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Sample records for selective reflection spectroscopy

  1. [Rapid selection of white clover germplasms' crude protein traits by SPAD and Fourier transform near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Yan, Rong; Cao, Wen-juan; Shu, Bin; Zhang, Ying-jun

    2009-09-01

    White clover is one of the most important forages in the world, with high nutritive value and crude protein content. Crude protein traits of white clover germplasms was selected using SPAD and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The SPAD value was measured by Chlorophyll Meter SPAD-502, and was used to evaluate the crude protein of white clover. In the vegetative period, there was a positive relationship between SPAD value and foliar protein content (y = 0.422x + 4.984, R2 = 0.737), but in the flowering period, there was a negative relationship between the two indexes (y = -0.345x + 37.50, R2 = 0.711). Crude protein content of white clover germplasms was predicted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy with PLS regression and the model was validated by cross validation and external validation. The results showed that the correlation coefficient of cross validation, the RMSECV, and the correlation coefficient of external validation are 0.904, 0.988%, and 0.987, respectively. NIRS model of white clover crude protein content has good accuracy and precision. FT-NIRS was more accurate than SPAD. NIRS is feasible as a rapid analysis method, and can be used in the selection and breeding of white clover germplasms to improve the breeding efficiency. PMID:19950635

  2. Electronic and optical properties of selected polymers studied by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Dahlang; Tougaard, Sven

    2012-03-01

    We have determined the electronic and optical properties of six polymers: Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyester (PET), polypyrrole (PPY), and polyamide (PA6) for energy losses from 0 to 70 eV by analysis of reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectra. We found that the surface was easily damaged by the incident electron beam, in particular for energies above 500 eV. The damage results in new peaks in the bandgap region and the polymers become metallic. Great care was exerted to determine experimental conditions under which these effects are minimized. The REELS spectra were corrected for multiple inelastically scattered electrons with the QUASES-XS-REELS software to determine the effective inelastic-scattering cross sections. From these cross sections, we found that the band gaps for PMMA, PE, PVC, PET, PPY, and PA6 are 5.0 eV, 7.5 eV, 7.0 eV, 3.0 eV, 3.5 eV, and 5.1 eV, respectively. Quantitative analysis of the experimental cross sections was carried out by using the QUEELS-ɛ(k,ω)-REELS software to determine the dielectric function and optical properties. This is done by comparing the experimental REELS inelastic electron-scattering cross-section with a simulated cross section in which the only input is Im(-1/ɛ). The dielectric function is expressed as a sum of oscillators and the oscillator parameters are determined. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical cross section is achieved for all polymers. From Im(-1/ɛ), the real and imaginary parts of ɛ (ω), the refractive index, and the extinction coefficient were determined for all polymers in the energy range ћω = 0 to 70 eV. An oscillator is clearly observed for PPY, PET, and PA6 at ˜ 6.7 eV, which corresponds to the π plasmon. This oscillator is not found for PMMA, PE, and PVC. A set of oscillators in the 20-30 eV energy range corresponding to the σ+π plasmon is found for all polymers.

  3. In situ Studies of Soft- and Reactive Landing of Mass-Selected Ions Using Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qichi; Wang, Peng; Gassman, Paul L.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-09-01

    Grazing incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) for in situ and in real time characterization of substrates modified by soft- and reactive landing (SL and RL) of complex ions was implemented on a mass-selected ion deposition instrument. Ions produced by electrospray ionization were mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and deposited onto inert and reactive self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Surface composition during and after ion deposition was monitored using IRRAS. Physisorption of a cyclic peptide, Garmicidin S (GS), was studied for 8 hrs during deposition and additional 12 hrs after the end of deposition. The integrated signal of the characteristic amide bands followed a linear increase during the deposition and stayed unchanged after the deposition was finished. Similar linear increase in IRRAS signal was obtained following reactive deposition of the protonated dodecanediamine onto SAMs of dithiobis (succinimidyl undecanoate) (NHS-SAM) and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid fluoride (COF-SAM) on gold. IRRAS allowed us to monitor for the first time the formation of the amide bond between reactive SAM surfaces and the projectile molecule.

  4. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  5. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  6. Green method by diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy and spectral region selection for the quantification of sulphamethoxazole and trimethoprim in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fabiana E B da; Flores, Érico M M; Parisotto, Graciele; Müller, Edson I; Ferrão, Marco F

    2016-03-01

    An alternative method for the quantification of sulphametoxazole (SMZ) and trimethoprim (TMP) using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and partial least square regression (PLS) was developed. Interval Partial Least Square (iPLS) and Synergy Partial Least Square (siPLS) were applied to select a spectral range that provided the lowest prediction error in comparison to the full-spectrum model. Fifteen commercial tablet formulations and forty-nine synthetic samples were used. The ranges of concentration considered were 400 to 900 mg g-1SMZ and 80 to 240 mg g-1 TMP. Spectral data were recorded between 600 and 4000 cm-1 with a 4 cm-1 resolution by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The proposed procedure was compared to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results obtained from the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), during the validation of the models for samples of sulphamethoxazole (SMZ) and trimethoprim (TMP) using siPLS, demonstrate that this approach is a valid technique for use in quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations. The selected interval algorithm allowed building regression models with minor errors when compared to the full spectrum PLS model. A RMSEP of 13.03 mg g-1for SMZ and 4.88 mg g-1 for TMP was obtained after the selection the best spectral regions by siPLS. PMID:26959321

  7. Reflection spectroscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Haugen, Olav A.; Barkost, Marianne; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2006-03-01

    Heart disease is the primary cause of death in the western world. Many of these deaths are caused by the rupture of vulnerable plaque. Vulnerable plaques are characterized by a large lipid core covered by a thin fibrous cap. One method for detecting these plaques is reflection spectroscopy. Several studies have investigated this method using statistical methods. A more analytic and quantitative study might yield more insight into the sensitivity of this detection modality. This is the approach taken in this work. Reflectance spectra in the spectral region from 400 to 1700 nm are collected from 77 measurement points from 23 human aortas. A measure of lipid content in a plaque based on reflection spectra is presented. The measure of lipid content is compared with the thickness of the lipid core, determined from histology. Defining vulnerable plaque as having a lipid core >500 µm and fibrous cap <500 µm, vulnerable plaques are detected with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 94%. Although the method can detect lipid content, it is not very sensitive to the thickness of the fibrous cap. Another detection modality is necessary to detect this feature.

  8. Selected techniques in radioecology: Model development and comparison for internal dosimetry of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and feasibiltiy assessment of reflectance spectroscopy use as a tool in phytoremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Nicole

    Factors (DCFs) for whole body as well as selected organs of O. mykiss were computed using Monte Carlo modeling, and combined with the empirical models for predicting activity concentration, to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (microGy) to selected organs after several half-lives of either 131I or 99Mo. The different computational models provided similar results, especially for organs that were both the source and target of radiation (less than 30% difference between estimated doses). Part 2 considers the use of reflectance spectroscopy as a remediation tool through its potential to determine plant stress from metal contaminants. The studies in Part 2 further investigate the potential use of reflectance spectroscopy as a method for assessing metal stress in plants. In the first study, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were treated twice weekly in a laboratory setting with varying levels (0 mM, 0.5 mM, or 5 mM) of cesium chloride (CsCl) solution, and reflectance spectra were collected every week for three weeks using an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer with both a contact probe and a field of view probe at 36.8 and 66.7 cm above the plant. As metal stress is known to mimic drought stress, plants were harvested each week after spectra collection for determination of relative water content and chlorophyll content. A visual assessment of the plants was also conducted using point observations on a uniform grid of 81 points. Two-way ANOVAs were performed on selected vegetation indices (VI) to determine the significance of the effects of treatment level and length of treatment. Linear regression was used to relate the most appropriate vegetation indices to the aforementioned endpoints and to compare results provided by the three different spectra collection techniques. One-way ANOVAs were performed on selected VI at each time point to determine which, if any, indices offered a significant prediction of the overall extent of Cs toxicity. Of the

  9. High spectral resolution reflectance spectroscopy of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; King, T.V.V.; Klejwa, M.; Swayze, G.A.; Vergo, N.

    1990-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of minerals are studied as a function of spectral resolution in the range from 0.2 to 3.0 ??m. Selected absorption bands were studied at resolving powers (??/????) as high as 2240. At resolving powers of approximately 1000, many OH-bearing minerals show diagnostic sharp absorptions at the resolution limit. At low resolution, some minerals may not be distinguishable, but as the resolution is increased, most can be easily identified. As the resolution is increased, many minerals show fine structure, particularly in the OH-stretching overtone region near 1.4 ??m. The fine structure can enhance the ability to discriminate between minerals, and in some cases the fine structure can be used to determine elemental composition. The study shows that high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy of minerals may prove to be a very important tool in the laboratory, in the field using field-portable spectrometers, from aircraft, and from satellites looking at Earth or other planetary surfaces. -from Authors

  10. Validation of a model for on-line classification of U.S. Select beef carcasses for longissimus tenderness using visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to provide a validation of a previously developed model for on-line classification of U.S. Select carcasses for LM tenderness based on visible and near-infrared (VISNIR) spectroscopy and to determine if the accuracy of VISNIR-based tenderness classification could...

  11. Selected techniques in radioecology: Model development and comparison for internal dosimetry of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and feasibiltiy assessment of reflectance spectroscopy use as a tool in phytoremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Nicole

    Factors (DCFs) for whole body as well as selected organs of O. mykiss were computed using Monte Carlo modeling, and combined with the empirical models for predicting activity concentration, to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (microGy) to selected organs after several half-lives of either 131I or 99Mo. The different computational models provided similar results, especially for organs that were both the source and target of radiation (less than 30% difference between estimated doses). Part 2 considers the use of reflectance spectroscopy as a remediation tool through its potential to determine plant stress from metal contaminants. The studies in Part 2 further investigate the potential use of reflectance spectroscopy as a method for assessing metal stress in plants. In the first study, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were treated twice weekly in a laboratory setting with varying levels (0 mM, 0.5 mM, or 5 mM) of cesium chloride (CsCl) solution, and reflectance spectra were collected every week for three weeks using an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer with both a contact probe and a field of view probe at 36.8 and 66.7 cm above the plant. As metal stress is known to mimic drought stress, plants were harvested each week after spectra collection for determination of relative water content and chlorophyll content. A visual assessment of the plants was also conducted using point observations on a uniform grid of 81 points. Two-way ANOVAs were performed on selected vegetation indices (VI) to determine the significance of the effects of treatment level and length of treatment. Linear regression was used to relate the most appropriate vegetation indices to the aforementioned endpoints and to compare results provided by the three different spectra collection techniques. One-way ANOVAs were performed on selected VI at each time point to determine which, if any, indices offered a significant prediction of the overall extent of Cs toxicity. Of the

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites.

  13. Soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Nkenke, Emeka; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre

    2009-07-01

    Laser surgery gives the possibility to work remotely which leads to high precision, little trauma and high level sterility. However these advantages are coming with the lack of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Therefore additional means are required to control tissue-specific ablation during laser surgery supporting the surgeon regardless of experience and skills. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from four various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the four tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerve as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating soft tissues as guidance for tissue-specific laser surgery by means of the diffuse reflectance.

  14. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of liver tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Nilsson, Jan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Sturesson, Christian; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic contact probe is a cost-effective, rapid, and non-invasive optical method used to extract diagnosis information of tissue. By combining commercially available VIS- and NIR-spectrometers with various fiber-optic contact-probes, we have access to the full wavelength range from around 400 to 1600 nm. Using this flexible and portable spectroscopy system, we have acquired ex-vivo DRS-spectra from murine, porcine, and human liver tissue. For extracting the tissue optical properties from the measured spectra, we have employed and compared predictions from two models for light propagation in tissue, diffusion theory model (DT) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC). The focus in this work is on the capacity of this DRS-technique in discriminating metastatic tumor tissue from normal liver tissue as well as in assessing and characterizing damage to non-malignant liver tissue induced by preoperative chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastases.

  15. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  16. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-06-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  17. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of GEO Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tammaso; Lederer, Susan M.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Bedard, Donald

    2013-01-01

    We report on optical reflection spectroscopy of geosynchronous (GEO) objects in the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. These observations were obtained using imaging spectrographs on the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to determine the composition of these objects by comparing these spectral observations with ground-based laboratory measurements of spacecraft materials. The observations are all low resolution (1 nm after smoothing) obtained through a 5 arcsecond wide slit and using a grism as the dispersing element. The spectral range covered was from 450 nm to 800 nm. All spectra were flux calibrated using observations of standard stars with the exact same instrumental setup. An effort was made to obtain all observations within a limited range of topocentric phase angle, although the solar incident angle is unknown due to the lack of any knowledge of the attitude of the observed surface at the time of observation.

  18. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  19. Specular Reflection and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies on the occurrence and effects of specular reflection in mid-infrared spectra of soils have shown that distortions due to specular reflection occur for both organic (humic acid) and non-organic fractions (carbonates, silica, ashed fraction of soil). The results demonstrated explain why the s...

  20. An automatic detection software for differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Seniha Esen; Dubroca, Thierry; Hummel, Rolf E.; Gader, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    Recent terrorist attacks have sprung a need for a large scale explosive detector. Our group has developed differential reflection spectroscopy which can detect explosive residue on surfaces such as parcel, cargo and luggage. In short, broad band ultra-violet and visible light is shone onto a material (such as a parcel) moving on a conveyor belt. Upon reflection off the surface, the light intensity is recorded with a spectrograph (spectrometer in combination with a CCD camera). This reflected light intensity is then subtracted and normalized with the next data point collected, resulting in differential reflection spectra in the 200-500 nm range. Explosives show spectral finger-prints at specific wavelengths, for example, the spectrum of 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) shows an absorption edge at 420 nm. Additionally, we have developed an automated software which detects the characteristic features of explosives. One of the biggest challenges for the algorithm is to reach a practical limit of detection. In this study, we introduce our automatic detection software which is a combination of principal component analysis and support vector machines. Finally we present the sensitivity and selectivity response of our algorithm as a function of the amount of explosive detected on a given surface.

  1. Apollo 17 Soil Characterization for Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Pieters, C.; Patchen, A.; Morris, R. V.; Keller, L. P.; Wentworth, S.; McKay, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    It is the fine fractions that dominate the observed spectral signatures of bulk lunar soil, and the next to the smallest size fractions are the most similar to the overall properties of the bulk soil. Thus, our Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium has concentrated on understanding the inter-relations of compositional, mineralogical, and optical properties of the <45-micron size fraction and its component sizes (20-44 micron, 10-20 micron, and <10 micron size fractions). To be able to generalize our results beyond the particular sample set studied, it is necessary to quantitatively identify the observed effects of space weathering and evaluate the processes involved. For this, it is necessary to know the chemistry of each size fraction, modal abundances of each phase, average compositions of the minerals and glasses, I(sub s)/FeO values, reflectance spectra, and the physical makeup of the individual particles and their patinas. This characterization includes the important dissection of the pyroxene minerals into four separate populations, with data on both modes and average chemical compositions. Armed with such data, it should be possible to effectively isolate spectral effects of space weathering from spectral properties related to mineral and glass chemistry. Four mare soils from the Apollo 17 site were selected for characterization based upon similarities in bulk composition and their contrasting maturities, ranging from immature to submature to mature. The methodology of our characterization has been discussed previously. Results of the Apollo 17 mare soils, outlined herein, are being prepared for publication in MAPS. As shown, with decreasing grain size, the agglutinitic (impact) glass content profoundly increases. This is the most impressive change for the mare soils. In several soils we have examined, there is an over two-fold increase in the agglutinitic glass contents between the 90-150- micron and the 10-20-micron size fractions. Accompanying this

  2. Forensic applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungol, Mary W.; Bartick, Edward G.; Reffner, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy in forensic science are discussed. Internal reflection spectra of single fibers, hairs, paint chips, vehicle rubber bumpers, photocopy toners, carbon copies, writing ink on paper, lipstick on tissue, black electrical tape, and other types of forensic evidence have been obtained. The technique is convenient, non-destructive, and may permit smeared materials to be analyzed in situ.

  3. Does Spectral Format Matter in Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near- and more recently, mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy have come to be extensively used to determine the composition of products ranging from forages to drugs. In these methods, spectra are generally collected as (Reflectance or R) and transformed to log (1/R) according to the Beer-...

  4. Estimating soil quality indicators with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid estimation of soil quality is needed for determining and mapping soil variability in site-specific management. One technology that can fulfill this need is diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, which measures light reflected from the soil in the visible and near infrared wavelength bands. Reflecta...

  5. Reflectance spectroscopy for evaluating hair follicle cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Caihua; Guan, Yue; Wang, Jianru; Zhu, Dan

    2014-02-01

    Hair follicle, as a mini-organ with perpetually cycling of telogen, anagen and catagen, provides a valuable experimental model for studying hair and organ regeneration. The transition of hair follicle from telogen to anagen is a significant sign for successful regeneration. So far discrimination of the hair follicle stage is mostly based on canonical histological examination and empirical speculation based on skin color. Hardly a method has been proposed to quantitatively evaluate the hair follicle stage. In this work, a commercial optical fiber spectrometer was applied to monitor diffuse reflectance of mouse skin with hair follicle cycling, and then the change of reflectance was obtained. Histological examination was used to verify the hair follicle stage. In comparison with the histological examination, the skin diffuse reflectance was relatively high for mouse with telogen hair follicles; it decreased once hair follicles transited to anagen stage; then it increased reversely at catagen stage. This study provided a new method to quantitatively evaluate the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for the basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  6. Passive optical element with selective angular reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, C.; Rheault, F.; Boulay, R.; Tremblay, R.

    1987-02-01

    This work is related to the development of passive selective transmission materials that will contribute to regularize the solar thermal gain. We propose an original solution to the problem of seasonal control of energetic input into buildings through windows. A passive optical element with selective angular reflection is used to solve this problem. This optical element allows sunlight to enter windows during the fall and winter, whereas, owing to the different astronomical path of the sun, it stops and rejects direct sunlight by means of the optical effect called total internal reflection (TIR) during the central spring-Summer period. The purpose of this paper is to describe the optical element in some detail, to develop the principal design equations, and give the results of the optimization of optical and geometrical parameters.

  7. Combined theory of reflectance and emittance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    The theory in which either or both reflected sunlight and thermally emitted radiation contribute to the power received by a detector viewing a particulate medium, such as a powder in the laboratory or a planetary regolith, is considered theoretically. This theory is of considerable interest for the interpretation of data from field or spacecraft instruments that are sensitive to the near-infrared region of the spectrum, such as NIMS (near-infrared mapping spectrometer) and VIMS (visual and infrared mapping spectrometer), as well as thermal infrared detectors.

  8. Analytical study of spacecraft deposition contamination by internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of ten individual contaminant materials and four binary mixtures of these have been studied using the internal reflection spectroscopy technique. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on these contaminants has also been studied. It has been observed that all siloxanes, silanes, and esters are drastically affected by ultraviolet irradiation. In most cases polymerization and tar formation results.

  9. Soil phosphorus and potassium estimation by reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visible and near infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has potential in site-specific measurement of soil properties. However, previous studies have reported VNIR estimates of plant available soil phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) to be of variable accuracy. In this study, we used a databa...

  10. Estimating a soil quality index with VNIR reflectance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sensor-based approaches to assessment and quantification of soil quality are important to facilitate cost-effective, site-specific soil management. The objective of this research was to evaluate the ability of visible, near-infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to estimate multiple soil q...

