic mirror, optical flat and optical fiber. A differential algorithm was employed to analyze the spectral signals. Based on the homebuilt setup, instability induced by variation of temperature was investigated. It was concluded that with the good control of temperature and air flow, the measurement repeatability of this system is better than 2 per thousand for a long-term period. Furthermore, an initial stage of organic thin film growth of pentacene molecules on the surface of Au was studied. As compared with the data of film thickness gauge and atomic force microscope, DR spectra accurately recorded the fine optical evolution with sub-monolayer resolution, which is related to the growth of the thin film. As a result, the DR optical system exhibits characteristics of broad spectrum (range from 300 to 820 nm), high stability (repeatability better than 2X 10(-3)), and high precision (sub-monolayer resolution) after efforts were done to decrease the influences on the spectral quality produced by misalignments of the optical components, the defects of the optics, and the disturbances of the environmental conditions. It is indicated that the proposed DR method is suitable for real-time online monitoring of thin film growth with high precision. PMID:26415453

  11. A Monte Carlo study of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy spectrum of a carbon contaminated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Da, B.; Li, Z. Y.; Chang, H. C.; Ding, Z. J.; Mao, S. F.

    2014-09-28

    It has been experimentally found that the carbon surface contamination influences strongly the spectrum signals in reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) especially at low primary electron energy. However, there is still little theoretical work dealing with the carbon contamination effect in REELS. Such a work is required to predict REELS spectrum for layered structural sample, providing an understanding of the experimental phenomena observed. In this study, we present a numerical calculation result on the spatially varying differential inelastic mean free path for a sample made of a carbon contamination layer of varied thickness on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. A Monte Carlo simulation model for electron interaction with a layered structural sample is built by combining this inelastic scattering cross-section with the Mott's cross-section for electron elastic scattering. The simulation results have clearly shown that the contribution of the electron energy loss from carbon surface contamination increases with decreasing primary energy due to increased individual scattering processes along trajectory parts carbon contamination layer. Comparison of the simulated spectra for different thicknesses of the carbon contamination layer and for different primary electron energies with experimental spectra clearly identifies that the carbon contamination in the measured sample was in the form of discontinuous islands other than the uniform film.

  12. [Discriminant Analysis of Lavender Essential Oil by Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Wang, Qing; Tong, Hong; Liao, Xiang; Zhang, Zheng-fang

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to use attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to identify the lavender essential oil by establishing a Lavender variety and quality analysis model. So, 96 samples were tested. For all samples, the raw spectra were pretreated as second derivative, and to determine the 1 750-900 cm(-1) wavelengths for pattern recognition analysis on the basis of the variance calculation. The results showed that principal component analysis (PCA) can basically discriminate lavender oil cultivar and the first three principal components mainly represent the ester, alcohol and terpenoid substances. When the orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) model was established, the 68 samples were used for the calibration set. Determination coefficients of OPLS-DA regression curve were 0.959 2, 0.976 4, and 0.958 8 respectively for three varieties of lavender essential oil. Three varieties of essential oil's the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) in validation set were 0.142 9, 0.127 3, and 0.124 9, respectively. The discriminant rate of calibration set and the prediction rate of validation set had reached 100%. The model has the very good recognition capability to detect the variety and quality of lavender essential oil. The result indicated that a model which provides a quick, intuitive and feasible method had been built to discriminate lavender oils. PMID:27400512

  13. X-ray reflection and scatter measurements on selected optical samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, S. A.; Reynolds, J. M.; Holland, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results from an experimental program to determine the reflection efficiency and scatter parameters of selected optical samples are presented. The measurements were made using 8.34A X-rays at various angles of incidence. Selected samples were contaminated after being measured and then remeasured to determine the effects of contamination. The instrumentation involved in taking the data, including the X-ray reflectometer and data processing equipment, is discussed in detail. The condition of the optical surfaces, the total reflection measurements, the scatter measurements, and the analysis are discussed.

  14. Assessment of Various Organic Matter Properties by Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy of Sediments and Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, G.; Leger, M.; Gagne, J.; Tremblay, L.

    2009-05-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the capability of infrared reflectance spectroscopy for a fast quantification of the elemental and molecular compositions of sedimentary and particulate organic matter (OM). A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model was used for analysis and values were compared to those obtained by traditional methods (i.e., elemental, humic and HPLC analyses). PLS tools are readily accessible from software such as GRAMS (Thermo-Fisher) used in spectroscopy. This spectroscopic-chemometric approach has several advantages including its rapidity and use of whole unaltered samples. To predict properties, a set of infrared spectra from representative samples must first be fitted to form a PLS calibration model. In this study, a large set (180) of sediments and particles on GFF filters from the St. Lawrence estuarine system were used. These samples are very heterogenous (e.g., various tributaries, terrigenous vs. marine, events such as landslides and floods) and thus represent a challenging test for PLS prediction. For sediments, the infrared spectra were obtained with a diffuse reflectance, or DRIFT, accessory. Sedimentary carbon, nitrogen, humic substance contents as well as humic substance proportions in OM and N:C ratios were predicted by PLS. The relative root mean square error of prediction (%RMSEP) for these properties were between 5.7% (humin content) and 14.1% (total humic substance yield) using the cross-validation, or leave-one out, approach. The %RMSEP calculated by PLS for carbon content was lower with the PLS model (7.6%) than with an external calibration method (11.7%) (Tremblay and Gagné, 2002, Anal. Chem., 74, 2985). Moreover, the PLS approach does not require the extraction of POM needed in external calibration. Results highlighted the importance of using a PLS calibration set representative of the unknown samples (e.g., same area). For filtered particles, the infrared spectra were obtained using a novel approach based on

  15. Rapid determination of ions by combined solid-phase extraction--diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, James S.; Arena, Matteo P.; Steiner, Steven A.; Porter, Marc D.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce colorimetric solid-phase extraction (C-SPE) for the rapid determination of selected ions. This new technique links the exhaustive concentration of an analyte by SPE onto a membrane disk surface for quantitative measurement with a hand-held diffuse reflectance spectrometer. The concentration/measurement procedure is complete in approximately 1 min and can be performed almost anywhere. This method has been used to monitor iodine and iodide in spacecraft water in the 0.1-5.0 ppm range and silver(I) in the range of 5.0-1000 microg/l. Applications to the trace analysis of copper(II), nickel(II), iron(III) and chromium(VI) are described. Studies on the mechanism of extraction showed that impregnation of the disk with a surfactant as well as a complexing reagent results in uptake of additional water, which markedly improves the extraction efficiency.

  16. Selecting relevant Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy wavenumbers for clustering authentic and counterfeit drug samples.

    PubMed

    Anzanello, Michel J; Fogliatto, Flavio S; Ortiz, Rafael S; Limberger, Renata; Mariotti, Kristiane

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for selecting subsets of wavenumbers provided by attenuated total reflectance by Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy able to improve the clustering of medicine samples into two groups; i.e., authentic or fraudulent. For that matter, we apply principal components analysis (PCA) to ATR-FTIR data, and derive two variable importance indices from the PCA parameters. Next, an iterative variable (i.e. wavenumbers) elimination procedure and sample clustering through k-means and Fuzzy C-means techniques are carried out; clustering performance is assessed by the Silhouette Index (SI). The performance of the proposed method is compared with a greedy variable selection method, the "leave one variable out at a time" approach, in terms of clustering quality, percent of retained variables, and computational time. When applied to Viagra ATR-FTIR data, our propositions increased the average SI from 0.5307 to 0.8603 using 0.61% of the original 661 wavenumbers; as for Cialis ATR-FTIR data, clustering quality increased from 0.7548 to 0.8681 when 1.21% of the original wavenumbers were retained in the procedure. The retained wavenumbers, located in the 1091-1046cm(-1) region, comprise the lactose typically hailed as key substance to discriminate between authentic and counterfeit samples. PMID:25278199

  17. Spectral reflectance properties of black chrome for use as a solar selective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center has determined that a widely available commercially electroplated decorative finish known as black chrome has desirable solar selective properties. The spectral reflectance properties of a commercially prepared black chrome on steel were measured. Values are presented for reflectance of the black chrome, and compared with the reflectance of black paint (Nextel) and with two available samples of black nickel which had been prepared for solar selective properties. The reflectance of black chrome, of the two black nickels, and of black paint integrated over the solar spectrum for air mass 2 were 0.132, 0.123, 0.133, and 0.033, respectively. The reflectance of the black chrome, two black nickels, and of the black paint integrated over the blackbody spectrum for 250 F from 3 to 15 microns are 0.912, 0.934, 0.891, and 0.033, respectively. These reflectance measurements indicate absorptivity-to-emissivity values of 9.8, 13.8, 8.0, and 1.00, respectively.

  18. Spectral reflectance properties of black chrome for use as a solar selective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center has determined that a widely available commercially electroplated decorative finish known as black chrome has desirable solar selective properties. Black chrome electroplated coating has high absorbtance in the solar spectrum and low emissivity in the 250 F blackbody thermal spectrum. The spectral reflectance properties of a commercially prepared black chrome on steel have been measured. Values are presented for reflectance of the black chrome, and compared with the reflectance of black paint and with two available samples of black nickel which had been prepared for solar selective properties. The reflectance of black chrome, of the two black nickels, and of black paint integrated over the solar spectrum for air mass 2 were 0.132, 0.123, 0.133, and 0.033, respectively. The reflectance of the black chrome, two black nickels, and of the black paint integrated over the blackbody spectrum for 250 F from 3 to 15 microns are 0.912, 0.934, 0.891, and 0.033, respectively. These reflectance measurements indicate absorptivity-to-emissivity values of 9.8, 13.8, 8.0, and 1.00, respectively.

  19. The Case for Using Student Voice in Teacher Selection and Recruitment: Reflections from a School Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this piece Peter Kent, headteacher of Lawrence Sheriff School in Rugby in the UK, reflects upon the role of the student voice in selecting and recruiting new teaching staff. Contextualised by some recent unsympathetic reporting in the UK media, Peter explains why for their school community, using the student voice to inform teacher recruitment…

  20. Selective mode excitation in finite size plasma crystals by diffusely reflected laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar

    2015-02-15

    The possibility to use diffuse reflections of a laser beam to exert a force on levitating dust particles is studied experimentally. Measurements and theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement. Further, the method is applied to test the selective excitation of breathing-like modes in finite dust clusters.

  1. Assessing spatial variability of soil petroleum contamination using visible near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Somsubhra; Weindorf, David C; Zhu, Yuanda; Li, Bin; Morgan, Cristine L S; Ge, Yufeng; Galbraith, John

    2012-11-01

    Visible near-infrared (VisNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a rapid, non-destructive method for sensing the presence and amount of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contamination in soil. This study demonstrates the feasibility of VisNIR DRS to be used in the field to proximally sense and then map the areal extent of TPH contamination in soil. More specifically, we evaluated whether a combination of two methods, penalized spline regression and geostatistics could provide an efficient approach to assess spatial variability of soil TPH using VisNIR DRS data from soils collected from an 80 ha crude oil spill in central Louisiana, USA. Initially, a penalized spline model was calibrated to predict TPH contamination in soil by combining lab TPH values of 46 contaminated and uncontaminated soil samples and the first-derivative of VisNIR reflectance spectra of these samples. The r(2), RMSE, and bias of the calibrated penalized spline model were 0.81, 0.289 log(10) mg kg(-1), and 0.010 log(10) mg kg(-1), respectively. Subsequently, the penalized spline model was used to predict soil TPH content for 128 soil samples collected over the 80 ha study site. When assessed with a randomly chosen validation subset (n = 10) from the 128 samples, the penalized spline model performed satisfactorily (r(2) = 0.70; residual prediction deviation = 2.0). The same validation subset was used to assess point kriging interpolation after the remaining 118 predictions were used to produce an experimental semivariogram and map. The experimental semivariogram was fitted with an exponential model which revealed strong spatial dependence among soil TPH [r(2) = 0.76, nugget = 0.001 (log(10) mg kg(-1))(2), and sill 1.044 (log(10) mg kg(-1))(2)]. Kriging interpolation adequately interpolated TPH with r(2) and RMSE values of 0.88 and 0.312 log(10) mg kg(-1), respectively. Furthermore, in the kriged map, TPH distribution matched with the expected TPH variability of the study site. Since the

  2. Prediction of phosphorus adsorbed and iron oxides using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in areas of sugarcane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, Livia; Marques, José, Jr.

    2014-05-01

    Traditional technologies for measuring phosphorus adsorbed (Pads) and other soil attributes of agronomic importance are relatively unfeasible when aims to mapping large areas using the characterization of the spatial variability of soil attributes. These mappings need a large number of samples, which makes it expensive in mappings scale detail. This arouses in scientific society the need to develop methodologies able to assess these attributes within the landscape quickly, nondestructive, and not expensive. The diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been used to aid the characterization of soil attributes view of these requirements. In this sensing, the objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of DRS to estimate the Pads, clay, Fe extracted by dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (Fedcb), contents of goethite (Gt) and hematite (Hm) and ratio Gt/(Gt + Hm) in Oxisols in The Northeastern State of São Paulo. Soil samples were collected in the transects each 25 m (100 samples). Geomorphic surfaces (GSs) were mapped in detail to support soil mapping. The soil in GS I was a Typic Hapludox, that in GS II a Typic Hapludox and Typic Eutrudox, and that in GS III a Typic Eutrudox. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical and mineralogical analysis and DRS spectra were obtained over 380-2300 nm. Chemometric calibration and validation (using a one-out crossvalidation procedure) were done on absorbance measurements [Log10 (1/Reflectance)] by Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) analysis. The calibration accuracy was evaluated via the determination coefficient (R2), RMSE and the ratio performance deviation (RPD). The graph of Variable Importance in the Projection (VIP) for the Pad was built. The DRS was effective in predicting the attributes studied whereas the obtained models for the prediction of clay, Fedcb and Gt with greater accuracy (RPD> 1.4) were calibrated in the visible (380-800 nm) and to predict Pads, ratio Gt/(Gt + Hm) and Hm

  3. Frequency selective reflection and transmission at a layer composed of a periodic dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoni, Henry L.; Cheo, Li-Hsiang S.; Tamir, Theodor

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using a periodic dielectric layer, composed of alternating bars having dielectric constants epsilon sub 1 and epsilon sub 2, as a frequency selective subreflector in order to permit feed separation in large aperture reflecting antenna systems was examined. For oblique incidence, it is found that total transmission and total reflection can be obtained at different frequencies for proper choices of epsilon sub 1, epsilon 2, and the geometric parameters. The frequencies of total reflection and transmission can be estimated from wave phenomena occurring in a layer of uniform dielectric constant equal to the average for the periodic layers. About some of the frequencies of total transmission, the bandwidth for 90% transmission is found to be 40%. However, the bandwidth for 90% reflection is always found to be much narrower; the greatest value found being 2.5%.

  4. Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of two-layer turbid media by densely packed multi-pixel photodiode reflectance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senlik, Ozlem; Greening, Gage; Muldoon, Timothy J.; Jokerst, Nan M.

    2016-03-01

    Spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance (SRDR) measurements provide photon path information, and enable layered tissue analysis. This paper presents experimental SRDR measurements on two-layer PDMS skin tissue-mimicking phantoms of varying top layer thicknesses, and bulk phantoms of varying optical properties using concentric multi-pixel photodiode array (CMPA) probes, and corresponding forward Monte Carlo simulations. The CMPA is the most densely packed semiconductor SRDR probe reported to date. Signal contrasts between the single layer phantom and bi-layer phantoms with varying top layer thicknesses are as high as 80%. The mean error between the Monte Carlo simulations and the experiment is less than 6.2 %.

  5. Experimental results using a three-layer skin model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strömberg, Tomas; Karlsson, Hanna; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    We have previously presented an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm based on a three-layer semi-infinite skin model for analyzing diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) data. The algorithm includes pre-simulated Monte Carlo data for a range of physiologically relevant epidermal thicknesses and tissue scattering levels. The simulated photon pathlength distributions in each layer are stored and the absorption effect from tissue chromophores added in the post-processing. Recorded DRS spectra at source-detector distances of 0.4 and 1.2 mm were calibrated for the relative intensity between the two distances and matched to simulated spectra in a non-linear optimization algorithm. This study evaluates the DRS spectral fitting accuracy and presents data on the main output parameters; the tissue fraction of red blood cells and local oxygenation (SO2). As a reference, the microcirculatory perfusion (Perf) was measured simultaneously in the same probe using laser Doppler Flowmetry. Data were recorded on the volar forearm of three healthy subjects in a protocol involving a 5 min systolic occlusion. The DRS spectra were modeled with an rms-error < 2%. In two subjects, SO2 decreased during occlusion to <10%, and increased to above baseline after hyperemia, while Perf increased >7 times compared to baseline. In the third subject the SO2 decreased less during occlusion and increased to baseline values at hyperemia with only a 2-fold increase in Perf. The observed difference could be due to different microvascular beds being probed. It is concluded that integrating DRS and LDF enables new possibilities to deduce microcirculation status.

  6. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of epithelial tissue with a smart fiber-optic probe

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Shah, Amy; Nagarajan, Vivek K.; Ferris, Daron G.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic probe can noninvasively quantify the optical properties of epithelial tissues and has shown the potential as a cost-effective, fast and sensitive tool for diagnosis of early precancerous changes in the cervix and oral cavity. However, current DRS systems are susceptible to several sources of systematic and random errors, such as uncontrolled probe-to-tissue pressure and lack of a real-time calibration that can significantly impair the measurement accuracy, reliability and validity of this technology as well as its clinical utility. In addition, such systems use bulky, high power and expensive optical components which impede their widespread use in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where epithelial cancer related death is disproportionately high. In this paper we report a portable, easy-to-use and low cost, yet accurate and reliable DRS device that can aid in the screening and diagnosis of oral and cervical cancer. The device uses an innovative smart fiber-optic probe to eliminate operator bias, state-of-the-art photonics components to reduce size and power consumption, and automated software to reduce the need of operator training. The device showed a mean error of 1.4 ± 0.5% and 6.8 ± 1.7% for extraction of phantom absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, respectively. A clinical study on healthy volunteers indicated that a pressure below 1.0 psi is desired for oral mucosal tissues to minimize the probe effects on tissue physiology and morphology. PMID:24688805

  7. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) for the estimation of agroindustrial compost quality.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Sola, L; Moral, R; Perez-Murcia, M D; Perez-Espinosa, A; Bustamante, M A; Martinez-Sabater, E; Paredes, C

    2010-02-15

    Composting is an environmentally friendly alternative for the recycling of organic wastes and its use is increasing in recent years. An exhaustive monitoring of the composting process and of the final compost characteristics is necessary to certify that the values of compost characteristics are within the limits established by the legislation in order to obtain a safe and marketable product. The analysis of these parameters on each composting batch in the commercial composting plant is time-consuming and expensive. So, their estimation in the composting facilities based on the use of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) could be an interesting approach in order to monitor compost quality. In this study, more than 300 samples from 20 different composting procedures were used to calibrate and validate the NIRS estimation of compost properties (pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total organic matter (TOM), total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and C/N ratio, macronutrient contents (N, P, K) and potentially pollutant element concentrations (Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn)). The composts used were elaborated using different organic wastes from agroindustrial activities (GS: grape stalk; EGM: exhausted grape marc; GM: grape marc; V: vinasse; CJW: citrus juice waste; Alpeorujo: olive-oil waste; AS: almond skin; EP: exhausted peat; TSW: tomato soup waste; SMS: spent mushroom substrate) co-composted with manures (CM: cattle manure; PM: poultry manure) or urban wastes (SS: sewage sludge) The estimation results showed that the NIRS technique needs to be fitted to each element and property, using specific spectrum transformations, in order to achieve an acceptable accuracy in the prediction. However, excellent prediction results were obtained for TOM and TOC, successful calibrations for pH, EC, Fe and Mn, and moderately successful estimations for TN, C/N ratio, P, K, Cu and Zn. PMID:20061002

  8. Fat/water ratios measured with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to detect breast tumor boundaries.

    PubMed

    de Boer, L L; Molenkamp, B G; Bydlon, T M; Hendriks, B H W; Wesseling, J; Sterenborg, H J C M; Ruers, T J M

    2015-08-01

    Recognition of the tumor during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) can be very difficult and currently a robust method of margin assessment for the surgical setting is not available. As a result, tumor-positive margins, which require additional treatment, are not found until histopathologic evaluation. With diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), tissue can be characterized during surgery based on optical parameters that are related to the tissue morphology and composition. Here we investigate which optical parameters are able to detect tumor in an area with a mixture of benign and tumor tissue and hence which parameters are most suitable for intra-operative margin assessment. DRS spectra (400-1600 nm) were obtained from 16 ex vivo lumpectomy specimens from benign, tumor border, and tumor tissue. One mastectomy specimen was used with a custom-made grid for validation purposes. The optical parameter related to the absorption of fat and water (F/W-ratio) in the extended near-infrared wavelength region (~1000-1600 nm) provided the best discrimination between benign and tumor sites resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100 % (excluding the border sites). Per patient, the scaled F/W-ratio gradually decreased from grossly benign tissue towards the tumor in 87.5 % of the specimens. In one test case, based on a predefined F/W-ratio for boundary tissue of 0.58, DRS produced a surgical resection plane that nearly overlapped with a 2-mm rim of benign tissue, 2 mm being the most widely accepted definition of a negative margin. The F/W-ratio provided excellent discrimination between sites clearly inside or outside the tumor and was able to detect the border of the tumor in one test case. This work shows the potential for DRS to guide the surgeon during BCS. PMID:26141407

  9. Light-induced autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in clinical diagnosis of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Pavlova, E.; Kundurjiev, T.; Troyanova, P.; Genova, Ts.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    We investigated more than 500 clinical cases to receive the spectral properties of basal cell (136 patients) and squamous cell carcinoma (28), malignant melanoma (41) and different cutaneous dysplastic and benign cutaneous lesions. Excitation at 365, 385 and 405 nm using LEDs sources is applied to obtain autofluorescence spectra, and broad-band illumination in the region of 400-900 nm is used to detect diffuse reflectance spectra of all pathologies investigated. USB4000 microspectrometer (Ocean Optics Inc, USA) is applied as a detector and fiber-optic probe is used for delivery of the light. In the case of in vivo tumor measurements spectral shape and intensity changes are observed that are specific for a given type of lesion. Autofluorescence origins of the signals coming from skin tissues are mainly due to proteins, such as collagen, elastin, keratin, their cross-links, co-enzimes - NADH and flavins and endogenous porphyrins. Spectral features significant into diffuse spectroscopy diagnosis are related to the effects of re-absorption of hemoglobin and its forms, as well as melanin and its concentration in different pathologies. We developed significant database and revealed specific features for a large class of cutaneous neoplasia, using about 30 different spectral peculiarities to differentiate cutaneous tumors. Sensitivity and specificity obtained exceed 90%, which make optical biopsy very useful tool for clinical practice. These results are obtained in the frames of clinical investigations for development of significant "spectral features" database for the most common cutaneous malignant, dysplastic and benign lesions. In the forthcoming plans, our group tries to optimize the existing experimental system for optical biopsy of skin, and to introduce it and the diagnostic algorithms developed into clinical practice, based on the high diagnostic accuracy achieved.

  10. Evaluation of various polyethylene as potential dosimeters by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, Fred; Collins, Greta; DiCicco, Michael; Logar, John

    2014-12-01

    Various types of polyethylene (PE) have been evaluated in the past for use as a potential dosimeter, chiefly via the formation of an unsaturated transvinylene (TV) double-bond resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation. The utilization of attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy in characterizing TV formation in irradiated PE for a potential dosimeter has yet to be fully developed. In this initial investigation, various PE films/sheets were exposed to ionizing radiation in a high-energy 5 megaelectron volt (MeV) electron beam accelerator in the 10-500 kilogray (kGy) dose range, followed by ATR-FTIR analysis of TV peak formation at the 965 cm-1 wavenumber. There was an upward trend in TV formation for low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets as a function of absorbed dose in the 10-50 kGy dose range, however, the TV response could not be equated to a specific absorbed dose. LDPE film displayed a downward trend from 50 kGy to 250 kGy and then scattering up to 500 kGy; HDPE sheets demonstrated an upward trend in TV formation up to 500 kGy. For ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) sheets irradiated up to 150 kGy, TV response was equivalent to non-irradiated UHMWPE, and a minimal upward trend was observed for 200 kGy to 500 kGy. The scatter of the data for the irradiated PE films/sheets is such that the TV response could not be equated to a specific absorbed dose. A better correlation of the post-irradiation TV response to absorbed dose may be attained through a better understanding of variables.

  11. [Alfalfa quality evaluation in the field by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui-Xuan; Li, Dong-Ning; Yang, Dong-Hai; Lin, Jian-Hai; Xiang, Min; Zhang, Ying-Jun

    2013-11-01

    To explore the feasibility of using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to evaluate alfalfa quality rapidly in the field and try to find the appropriate machine and sample preparation method, the representative population of 170 fresh alfalfa samples collected from different regions with different stages and different cuts were scanned by a portable NIRS spectrometer (1 100 - 1 800 nm). This is the first time to build models of fresh alfalfa to rapidly estimate quality in the field for harvesting in time. The calibrations of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) were developed through the partial least squares regression (PLS). The determination coefficients of cross-validation (R2((CV)) were 0.831 4, 0.597 9, 0.803 6, 0.786 1 for DM, CP, NDF, ADF, respectively; the root mean standard error of cross-validation (RMSECV) were 1.241 1, 0.261 4, 0.990 3, 0.830 6; The determination coefficients of validation (R2(V)) were 0.815 0, 0.401 1, 0.784 9, 0.752 1 and the root mean standard errors of validation(RMSEP)were 1.06, 0.31, 0.95, 0.80 for DM, CP, NDF, ADF, respectively. For fresh alfalfa ,the calibration of DM, NDF, ADF can do rough quantitative analysis but the CP's calibration is failed. however, as CP in alfalfa hay is enough for animal and the DM, NDF and ADF is the crucial indicator for evaluating havest time, the model of DM, NDF and ADF can be used for evaluating the alfalfa quality rapidly in the field. PMID:24555370

  12. Assessment of Microcirculatory Hemoglobin Levels in Normal and Diabetic Subjects using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy in the Visible Region — a Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, N.; Anand, B. S. Suresh; Nivetha, K. Bala; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, R.

    2015-07-01

    Light-based diagnostic techniques provide a minimally invasive way for selective biomarker estimation when tissues transform from a normal to a malignant state. Spectroscopic techniques based on diffuse reflectance characterize the changes in tissue hemoglobin/oxygenation levels during the tissue transformation process. Recent clinical investigations have shown that changes in tissue oxygenation and microcirculation are observed in diabetic subjects in the initial and progressive stages. In this pilot study, we discuss the potential of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the visible (Vis) range to differentiate the skin microcirculatory hemoglobin levels between normal and advanced diabetic subjects with and without neuropathy. Average concentration of hemoglobin as well as hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the probed tissue volume is estimated for a total of four different sites in the foot sole. The results indicate a statistically significant decrease in average total hemoglobin and increase in hemoglobin oxygen saturation levels for diabetic foot compared with a normal foot. The present study demonstrates the ability of reflectance spectroscopy in the Vis range to determine and differentiate the changes in tissue hemoglobin and hemoglobin oxygen saturation levels in normal and diabetic subjects.

  13. Adaptive global training set selection for spectral estimation of printed inks using reflectance modeling.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Timo; Valero, Eva M; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Schnitzlein, Markus

    2014-02-01

    The performance of learning-based spectral estimation is greatly influenced by the set of training samples selected to create the reconstruction model. Training sample selection schemes can be categorized into global and local approaches. Most of the previously proposed global training schemes aim to reduce the number of training samples, or a selection of representative samples, to maintain the generality of the training dataset. This work relates to printed ink reflectance estimation for quality assessment in in-line print inspection. We propose what we believe is a novel global training scheme that models a large population of realistic printable ink reflectances. Based on this dataset, we used a recursive top-down algorithm to reject clusters of training samples that do not enhance the performance of a linear least-square regression (pseudoinverse-based estimation) process. A set of experiments with real camera response data of a 12-channel multispectral camera system illustrate the advantages of this selection scheme over some other state-of-the-art algorithms. For our data, our method of global training sample selection outperforms other methods in terms of estimation quality and, more importantly, can quickly handle large datasets. Furthermore, we show that reflectance modeling is a reasonable, convenient tool to generate large training sets for print inspection applications. PMID:24514188

  14. A Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction-Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy Study of Silicon Growth Dynamics During Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy from Silanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, B. A.; Zhang, J.; Taylor, A. G.; Lees, A. K.

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) provides an ideal experimental vehicle for the in situ study of thin film growth dynamics. By using a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflectance anisotropy (difference) spectroscopy [RA(D)S], it is possible to separate morphological (long range order) and local electronic structure effects, which we demonstrate with the growth of silicon films from disilane (Si2H6) on Si(001) (2 × 1)+(1 × 2) reconstructed surfaces. The rate-limiting step in Si growth from both monosilane (SiH4) and disilane is the desorption of molecular hydrogen and we have found using RAS that, over a significant range of temperature and coverage, hydrogen desorption follows zeroth order kinetics as the result of a step-mediated process. Finally, we show how this influences the growth rate on substrates of differing degrees of vicinality.

  15. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrate and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O and adsorbed H2O. The spectal character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micrometers, 2.2 micrometers, 2.7 micrometers, 3 micrometers, and 6 micrometers are reported here in spetra measured under Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stonger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micrometer feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micrometer feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3- micrometer band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micromter band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural

  16. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials

  17. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light by heliconical cholesteric structures (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Xiang, Jie; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Li, Quan

    2015-10-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Resulting interference colors are highly saturated, they add like colored lights and produce a color gamut greater than that obtained with inks, dyes, and pigments. The periodicity of the helical structure and thus the wavelength of the reflected light can be controlled by chemical composition and sometimes by temperature, but tuning with the electric field has been so far elusive. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal (heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic "right-angle" helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of light, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, and transparent "see-through" displays. Since the material is non-absorbing and transparent everywhere except the electrically preselected reflection band, the effect can be used in creating multilayered structures with a dynamic additive mixture of colors.

  18. Molecular spectroscopy and molecular structure - Selected communications presented at the 1st International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, James R.; Fausto, Rui; Ünsalan, Ozan; Bayarı, Sevgi; Kuş, Nihal; Ildız, Gülce Ö.

    2016-01-01

    The First International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013) took place at the Harbiye Cultural Center & Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, September 15-20, 2013. The main aim of the congress was to encourage the exchange of scientific ideas and collaborations all around the world, introduce new techniques and instruments, and discuss recent developments in the field of molecular spectroscopy. Among the different subjects covered, particular emphasis was given to the relevance of spectroscopy to elucidate details of the molecular structure and the chemical and physical behavior of systems ranging from simple molecules to complex biochemical molecules. Besides experimental spectroscopic approaches, related computational and theoretical methods were also considered. In this volume, selected contributions presented at the congress were put together.

  19. Colorimetric evaluation of composite materials with different thickness by reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portero, Priscila Paiva; Florez, Fernando; Bagnato, Vanderlei; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista, Jr.; de Castro Monteiro Loffredo, Leonor

    2007-02-01

    Selection of the proper shade and color matching of restorations to natural dentition continues to be one of the most frustrating problems in dentistry and currently available shade guide presents a limited selection of colors compared to those found in natural dentition. This investigation evaluation if the composites resins shade B2 are equivalent to the Vita shade guide B2. Twelve composite resins (Renamel Microfill Super Brite- Cosmedent USA, Renamel Universal Brite- Cosmedent USA, Renamel Microfill Body- Cosmedent USA, Renamel Universal Body- Cosmedent USA, Opallis EB2-FGM, Opallis DB2-FGM, Filtek Supreme XT-3M/ESPE, Filtek Z250-3M/ESPE, Filtek Z350-3M/ESPE, Z100-3M/ESPE, 4 Seasons Dentin-Ivoclar/Vivadent, Tetric Ceram-Ivoclar/Vivadent) shade B2 were used. From each composite, two specimens were made in a steel matrix with 8.0 mm diameter and 10.0 mm different predetermined thickness (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, 2.0 mm). The specimens were 40 seconds light polymerized by LED Ultrablue (DMC). The specimens were measured 10 times each to determine the shade using a reflectance spectrophotometer (Pocket Spec). According to results was verified that not any of composites resins shade B2 evaluated in this study presented values of color difference (ΔE) equivalent to the Vita shade guide B2 and the 2 mm thickness showed the closer match to the Vita shade guide B2.

  20. The use of reflectance confocal microscopy in selected inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Białek-Galas, Kamila; Wielowieyska-Szybińska, Dorota; Dyduch, Grzegorz; Wojas-Pelc, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is a modern, non-invasive diagnostic method that enables real-time imaging of the epidermis and upper layers of the dermis with nearly histological precision and high contrast. The application of this technology to skin imaging during the last years has resulted in progress of dermatological diagnosis, providing virtual access to living skin, without the need for conventional histopathology. The presented method potentially has broad application in the diagnosis of skin diseases. This article provides a summary of the latest reports and previous achievements in the field of reflectance confocal microscopy. General characteristics of confocal images in selected inflammatory skin diseases are presented. PMID:26247522

  1. [Study on determining the content of all kinds of composition in the natural rock by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Hua; Wu, Wei; He, Yan; Yao, Jin-Zhu; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Deng, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The infrared reflectance spectroscopy from the sample simulating natural-rock prepared by kaolin, muscovite and montmorillonite mixed-powders was obtained by a spectrometer. Spectral data preprocessing was done using SNV. Random forest mathematical modeling was used for predicting the components of rock samples. The smallest root mean square error of the predicted three types of rock composition were 0.088 0, 0.095 6 and 0.121 2 respectively. The predictive studies showed that the application of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to determining the content of the natural rocks and minerals of various rock composition is feasible. The study provides a theoretical basis for the rapid detection of the rock composition in the future. PMID:23586231

  2. Mapping of egg yolk and animal skin glue paint binders in Early Renaissance paintings using near infrared reflectance imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kathryn A; Lomax, Suzanne; Zeibel, Jason G; Miliani, Costanza; Ricciardi, Paola; Hoenigswald, Ann; Loew, Murray; Delaney, John K

    2013-09-01

    In situ chemical imaging techniques are being developed to provide information on the spatial distribution of artists' pigments used in polychrome works of art such as paintings. The new methods include reflectance imaging spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence mapping. Results from these new methods have extended the knowledge obtained from site-specific chemical analyses widely in use. While these mapping methods have aided in determining the distribution of pigments, there is a growing interest to develop methods capable of identifying and mapping organic paint binders as well. Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively used in the remote sensing field as well as in the chemical industry to detect organic compounds. NIR spectroscopy provides a rapid method to assay organics by utilizing vibrational overtones and combination bands of fundamental absorptions that occur in the mid-IR. Here we explore the utility of NIR reflectance imaging spectroscopy to map organic binders in situ by examining a series of panel paintings known to have been painted using distemper (animal skin glue) and tempera (egg yolk) binders as determined by amino acid analysis of samples taken from multiple sites on the panels. In this report we demonstrate the success in identifying and mapping these binders by NIR reflectance imaging spectroscopy in situ. Three of the four panel paintings from Cosimo Tura's The Annunciation with Saint Francis and Saint Louis of Toulouse (ca. 1475) are imaged using a highly sensitive, line-scanning hyperspectral imaging camera. The results show an animal skin glue binder was used for the blue skies and blue robe of the Virgin Mary, and egg yolk tempera was used for the red robes and brown landscape. The mapping results show evidence for the use of both egg yolk and animal skin glue in the faces of the figures. The strongest absorption associated with lipidic egg yolk features visually correlates with areas that appear to have white

  3. Spectral bidirectional and hemispherical reflectance characteristics of selected sites in the Streletskaya steppe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, Thomas F.; Deering, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of plant canopy bidirectional reflectance made by the PARABOLA (portable apparatus for rapid acquisition of bidirectional observations of the land and atmosphere) instrument in three spectral bands are analyzed for steppe grassland sites of differing productivity levels. The variation of spectral reflectance and the normalized difference vegetation index in the solar principal plane is presented. Comparisons are made with PARABOLA measurements from selected first ISLSCP field experiment (FIFE) grassland sites in the Konza prairie, Kansas. The Streletskaya steppe sites showed no strong hot spot reflectance, while this effect was present in some FIFE sites but absent in others. The hot spot effect seems to be dependent on canopy geometry and background reflectance characteristics of these sites. Spectral hemispherical reflectance was computed from the angular integration of the bidirectional measurements for the steppe sites. Total shortwave albedo was estimated from these hemispherical reflectance measurements and compared to albedo measured by pyranometers. The albedo estimates from PARABOLA were found to be approximately 12-17 percent higher than the pyranometer measurements.

  4. Valence band gaps and plasma energies for galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite natural minerals using differential optical reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Szakacs, Zs.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the determinations of the valence band gaps and plasma energies of the galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite natural minerals. The work was carried out using differential optical reflectance spectroscopy of the clean mineral surfaces. The determination of the optical properties such as refractive index, real part of the complex dielectric constant and the location of certain van Hove singularities, was carried out using the Kramers-Kronig formalism.

  5. Results of an analytical study of spacecraft deposition contamination by internal reflection spectroscopy. [(haze on spacecraft windows from space debris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1976-01-01

    Outgassing, deposition, and desorption kinetics of silicone compounds, are examined as examples of optical surface contaminants of spacecraft windows. Their behavior in a space environment after exposure to ultraviolet radiation is also examined. The use of internal reflection spectroscopy is shown to provide a viable means of real-time, in-situ identification of contaminants of orbiting spacecraft. The instrumental techniques are proposed as the basis of further investigations and the development of flight hardware.

  6. Single fiber reflectance spectroscopy on cervical premalignancies: the potential for reduction of the number of unnecessary biopsies.

    PubMed

    Hariri Tabrizi, Sanaz; Mahmoud Reza Aghamiri, S; Farzaneh, Farah; Amelink, Arjen; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M

    2013-01-01

    We have assessed the value of single fiber reflectance (SFR) spectroscopy in prediction of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL). SFR was used to measure reflected light from 32 patients undergoing standard colposcopy. Seven parameters extracted from the spectra in addition to two biographic parameters were compared in biopsy-confirmed SIL versus nonSIL. The significant parameters in the model were determined using stepwise logistic regression. The classification performance was evaluated by a leave-one-out cross-validation method and reported by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Light absorption properties and biographic characteristics of the patient contributed significantly to the accuracy of the model. Combining important parameters, the best retrospective sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve for SIL sites versus nonSIL were 89%, 80% and 0.89%, respectively. SFR spectroscopy shows promise as a noninvasive, real-time method to guide the clinician in reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies. Discrimination of SIL from other abnormalities compares favorably with that obtained by fluorescence alone and by fluorescence combined with reflectance spectroscopy while the simplicity and low cost of the presented system are dominant. PMID:23292613

  7. Classification and quantification analysis of peach kernel from different origins with near-infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Qing, Jian-Ping; Li, Hong-Juan; Xiao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peach kernels which contain kinds of fatty acids play an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and biological functions. Objective: To establish an innovative and rapid diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (DR-NIR) analysis method along with chemometric techniques for the qualitative and quantitative determination of a peach kernel. Materials and Methods: Peach kernel samples from nine different origins were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as a reference method. DR-NIR is in the spectral range 1100-2300 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) algorithm were applied to obtain prediction models, The Savitzky-Golay derivative and first derivative were adopted for the spectral pre-processing, PCA was applied to classify the varieties of those samples. For the quantitative calibration, the models of linoleic and oleinic acids were established with the PLSR algorithm and the optimal principal component (PC) numbers were selected with leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation. The established models were evaluated with the root mean square error of deviation (RMSED) and corresponding correlation coefficients (R2). Results: The PCA results of DR-NIR spectra yield clear classification of the two varieties of peach kernel. PLSR had a better predictive ability. The correlation coefficients of the two calibration models were above 0.99, and the RMSED of linoleic and oleinic acids were 1.266% and 1.412%, respectively. Conclusion: The DR-NIR combined with PCA and PLSR algorithm could be used efficiently to identify and quantify peach kernels and also help to solve variety problem. PMID:25422544

  8. Quantitative Subtractively Normalized Interfacial Fourier Transform Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy Study of the Adsorption of Adenine on Au(111) Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Francisco; Su, Zhangfei; Leitch, J Jay; Rueda, Manuela; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2016-04-26

    Quantitative subtractively normalized interfacial Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy (SNIFTIRS) was used to determine the molecular orientation and identify the metal-molecular interactions responsible for the adsorption of adenine from the bulk electrolyte solution onto the surface of the Au(111) electrode. The recorded p-polarized IR spectra of the adsorbed species were subtracted from the collected s-polarized IR spectra to remove the IR contributions of the vibrational bands of the desorbed molecules that are located within the thin layer cavity of the spectroelectrochemical cell. The intense IR band around 1640 cm(-1), which is assigned to the pyrimidine ring stretching vibrations of the C5-C6 and C6-N10 bonds, and the IR band at 1380 cm(-1), which results from a combination of the ring stretching vibration of the C5-C7 bond and the in-plane CH bending vibration, were selected for the quantitative analysis measurements. The transition dipoles of these bands were evaluated by DFT calculations. Their orientations differed by 85 ± 5°. The tilt angles of adsorbed adenine molecules were calculated from the intensity of these two vibrations at different potentials. The results indicate that the molecular plane is tilted at an angle of 40° with respect to the surface normal of the electrode and rotates by 16° around its normal axis with increasing electrode potential. This orientation results from the chemical interaction between the N10 and gold atoms coupled with the π-π parallel stacking interactions between the adjacent adsorbed molecules. Furthermore, the changes in the molecular plane rotation with the electric field suggests that the N1 atom of adenine must also participate in the interaction between the molecule and metal. PMID:27040121

  9. SELECTED ASPECTS OF TERAHERTZ SPECTROSCOPY IN PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Kacper; Pliński, Edward F; Karolewicz, Bożena; Jarząb, Przemysław P; Plińska, Stanisława; Fuglewicz, Bogusław; Walczakowski, Michał J; Augustyn, Łukasz; Sterczewsk, Łukasz A; Grzelczak, Michał P; Hruszowiec, Mariusz; Beziuk, Grzegorz; Mikulic, Martin; Pałka, Norbert; Szustakowskip, Mieczysław

    2015-01-01

    THz-TDS techniques are applied to investigate selected pharmaceutical samples. Investigations were performed on selected pharmaceutical samples with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API)--famotidine, ranitidine, fenofibrate, lovastatin, simvastatin, aspirin, ketoconazole, acyclovir (hydrated and non-hydrated), on excipients--lactose, glucose (hydrated and non-hydrated), Pluronic 127, and on mixtures of selected compounds. Pseudo-polymorphism effects are considered as well. Examples of the terahertz imaging technique are also given. APIs and excipients can be easily recognized in the terahertz band by their specific "fingerprints" as individual components and in mixtures. The hydration process as a variety of polymorphism can also be easily monitored using the THz technique. Moreover, terahertz light can be useful for the penetration of tablets, giving clear pictures of possible defects in tablet coatings. PMID:26665391

  10. Ir Spectroscopy of Selected Atmospheric Monoterpenes and Oxydation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.; Goubet, Manuel; Soulard, Pascale; Asselin, Pierre; Georges, Robert; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, P.

    2014-06-01

    Several monoterpenes are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS) present in the atmosphere. They can react with OH, O_3, NO_x, etc. to give rise to several oxydation and degradation products. We have studied the gas phase spectroscopy of monocyclic (limonene, γ-terpinene) and bicyclic (α-pinene, β-pinene) atmospheric monoterpenes (C10H_{16}), as well as two C10H_{14O} oxydation products (perillaldehyde, carvone). In the first step of this work, theoretical calculations and microwave spectroscopy were used in order to evidence the most stable conformers and their relative energies. In the present communication we will present the results of the IR study. Infrared spectra have been recorded on the FTIR spectrometer of the AILES beamline at synchrotron SOLEIL, using the Jet-AILES molecular beam and a long path cell. Special attention was given to the 700-1300 wn atmospheric window, to the CH vibration region, and to the "finger print" FIR region. Quantum calculations have been performed at different levels of theory (DFT, ab initio). In particular anharmonic force fields were obtained in order to model the vibrational structures. J. R. Aviles Moreno, F. Partal Urena, J. J. Lopez Gonzalez and T. R. Huet, C. Phys. Lett. 473 (2009) 17 J. R. Aviles Moreno, T. R. Huet, F. Partal Urena, J. J. Lopez Gonzalez, Struc. Chem. 24 (2013) 1163 J. R. Aviles Moreno, E. Neeman, T. R. Huet, manuscript in preparation Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged. The experiment on the AILES beam-line at synchrotron SOLEIL was performed under project number 20130192.

  11. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-01

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum.

  12. Direct characterization of the energy level alignments and molecular components in an organic hetero-junction by integrated photoemission spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Shin, Weon-Ho; Bulliard, Xavier; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seyun; Chung, Jae Gwan; Kim, Yongsu; Heo, Sung; Kim, Seong Heon

    2016-08-26

    A novel, direct method for the characterization of the energy level alignments at bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)/electrode interfaces on the basis of electronic spectroscopy measurements is proposed. The home-made in situ photoemission system is used to perform x-ray/ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy of organic-semiconductors (OSCs) deposited onto a Au substrate. Through this analysis system, we are able to obtain the electronic structures of a boron subphthalocyanine chloride:fullerene (SubPC:C60) BHJ and those of the separate OSC/electrode structures (SubPC/Au and C60/Au). Morphology and chemical composition analyses confirm that the original SubPC and C60 electronic structures remain unchanged in the electrodes prepared. Using this technique, we ascertain that the position and area of the nearest peak to the Fermi energy (EF = 0 eV) in the UPS (REELS) spectra of SubPC:C60 BHJ provide information on the highest occupied molecular orbital level (optical band gap) and combination ratio of the materials, respectively. Thus, extracting the adjusted spectrum from the corresponding SubPC:C60 BHJ UPS (REELS) spectrum reveals its electronic structure, equivalent to that of the C60 materials. This novel analytical approach allows complete energy-level determination for each combination ratio by separating its electronic structure information from the BHJ spectrum. PMID:27420635

  13. Terahertz imaging of composite materials in reflection and transmission mode with a time-domain spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørgârd, Trygve R.; van Rheenen, Arthur D.; Haakestad, Magnus W.

    2016-02-01

    A fiber-coupled Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system based on photoconductive antennas, pumped by a 100-fs fiber laser, has been used to characterize materials in transmission and reflection mode. THz images are acquired by mounting the samples under investigation on an x-y stage, which is stepped through the beam while the transmitted or reflected THz waveform is captured. The samples include a carbon fiber epoxy composite and a sandwich-structured composite panel with an aramid fiber honeycomb core in between two skin layers of fiberglass reinforced plastic. The former has an artificially induced void, and from a comparison of recorded reflected time-domain signals, with and without the void, a simple model for the structure of the composite is proposed that describes the time-domain signals reasonably well.

  14. Hollow optical-fiber based infrared spectroscopy for measurement of blood glucose level by using multi-reflection prism

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Saiko; Omori, Suguru; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy system employing hollow optical fibers and a trapezoidal multi-reflection ATR prism has been developed to measure blood glucose levels. Using a multi-reflection prism brought about higher sensitivity, and the flat and wide contact surface of the prism resulted in higher measurement reproducibility. An analysis of in vivo measurements of human inner lip mucosa revealed clear signatures of glucose in the difference spectra between ones taken during the fasting state and ones taken after ingestion of glucose solutions. A calibration plot based on the absorption peak at 1155 cm−1 that originates from the pyranose ring structure of glucose gave measurement errors less than 20%. PMID:26977373

  15. Integration of single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy into ultrasound-guided endoscopic lung cancer staging of mediastinal lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; van der Leest, Cor; Aerts, Joachim G. J. V.; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Kaščáková, Slávka; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Amelink, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    We describe the incorporation of a single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy probe into the endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) procedure utilized for lung cancer staging. A mathematical model is developed to extract information about the physiological and morphological properties of lymph tissue from single-fiber reflectance spectra, e.g., microvascular saturation, blood volume fraction, bilirubin concentration, average vessel diameter, and Mie slope. Model analysis of data from a clinical pilot study shows that the single-fiber reflectance measurement is capable of detecting differences in the physiology between normal and metastatic lymph nodes. Moreover, the clinical data show that probe manipulation within the lymph node can perturb the in vivo environment, a concern that must be carefully considered when developing a sampling strategy. The data show the feasibility of this novel technique; however, the potential clinical utility has yet to be determined.