  11. Instrumentation for Reflectance Spectroscopy and Microspectroscopy with Application to Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    We present instrument concepts for in-situ reflectance spectroscopy over a spatial resolution range from several meters to tens of micrometers. These have been adapted to the low mass and power requirements of rover or similar platforms. Described are a miniaturized imaging spectrometer for rover mast, a combined mast and arm point spectrometer, and an imaging microspectrometer for the rover arm.

  12. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2005-08-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  13. Reflection Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Surface Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    1996-05-01

    This book is a comprehensive review of the theories, techniques and applications of reflection electron microscopy (REM), reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). The book is divided into three parts: diffraction, imaging and spectroscopy. The text is written to combine basic techniques with special applications, theories with experiments, and the basic physics with materials science, so that a full picture of RHEED and REM emerges. An entirely self-contained study, the book contains much invaluable reference material, including FORTRAN source codes for calculating crystal structures data and electron energy-loss spectra in different scattering geometries. This and many other features makes the book an important and timely addition to the materials science literature for researchers and graduate students in physics and materials science.

  14. Terahertz reflection spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy-Hoppa, Megan R.; Fitch, Michael J.; Osiander, Robert

    2008-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has been demonstrated as a promising tool for detection of explosives and is being developed for aviation screening and sensing of improvised explosive devices. THz radiation is attractive for many applications due to its ability to penetrate through a wide range of dielectric materials including clothing, paper, cardboard, plastics, and wood. Of course, metals block THz waves as is the case for microwave, IR, and visible light. Our work has involved investigating the reflection spectroscopy of a variety of materials including explosives such as RDX and PETN, plastic explosive taggants such as DMDNB, and other organic materials. We have also investigated the changes of the reflection spectra in varying grades of sucrose. Spectral differences are observed between three grades of crystalline sugar in the region from 0.1 to 1 THz. By exploiting the unique spectral features, the discrimination capabilities of THz reflection spectroscopy points to the broad applicability of identifying a wide variety of materials.

  15. Pancreatic tissue assessment using fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Malavika; Heidt, David; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Scheiman, James; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2007-07-01

    The ability of multi-modal optical spectroscopy to detect signals from pancreatic tissue was demonstrated by studying human pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice and freshly excised human pancreatic tumor tissue. Measured optical spectra and fluorescence decays were correlated with tissue morphological and biochemical properties. The measured spectral features and decay times correlated well with expected pathological differences in normal, pancreatitis and adenocarcinoma tissue states. The observed differences between the fluorescence and reflectance properties of normal, pancreatitis and adenocarcinoma tissue indicate a possible application of multi-modal optical spectroscopy to differentiating between the three tissue classifications.

  16. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Gianluca; Salza, Mario; Ferraro, Pietro; Chehura, Edmond; Tatam, Ralph P.; Gangopadhyay, Tarun K.; Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Barnes, Jack A.; Loock, Hans-Peter; Lam, Timothy T.-Y.; Chow, Jong H.; De Natale, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented. PMID:22294902

  17. Attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy with chirped-pulse upconversion.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Hideto; Duchesne, Constance; Furutani, Yuji; Fuji, Takao

    2014-12-01

    Chirped-pulse upconversion technique has been applied to attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy. An extremely broadband infrared pulse was sent to an ATR diamond prism and the reflected pulse was converted to the visible by using four-wave mixing in krypton gas. Absorption spectra of liquids in the range from 200 to 5500 cm(-1) were measured with a visible spectrometer on a single-shot basis. The system was applied to observe the dynamics of exchanging process of two solvents, water and acetone, which give clear vibrational spectral contrast. We observed that the exchange was finished within ∼ 10 ms. PMID:25606893

  18. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  19. Reflectance spectroscopy for noninvasive evaluation of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Caihua; Guan, Yue; Wang, Jianru; Zhong, Xiewei; Liu, Xiuli; Zhu, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle offers an excellent model for systems biology and regenerative medicine. So far, the stages of hair follicle growth have been evaluated by histological examination. In this work, a noninvasive spectroscopy was proposed by measuring the diffuse reflectance of mouse skin and analyzing the melanin value. Results show that the skin diffuse reflectance was relatively high when hair follicles were at the telogen stage and at the beginning of the anagen stage, and decreased with the progression of the anagen stage. When the hair follicle entered into the catagen stage, the diffuse reflectance gradually increased. The changes in the melanin content of skin had contrary dynamics. Substages of the hair follicle cycle could be distinguished by comparing the changes in melanin value with the histological examination. This study provided a new method for noninvasive evaluation of the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  20. Reflectance spectroscopy for noninvasive evaluation of hair follicle stage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Caihua; Guan, Yue; Wang, Jianru; Zhong, Xiewei; Liu, Xiuli; Zhu, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle offers an excellent model for systems biology and regenerative medicine. So far, the stages of hair follicle growth have been evaluated by histological examination. In this work, a noninvasive spectroscopy was proposed by measuring the diffuse reflectance of mouse skin and analyzing the melanin value. Results show that the skin diffuse reflectance was relatively high when hair follicles were at the telogen stage and at the beginning of the anagen stage, and decreased with the progression of the anagen stage. When the hair follicle entered into the catagen stage, the diffuse reflectance gradually increased. The changes in the melanin content of skin had contrary dynamics. Substages of the hair follicle cycle could be distinguished by comparing the changes in melanin value with the histological examination. This study provided a new method for noninvasive evaluation of the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration. PMID:25428579

  1. Catheter based mid-infrared reflectance and reflectance generated absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2013-10-29

    A method of characterizing conditions in a tissue, by (a) providing a catheter that has a light source that emits light in selected wavenumbers within the range of mid-IR spectrum; (b) directing the light from the catheter to an area of tissue at a location inside a blood vessel of a subject; (c) collecting light reflected from the location and generating a reflectance spectra; and (d) comparing the reflectance spectra to a reference spectra of normal tissue, whereby a location having an increased number of absorbance peaks at said selected wavenumbers indicates a tissue inside the blood vessel containing a physiological marker for atherosclerosis.

  2. Selective reflection of obliquely incident polarised light

    SciTech Connect

    Fofanov, Ya A

    2009-06-30

    A series of reflection resonances formed by the hyperfine components of the D{sub 2}-lines in the spectrum of the natural mixture of rubidium isotopes is studied. Passages from resonantly frustrated total internal reflection to resonance Brewster reflection caused by the frequency tuning of the incident light are demonstrated experimentally. The contrast of the strongest refection resonances exceeds 500% at the moderate heating of reflecting cells. The intensity of the reflected light changes in this case by more than 20 times. A theory is developed which is based on a two-level model for resonance atoms and Fresnel formulas for reflection coefficients. Numerical calculations based on the proposed theory confirm main experimental results. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for noninvasive detection of reflective index alternations at nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuanhao; Ding, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Cancer has been one of the most serious threats to human life. However, there is no substantial improvement in overall treatment of cancer patients. One of the key reasons is the unavailability of convenient method to detect cellular alterations in ultra-early stage of carcinogenesis processes, where genetic aberrations at nano-scale have not yet resulted in histological changes. In this paper, we described an optical method based on reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for ultra-early cancer detection. According to mesoscopic light transport theory, photons propagating in one dimension (1D) within a weakly disordered medium have the non-self-averaging effect. Reflected signal after 1D propagating is sensitive to any length scale of refractive index fluctuations due to multiple interferences of light waves travelling along 1D trajectory. The principle of mesoscopic spectroscopy for perceiving reflective index fluctuations at length scale of nanometers is introduced. A system for the measurement of reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy based on spatial-incoherence broadband source and spectrometer is established. Simulations on light propagation in cell-emulating model with controlled refractive index distribution are done by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach.

  4. Reflective Leadership by Selected Community College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeckel, Pamella Rae; Davies, Timothy Gray

    2007-01-01

    This phenomenological study addressed the following question: How do community college presidents experience self-reflection in their leadership roles? Male and female community college presidents of diverse racial backgrounds were interviewed to better understand how they experienced self-reflection in their own leadership. Three themes emerged:…

  5. Model-Based Material Parameter Estimation for Terahertz Reflection Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniffin, Gabriel Paul

    Many materials such as drugs and explosives have characteristic spectral signatures in the terahertz (THz) band. These unique signatures imply great promise for spectral detection and classification using THz radiation. While such spectral features are most easily observed in transmission, real-life imaging systems will need to identify materials of interest from reflection measurements, often in non-ideal geometries. One important, yet commonly overlooked source of signal corruption is the etalon effect -- interference phenomena caused by multiple reflections from dielectric layers of packaging and clothing likely to be concealing materials of interest in real-life scenarios. This thesis focuses on the development and implementation of a model-based material parameter estimation technique, primarily for use in reflection spectroscopy, that takes the influence of the etalon effect into account. The technique is adapted from techniques developed for transmission spectroscopy of thin samples and is demonstrated using measured data taken at the Northwest Electromagnetic Research Laboratory (NEAR-Lab) at Portland State University. Further tests are conducted, demonstrating the technique's robustness against measurement noise and common sources of error.

  6. Characterization of probe contact effects on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Mayjonade, Mallory; Ahadi, Aylin; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a rapid, non-invasive optical method widely adopted to gain diagnostic information of tissue. The most flexible approach to this method is a fiber-optic contact-probe used with a spectroscopy system. A challenge of this method is that the external pressure brought by the probe can significantly affect the tissue optical properties as well as the light coupling into the probe, and thus influence the collected DRS-spectrum. In this study we investigate and characterize the effect of probe pressure on DRS-spectra obtained with a calibrated loaded-spring system used with a fiber optic probe in the range (400 - 1600) nm. A multilayer FE-model of the indentation is developed to get a better insight of the distribution of pressure and stresses inside the skin under indentation.

  7. Depth sensitive oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with epithelial cancerous lesions can be challenging in the oral cavity where variable epithelial thicknesses and troublesome keratin growths are prominent. Spectroscopic methods with enhanced depth resolution would immensely aid in isolating optical properties associated with malignant transformation. Combining multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating, oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) achieves depth sensitive detection. We report promising results from a clinical trial of patients with oral lesions suspected of dysplasia or carcinoma demonstrating the potential of OPRS for the analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of multilayer, epithelial oral tissue.

  8. Pancreatic tumor margin detection by oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Zou, Jun; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kuczynski, John; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In surgical treatment of pancreatic cancers, the effectiveness of the procedures largely depends on the ability to completely and precisely remove the malignant tumors. We present the ex-vivo use of oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (OIRDS) to detect and differentiate normal from neoplastic tissue. An OIRDS probe has been constructed to provide scattering and absorption information of the pancreatic tissue. To reveal the physiological origin of the difference in these optical signatures, the optical scattering coefficients were extracted along the pancreatic duct with 1-cm spacing. Experimental results show that OIDRS was able to successfully determinate the tumor margins based on the higher optical scattering on malignant tissue.

  9. Raman and infrared reflection spectroscopy in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, S.; Shirotani, I.

    1985-03-01

    The symmetry and energies of all optically active phonon modes in black phosphorous are determined by polarized Raman scattering and infrared reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The obtained energies are; 365 and 470 cm -1 for A g modes, 197 for B lg, 442 for B 2g, 223 and 440 for B 3g, 136 (TO) and 138 (LO) for B lu, and 468 (TO) and 470 (LO) for B 2u, respectively. The small TO-LO splitting is related to the charge transfer between phosphorus atoms induced by the atomic displacement.

  10. Multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Ohsugi, Yu; Kinjo, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    We report simultaneous determination of diffusion coefficients at different points of a cell membrane using a multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system. A system carrying seven detection areas in the evanescent field is achieved by using seven optical fibers on the image plane in the detection port of an objective-type total internal reflection FCS (TIR-FCS) system. Fluctuation of fluorescence intensity is monitored and evaluated using seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a newly constructed multichannel correlator. We demonstrate simultaneous-multipoint FCS, with a 3-mus time resolution, to investigate heterogeneous structures such as cell membranes and membrane-binding molecular dynamics near glass surfaces in live cells. PMID:19256718

  11. Analysis of remote reflection spectroscopy to monitor plant health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, R.; Heeb, M.; Berry, W.; Hoshizaki, T.; Wood, M.

    1994-11-01

    Remote non-contact reflection spectroscopy is examined as a method for detecting stress in Controlled Ecological Life Support System CELSS type crops. Lettuce (Latuca Sativa L. cv. Waldmans Green) and wheat (Triticum Aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) were grown hydroponically. Copper and zinc treatments provided toxic conditions. Nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium treatments were used for deficiency conditions. Water stress was also induced in test plants. Reflectance spectra were obtained in the visible and near infrared (400nm to 2600nm) wavebands. Numerous effects of stress conditions can be observed in the collected spectra and this technique appears to have promise as a remote monitor of plant health, but significant research remains to be conducted to realize the promise.

  12. Analysis of remote reflection spectroscopy to monitor plant health.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, R; Heeb, M; Berry, W; Hoshizaki, T; Wood, M

    1994-11-01

    Remote non-contact reflection spectroscopy is examined as a method for detecting stress in Controlled Ecological Life Support System CELSS type crops. Lettuce (Lactuca [correction of Latuca] Sativa L. cv. Waldmans Green) and wheat (Triticum Aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) were grown hydroponically. Copper and zinc treatments provided toxic conditions. Nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium treatments were used for deficiency conditions. Water stress was also induced in test plants. Reflectance spectra were obtained in the visible and near infrared (400nm to 2600nm) wavebands. Numerous effects of stress conditions can be observed in the collected spectra and this technique appears to have promise as a remote monitor of plant health, but significant research remains to be conducted to realize the promise. PMID:11540181

  13. Multiply enhanced site selective CARS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steehler, J. K.; Wright, J. C.

    1985-10-01

    Three tunable lasers are used to perform site selective coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) spectroscopy in pentacene:p-terphenyl crystals at 2 K. The vibrational and vibronic levels of pentacene in the individual substitutional sites of p-terphenyl can be selectively examined by matching the resonances of a particular site. The signals from a site and the selectivity between sites are much higher than CARS performed with two tunable lasers. The spectra are dominated by lines from processes where the vibrational and vibronic states involved in the four-wave mixing are associated with the same molecular mode. There are also important lines from processes where different vibrational and vibronic modes are involved in the nonlinear mixing. The intensities of lines from the resonant site are strongly dependent on the laser energy because of saturation of the electronic transition.

  14. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy and thermographic investigations of the Shroud of Turin.

    PubMed

    Accetta, J S; Baumgart, J S

    1980-06-15

    In this paper we present the results of the IR investigations of the controversial Turin Shroud. Reflectance spectroscopy in the 3-5- and 8-14-microm bands was attempted in situ using commercial equipment with moderate success. Spectral comparisons are made between laboratory reflectance data and selected Shroud features. Infrared thermographic imaging was accomplished with an enhanced contrast technique using external illumination. Due to the spectral similarities of most features observed, we show that the results are inconclusive. The IR imagery yielded results that are consistent with expectations with no anomalies observed. PMID:20221156

  15. Development of techniques for advanced optical contamination measurement with internal reflection spectroscopy, phase 1, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring volatile contaminants in a large space simulation chamber using techniques of internal reflection spectroscopy was demonstrated analytically and experimentally. The infrared spectral region was selected as the operational spectral range in order to provide unique identification of the contaminants along with sufficient sensitivity to detect trace contaminant concentrations. It was determined theoretically that a monolayer of the contaminants could be detected and identified using optimized experimental procedures. This ability was verified experimentally. Procedures were developed to correct the attenuated total reflectance spectra for thick sample distortion. However, by using two different element designs the need for such correction can be avoided.

  16. Raman spectroscopy and polarization: Selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossikovski, Razvigor; Picardi, Gennaro; Ndong, Gérald; Chaigneau, Marc

    2012-10-01

    We show, through several selected case studies, the potential benefits that can be obtained by controlling the polarization states of the exciting and scattered radiations in a Raman scattering experiment. When coupled with polarization control, Raman spectroscopy is thus capable of providing extra information on the structural properties of the materials under investigation. The experimental examples presented in this work are taken from the area of both conventional, i.e., far-field, as well as from near-field Raman spectroscopy. They cover topics such as the stress tensor measurement in strained semiconductor structures, the vibration mode assignment in pentacene thin films and the Raman scattering tensor determination from near-field measurements on azobenzene monolayers. The basic theory necessary for modelling the far- and near-field polarized Raman responses is also given and the model efficiency is illustrated on the experimental data.

  17. Assessing human skin with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and colorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, InSeok; Liu, Yang; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2012-02-01

    Colorimetry has been used as an objective measure of perceived skin color by human eye to document and score physiological responses of the skin from external insults. CIE color space values (L*, a* and b*) are the most commonly used parameters to correlate visually perceived color attributes such as L* for pigment, a* for erythema, and b* for sallowness of the skin. In this study, we investigated the relation of Lab color scale to the amount of major skin chromophores (oxy-, deoxyhemoglobin and melanin) calculated from diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Thirty two healthy human subjects with ages from 20 to 70 years old, skin types I-VI, were recruited for the study. DRS and colorimetry measurements were taken from the left and right cheeks, and on the right upper inner arm. The melanin content calculated from 630-700 nm range of DRS measurements was shown to correlate with the lightness of skin (L*) for most skin types. For subjects with medium-to-light complexion, melanin measured at the blue part spectrum and hemoglobin interfered on the relation of lightness of the skin color to the melanin content. The sallowness of the skin that is quantified by the melanin contribution at the blue part spectrum of DRS was found to be related to b* scale. This study demonstrates the importance of documenting skin color by assessing individual skin chromophores with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, in comparison to colorimetry assessment.

  18. Surface-enhanced, multi-dimensional attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Lotti, Davide; Hamm, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) spectroscopy is performed in attenuated total reflectance (ATR) geometry with the Kretschmann configuration in order to measure femtosecond to picosecond dynamics of self-assembled monolayers on gold-coated solid-liquid interfaces. In the monolayers low-absorbing (<200 M-1 cm-1) nitrile functional groups are used as local vibrational probes to monitor vibrational relaxation and spectral diffusion in dependence of different environments of the nitrile group. By comparing spectral diffusion dynamics of the vibrational probe in bulk solution and in the monolayer we find that the dynamics are slowed down by more than a factor of 20 upon immobilization of the sample. Moreover, spectral diffusion dynamics are affected by the local environment within the monolayers as evidenced by 2D ATR IR experiments on mixed monolayers with different aliphatic and aromatic co-adsorbates. The results are interpreted in terms of absent excitation energy-transfer as well as solvation dynamics around the nitrile vibrational probe. Our results demonstrate that 2D ATR IR spectroscopy offers the possibility to obtain ultrafast dynamics from sub-monolayer coverages of even low-absorbing vibrational probes such as nitrile functional groups.

  19. Autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance patterns in cervical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Nena Maribel

    Fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy are two new optical technologies, which have shown promise to aid in the real time, non-invasive identification of cancers and precancers. Spectral patterns carry a fingerprint of scattering, absorption and fluorescence properties in tissue. Scattering, absorption and fluorescence in tissue are directly affected by biological features that are diagnostically significant, such as nuclear size, micro-vessel density, volume fraction of collagen fibers, tissue oxygenation and cell metabolism. Thus, analysis of spectral patterns can unlock a wealth of information directly related with the onset and progression of disease. Data from a Phase II clinical trial to assess the technical efficacy of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy acquired from 850 women at three clinical locations with two research grade optical devices is calibrated and analyzed. Tools to process and standardize spectra so that data from multiple spectrometers can be combined and analyzed are presented. Methodologies for calibration and quality assurance of optical systems are established to simplify design issues and ensure validity of data for future clinical trials. Empirically based algorithms, using multivariate statistical approaches are applied to spectra and evaluated as a clinical diagnostic tool. Physically based algorithms, using mathematical models of light propagation in tissue are presented. The presented mathematical model combines a diffusion theory in P3 approximation reflectance model and a 2-layer fluorescence model using exponential attenuation and diffusion theory. The resulting adjoint fluorescence and reflectance model extracts twelve optical properties characterizing fluorescence efficiency of cervical epithelium and stroma fluorophores, stromal hemoglobin and collagen absorption, oxygen saturation, and stromal scattering strength and shape. Validations with Monte Carlo simulations show that adjoint model extracted

  20. Testing black holes via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The study of the properties of the radiation emitted by gas in the inner part of the accretion disk can provide useful information on the spacetime geometry around these compact objects and test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. The iron line method is the most promising techniques to test black hole candidates. In this talk, we present a new reflection model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis. We use the formalism of the transfer function and we split the calculations into two blocks. One is the calculation of the transfer function, which takes into account all the relativistic effects and only depends on the background metric. The second block is the calculation of the intrinsic spectrum in the rest frame of the gas. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. The transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER, which is the best reflection code available today. The result is best model to test black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  1. [The research progress in determining lignocellulosic content by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; An, Dong; Xia, Tian; Huang, Yan-Hua; Li, Hong-Chao; Zhang, Yun-Wei

    2013-12-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology, as a new analytic method, can be used to determine the content of lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose which is faster, effective, easier to operate, and more accurate than the traditional wet chemical methods. Nowadays it has been widely used in measuring the composition of lignocelluloses in woody plant and herbaceous plant. The domestic and foreign research progress in determining the lignin, cellulose and hemi-cellulose content in woody plant ( wood and bamboo used as papermaking raw materials and wood served as potential biomass energy) and herbaceous plant (forage grass and energy grass) by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology is comprehensively summarized and the advances in method studies of measuring the composition of lignocelluloses by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology are summed up in three aspects, sample preparation, spectral data pretreatment and wavelength selection methods, and chemometric analysis respectively. Four outlooks are proposed combining the development statues of wood, forage grass and energy grass industry. First of all, the authors need to establish more feasible and applicable models for a variety of uses which can be used for more species from different areas, periods and anatomical parts. Secondly, comprehensive near infrared reflectance spectroscopy data base of grass products quality index needs to be improved to realize on-line quality and process control in grassproducts industry, which can guarantee the quality of the grass product. Thirdly, the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy quality index model of energy plant need to be built which can not only contribute to breed screening, but also improve the development of biomass industry. Besides, modeling approaches are required to be explored and perfected any further. Finally, the authors need to try our best to boost the advancement in the determination method of lignin, cellulose and hemi

  2. Laboratory Studies of Organic Compounds With Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchin, J. M.; Clark, R. N.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    In order to properly interpret reflectance spectra of any solar system surface from the earth to the Oort cloud, laboratory spectra of candidate materials for comparative analysis are needed. Although the common cosmochemical species (H2O, CO2, CO, NH3, and CH4) are well represented in the spectroscopic literature, comparatively little reflectance work has been done on organics from room to cryogenic temperatures at visible to near infrared wavelengths. Reflectance spectra not only enhance weak or unseen transmission features, they are also more analogous to spectra obtained by spacecraft that are imaging such bodies as giant planet moons, kuiper belt objects, centaurs, comets and asteroids, as well as remote sensing of the earth. The USGS Spectroscopy Laboratory is measuring reflectance spectra of organic compounds from room to cryogenic temperatures over the spectral range of 0.35 to 15.5 microns. This region encompasses the fundamental absorptions and many overtones and combinations of C, H, O, and N molecular bonds. Because most organic compounds belong to families whose members have similar structure and composition, individual species identification within a narrow wavelength range may be ambiguous. By measuring spectral reflectance of the pure laboratory samples from the visible through the near and mid-infrared, absorption bands unique to each can be observed, cataloged, and compared to planetary reflectance data. We present here spectra of organic compounds belonging to five families: the alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and cyanides. Common to all of these are the deep C-H stretch fundamental absorptions, which shift shortward from 3.35+ microns in alkanes to 3.25+ microns in aromatics, to 3.2+ microns in alkenes, and down to 3.0+ microns in alkynes. Mid-IR absorptions due to C-H bending deformations at 6.8+ and 7.2+ microns are also identified. In the near infrared these stretching and bending fundamentals yield a diagnostic set of combination

  3. Analysis of silage composition by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, James B., III; Blosser, Timothy H.; Colenbrander, V. F.

    1991-02-01

    Two studies were performed to investigate the feasibility of using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) with undried silages. In the first study silages were analyzed for major components (e. g. dry matter crude protein and other forms of nitrogen fiber and in vitro digestible dry matter) and short chain fatty acids (SCFA). NIRS was found to operate satisfactorily except for some forms of nitrogen and SCFA. In study two various methods of grinding spectral regions and sample presentation were examined. Undried Wiley ground samples in a rectangular cell gave the best overall results for non-dry ice undried grinds with wavelengths between 1100 and 2498 nm. Silages scanned after drying however produced the best results. Intact samples did not perform as well as ground samples and wavelengths below 1100 nm were of little use. 2 .

  4. Nanoscale Andreev Reflection Spectroscopy on Bismuth-Chalcogenide Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, C. R.; Fridman, I.; Liang, R. X.; Lei, H.; Petrovic, C.; Yang, Shuo; Wu, K. H.; Wei, J. Y. T.

    Andreev reflection (AR) is the basic mechanism underlying the superconducting proximity effect which, at the interface between a topological insulator (TI) and a spin-singlet superconductor, can induce chiral p-wave pairing in the TI. Despite this novel importance, it is not well understood how AR is affected by the unique attributes of a three-dimensional TI, namely the Dirac dispersion and helical spin-polarization of its surface states. In this work, we use both s-wave and d-wave superconducting tips to perform AR spectroscopy at 4.2 K on flux-grown Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 single crystals, as well as epitaxial Bi2Se3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. These AR measurements are complemented by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, in order to characterize the superconducting tip as well as the doping level and surface condition of the TI sample. Our data are analyzed using BTK theory, in light of the characteristic band structure of bismuth chalcogenides, to elucidate how the band structure affects the AR process. Work supported by: NSERC, CFI-OIT, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and the Department of Energy.

  5. Resonant Reflection Spectroscopy of Biomolecular Arrays in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kevin W.; Radic, Stojan; Myslivets, Evgeny; O’Connor, Shawn M.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomeres, the functional units of contraction in striated muscle, are composed of an array of interdigitating protein filaments. Direct interaction between overlapping filaments generates muscular force, which produces animal movement. When filament length is known, sarcomere length successfully predicts potential force, even in whole muscles that contain billions of sarcomere units. Inability to perform in vivo sarcomere measurements with submicrometer resolution is a long-standing challenge in the muscle physiology field and has hampered studies of normal muscle function, adaptation, injury, aging, and disease, particularly in humans. Here, we develop theory and demonstrate the feasibility of to our knowledge a new technique that measures sarcomere length with submicrometer resolution. In this believed novel approach, we examine sarcomere structure by measuring the multiple resonant reflections that are uniquely defined by Fourier decomposition of the sarcomere protein spatial framework. Using a new supercontinuum spectroscopic system, we show close agreement between sarcomere lengths measured by resonant reflection spectroscopy and laser diffraction in an ensemble of 10 distinct muscles. PMID:25418304

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of mass-selected carbocations

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael A.

    2015-01-22

    Small carbocations are of longstanding interest in astrophysics, but there are few measurements of their infrared spectroscopy in the gas phase at low temperature. There are fewer-still measurements of spectra across the full range of IR frequencies useful to obtain an IR signature of these ions to detect them in space. We have developed a pulsed-discharge supersonic nozzle ion source producing high densities of small carbocations at low temperatures (50–70K). We employ mass-selected photodissociation spectroscopy and the method of rare gas “tagging”, together with new broadly tunable infrared OPO lasers, to obtain IR spectra for a variety of small carbocations including C{sub 2}H{sub 3}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}{sup +}, protonated benzene and protonated naphthalene. Spectra in the frequency range of 600–4500 cm{sup −1} provide new IR data for these ions and evidence for the presence of co-existing isomeric structures (e.g., C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} is present as both cyclopropenyl and propargyl). Protonated naphthalene has sharp bands at 6.2, 7.7 and 8.6 microns matching prominent features in the UIR spectra.

  7. How well is Martian ozone inferred with reflectance spectroscopy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    through the entire cloud and dust abundance in order to actually see the total O3 column abundance. If reflectance spectroscopy is used, as on Mariner 9, then the cloud and the airborne dust must be traversed twice; first by the incoming solar flux down to the surface, and then once again upon reflection from the surface out to the spacecraft.

  8. Secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers as examined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. The selected harvesting points coincide with secondary cell wall (SCW) development in the fibers. Progressive but moderat...

  9. Isoconversion effective activation energy profiles by variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel R; White, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Thermal process characterization based on calculating effective activation energies from variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (VT-DRIFTS) measurements is demonstrated. Experimental factors that affect the accuracies of activation energy values are outlined. Infrared radiation scattering efficiency, thermal conductivity, and inertness towards chemical reactions are factors that should be considered when selecting an appropriate diluent for preparing samples. The Kubelka-Munk representation is superior to apparent absorbance when baseline variations in spectra measured at different temperatures can be minimized. Variable-temperature infrared spectral features, such as integrated absorption band area, can be used to compute isoconversion effective activation energies, provided that measured quantities are proportional to species concentrations. PMID:18230216

  10. Prediction of leaf chemistry by the use of visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Don H.; Peterson, David L.; Matson, Pamela A.; Aber, John D.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical content of dry, ground leaf material sampled from deciduous and conifer tree species from sites in Alaska, Wisconsin, and California was estimated using visible and shortwave IR spectroscopy. Seven chemical components - sugar, starch, protein, cellulose, total chlorophyll, lignin, and total nitrogen - were analyzed by wet chemical methods and their concentrations regressed against log 1/rho and first and second differences of log 1/rho (where rho is measured reflectance) at wavelengths selected by stepwise regression. Predictions of chemical concentrations based on cross validation suggest that this technique may be useful for extracting vegetation canopy biochemical information by remote sensing.

  11. A study on the protection to relics and the related problems with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqin; Liang, Guozheng; Dang, Gaochao

    2005-03-01

    The application of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to relic protection is studied by using a self-made fiber optics reflectance spectrophotometer. The major work done includes: (1) the composition of pigment on colored relics and its changes are identified; (2) the change on metal surface is monitored; (3) the reflectance spectrum characteristics of relic protection materials are studied. The results tell that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a new protection technique, characterized by its quickness and non-destructiveness to the relic. PMID:15683812

  12. Aerosol collection and analysis using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Wong, Diane M.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Williams, Barry R.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Manning, Christopher J.

    2004-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is routinely employed for the identification of organic molecules and, more recently, for the classification of biological materials. We have developed a sample collection method that facilitates infrared analysis of airborne particulates using a diffuse reflectance (DR) technique. Efforts are underway to extend the method to include simultaneous analysis of vapor phase organics by using adsorbent substrates compatible with the DR technique. This series of laboratory results provides proof-of-principle for both the sample collection and data collection processes. Signal processing of the DR spectra is shown to provide rapid qualitative identification of representative aerosol materials, including particulate matter commonly found in the environment. We compare the results for such materials as bacterial spores, pollens and molds, clays and dusts, smoke and soot. Background correction analysis is shown to be useful for differentiation and identification of these constituents. Issues relating to complex mixtures of environmental samples under highly variable conditions are considered. Instrumentation development and materials research are now underway with the aim of constructing a compact sampling system for near real-time monitoring of aerosol and organic pollutants. A miniature, tilt-compensated Fourier transform spectrometer will provide spectroscopic interrogation. A series of advanced digital signal processing methods are also under development to enhance the sensor package. The approach will be useful for industrial applications, chemical and biological agent detection, and environmental monitoring for chemical vapors, hazardous air pollutants, and allergens.

  13. Intramyocardial oxygen transport by quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in calves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbergh, Tobias; Larsson, Marcus; Szabó, Zoltán; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-03-01

    Intramyocardial oxygen transport was assessed during open-chest surgery in calves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using a small intramuscular fiber-optic probe. The sum of hemo- and myoglobin tissue fraction and oxygen saturation, the tissue fraction and oxidation of cytochrome aa3, and the tissue fraction of methemoglobin were estimated using a calibrated empirical light transport model. Increasing the oxygen content in the inhaled gas, 21%-50%-100%, in five calves (group A) gave an increasing oxygen saturation of 19+/-4%, 24+/-5%, and 28+/-8% (p<0.001, ANOVA repeated measures design) and mean tissue fractions of 1.6% (cytochrome aa3) and 1.1% (hemo- and myoglobin). Cardiac arrest in two calves gave an oxygen saturation lower than 5%. In two calves (group B), a left ventricular assistive device (LVAD pump) was implanted. Oxygen saturation in group B animals increased with LVAD pump speed (p<0.001, ANOVA) and with oxygen content in inhaled gas (p<0.001, ANOVA). The cytochrome aa3 oxidation level was above 96% in both group A and group B calves, including the two cases involving cardiac arrest. In conclusion, the estimated tissue fractions and oxygenation/oxidation levels of the myocardial chromophores during respiratory and hemodynamic provocations were in agreement with previously presented results, demonstrating the potential of the method.

  14. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  15. Noninvasive measurements of carotenoids in bovine udder by reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E.; Müller, Kerstin E.; Lademann, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    For a long time, the antioxidative status in cattle has been discussed as an indicator for stress conditions resulting from disease or exertion. Until now, invasive approaches have been necessary to obtain blood samples or biopsy materials and gain insights into the antioxidative status of cattle. Due to these efforts and the costs of the analyses, serial sampling is feasible in an experimental setting, but not for measurements on a routine basis. The present study focuses on the feasibility of an innovative, noninvasive spectroscopic technique that allows in vivo measurements of carotenoids in the skin by reflection spectroscopy. To this end, in a first trial, repeated measurements of the carotenoid concentration of the udder skin were performed on 25 healthy cattle from different breeds. Carotenoid concentrations showed highly significant differences between individual animals (P<0.001), although they were kept under the same environmental conditions and received the same diet. The carotenoid concentrations in "sensitive" and "robust" cows (evaluated by a temperament test) differed significantly (P<0.005), with higher concentrations observed in robust cows.

  16. High-order derivative spectroscopy for selecting spectral regions and channels for remote sensing algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    1999-12-01

    A remote sensing reflectance model, which describes the transfer of irradiant light within a plant canopy or water column has previously been used to simulate the nadir viewing reflectance of vegetation canopies and leaves under solar induced or an artificial light source and the water surface reflectance. Wavelength dependent features such as canopy reflectance leaf absorption and canopy bottom reflectance as well as water absorption and water bottom reflectance have been used to simulate or generate synthetic canopy and water surface reflectance signatures. This paper describes how derivative spectroscopy can be utilized to invert the synthetic or modeled as well as measured reflectance signatures with the goal of selecting the optimal spectral channels or regions of these environmental media. Specifically, in this paper synthetic and measured reflectance signatures are used for selecting vegetative dysfunction variables for different plant species. The measured reflectance signatures as well as model derived or synthetic signatures are processed using extremely fast higher order derivative processing techniques which filter the synthetic/modeled or measured spectra and automatically selects the optimal channels for automatic and direct algorithm application. The higher order derivative filtering technique makes use of a translating and dilating, derivative spectroscopy signal processing (TDDS-SPR) approach based upon remote sensing science and radiative transfer theory. Thus the technique described, unlike other signal processing techniques being developed for hyperspectral signatures and associated imagery, is based upon radiative transfer theory instead of statistical or purely mathematical operational techniques such as wavelets.

  17. Near-earth asteroids - Possible sources from reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, L. A.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mccord, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    The diversity of reflectance spectra noted among near-earth asteroids that were compared with selected asteroids, planets and satellites to determine possible source regions is indicative of different mineralogical composition and, accordingly, of more than one source region. Spectral signatures that are similar to those of main belt asteroids support models deriving some of these asteroids from the 5:2 Kirkwood gap and the Flora family, by way of gravitational perturbations. The differences in composition found between near-earth asteroids and planetary and satellite surfaces are in keeping with theoretical arguments that such bodies should not be sources. While some near-earth asteroids furnish portions of the earth's meteorite flux, other sources must also contribute.

  18. Far- and Deep-UV Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanoparticles Measured Based on Attenuated Total Reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Yamada, Yosuke; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-02-16

    Far- and deep-ultraviolet spectra (150-300 nm) of semiconductor nanoparticles (zinc oxide and zinc sulfide) are successfully measured by using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy, and analyzed using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The obtained spectra show good consistency with earlier synchrotron-radiation spectra and with theoretical calculations. The FDTD simulation results show that the present system collected the correct spectra. In the present system, the obtained spectra are affected by the real part n of the complex refractive index more strongly than the imaginary part k. It is also revealed both experimentally and theoretically that spectral intensities of the semiconductor nanoparticles are approximately one tenth those of liquid samples. These results provide insights into the far- and deep-ultraviolet spectroscopy based on the ATR system, and show the general applicability of our original ATR spectroscopy to semiconductor nanoparticles. The system needs neither high vacuum nor much space, and enables rapid and systematic investigation of the electronic states of various materials. PMID:26691240

  19. Reflectance spectroscopy with polarized light: is it sensitive to cellular and nuclear morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Gossage, Kirk; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    1999-12-01

    We present a method for selective detection of size-dependent scattering characteristics of epithelial cells in vivo based on polarized illumination and polarization sensitive detection of scattered light. We illustrate the method using phantoms designed to simulate squamous epithelial tissue and progressing to epithelial tissue in vitro and in vivo. Elastic light scattering spectroscopy with polarized illumination/detection dramatically reduces background signals due to both diffuse stromal scattering and hemoglobin absorption. Resulting spectra can be described as a linear combination of forward and backscattering components determined from Mie theory. Nuclear sizes and refractive indices extracted by fitting experimental spectra to this model agree well with previous measurements. Reflectance spectroscopy with polarized light can provide quantitative morphological information which could potentially be used for non-invasive detection of neoplastic changes.

  20. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy for Total Carbon Analysis of Hawaiian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, M. L.; Bruland, G. L.; Deenik, J. L.; Grunwald, S.; Uchida, R.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate assessment of total carbon (Ct) content is important for fertility and nutrient management of soils, as well as for carbon sequestration studies. The non-destructive analysis of soils by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a potential supplement or alternative to the traditional time-consuming and costly combustion method of Ct analysis, especially in spatial or temporal studies where sample numbers are large. We investigate the use of the visible to near-infrared (VNIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of soils coupled with chemometric analysis to determine their Ct content. Our specific focus is on Hawaiian soils of agricultural importance. Though this technique has been introduced to the soil community, it has yet to be fully tested and used in practical applications for all soil types, and this is especially true for Hawaii. In short, DRS characterizes and differentiates materials based on the variation of the light reflected by a material at certain wavelengths. This spectrum is dependent on the material’s composition, structure, and physical state. Multivariate chemometric analysis unravels the information in a set of spectra that can help predict a property such as Ct. This study benefits from the remarkably diverse soils of Hawaii. Our sample set includes 216 soil samples from 145 pedons from the main Hawaiian Islands archived at the National Soil Survey Center in Lincoln, NE, along with more than 50 newly-collected samples from Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, and Maui. In total, over 90 series from 10 of the 12 soil orders are represented. The Ct values of these samples range from < 1% - 55%. We anticipate that the diverse nature of our sample set will ensure a model with applicability to a wide variety of soils, both in Hawaii and globally. We have measured the VNIR and MIR spectra of these samples and obtained their Ct values by dry combustion. Our initial analyses are conducted using only samples obtained from the Lincoln archive. In this

  1. Mid- Versus Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for On-Site Determination of Soil Carbon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has demonstrated that the determination of soil C diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is often more accurate and produces more robust calibrations than near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) when analyzing ground, dry soils. DRIFTS is also not ...