  16. Tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for automated oral and maxillofacial laser surgery: ex vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael; Douplik, Alexandre

    2010-02-01

    Remote laser surgery lacks of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Hence, there is a risk of iatrogenic damage or destruction of anatomical structures like nerves or salivary glands. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from seven various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the seven tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerves and salivary glands as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating tissues as guidance for oral and maxillofacial laser surgery by means of diffuse reflectance.

  17. Hollow optical-fiber based infrared spectroscopy for measurement of blood glucose level by using multi-reflection prism.

    PubMed

    Kino, Saiko; Omori, Suguru; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A mid-infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy system employing hollow optical fibers and a trapezoidal multi-reflection ATR prism has been developed to measure blood glucose levels. Using a multi-reflection prism brought about higher sensitivity, and the flat and wide contact surface of the prism resulted in higher measurement reproducibility. An analysis of in vivo measurements of human inner lip mucosa revealed clear signatures of glucose in the difference spectra between ones taken during the fasting state and ones taken after ingestion of glucose solutions. A calibration plot based on the absorption peak at 1155 cm(-1) that originates from the pyranose ring structure of glucose gave measurement errors less than 20%. PMID:26977373

  18. Identification of Hydrated Sulfates Collected in the Northern Rio Tinto Valley by Reflectance and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chemtob, S. M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Fernandez-Remolar, D. C.; Amils, R.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Mustard, J. F.; Hutchinson, L.; Stein, T. C.; Donovan, C. E.; Fairchild, G. M.; Friedlander, L. R.; Karas, N. M.; Klasen, N.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Robinson, E. M.; Steinhardt, S. E.; Weber, L. R.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA recently identified spectral signatures of kieserite, gypsum, and other polyhydrated sulfates at multiple locations on the surface of Mars [1,2]. The presence of sulfates was confirmed through in situ spectroscopy by MER Opportunity [3]. An approach to validate these interpretations is to collect corresponding spectral data from sulfate-rich terrestrial analog sites. The northern Rio Tinto Valley near Nerva, Spain, is a good Martian analog locale because it features extensive seasonal sulfate mineralization driven by highly acidic waters [4]. We report on mineralogical compositions identified by field VNIR spectroscopy and laboratory Raman spectroscopy.

  19. A few selected applications of surface nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Y R

    1996-01-01

    As a second-order nonlinear optical process, sum-frequency generation is highly surface-specific and accordingly has been developed into a very powerful and versatile surface spectroscopic tool. It has found many unique applications in different disciplines and thus provided many exciting new research opportunities in surface and surface-related science. Selected examples are discussed here to illustrate the power of the technique. PMID:8901540

  20. Cure characterization of an unsaturated polyester resin using near-infrared, fluorescence and UV/visible reflection spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunden, Bradley Lyn

    This dissertation seeks to characterize the cure reaction of an unsaturated polyester resin using near-infrared, fluorescence and UV/Visible reflection spectroscopies. The results will provide a foundation for developing fiber-optic in-situ cure monitoring techniques based on near-infrared, fluorescence, and UV/Visible reflection spectroscopies for an unsaturated polyester resin system. Near-infrared spectra of the unsaturated polyester resin during cure showed a decrease in absorption at 1629, 2087, 2117, and 2227 nm. Model compounds representing the reactants and products of the cure reaction were characterized, and assignment of peaks in the NIR were made. Conversion of styrene and vinylene, determined from NIR measurements, were compared with values obtained using conventional FTIR measurements. Discrepancies between conversion values determined from NIR and FTIR measurements were attributed to a difference in sample sizes used for measurement. Using a microgel based reaction mechanism, the effects of temperature on the conversion of styrene and vinylene was discussed. A strong fluorescence emission was found during cure of the unsaturated polyester resin. As the reaction proceeded, the emission intensity at 306 nm increased. Model compound studies confirmed that the unsaturated polyester vinylene component exhibits negligible fluorescence when excited at 250 nm. The fluorescence emission at 306 nm was attributed to a reduced self-quenching effect of styrene monomer. In-situ fluorescence characterization of the cure reaction was also attempted. Fiber-optic fluorescence measurements taken in-situ at 75°C were found to be higher than those taken by fiber-optics at room temperature, indicating a temperature effect on the fluorescence emission. These results may be a consequence of the static quenching behavior of styrene monomer. UV/Visible reflection spectra of styrene showed a decrease in the % Reflectance at 255 nm with reaction time. This decrease was

  1. Use of mid-infrared fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) to evaluate efficacy of nanostructured systems in wall painting conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, B.; Carretti, E.; Picollo, M.; Baglioni, P.; Dei, L.

    2006-06-01

    Mid-infrared fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy (Mid-IR FORS), a sensitive, non-invasive technique for determining chemicals present on a surface, has been used to test efficacy of oil-in-water microemulsions and micellar solutions in cleaning of painted surfaces. The target of the application of these innovative nanostructured systems was the selective removal of an undesired polymeric layer from a fresco surface. The experiments were carried out by first coating frosted glass slides and painted mortar simulating a real fresco with four acrylic and vinyl polymer varnishes commonly used in wall painting restoration. Spectra of the samples were then collected by means of microreflectance single-beam infrared spectroscopy and Mid-IR FORS before and after the application of the aqueous dispersed systems based cleaning agents. Sharp, strong peaks due to the stretching of the estereous C=O bond of the polymers in a wavelength range between 1730 and 1750 cm-1 were used as marker for the presence of these organic materials. Through Mid-IR FORS semiquantitative spectroscopy, the efficiency of the treatment has been clearly demonstrated, indicating that the nanotechnology approach represents a new, safe, and very efficient way of removing aged polymers from fresco surfaces.

  2. Optical diffuse reflectance accessory for measurements of skin tissue by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, R.; Heise, H. M.

    1995-02-01

    An optimized accessory for measuring the diffuse reflectance spectra of human skin tissue in the near-infrared spectral range is presented. The device includes an on-axis ellipsoidal collecting mirror with efficient illumination optics for small sampling areas of bulky body specimens. The optical design is supported by the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the reflectance characteristics of skin tissue. Because the results evolved from efforts to measure blood glucose noninvasively, the main emphasis is placed on the long-wavelength near-infrared range where sufficient penetration depth for radiation into tissue is still available. The accessory is applied for in vivo diffuse reflectance measurements.

  3. Optimal source to detector separation for extracting sub-dermal chromophores in fiber optic diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, N.; Nivetha, K. Bala; Singhal, Akshay

    2014-05-01

    Localization and determination of blood region parameters in skin tissue can serve as a valuable supplement to standard non invasive techniques, especially in accessing the degree of depth of burns on skin and for the classification of vascular malformations. Quantitative optical examination of skin local blood region requires the use of depth sensitive techniques and preferential probing for assessment of data from specific layers of skin tissue. This work incorporates the depth sensitivity of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optimal source to detector fiber separation for maximum reflectance collection efficiency from local blood region in skin. Monte Carlo simulation for diffuse reflectance was performed on a multi layered skin tissue model consisting of epidermis, perfused dermis and localized blood region. It was found that the slope of the spatially resolved reflectance curve plotted with respect to the source to detector separation distance in semi log scale varies with the depth of the local blood region at specific wavelengths corresponding to the absorption wavelengths of hemoglobin. From the depth information obtained from the spatially resolved reflectance data, the optimum source to detector separation (SDS) is determined for maximum collection efficiency from the chromophore layer. The results obtained from simulation suggest the design of a linearly variable source to detector separation probe for preferential analysis of the depth of a specific tissue layer and subsequent determination of optimal source to detector separation for extracting the layer information.

  4. Visible and near-infrared reflectivity of solid and liquid methane: application to spectroscopy of Titan's hydrocarbon lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, K.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Liu, Z.; Somayazulu, M.; Thomas, S.; Jurdy, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy provides one of the few direct observations of outer solar system bodies for interpreting their surface compositions. At Titan, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini spacecraft revealed dark patches on the surface through the narrow 2 and 5 μm windows of Titan's atmosphere, which have been interpreted as hydrocarbon lakes forming seasonally through a methane cycle. Whereas the composition of planetary materials in the solar system has been inferred from characteristic absorption bands, the need to identify phase states (liquid versus solid) on dynamic planetary surfaces requires laboratory reflectance ratio measurements at relevant temperatures. Using visible and near-infrared radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), we will present confocal reflectance ratio measurements of solid (single crystal) and liquid CH4 at temperatures from 50-100 K. Although the position and shape of the six characteristic methane absorption bands at around 1.7 and 2.3 μm are insensitive to temperature or phase state from 50-100 K, the broad-spectrum reflectance between 0.5-2 μm decreases upon melting by about 25% at 87-94 K. Transition from solid CH4-I to liquid states at ~90 K displays a reflectance ratio (sold/liquid) of about 1.3 at 2 μm. Darkening of CH4 upon melting is similar at visible wavelengths, and consistent with VIMS observations of hydrocarbon lakes in the far northern and southern latitudes of Titan.

  5. Assessing the use of reflectance spectroscopy in determining CsCl stress in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martinez, N. E.; Sharp, J. L.; Kuhne, W. W.; Johnson, T. E.; Stafford, C. T.; Duff, M. C.

    2015-11-23

    Here, reflectance spectroscopy is a rapid and non-destructive analytical technique that may be used for assessing plant stress, and has potential applications for use in remediation. Changes in reflectance such as that due to metal stress may occur before damage is visible, and existing studies have shown that metal stress does cause changes in plant reflectance. To further investigate the potential use of reflectance spectroscopy as a method for assessing metal stress in plants, an exploratory study was conducted in which Arabidopsis thaliana plants were treated twice weekly in a laboratory setting with varying levels (0, 0.5, or 5 mMmore » (millimolar)) of caesium chloride (CsCl) solution, and reflectance spectra were collected every week for three weeks using an Analytical Spectral Devices FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer with both a contact probe (CP) and a field of view (FOV) probe at 36.8 and 66.7 cm, respectively, above the plant. Plants were harvested each week after spectra collection for determination of relative water content and chlorophyll content. A visual assessment of the plants was also conducted using point observations on a uniform grid of 81 points. A mixed-effects model analysis was conducted for each vegetation index (VI) considered to determine the effects of length of treatment, treatment level, view with which spectra were acquired, and the interactions of these terms. Two-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were performed on the aforementioned endpoints (e.g. chlorophyll content) to determine the significance of the effects of treatment level and length of treatment. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to develop a predictive model for each endpoint, considering VI acquired at each view (CP, high FOV, and low FOV). Of the 14 VI considered, 8 were included in the MLR models. Contact probe readings and FOV readings differed significantly, but FOV measurements were generally consistent at each height.« less

  6. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for optical nerve identification. Preliminary ex vivo results for feedback controlled oral and maxillofacial laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzle, Florian; Zam, Azhar; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Schmidt, Michael

    Objective: Laser surgery has many advantages. However, due to a lack of haptic feedback it is accompanied by the risk of iatrogenic nerve damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities of optical nerve identification by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to set the base for a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Materials and Methods: Diffuse reflectance spectra of nerve tissue, skin, mucosa, fat tissue, muscle, cartilage and bone (15120 spectra) of ex vivo pig heads were acquired in the wavelength range of 350-650 nm. Tissue differentiation was performed by principal components analysis (PCA) followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Specificity and sensitivity were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Results: Nerve tissue could correctly be identified and differed from skin, mucosa, fat tissue, muscle, cartilage and bone in more than 90% of the cases (AUC results) with a specificity of over 78% and a sensitivity of more than 86%. Conclusion: Nerve tissue can be identified by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with high precision and reliability. The results may set the base for a feedback system to prevent iatrogenic nerve damage performing oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  7. Fiber-bundle microendoscopy with sub-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intensity mapping for multimodal optical biopsy of stratified epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Gage J.; James, Haley M.; Powless, Amy J.; Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Dierks, Mary K.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of structural or functional changes in dysplastic epithelia may be crucial for improving long-term patient care. Recent work has explored myriad non-invasive or minimally invasive “optical biopsy” techniques for diagnosing early dysplasia, such as high-resolution microendoscopy, a method to resolve sub-cellular features of apical epithelia, as well as broadband sub-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, a method that evaluates bulk health of a small volume of tissue. We present a multimodal fiber-based microendoscopy technique that combines high-resolution microendoscopy, broadband (450-750 nm) sub-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (sDRS) at two discrete source-detector separations (374 and 730 μm), and sub-diffuse reflectance intensity mapping (sDRIM) using a 635 nm laser. Spatial resolution, magnification, field-of-view, and sampling frequency were determined. Additionally, the ability of the sDRS modality to extract optical properties over a range of depths is reported. Following this, proof-of-concept experiments were performed on tissue-simulating phantoms made with poly(dimethysiloxane) as a substrate material with cultured MDA-MB-468 cells. Then, all modalities were demonstrated on a human melanocytic nevus from a healthy volunteer and on resected colonic tissue from a murine model. Qualitative in vivo image data is correlated with reduced scattering and absorption coefficients. PMID:26713207

  8. A transmit/reflect switchable frequency selective surface based on all dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Du, Hongliang; Zhuo, Xu; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel transmit/reflect switchable frequency selective surface (FSS) in millimeter wave band based on the effective medium theory under quasi-static limit, which is designed with square-hole elements cut from continuum dielectric plates. The building elements of the surface are composed of all dielectric metamaterial rather than metal material. With proper structural design and parameters tuning, the resonance frequencies can be tuned appropriately. The frequency response of the surface can be switched from that of a reflecting structure to a transmitting one by rotating the surface 90°, which means under different incident polarizations. The reflective response can be realized due to the effect of electric and magnetic resonances. Theoretical analysis shows that the reflective response arises from impedance mismatching by electric and magnetic resonances. And the transmitting response is the left-handed passband, arises from the coupling of the electric and magnetic resonances. In addition, effective electromagnetic parameters and the dynamic induced field distributions are analyzed to explain the mechanism of the responses. The method can also be used to design switchable all-dielectric FSS with continuum structures in other frequencies.

  9. Spectroscopy of selected metal-containing diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Iouli

    unobserved EuH and EuD molecules were studied by means of Fourier transform spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence. The extreme complexity of these transitions made rotational assignments of EuH bands impossible. However, the spin-spin interaction constant, [lambda], and Fermi contact parameter, bF, in the ground X9[sigma]- electronic state were estimated for the 151EuH and 153EuH isotopologues. Electronic spectra of SmH, SmCl, TmH and ErF molecules were recorded for the first time using Fourier transform spectrometer. The poor signal to noise ratio of the observed bands coupled with their complexity prevented a rotational analysis. The electronic states that may be involved in the observed transitions are discussed.

  10. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of Thick Corrosion Layers on 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    R Castelli; P Persans; W Strohmayer; V Parkinson

    2006-03-23

    Corrosion resistant structural materials of both iron and nickel based alloys are used in the electric power industry for the construction of the coolant loops of both conventional and nuclear power generating stations. These materials, in the presence of high temperature (e.g. 287 C), high pH (e.g. 10.0 {at} 20 C) water with dissolved hydrogen will oxidize and form corrosion films that are double metal oxides (or spinels) of the form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}. This work describes optical reflectivity techniques that have been developed to study the growth of these films in situ. The optical technique uses a dual-beam specular reflection spectrometer to measure the spectrum of reflected light in small angle (i.e. < 15{sup o}) scatter. The reflection spectra are then calibrated using a set of corrosion coupons with corrosion films that are well known. Results are compared with models based on multilayer reflection and Mie scattering from a particle size distribution. Surface roughness is found to be the dominant cause of reduced reflection as the films grow.

  11. Achieving molecular selectivity in imaging using multiphoton Raman spectroscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Holtom, Gary R. ); Thrall, Brian D. ); Chin, Beek Yoke ); Wiley, H Steven ); Colson, Steven D. )

    2000-12-01

    In the case of most imaging methods, contrast is generated either by physical properties of the sample (Differential Image Contrast, Phase Contrast), or by fluorescent labels that are localized to a particular protein or organelle. Standard Raman and infrared methods for obtaining images are based upon the intrinsic vibrational properties of molecules, and thus obviate the need for attached flurophores. Unfortunately, they have significant limitations for live-cell imaging. However, an active Raman method, called Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), is well suited for microscopy, and provides a new means for imaging specific molecules. Vibrational imaging techniques, such as CARS, avoid problems associated with photobleaching and photo-induced toxicity often associated with the use of fluorescent labels with live cells. Because the laser configuration needed to implement CARS technology is similar to that used in other multiphoton microscopy methods, such as two -photon fluorescence and harmonic generation, it is possible to combine imaging modalities, thus generating simultaneous CARS and fluorescence images. A particularly powerful aspect of CARS microscopy is its ability to selectively image deuterated compounds, thus allowing the visualization of molecules, such as lipids, that are chemically indistinguishable from the native species.

  12. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  13. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  14. Prediction of Soil Organic Carbon at the European Scale by Visible and Near InfraRed Reflectance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Antoine; Nocita, Marco; Tóth, Gergely; Montanarella, Luca; van Wesemael, Bas

    2013-01-01

    Soil organic carbon is a key soil property related to soil fertility, aggregate stability and the exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Existing soil maps and inventories can rarely be used to monitor the state and evolution in soil organic carbon content due to their poor spatial resolution, lack of consistency and high updating costs. Visible and Near Infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is an alternative method to provide cheap and high-density soil data. However, there are still some uncertainties on its capacity to produce reliable predictions for areas characterized by large soil diversity. Using a large-scale EU soil survey of about 20,000 samples and covering 23 countries, we assessed the performance of reflectance spectroscopy for the prediction of soil organic carbon content. The best calibrations achieved a root mean square error ranging from 4 to 15 g C kg−1 for mineral soils and a root mean square error of 50 g C kg−1 for organic soil materials. Model errors are shown to be related to the levels of soil organic carbon and variations in other soil properties such as sand and clay content. Although errors are ∼5 times larger than the reproducibility error of the laboratory method, reflectance spectroscopy provides unbiased predictions of the soil organic carbon content. Such estimates could be used for assessing the mean soil organic carbon content of large geographical entities or countries. This study is a first step towards providing uniform continental-scale spectroscopic estimations of soil organic carbon, meeting an increasing demand for information on the state of the soil that can be used in biogeochemical models and the monitoring of soil degradation. PMID:23840459

  15. Resin characterization in cured graphite fiber reinforced composites using diffuse reflectance-FTIR. [Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Stein, B. A.; Chang, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using diffuse reflectance in combination with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain information on cured graphite fiber reinforced polymeric matrix resin composites was investigated. Several graphite/epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide composites exposed to thermal or radiation environments were examined. An experimental polyimide-sulfone adhesive tape was also studied during processing. In each case, significant changes in resin molecular structure was observed due to environmental exposure. These changes in molecular structure were correlated with previously observed changes in material properties providing new insights into material behavior.

  16. Layer-Resolved Evolution of Organic Thin Films Monitored by Photoelectron Emission Microscopy and Optical Reflectance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and differential (optical) reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) have proven independently to be versatile analytical tools for monitoring the evolution of organic thin films during growth. In this paper, we present the first experiment in which both techniques have been applied simultaneously and synchronously. We illustrate how the combined PEEM and DRS results can be correlated to obtain an extended perspective on the electronic and optical properties of a molecular film dependent on the film thickness and morphology. As an example, we studied the deposition of the organic molecule α-sexithiophene on Ag(111) in the thickness range from submonolayers up to several monolayers. PMID:26523159

  17. Detection of Organic Matter in Sediments with Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy: Effects of Mineralogy, Albedo and Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, H. H.; Milliken, R.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory, field-, and satellite-based visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy allows for rapid, remote, and non-destructive analysis of geologic materials to identify mineralogy as well as organic compounds. This type of analysis has potential to aid the search for organics on Mars as a means of first detection of reduced carbon, or to study organic matter nondestructively in valuable samples such as meteorites. In order to assess potential applications of this method we aim to answer fundamental questions about detection limits and quantification of organic matter using reflectance spectroscopy. Laboratory mixtures and natural samples are measured for total organic carbon (TOC in wt.%) with standard methods and reflectance spectroscopy. Absorption features due to C-H2 and C-H3 bonds are observed in the 3.3 to 3.5μm (3000 to 2850 cm-1) wavelength region. A strong H2O feature near 3μm, as well as carbonate-related absorptions near 3.4µm, are also found in this spectral region and can complicate detection of organic material, particularly at low TOC values. In natural samples without carbonate there appears to be a linear trend between TOC and the band depth of organic absorptions; samples that have low albedo, or strong 3μm water features deviate from this trend line. Spectra of samples with carbonate may be modeled with Gaussians to remove the influence of the carbonate features and better match the organic absorption trend. Early results indicate that quantification of organic matter in natural fine-grained samples using reflectance spectroscopy will need to take low-albedo components and water content into account. Detection limits may also depend on these properties; organic absorption features are clearly seen in the lowest TOC sample measured so far (0.08wt% or 800ppm), which is a relatively bright, carbonate-free, quartz- and clay-dominated outcrop sample. A series of laboratory experiments have been undertaken in which known amounts of organic

  18. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1994-09-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for this enhancement the authors have investigated the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and water from lithium oxide (a leading candidate for the breeder material) by temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The results from these studies indicate that several different types of hydroxide groups are formed on the lithium oxide surface. They also suggest that under certain conditions hydride species form on the surface. The role of these species in tritium release from lithium oxide is discussed.

  19. Comparative study of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in transmission, attenuated total reflection, and total reflection modes for the analysis of plastics in the cultural heritage field.

    PubMed

    Picollo, Marcello; Bartolozzi, Giovanni; Cucci, Costanza; Galeotti, Monica; Marchiafava, Veronica; Pizzo, Benedetto

    2014-01-01

    This study was completed within the framework of two research projects dealing with the conservation of contemporary artworks. The first is the Seventh Framework Project (FP7) of the European Union, Preservation of Plastic ARTefacts in Museum Collections (POPART), spanning years 2008-2012, and the second is the Italian project funded by the Tuscan Region, Preventive Conservation of Contemporary Art (Conservazione Preventiva dell'Arte Contemporanea (COPAC)), spanning 2011-2013. Both of these programs pointed out the great importance of having noninvasive and portable analytical techniques that can be used to investigate and characterize modern and contemporary artworks, especially those consisting of synthetic polymers. Indeed, despite the extensive presence of plastics in museum collections, there is still a lack of analytical tools for identifying, characterizing, and setting up adequate conservation strategies for these materials. In this work, the potentials of in situ and noninvasive Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, implemented by means of portable devices that operate in reflection mode, are investigated with a view to applying the results in large-scale surveys of plastic objects in museums. To this end, an essential prerequisite are the reliability of spectral data acquired in situ and the availability of spectral databases acquired from reference materials. A collection of polymeric samples, which are available commercially as ResinKit, was analyzed to create a reference spectral archive. All the spectra were recorded using three FT-IR configurations: transmission (trans), attenuated total reflection (ATR), and total reflection (TR). A comparative evaluation of the data acquired using the three instrumental configurations is presented, together with an evaluation of the similarity percentages and a discussion of the critical cases. PMID:24694694

  20. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic characteristics, and reflection loss analysis of nickel-strontium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Ali; Paesano, Andrea; Cerqueira Machado, Carla Fabiana; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Liu, Xiaoxi; Morisako, Akimitsu

    2014-05-07

    In current research work, Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x/2}Sr{sub x/2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0–1 in a step of 0.2) ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a sol-gel method. According to the evolution in the subspectral areas obtained from Mössbauer spectroscopy, it was found that the relaxing iron belongs mostly to the site B, since the Mössbauer fraction of site A does not vary appreciably. With an increase in Ni-Sr substitution contents in cobalt ferrite, the coercivity and saturation of magnetization decrease. Variation of reflection loss versus frequency in microwave X-band demonstrates that the reflection peak shifts to lower frequency by adding substituted cations and the synthesized nanoparticles can be considered for application in electromagnetic wave absorber technology.

  1. Chemical modification of oxidized and silicon oxide covered aluminium surfaces studied by FTIR/multiple specular reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondag, A. H.; Raas, M. C.; Touwslager, F. J.; Ponjee, J. J.

    1989-12-01

    Multiple Specular Reflectance (MSR) infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy has been applied to study surface modification by organosilane (sub)monomolecular layers. The spectrum of octadecyldimethylmethoxysilane immobilized on an oxidized aluminium substrate is compared to the absorption spectra of the monomer and the disiloxane condensation product. Formation of hydroxyl groups on a Si02 covered aluminium substrate by a UV-ozon treatment is shown. Simultaneously, organic contaminants are removed from the surface by the UV-ozon treatment. The chemisorption of 3-methacryloxypropyldimethylethoxysilane on UV-ozon treated Si02 has been examined at different surface coverages. An increase of the number of organosilane species at the surface is accompanied by a decrease of surface hydroxyl groups.