  2. Near- and Mid-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for the Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several decades near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to determine the composition of a variety of agricultural products. More recently, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) has similarly been shown to be able to determine the co...

  3. Selective reflection of light from Rb2 molecular vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Aleksandr; Gogyan, Anahit; Movsisyan, Marina; Papoyan, Aram

    2015-07-01

    We report the first observation of selective reflection of light from an interface of a dielectric window and molecular vapor of Rb2 dimers formed in all-sapphire sealed-off rubidium vapor cell (temperature up to 520 °C, atomic and molecular densities up to 1018 and 3 × 1016 cm-3, respectively). The selective reflection signals were recorded on various rovibronic components of 1(X) 1 Σg+ - 1(A) 1 Σu+ bound-bound electronic transition of Rb2 by scanning a diode laser frequency in a spectral range of 851-854 nm. Mainly selective reflection signals corresponding to groups of several rovibronic transitions have been recorded, which was attributed to high spectral density, large collisional broadening, and low oscillator strength of individual rovibronic transitions.

  4. Characterization of atherosclerotic plaque by reflection spectroscopy and thermography: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; Haugen, Olav A.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2005-04-01

    Many methods for detecting and measuring vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques have been proposed. These include reflection spectroscopy, thermography, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This paper presents an analysis and a comparison of two of these methods, near-infrared reflection spectroscopy (NIRS) and thermography. Most of the published literature evaluate methods statistically. A more analytic approach will make it easier to compare the different methods and determine if the measured signal will be strong enough in a real measurement situation. This is the approach taken in this article. Eight samples of human aorta were examined by NIRS and subsequently prepared for histology. A total of 28 measurement points were selected. A measure of the lipid content based on reflection spectra is proposed. Comparisons of this lipid measure with histology show that the lipid content in the plaques yields relatively small changes in the value of this lipid-index. Reflectance spectra from models based on the diffusion approximation for total reflectance were simulated. Temperature measurements were performed on three Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits and one New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit with a thermistor-type intravascular temperature sensor. The measurements gave no significant signals which correlated with the subsequent histology. A simple analytic model was developed which indicates that a temperature increase of more than 0.01-0.04 °C at the surface of a vessel wall, due to inflammation in a plaque, is unlikely. Such a small temperature difference will probably be obscured by normal variation in the vessel wall temperature.

  5. Determination of plant silicon content with near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Smis, Adriaan; Ancin Murguzur, Francisco Javier; Struyf, Eric; Soininen, Eeva M.; Herranz Jusdado, Juan G.; Meire, Patrick; Bråthen, Kari Anne

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most common elements in the earth bedrock, and its continental cycle is strongly biologically controlled. Yet, research on the biogeochemical cycle of Si in ecosystems is hampered by the time and cost associated with the currently used chemical analysis methods. Here, we assessed the suitability of Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (NIRS) for measuring Si content in plant tissues. NIR spectra depend on the characteristics of the present bonds between H and N, C and O, which can be calibrated against concentrations of various compounds. Because Si in plants always occurs as hydrated condensates of orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), linked to organic biomolecules, we hypothesized that NIRS is suitable for measuring Si content in plants across a range of plant species. We based our testing on 442 samples of 29 plant species belonging to a range of growth forms. We calibrated the NIRS method against a well-established plant Si analysis method by using partial least-squares regression. Si concentrations ranged from detection limit (0.24 ppmSi) to 7.8% Si on dry weight and were well predicted by NIRS. The model fit with validation data was good across all plant species (n = 141, R2 = 0.90, RMSEP = 0.24), but improved when only graminoids were modeled (n = 66, R2 = 0.95, RMSEP = 0.10). A species specific model for the grass Deschampsia cespitosa showed even slightly better results than the model for all graminoids (n = 16, R2 = 0.93, RMSEP = 0.015). We show for the first time that NIRS is applicable for determining plant Si concentration across a range of plant species and growth forms, and represents a time- and cost-effective alternative to the chemical Si analysis methods. As NIRS can be applied concurrently to a range of plant organic constituents, it opens up unprecedented research possibilities for studying interrelations between Si and other plant compounds in vegetation, and for addressing the role of Si in ecosystems across a range of Si

  6. Technique for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the kubelka-munk function

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Yang, Yuanlong

    2003-09-02

    Method and apparatus for examining biological materials using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function. In one aspect, the method is used to determine whether a tissue sample is cancerous or not and comprises the steps of (a) measuring the diffuse reflectance from the tissue sample at a first wavelength and at a second wavelength, wherein the first wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 255-265 nm and wherein the second wavelength is a wavelength selected from the group consisting of 275-285 nm; (b) using the Kubelka-Munk function to transform the diffuse reflectance measurement obtained at the first and second wavelengths; and (c) comparing a ratio or a difference of the transformed Kubelka-Munk measurements at the first and second wavelengths to appropriate standards determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous. One can use the spectral profile of KMF between 250 nm to 300 nm to determine whether or not the tissue sample is cancerous or precancerous. According to the value at the first and second wavelengths determine whether or not the malignant tissue is invasive or mixed invasive and in situ or carcinoma in situ.

  7. Select Higher Education Chief Diversity Officers: Roles, Realities, and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittard, Lesley-Anne

    2010-01-01

    This naturalistic inquiry sought to obtain the "essence" of select administrative chief diversity officers (CDOs), by exploring their participant profiles, organizational realities, and career reflections. Participants self-identified as their institution's senior most chief executive, were poised executively, and charged to facilitate an…

  8. Reflections on Teaching Literacy: Selected Speeches of Margaret J. Early

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolcott, Willa, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The late Margaret J. Early was a nationally renowned educator in the field of English education and reading, a past president of the National Council of Teachers of English, an author and an editor herself, and the recipient of many awards. The book Reflections on Teaching Literacy: Selected Speeches of Margaret J. Early, edited by Willa Wolcott,…

  9. Optimally designed narrowband guided-mode resonance reflectance filters for mid-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jui-Nung; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Bhargava, Rohit; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    An alternative to the well-established Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, termed discrete frequency infrared (DFIR) spectrometry, has recently been proposed. This approach uses narrowband mid-infrared reflectance filters based on guided-mode resonance (GMR) in waveguide gratings, but filters designed and fabricated have not attained the spectral selectivity (≤ 32 cm−1) commonly employed for measurements of condensed matter using FT-IR spectroscopy. With the incorporation of dispersion and optical absorption of materials, we present here optimal design of double-layer surface-relief silicon nitride-based GMR filters in the mid-IR for various narrow bandwidths below 32 cm−1. Both shift of the filter resonance wavelengths arising from the dispersion effect and reduction of peak reflection efficiency and electric field enhancement due to the absorption effect show that the optical characteristics of materials must be taken into consideration rigorously for accurate design of narrowband GMR filters. By incorporating considerations for background reflections, the optimally designed GMR filters can have bandwidth narrower than the designed filter by the antireflection equivalence method based on the same index modulation magnitude, without sacrificing low sideband reflections near resonance. The reported work will enable use of GMR filters-based instrumentation for common measurements of condensed matter, including tissues and polymer samples. PMID:22109445

  10. The view of AGN-host alignment via reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; Parker, Michael L.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Lohfink, Anne M.

    2016-04-01

    The fuelling of active galactic nuclei (AGN) - via material propagated through the galactic disc or via minor mergers - is expected to leave an imprint on the alignment of the sub-pc disc relative to the host galaxy's stellar disc. Determining the inclination of the inner disc usually relies on the launching angle of the jet; here instead we use the inclination derived from reflection fits to a sample of AGN. We determine the distorting effect of unmodelled Fe XXV/XXVI features and, via extensive simulations, determine the difference in disc inclination resulting from the use of RELXILL compared to REFLIONX. We compare inner disc inclinations to those for the host galaxy stellar disc derived from the Hubble formula and, via Monte Carlo simulations, find a strong lack of a correlation (at ≫5σ) implying either widespread feeding via mergers if we assume the sample to be homogeneous, or that radiative disc warps are distorting our view of the emission. However, we find that by removing a small (˜1/5) subset of AGN, the remaining sample is consistent with random sampling of an underlying 1:1 correlation (at the 3σ level). A heterogenous sample would likely imply that our view is not dominated by radiative disc warps but instead by different feeding mechanisms with the majority consistent with coplanar accretion (although this may be the result of selection bias), whilst a smaller but not insignificant fraction may have been fuelled by minor mergers in the recent history of the host galaxy.

  11. Reflectance spectroscopy: quantitative analysis techniques for remote sensing applications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Roush, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods for the analysis of remotely sensed reflectance data are compared, including empirical methods and scattering theories, both of which are important for solving remote sensing problems. The concept of the photon mean path length and the implications for use in modeling reflectance spectra are presented.-from Authors

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy in planetary science: Review and strategy for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccord, Thomas B. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy is a remote sensing technique used to study the surfaces and atmospheres of solar system bodies. It provides first-order information on the presence and amounts of certain ions, molecules, and minerals on a surface or in an atmosphere. Reflectance spectroscopy has become one of the most important investigations conducted on most current and planned NASA Solar System Exploration Program space missions. This book reviews the field of reflectance spectroscopy, including information on the scientific technique, contributions, present conditions, and future directions and needs.

  13. Oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy for depth sensitive measurements in the epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Fradkin, Leonid; Nieman, Linda T.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2013-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy has shown potential as a tool for precancer detection by discriminating alterations in the optical properties within epithelial tissues. Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with the progression of epithelial cancerous lesions can be especially challenging in the oral cavity due to the variable thickness of the epithelium and the presence of keratinization. Optical spectroscopy of epithelial tissue with improved depth resolution would greatly assist in the isolation of optical properties associated with cancer progression. Here, we report a fiber optic probe for oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) that is capable of depth sensitive detection by combining the following three approaches: multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating. We analyze how probe design parameters are related to improvements in collection efficiency of scattered photons from superficial tissue layers and to increased depth discrimination within epithelium. We have demonstrated that obliquely-oriented collection fibers increase both depth selectivity and collection efficiency of scattering signal. Currently, we evaluate this technology in a clinical trial of patients presenting lesions suspicious for dysplasia or carcinoma in the oral cavity. We use depth sensitive spectroscopic data to develop automated algorithms for analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of the multilayer oral epithelial tissue. Our initial results show that OPRS has the potential to improve the detection and monitoring of epithelial precancers in the oral cavity.

  14. Feasibility of quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for targeted measurement of renal ischemia during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Utsav O.; Maddox, Michael M.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Dorsey, Philip J.; Wang, Mei; McCaslin, Ian Ross; Brown, J. Quincy; Lee, Benjamin R.

    2014-10-01

    Reduction of warm ischemia time during partial nephrectomy (PN) is critical to minimizing ischemic damage and improving postoperative kidney function, while maintaining tumor resection efficacy. Recently, methods for localizing the effects of warm ischemia to the region of the tumor via selective clamping of higher-order segmental artery branches have been shown to have superior outcomes compared with clamping the main renal artery. However, artery identification can prolong operative time and increase the blood loss and reduce the positive effects of selective ischemia. Quantitative diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can provide a convenient, real-time means to aid in artery identification during laparoscopic PN. The feasibility of quantitative DRS for real-time longitudinal measurement of tissue perfusion and vascular oxygenation in laparoscopic nephrectomy was investigated in vivo in six Yorkshire swine kidneys (n=three animals). DRS allowed for rapid identification of ischemic areas after selective vessel occlusion. In addition, the rates of ischemia induction and recovery were compared for main renal artery versus tertiary segmental artery occlusion, and it was found that the tertiary segmental artery occlusion trends toward faster recovery after ischemia, which suggests a potential benefit of selective ischemia. Quantitative DRS could provide a convenient and fast tool for artery identification and evaluation of the depth, spatial extent, and duration of selective tissue ischemia in laparoscopic PN.

  15. Quantitative assessment of hydrocarbon contamination in soil using reflectance spectroscopy: a "multipath" approach.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Guy; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2013-11-01

    that predicting TPH levels at low concentrations in selected soils at high precision levels is viable. Dividing a dataset into training, validation, and test groups affects the modeling process, and different preprocessing methods, alone or in combination, need to be selected based on soil type and PHC type. MPS was found to be a better parameter for selecting the best performing model than ratio of prediction to deviation, yielding models with the same performance but less complicated and more stable. The use of the "all possibilities" system proved to be mandatory for efficient optimal modeling of reflectance spectroscopy data. PMID:24160885

  16. Reflectance spectroscopy of pigmented cutaneous benign and malignant lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Kundurdjiev, T.; Pavlova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-10-01

    For the DRS measurements of skin benign, dysplastic and malignant lesions in vivo we applied halogen lamp (LS-1, OceanOptics Inc, Dunedin, Fl, USA) as a continuous light source in the region of 400-900 nm, optical probe (6+1 fibers) for the delivery of illumination and diffuse reflected light from the skin investigated and microspectrometer USB4000 (OceanOptics Inc., Dunedin, Fl, USA) for a storage and display of the spectra detected. As a diffuse reflectance standard Spectralon® plate was used to calibrate the spectrometer. The reflectance spectra obtained from normal skin in identical anatomic sites of different patients have similar spectral shape features, slightly differ by the reflectance intensity at different wavelengths, depending on the particular patient' skin phototype. One could find diagnostically important spectral features, related to specific intensity changes for a given wavelength due to specific pigments appearance, slope changes by value and sign for the reflectance spectra curves in a specific spectral range, disappearance or manifestation of minima, related to hemoglobin absorption at 410-420 nm, 543, 575 nm. Based on the observed peculiarities multispectral analysis of the reflectance spectra of the different lesions was used and diagnostically specific features are found. Discrimination using the DRS data obtained between benign compound and dermal nevi (45 cases), dysplastic nevi (17 cases) and pigmented malignant melanoma (41 cases) lesions is achieved with a diagnostic accuracy of 96 % for the benign nevi vs. MM, and 90 % for the dysplastic nevi vs. MM.

  17. Quantitative characterization of traumatic bruises by combined pulsed photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Randeberg, Lise L.; Majaron, Boris

    2015-02-01

    We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for characterization of the bruise evolution process. While DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths, the PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin). In this study, we simulate experimental DRS spectra and PPTR signals using the Monte Carlo technique and focus on characterization of a suitable fitting approach for their analysis. We find inverse Monte Carlo to be superior to the diffusion approximation approach for the inverse analysis of DRS spectra. The analysis is then augmented with information obtainable by the fitting of the PPTR signal. We show that both techniques can be coupled in a combined fitting approach. The combining of two complementary techniques improves the robustness and accuracy of the inverse analysis, enabling a comprehensive quantitative characterization of the bruise evolution dynamics.

  18. Experimental analysis of bruises in human volunteers using radiometric depth profiling and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2015-07-01

    We combine pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) depth profiling with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurements for a comprehensive analysis of bruise evolution in vivo. While PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin), DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths and thus offers an additional insight into dynamics of the hemoglobin degradation products. Combining the two approaches enables us to quantitatively characterize bruise evolution dynamics. Our results indicate temporal variations of the bruise evolution parameters in the course of bruise self-healing process. The obtained parameter values and trends represent a basis for a future development of an objective technique for bruise age determination.

  19. Calibration and prediction of amino acids in stevia leaf powder using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guan; Wang, Ruiguo; Quampah, Alfred Julius; Rong, Zhengqin; Shi, Chunhai; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-28

    The use of stevia as animal feed additive has been researched over the years, but how to rapidly predict its amino acid contents has not been studied yet by using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. In the present study, 301 samples of stevia leaf powder were defined as the calibration set from which calibration models were optimized, and the performance of prediction was evaluated. Compared with other mathematical treatments, the models developed with the "1, 12, 12, 1" treatment, combined with modified partial least-squares regression and standard normal variance with de-trending, had a significant potential in predicting amino acid contents, such as threonine, serine, etc. Six spectral regions were found to possess large spectrum variation and show high contribution to calibration models. From the present study, the calibration models of amino acids in stevia were successfully developed and could be applied to quality control in feed processing, breeding selection and mutant screening. PMID:22066716

  20. [Application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy in grass breeding with space flight mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei-Bo; Han, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Yun-Wei; Guo, Hui-Qin

    2008-02-01

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a new fast and efficient analysis method. It has been wildly used in many areas such as evaluation of feedstuff, assessment of soil fertilizer and so on. In the present paper, the principle, technique method and merits of NIRS were introduced. The potential application of NIRS in grass breeding with space flight mutagenesis was discussed in areas such as analysis of grass nutrition, estimate of secondary metabolism compounds, forecast of disease and insects resistance, and evaluation of abiotic stress. The conclusion is that application of NIRS in grass breeding with space mutagenesis is significant in both academic and technical areas because it not only improves the efficiency of mutation selection but helps uncover the mechanism of space mutation breeding. PMID:18479009

  1. Improved depth resolution in near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using obliquely oriented fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilwind, Rachel Estelle; 't Hooft, Gert; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a significant improvement of depth selectivity when using obliquely oriented fibers for near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. This is confirmed by diffuse reflectance measurements of a two-layer tissue-mimicking phantom across the spectral range from 1000 to 1940 nm. The experimental proof is supported by Monte Carlo simulations. The results reveal up to fourfold reduction in the mean optical penetration depth, twofold reduction in its variation, and a decrease in the number of scattering events when a single fiber is oriented at an angle of 60 deg. The effect of reducing the mean optical penetration depth is enhanced by orienting both fibers inwardly. Using outwardly oriented fibers enables more selective probing of deeper layers, while reducing the contribution from surface layers. We further demonstrate that the effect of an inward oblique arrangement can be approximated to a decrease in fiber-to-fiber separation in the case of a perpendicular fiber arrangement. This approximation is valid in the weak- or absorption-free regime. Our results assert the advantages of using obliquely oriented fibers when attempting to specifically address superficial tissue layers, for example, for skin cancer detection, or in noninvasive glucose monitoring. Such flexibility could be further advantageous in a range of minimally invasive applications, including catheter-based interventions.

  2. Doppler-shifted reflections of X rays in beamfoil spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, E. M.; Mcintyre, L. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon foils were positioned at roughly 10 deg to the conventional perpendicular position so that the spectrometer would view the beam on emergence from the foil, with no radiation shielded by a bowed or wrinkled foil or by the foil holder. Extraneous peaks due to reflected radiation were detected in the spectrum obtained with the tilted foil. A large satellite appears longward of the spectral line and is attributed to Doppler-shifted radiation reflected from the foil surface. Special tests arranged to validate the origin of the satellites are described. The relative intensity of the reflected radiation compared with the direct radiation observed is at variance with the relative intensities reported for longer wavelengths. The reasons for this, possible effects of spectrometer geometry, and applications in the investigation or generation of polarization remain to be investigated

  3. Determination of styrene-butadiene rubber composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. S.; Kiselev, S. A.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Budeeva, A. V.; Mashukov, V. I.

    2013-03-01

    A rapid method for determining the composition of styrene-butadiene rubber using attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was proposed. PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy and infrared transmission spectroscopy were used as absolute techniques for determining the compositions of calibration samples. It was shown that the method was applicable to a wide range of styrene-butadiene rubbers, did not require additional sample preparation, and was easily reproducible.

  4. Monitoring bruise age using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurdy, John W.; Duffy, Susan; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    The ability to determine the age of a bruise of unknown age mechanism is important in matters of domestic and child abuse and forensics. While physicians are asked to make clinical judgment on the age of a bruise using color and tenderness, studies have shown that a physicians estimate is highly inaccurate and in cases no better than chance alone. We present here the temporal progression of reflection spectrum collected from accidentally inflicted contusions in adult and child study participants with a synopsis of the observed phenomena. Reflection spectra collected using a portable fiber optic reflection spectrometer can track the increase in extravasated hemoglobin from trauma caused blood vessel rupture and subsequent removal of this hemoglobin occurring concurrent with an increase in the absorption attributed to the breakdown product bilirubin. We hypothesize that this time dependent pattern can be used to determine the age of an unknown bruise in an individual provided rate constant information for the patient can be determined in a controlled calibration bruise. Using reflection spectra to estimate bruise age can provide a rapid and noninvasive method to improve the ability of physicians in dating the age of a contusion.

  5. Identification of thermal degradation using probabilistic models in reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criner, A. K.; Cherry, A. J.; Cooney, A. T.; Katter, T. D.; Banks, H. T.; Hu, Shuhua; Catenacci, Jared

    2015-03-01

    Different probabilistic models of molecular vibration modes are considered to model the reflectance spectra of chemical species through the dielectric constant. We discuss probability measure estimators in parametric and nonparametric models. Analyses of ceramic matrix composite samples that have been heat treated for different amounts of times are compared. We finally compare these results with the analysis of vitreous silica using nonparametric models.

  6. NEAR-INFRARED TRANSMISSION AND REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY FOR DETERMINATION OF DIETARY FIBER IN BARLEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley. The Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and the NIR Systems 6500 monochromator were used to obtain transmission and reflectance spectra, respectiv...

  7. Pupil diameter reflects uncertainty in attentional selection during visual search

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Joy J.; Blumenfeld, Zachary; Tyson, Terence L.; Minzenberg, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Pupil diameter has long been used as a metric of cognitive processing. However, recent advances suggest that the cognitive sources of change in pupil size may reflect LC-NE function and the calculation of unexpected uncertainty in decision processes (Aston-Jones and Cohen, 2005; Yu and Dayan, 2005). In the current experiments, we explored the role of uncertainty in attentional selection on task-evoked changes in pupil diameter during visual search. We found that task-evoked changes in pupil diameter were related to uncertainty during attentional selection as measured by reaction time (RT) and performance accuracy (Experiments 1-2). Control analyses demonstrated that the results are unlikely to be due to error monitoring or response uncertainty. Our results suggest that pupil diameter can be used as an implicit metric of uncertainty in ongoing attentional selection requiring effortful control processes. PMID:26300759

  8. ChemCam Passive Reflectance Spectroscopy at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F.; Cloutis, E.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D. L.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Gasnault, O.; Kinch, K. M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rice, M. S.; Wiens, R. C.; DeFlores, L.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) portion of the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover uses 3 dispersive spectrometers to cover the ultraviolet (240-342 nm), visible (382-469 nm) and visible/near-infrared (474-906 nm) spectral regions at high spectral (<0.5nm) and spatial (0.65mrad) resolution. In active LIBS mode, light emitted from a laser-generated plasma is dispersed onto these spectrometers and used to detect elemental emission lines. Typical observations include 3 msec-exposure 'dark' spectra (acquired with the LIBS laser off) used to remove the background signal from the LIBS measurement. Similar 'passive' observations of the ChemCam calibration target holder can be made at similar times of day and at identical exposure times (to minimize variations from dark current). Because this target exhibits ~95% flat reflectance in the ~400-900 nm region, radiance spectra ratios (surface/calibration target) can be normalized to known calibration target lab spectra to produce relative reflectance spectra (400-900 nm) with an estimated accuracy of 10-20%. Initial results replicated the known spectral shape and overall reflectance values of the ChemCam calibration targets and green color chip on the Mastcam calibration target. Dust contamination was evident, although dust on the ChemCam calibration targets is minimized by their tilted placement on the rover deck. All ChemCam targets that were sunlit during LIBS acquisition (~80% of all measurements) provide 'dark' spectra for which relative reflectance spectra can be obtained. Owing to the dusty nature of the Gale landing sites, passive spectra observed to date exhibit spectral shapes indicative of ferric phases, similar to spectra of palagonitic soils. Most spectra are bracketed in reflectance by typical 'bright' and 'dark' spectra from the OMEGA and CRISM orbital spectrometers. Preliminary Mastcam reflectance spectra are similar, providing additional confidence regarding the

  9. [Rapid determination of fatty acids in soybean oils by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Feng-ping; Liu, Yao-min; Wu, Zong-wen; Suo, You-rui

    2012-08-01

    In the present research, a novel method was established for determination of five fatty acids in soybean oil by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy. The optimum conditions of mathematics model of five components (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3) were studied, including the sample set selection, chemical value analysis, the detection methods and condition. Chemical value was analyzed by gas chromatography. One hundred fifty eight samples were selected, 138 for modeling set, 10 for testing set and 10 for unknown sample set. All samples were placed in sample pools and scanned by transmission reflection-near infrared spectrum after sonicleaning for 10 minute. The 1100-2500 nm spectral region was analyzed. The acquisition interval was 2 nm. Modified partial least square method was chosen for calibration mode creating. Result demonstrated that the 1-VR of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.8839, 0.5830, 0.9001, 0.9776 and 0.9596, respectively. And the SECV of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.42, 0.29, 0.83, 0.46 and 0.21, respectively. The standard error of the calibration (SECV) of five fatty acids between the reference value of testing sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.891, 0.790, 0.900, 0.976 and 0.942, respectively. It was proved that the near infrared spectrum predictive value was linear with chemical value and the mathematical model established for fatty acids of soybean oil was feasible. For validation, 10 unknown samples were selected for analysis by near infrared spectrum. The result demonstrated that the relative standard deviation between predict value and chemical value was less than 5.50%. That was to say that transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy had a good veracity in analysis of fatty acids of soybean oil

  10. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  11. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of pre- and post-treated oral submucous fibrosis: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivabalan, S.; Ponranjini Vedeswari, C.; Jayachandran, S.; Koteeswaran, D.; Pravda, C.; Aruna, P.; Ganesan, S.

    2010-02-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a high risk precancerous condition characterized by changes in the connective tissue fibers of the lamina propria and deeper parts leading to stiffness of the mucosa and restricted mouth opening, fibrosis of the lining mucosa of the upper digestive tract involving the oral cavity, oro- and hypo-pharynx and the upper two-thirds of the oesophagus. Optical reflectance measurements have been used to extract diagnostic information from a variety of tissue types, in vivo. We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to quantitatively monitor tumour response to chemotherapy. Twenty patients with submucous fibrosis were diagnosed with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and treated with the chemotherapy drug, Dexamethasone sodium phosphate and Hyaluronidase injection for seven weeks and after the treatment they were again subjected to the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The major observed spectral alterations on pre and post treated submucous fibrosis is an increase in the diffuse reflectance from 450 to 600 nm. Normal mucosa has showed higher reflectance when compared to the pre and post-treated cases. The spectral changes were quantified and correlated to conventional diagnostic results viz., maximum mouth opening, tongue protrusion and burning sensation. The results of this study suggest that the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy may also be considered as complementary optical techniques to monitor oral tissue transformation.

  12. Investigation of select energetic materials by differential reflection spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna Marie

    The presence of explosive or energetic materials is prevalent in today's world. Terrorists continue to target buildings and mass transit systems with explosive devices. The detection of these energetic materials is necessary to insure national security and welfare. Detection techniques such as X-ray scanners, Raman spectroscopy, Terahertz spectroscopy and ion mobility spectrometry are in current use or development; however, none of these are appropriate for all necessary applications. These techniques include. The present document provides an overview of the current detection techniques and describes a new technique for detecting energetic materials called differential reflection spectrometry (DRS). DRS essentially measures the optical absorption of energetic materials. The use of DRS has led to the discovery of previously unreported optical characteristics for some energetic compounds that are unique to the individual material. These optical characteristics consist of absorption shoulders between 270 and 420 nm, e.g. near 420 nm for 2, 4, 6 trinitrotoluene (TNT). In the presented research, the origin of the differential reflection spectra obtained was investigated using several techniques including UV-Visible spectrophotometry (transmission and reflection) and computer molecular modeling. Experimental DRS spectra of TNT, hexahydro-1,3,5 trinitro-1,3,5 triazine (RDX), octahydro 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,6 tetrazocine (HMX), 18 pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2, 4, 6, n-tetranitro-n-methylaniline (Tetryl) were taken and analyzed. From the experimental results and verification by molecular modeling, it was found that the absorption features observed in the redder region of the UV range (270--420 nm) are due to molecular orbital transitions in the nitro (NO2) groups of the measured explosives. These transitions only occur in specific conditions, such as high concentration solutions and solids, where the normally forbidden transitions are allowed. The unique

  13. Early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and autofluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous preclinical study demonstrated that both visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy, each of which yields a different set of physiological information, can predict skin flap viability with high accuracy in a MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model. In this report, we further evaluated our technique for the early detection and differentiation of venous occlusion and arterial occlusion in a rat groin flap model. We performed both diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence measurements on the skin flap model and statistically differentiated between flaps with and without occlusions as well as between flaps with venous occlusion and those with arterial occlusion based on these non-invasive optical measurements. Our preliminary results suggested that visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy can be potentially used clinically to detect both venous and arterial occlusion and differentiate one from the other accurately at an early time point. PMID:26977363

  14. Early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and autofluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-02-01

    Our previous preclinical study demonstrated that both visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy, each of which yields a different set of physiological information, can predict skin flap viability with high accuracy in a MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model. In this report, we further evaluated our technique for the early detection and differentiation of venous occlusion and arterial occlusion in a rat groin flap model. We performed both diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence measurements on the skin flap model and statistically differentiated between flaps with and without occlusions as well as between flaps with venous occlusion and those with arterial occlusion based on these non-invasive optical measurements. Our preliminary results suggested that visible diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy can be potentially used clinically to detect both venous and arterial occlusion and differentiate one from the other accurately at an early time point. PMID:26977363

  15. Detection of propranolol in pharmaceutical formulations by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotardo, Mara Andréia; Tognolli, João Olímpio; Pezza, Helena Redigolo; Pezza, Leonardo

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes an analytical reflectometric method that has an objective not only the industrial quality control but also to detect possible falsifications and/or adulterations of propranolol in pharmaceutical formulations. The method is based on the diffuse reflectance measurements of the colored product (III) of the spot test reaction between propranolol hydrochloride (I) and 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide (II) using filter paper as solid support. Spot test conditions have been investigated using experimental design in order to identify and optimize the critical factors. The factors evaluated were DCQ concentration, propranolol solvent and DCQ solvent. The best reaction conditions were achieved with the addition of 30 μL of propranolol solution in ethanol 35% (v/v) and 30 μL of DCQ solution at 70 mg mL -1 in acetone, in this order. All reflectance measurements were carried out at 500 nm and the linear range was from 8.45 × 10 -4 to 8.45 × 10 -2 mol L -1 ( r = 0.998). The limit of detection was 1.01 × 10 -4 mol L -1. No interference was observed from the assessed excipients and drugs. The method was applied to determine propranolol in commercial brands of pharmaceuticals. The results obtained by the proposed method were favorably compared with those given by the British Pharmacopoeia procedure.

  16. MEMS-based programmable reflective slit mask for multi-object spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, Michael; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Lanzoni, Patrick; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Multi-object spectroscopy is a powerful tool for space and ground-based telescopes for the study of the formation of galaxies. This technique requires a programmable slit mask for astronomical object selection. We are developing MEMS-based programmable reflective slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy that consist of micromirror arrays on which each micromirror of size 100 x 200 μm2 is electrostatically tilted providing a precise angle. The main requirements for these arrays are cryogenic environment capabilities, precise and uniform tilt angle over the whole device, uniformity of the mirror voltage-tilt hysteresis and a low mirror deformation. A first generation of MEMS-based programmable reflective slit masks composed of 5 x 5 micromirrors was tested in cryogenic conditions at 92 K. Then, first prototypes of large arrays were microfabricated and characterized, but the reliability of these arrays had to be improved. To increase the reliability of these devices, a third generation of micromirror arrays composed of 64 x 32 micromirrors is under development. This generation was especially designed for individual actuation of each mirror, applying a line-column algorithm based on the voltage-tilt hysteresis of the actuator. The fabrication process was optimized and is now based on multiple wafer level bonding steps. Microfabricated devices have micromirror with a peak-to-valley deformation less than 3 nm. The mirrors can be tilted at 20° by an actuation voltage lower than 100 V. First experiments showed that our micromirrors are well suited for the line-column addressing of each micromirror.

  17. Using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) for qualitative examination of iron minerals formed in a hydromorphic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringer, Marianna; Kiss, Klaudia; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    The method of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) allows a large number of measurements in a rapid, non-destructive mode and does not require complex sample preparation. Based on the recorded wavelength-reflectance spectra, the simultaneous investigation of various soil parameters such as colour, mineral composition, organic matter and moisture content is possible. Several publications have presented results of the qualitative and quantitative analysis of iron-oxides containing trivalent iron (primarily hematite, goethite) by DRS. These iron minerals are usually formed in soils and sediments under surface conditions. Nevertheless in the case of hydromorhic soils water saturation can result iron mineral formation in the absence of oxygen. However, the related soil forming process leads to the appearance of ferrous iron-hydroxides (green rust) in the soil profile, in the literature no reference was found discussing the investigation of samples from reduced soil conditions by DRS method. Our aim was to reveal if DRS is suitable to perform qualitative characterization of both ferrous and ferric iron-oxide and hydroxide minerals of waterlogged soils. In the present study samples from a sandy meadow soil (calcic, gleyic Phaeozem ferric, arenic) profile were examined in the laboratory using an UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer with a diffuse reflectance attachement. Pedogenic iron minerals were characterized through spectral transformations and by comparison with spectrum database and literature data. The results were compared with data obtained from widely used routine methods. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) for the determination of mineral composition, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) for total iron content and selective chemical dissolution (SCD) for the amorphous and crystalline iron content were presented. Although iron oxide minerals are usually at low concentrations (approx. 0,1%) or present in a poorly crystalline form, our results show that the presence of

  18. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a semiconductor lubricant elemental analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehabi, Abbas; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Kawai, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Photoelectron spectra from a typical hard disk storage media device (HDD) were measured at total reflection and non-total reflection at unburnished, acetone-cleaned, and argon-sputtered conditions. F, O, N, and C usually making the upper layer of a typical hard disk medium were detected. Enhancement of the photoelectron emission of the fluorocarbon lubricant was observed at total reflection. Pt and Co were only found by non-total X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) because they are constituents of a deeper region than the top and interface regions. Argon-sputtered, ultrasonic acetone-cleaned, and unburnished top layers were compared at total and non-total reflection conditions. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for storage media lubrication layer chemical state analysis, reliable for industrial quality control application , and reproducible.

  19. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Analytical alignment tolerances for off-plane reflection grating spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allured, Ryan; McEntaffer, Randall T.

    2013-12-01

    Future NASA X-ray Observatories will shed light on a variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. Off-plane reflection gratings can be used to provide high throughput and spectral resolution in the 0.3-1.5 keV band, allowing for unprecedented diagnostics of energetic astrophysical processes. A grating spectrometer consists of multiple aligned gratings intersecting the converging beam of a Wolter-I telescope. Each grating will be aligned such that the diffracted spectra overlap at the focal plane. Misalignments will degrade both spectral resolution and effective area. In this paper we present an analytical formulation of alignment tolerances that define grating orientations in all six degrees of freedom. We verify our analytical results with raytrace simulations to fully explore the alignment parameter space. We also investigate the effect of misalignments on diffraction efficiency.

  1. Optical monitoring of tissue viability using reflected spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Kraut, Ari; Manor, Tamar; Sonn, Judith; Zurovsky, Yehuda

    2001-05-01

    Only few techniques that could provide real-time continuous multiparametric physiological data have been developed. Therefore, experimental and clinical monitoring devices for organ and tissue viability evaluation are still lacking. In this study, we present the new concept of tissue vitality defined as a product of a few parameters monitored in real- time by a combined measurement of tissue blood flow and volume as well as the oxidation reduction state of the mitochondria. The hypothesis behind the new approach is that in order to evaluate in real-time tissue vitality, it is necessary to monitor both microcirculatory blood flow and volume as well as the intracellular O2 balance as reflected in the mitochondrial redox state.

  2. Modeling Icy Saturnian Satellite Compositions Using Cryogenic Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, James B.

    2006-09-01

    Surface compositions among the icy Saturnian satellites range from nearly pure water ice at Mimas and Tethys to dark, nitrile-laced compounds at Phoebe and Dione. New measurements from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) coupled with laboratory measurements of relevant compounds at cryogenic temperatures, are beginning to reveal some of the subtle variations in compounds on these worlds. By comparing spectral observations for each of these moons to the others, inferences may be drawn which help to reveal their varying formation histories. Spectral modeling of Tethys observations, for example, indicates a surface dominated by water ice with only small contributions by other materials such as carbon dioxide or amorphous carbon; yet, requires an unusual mixture of grain sizes ranging from less than ten microns to as much as 2.5 millimeters in diameter. At the other extreme, Phoebe has been shown to exhibit much clearer evidence (cf. Clark et al., 2005) for a host of compounds, including iron-bearing materials, carbon dioxide, nitriles, and organics. Comparison of Cassini VIMS spectra of Phoebe, Dione, and Hyperion indicate many of the same spectral features. Mapping of these spectral features using automated feature extraction algorithms, cryogenic laboratory reflectance measurements, and standard Hapke reflectance models allows insights into the nature and distribution of these materials on the icy Saturnian satellites. In addition, this exercise allows examination of the methods and suggests ways in which the models might be improved. These include improved formulations of phase and scattering functions, as well as laboratory investigations of both pure compounds and mixtures.

  3. Cryogenic Reflectance Spectroscopy in Support of Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Present understanding of planetary composition is based primarily on remotely-sensed data, and in particular upon ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectroscopy. Spectra acquired by telescopic and spacecraft instruments are compared to laboratory measurements of pure materials in order to identify surface components based on characteristic absorption features. Cryogenic spectral measurements are necessary for the study of worlds beyond the Earth's orbit. While some materials exhibit only small spectral changes as a function of temperature, many others are strongly temperature-dependent. For example, hydrated salts exhibit different spectral behavior under conditions appropriate to Europa than at terrestrial temperatures. The icy satellites of the outer solar system contain significant quantities of volatile ices which do not even exist at standard temperature and pressure (STP). A comprehensive spectral database of ices and minerals covering a wide temperature range will have applications ranging from the study of comets and Kuiper Belt objects to outer planet satellites and the polar regions of Mars. Efforts are presently underway at NASA-Ames to develop capabilities which will contribute to such a database. As spacecraft instruments feature increasing spatial and spectral resolution, appropriate laboratory reference spectra become increasingly critical to accurate interpretation of the spacecraft data.

  4. Mars surface composition from reflectance spectroscopy - A summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, R. B.; Clark, R. N.; Mccord, T. B.; Adams, J. B.; Huguenin, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra and multispectral maps of the Martian surface are discussed, and implications of the data for the composition of the Martian surface are considered. Spacecraft and earth-based telescopic observations have confirmed the generally bimodal albedo distribution of the planet, dividing the surface into bright and dark regions. Mars spectra are characterized by the presence of strong Fe(+3) absorption, which is attributed to various ferric oxide minerals. Interpretations of the spectra from the dark regions indicate a basaltic or ultramafic source rock. Evidence for water ice or a highly desiccated metal hydrate has been obtained, along with evidence for CO2-ice only in the south polar cap. Mariner 9 observations of Martian dust suggest the presence of rather acidic rock or mineral particles, or a montmorillonite-type clay. Prospects for the future study of Martian surface composition include continuing earth-based spectrophotometric studies, and high-spectral-resolution mapping of a significant portion of the surface by the Galileo spacecraft and the next Mars mission.