  2. VUV and XUV reflectance of optically coated mirrors for selection of high harmonics.

    PubMed

    Larsen, K A; Cryan, J P; Shivaram, N; Champenois, E G; Wright, T W; Ray, D; Kostko, O; Ahmed, M; Belkacem, A; Slaughter, D S

    2016-08-01

    We report the reflectance, ~1° from normal incidence, of six different mirrors as a function of photon energy, using monochromatic vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation with energies between 7.5 eV and 24.5 eV. The mirrors examined included both single and multilayer optical coatings, as well as an uncoated substrate. We discuss the performance of each mirror, paying particular attention to the potential application of suppression and selection of high-order harmonics of a Ti:sapphire laser. PMID:27505785

  3. Ultra high throughput four-reflection x-ray telescope for high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawara, Yuzuru; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Babazaki, Yasunori; Nakamichi, Ren; Bandai, Ayako

    2015-09-01

    The first application of four-times reflection X-ray optics is planned for the DIOS mission, in which very soft X-ray observation is expected. On the other hand, effective area of the telescope for higher X-ray energy (E < 10 keV) including iron K emission lines has been so far limited to about 1000 cm2 for assumed several meter focal length. However, if we introduce four-reflection optics to this energy range, we can get several times large effective area for single telescope with same several meter focal length. To prove this possibility, we performed ray tracing simulation for four-reflection telescope with 6 m focal length and found that effective area of 3100 cm2 at 6 keV can be obtained for single telescope. In this paper, we will discuss about other telescope performances, mechanical properties and application to fine spectroscopic mission using X-ray micro-calorimeter.

  4. Integrated reflectivity measurements of hydrogen phthalate crystals for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrau, U.; Förster, E.

    2014-09-01

    The integrated x-ray reflectivity of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate (KAP) and Rubidium Hydrogen Phthalate (RAP) crystals is studied at a photon energy of (1740±14) eV using a double-crystal setup. The absolute measured reflectivities are in < 5% agreement with the values predicted by the dynamic diffraction theory for perfect crystals when absorption is included. Within 4% experimental error margins, specimen that were exposed to ambient conditions over many years show identical reflectivity as specimen that were cleaved just before the measurement. No differences are observed between cleaving off a 10 μm surface layer and splitting the entire crystal bulk of 2 mm thickness. We conclude that at 1.7 keV photon energy the penetration depth of ~ 1 μm is large compared to a potentially deteriorated surface layer of a few 10 nm.

  5. ChemCam passive reflectance spectroscopy of surface materials at the Curiosity landing site, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Bell, J. F.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D.; Cloutis, E.; DeFlores, L.; Ehlmann, B.; Gasnault, O.; Gondet, B.; Kinch, K.; Lemmon, M.; Le Mouélic, S.; Maurice, S.; Rice, M.; Wiens, R. C.

    2015-03-01

    The spectrometers on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) ChemCam instrument were used in passive mode to record visible/near-infrared (400-840 nm) radiance from the martian surface. Using the onboard ChemCam calibration targets' housing as a reflectance standard, we developed methods to collect, calibrate, and reduce radiance observations to relative reflectance. Such measurements accurately reproduce the known reflectance spectra of other calibration targets on the rover, and represent the highest spatial resolution (0.65 mrad) and spectral sampling (<1 nm) visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra from a landed platform on Mars. Relative reflectance spectra of surface rocks and soils match those from orbital observations and multispectral data from the MSL Mastcam camera. Preliminary analyses of the band depths, spectral slopes, and reflectance ratios of the more than 2000 spectra taken during the first year of MSL operations demonstrate at least six spectral classes of materials distinguished by variations in ferrous and ferric components. Initial comparisons of ChemCam spectra to laboratory spectra of minerals and Mars analog materials demonstrate similarities with palagonitic soils and indications of orthopyroxene in some dark rocks. Magnesium-rich "raised ridges" tend to exhibit distinct near-infrared slopes. The ferric absorption downturn typically found for martian materials at <600 nm is greatly subdued in brushed rocks and drill tailings, consistent with their more ferrous nature. Calcium-sulfate veins exhibit the highest relative reflectances observed, but are still relatively red owing to the effects of residual dust. Such dust is overall less prominent on rocks sampled within the "blast zone" immediately surrounding the landing site. These samples were likely affected by the landing thrusters, which partially removed the ubiquitous dust coatings. Increased dust coatings on the calibration targets during the first year of the mission were documented by

  6. A simple and green analytical method for determination of glyphosate in commercial formulations and water by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Aline Santana; Fernandes, Flávio Cesar Bedatty; Tognolli, João Olímpio; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2011-09-01

    This article describes a simple, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly method for the monitoring of glyphosate using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The proposed method is based on reflectance measurements of the colored compound produced from the spot test reaction between glyphosate and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (p-DAC) in acid medium, using a filter paper as solid support. Experimental designs were used to optimize the analytical conditions. All reflectance measurements were carried out at 495 nm. Under optimal conditions, the glyphosate calibration graphs obtained by plotting the optical density of the reflectance signal (AR) against the concentration were linear in the range 50-500 μg mL(-1), with a correlation coefficient of 0.9987. The limit of detection (LOD) for glyphosate was 7.28 μg mL(-1). The technique was successfully applied to the direct determination of glyphosate in commercial formulations, as well as in water samples (river water, pure water and mineral drinking water) after a previous clean-up or pre-concentration step. Recoveries were in the ranges 93.2-102.6% and 91.3-102.9% for the commercial formulations and water samples, respectively. PMID:21689973

  7. A simple and green analytical method for determination of glyphosate in commercial formulations and water by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Aline Santana; Fernandes, Flávio Cesar Bedatty; Tognolli, João Olímpio; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2011-09-01

    This article describes a simple, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly method for the monitoring of glyphosate using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The proposed method is based on reflectance measurements of the colored compound produced from the spot test reaction between glyphosate and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde ( p-DAC) in acid medium, using a filter paper as solid support. Experimental designs were used to optimize the analytical conditions. All reflectance measurements were carried out at 495 nm. Under optimal conditions, the glyphosate calibration graphs obtained by plotting the optical density of the reflectance signal (A R) against the concentration were linear in the range 50-500 μg mL -1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9987. The limit of detection (LOD) for glyphosate was 7.28 μg mL -1. The technique was successfully applied to the direct determination of glyphosate in commercial formulations, as well as in water samples (river water, pure water and mineral drinking water) after a previous clean-up or pre-concentration step. Recoveries were in the ranges 93.2-102.6% and 91.3-102.9% for the commercial formulations and water samples, respectively.

  8. A simple, sensitive and non-destructive technique for characterizing bovine dental enamel erosion: attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Hye; Son, Jun Sik; Min, Bong Ki; Kim, Young Kyoung; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2016-01-01

    Although many techniques are available to assess enamel erosion in vitro, a simple, non-destructive method with sufficient sensitivity for quantifying dental erosion is required. This study characterized the bovine dental enamel erosion induced by various acidic beverages in vitro using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Deionized water (control) and 10 acidic beverages were selected to study erosion, and the pH and neutralizable acidity were measured. Bovine anterior teeth (110) were polished with up to 1 200-grit silicon carbide paper to produce flat enamel surfaces, which were then immersed in 20 mL of the beverages for 30 min at 37 °C. The degree of erosion was evaluated using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and Vickers' microhardness measurements. The spectra obtained were interpreted in two ways that focused on the ν1, ν3 phosphate contour: the ratio of the height amplitude of ν3 PO4 to that of ν1 PO4 (Method 1) and the shift of the ν3 PO4 peak to a higher wavenumber (Method 2). The percentage changes in microhardness after the erosion treatments were primarily affected by the pH of the immersion media. Regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations between the surface hardness change and the degree of erosion, as detected by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy (P<0.001). Method 1 was the most sensitive to these changes, followed by surface hardness change measurements and Method 2. This study suggests that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is potentially advantageous over the microhardness test as a simple, non-destructive, sensitive technique for the quantification of enamel erosion. PMID:27025266

  9. A simple, sensitive and non-destructive technique for characterizing bovine dental enamel erosion: attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Hye; Son, Jun Sik; Min, Bong Ki; Kim, Young Kyoung; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2016-01-01

    Although many techniques are available to assess enamel erosion in vitro, a simple, non-destructive method with sufficient sensitivity for quantifying dental erosion is required. This study characterized the bovine dental enamel erosion induced by various acidic beverages in vitro using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Deionized water (control) and 10 acidic beverages were selected to study erosion, and the pH and neutralizable acidity were measured. Bovine anterior teeth (110) were polished with up to 1 200-grit silicon carbide paper to produce flat enamel surfaces, which were then immersed in 20 mL of the beverages for 30 min at 37 °C. The degree of erosion was evaluated using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and Vickers' microhardness measurements. The spectra obtained were interpreted in two ways that focused on the ν1, ν3 phosphate contour: the ratio of the height amplitude of ν3 PO4 to that of ν1 PO4 (Method 1) and the shift of the ν3 PO4 peak to a higher wavenumber (Method 2). The percentage changes in microhardness after the erosion treatments were primarily affected by the pH of the immersion media. Regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations between the surface hardness change and the degree of erosion, as detected by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy (P<0.001). Method 1 was the most sensitive to these changes, followed by surface hardness change measurements and Method 2. This study suggests that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is potentially advantageous over the microhardness test as a simple, non-destructive, sensitive technique for the quantification of enamel erosion. PMID:27025266

  10. A quantitative study for determination of sugar concentration using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhandy, Diding; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Ogawa, Yuichi; Kondo, Naoshi; Ishihara, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yuichiro

    2011-06-01

    The objective of our research was to use ATR-THz spectroscopy together with chemometric for quantitative study in food analysis. Glucose, fructose and sucrose are main component of sugar both in fresh and processed fruits. The use of spectroscopic-based method for sugar determination is well reported especially using visible, near infrared (NIR) and middle infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. However, the use of terahertz spectroscopy for sugar determination in fruits has not yet been reported. In this work, a quantitative study for sugars determination using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy was conducted. Each samples of glucose, fructose and sucrose solution with different concentrations were prepared respectively and their absorbance spectra between wavenumber 20 and 450 cm-1 (between 0.6 THz and 13.5 THz) were acquired using a terahertz-based Fourier Transform spectrometer (FARIS-1S, JASCO Co., Japan). This spectrometer was equipped with a high pressure of mercury lamp as light source and a pyroelectric sensor made from deuterated L-alanine triglycine sulfate (DLTGS) as detector. Each spectrum was acquired using 16 cm-1 of resolution and 200 scans for averaging. The spectra of water and sugar solutions were compared and discussed. The results showed that increasing sugar concentration caused decreasing absorbance. The correlation between sugar concentration and its spectra was investigated using multivariate analysis. Calibration models for glucose, fructose and sucrose determination were developed using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The calibration model was evaluated using some parameters such as coefficient of determination (R2), standard error of calibration (SEC), standard error of prediction (SEP), bias between actual and predicted sugar concentration value and ratio prediction to deviation (RPD) parameter. The cross validation method was used to validate each calibration model. It is showed that the use of ATR

  11. XFAS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF SELECTED HAP ELEMENTS IN FINE PM DERIVED FROM COAL COMBUSTION: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-RTP-P-646 Shoji, T., Huggins, F.E., Huffman, G.P., Linak*, W.P., and Miller*, C.A. XFAS Spectroscopy Analysis of Selected HAP Elements in Fine PM Derived from Coal Combustion. Energy and Fuels 16 (2): (2002). 11/30/2001 X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscop...

  12. Use of spectral reflectance for indirect selection of yield potential and stability in Pacific Northwest winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indirect selection approaches have been recommended to augment genetic gain from yield based selection in highly variable environments. We evaluated the potential use of spectral reflectance indices (SRIs) to select for grain yield in Pacific Northwest Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in wide ran...

  13. Models for Estimating the Physical Properties of Paddy Soil Using Visible and Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizadeh, A.; Amin, M. S. M.; Borůvka, L.; Saberioon, M. M.

    2014-07-01

    A fast and convenient soil analytical technique is needed for soil quality assessment and precision soil management. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of visible (Vis) and near-infrared (NIR) refl ectance spectroscopy to predict paddy soil properties in a typical Malaysian paddy fi eld. To assess the utility of spectroscopy for soil physical characteristics (bulk density, moisture content, clay, silt and sand) prediction, 118 soil samples were used for laboratory analysis and optical measurement in the Vis-NIR region using an analytical spectral device (ASD) FieldSpec spectroradiometer (350-2500 nm). The Savitzky-Golay algorithm and stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) were then applied to preprocess, model, and predict the properties on the basis of their spectral refl ectance within the Vis-NIR range. One-third of the samples (40 samples) were withheld for validation purposes. The study revealed that Vis and NIR spectroscopy calibration models for all the measured soil physical characteristics provided a good fi t (R2 > 0.78); hence Vis and NIR (specifi cally NIR refl ectance) can be considered to be a reliable tool to assess soil physical properties of Malaysian paddy fi elds. The results of this study could contribute signifi cantly to developing site-specifi c management.

  14. Combination of infrared thermography and reflectance spectroscopy for precise classification of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianru; Guan, Yue; Liu, Caihua; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Hair follicles enjoy continual cycle of anagen, catagen and telogen all life. They not only provide a unique opportunity to study the physiological mechanism of organ regeneration, but also benefit to guide the treatment of organ repair in regenerative medicine. Usually, the histological examination as a gold standard has been applied to determine the stage of hair follicle cycle, but noninvasive classification of hair cycle in vivo remains unsolved. In this study, the thermal infrared imager was applied to measure the temperature change of mouse dorsal skin with hair follicle cycle, and the change of diffuse reflectance was monitored by the optical fiber spectrometer. Histological examination was used to verify the hair follicle stages. The results indicated that the skin temperature increased at the beginning of anagen. After having stayed a high value for several days, the temperature began to decrease. At the same time, the skin diffuse reflectance decreased until the end of this period. Then the temperature increased gradually after slightly decreased when the hair follicle entered into catagen stage, and the diffuse reflectance increased at this time. In telogen, both the temperature and the diffuse reflectance went back to a steady state all the time. Sub-stages of hair follicle cycle could be distinguished based on the joint curves. This study provided a new method to noninvasively recognize the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for the basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  15. Why Do Marbles Become Paler on Grinding? Reflectance, Spectroscopy, Color, and Particle Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagorio, Maria Gabriela

    2004-01-01

    A qualitative description of the color-change problem, which will assist in rationalizing the change in color of marbles after grinding them using a simple physical picture and the qualitative dependence of diffuse reflectance on particle size is presented. Different approaches are discussed but it is seen that the interpretation of nanoparticles…

  16. Sensing of moisture content in in-shell peanuts by NIR (Near Infra Red) reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It was found earlier that moisture content (MC) of intact kernels of grain and nuts could be determined by Near Infra Red (NIR) reflectance spectrometry. However, if the MC values can be determined while the nuts are in their shells, it would save lot of labor and money spent in shelling and cleanin...

  17. Sampling and Calibration Requirements for Soil Property Estimation Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical diffuse reflectance sensing is a potential approach for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. One issue with this sensing approach is whether additional calibration is necessary when the sensor is applied under conditions (e.g., soil types or ambient conditions) different...

  18. Online high-speed NIR diffuse-reflectance imaging spectroscopy in food quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Richard D.; Didona, Kevin

    2009-05-01

    The use of hyperspectral technology in the NIR for food quality monitoring is discussed. An example of the use of hyperspectral diffuse reflectance scanning and post-processing with a chemometric model shows discrimination between four pharmaceutical samples comprising Aspirin, Acetaminophen, Vitamin C and Vitamin D.

  19. Vitrified chiral-nematic liquid crystalline films for selective reflection and circular polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Katsis, D.; Chen, P.H.M.; Mastrangelo, J.C.; Chen, S.H.; Blanton, T.N.

    1999-06-01

    Nematic and left-handed chiral-nematic liquid crystals comprising methoxybiphenylbenzoate and (S)-(-)-1-phenylethylamine pendants to a cyclohexane core were synthesized and characterized. Although pristine samples were found to be polycrystalline, thermal quenching following heating to and annealing at elevated temperatures permitted the molecular orders characteristic of liquid crystalline mesomorphism to be frozen in the glassy state. Left at room temperature for 6 months, the vitrified liquid crystalline films showed no evidence of recrystallization. An orientational order parameter of 0.65 was determined with linear dichroism of a vitrified nematic film doped with Exalite 428 at a mole fraction of 0.0025. Birefringence dispersion of a blank vitrified nematic film was determined using a phase-difference method complemented by Abbe refractometry. A series of vitrified chiral-nematic films were prepared to demonstrate selective reflection and circular polarization with a spectral region tunable from blue to the infrared region by varying the chemical composition. The experimentally measured circular polarization spectra were found to agree with the Good-Karali theory in which all four system parameters were determined a priori: optical birefringence, average refractive index, selective reflection wavelength, and film thickness.

  20. Selective Removal of Demineralization Using Near Infrared Cross Polarization Reflectance and a Carbon Dioxide Laser

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Lasers can ablate/remove tissue in a non-contact mode of operation and a pulsed laser beam does not interfere with the ability to image the tooth surface, therefore lasers are ideally suited for integration with imaging devices for image-guided ablation. Laser energy can be rapidly and efficiently delivered to tooth surfaces using a digitally controlled laser beam scanning system for precise and selective laser ablation with minimal loss of healthy tissues. Under the appropriate irradiation conditions such laser energy can induce beneficial chemical and morphological changes in the walls of the drilled cavity that can increase resistance to further dental decay and produce surfaces with enhanced adhesive properties to restorative materials. Previous studies have shown that images acquired using near-IR transillumination, optical coherence tomography and fluorescence can be used to guide the laser for selective removal of demineralized enamel. Recent studies have shown that NIR reflectance measurements at 1470-nm can be used to obtain images of enamel demineralization with very high contrast. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that image guided ablation of occlusal lesions can be successfully carried out using a NIR reflectance imaging system coupled with a carbon dioxide laser operating at 9.3-μm with high pulse repetition rates. PMID:24357906

  1. Selective removal of demineralization using near infrared cross polarization reflectance and a carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Lasers can ablate/remove tissue in a non-contact mode of operation and a pulsed laser beam does not interfere with the ability to image the tooth surface, therefore lasers are ideally suited for integration with imaging devices for image-guided ablation. Laser energy can be rapidly and efficiently delivered to tooth surfaces using a digitally controlled laser beam scanning system for precise and selective laser ablation with minimal loss of healthy tissues. Under the appropriate irradiation conditions such laser energy can induce beneficial chemical and morphological changes in the walls of the drilled cavity that can increase resistance to further dental decay and produce surfaces with enhanced adhesive properties to restorative materials. Previous studies have shown that images acquired using near-IR transillumination, optical coherence tomography and fluorescence can be used to guide the laser for selective removal of demineralized enamel. Recent studies have shown that NIR reflectance measurements at 1470-nm can be used to obtain images of enamel demineralization with very high contrast. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that image guided ablation of occlusal lesions can be successfully carried out using a NIR reflectance imaging system coupled with a carbon dioxide laser operating at 9.3-μm with high pulse repetition rates.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of optical glucose sensing in red cell concentrations using near-infrared diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Maruo, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Alice W; Shimogaki, Kazushige; Ogawa, Hideto; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products is one of the most frequent infectious complications of transfusion. Since glucose levels in blood supplies decrease as bacteria proliferate, it should be possible to detect the presence of bacterial contamination by measuring the glucose concentrations in the blood components. Hence this study is aimed to serve as a preliminary study for the nondestructive measurement of glucose level in transfusion blood. The glucose concentrations in red blood cell (RBC) samples were predicted using near-infrared diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy in the 1350 to 1850 nm wavelength region. Furthermore, the effects of donor, hematocrit level, and temperature variations among the RBC samples were observed. Results showed that the prediction performance of a dataset which contained samples that differed in all three parameters had a standard error of 29.3 mg/dL. Multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) preprocessing method was also found to be effective in minimizing the variations in scattering patterns created by various sample properties. The results suggest that the diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy may provide another avenue for the detection of bacterial contamination in red cell concentrations (RCC) products. PMID:22352670

  3. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-01

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm-1 to 68 cm-1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  4. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-25

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm{sup -1} to 68 cm{sup -1} to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100 Degree-Sign C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  5. Preliminary evaluation of optical glucose sensing in red cell concentrations using near-infrared diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Maruo, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Alice W.; Shimogaki, Kazushige; Ogawa, Hideto; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products is one of the most frequent infectious complications of transfusion. Since glucose levels in blood supplies decrease as bacteria proliferate, it should be possible to detect the presence of bacterial contamination by measuring the glucose concentrations in the blood components. Hence this study is aimed to serve as a preliminary study for the nondestructive measurement of glucose level in transfusion blood. The glucose concentrations in red blood cell (RBC) samples were predicted using near-infrared diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy in the 1350 to 1850 nm wavelength region. Furthermore, the effects of donor, hematocrit level, and temperature variations among the RBC samples were observed. Results showed that the prediction performance of a dataset which contained samples that differed in all three parameters had a standard error of 29.3 mg/dL. Multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) preprocessing method was also found to be effective in minimizing the variations in scattering patterns created by various sample properties. The results suggest that the diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy may provide another avenue for the detection of bacterial contamination in red cell concentrations (RCC) products.

  6. Reflectance measurements of port-wine stains: influence of selective cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-12-01

    Port wine stain birthmark removal is based on selective photothermolysis. The most common technique utilizes 0.45 ms laser pulses at 585 nm wavelength. High incident energy doses are often needed to reach the ectatic blood vessels in dermis. This might induce changes in pigmentation or even epidermal necrosis. However, the epidermis can be protected by selectively cooling it down prior to laser exposure. Short cooling pulses ensure epidermal protection while preserving the temperature in dermis. Visible reflectance spectra of the birthmark are dependent on the melanin content, the blood volume and the scattering properties. these parameters also determine the fluence underneath the skin during laser exposure. Threshold fluence values can therefore be predicted for each specific lesion. Eight Scandinavian patients with red to purple macular port wine stains were treated with a pulsed dye laser at the energy density 6 J/cm2. Seven patients have developed hyperpigmentation in earlier treatments at this energy dose. One site in each lesion was cooled with a 20 ms cryogen spray immediately prior to laser exposure. Visible reflectance spectra were measured before and eight weeks after treatment. A simulation model based on diffusion approximation was used to estimate blood volume, skin pigmentation and scattering properties each time. The measured reflectance spectra, as well as the clinical observations, showed no significant differences between the cooled and uncooled sites. Estimated blood volume fractions and melanin pigmentations were about the same, and the short cooling spurts did not prevent hyperpigmentation. A light brown color was seen in both sites for 7 patients, and could be detected in the spectra for two patients. However, the estimated increases in pigmentation were small also for these patients. Calculated threshold fluence values were almost the same for cooled and uncooled sites after treatment.

  7. Auger, zero-energy photoelectron, coincidence spectroscopy (AZEPECO): Chemical-site-selective Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Ji, D.; Hanson, D.M.; Hulbert, S.L.; Kuiper, P.

    1993-12-31

    The Auger electron spectrum associated with decay of a core-hole on the terminal nitrogen and that associated with the central nitrogen of nitrous oxide, N{sub 2}O, are obtained individually through the use of a coincidence technique. Specifically, each of the two Auger electron spectra is obtained by detection of Auger electrons in coincidence with near zero energy (threshold) photoelectrons at the respective ionization thresholds. These zero energy electrons serve to identify the core-ionization continuum associated with the different Auger electrons. The salient features of the experimental spectra are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. The low counting rate generally associated with coincidence experiments, especially in the gas phase, is not encountered because the low energy electrons are collected over a 4{pi} solid angle. Also, velocity discrimination is accomplished by a spatial filter rather than by time-of-flight to utilize the maximum duty cycle of the synchrotron source. These data are believed to be the first examples of chemical-site-selective molecular Auger spectra.

  8. Quantitative nondestructive methods for the determination of ticlopidine in tablets using reflectance near-infrared and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Markopoulou, C K; Koundourellis, J E; Orkoula, M G; Kontoyannis, C G

    2008-02-01

    Two different nondestructive spectroscopy methods based on near-infrared (NIR) and Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy were developed for the determination of ticlopidine-hydrochloride (TCL) in pharmaceutical formulations and the results were compared to those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An NIR assay was performed by reflectance over the 850-1700 nm region using a partial least squares (PLS) prediction model, while the absolute FT-Raman intensity of TCL's most intense vibration was used for constructing the calibration curve. For both methodologies the spectra were obtained from the as-received film-coated tablets of TCL. The two quantitative techniques were built using five "manual compressed" tablets containing different concentrations and validated by evaluating the calibration model as well as the accuracy and precision. The models were applied to commercial preparations (Ticlid). The results were compared to those obtained from the application of HPLC using the methodology described by "Sanofi Research Department" and were found to be in excellent agreement, proving that NIR, using fiber-optic probes, and FT-Raman spectroscopy can be used for the fast and reliable determination of the major component in pharmaceutical analysis. PMID:18284803

  9. Reflectance spectroscopy of fresh whole leaves for the estimation of chemical concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Macler, Bruce A.; Plummer, Stephen E.; Peterson, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Remotely sensed plant-canopy data in the visible and near-IR ranges are used to establish relations between the canopy reflectance and the chemical content of the leaves. The mathematical relation is generated by means of stepwise regression based on the derivative reflectance at certain wavelengths. Fourier filtering and sample control are used to minimize instrument noise and spectral overlap respectively, and absorption features are noted that correspond to sugar and protein. The coefficients of determination between estimated and measured concentrations are at least 0.82 for such substances as starch and chlorophyll. It is recommended in the analysis of remotly sensed canopy data that the chemicals with strong spectral overlaps with the chemical of interest be accounted for in order to estimate foliar chemical concentrations accurately.

  10. Noninvasive diagnostics of skin microphysical parameters based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to determine noninvasively microphysical parameters (MPPs) of skin characteristic of malignant melanoma was demonstrated. The MPPs were the melanin content in dermis, saturation of tissue with blood vessels, and concentration and effective size of tissue scatterers. The proposed method was based on spatially resolved spectral measurements of skin diffuse reflectance and multiple regressions between linearly independent measurement components and skin MPPs. The regressions were established by modeling radiation transfer in skin with a wide variation of its MPPs. Errors in the determination of skin MPPs were estimated using fiber-optic measurements of its diffuse reflectance at wavelengths of commercially available semiconductor diode lasers (578, 625, 660, 760, and 806 nm) at source-detector separations of 0.23-1.38 mm.

  11. Theory of Andreev reflection spectroscopy for tetrahedral and non-unitary superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohloul, S.; Curnoe, S. H.

    2016-02-01

    A general formula for point contact conductance from a normal metal tip into a superconductor is derived using the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk theory of Andreev reflection, with special emphasis on non-unitary superconductors. The results of a comprehensive set of conductance spectrum calculations are presented: all symmetry-allowed gap functions for superconductors with tetrahedral symmetry, such as PrOs4Sb12, are considered, including several non-unitary cases.

  12. Toward a UV-visible-near-infrared hyperspectral imaging platform for fast multiplex reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Chan, Robert K Y

    2010-10-15

    A reflection hyperspectral imaging system covering a 350-1000nm spectral range is realized by a UV-visible-near-IR Fourier transform imaging spectrometer. The system has a simple design and good spectral and spatial resolving performance. Accurate and fast microspectroscopic measurement results on novel colloidal crystal beads demonstrate the system has practical potential for high-throughput molecular multiplex assays. PMID:20967056

  13. All-reflective femtosecond optical pump-probe setup for transient grating spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cucini, R; Bencivenga, F; Masciovecchio, C

    2011-04-01

    We developed a pump-probe setup that can be used for free electron lasers based four-wave mixing experiments in the extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray spectral range. The main feature of the proposed optical layout is the absence of transmission optics. Test measurements on liquid and solid samples carried out using the transient grating technique in both transmission and reflection geometry demonstrate the reliability of the setup. PMID:21478973

  14. Theory of Andreev reflection spectroscopy for tetrahedral and non-unitary superconductors.

    PubMed

    Bohloul, S; Curnoe, S H

    2016-02-01

    A general formula for point contact conductance from a normal metal tip into a superconductor is derived using the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk theory of Andreev reflection, with special emphasis on non-unitary superconductors. The results of a comprehensive set of conductance spectrum calculations are presented: all symmetry-allowed gap functions for superconductors with tetrahedral symmetry, such as PrOs4Sb12, are considered, including several non-unitary cases. PMID:26750247

  15. Pulsed Field Gradient Selection in Two-Dimensional Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy of Dipolar Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzhanns, Tilo; Hafner, Siegfried; Demco, Dan E.; Spiess, Hans W.; Laukien, Frank H.

    1998-10-01

    The utility of gradient selection in MAS spectroscopy of dipolar solids is explored in two examples. In the first, rotor-synchronized gradients of appropriate strength and duration are applied to select1H double-quantum coherences. The resulting DQ MAS spectrum of adamantane is compared with that acquired by the corresponding phase-cycling technique. As a second example, a1H 2D exchange MAS experiment is performed on an elastomer sample. In this experiment, a gradient is applied to remove undesired coherences that would otherwise distort the spectrum for short mixing times. The diagonal-peak intensities in the resulting spectrum show a linear decrease with increasing mixing time indicating cross-relaxation by slow chain motions as the relevant process. Both types of experiments demonstrate the potential of gradient-selection techniques for MAS spectroscopy of dipolar solids.

  16. Classifying diseased poultry carcasses by visible and near-IR reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yud-Ren

    1993-05-01

    Five classification techniques were compared for their accuracy in classifying normal, septicemic, and cadaver chicken carcasses, based on their optical reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared regions (504 - 888 nm). The techniques compared were the multiple- linear-regression, closest-class-mean, k-nearest-neighbor, artificial-neural-network (ANN), and principal-component/Mahalanobis-distance methods. The spectra were obtained with a diode array spectrophotometer system. The collection of the data and the development of the multiple linear regression model were described previously (Chen and Massie, 1992). The best results were obtained with the ANN model using the reflectances at the 8 optimal wavelengths identified by the multiple-linear regression method. The overall classification accuracy of this model was 91.6%. However, another ANN model with 192 inputs, which resulted in an overall accuracy of 90.4%, was preferred, because it utilized a broader range of reflectances (512.9 to 851.6 nm) without performing a wavelength search. This model yielded a 94.4% accuracy for the normal carcasses, 83.3% for the septicemic carcasses, and 94.3% for the cadaver carcasses.

  17. Reflectance spectroscopy of oxalate minerals and relevance to Solar System carbon inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, Daniel M.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.

    2016-11-01

    The diversity of oxalate formation mechanisms suggests that significant concentrations of oxalic acid and oxalate minerals could be widely distributed in the Solar System. We have carried out a systematic study of the reflectance spectra of oxalate minerals and oxalic acid, covering the 0.2-16 μm wavelength region. Our analyses show that oxalates exhibit unique spectral features that enable discrimination between oxalate phases and from other commonly occurring compounds, including carbonates, in all regions of the spectrum except for the visible. Using these spectral data, we consider the possible contribution of oxalate minerals to previously observed reflectance spectra of many objects throughout the Solar System, including satellites, comets, and asteroids. We find that polycarboxylic acid dimers and their salts may explain the reflectance spectra of many carbonaceous asteroids in the 3 μm spectral region. We suggest surface concentration of these compounds may be a type of space weathering from the photochemical and oxidative decomposition of the organic macromolecular material found in carbonaceous chondrites. The stability and ubiquity of these minerals on Earth, in extraterrestrial materials, and in association with biological processes make them useful for many applications in Earth and planetary sciences.

  18. Attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy of plant leaves: A tool for ecological and botanical studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ribeiro da Luz, B.

    2006-01-01

    ??? Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectra of plant leaves display complex absorption features related to organic constituents of leaf surfaces. The spectra can be recorded rapidly, both in the field and in the laboratory, without special sample preparation. ??? This paper explores sources of ATR spectral variation in leaves, including compositional, positional and temporal variations. Interspecific variations are also examined, including the use of ATR spectra as a tool for species identification. ??? Positional spectral variations generally reflected the abundance of cutin and the epicuticular wax thickness and composition. For example, leaves exposed to full sunlight commonly showed more prominent cutin- and wax-related absorption features compared with shaded leaves. Adaxial vs. abaxial leaf surfaces displayed spectral variations reflecting differences in trichome abundance and wax composition. Mature vs. young leaves showed changes in absorption band position and intensity related to cutin, polysaccharide, and possibly amorphous silica development on and near the leaf surfaces. ??? Provided that similar samples are compared (e.g. adaxial surfaces of mature, sun-exposed leaves) same-species individuals display practically identical ATR spectra. Using spectral matching procedures to analyze an ATR database containing 117 individuals, including 32 different tree species, 83% of the individuals were correctly identified. ?? The Authors (2006).

  19. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy. III - Correction for macroscopic roughness. [of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, B.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematically rigorous formalism is derived by which an arbitrary photometric function for the bidirectional reflectance of a smooth surface may be corrected to include effects of general macroscopic roughness. The correction involves only one arbitrary parameter, the mean slope angle, and is applicable to surfaces of any albedo. Using physically reasonable assumptions and mathematical approximations, the correction expressions are evaluated analytically to second order in the mean slope angle. The correction is applied to the bidirectional-reflectance function of Hapke (1981). Expressions for both the differential and integral brightnesses are obtained. Photometric profiles on hypothetical smooth and rough planets of low and high albedo are shown to illustrate the effects of macroscopic roughness. The theory is applied to observations of Mercury and predicts the integral phase function, the apparent polar darkening, and the lack of limb brightness surge on the planet. The roughness-corrected bidirectional-reflectance function is sufficiently simple that it can be conveniently evaluated on a programmable hand-held calculator.

  20. NuSTAR SPECTROSCOPY OF GRS 1915+105: DISK REFLECTION, SPIN, AND CONNECTIONS TO JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Fuerst, F.; Walton, D. J.; Bachetti, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Barret, D.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Boggs, S. E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Chakrabarty, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D. K.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the results of spectral fits made to a NuSTAR observation of the black hole GRS 1915+105 in a 'plateau' state. This state is of special interest because it is similar to the 'low/hard' state seen in other black holes, especially in that compact, steady jets are launched in this phase. The 3-79 keV bandpass of NuSTAR, and its ability to obtain moderate-resolution spectra free from distortions such as photon pile-up, are extremely well suited to studies of disk reflection in X-ray binaries. In only 15 ks of net exposure, an extraordinarily sensitive spectrum of GRS 1915+105 was measured across the full bandpass. Ionized reflection from a disk around a rapidly spinning black hole is clearly required to fit the spectra; even hybrid Comptonization models including ionized reflection from a disk around a Schwarzschild black hole proved inadequate. A spin parameter of a = 0.98 ± 0.01 (1σ statistical error) is measured via the best-fit model; low spins are ruled out at a high level of confidence. This result suggests that jets can be launched from a disk extending to the innermost stable circular orbit. A very steep inner disk emissivity profile is also measured, consistent with models of compact coronae above Kerr black holes. These results support an emerging association between the hard X-ray corona and the base of the relativistic jet.

  1. Detection of highly energetic materials on non-reflective substrates using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Castro-Suarez, John R; Hidalgo-Santiago, Migdalia; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P

    2015-09-01

    A quantum cascade laser spectrometer was used to obtain the reflection spectra of highly energetic materials (HEMs) deposited on nonideal, low-reflectivity substrates, such as travel-bag fabric (polyester), cardboard, and wood. Various deposition methods were used to prepare the standards and samples in the study. The HEMs used were the nitroaromatic explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the aliphatic nitrate ester pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and the aliphatic nitramine 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Chemometrics algorithms were applied to analyze the recorded spectra. Partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis was used to find the best correlation between the infrared signals and the surface concentrations of the samples, and PLS combined with discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to discriminate, classify, and identity similarities in the spectral datasets. Several preprocessing steps were applied to prepare the mid-infrared spectra of HEMs deposited on the target substrates. The results demonstrate that the infrared vibrational method described in this study is well suited for the rapid screening analysis of HEMs on low-reflectivity substrates when a supervised model has been previously constructed or when a reference spectrum of the clean substrate can be acquired to be subtracted from the HEM-substrate spectrum. PMID:26414522

  2. NuSTAR Spectroscopy of Multi-component X-Ray Reflection from NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Franz E.; Arévalo, Patricia; Walton, Dominic J.; Koss, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Gandhi, Poshak; Stern, Daniel; Alexander, David M.; Baloković, Mislav; Boggs, Steve E.; Brandt, William N.; Brightman, Murray; Christensen, Finn E.; Comastri, Andrea; Craig, William W.; Del Moro, Agnese; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hickox, Ryan; Luo, Bin; Markwardt, Craig B.; Marinucci, Andrea; Matt, Giorgio; Rigby, Jane R.; Rivers, Elizabeth; Saez, Cristian; Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C. Megan; Zhang, William W.

    2015-10-01

    We report on high-energy X-ray observations of the Compton-thick Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with NuSTAR, which provide the best constraints to date on its >10 keV spectral shape. The NuSTAR data are consistent with those from past and current instruments to within cross-calibration uncertainties, and we find no strong continuum or line variability over the past two decades, which is in line with its X-ray classification as a reflection-dominated Compton-thick active galactic nucleus. The combined NuSTAR, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift BAT spectral data set offers new insights into the complex secondary emission seen instead of the completely obscured transmitted nuclear continuum. The critical combination of the high signal-to-noise NuSTAR data and the decomposition of the nuclear and extranuclear emission with Chandra allow us to break several model degeneracies and greatly aid physical interpretation. When modeled as a monolithic (i.e., a single NH) reflector, none of the common Compton reflection models are able to match the neutral fluorescence lines and broad spectral shape of the Compton reflection hump without requiring unrealistic physical parameters (e.g., large Fe overabundances, inconsistent viewing angles, or poor fits to the spatially resolved spectra). A multi-component reflector with three distinct column densities (e.g., with best-fit values of NH of 1.4 × 1023, 5.0 × 1024, and 1025 cm-2) provides a more reasonable fit to the spectral lines and Compton hump, with near-solar Fe abundances. In this model, the higher NH component provides the bulk of the flux to the Compton hump, while the lower NH component produces much of the line emission, effectively decoupling two key features of Compton reflection. We find that ≈30% of the neutral Fe Kα line flux arises from >2″ (≈140 pc) and is clearly extended, implying that a significant fraction (and perhaps most) of the <10 keV reflected component arises from regions well outside a parsec

  3. Reflectance and Mossbauer spectroscopy of ferrihydrite-montmorillonite assemblages as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Chang, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses show that Fe(3+)-doped smectites prepared in the laboratory exhibit important similarities to the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite has been identified as the interlayer ferric component in Fe(3+)-doped smectites by a low quadrupole splitting and magnetic field strength of approximately 48 tesla in Mossbauer spectra measured at 4.2 K, as well as a crystal field transition at 0.92 micrometer. Ferrihydrite in these smectites explains features in the visible-near infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. Clay silicates have met resistance in the past as Mars soil analogs because terrestrial clay silicates exhibit prominent hydrous spectral features at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.2 micrometers; and these are observed weakly, if at all, in reflectance spectra of Mars. However, several mechanisms can weaken or compress these features, including desiccation under low-humidity conditions. The hydration properties of the interlayer cations also effect band strengths, such that a ferrihydrite-bearing smectite in the Martian environment would exhibit a 1.9 micrometers H2O absorption that is even weaker than the 2.2 micrometers structural OH absorption. Mixing experiments demonstrate that infrared spectral features of clays can be significantly suppressed and that the reflectance can be significantly darkened by mixing with only a few percent of a strongly absorbing opaque material. Therefore, the absolute reflectance of a soil on Mars may be disproportionately sensitive to a minor component. For this reason, the shape and position of spectral features and the chemical composition of potential analogs are of utmost importance in assessing the composition of the soil on Mars. Given the remarkable similarity between visible-infrared reflectance spectra of soils in bright regions on Mars and Fe(3+)-doped montmorillonites, coupled with recent observations of smectites in SNC

  4. Paddy soil nutrient assessment using visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizadeh, A.; Saberioon, M. M.; Amin, M. S. M.

    The ability of obtaining soil properties estimations from time and cost efficient remotely sensed techniques has been identified as a valuable technique as there is a great demand for larger amounts of good quality and inexpensive soil data to be used in environmental monitoring, modelling and precision agriculture. Visible (Vis) and Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy provides a good alternative that may be used to enhance or replace conventional methods of soil analysis. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the abilities of Vis (350-700 nm) and near infrared (700-2500 nm) for prediction of soil nutrients. In this instance we implemented Savitzky-Golay algorithm and Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR) to construct calibration models. The soil nutrients examined were soil Total Nitrogen (N), Available Phosphorus (P) and Exchangeable Potassium (K). Our results revealed the accuracy of SMLR prediction in each of the Vis and NIR spectral regions. The NIR produced more accurate predictions for N and K; however, higher significant correlation was obtained using the Vis for available P. This work demonstrated Vis and NIR spectroscopy could be considered as a good tool to assess soil nutrients in Malaysian paddy fields.

  5. Optimizing the models for rapid determination of chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin in plant samples by near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhiyi; Shan, Ruifeng; Wang, Jiajun; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-01

    Polyphenols in plant samples have been extensively studied because phenolic compounds are ubiquitous in plants and can be used as antioxidants in promoting human health. A method for rapid determination of three phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin) in plant samples using near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRDRS) is studied in this work. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used for building the calibration models, and the effects of spectral preprocessing and variable selection on the models are investigated for optimization of the models. The results show that individual spectral preprocessing and variable selection has no or slight influence on the models, but the combination of the techniques can significantly improve the models. The combination of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for removing the variant background, multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) for correcting the scattering effect and randomization test (RT) for selecting the informative variables was found to be the best way for building the optimal models. For validation of the models, the polyphenol contents in an independent sample set were predicted. The correlation coefficients between the predicted values and the contents determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis are as high as 0.964, 0.948 and 0.934 for chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and rutin, respectively.

  6. Color Reflectance Spectroscopy and Sedimentological Analysis from Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Siberia during Marine Isotope Stages 8 - 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J. H.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Castaneda, I. S.; Finkelstein, D. B.; Nowaczyk, N.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment cores ICDP 5011-1collected from Lake El'gygytgyn (67°29.98'N, 172° 6.23E), located in north east Russia, represent a 3.58 Ma terrestrial climate record representative of the western Arctic. The focus of this study is to determine the relationship between traditional sediment core analysis methods with emerging techniques used for core analysis, and to validate these new approaches. Particle size analysis and bulk clay mineralogy are being conducted to determine how temporal variability and physical properties as compared to core color analysis and biomarker investigations. Core color analysis, or reflectance spectroscopy, is a relatively new technique which is both rapid and non-destructive. Reflectance core scanning provides a dataset of the color spectrum ranging from the near infrared to near ultraviolet, captured in 10 nm reflectance bands at high resolution (1mm) intervals. Using published algorithms and ratios, proxy records can be constructed from the color data which correlate well with proxies such as total organic carbon (TOC), pollen, and global δ18O records as well as facies changes. Samples for this study were taken from a 315m long core, recovered in 2009. Eighteen sample intervals for proxy development were taken at 1cm resolution and spanning approx. 200 kyrs from Marine Isotope Stages 8 through 12 (275-475 Ka). At this spacing, all four sedimentological facies identified in the core were characterized including: massive, wavy laminated/clast rich, fine clay laminations, and red laminations. Particle size and color analysis distinguish these different facies, and validate the physical facies interpretations. Sedimentological analysis indicates finer grain sizes during glacial periods, with the largest grain size ranges in the red laminated interglacial facies. Furthermore, calculated hue values, derived from core scanning L*,a* and b* values, show remarkable correspondence to global δ18O records. Initial principle component analysis of

  7. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy of pyroxene-bearing rocks: New constraints for understanding planetary surface compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompilio, Loredana; Sgavetti, Maria; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe

    Laboratory visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of solid rock slabs, mineral separates and systematic mixtures were simultaneously investigated. We apply an empirical approach to evaluate spectra, in order to achieve qualitative and quantitative information. We use cumulates (mostly norites, leuconorites, melanorites and anorthosites) belonging to the Bjerkreim-Sokndal Layered Intrusion, a sequence of genetically related rocks with simple textures. Laboratory spectra are measured on slightly polished rock slabs in the 350- to 2500-nm interval and directional-hemispherical reflectance geometry. Composition is determined using traditional techniques other than reflectance spectroscopy. We find that: (1) band minima measured on rock spectra are strongly influenced by the concurrent effects due to modal abundance of the spectroscopically active mineral and mineral chemistry; (2) band depths can be used for semiquantitative analyses, limited to the set of rocks investigated; (3) the spectral parameters derived from powdered pyroxene are in agreement with previously published calibrations; (4) the mineral mixture systematics can be reasonably considered as linear, when pyroxene is mixed with neutral components; and (5) the empirical evaluation of solid rock surface spectra needs further insights to give a great improvement to planetary researches. In addition, genetic sequences of rocks should be investigated in detail to help the geological interpretation of planetary evolution. Therefore more laboratory and analytical studies are required in order to understand the influence of composition and petrographic textures on the spectral analysis.

  8. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy Versus Mexameter(®) MX18 Measurements of Melanin and Erythema in an African Population.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caradee Y; Karsten, Aletta E; Wilkes, Marcus; Singh, Ann; du Plessis, Johan; Albers, Patricia N; Karsten, Petrus A

    2016-07-01

    Melanin provides protection against excess exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and related adverse health effects. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can be used to calculate cutaneous melanin and erythema, but this is complex and has been mostly used for light-to-medium pigmented skin. Handheld reflectance spectrophotometers, such as the Mexameter(®) MX18, can also be used. We compared DRS-calculated melanin and erythema values with Mexameter melanin and erythema index values to understand how these techniques/measurements correlate in an African population of predominantly deeply pigmented skin. Five hundred and three participants comprised 68.5% self-identified Black African, 9.9% Indian/Asian, 18.4% White and 2.9% Colored. The majority of Black African (45%), Indian/Asian (34%) and Colored (53%) participants self-identified their skin as being "brown." Measured melanin levels increased with darker self-reported skin color. DRS-calculated and Mexameter melanin values demonstrated a positive correlation (Spearman rho = 0.87, P < 0.001). The results from both instruments showed erythema values were strongly correlated with their own melanin values. This finding is considered spurious and may result from the complexity of separating brown and red pigment when using narrowband reflectance techniques. Further work is needed to understand melanin, erythema and color in Black skin given sun-related health risks in vulnerable groups in Africa. PMID:27276188

  9. Spectral reflectance indices as a selection criterion for yield improvement in wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babar, Md. Ali

    2005-11-01

    Scope and methods of study. Yield in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) is a complex trait and influenced by many environmental factors, and yield improvement is a daunting task for wheat breeders. Spectral reflectance indices (SRIs) have been used to study different physiological traits in wheat. SRIs have the potential to differentiate genotypes for grain yield. SRIs strongly associated with grain yield can be used to achieve effective genetic gain in wheat under different environments. Three experiments (15 adapted genotypes, 25 and 36 random sister lines derived from two different crosses) under irrigated conditions, and three experiments (each with 30 advanced genotypes) under water-limited conditions were conducted in three successive years in Northwest Mexico at the CIMMYT (International Maize and wheat Improvement Center) experimental station. SRIs and different agronomic data were collected for three years, and biomass was harvested for two years. Phenotypic and genetic correlations between SRIs and grain yield, between SRIs and biomass, realized and broad sense heritability, direct and correlated selection responses for grain yield, and SRIs were calculated. Findings and conclusion. Seven SRIs were calculated, and three near infrared based indices (WI, NWI-1 and NWI-2) showed higher level of genetic and phenotypic correlations with grain yield, yield components and biomass than other SRIs (PRI, RNDVI, GNDVI, and SR) under both irrigated and water limiting environments. Moderate to high realized and broad sense heritability, and selection response were demonstrated by the three NIR based indices. High efficiency of correlated response for yield estimation was demonstrated by the three NIR based indices. The ratio between the correlated response to grain yield based on the three NIR based indices and direct selection response for grain yield was very close to one. The NIR based indices showed very high accuracy in selecting superior genotypes for grain yield

  10. Simultaneous monitoring of organic acids and sugars in fresh and processed apple juice by Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Irudayaraj, Joseph; Tewari, Jagdish

    2003-12-01

    A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and chemometrics was used as a screening tool for the determination of sugars and organic acids such as sucrose, glucose, fructose, sorbitol, citric acid, and malic acid in processed commercial and extracted fresh apple juices. Prepared samples of synthetic apple juice in different constituent concentration ranges were scanned by attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory and the spectral region in the range between 950 and 1500 cm(-1) was selected for calibration model development using partial least squares (PLS) regression and principal component regression (PCR). The calibration models were successfully validated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements against several commercial juice varieties as well as juice extracted from different apple varieties to provide an overall R2 correlation of 0.998. The present study demonstrates that Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy could be used for rapid and nondestructive determination of multiple constituents in commercial and fresh apple juices. Results indicate this approach to be a rapid and cost-effective tool for routine monitoring of multiple constituents in a fruit juice production facility. PMID:14686782

  11. [Quantitative analysis of surface composition of polypropylene blends using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-jia; Zhu, Ya-fei; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Jia-rui

    2008-08-01

    The surface composition and structure of solid organic polymers influence many of their properties and applications. Oligomers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) and their graft copolymers of polybutadiene and polypropylene were used as the macromolecular surface modifiers of polypropylene. The compositions on surface and in bulk of the polypropylene (PP) blends were determined quantitatively using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) technique with a variable-angle multiple-reflection ATR accessory and FTIR measurements, respectively. By validating by Lambert-Beer law, 1103 and 1733 cm(-1) can be used to represent modifiers characteristic absorbance band to determine quantitatively the surface composition of modifiers including poly(ethylene glycol) and carbonyl segment in PP blends, respectively. The determination error can be effectively eliminated by calibrating wavelength and using absorption peak area ratio as the calibrating basis for the quantitative analysis. To minimize the effect of contact between the polymer film and the internal reflection element on the results of absolute absorbance, the technique of "band ratioing" was developed, and it was testified that the error of the peak area ratios of interest can be reduced to 5% or below, which was suitable for ATR-FTIR used as a determining quantitative tool for surface composition. The working curves were then established and used to calculate the composition of the responding functional groups in the film surface of the PP blends. The depth distribution of modifiers on the surface of blend films also can be determined by changing the incident angle of interest on the basis of the equation of the depth of penetration of the excursion wave in ATR spectra. The results indicated that ATR-FTIR can be used to determine quantitatively the surface composition and distribution of modifiers with reproducible and reliable

  12. Use of reflectance spectroscopy for early detection of calcium deficiency in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingqing; Wah, Liew Oi; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This article investigates calcium deficiency symptoms of the plants grown under hydroponics conditions. Leaf reflectance data were collected from plants, and then transformed to L*, a*, b* values, which provide color information of the leaves. After comparing the color information of deficient plants to control plants, a set of deficiency criterion was established for early detection of calcium deficiency in the plants. Calcium deficiency could be detected as early as two days from the onset of stress in mature plants when optical data were collected from terminal young leaves. Young plants subjected to calcium stress for 9 days could not be distinguished from nutrient sufficient plants.