  5. Standoff detection of explosive materials by differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna M.; Hummel, Rolf E.; Schöllhorn, Claus; Holloway, Paul H.

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that 2, 4, 6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct structures in differential reflectograms, near 420 nm and 250 nm. These characteristic peaks are not observed from approximately two dozen organic and inorganic substances which we tested and which may be in or on a suitcase. This exclusivity infers an ideal technique for explosives detection in mass transit and similar locations. The described technique for detection of explosives is fast, inexpensive, reliable, portable, and is applicable from some distance, that is, it does not require contact with the surveyed substance. Moreover, we have developed a curve discrimination program for field applications of the technique. Other explosives such as 1, 3, 5-trinitro-1, 3, 5 triazacyclohexane (RDX), 1, 3, 5, 7-Tetranitro-1, 3, 5, 7- tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), 2, 4, 6, N-Tetranitro-N-methylaniline (Tetryl), Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and nitroglycerin have also been investigated and demonstrate similar, but unique, characteristic spectra. The technique utilizes near-ultraviolet to visible light reflected from two spots on the same sample surface yielding a differential reflectogram corresponding to the absorption of the sample. The origin of the spectra is attributed to the highest occupied molecular orbital to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) transitions of the respective explosive molecule. Experiments using transmission spectrophotometry have also been performed to compliment and confirm the specific transitions. The results are supported by computer modeling of the molecular orbitals that yield UV and visible transitions.

  6. Simulation of selective pulse techniques for localized NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwood, Michael; Schleich, Thomas; Robin Bendall, M.

    The results of a computer simulation investigation delineating the limits of resolution, sensitivity, and accuracy of the depth- resolved suface-coil spectroscopy (DRESS), volume-selective excitation (VSE), and image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) methods for achieving spatially localized NMR spectroscopy are presented. A computer program, which numerically solves the Bloch equations for variable input parameters, is used to simulate the spatial localization afforded by each technique. Because the numerical solution of the Bloch equations describes the behavior of the bulk magnetization with great precision, the simulations provide an objective and realistic means of evaluating the performance of the individual localization schemes and reveal nuances and limitations not discussed in the original experimental papers. The results of this computer simulation study should encourage the optimization of localization methodology for use in specific applications.

  7. [Application of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to the detection and identification of transgenic corn].

    PubMed

    Rui, Yu-kui; Luo, Yun-bo; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhang, Lu-da

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of the GMO, more and more GMO food has been pouring into the market. Much attention has been paid to GMO labeling under the controversy of GMO safety. Transgenic corns and their parents were scanned by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy range of 12000-4000 cm(-1); the resolution was 4 cm(-1); scanning was carried out for 64 times; BP algorithm was applied for data processing. The GMO food was easily resolved. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is unpolluted and inexpensive compared with PCR and ELISA, so it is a very promising detection method for GMO food. PMID:16395887

  8. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  9. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study of tuberculin skin tests reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Anne; Grande, Sophie; Dahel, Karima; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Poher, Vincent; Goujon, Catherine; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a technique widely used to determine optical properties of tissues: scattering and absorption coefficients. In this study, we present the development of a low-cost optical instrument usable in a clinical environment based upon the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy approach. This instrument has been used in a clinical study to support the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The idea is to establish a new scanning method for an early detection of inflammation due to a reagent injection, before the onset of visual signs. Results comparing the instrumental and classical clinical readings are presented.

  10. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, F.; Zhang, F.; Evertsson, J.; Carlà, F.; Pan, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Lundgren, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  11. In vivo soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Schmidt, Michael; Douplik, Alexandre

    Remote laser surgery does not provide haptic feedback to operate layer by layer and preserve vulnerable anatomical structures like nerve tissue or blood vessels. The aim of this study is identification of soft tissue in vivo by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to set the base for a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Various soft tissues can be identified by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo. The results may set the base for a feedback system to prevent nerve damage during oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  12. Polarization-dependent differential reflectance spectroscopy for real-time monitoring of organic thin film growth.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Quezada, A; Aiglinger, M; Ghanbari, E; Wagner, Th; Zeppenfeld, P

    2015-11-01

    By monitoring the reflectance of a sample surface during deposition of a thin organic film, one can obtain information with submonolayer resolution in real-time. A special kind of optical spectroscopy is Differential Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS), which compares the reflectance before and during deposition of a thin film or any other change of the surface optical properties. In this work, we present an extended DRS setup that allows monitoring simultaneously both linear polarization states (s and p) of the reflected light. We implement polarization-dependent DRS to monitor the growth of perflouropentacene thin films on a Ag(110) single crystal. The setup allows us to deduce the optical anisotropy of the sample and, in particular, the preferred orientation of the molecules on the surface. PMID:26628122

  13. Exemplar selectivity reflects perceptual similarities in the human fusiform cortex.

    PubMed

    Davidesco, Ido; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Bickel, Stephan; Harel, Michal; Groppe, David M; Keller, Corey J; Schevon, Catherine A; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Goelman, Gadi; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2014-07-01

    While brain imaging studies emphasized the category selectivity of face-related areas, the underlying mechanisms of our remarkable ability to discriminate between different faces are less understood. Here, we recorded intracranial local field potentials from face-related areas in patients presented with images of faces and objects. A highly significant exemplar tuning within the category of faces was observed in high-Gamma (80-150 Hz) responses. The robustness of this effect was supported by single-trial decoding of face exemplars using a minimal (n = 5) training set. Importantly, exemplar tuning reflected the psychophysical distance between faces but not their low-level features. Our results reveal a neuronal substrate for the establishment of perceptual distance among faces in the human brain. They further imply that face neurons are anatomically grouped according to well-defined functional principles, such as perceptual similarity. PMID:23438448

  14. Detection and identification of explosive RDX by THz diffuse reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Bo; Chen, Yunqing; Bastiaans, Glenn J; Zhang, X-C

    2006-01-01

    The reflection spectrum of the explosive RDX was acquired from a diffuse reflection measurement using a THz time-domain spectroscopy system in combination with a diffuse reflectance accessory. By applying the Kramers-Kronig transform to the reflection spectrum, the absorption spectrum (0.2-1.8 THz) was obtained. It agrees with the result from a transmission measurement and distinguishes RDX from other materials. The effect of the reference spectrum was examined by using both a Teflon pellet and a copper plate as references. The strong absorption of RDX at 0.82 THz allowed it to be identified by the diffuse reflection measurement even when the RDX sample was covered with certain optically opaque materials. Our investigation demonstrates that THz technique is capable of detecting and identifying hidden RDX-related explosives in a diffuse reflection mode, which is crucial for the standoff detection in the real world applications. PMID:19503355

  15. Reflectance and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Mars: Relationship Between ISM and TES for Compositional Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor); Mustard, John

    2004-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy has demonstrated that high albedo surfaces on Mars contain heavily altered materials with some component of hematite, poorly crystalline ferric oxides, and an undefined silicate matrix. The spectral properties of many low albedo regions indicate crystalline basalts containing both low and high calcium pyroxene, a mineralogy consistent with the basaltic SNC meteorites. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) experiment on the Mars Geochemical Surveyor has acquired critical new data relevant to surface composition and mineralogy, but in a wavelength region that is complementary to reflectance spectroscopy. The essence of the completed research was to analyze TES data in the context of reflectance data obtained by the French ISM imaging spectrometer experiment in 1989. This approach increased our understanding of the complementary nature of these wavelength regions for mineralogic determinations using actual observations of the martian surface. The research effort focused on three regions of scientific importance: Syrtis Major-Isidis Basin, Oxia Palus-Arabia, and Valles Marineris. In each region distinct spatial variations related to reflectance, and in derived mineralogic information and interpreted compositional units were analyzed. In addition, specific science questions related to the composition of volcanics and crustal evolution, soil compositions and pedogenic processes, and the relationship between pristine lithologies and weathering provided an overall science-driven framework for the work. The detailed work plan involved colocation of TES and ISM data, extraction of reflectance and emissivity spectra from areas of known reflectance variability, and quantitative analysis using factor analysis and statistical techniques to determine the degree of correspondence between these different wavelength regions. Identified coherent variations in TES spectroscopy were assessed against known atmospheric effects to validate that the variations

  16. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Human Skin Using a Commercial Fiber Optic Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, J. A. Delgado; Rodriguez, M. Cunill; Montiel, S. Vazquez y; Castro, Jorge; Rodriguez, A. Cornejo; Gutierrez, J. L.; Martinez, F.; Gutierrez, B.; Orozco, E.

    2008-08-11

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a reliable and easy to implement technique in human tissue characterization. In this work we evaluate the performance of the commercial USB4000 miniature fiber optic spectrometer in the in-vivo measurement of the diffuse reflectance spectra of different healthy skin sites and lesions in a population of 54 volunteers. Results show, that this spectrometer reproduces well the typical signatures of skin spectra over the 400-1000 nm region. Remarkable spectral differences exist between lesions and normal surrounding skin. A diffusion-based model was used to simulate reflectance spectra collected by the optical probe of the system.

  17. Prediction of olive quality using FT-NIR spectroscopy in reflectance and transmittance modes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to use FT-NIR spectroscopy to predict the firmness, oil content and color of two olive (Olea europaea L) varieties (‘Ayvalik’ and ‘Gemlik’). Spectral measurements were performed on the intact olives for the wavelengths of 780-2500 nm in reflectance and for 800-1725...

  18. Near-infrared transmission and reflectance spectroscopy for the measurement of dietary fiber in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared (NIR) transmission and reflectance spectroscopy were investigated as rapid screening tools to evaluate the total dietary fiber content of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars. A Foss Grainspec Rice Analyzer and an NIR Systems 6500 spectrometer were used to obtain transmission and ref...

  19. INVESTIGATING ULTRASONIC DIFFRACTION GRATING SPECTROSCOPY AND REFLECTION TECHNIQUES FOR CHARACTERIZING SLURRY PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the project are to investigate the use of (1) ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy (UDGS) for measuring the particle size of a slurry and (2) shear wave reflection techniques to measure the viscosity of a slurry. For the first topic, the basic principle...

  20. Nondestructive Olive Quality Detection Using FT-NIR Spectroscopy in Reflectance Mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality features (firmness, oil content and color in terms of hue and chroma) of two olive (Olea europaea L) varieties (‘Ayvalik’ and ‘Gemlik’) were predicted using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Reflectance measurements of intact olives were performed using a bifurcated fibe...

  1. Reflectance spectroscopy detects management and landscape differences in soil carbon and nitrogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many studies document the successful calibration of visible and near infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) to various soil properties. However, few studies have reported on the use of VNIR DRS to detect treatment differences in controlled experiments. Therefore, our objective in thi...

  2. Measurement of Trans-Fatty Acids in Cereal Products Without Oil Extraction Using NIR Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was evaluated as a rapid technique, to determine the trans-fatty acid content of ground cereal products. NIR spectra were obtained with a dispersive spectrometer and trans-fatty acids determined by modified AOAC Method 996.01. First derivative PLS1 mode...

  3. Real time, in-situ temperature monitoring using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.L.; Beard, B.T.; Pearsall, T.P.; Wang, Z.Z.; Stevens, J.E.; Blain, M.G.; Meisenheimer, T.L.

    1996-11-01

    Real time temperature measurements have been performed on both GaAs and silicon substrates during wafer processing using a technique based upon diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Good temperature resolution ({+-}O.4 {degrees}C) and rapid updates have enabled the process control potential of the device to be demonstrated.

  4. Absorption and Scattering Coefficients: A Biophysical-Chemistry Experiment Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Gabriela B.; Lagorio, M. Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A biophysical-chemistry experiment, based on the reflectance spectroscopy for calculating the absorption and scattering coefficients of leaves is described. The results show that different plants species exhibit different values for both the coefficients because of their different pigment composition.

  5. Analysis of total oil and fatty acids composition by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy in edible nuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, Chari V.; Sundaram, Jaya

    2014-10-01

    Near Infrared (NIR) Reflectance spectroscopy has established itself as an important tool in quantifying water and oil present in various food materials. It is rapid and nondestructive, easier to use, and does not require processing the samples with corrosive chemicals that would render them non-edible. Earlier, the samples had to be ground into powder form before making any measurements. With the development of new soft ware packages, NIR techniques could now be used in the analysis of intact grain and nuts. While most of the commercial instruments presently available work well with small grain size materials such as wheat and corn, the method present here is suitable for large kernel size products such as shelled or in-shell peanuts. Absorbance spectra were collected from 400 nm to 2500 nm using a NIR instrument. Average values of total oil contents (TOC) of peanut samples were determined by standard extraction methods, and fatty acids were determined using gas chromatography. Partial least square (PLS) analysis was performed on the calibration set of absorption spectra, and models were developed for prediction of total oil and fatty acids. The best model was selected based on the coefficient of determination (R2), Standard error of prediction (SEP) and residual percent deviation (RPD) values. Peanut samples analyzed showed RPD values greater than 5.0 for both absorbance and reflectance models and thus could be used for quality control and analysis. Ability to rapidly and nondestructively measure the TOC, and analyze the fatty acid composition, will be immensely useful in peanut varietal improvement as well as in the grading process of grain and nuts.

  6. Immunoglobulin surface-binding kinetics studied by total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, N L; Axelrod, D

    1983-01-01

    An experimental application of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR/FCS) is presented. TIR/FCS is a new technique for measuring the binding and unbinding rates and surface diffusion coefficient of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules in equilibrium at a surface. A laser beam totally internally reflects at the solid-liquid interface, selectively exciting surface-adsorbed molecules. Fluorescence collected by a microscope from a small, well-defined surface area approximately 5 micron2 spontaneously fluctuates as solute molecules randomly bind to, unbind from, and/or diffuse along the surface in chemical equilibrium. The fluorescence is detected by a photomultiplier and autocorrelated on-line by a minicomputer. The shape of the autocorrelation function depends on the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the binding rate constants, and the shape of the illuminated and observed region. The normalized amplitude of the autocorrelation function depends on the average number of molecules bound within the observed area. TIR/FCS requires no spectroscopic or thermodynamic change between dissociated and complexed states and no extrinsic perturbation from equilibrium. Using TIR/FCS, we determine that rhodamine-labeled immunoglobulin and insulin each nonspecifically adsorb to serum albumin-coated fused silica with both reversible and irreversible components. The characteristic time of the most rapidly reversible component measured is approximately 5 ms and is limited by the rate of bulk diffusion. Rhodamine-labeled bivalent antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) bind to DNP-coated fused silica virtually irreversibly. Univalent Fab fragments of these same antibodies appear to specifically bind to DNP-coated fused silica, accompanied by a large amount of nonspecific binding. TIR/FCS is shown to be a feasible technique for measuring absorption/desorption kinetic rates at equilibrium. In suitable systems where nonspecific binding is low, TIR

  7. Recent progress in noninvasive diabetes screening by diffuse reflectance near-infrared skin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Haiber, S.; Licht, M.; Ihrig, D. F.; Moll, C.; Stuecker, M.

    2006-02-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy exhibits a tremendous potential for clinical chemistry and tissue pathology. Owing to its penetration depth into human skin, near infrared radiation can probe chemical and structural information non-invasively. Metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus increase nonenzymatic glycation with the effect of glucose molecules bonding chemically to proteins. In addition, glycation accumulates on tissue proteins with the clearest evidence found in extracellular skin collagen, affecting also covalent crosslinking between adjacent protein strands, which reduces their flexibility, elasticity, and functionality. Non-enzymatically glycated proteins in human skin and following chemical and structural skin changes were our spectroscopic target. We carried out measurements on 109 subjects using two different NIR-spectrometers equipped with diffuse reflection accessories. Spectra of different skin regions (finger and hand/forearm skin) were recorded for comparison with clinical blood analysis data and further patient information allowing classification into diabetics and non-diabetics. Multivariate analysis techniques for supervised classification such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied using broad spectral interval data or a number of optimally selected wavelengths. Based on fingertip skin spectra recorded by fiber-optics, it was possible to classify diabetics and non-diabetics with a maximum accuracy of 87.8 % using leave-5-out cross-validation (sensitivity of 87.5. %, specificity of 88.2 %). With the results of this study, it can be concluded that ageing and glycation at elevated levels cannot always be separated from each other.

  8. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  9. In vivo detection of epileptic brain tissue using static fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Nitin; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Mehta, Rupal; Jayakar, Prasanna; Yong, William; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to detect histopathological abnormalities of an epileptic brain in a human subject study. Static diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra are acquired from normal and epileptic brain areas, defined by electrocorticography (ECoG), from pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Biopsy specimens are taken from the investigated sites within an abnormal brain. Spectral analysis reveals significant differences in diffuse reflectance spectra and the ratio of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra from normal and epileptic brain areas defined by ECoG and histology. Using these spectral differences, tissue classification models with accuracy above 80% are developed based on linear discriminant analysis. The differences between the diffuse reflectance spectra from the normal and epileptic brain areas observed in this study are attributed to alterations in the static hemodynamic characteristics of an epileptic brain, suggesting a unique association between the histopathological and the hemodynamic abnormalities in an epileptic brain.

  10. Use of visible and infrared reflectance and luminescence imaging spectroscopy to study illuminated manuscripts: pigment identification and visualization of underdrawings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, Paola; Delaney, John K.; Glinsman, Lisha; Thoury, Mathieu; Facini, Michelle; de la Rie, E. René

    2009-07-01

    Site specific, in situ techniques such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy are commonly used to identify pigments on illuminated manuscripts. With both techniques, spectra are usually acquired on visually identified sites thought to be representative of the pigments and mixtures used for the illumination. Such visual inspection may not always ensure an adequate representation of the pigment diversity. Here we report on the application of multispectral (MSI) visible/infrared reflectance and luminescence imaging spectroscopy, along with fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) to help determine and map the primary pigments in a late 14th century miniature on vellum, attributed to Niccolo da Bologna and representing the birth of John the Baptist. XRF analyses of visually selected sites found elements consistent with azurite, ultramarine, vermillion, lead white, "mosaic gold" and yellow earth pigments. Visible/infrared FORS analyses confirmed these assignments and showed evidence for the use of organic dyes. The spectral analysis of the MSI-reflectance images gave distribution maps for these pigments (i.e., regions of azurite, ultramarine, vermillion) along with some indication of pigment layering not identified visually. The luminescence image gave a probable map of the organic dye(s). Images acquired in the near- and shortwave-infrared (NIR and SWIR, 750 to 2400 nm) revealed preparatory sketches and illumination techniques. These results show, like those of a prior study carried out on another 14th century Italian miniature, that the combination of low light multi-spectral imaging spectroscopy with FORS provides improved in situ mapping and identification of pigments on illuminated manuscripts.

  11. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements for tissue-type discrimination during deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsson, Johan; Eriksson, Ola; Blomstedt, Patric; Bergenheim, A. Tommy; Hariz, Marwan I.; Richter, Johan; Zsigmond, Peter; Wårdell, Karin

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a method for improving intracerebral guidance during functional neurosurgery has been investigated. An optical probe was developed for measurements during stereotactic and functional neurosurgery in man. The aim of the study was to investigate the spectral differences between white and grey matter and between white matter and functional targets. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements in ten patients were recorded at incremental steps towards and in three different functional targets (STN, GPi and Zi). The recorded spectra along the trajectory were sorted into white or grey matter, based on preoperative MRI images or the recorded spectral shape and intensity. The difference between tissue types was calculated as a quotient. Significant intensity differences between white and grey matter were found to be at least 14% (p < 0.05) and 20% (p < 0.0001) for MRI and spectral-sorted data respectively. The reflectance difference between white matter and the functional targets of GPi was higher than for STN and Zi. The results indicate that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has a potential to be developed to a suitable complement to other intracerebral guidance methods.

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite clay mixtures: Implications for the surface composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Handy, J.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the power of remote sensing reflectance spectroscopy in determining mineralogy, it was used as the major method of identifying possible mineral analogs of the Martian surface. A summary of proposed Martian surface compositions from reflectance spectroscopy before 1979 was presented. Since that time, iron-rich montmorillonite clay, nanocrystalline or nanophase hematite, and palagonite were suggested as Mars soil analog materials.

  13. Prediction of alpaca fibre quality by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canaza-Cayo, A W; Alomar, D; Quispe, E

    2013-07-01

    Rapid and efficient methods to evaluate variables associated with fibre quality are essential in animal breeding programs and fibre trade. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with multivariate analysis was evaluated to predict textile quality attributes of alpaca fibre. Raw samples of fibres taken from male and female Huacaya alpacas (n = 291) of different ages and colours were scanned and their visible-near-infrared (NIR; 400 to 2500 nm) reflectance spectra were collected and analysed. Reference analysis of the samples included mean fibre diameter (MFD), standard deviation of fibre diameter (SDFD), coefficient of variation of fibre diameter (CVFD), mean fibre curvature (MFC), standard deviation of fibre curvature (SDFC), comfort factor (CF), spinning fineness (SF) and staple length (SL). Patterns of spectral variation (loadings) were explored by principal component analysis (PCA), where the first four PC's explained 99.97% and the first PC alone 95.58% of spectral variability. Calibration models were developed by modified partial least squares regression, testing different mathematical treatments (derivative order, subtraction gap, smoothing segment) of the spectra, with or without applying spectral correction algorithms (standard normal variate and detrend). Equations were selected through one-out cross-validation according to the proportion of explained variance (R 2CV), root mean square error in cross-validation (RMSECV) and the residual predictive deviation (RPD), which relates the standard deviation of the reference data to RMSECV. The best calibration models were accomplished when using the NIR region (1100 to 2500 nm) for the prediction of MFD and SF, with R 2CV = 0.90 and 0.87; RMSECV = 1.01 and 1.08 μm and RPD = 3.13 and 2.73, respectively. Models for SDFD, CVFD, MFC, SDFC, CF and SL had lower predictive quality with R 2CV < 0.65 and RPD < 1.5. External validation performed for MFD and SF on 91 samples was slightly poorer than cross

  14. Evaluation of contact status between probe and skin for noninvasive blood sensing with NIR reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qingjun; Xu, Kexin; Jiang, Jingying; Chen, Wen Liang

    2004-07-01

    In non-invasive blood sensing with near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy, optical probe usually directly contacts skin to eliminate specular reflection. Due to the direct contact, changes in contact pressure can lead to changes in internal structure and components distribution of the measured site, and thus introduces great interference into the final results. In this paper, we use self-made AOTF spectrophotometer to investigate the changes of reflectance spectrum with changing contact status for tissues in vitro (fresh porcine skin) and in vivo (two volunteers' left palms) at wavelengths ranging from 1100 nm to 1700 nm. The results show that with increasing degree of contact, energy of reflectance spectrum gradually decreases and the trend goes stable with time. However, the decreasing degree is related to wavelengths, which potentially suggests an indirect relevance with changes of components in tissues. Meanwhile, the results provide a practical solution to determining the optimum contact status between probe and skin.

  15. Majorana Zero Mode Detected with Spin Selective Andreev Reflection in the Vortex of a Topological Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Wang, Guan-Yong; Ma, Hai-Yang; Xu, Zhu-An; Gao, Chun-Lei; Guan, Dan-Dan; Li, Yao-Yi; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yi; Fu, Liang; Li, Shao-Chun; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Recently, theory has predicted a Majorana zero mode (MZM) to induce spin selective Andreev reflection (SSAR), a novel magnetic property which can be used to detect the MZM. Here, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy or spectroscopy has been applied to probe SSAR of MZMs in a topological superconductor of the Bi2 Te3 /NbSe2 heterostructure. The zero-bias peak of the tunneling differential conductance at the vortex center is observed substantially higher when the tip polarization and the external magnetic field are parallel rather than antiparallel to each other. This spin dependent tunneling effect provides direct evidence of MZM and reveals its magnetic property in addition to the zero energy modes. Our work will stimulate MZM research on these novel physical properties and, hence, is a step towards experimental study of their statistics and application in quantum computing.

  16. Majorana Zero Mode Detected with Spin Selective Andreev Reflection in the Vortex of a Topological Superconductor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Wen; Hu, Lun-Hui; Li, Chuang; Wang, Guan-Yong; Ma, Hai-Yang; Xu, Zhu-An; Gao, Chun-Lei; Guan, Dan-Dan; Li, Yao-Yi; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Zhou, Yi; Fu, Liang; Li, Shao-Chun; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2016-06-24

    Recently, theory has predicted a Majorana zero mode (MZM) to induce spin selective Andreev reflection (SSAR), a novel magnetic property which can be used to detect the MZM. Here, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy or spectroscopy has been applied to probe SSAR of MZMs in a topological superconductor of the Bi_{2}Te_{3}/NbSe_{2} heterostructure. The zero-bias peak of the tunneling differential conductance at the vortex center is observed substantially higher when the tip polarization and the external magnetic field are parallel rather than antiparallel to each other. This spin dependent tunneling effect provides direct evidence of MZM and reveals its magnetic property in addition to the zero energy modes. Our work will stimulate MZM research on these novel physical properties and, hence, is a step towards experimental study of their statistics and application in quantum computing. PMID:27391745

  17. [Reflectance spectroscopy study of low-frequency ultrasound and glycerol on skin optical clearing].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hui-Qing; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Wei, Hua-Jiang; Zhang, Zu-De; Yang, Hong-Qin; Xie, Shu-Sen

    2009-12-01

    In order to find a non-invasive way to improve the efficacy of skin optical clearing with topically applied optical clearing agents, the authors researched the changes of reflectance spectroscopy of skin tissues before and after being dealt by low-frequency ultrasound and osmotic active chemical agents within the wavelength range of 400-860 nm, and the degree of changes in reflectance spectroscopy of each group skin during 0-15 min and 15-30 min at 580 nm. The measurements were performed using a AvaSpec-2048 optical fiber spectrometer with integrating-sphere setup. The results of measurements showed that there were a few changes of the reflectance spectroscopy of skin tissues in the control group (Group 1) (The skin tissue was dealt with nothing. ) during the whole observation; But in the Group 2 (The skin tissue was dealt with only low-frequency ultrasound), it was found that the reflectance of the skin tissue showed a significant increase comparing 15 min with 0 min, but the changes in reflectance of the tissues slowly restored the original form following the longer time since the ultrasound stopping; There was also a very fast changes in reflectance of the skins in the Group 3 (the skin were dealt with only 80% glycerol) compared with that in the Group 1. The authors also found that there was a very distinct decrease in the reflectance of skin tissues dealt with both low-frequency ultrasound and 80% glycerol group (Group 4), especially during the 0-15 min, and its speed was 4.0 times that of the Group 1 and 2. 3 times that of Group 3 (During 0-15 min, the reflectance of skin tissues in the Group 1 decreased 1.896%; the reflectance of skin tissue in the Group 3 decreased 3.316%; the reflectance of skin tissues in the Group 4 decreased 7.551%). From the above results, it can be clearly seen that the low-frequency ultrasound and 80% glycerol not only have synergistic effect on optical clearing of skin tissue in vitro, but can change the optical clearing of the skin

  18. Diagnostics of pigmented skin tumors based on laser-induced autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borisova, E; Avramov, L; Troyanova, P; Pavlova, P

    2008-06-30

    Results of investigation of cutaneous benign and malignant pigmented lesions by laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) are presented. The autofluorescence of human skin was excited by a 337-nm nitrogen laser. A broadband halogen lamp (400-900 nm) was used for diffuse reflectance measurements. A microspectrometer detected in vivo the fluorescence and reflectance signals from human skin. The main spectral features of benign (dermal nevi, compound nevi, dysplastic nevi) and malignant (melanoma) lesions are discussed. The combined usage of the fluorescence and reflectance spectral methods to determine the type of the lesion, which increases the total diagnostic accuracy, is compared with the usage of LIAFS or DRS only. We also applied colorimetric transformation of the reflectance spectra detected and received additional evaluation criteria for determination of type of the lesion under study. Spectra from healthy skin areas near the lesion were detected and changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra were revealed. The influence of the main skin pigments on the detected spectra is discussed and evaluation of possibilities for differentiation between malignant and benign lesions is performed based on their spectral properties. This research shows that the non-invasive and high-sensitive in vivo detection by means of appropriate light sources and detectors should be possible, related to the real-time determination of existing pathological conditions. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  19. Exploiting Optical Contrasts for Cervical Precancer Diagnosis via Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Vivide Tuan-Chyan

    collagen without altering the amount of collagen present. Further work would be required to elucidate the exact sources of scattering contrast observed. Common confounding variables that limit the accuracy and clinical acceptability of optical spectroscopic systems are calibration requirements and variable probe-tissue contact pressures. Our results suggest that using a real-time self-calibration channel, as opposed to conventional post-experiment diffuse reflectance standard calibration measurements, significantly improved data integrity for the extraction of scattering contrast. Extracted [total Hb] and scattering were also significantly associated with applied contact probe pressure in colposcopically normal sites. Hence, future contact probe spectroscopy or imaging systems should incorporate a self-calibration channel and ensure spectral acquisition at a consistent contact pressure to collect reliable data with enhanced absorption and scattering contrasts. Another method to enhance optical contrast is to selectively interrogate different depths in the dysplastic cervix. For instance, scattering has been shown to increase in the epithelium (increase in nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio) while decrease in the stroma (re-organization of the extra-cellular matrix and changes in of collagen fiber cross-links). A fiber-optic probe with 45° illumination and collection fibers with a separation distance of 330 μm was designed and constructed to selectively interrogate the cervical epithelium. Mean extraction errors from liquid phantoms with optical properties mimicking the cervical epithelium for μa and μs' were 11.3 % and 12.7 %, respectively. Diffuse reflectance spectra from 9 sites in four loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) patients were analyzed. Preliminary data demonstrate the utility of the oblique fiber geometry in extracting scattering contrast in the cervical epithelium. Further work is needed to study the systematic error in optical property extraction and

  20. [Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) and its application in the determination for the quality of animal feed and products].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Meng, Qing-Xiang; Ren, Li-Ping; Yang, Jian-Song

    2010-06-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) has been the most rapidly developing and noticeable spectrographic analytical technique in recent years. The determining principle and progresses of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy are presented briefly. It mainly includes the progresses in pre-processing technique and analyzing model of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Two pre-processing techniques, including differential coefficient-dealt with technique, the signal-smoothing technique, and four analyzing models of near-infrared spectroscopy, including the multiplied lined regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS), and artificial nerve network (ANN). The application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to the first time. The investigation of reviewed papers shows that the near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy is widely applied in feed analysis and animal products analysis because of its rapidness, non-destruction and non-pollution. The near infrared reflectance spectroscopy has been used to determine the feed common ingredient, such as dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, crude fat and so on, micro-components including amino acid, vitamin, and noxious components, and to determine the physical and chemical properties of animal products which including egg, mutton, beef and pork. Details of the analytical characteristics of feed and animal products described in the reviewed papers are given. New trends and limits to the application of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy in these fields are also discussed. PMID:20707134

  1. A model for testing strong gravity via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The X-ray radiation produced in the inner part of the accretion disk can be a powerful tool to test the Kerr nature of these objects. In this talk, we present a new model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis via X-ray reflection spectroscopy. We employ the formalism of the transfer function proposed by Cunningham 40 years ago. The transfer function acts as an integration kernel and takes into account all the relativistic effects. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. These transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER. The result is best model that we can have today for testing black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  2. Influence of contact state on NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenliang; Liu, Rong; Xu, Kexin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    In the practice of non-invasive blood glucose measurement by near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, an optical probe usually directly contacts skin in order to eliminate specular reflection. In this paper, the influence of contact state on the diffuse reflectance in vivo and the variation trend of diffuse reflectance with contact time under the same contact pressure, are investigated at wavelengths ranging from 1100 to 1700 nm. The result shows that the diffuse reflectance decreases with increasing contact pressure under the contact state. At a certain applied pressure, the diffuse reflectance fluctuates significantly at the beginning of contact, and the fluctuation becomes stable with elapsing contacting time. It is our aim in this paper to find out the optimal contact state and optimal measuring time, in order to reduce the influence of contact pressure on diffuse reflectance measurements. It is found from our experiments that, for in vivo measurement, the optimal contact state appears when the skin is pressed to about 0.5 mm by the probe, where the probe contacts the palm entirely, and that the optimal measuring time is at the 30th second since the probe contacting with the measuring site. Putting the above conclusions into practice, the repeatability of spectra is improved greatly.

  3. Detection of human colonic adenoma by laser-induced autofluorescence integrated with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guilin; Lu, Haibao; Zhang, Yangde; Yan, Shuhua; Chen, Zhifeng

    2000-10-01

    A combined in vivo measurement system integrating laser- induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurement was developed and investigated for detecting colonic adenoma. The system could work with regular endoscopy examination. A three- layer backpropagating neural network (BNN) was built to differentiate the two tissue classes. The preliminary results gave the mean predictive accuracy, sensitivity and specificity better than either of the two methods used alone.

  4. TOTAL INTERNAL REFLECTION WITH FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY: APPLICATIONS TO SUBSTRATE-SUPPORTED PLANAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Nancy L.; Wang, Xiang; Navaratnarajah, Punya

    2009-01-01

    In this review paper, the conceptual basis and experimental design of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS) is described. The few applications to date of TIR-FCS to supported membranes are discussed, in addition to a variety of applications not directly involving supported membranes. Methods related, but not technically equivalent, to TIR-FCS are also summarized. Future directions for TIR-FCS are outlined. PMID:19269331

  5. Microscopic reflection difference spectroscopy for strain field of GaN induced by Berkovich nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H. S.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H. Y.; Wu, S. J.; Jiang, C. Y.; Yu, J. L.; Zhu, L. P.; Li, Y.; Huang, W.; Chen, Y. H.

    2014-02-01

    We have measured strain field of Berkovich nanoindentation by Raman mapping technique and microscopic reflection difference spectroscopy (μ-RDS). The validity of the μ-RDS method is verified by the accordance between the theoretical simulated result and the rotated measurement result. Comparing the two different methods, it is concluded that μ-RDS is sensitive and effective to measure anisotropic strain zone in the plane.

  6. [Application of Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy in analysis of pulp and paper industry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Cao, Chun-yu; Feng, Wen-ying; Xu, Ming; Su, Zhen-hua; Liu, Xiao-meng; Lü, Wei-jun

    2011-03-01

    As one of the most powerful tools to investigate the compositions of raw materials and the property of pulp and paper, infrared spectroscopy has played an important role in pulp and paper industry. However, the traditional transmission infrared spectroscopy has not met the requirements of the producing processes because of its disadvantages of time consuming and sample destruction. New technique would be needed to be found. Fourier transform attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is an advanced spectroscopic tool for nondestructive evaluation and could rapidly, accurately estimate the production properties of each process in pulp and paper industry. The present review describes the application of ATR-FTIR in analysis of pulp and paper industry. The analysis processes will include: pulping, papermaking, environmental protecting, special processing and paper identifying. PMID:21595211

  7. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy of buddingtonite from the Cuprite mining district, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Felzer, B.; Hauff, P.; Goetz, A.F.H.

    1994-02-01

    Buddingtonite, an ammonium-bearing feldspar diagnostic of volcanic-hosted alteration, can be identified and, in some cases, quantitatively measured using short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectance spectroscopy. In this study over 200 samples from Cuprite, Nevada, were evaluated by X ray diffraction, chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and SWIR reflectance spectroscopy with the objective of developing a quantitative remote-sensing technique for rapid determination of the amount of ammonium or buddingtonite present, and its distribution across the site. Based upon the Hapke theory of radiative transfer from particulate surfaces, spectra from quantitative, physical mixtures were compared with computed mixture spectra. We hypothesized that the concentration of ammonium in each sample is related to the size and shape of the ammonium absorption bands and tested this hypothesis for samples of relatively pure buddingtonite. We found that the band depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 feature is linearly related to the NH4 concentration for the Cuprite buddingtonite, and that the relationship is approximately exponential for a larger range of NH4 concentrations. Associated minerals such as smectite and jarosite suppress the depth of the 2.12-micron NH4 absorption band. Quantitative reflectance spectroscopy is possible when the effects of these associated minerals are also considered.

  8. Prediction of erodibility in Oxisols using iron oxides, soil color and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantes Camargo, Livia; Marques, José, Jr.

    2015-04-01

    The prediction of erodibility using indirect methods such as diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could facilitate the characterization of the spatial variability in large areas and optimize implementation of conservation practices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prediction of interrill erodibility (Ki) and rill erodibility (Kr) by means of iron oxides content and soil color using multiple linear regression and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) using regression analysis by least squares partial (PLSR). The soils were collected from three geomorphic surfaces and analyzed for chemical, physical and mineralogical properties, plus scanned in the spectral range from the visible and infrared. Maps of spatial distribution of Ki and Kr were built with the values calculated by the calibrated models that obtained the best accuracy using geostatistics. Interrill-rill erodibility presented negative correlation with iron extracted by dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, hematite, and chroma, confirming the influence of iron oxides in soil structural stability. Hematite and hue were the attributes that most contributed in calibration models by multiple linear regression for the prediction of Ki (R2 = 0.55) and Kr (R2 = 0.53). The diffuse reflectance spectroscopy via PLSR allowed to predict Interrill-rill erodibility with high accuracy (R2adj = 0.76, 0.81 respectively and RPD> 2.0) in the range of the visible spectrum (380-800 nm) and the characterization of the spatial variability of these attributes by geostatistics.