  13. Estimation of porphyrin concentration in the kerogen fraction of shales using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Peter N.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Sundararaman, P.

    1991-01-01

    An interpretive model for estimating porphyrin concentration in bitumen and kerogen from spectral reaflectance data in the visible and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum is derived and calibrated. Preliminary results obtained using the model are consistent with concentrations determined from the bitumen extract and suggest that 40 to 60 percent of the total porphyrin concentration remains in the kerogen after extraction of bitumen from thermally immature samples. The reflectance technique will contribute to porphyrin and kerogen studies and can be applied at its present level of development to several areas of geologic and paleo-oceanographic research.

  14. Atomic Scale Flatness of Chemically Cleaned Silicon Surfaces Studied by Infrared Attenuated-Total-Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawara, Kenichi; Yasaka, Tatsuhiro; Miyazaki, Seiichi; Hirose, Masataka

    1992-07-01

    Hydrogen-terminated Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces obtained by aqueous HF or pH-modified (pH{=}5.3) buffered-HF (BHF) treatments have been characterized by a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) technique. The BHF treatment provides better surface flatness than the HF treatment. Pure water rinse is effective for improving the Si(111) surface flatness, while this is not the case for Si(100) because the pure water acts as an alkaline etchant and promotes the formation of (111) microfacets or microdefects on the (100) surface.

  15. Development of a movable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system for clinical study of esophageal precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsien; Tien, Gen-Hao; Chuang, Min-Jie; Hsu, Fang-Wei; Hsieh, Hong-Po; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2015-07-01

    We constructed a movable imaging spectrograph-based system and a contact probe consisting of fibers with several source-to-detection separations (SDS) to measure spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance spectra from superficial tissue. The goal is to estimate optical properties of the mucosa in the oral cavity and investigate correlations between the estimated properties and precancerous changes in the mucosa. A previously developed GPU-based iterative curve-fitting inverse Monte Carlo model was used to extract optical properties from measured spectra. We validated the system with two-layer tissue phantoms, took in-vivo measurements on the buccal mucosa of three normal volunteers, and extracted optical parameters.

  16. Reflection spectroscopy study of the 16O12C16O ν3-band lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsheere, X.; Pangui, E.; Boulet, C.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2016-05-01

    Reflection spectra of pure CO2 gas have been recorded in the 4.3 μ m region by using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer, providing measured values of the refractive index. Comparisons with the results of calculations using available spectroscopic data, and free of any adjusted line parameter, show a very good agreement. This confirms that this experimental technique provides an alternative approach for the test or determination of spectroscopic parameters. Its advantages for studies of extremely strongly absorbing species and investigations of spatially (tightly) confined molecular gases are discussed.

  17. A note on Hapke's bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy. Part 3: Correction for macroscopic roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumme, K.; Bowell, E.

    1986-01-01

    The multiple-scattering theory of K. Lumme and E. Bowell (1981) was criticized by B. Hapke by stating, in particular, that energy is not conserved. It is shown that Hapke's treatment is, in this respect, inferior to that of Lumme and Bowell, and itself violates the principal concepts of radiative transfer theory. Hapke's additinal claim that, in Lumme and Bowell's work, the reflectance tends to zero at the limb is also refuted. Comment is made on the deduction of surface physical properties by modeling photometric observations.

  18. Multivariate determination of hematocrit in whole blood by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrewa, S.; Paarmann, Ch.; Goemann, W.; Heise, H. M.

    1998-06-01

    A spectral analysis of whole blood was undertaken in the mid-infrared spectral range by using the attenuated total reflection technique. The reference hematocrit values of 109 blood samples were measured after centrifugation with a range between 30% and 50%. Multivariate calibration with the partial least-squares (PLS) algorithm was performed using baseline corrected absorbance spectra between 1600 and 1200 cm-1. The relative prediction error achieved was 2.7% based on average hematocrit values. The performance is comparable to that using centrifugation or conductivity measurements. The spectral effects from protein adsorption onto the ATR-crystal, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation have been investigated.

  19. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-15

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  20. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, R; Schade, U; Kleber, Ch; Schreiner, M

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations. PMID:24985826

  1. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  2. Early detection of melanoma with the combined use of acoustic microscopy, infrared reflectance and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiannis, Georgios T.; Grivas, Ioannis; Tsingotjidou, Anastasia; Apostolidis, Georgios K.; Grigoriadou, Ifigeneia; Dori, I.; Poulatsidou, Kyriaki-Nefeli; Doumas, Argyrios; Wesarg, Stefan; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Malignant melanoma is a form of skin cancer, with increasing incidence worldwide. Early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis and treatment of the disease. The objective of this study is to develop a novel animal model of melanoma and apply a combination of the non-invasive imaging techniques acoustic microscopy, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies, for the detection of developing tumors. Acoustic microscopy provides information about the 3D structure of the tumor, whereas, both spectroscopic modalities give qualitative insight of biochemical changes during melanoma development. In order to efficiently set up the final devices, propagation of ultrasonic and electromagnetic waves in normal skin and melanoma simulated structures was performed. Synthetic and grape-extracted melanin (simulated tumors), endermally injected, were scanned and compared to normal skin. For both cases acoustic microscopy with central operating frequencies of 110MHz and 175MHz were used, resulting to the tomographic imaging of the simulated tumor, while with the spectroscopic modalities IR and Raman differences among spectra of normal and melanin- injected sites were identified in skin depth. Subsequently, growth of actual tumors in an animal melanoma model, with the use of human malignant melanoma cells was achieved. Acoustic microscopy and IR and Raman spectroscopies were also applied. The development of tumors at different time points was displayed using acoustic microscopy. Moreover, the changes of the IR and Raman spectra were studied between the melanoma tumors and adjacent healthy skin. The most significant changes between healthy skin and the melanoma area were observed in the range of 900-1800cm-1 and 350-2000cm-1, respectively.

  3. Water sorption on martian regolith analogs: Thermodynamics and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, Antoine; Schmitt, Bernard; Beck, Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier

    2009-11-01

    The near-infrared reflectance spectra of the martian surface present strong absorption features attributed to hydration water present in the regolith. In order to characterize the relationships between this water and atmospheric vapor and decipher the physical state of water molecules in martian regolith analogs, we designed and built an experimental setup to measure near-IR reflectance spectra under martian atmospheric conditions. Six samples were studied that cover part of the diversity of Mars surface mineralogy: a hydrated ferric oxide (ferrihydrite), two igneous samples (volcanic tuff, and dunite sand), and three potential water rich soil materials (Mg-sulfate, smectite powder and a palagonitic soil, the JSC Mars-1 regolith stimulant). Sorption and desorption isotherms were measured at 243 K for water vapor pressure varying from 10 -5 to ˜0.3 mbar (relative humidity: 10 -4 to 75%). These measurements reveal a large diversity of behavior among the sample suite in terms of absolute amount of water adsorbed, shape of the isotherm and hysteresis between the adsorption and desorption branches. Simultaneous in situ spectroscopic observations permit a detailed analysis of the spectral signature of adsorbed water and also point to clear differences between the samples. Ferric (oxy)hydroxides like ferrihydrite or other phases present in palagonitic soils are very strong water adsorbent and may play an important role in the current martian water cycle by allowing large exchange of water between dust-covered regions and atmosphere at diurnal and seasonal scales.

  4. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy 7. The single particle phase function hockey stick relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    2012-11-01

    The measured volume-average single particle angular scattering functions of a large number of types of particle of interest for planetary regoliths in the visible-near-IR wavelength region can be represented to a reasonable approximation by two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein functions. When the two parameters of this function are plotted against one another they are found to be inversely correlated and lie within a restricted zone shaped like a hockey stick within the parameter space. The centroid of the zone is a curve that can be represented by a simple empirical equation. The wide variety of types of particles used to construct the plot implies that this equation may represent most of the particles found in regoliths. This means that when modeling the bidirectional reflectance of a regolith it may be possible to reduce the number of parameters necessary to specify the reflectance, and also to characterize the entire single particle phase function from observations at phase angles less than 90°. Even if the hockey stick relation has a finite width, rather than being a line, it restricts the parameter space that must be searched when fitting data. The curve should also be useful for forward modeling particle phase functions.

  5. Identification and characterization of colorectal cancer using Raman spectroscopy and feature selection techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxin; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Xu, Junfa; Li, Xueqiang; Lin, Lin

    2014-10-20

    This study aims to detect colorectal cancer with near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and feature selection techniques. A total of 306 Raman spectra of colorectal cancer tissues and normal tissues are acquired from 44 colorectal cancer patients. Five diagnostically important Raman bands in the regions of 815-830, 935-945, 1131-1141, 1447-1457 and 1665-1675 cm(-1) related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids of tissues are identified with the ant colony optimization (ACO) and support vector machine (SVM). The diagnostic models built with the identified Raman bands provide a diagnostic accuracy of 93.2% for identifying colorectal cancer from normal Raman spectroscopy. The study demonstrates that the Raman spectroscopy associated with ACO-SVM diagnostic algorithms has great potential to characterize and diagnose colorectal cancer. PMID:25401621

  6. Detection of fungus-infected corn kernels using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy and color imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of grain products by fungus can lead to economic losses and is deleterious to human and livestock health. Detection and quantification of fungus-infected corn kernels would be adventitious for producers and breeders in evaluating quality and in selecting hybrids with resistance to inf...

  7. Observation of two regions of selective light reflection from a thin film of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Alaverdyan, R B; Dadalyan, T K; Chilingaryan, Yurii S

    2013-05-31

    Two regions of selective light reflection (in the short- and long- wavelength parts of the visible spectrum) from a thin film of a cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC), consisting of the mixture of two CLCs with opposite chirality and a nematic liquid crystal, are experimentally found for the first time. The spectral position of the reflection regions and the separation between them varies depending on the CLC composition and the temperature. The long-wavelength region of reflection corresponds to the region of Bragg reflection from the CLC helix, while the short-wavelength region is probably due to the defects in the structure of the CLC film. (letters)

  8. IR reflectance spectroscopy of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates. Implications for Saturn's icy moons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oancea, A.; Grasset, O.; Le Menn, E.; Bezacier, L.; Bollengier, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Tobie, G.

    2012-04-01

    A CO2 spectral band was discovered by VIMS on the Saturn's satellites Dione, Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe [1]. The band position on the three first satellites corresponds to CO2 trapped in a complex material, but no indication exists whether this latter is water ice or some mineral or complex organic compound [1]. On Phoebe, the CO2 spectral band is consistent with solid CO2 or CO2 molecules trapped in the small cages of a clathrate hydrate structure [2]. It is thought that clathrate hydrates could play a significant role in the chemistry of the solar nebula [3] and in the physical evolution of astrophysical objects [4]. But so far, no clathrate hydrate structure has been observed in astrophysical environments. Moreover, identification of molecules trapped in a clathrate hydrate structure is extremely difficult because of the strong IR vibration modes of the water ice matrix. In this work, experimental IR reflectance spectra for CO2 clathrate hydrates are studied on grains and films. Clathrates are synthesized in a high pressure autoclave at low temperatures. IR spectral analysis is made with a low pressure and low temperature cryostat. These experimental conditions - 80 < T < 110 K, P~10-5 bar - are relevant to icy moons' surfaces. We have observed that the IR reflectance, in the spectral region (3 - 5 μm) characterized by H2O and CO2 high absorption coefficients, is strongly dependent on physical (size, surface) and optical (n and k) properties of the samples. The impact of these parameters on the CO2 clathrate IR reflectance spectrum will be presented. A comparison between the absorption bands of CO2 clathrate hydrates obtained in our lab and CO2 absorption bands as detected by VIMS on the icy satellites of Saturn will be shown. This experimental work confirms that VIMS data are not consistent with the presence of structure I CO2 clathrate hydrates on the surface of the icy moons. Possibility of having metastable structure II still remains unsolved and will be

  9. Multiple perturbation two-dimensional correlation analysis of cellulose by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Morita, Shin-Ich; Awa, Kimie; Okada, Mariko; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-05-01

    An extension of the two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis scheme for multi-dimensional perturbation is described. A simple computational form is provided to construct synchronous correlation and disrelation maps for the analysis of microscopic imaging data based on two independent perturbation variables. Sets of time-dependent attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectra of water and cellulose mixtures were collected during the evaporation of water from finely ground cellulose. The system exhibits complex behaviors in response to two independent perturbations, i.e., evaporation time and grinding time. Multiple perturbation 2D analysis reveals a specific difference in the rate of evaporation of water molecules when accompanied by crystallinity changes of cellulose. It identifies subtle differences in the volatility of water, which is related to the crystalline structure of cellulose. PMID:19470205

  10. Polyimide analysis using diffuse reflectance-FTIR. [Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal imidization of a number of polyimide precursors in the form of powders, films, and prepregs was examined by an in situ diffuse reflectance-FTIR technique where infrared spectra were determined while the material was being heated. An analysis of these spectra revealed that, with the exception of one water soluble adhesive, each precursor developed an anhydride band around 1850 cm/cu during imidization. This band diminished in intensity during final stages of cure. Efforts were made to quantify the amount of anhydride in several samples. Evidence obtained could be interpreted to mean that poly(amic acid) resins undergo an initial reduction in molecular weight during imidization before recombining to achieve their ultimate molecular weights as polyimides. Several reports in the literature are cited to support this interpretation. This report serves both to document anhydride formation during imidization and to increase our fundamental understanding of how polyimides cure.

  11. Simple fully reflective method of scatter reduction in 2D-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spector, Ivan C; Olson, Courtney M; Huber, Christopher J; Massari, Aaron M

    2015-04-15

    A fully reflective two-dimensional IR (2D-IR) setup is described that enables efficient cancellation of scattered light from multiple pulses in the phase-matched direction. The local oscillator pulse and the pulse that stimulates the vibrational echo signal are synchronously modulated (or fibrillated) in time maintaining their phase relationships with the echo wavepacket. The modification is cost-effective and can be easily implemented on existing 2D-IR instruments, and it avoids the addition of dispersive elements into the beam paths. The fibrillation results in a decrease of waiting-time resolution of only tens of femtoseconds and has no impact on the spectral lineshape, making it a general improvement for 2D-IR spectrometers even for weakly or non-scattering samples. PMID:25872090

  12. Express quality analysis of coal concentrates by diffuse reflection IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    V.N. Egorov; I.I. Mel'nikov; N.A. Tarasov; V.I. Butakova; Y.M. Posokhov

    2007-07-01

    Ongoing quality monitoring of coal concentrates is important today on account of instability in the raw materials for coking at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK) and the variable composition of the coal batch for enrichment plants. Currently, numerous standardized methods permit the determination of the classificational and quality characteristics of coal and batch. These methods are slow, laborious, and relatively ineffective in industrial conditions. In May 2005, an automated Spektrotest express-analysis system developed by ECCI was installed in the coke laboratory at ZAO RMK in order to determine the quality of the coal concentrate and batch. The basic equipment is an IR spectrometer with a unit for Fourier transformation and a special optical module yielding the reflect on spectra of the pulverized coal. A control station based on a high-speed computer runs an algorithm for information analysis and storage and for printing out the test protocol. The Spektrotest system includes complex algorithms and software specially developed at ECCI.

  13. Exploration of crustal/mantle material for the earth and moon using reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, Carle M.; Mustard, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra have been acquired (1) for Moses Rock diatreme in SE Utah using an airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS) and (2) for small areas in and around the large lunar impact crater Copernicus using a spectrometer on earth-based telescopes. The high spectral resolution and precision of these data allow several mineral components of surface material to be identified and analyzed in a spatial context. The derived mineralogical information is used to address specific geological problems. For the terrestrial study the distribution of the measured abundance of mantle derived ultramafic microbreccia across Moses Rock dike indicates that flow stabilized into a few channels during the violent eruption. For the lunar study the variety of rock types identified in crustal material of deep-seated origin is distinct from the dominant rock types sampled from the upper lunar crust and suggests a complex crustal evolution.

  14. Search for astrophysical rotating Ellis wormholes with x-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Menglei; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro; Bambi, Cosimo; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta

    2016-07-01

    Recently, two of us have found numerically rotating Ellis wormholes as solutions of four-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to a phantom field. In this paper, we investigate possible observational signatures to identify similar objects in the Universe. These symmetric wormholes have a mass and are compact, so they may look like black holes. We study the iron line profile in the x-ray reflection spectrum of a thin accretion disk around rotating Ellis wormholes and we find some specific observational signatures that can be used to distinguish these objects from Kerr black holes. We simulate some observations with XIS/Suzaku assuming typical parameters for a bright active galactic nucleus and we conclude that current x-ray missions cannot apply strong constraints.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of multiple adulterants in roasted coffee by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Reis, Nádia; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S

    2013-10-15

    The current study presents an application of Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy for detection and quantification of fraudulent addition of commonly employed adulterants (spent coffee grounds, coffee husks, roasted corn and roasted barley) to roasted and ground coffee. Roasted coffee samples were intentionally blended with the adulterants (pure and mixed), with total adulteration levels ranging from 1% to 66% w/w. Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS) was used to relate the processed spectra to the mass fraction of adulterants and the model obtained provided reliable predictions of adulterations at levels as low as 1% w/w. A robust methodology was implemented that included the detection of outliers. High correlation coefficients (0.99 for calibration; 0.98 for validation) coupled with low degrees of error (1.23% for calibration; 2.67% for validation) confirmed that DRIFTS can be a valuable analytical tool for detection and quantification of adulteration in ground, roasted coffee. PMID:24054633

  16. Total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS) with low background and high count-rate per molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Kai; Leutenegger, Marcel; Rigler, Per; Rao, Ramachandra; Rigler, Rudolf; Gösch, Michael; Lasser, Theo

    2005-09-01

    We designed a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system for measurements on surfaces. The system consists of an objective-type total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy setup, adapted to measure FCS. Here, the fluorescence exciting evanescent wave is generated by epi-illumination through the periphery of a high NA oil-immersion objective. The main advantages with respect to conventional FCS systems are an improvement in terms of counts per molecule (cpm) and a high signal to background ratio. This is demonstrated by investigating diffusion as well as binding and release of single molecules on a glass surface. Furthermore, the size and shape of the molecule detection efficiency (MDE) function was calculated, using a wave-vectorial approach and taking into account the influence of the dielectric interface on the emission properties of fluorophores.

  17. In-situ analysis of fruit anthocyanins by means of total internal reflectance, continuous wave and time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zude, Manuela; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Dosche, Carsten; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2009-08-01

    In sweet cherry (Prunus avium), the red pigmentation is correlated with the fruit maturity stage and can be measured by non-invasive spectroscopy. In the present study, the influence of varying fruit scattering coefficients on the fruit remittance spectrum (cw) were corrected with the effective pathlength and refractive index in the fruit tissue obtained with distribution of time-of-flight (DTOF) readings and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) analysis, respectively. The approach was validated on fruits providing variation in the scattering coefficient outside the calibration sample set. In the validation, the measuring uncertainty when non-invasively analyzing fruits with cw method in comparison with combined application of cw, DTOF, and TIRF measurements showed an increase in r2 up to 22.7 % with, however, high errors in all approaches.

  18. Time-integrated photoluminescence and pump-probe reflection spectroscopy of Si doped InN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Jang, Der-Jun Wang, Ming-Sung; Tu, L. W.

    2014-01-28

    Temperature and excitation power dependent time-integrated photoluminescence of Si doped InN thin films are investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra at low temperatures are described by single emission peak ensued due to “free-to-bound” recombination; whereas PL spectra at higher temperatures above 150 K are characterized by both “band-to-band” and “free-to-bound” transition. Carrier dynamics of Si doped InN thin films is studied using pump-probe reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The hot electron cooling process is well described by electron-electron scattering. The dependence of the hot electron cooling rate on total electron density shows sublinear to linear behavior with increase of background electron density. The variation of the carrier recombination lifetime with total electron density implicates the dominance of the defect-related nonradiative recombination channel over other recombination processes.

  19. Application of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for determination of cefixime in oral pharmaceutical formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandhro, Aftab A.; Laghari, Abdul Hafeez; Mahesar, Sarfaraz A.; Saleem, Rubina; Nelofar, Aisha; Khan, Salman Tariq; Sherazi, S. T. H.

    2013-11-01

    A quick and reliable analytical method for the quantitative assessment of cefixime in orally administered pharmaceutical formulations is developed by using diamond cell attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy as an easy procedure for quality control laboratories. The standards for calibration were prepared in aqueous medium ranging from 350 to 6000 mg/kg. The calibration model was developed based on partial least square (PLS) using finger print region of FT-IR spectrum in the range from 1485 to 887 cm-1. Excellent coefficient of determination (R2) was achieved as high as 0.99976 with root mean square error of 44.8 for calibration. The application of diamond cell (smart accessory) ATR FT-IR proves a reliable determination of cefixime in pharmaceutical formulations to assess the quality of the final product.

  20. Differentiation of Body Fluid Stains on Fabrics Using External Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Félix; de la Ossa, Ma Ángeles Fernández; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Body fluids are evidence of great forensic interest due to the DNA extracted from them, which allows genetic identification of people. This study focuses on the discrimination among semen, vaginal fluid, and urine stains (main fluids in sexual crimes) placed on different colored cotton fabrics by external reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with chemometrics. Semen-vaginal fluid mixtures and potential false positive substances commonly found in daily life such as soaps, milk, juices, and lotions were also studied. Results demonstrated that the IR spectral signature obtained for each body fluid allowed its identification and the correct classification of unknown stains by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA). Interestingly, results proved that these IR spectra did not show any bands due to the color of the fabric and no substance of those present in daily life which were analyzed, provided a false positive. PMID:26896150

  1. Simultaneous Determination of Monoatomic Ions via Infrared Attenuated Total Reflection Spectroscopy in Aqueous Solution at Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-07-01

    In this study, monoatomic and thus IR-inactive ions were determined via infrared attenuated total reflection (IR-ATR) spectroscopy including Cl(-), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+) and Br(-), next to the IR-active ion [Formula: see text] The determination of IR-inactive ions is enabled, as each ion influences the infrared spectrum of bulk water by organizing the water molecules within the solvation shell around the ionic species in a unique way. Furthermore, the influence of temperature was taken into account for the potential application of this analytical technique in real-world scenarios. Using chemometric data analysis, seven ions could be discriminated at temperatures ranging between 3 ℃ and 45 ℃. Finally, within a sample of seawater, Cl(-), Na(+), Mg(2+) and [Formula: see text] could be simultaneously quantified, while the concentrations of Ca(2+), K(+) and Br(-) remained below the achievable limits of detection. PMID:27340219

  2. Characterizing and Authenticating Montilla-Moriles PDO Vinegars Using Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) Technology

    PubMed Central

    De la Haba, María-José; Arias, Mar; Ramírez, Pilar; López, María-Isabel; Sánchez, María-Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the potential of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy as a non-destructive method for characterizing Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) “Vinagres de Montilla-Moriles” wine vinegars and for classifying them as a function of the manufacturing process used. Three spectrophotometers were evaluated for this purpose: two monochromator instruments (Foss NIRSystems 6500 SY-I and Foss NIRSystems 6500 SY-II; spectral range 400–2,500 nm in both cases) and a diode-array instrument (Corona 45 VIS/NIR; spectral range 380–1,700 nm). A total of 70 samples were used to predict major chemical quality parameters (total acidity, fixed acidity, volatile acidity, pH, dry extract, ash, acetoin, methanol, total polyphenols, color (tonality and intensity), and alcohol content), and to construct models for the classification of vinegars as a function of the manufacturing method used. The results obtained indicate that this non-invasive technology can be used successfully by the vinegar industry and by PDO regulators for the routine analysis of vinegars in order to authenticate them and to detect potential fraud. Slightly better results were achieved with the two monochromator instruments. The findings also highlight the potential of these NIR instruments for predicting the manufacturing process used, this being of particular value for the industrial authentication of traditional wine vinegars. PMID:24561402

  3. Characterizing and authenticating Montilla-Moriles PDO vinegars using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) technology.

    PubMed

    De la Haba, María-José; Arias, Mar; Ramírez, Pilar; López, María-Isabel; Sánchez, María-Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the potential of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy as a non-destructive method for characterizing Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) "Vinagres de Montilla-Moriles" wine vinegars and for classifying them as a function of the manufacturing process used. Three spectrophotometers were evaluated for this purpose: two monochromator instruments (Foss NIRSystems 6500 SY-I and Foss NIRSystems 6500 SY-II; spectral range 400-2,500 nm in both cases) and a diode-array instrument (Corona 45 VIS/NIR; spectral range 380-1,700 nm). A total of 70 samples were used to predict major chemical quality parameters (total acidity, fixed acidity, volatile acidity, pH, dry extract, ash, acetoin, methanol, total polyphenols, color (tonality and intensity), and alcohol content), and to construct models for the classification of vinegars as a function of the manufacturing method used. The results obtained indicate that this non-invasive technology can be used successfully by the vinegar industry and by PDO regulators for the routine analysis of vinegars in order to authenticate them and to detect potential fraud. Slightly better results were achieved with the two monochromator instruments. The findings also highlight the potential of these NIR instruments for predicting the manufacturing process used, this being of particular value for the industrial authentication of traditional wine vinegars. PMID:24561402

  4. Reflectance spectroscopy is an effective tool for monitoring soot pollution in an urban suburb.

    PubMed

    Saaroni, H; Chudnovsky, A; Ben-Dor, E

    2010-02-01

    This study examines whether converting the fossil fuel of the Tel Aviv power station from oil to gas influences air pollution in the local urban environment. To this end, the spectral properties of accumulated dust on tree leaves and paper bags were assessed before (2004) and after (2006) the conversion. The sampling site was a garden in a neighborhood located 2700m downwind of the power station. In addition, air pollution concentrations and particulate matter parameters recorded by a local meteorological station were analyzed (PM(10), NO(x), NO(2), NO, and SO(2)). Although differences in the average monthly concentration of pollution parameters are mostly insignificant between the two periods, the accumulated particulate matter exhibits considerably different spectral patterns. All first period samples exhibit a distinctly concave slope in the spectral region between 400 and 1400nm, indicative of high amounts of soot, most likely due to the combustion products of fuel oil exhausted by the power plant. In contrast, the second period samples exhibit spectra that indicate reduced soot content and even appear slightly convex, evidencing the presence of dust of mineral origin, a feature likely masked by the soot in the first period. Thus, the spectral data support that the power plant conversion results in less pollution. More generally, this study corroborates that VIS-NIR-SWIR spectroscopy characterizes key properties of the particulate layer accumulating on sampled surfaces and thus, is a powerful method for monitoring the urban environment. PMID:19944448

  5. Cloud-Aerosol Drivers of Reflective Roof and Solar Power Potential Benefits Across Selected Indian Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millstein, D.; Fischer, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Application of reflective roof surfaces is an adaptive strategy for sustainable warm-climate human environments that can improve human comfort for un-conditioned buildings, energy consumption for conditioned buildings, the urban heat island effect, and potentially net radiation absorbed by the earth. Here, we evaluate the (1) potential radiative benefits of installing cool roofs and (2) incoming surface radiation available for solar power generation across selected Indian cities using a combination of satellite data (MODIS and MERRA) and a radiative transfer model (RRTMG). The radiative transfer model was run multiple times at each time step and location in order to separate the effects of clouds and aerosols on top of the atmosphere outgoing shortwave radiation reflected from roofs and on bottom of the atmosphere incoming shortwave radiation available for solar power generation. Modeled downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface was first validated against measurements obtained from urban rooftops during the 9-month (June, 2011-March, 2012) a joint Indian-US Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) campaign. Results show that model bias at two Indian cities, Nainital (-4.2% average midday bias) and Pantnagar (0.5% average midday bias) was small compared to the radiative benefit obtained from a typical increase in surface reflectance (e.g., 0.3-0.6). Although both cities are located in the northern state of Uttarakhand, differences in terrain type, pollution burdens and cloudiness allow for validation of the model across a wide range of conditions. For example, Nainital is located in complex terrain at an altitude of ~2,000 meters near the Himalayan Mountains while Pantnagar is located in a flat plain at an altitude of ~300 meters. Pantnagar had a larger aerosol burden than Nainital as the average aerosol optical depth at Pantnagar (0.47) was larger than Nainital (0.33). Nainital was cloudier, with clouds observed on 62% of the days during the validation period

  6. Low temperature hydrogen plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of copper studied using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; Rai, Vikrant R.; Agarwal, Sumit; Thissen, Nick F. W.

    2014-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an ideal technique to deposit ultrathin, conformal, and continuous metal thin films. However, compared to the ALD of binary materials such as metal oxides and metal nitrides, the surface reaction mechanisms during metal ALD are not well understood. In this study, the authors have designed and implemented an in situ reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (IRAS) setup to study the surface reactions during the ALD of Cu on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using Cu hexafluoroacetylacetonate [Cu(hfac){sub 2}] and a remote H{sub 2} plasma. Our infrared data show that complete ligand-exchange reactions occur at a substrate temperature of 80 °C in the absence of surface hydroxyl groups. Based on infrared data and previous studies, the authors propose that Cu(hfac){sub 2} dissociatively chemisorbs on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, where the Al-O-Al bridge acts as the surface reactive site, leading to surface O-Cu-hfac and O-Al-hfac species. Surface saturation during the Cu(hfac){sub 2} half-cycle occurs through blocking of the available chemisorption sites. In the next half-reaction cycle, H radicals from an H{sub 2} plasma completely remove these surface hfac ligands. Through this study, the authors have demonstrated the capability of in situ IRAS as a tool to study surface reactions during ALD of metals. While transmission and internal reflection infrared spectroscopy are limited to the first few ALD cycles, IRAS can be used to probe all stages of metal ALD starting from initial nucleation to the formation of a continuous film.

  7. Differential effects of early postinjury treatment with neuroprotective drugs in a mouse model using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shochat, Ariel; Abookasis, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The time required for the arrival of an ambulance crew and administration of first aid is critical to clinical outcome, particularly in the case of head injury victims requiring neuroprotective drugs following a car accident, falls, and assaults. Short response times of the medical team, together with proper treatment, can limit injury severity and even save a life before transportation to the nearest medical center. We present a comparative evaluation of five different neuroprotective drugs frequently used in intensive care and operating units in the early phase following traumatic brain injury (TBI): hypertonic saline (HTS), mannitol, morphine, melatonin, and minocycline. The effectiveness of these drugs in terms of changes in brain tissue morphology (cell organelle size, density, distribution, etc.) and biochemical tissue properties (chromophores’ content) was experimentally evaluated through analysis of the spectral reduced scattering and optical absorption coefficient parameters in the near-infrared (NIR) optical range (650 to 1000 nm). Experiments were conducted on anesthetized male mice subjected to a noninvasive closed head weight-drop model of focal TBI (n=50 and n=10 control) and monitored using an NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system utilizing independent source–detector separation and location. After 10 min of baseline measurement, focal TBI was induced and measurements were conducted for 20 min. Subsequently, a neuroprotective drug was administrated and measurements were recorded for another 30 min. This work’s major findings are threefold: first, minocycline was found to improve hemodynamic outcome at the earliest time postinjury. Second, HTS decreased brain water content and inhibited the increase in intracranial pressure. Third, the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs can be monitored noninvasively with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The demonstrated ability to noninvasively detect cerebral physiological properties

  8. Ultrafast charge separation dynamics in opaque, operational dye-sensitized solar cells revealed by femtosecond diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, Elham; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Moser, Jacques-E.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient dye-sensitized solar cells are based on highly diffusive mesoscopic layers that render these devices opaque and unsuitable for ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements in transmission mode. We developed a novel sub-200 femtosecond time-resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy scheme combined with potentiostatic control to study various solar cells in fully operational condition. We studied performance optimized devices based on liquid redox electrolytes and opaque TiO2 films, as well as other morphologies, such as TiO2 fibers and nanotubes. Charge injection from the Z907 dye in all TiO2 morphologies was observed to take place in the sub-200 fs time scale. The kinetics of electron-hole back recombination has features in the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. This observation is significantly different from what was reported in the literature where the electron-hole back recombination for transparent films of small particles is generally accepted to occur on a longer time scale of microseconds. The kinetics of the ultrafast electron injection remained unchanged for voltages between +500 mV and –690 mV, where the injection yield eventually drops steeply. The primary charge separation in Y123 organic dye based devices was clearly slower occurring in two picoseconds and no kinetic component on the shorter femtosecond time scale was recorded. PMID:27095505

  9. Determination of antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of chocolate by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaxi; Pan, Zhi Jie; Liao, Wen; Li, Jiaqi; Gruget, Pierre; Kitts, David D; Lu, Xiaonan

    2016-07-01

    Antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of chocolate, containing different amounts of cacao (35-100%), were determined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-Fourier transformed-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy (4000-550cm(-1)). Antioxidant capacities were first characterized using DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) assays. Phenolic contents, including total phenol and procyanidins monomers, were quantified using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detector (HPLC-DAD), respectively. Five partial least-squares regression (PLSR) models were constructed and cross-validated using FT-IR spectra from 18 types of chocolate and corresponding reference values determined using DPPH, ORAC, Folin-Ciocalteu, and HPLC assays. The models were validated using seven unknown samples of chocolate. PLSR models showed good prediction capability for DPPH [R(2)-P (prediction)=0.88, RMSEP (root mean squares error of prediction)=12.62μmol Trolox/g DFW], ORAC (R(2)-P=0.90, RMSEP=37.92), Folin-Ciocalteu (R(2)-P=0.88, RMSEP=5.08), and (+)-catechin (R(2)-P=0.86, RMSEP=0.10), but lacked accuracy in the prediction of (-)-epicatechin (R(2)-P=0.72, RMSEP=0.57). ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy can be used for rapid prediction of antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content, and (+)-catechin in chocolate. PMID:26920292

  10. Rapid Quantification of Methamphetamine: Using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and Chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Juanita; Ayoko, Godwin; Collett, Simon; Golding, Gary

    2013-01-01

    In Australia and increasingly worldwide, methamphetamine is one of the most commonly seized drugs analysed by forensic chemists. The current well-established GC/MS methods used to identify and quantify methamphetamine are lengthy, expensive processes, but often rapid analysis is requested by undercover police leading to an interest in developing this new analytical technique. Ninety six illicit drug seizures containing methamphetamine (0.1%–78.6%) were analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy with an Attenuated Total Reflectance attachment and Chemometrics. Two Partial Least Squares models were developed, one using the principal Infrared Spectroscopy peaks of methamphetamine and the other a Hierarchical Partial Least Squares model. Both of these models were refined to choose the variables that were most closely associated with the methamphetamine % vector. Both of the models were excellent, with the principal peaks in the Partial Least Squares model having Root Mean Square Error of Prediction 3.8, R2 0.9779 and lower limit of quantification 7% methamphetamine. The Hierarchical Partial Least Squares model had lower limit of quantification 0.3% methamphetamine, Root Mean Square Error of Prediction 5.2 and R2 0.9637. Such models offer rapid and effective methods for screening illicit drug samples to determine the percentage of methamphetamine they contain. PMID:23936058

  11. Attenuated Total Reflection Mid-Infrared (ATR-MIR) Spectroscopy and Chemometrics for the Identification and Classification of Commercial Tannins.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Arianna; Parpinello, Giuseppina P; Olejar, Kenneth J; Kilmartin, Paul A; Versari, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize 40 commercial tannins, including condensed and hydrolyzable chemical classes, provided as powder extracts from suppliers. Spectral data were processed to detect typical molecular vibrations of tannins bearing different chemical groups and of varying botanical origin (univariate qualitative analysis). The mid-infrared region between 4000 and 520 cm(-1) was analyzed, with a particular emphasis on the vibrational modes in the fingerprint region (1800-520 cm(-1)), which provide detailed information about skeletal structures and specific substituents. The region 1800-1500 cm(-1) contained signals due to hydrolyzable structures, while bands due to condensed tannins appeared at 1300-900 cm(-1) and exhibited specific hydroxylation patterns useful to elucidate the structure of the flavonoid monomeric units. The spectra were investigated further using principal component analysis for discriminative purposes, to enhance the ability of infrared spectroscopy in the classification and quality control of commercial dried extracts and to enhance their industrial exploitation. PMID:26647047

  12. Quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance infrared, near-infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Erxleben, Andrea; Ryder, Alan G; McArdle, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    The simultaneous quantitative analysis of sulfathiazole polymorphs (forms I, III and V) in ternary mixtures by attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR), near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is reported. To reduce the effect of systematic variations, four different data pre-processing methods; multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), standard normal variate (SNV), first and second derivatives, were applied and their performance was evaluated using their prediction errors. It was possible to derive a reliable calibration model for the three polymorphic forms, in powder ternary mixtures, using a partial least squares (PLS) algorithm with SNV pre-processing, which predicted the concentration of polymorphs I, III and V. Root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for ATR-IR spectra were 5.0%, 5.1% and 4.5% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively, while NIR spectra had a RMSEP of 2.0%, 2.9%, and 2.8% and Raman spectra had a RMSEP of 3.5%, 4.1%, and 3.6% for polymorphs I, III and V, respectively. NIR spectroscopy exhibits the smallest analytical error, higher accuracy and robustness. When these advantages are combined with the greater convenience of NIR's "in glass bottle" sampling method both ATR-IR and Raman methods appear less attractive. PMID:20605386

  13. Ultrafast charge separation dynamics in opaque, operational dye-sensitized solar cells revealed by femtosecond diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Elham; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Moser, Jacques-E.

    2016-04-01

    Efficient dye-sensitized solar cells are based on highly diffusive mesoscopic layers that render these devices opaque and unsuitable for ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements in transmission mode. We developed a novel sub-200 femtosecond time-resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy scheme combined with potentiostatic control to study various solar cells in fully operational condition. We studied performance optimized devices based on liquid redox electrolytes and opaque TiO2 films, as well as other morphologies, such as TiO2 fibers and nanotubes. Charge injection from the Z907 dye in all TiO2 morphologies was observed to take place in the sub-200 fs time scale. The kinetics of electron-hole back recombination has features in the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. This observation is significantly different from what was reported in the literature where the electron-hole back recombination for transparent films of small particles is generally accepted to occur on a longer time scale of microseconds. The kinetics of the ultrafast electron injection remained unchanged for voltages between +500 mV and –690 mV, where the injection yield eventually drops steeply. The primary charge separation in Y123 organic dye based devices was clearly slower occurring in two picoseconds and no kinetic component on the shorter femtosecond time scale was recorded.

  14. Benefits of applying combined diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy and principal component analysis for the study of blue tempera historical painting.

    PubMed

    Navas, Natalia; Romero-Pastor, Julia; Manzano, Eloisa; Cardell, Carolina

    2008-12-23

    This paper explores the application of diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to the examination of historic blue pigments and blue tempera paintings commonly found on works of art. The discussion is mainly focused on the practical benefits of using this technique joined to principal component analysis (PCA), a powerful multivariate analysis tool. Thanks to the study of several replica samples that contain either pure blue pigments (azurite, lapis lazuli and smalt), or pure binder (rabbit glue) and mixtures of each of the pigments with the binder (tempera samples), different aspects of these benefits are highlighted. Comparative results of direct spectra and multivariate analysis using transmittance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (T-FTIR) are discussed throughout this study. Results showed an excellent ability of PCA on DRIFT spectra for discriminating replica samples according to differing composition. Several IR regions were tested with this aim; the fingerprint IR region exhibited the best ability for successfully clustering the samples. The presence of the binder was also discriminated. Only using this approach it was possible to completely separate all the studied replica samples. This demonstrates the potential benefits of this approach in identifying historical pigments and binders for conservation and restoration purposes in the field of Cultural Heritage. PMID:19012825

  15. Ultrafast charge separation dynamics in opaque, operational dye-sensitized solar cells revealed by femtosecond diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghadiri, Elham; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Moser, Jacques-E

    2016-01-01

    Efficient dye-sensitized solar cells are based on highly diffusive mesoscopic layers that render these devices opaque and unsuitable for ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements in transmission mode. We developed a novel sub-200 femtosecond time-resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy scheme combined with potentiostatic control to study various solar cells in fully operational condition. We studied performance optimized devices based on liquid redox electrolytes and opaque TiO2 films, as well as other morphologies, such as TiO2 fibers and nanotubes. Charge injection from the Z907 dye in all TiO2 morphologies was observed to take place in the sub-200 fs time scale. The kinetics of electron-hole back recombination has features in the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. This observation is significantly different from what was reported in the literature where the electron-hole back recombination for transparent films of small particles is generally accepted to occur on a longer time scale of microseconds. The kinetics of the ultrafast electron injection remained unchanged for voltages between +500 mV and -690 mV, where the injection yield eventually drops steeply. The primary charge separation in Y123 organic dye based devices was clearly slower occurring in two picoseconds and no kinetic component on the shorter femtosecond time scale was recorded. PMID:27095505

  16. The detection and identification of selected lube base oil using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tian; Zhou, Qing-li; Jin, Bin; Zhao, Kun; Zhao, Song-qing; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2009-07-01

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), the frequency-dependent absorption coefficient(s) and refractive index (indices) of selected lube base oil (LBO) were extracted in the spectral range of 0.3-1.6 THz. The selected LBO was also characterized by near-infrared spectrum. The experimental results reveal that LBO is more sensitive in the THz range than near-infrared, and the different viscosity index of LBO can be identified according to their different spectral features in THz range. Due to better repeatability, shorter testing time, and easy operation, THz- TDS can be used as a complementary for identifying the chemical composition of LBO.

  17. Reflectance Spectroscopy and Lunar Sample Science: Finally a Marriage After Far Too Long an Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Pieters, Carle; McKay, David S.

    1998-01-01

    Inferences about the igneous and impact evolution of planetary bodies are based upon spectral remote sensing of their surfaces. However, it is not the rocks of a body that are seen by the remote sensing, but rather the regolith, that may contain small pieces of rock but also many other phases as well. Indeed, recent flybys of objects even as small as asteroid Ida have shown that these objects are covered by a regolith. Thus, spectral properties cannot be directly converted into information about the igneous history of the object. It is imperative to fully understand the nature of the regolith, particularly its finer fraction termed "soil," to appreciate the possible effects of "space weathering" on the reflectance spectra. We have initiated a study of our nearest, regolith-bearing body, the Moon, as "ground truth" for further probes of planetary and asteroidal surfaces. the foundation for remote chemical and mineralogical analyses lies in the physics underlying optical absorption and the linking of spectral properties of materials measured in the laboratory to well understood mineral species and their mixtures. From this statement, it is obvious that there should be a thorough integration of the material science of lunar rocks and soils with the remote-sensing observations. That is, the lunar samples returned by the Apollo missions provide a direct means for evaluation of spectral characteristics of the Moon. However, this marriage of the remote-sensing and lunar sample communities has suffered from a prolonged unconsummated betrothal, nurtured by an obvious complacency by both parties. To make more direct and quantitative links between soil chemistry/mineralogy and spectral properties, we have initiated a program to (1) obtain accurate characterization of the petrography of lunar soils (in terms relevant to remote analyses), coupled with (2) measurement of precise reflectance spectra, with testing and use of appropriate analytical tools that identify and

  18. Exploration of attenuated total reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration to measure immunoglobulin G in human sera.

    PubMed

    Hou, Siyuan; Riley, Christopher B; Mitchell, Cynthia A; Shaw, R Anthony; Bryanton, Janet; Bigsby, Kathryn; McClure, J Trenton

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is crucial for the protection of the host from invasive pathogens. Due to its importance for human health, tools that enable the monitoring of IgG levels are highly desired. Consequently there is a need for methods to determine the IgG concentration that are simple, rapid, and inexpensive. This work explored the potential of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy as a method to determine IgG concentrations in human serum samples. Venous blood samples were collected from adults and children, and from the umbilical cord of newborns. The serum was harvested and tested using ATR infrared spectroscopy. Partial least squares (PLS) regression provided the basis to develop the new analytical methods. Three PLS calibrations were determined: one for the combined set of the venous and umbilical cord serum samples, the second for only the umbilical cord samples, and the third for only the venous samples. The number of PLS factors was chosen by critical evaluation of Monte Carlo-based cross validation results. The predictive performance for each PLS calibration was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient, scatter plot and Bland-Altman plot, and percent deviations for independent prediction sets. The repeatability was evaluated by standard deviation and relative standard deviation. The results showed that ATR infrared spectroscopy is potentially a simple, quick, and inexpensive method to measure IgG concentrations in human serum samples. The results also showed that it is possible to build a united calibration curve for the umbilical cord and the venous samples. PMID:26003699

  19. Evaluation of Leymus chinensis quality using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy with three different statistical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jishan; Zhu, Ruifen; Xu, Ruixuan; Zhang, Wenjun; Shen, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Due to a boom in the dairy industry in Northeast China, the hay industry has been developing rapidly. Thus, it is very important to evaluate the hay quality with a rapid and accurate method. In this research, a novel technique that combines near infrared spectroscopy (NIRs) with three different statistical analyses (MLR, PCR and PLS) was used to predict the chemical quality of sheepgrass (Leymus chinensis) in Heilongjiang Province, China including the concentrations of crude protein (CP), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF). Firstly, the linear partial least squares regression (PLS) was performed on the spectra and the predictions were compared to those with laboratory-based recorded spectra. Then, the MLR evaluation method for CP has a potential to be used for industry requirements, as it needs less sophisticated and cheaper instrumentation using only a few wavelengths. Results show that in terms of CP, ADF and NDF, (i) the prediction accuracy in terms of CP, ADF and NDF using PLS was obviously improved compared to the PCR algorithm, and comparable or even better than results generated using the MLR algorithm; (ii) the predictions were worse compared to laboratory-based spectra with the MLR algorithmin, and poor predictions were obtained (R2, 0.62, RPD, 0.9) using MLR in terms of NDF; (iii) a satisfactory accuracy with R2 and RPD by PLS method of 0.91, 3.2 for CP, 0.89, 3.1 for ADF and 0.88, 3.0 for NDF, respectively, was obtained. Our results highlight the use of the combined NIRs-PLS method could be applied as a valuable technique to rapidly and accurately evaluate the quality of sheepgrass hay. PMID:26644973

  20. Multi-band reflectance spectroscopy of carbonaceous lithium iron phosphate battery electrodes versus state of charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, R.; Iyer, K.; Chabot, V.; Nieva, P.; Yu, A.; Khajepour, A.; Wang, J.

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to expand the body of knowledge about the optical properties of battery cathode materials. Although some studies have been conducted on the optical properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate (LiFePO4), to the authors' knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on electrodes extracted from commercially available LiFePO4 batteries. The use of Vis/NIR and FTIR spectroscopy provides for a methodology to study the optical properties of LiFePO4 and may allow for the characterization of other properties such as particle size and the proportions of LiFePO4 versus FePO4 material. Knowledge of these properties is important for the development of a mechanism to measure the state-of charge (SOC) in lithium ion batteries. These properties are also important in a host of other applications including battery modeling and materials characterization. Cylindrical LiFePO4 batteries (from A123 Systems Inc.) were acquired from the commercial market and charged to 10 different states between 30% and 80% of their nominal capacity using a constant-current, constant-voltage (CCCV) cycling method. Visual inspection of the extracted electrodes shows that the LiFePO4/C-cathodes display subtle changes in color (shades of grey) with respect to SOC. Vis/NIR measurements support the visual observation of uniform intensity variations versus SOC. FTIR measurements show an absorbance signature that varies with SOC and is distinct from results found in the literature for similar LiFePO4-based material systems, supporting the uniqueness of the absorbance fingerprint.

  1. Microcirculation assessment using an individualized model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and conventional laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strömberg, Tomas; Karlsson, Hanna; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Nyström, Fredrik H.; Larsson, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    Microvascular assessment would benefit from co-registration of blood flow and hemoglobin oxygenation dynamics during stimulus response tests. We used a fiber-optic probe for simultaneous recording of white light diffuse reflectance (DRS; 475-850 nm) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF; 780 nm) spectra at two source-detector distances (0.4 and 1.2 mm). An inverse Monte Carlo algorithm, based on a multiparameter three-layer adaptive skin model, was used for analyzing DRS data. LDF spectra were conventionally processed for perfusion. The system was evaluated on volar forearm recordings of 33 healthy subjects during a 5-min systolic occlusion protocol. The calibration scheme and the optimal adaptive skin model fitted DRS spectra at both distances within 10%. During occlusion, perfusion decreased within 5 s while oxygenation decreased slowly (mean time constant 61 s dissociation of oxygen from hemoglobin). After occlusion release, perfusion and oxygenation increased within 3 s (inflow of oxygenized blood). The increased perfusion was due to increased blood tissue fraction and speed. The supranormal hemoglobin oxygenation indicates a blood flow in excess of metabolic demands. In conclusion, by integrating DRS and LDF in a fiber-optic probe, a powerful tool for assessment of blood flow and oxygenation in the same microvascular bed has been presented.

  2. Estimation of soil pH at Mount Beigu Wetland based on visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongguang; Li, Pingping; Mao, Hanping; Chen, Bin; Wang, Xi

    2006-12-01

    pH of the wetland soil is one of the most important indicators for aquatic vegetation and water bodies. Mount Beigu Wetland, just near the Yangtse River, is under ecological recovery. Visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy was adopted to estimate soil pH of the wetland. The spectroradiometer, FieldSpec 3 (ASD) with a full spectral range (350-2500 nm), was used to acquire the reflectance spectra of wetland soil, and soil pH was measured with the pH meter of IQ150 (Spectrum) and InPro 3030 (Mettler Toledo). 146 soil samples were taken with soil sampler (Eijkelkamp) according to different position and depth, which covered the wider range of pH value from 7.1 to 8.39. 133 samples were used to establish the calibration model with the method of partial least square regression and principal component analysis regression. 13 soil samples were used to validate the model. The results show that the model is not good, but the mean error and root mean standard error of prediction are less (1.846% and 0.186 respectively). Spectral reflectancebased estimation of soil pH of the wetland is applicable and the calibration model needs to be improved.

  3. Application of Genetic Algorithm in the Modeling of Leaf Chlorophyll Level Based on Vis/Nir Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haiqing; Yang, Haiqing; He, Yong

    In order to detect leaf chlorophyll level nondestructively and instantly, VIS/NIR reflection spectroscopy technique was examined. In the test, 70 leaf samples were collected for model calibration and another 50 for model verification. Each leaf sample was optically measured by USB4000, a modular spectrometer. By the observation of spectral curves, the spectral range between 650nm and 750nm was found significant for mathematic modeling of leaf chlorophyll level. SPAD-502 meter was used for chemometrical measurement of leaf chlorophyll value. In the test, it was found necessary to put leaf thickness into consideration. The procedure of shaping the prediction model is as follows: First, leaf chlorophyll level prediction equation was created with uncertain parameters. Second, a genetic algorithm was programmed by Visual Basic 6.0 for parameter optimization. As the result of the calculation, the optimal spectral range was narrowed within 683.24nm and 733.91nm. Compared with the R2=0.2309 for calibration set and R2=0.5675 for on the spectral modeling is significant: the R2 of calibration set and verification set has been improved as high as 0.8658 and 0.9161 respectively. The test showed that it is practical to use VIS/NIR reflection spectrometer for the quantitative determination of leaf chlorophyll level.

  4. Optical detection of breast tumors: a comparison of diagnostic performance of autofluorescence, diffuse reflectance, and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Shovan K.; Keller, Matthew D.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2007-02-01

    We report the results of a comparative evaluation of the diagnostic capabilities of autofluorescence, diffuse reflectance, and Raman spectroscopic approaches in differentiating the various types of breast tumors from normal breast tissues. Optical spectra (n=293) were acquired ex-vivo from a total of 75 breast tissue samples belonging to six distinct histopathologic categories: invasive ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in-situ, fibroadenoma, other benign tumors, and normal breast tissue. Autofluorescence, diffuse reflectance, and Raman spectra were measured from the same locations of a given tissue sample. A probability based multivariate statistical algorithm capable of direct multiclass classification was developed to analyze the diagnostic content of the optical spectra measured from the same set of breast tissue sites with these different techniques. The algorithm uses the theory of nonlinear Maximum Representation and Discrimination Feature (MRDF) for feature extraction, and the theory of Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression (SMLR) for classification. The results of discrimination analyses reveal that the performance of Raman spectroscopy is superior to that of all others in classifying the breast tissues into respective histopathologic categories. The best classification accuracy was observed to be ~96%, 86%, 94%, 98%, 85%, and 100% for invasive ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in-situ, fibroadenoma, benign tumors and normal breast tissues, respectively, on the basis of leave-one-out cross validation, with the overall accuracy being ~97%.

  5. Retrieving the optical parameters of biological tissues using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Fourier series expansions. I. theory and application

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz Morales, Aarón A.; Vázquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The determination of optical parameters of biological tissues is essential for the application of optical techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy is a widely used technique to analyze the optical characteristics of biological tissues. In this paper we show that by using diffuse reflectance spectra and a new mathematical model we can retrieve the optical parameters by applying an adjustment of the data with nonlinear least squares. In our model we represent the spectra using a Fourier series expansion finding mathematical relations between the polynomial coefficients and the optical parameters. In this first paper we use spectra generated by the Monte Carlo Multilayered Technique to simulate the propagation of photons in turbid media. Using these spectra we determine the behavior of Fourier series coefficients when varying the optical parameters of the medium under study. With this procedure we find mathematical relations between Fourier series coefficients and optical parameters. Finally, the results show that our method can retrieve the optical parameters of biological tissues with accuracy that is adequate for medical applications. PMID:23082281

  6. Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Neal B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2008-07-14

    Previous work on detection of low-volatility liquid organic (and organophosphorus) analytes on soil indicated strong signal in FTIR spectra in the 2966–2855 cm-1 range attributed to C–H vibrational stretching modes. This range is the focus of detection strategies examined here as an anticipated prelude to subsequent detection and classification approaches utilizing additional spectral bands. This laboratory study is being used to test detection algorithms that may be useful for rapid standoff detection of organics compounds on soil. Six signal processing methods (designed to minimize irrelevant variability in the recorded soil reflection-absorption spectra while enhancing signal from analyte compounds possibly present on soil) were studied. These included Savitzky-Golay second derivatives, extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), and a novel alternative to piece-wise EMSC. The preprocessed signal was then used for detection. Previous work utilized principal components analysis (PCA) based multivariate statistical process control methodologies for detection. Six alternative anomaly detection statistics were examined here that were based on the preprocessed signal, weighted signal, and generalized weighted signal. The latter statistic can be considered easier than PCA with many of the same benefits. Two tests corresponding to different monitoring strategies were examined: test data ‘local’ and ‘non-local’ to the calibration data. Although the results are expected to be optimistic, the generalized weighted approach worked extremely well for the ‘local’ detection test, but was less successful for ‘non-local’ test. Results suggest that good characterization of analyte-free soil prior to monitoring will lead to the best detection performance. Second derivative preprocessing showed the best results on receiver operator characteristic curves and it’s ease of application is a distinct advantage. However, it may not be universally successful

  7. Real-time multi-analyte label-free detection of proteins by white light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Panagiota; Koukouvinos, Georgios; Drygiannakis, Dimitrios; Goustouridis, Dimitris; Raptis, Ioannis; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Kakabakos, Sotirios E.

    2014-03-01

    Label-free optical sensors are considered ideal for biomedical analysis since they provide the advantages of multiplex and real-time detection. They still suffer; however, from lower sensitivity and/or more sophisticated equipment as compared to indirect detection methods. Here, we propose a label-free sensor based on White Light Reflectance Spectroscopy that overcomes the limitation of high cost and low detection sensitivity. The optical setup consists of a VIS-NIR light source, a spectrometer and a reflection probe. The sensor is Si with 1-μm thick thermal SiO2 and functionalized with antibodies. The incident light is directed vertically to sensor surface and the reflected interference spectrum is recorded through the spectrometer. The evolution of the biomolecular reactions are monitored in real-time by monitoring the shifts in the interference spectrum. Up to seven different reactions sites have been created onto the same sensing surface allowing for multi-analyte determinations. The analytical capabilities of the proposed sensor were demonstrated through the development of a sensitive immunoassay for the detection of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in human serum samples. CRP, a biomarker related to acute inflammatory incidents, it has attracted particular interest as a marker of inflammation associated with cardiovascular diseases. The lowest CRP concentration detected was 10 ng/mL, and the dynamic range of the assay was extended up to 500 ng/mL. Regeneration of antibody coated sensing areas for up to 20 times without loss of immobilized antibody reactivity is also presented. In conclusion, the proposed sensing system is characterized by low cost, high assay sensitivity and, reliability.

  8. Assessment of microcirculation frequency components through functional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a promising tool for noninvasive skin diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargo, Paulo R.; Seo, InSeok; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    Measurement of cutaneous microcirculation is of great importance for clinical evaluations as many biological processes (i.e. inflammation) activate superficial vessels. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) is a widely used method to assess cutaneous microcirculation since it is based on the spectral characteristics of skin chromophores, particularly the strong absorption bands of blood in the visible spectral range. However, the DRS system only provides a snapshot of the blood content in tissue from the reflectance detected at a single exposure time, and it fails to demonstrate dynamic changes of blood flow inside the tissues. In the present study, a prototype system for functional DRS (fDRS) has been developed for the sequential acquisition of multiple reflectance spectra in the visible range at sub-second intervals. Twelve healthy subjects with skin phototype I-III were recruited for a UV skin phototest where the subject's back was exposed to an increasing dose of solar-simulated radiation at a maximum of 3 minimum erythema dose (MED). Evaluations included conventional DRS, functional DRS, and a laser Doppler flowmeter/imaging system. In a frequency analysis results, there were two distinctive frequency components. A low-frequency component was found near 0.03-0.1 Hz, and another high-frequency component near 0.9-1.2 Hz which is synchronous with heart pulsations. The magnitude of the high-frequency and the steady-state components of the fDRS signal increased with increase in exposure dose. These results demonstrate the potential of this technique for noninvasive assessment of cutaneous microcirculation.

  9. Mapping of healthy oral mucosal tissue using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: ratiometric-based total hemoglobin comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Razan; Hamadah, Omar; Bachir, Wesam

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clinically evaluate the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) ratiometric method for differentiation of normal oral mucosal tissues with different histological natures and vascularizations in the oral cavity. Twenty-one healthy patients aged 20-44 years were diagnosed as healthy and probed with a portable DRS system. Diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded in vivo in the range (450-650 nm). In this study, the following three oral mucosal tissues were considered: masticatory mucosa, lining mucosa, and specialized mucosa. Spectral features based on spectral intensity ratios were determined at five specific wavelengths (512, 540, 558, 575, and 620 nm). Total hemoglobin based on spectral ratios for the three anatomical regions have also been evaluated. The three studied groups representing different anatomical regions in the oral cavity were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc least significant difference tests. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the mean of diffuse spectral ratios between the groups (P < 0.05). Post hoc test detected significant difference between masticatory mucosa group and lining mucosa group (P < 0.05) and between masticatory mucosa group and specialized mucosa group (P = 0.000, at ratio 558/620 and P = 0.000, at ratio 575/620). Significant difference was also found between the lining mucosa group and specialized mucosa group (P = 0.000, at ratio 512/558 and P = 0.000, at ratio 512/575). It has also been shown that spectral ratios at wavelengths 558, 575, and 620 nm reveal the greatest difference among the main oral sites in terms of total hemoglobin content. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy might be used for creating a DRS databank of normal oral mucosal tissue with specific spectral ratios featuring the total hemoglobin concentrations. That would further enhance the discrimination of oral tissue for examining the histological nature of oral mucosa

  10. Reflectance spectroscopy (350-2500 nm) of solid-state polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Applin, D. M.; Norman, L.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2014-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic compounds based on fused aromatic rings, and are formed in a variety of astrophysical, solar nebula and planetary processes. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are known or suspected to occur in a wide variety of planetary settings including icy satellites, Titan’s hazes, carbonaceous meteorites, comet nuclei, ring particles; and terrestrial organic-rich lithologies such as coals, asphaltites, and bituminous sands. Relatively few measurements of the visible and near-infrared spectra of PAHs exist, yet this wavelength region (350-2500 nm) is widely used for remote sensing. This study presents detailed analyses of the 350-2500 nm reflectance spectra of 47 fine-grained powders of different high-purity solid-state PAHs. Spectral properties of PAHs change with variations in the number and connectivity of linked aromatic rings and the presence and type of side-groups and heterocycles. PAH spectra are characterized by three strong features near ∼880 nm, ∼1145 nm, and ∼1687 nm due to overtones of νCH fundamental stretching vibrations. Some PAHs are amenable to remote detection due to the presence of diagnostic spectral features, including: Nsbnd H stretching overtones at 1490-1515 nm in NH- and NH2-bearing PAHs, aliphatic or saturated bond Csbnd H overtone vibrations at ∼1180-1280 nm and ∼1700-1860 nm; a broad asymmetric feature between ∼1450 nm and ∼1900 nm due to Osbnd H stretching overtones in aromatic alcohols, Csbnd H and Cdbnd O combinations near ∼2000-2010 nm and ∼2060-2270 nm in acetyl and carboxyl-bearing PAHs. Other substituents such as sulphonyl, thioether ether and carboxyl heterocycles, or cyano, nitrate, and aromatic side groups, do not produce well-resolved diagnostic spectral features but do cause shifts in the positions of the aromatic Csbnd H vibrational overtone features. Fluorescence is commonly suppressed by the presence of heterocycles, side-groups and in many non-alternant PAHs

  11. Study of the oxidation of uranium by external and diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy using remote-sensing and evacuable cell techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, G. L.; Dobbins, A.; Cristy, S. S.; Cliff, T. L.; Meyer, H. M., III; Lucania, J.; Milosevic, Milan

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the application of reflectance FTIR spectroscopy to the measurement of the oxidation rate of uranium by environmental gases near room temperature. It also describes very efficient evacuable cells designed for 75 degree(s) external reflectance with polarized light and for diffuse reflectance using mid-infrared FTIR spectroscopy. These cells, along with functionally similar remote sensing accessories, have been applied to the study of the oxidation of uranium metal in air, oxygen, and water vapor by precisely measuring the 575 cm-1 band of UO2 and other properties of the corrosion film such as absorbed water and reflective losses caused by film degradation related to pitting or nucleation phenomena.

  12. Rapid estimation of taro (Colocasia esculenta) quality by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lebot, Vincent; Malapa, Roger; Bourrieau, Marion

    2011-09-14

    The aim of the present study is to develop a methodology for the rapid estimation of taro (Colocasia esculenta) quality. Chemical analyses were conducted on 315 accessions for major constituents (starch, total sugars, cellulose, proteins, and minerals). NIRS calibration equations, developed on a calibration set composed of 243 accessions, showed high explained variances in cross-validation (r(2)(cv)) for starch (0.89), sugars (0.90), proteins (0.89), and minerals (0.90) but poor response for amylose (0.44) and cellulose (0.61). The predictions were tested on an independent set of 58 randomly selected accessions. The r(2)(pred) values for starch, sugars, proteins, and minerals were, respectively, of 0.76, 0.74, 0.85, and 0.85 with ratios of performance to deviation (RPD) of 3.41, 4.01, 3.78, and 3.64. New calibration equations developed on 303 accessions confirmed good RPD values for starch (3.30), sugars (4.13), proteins (3.61), and minerals (3.74). NIRS could be used to predict starch, sugars, proteins, and minerals contents in taro corms with reasonably high confidence. PMID:21806061

  13. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  14. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  15. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-selected Ions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, K. Don Dasitha; Laskin, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+ (bpy = bipyridine), onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces. PMID:24961913

  16. Individual attentional selection capacities are reflected in interhemispheric connectivity of the parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Simone; Weidner, Ralph; Moos, Katharina; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-04-01

    Modelling psychophysical data using the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA) allows for a quantification of attentional sub-processes, such as the resolution of competition amongst multiple stimuli by top-down control signals for target selection (TVA-parameter α). This fMRI study investigated the neural correlates of α by comparing activity differences and changes of effective connectivity between conditions where a target was accompanied by a distractor or by a second target. Twenty-five participants performed a partial report task inside the MRI scanner. The left angular gyrus (ANG), medial frontal, and posterior cingulate cortex showed higher activity when a target was accompanied by a distractor as opposed to a second target. The reverse contrast yielded activation of a bilateral fronto-parietal network, the anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and left inferior occipital gyrus. A psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed that the connectivity between left ANG and the left and right supramarginal gyrus (SMG), left anterior insula, and right putamen was enhanced in the target-distractor condition in participants with worse attentional top-down control. Dynamic causal modelling suggested that the connection from left ANG to right SMG during distractor presence was modulated by α. Our data show that interindividual differences in attentional processing are reflected in changes of effective connectivity without significant differences in activation strength of network nodes. PMID:26827815

  17. Exploring Optical Contrast in Ex-Vivo Breast Tissue Using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy and Tissue Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Stephanie Ann

    was negatively correlated with age, BMI and average cell area. but positively related to the log of the average cell density. In addition, BMI was positively correlated to average cell area and negatively related to log of the cell density. In non-adipose sites, age was negatively correlated to <μs‧> in benign and malignant sites and this correlation varied significantly by the collagen level. BMI was negatively correlated to <μs‧> in benign and malignant sites but this relationship did not vary by collagen level. MBD was positively correlated to <μs‧> in benign and malignant sites. Optical scattering was shown to be tied to patient demographics. Lastly, the analysis of collagen vs. glands was narrowed to investigate sites with glands between 0-40% (the dynamic range of the data), the linear model reflected an equivalent relationship to scattering from % glands and the % collagen in benign sites. In addition, the malignant sites showed a stronger positive relationship to <μs‧> compared to the benign sites. The data indicate that the ability of an optical parameter to differentiate benign from malignant breast tissues is dictated by patient demographics. Scattering differentiated between malignant and adipose sites and would be most effective in post-menopausal women. [β-carotene] or [THb] may be more applicable in pre-menopausal women to differentiate malignant from fibrous sites. Patient demographics are therefore an important component to incorporate into optical characterization of breast specimens. Through the subsequent stepwise analysis of tissue morphology, <μs‧> was positively correlated to collagen and negatively correlated to age and BMI. Increased variability of <μs‧> with collagen level was not dependent on the adipose contribution. A stronger correlation between age and <μ s‧> was seen in high collagen sites compared to low collagen sites. Contributions from collagen and glands to <μs‧> were independent and equivalent in benign

  18. RXTE, Chandra, and XMM Spectroscopy of the Fe-K Lines and Compton Reflection in Type 1 AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir

    2004-01-01

    This award pertains to an RXTE observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Akn 120. The purpose of the observation was to measure the Fe-K emission line and the Compton reflection continuum with RXTE, simultaneously with Chandra and XMM. Such measurements can severely constrain accretion disk models of the central engine since the Fe-K line emission and Compton reflection are intimately related in terms of the physics of X-ray reprocessing in optically-thick matter. Akn 120 was selected for this study because it is amongst the brightest AGN in its class and has a particularly strong and apparently broad Fe-K emission line. The results could then also be used to lay the ground work for even higher resolution studies with Astro-E2. Unfortunately, the Chandra observation was not performed but a contemporaneous XMM observation was performed by another group of researchers. Those data recently became public and can be compared with the RXTE data. In addition, non-contemporaneous observations with other missions do still provide additional important constraints (for example any non-varying line or continuum emission components can be established and used to reject or preserve various model scenarios). We analyzed the RXTE data and found a strong Fe-K emission line (resolved even with the poor resolution of RXTE), and a strong Compton-reflection continuum (see Fig. l(a)). We found that the results of archival ASCA data on Akn 120 had not been published in the literature so we analyzed the ASCA data too, in order to compare with the new RXTE data. Fig. l(b) shows that the ASCA data also reveal a strong, broad FeK emission line (but the data are not sensitive to the Compton-reflection continuum). We compared our spectral fitting results for the RXTE and ASCA data with the results from XMM and from previous RXTE observations.

  19. Ir Spectroscopy on Peptides and Proteins after Ion Mobility Selection and in Liquid Helium Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Helden, Gert

    2015-06-01

    IR spectroscopy has become a frequently used tool to characterize gas-phase peptides and proteins. In many experiments, ions are m/z selected, irradiated by intense and tunable IR light and fragmentation is monitored as a function of IR wavelength. The presence of different conformers can, however, complicate the interpretation, as the resulting spectra represent the sum of the spectra of the individual components. We constructed a setup, in which ion mobility methods are used to obtain m/z selected ions of defined shape on which are then further investigated by IR spectroscopy. First results on peptide aggregates are presented and for some of those, the IR spectra show a transition from helical or random coil to beta sheet structures. In a different experiment, peptide or protein ions are captures in liquid helium droplets prior to IR spectroscopic investigation. The conditions inside a helium droplet are isothermal at 0.38 K and the interaction between the helium matrix and the molecules are weak so that only small perturbations on the molecule are expected. IR spectra for m/z selected peptides with up to 10 aminoacids and proteins containing more than 100 aminoacids have been measured. The spectra of the smaller species show resolved bands of individual oscillators, which can be used for structure assignment. For the larger species, band envelopes are obtained and for the case of highly charged proteins, a transition form helical to extended structures is observed.

  20. Rapid, specific determination of iodine and iodide by combined solid-phase extraction/diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Matteo P.; Porter, Marc D.; Fritz, James S.

    2002-01-01

    A new, rapid methodology for trace analysis using solid-phase extraction is described. The two-step methodology is based on the concentration of an analyte onto a membrane disk and on the determination by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of the amount of analyte extracted on the disk surface. This method, which is adaptable to a wide range of analytes, has been used for monitoring ppm levels of iodine and iodide in spacecraft water. Iodine is used as a biocide in spacecraft water. For these determinations, a water sample is passed through a membrane disk by means of a 10-mL syringe that is attached to a disk holder assembly. The disk, which is a polystyrene-divinylbenzene composite, is impregnated with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), which exhaustively concentrates iodine as a yellow iodine-PVP complex. The amount of concentrated iodine is then determined in only 2 s by using a hand-held diffuse reflectance spectrometer by comparing the result with a calibration curve based on the Kubelka-Munk function. The same general procedure can be used to determine iodide levels after its facile and exhaustive oxidation to iodine by peroxymonosulfate (i.e., Oxone reagent). For samples containing both analytes, a two-step procedure can be used in which the iodide concentration is calculated from the difference in iodine levels before and after treatment of the sample with peroxymonosulfate. With this methodology, iodine and iodide levels in the 0.1-5.0 ppm range can be determined with a total workup time of approximately 60 s with a RSD of approximately 6%.