  9. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I–VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  10. [Component analysis of complex mixed solution based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiong, Chan; Zhao, Li-ying; Lin, Ling; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2012-02-01

    In the present paper, the authors proposed a method for component analysis of complex mixed solutions based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy by analyzing the information carried by spectrum signals from various optical properties of various components of the analyte. The experiment instrument was designed with supercontinuum laser source, the motorized precision translation stage and the spectrometer. The Intralipid-20% was taken as an analyte, and was diluted over a range of 1%-20% in distilled water. The diffuse reflectance spectrum signal was measured at 24 points within the distance of 1.5-13 mm (at an interval of 0.5 mm) above the incidence point. The partial least squares algorithm model was used to perform a modeling and forecasting analysis for the spectral analysis data collected from single-point and multi-point. The results showed that the most accurate calibration model was created by the spectral data acquired from the nearest 1-13 points above the incident point; the most accurate prediction model was created by the spectral signal acquired from the nearest 1-7 points above the incident point. It was proved that multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can improve the spectral signal to noise ratio. Compared with the traditional spectrum technology using a single optical property such as absorbance or reflectance, this method increased the impact of scattering characteristics of the analyte. So the use of a variety of optical properties of the analytes can make an improvement of the accuracy of the modeling and forecasting, and also provide a basis for component analysis of the complex mixed solution based on multidimensional diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. PMID:22512196

  11. Quantitative determination of molecular structure in multilayered thin films of biaxial and lower symmetry from photon spectroscopies. I. Reflection infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Atul N.; Allara, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A semitheoretical formalism based on classical electromagnetic wave theory has been developed for application to the quantitative treatment of reflection spectra from multilayered anisotropic films on both metallic and nonmetallic substrates. Both internal and external reflection experiments as well as transmission can be handled. The theory is valid for all wavelengths and is appropriate, therefore, for such experiments as x-ray reflectivity, uv-visible spectroscopic ellipsometry, and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Further, the theory is applicable to multilayered film structures of variable number of layers, each with any degree of anisotropy up to and including full biaxial symmetry. The reflectivities (and transmissivities) are obtained at each frequency by solving the wave propagation equations using a rigorous 4×4 transfer matrix method developed by Yeh in which the optical functions of each medium are described in the form of second rank (3×3) tensors. In order to obtain optical tensors for materials not readily available in single crystal form, a method has been developed to evaluate tensor elements from the complex scalar optical functions (n̂) obtained from the isotropic material with the limitations that the molecular excitations are well characterized and obey photon-dipole selection rules. This method is intended primarily for infrared vibrational spectroscopy and involves quantitative decomposition of the isotropic imaginary optical function (k) spectrum into a sum of contributions from fundamental modes, the assignment of a direction in molecular coordinates to the transition dipole matrix elements for each mode, the appropriate scaling of each k vector component in surface coordinates according to a selected surface orientation of the molecule to give a diagonal im(n̂) tensor, and the calculation of the real(n̂) spectrum tensor elements by the Kramers-Kronig transformation. Tensors for other surface orientations are generated by an

  12. Combined reflectance spectroscopy and stochastic modeling approach for noninvasive hemoglobin determination via palpebral conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oleg; McMurdy, John; Jay, Gregory; Lines, Collin; Crawford, Gregory; Alber, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A combination of stochastic photon propagation model in a multilayered human eyelid tissue and reflectance spectroscopy was used to study palpebral conjunctiva spectral reflectance for hemoglobin (Hgb) determination. The developed model is the first biologically relevant model of eyelid tissue, which was shown to provide very good approximation to the measured spectra. Tissue optical parameters were defined using previous histological and microscopy studies of a human eyelid. After calibration of the model parameters the responses of reflectance spectra to Hgb level and blood oxygenation variations were calculated. The stimulated reflectance spectra in adults with normal and low Hgb levels agreed well with experimental data for Hgb concentrations from 8.1 to 16.7 g/dL. The extracted Hgb levels were compared with in vitro Hgb measurements. The root mean square error of cross‐validation was 1.64 g/dL. The method was shown to provide 86% sensitivity estimates for clinically diagnosed anemia cases. A combination of the model with spectroscopy measurements provides a new tool for noninvasive study of human conjunctiva to aid in diagnosing blood disorders such as anemia. PMID:24744871

  13. Spectral reflectance of selected aqueous solutions for water quality applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querr, M. R.; Waring, R. C.; Holland, W. E.; Nijm, W.; Hale, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    The relative specular reflectances of individual aqueous solutions having a particular chemical salt content were measured in the 2 to 20 micrometers region of the infrared component or radiant flux. Distilled water was the reflectance standard. The angle of incidence was 70.03 deg plus or minus 0.23 deg. Absolute reflectances of the solutions for the same polarization and angle of incidence were computed by use of the measured relative reflectances, one of the Fresnel equations, and the optical constants of distilled water. Phase shift and phase difference spectra were obtained by respectively applying a Kramers-Kronig dispersion analysis to the absolute and relative reflectance spectra. The optical constants of the solutions were determined by algorithms commonly associated with the Kramers-Kronig analysis. Spectral signatures that qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the solute and that show structure of the infrared bands of water were noted in the phase difference spectra. The relative and absolute reflectances, the phase shift and phase difference spectra and the optical constants are presented in graphical form. Application of these results to remote sensing of the chemical quality of natural waters is discussed briefly.

  14. Determination of Cellulose Fiber Structure Using IR Reflectance Spectroscopy of Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and non-destructive method for analyzing the structure of cellulose fibers using IR reflectance spectroscopy from a paper surface was developed and verified for correctness. IR absorption and reflectance spectra of standard paper samples of known composition (sheets made of four fibers of different origin without additives and with additives of kaolin and chalk) were analyzed. Good correlations between these two spectral methods were found for the studied samples. Calibration curves were useful for assessing the structure of cellulose samples from XVIth century historical paper. Data on the degree of cellulose ordering that were obtained from the paper reflectance spectra indicated that the studied sheets consisted mainly of flax fibers with added cotton. This agreed fully with the historical fact that the studied samples were rag papers.

  15. Transmission and Reflection Terahertz Spectroscopy of Insensitive Melt-Cast High-Explosive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Szala, Mateusz

    2016-05-01

    Currently, artillery shells and grenades that are introduced into the market are based on melt-castable insensitive high explosives (IHEs), which do not explode while they run a risk of impact, heat or shrapnel. Particles of explosives (such as hexogen, nitroguanidine and nitrotriazolone) are suspended in different proportions in a matrix of 2.4-dinitroanisole. In this paper, we investigated samples of commonly used IHEs: PAX-41, IMX-104 and IMX-101, whose internal structures were determined by a scanning electron microscope. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy was applied in both transmission and reflection configurations. At first, the complex refraction indices of four pure constituents creating IHEs were determined and became the basis of further calculations. Next, the experimentally determined transmission and reflection spectra of IHEs and pure constituents were compared with theoretical considerations. The influence of the grain size of constituent material and scattering on the reflection spectra was analysed, and good agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was achieved.

  16. Particular features of the application of IR reflection spectroscopy methods in studies in archeology and paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarev, V. M.; Khlopachev, G. A.

    2013-06-01

    We have considered an optical model of a porous rough surface with optical properties of objects (bone, flint) that are typical of archeology and paleontology. We have formulated an approach that makes it possible to perform mathematical processing of the IR reflection spectra of objects of this kind using standard algorithms and determine criteria that ensure obtaining reliable information on objects with a rough surface in the course of interpretation of frequencies in their IR reflection spectra. The potential of the approach has been demonstrated using as an example an investigation by the IR Fourier-transform reflection spectroscopy of mineralization processes of mammoth tusks from two paleolithic sites (14000 and 16000 BCE) located by the town of Yudinovo, Bryansk oblast, Russia.

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy properties of the selected engine oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shouming; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Tian; Zhao, Songqing; Zhou, Qingli; Shi, Yulei; Zhao, Dongmei; Zhang, Cunlin

    2010-11-01

    Engine oil, most of which is extracted from petroleum, consist of complex mixtures of hydrocarbons of molecular weights in the range of 250-1000. Variable amounts of different additives are put into them to inhibit oxidation, improve the viscosity index, decrease the fluidity point and avoid foaming or settling of solid particles among others. Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy contains rich physical, chemical, and structural information of the materials. Most low-frequency vibrational and rotational spectra of many petrochemicals lie in this frequency range. In recent years, much attention has been paid to the THz spectroscopic studies of petroleum products. In this paper, the optical properties and spectroscopy of selected kinds of engine oil consisting of shell HELIX 10W-40, Mobilube GX 80W-90, GEELY ENGINE OIL SG 10W-30, SMA engine oil SG 5W-30, SMA engine oil SG 10W-30, SMA engine oil SG 75W-90 have been studied by the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the spectral range of 0.6-2.5 THz. Engine oil with different viscosities in the terahertz spectrum has certain regularity. In the THz-TDS, with the increase of viscosity, time delay is greater and with the increase of viscosity, refractive indexes also grow and their rank is extremely regular. The specific kinds of engine oil can be identified according to their different spectral features in the THz range. The THz-TDS technology has potentially significant impact on the engine oil analysis.

  18. Identifying water on our Moon and organics in the outer Solar System with active reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbitts, C. A.; Spiers, G. D.; Hansen, G. B.

    2005-08-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy has successfully characterized H2O and identified organic molecules on many Solar System objects. However, passive reflectance spectroscopy cannot detect water in the permanently shadowed regions of the Moon. Similarly, the mid-IR fingerprints of organics on the surfaces of outer solar system objects cannot be detected passively because the sunlight is too dim and the surfaces are too cold. The strongest absorption band for condensed water and ice is near 3 microns. Organic molecules have strong absorptions near 3.4 microns, with spectral fingerprints necessary for unique identification present from approximately 5 to 10 microns. Given a sufficiently strong source of illumination, water hidden in shadows on the Moon and organic molecules in the outer solar system would be detectable and identifiable. Quantum Cascade (QC) laser technology is now becoming sufficiently capable to support reflectance spectroscopy at some of these wavelengths from orbit. Conceived under the HCIPE program in support of Prometheus missions, this technique is intrinsically very scalable. For instance, water can be detected using only two wavelengths and its physical state can be characterized with only five. Requiring an optical power of 2W per wavelength for sufficient signal-to-noise, the total power consumption by the lasing system would be approximately 80 and 200W, respectively. Currently, a continuous power output at 3 μm of 200 mWatts has been demonstrated. With beam combining, an optical power of 2 Watts is currently achievable. On the Moon, this would enable the detection of as little as 100ppm water. Radar and neutron spectroscopy measurements suggest there may be > 1000 ppm of water-ice present in permanent crater shadows on the Moon [Feldman et al., 1998; 2000; Nozette et al., 1996] which, if present the surface regolith would stabily exist adsorbed on the grains [Hodges, 2002; Cocks et al., 2002].

  19. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method.

    PubMed

    Kaniber, M; Schraml, K; Regler, A; Bartl, J; Glashagen, G; Flassig, F; Wierzbowski, J; Finley, J J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  20. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method

    PubMed Central

    Kaniber, M.; Schraml, K.; Regler, A.; Bartl, J.; Glashagen, G.; Flassig, F.; Wierzbowski, J.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  1. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for monitoring diabetic foot ulcer - A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Suresh; Sujatha, N.; Narayanamurthy, V. B.; Seshadri, V.; Poddar, Richa

    2014-02-01

    Foot ulceration due to diabetes mellitus is a major problem affecting 12-25% of diabetic subjects in their lifetime. An untreated ulcer further gets infected which causes necrosis leading to amputation of lower extremities. Early identification of risk factors and treatment for these chronic wounds would reduce health care costs and improve the quality of life for people with diabetes. Recent clinical investigations have shown that a series of factors including reduced oxygen delivery and disturbed metabolism have been observed on patients with foot ulceration due to diabetes. Also, these factors can impair the wound healing process. Optical techniques based on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provide characteristic spectral finger prints shed light on tissue oxygenation levels and morphological composition of a tissue. This study deals with the application of diffuse reflectance intensity ratios based on oxyhemoglobin bands (R542/R580), ratios of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin bands (R580/R555), total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation between normal and diabetic foot ulcer sites. Preliminary results obtained are found to be promising indicating the application of reflectance spectroscopy in the assessment of foot ulcer healing.

  2. Application of multibounce attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics for determination of aspartame in soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Harpreet Kaur; Cho, Il Kyu; Shim, Jae Yong; Li, Qing X; Jun, Soojin

    2008-02-13

    Aspartame is a low-calorie sweetener commonly used in soft drinks; however, the maximum usage dose is limited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance sampling accessory and partial least-squares regression (PLS) was used for rapid determination of aspartame in soft drinks. On the basis of spectral characterization, the highest R2 value, and lowest PRESS value, the spectral region between 1600 and 1900 cm(-1) was selected for quantitative estimation of aspartame. The potential of FTIR spectroscopy for aspartame quantification was examined and validated by the conventional HPLC method. Using the FTIR method, aspartame contents in four selected carbonated diet soft drinks were found to average from 0.43 to 0.50 mg/mL with prediction errors ranging from 2.4 to 5.7% when compared with HPLC measurements. The developed method also showed a high degree of accuracy because real samples were used for calibration, thus minimizing potential interference errors. The FTIR method developed can be suitably used for routine quality control analysis of aspartame in the beverage-manufacturing sector. PMID:18181572

  3. Infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy: an innovative strategy for analyzing mineral components in energy relevant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Delle Piane, Claudio; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  4. Point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy on Bi2Se3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, C. R.; Fridman, I.; Lei, H.-C.; Petrovic, C.; Wei, J. Y. T.

    2016-04-01

    To study how Andreev reflection (AR) occurs between a superconductor and a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), we use superconducting Nb tips to perform point-contact AR spectroscopy at 4.2 K on as-grown single crystals of Bi2Se3. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy are also used to characterize the superconducting tip and both the doping level and surface condition of the TI sample. The point-contact measurements show clear spectral signatures of AR, as well as a depression of zero-bias conductance with decreasing junction impedance. The latter observation can be attributed to interfacial Rashba spin-orbit coupling, and the presence of bulk bands at the Fermi level in our samples suggests that bulk states of Bi2Se3 are involved in the observed AR.

  5. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  6. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  7. Phthalocyanine identification in paintings by reflectance spectroscopy. A laboratory and in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poldi, G.; Caglio, S.

    2013-06-01

    The importance of identifying pigments using non invasive (n.i.) analyses has gained increasing importance in the field of spectroscopy applied to art conservation and art studies. Among the large set of pigments synthesized and marketed during 20th century, surely phthalocyanine blue and green pigments occupy an important role in the field of painting (including restoration) and printing, thanks to their characteristics like brightness and fastness. This research focused on the most used phthalocyanine blue (PB15:1 and PB15:3) and green pigments (PG7), and on the possibility to identify these organic compounds using a methodology like reflectance spectroscopy in the UV, visible and near IR range (UV-vis-NIR RS), performed easily through portable instruments. Laboratory tests and three examples carried out on real paintings are discussed.

  8. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  9. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lastras-Martínez, A. E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F.; Lastras-Montaño, L. A.; Lastras-Montaño, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  10. [Nondestructive analysis and identification of pigments on colored relics by fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-qin; Dang, Gao-chao; Zhao, Jing

    2008-08-01

    and reliable, and verified by XRF analysis. Fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy is a new quick analytical technique to identify pigments on colored relics. PMID:18975788

  11. Preliminary Method for Direct Quantification of Colistin Methanesulfonate by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Niece, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin use has increased in response to the advent of infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. It is administered parenterally as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS). Various formulations of CMS and labeling conventions can lead to confusion about colistin dosing, and questions remain about the pharmacokinetics of CMS. Since CMS does not have strong UV absorbance, current methods employ a laborious process of chemical conversion to colistin followed by precolumn derivatization to detect formed colistin by high-performance liquid chromatography. Here, we report a method for direct quantification of colistin methanesulfonate by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FTIR). PMID:26124160

  12. Sorting of polypropylene resins by color in MSW using visible reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Safavi, S M; Masoumi, H; Mirian, S S; Tabrizchi, M

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, an automated sorter is proposed for distinguishing polypropylene (PP) plastics based on their color. This sorting system uses visible (VIS) reflectance spectroscopy to separate PP resins according to their colors. A "Three-Filter" identification algorithm was developed to recognize the PP color (blue, red, green, white or yellow), and accordingly, give the command for throwing or not throwing PP to a series of electro pneumatic valves. The proposed sorting system was demonstrated to be fast and accurate, despite the presence of different labels and surface contamination on the PP resins. PMID:20674323

  13. Improvement of photon correlation spectroscopy method for measuring nanoparticle size by using attenuated total reflectance.

    PubMed

    Krishtop, Victor; Doronin, Ivan; Okishev, Konstantin

    2012-11-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy is an effective method for measuring nanoparticle sizes and has several advantages over alternative methods. However, this method suffers from a disadvantage in that its measuring accuracy reduces in the presence of convective flows of fluid containing nanoparticles. In this paper, we propose a scheme based on attenuated total reflectance in order to reduce the influence of convection currents. The autocorrelation function for the light-scattering intensity was found for this case, and it was shown that this method afforded a significant decrease in the time required to measure the particle sizes and an increase in the measuring accuracy. PMID:23187387

  14. Frequency-selective analysis of multichannel magnetic resonance spectroscopy data.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Niclas; Stoica, Petre

    2005-01-01

    In several practical magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) applications the user is interested only in the spectral content of a specific frequency band of the spectrum. A frequency-selective (or sub-band) method estimates only the parameters of those spectroscopic components that lie in a pre-selected frequency band of the spectrum in a computationally efficient manner. Multichannel MRS is a technique that employs phased-array receive coils to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the spectra by combining several simultaneous measurements of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation of an excited sample. In this paper we suggest a frequency-selective multichannel parameter estimation approach that combines the appealing features (high speed and improved SNR) of the two techniques above. The presented method shows parameter estimation accuracies comparable to those of existing fullband multichannel techniques in the high SNR case, but at a considerably lower computational complexity, and significantly better parameter estimation accuracies in low SNR scenarios. PMID:17282712

  15. Infrared reflectance and photoemission spectroscopy studies across the phase transition boundary in thin film vanadium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Zawilski, Kevin; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2008-01-01

    Optical properties and valence band density of states near the Fermi level of high-quality VO2 thin films have been investigated by mid-infrared reflectometry and hard-UV (h = 150 eV) photoemission spectroscopy. An exceptionally large change in reflectance from 2 to 94% is found upon the thermally driven metal insulator transition (MIT). The infrared dispersion spectra of the reflectance across the MIT are presented and evidence for the percolative nature of the MIT is pointed out. The discrepancy between the MIT temperatures defined from the electrical and optical properties is found and its origin is discussed. The manifestation of the MIT is observed in the photoemission spectra of the V 3d levels. The analysis of the changes of the V 3d density of states is done and the top valence band shift upon the MIT is measured to be 0.6 eV.

  16. Sediment mineralogy based on visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrard, R.D.; Vanden Berg, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (VNIS) can be used to measure reflectance spectra (wavelength 350-2500 nm) for sediment cores and samples. A local ground-truth calibration of spectral features to mineral percentages is calculated by measuring reflectance spectra for a suite of samples of known mineralogy. This approach has been tested on powders, core plugs and split cores, and we conclude that it works well on all three, unless pore water is present. Initial VNIS studies have concentrated on determination of relative proportions of carbonate, opal, smectite and illite in equatorial Pacific sediments. Shipboard VNIS-based determination of these four components was demonstrated on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 199. ?? The Geological Society of London 2006.

  17. High Resolution K-Band Spectroscopy of Selected M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Tadashi

    2013-06-01

    We propose to obtain high-resolution K-band spectra of selected M dwarfs to study stellar properties such as effective temperature and metallicity. M dwarfs are under scrutiny as potential planet hosts. They have sufficiently low masses and small radii that exoplanets induce considerably larger reflex velocities and transit depths than an identical planet would around larger, more massive hosts. The low temperatures of M dwarfs imply short-period planets are in the habitable zone. However, due to the cool atmosphere, the characterization of M dwarfs at visible wavelengths has been rather difficult and the previously known stellar parameters have been rather crude. Recently a new method to use medium resolution K-band spectroscopy to determine the effective temperature and metallicity was devised. The purposes of this proposal is to examine the validity of the new method with a spectral resolution one order of magnitude higher and, if possible, to find a better method to determine the stellar properties.

  18. Mass-selective Neutron Spectroscopy Beyond the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, M.; Seel, A. G.; Richards, S. E.; Gutmann, M. J.; Fernandez-Alonso, F.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss ongoing methodological developments underpinning the determination of nuclear-momentum distributions from mass-resolved neutron Compton data of lightweight materials. To this end, two systems are considered in detail, namely, lithium hydride (including its deuterated counterpart) and squaric acid, an organic antiferroelectric material containing hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Beyond the usual case of the proton, our approach enables direct access to detailed line shape information associated with the underlying nuclear-momentum distributions of both deuterium and lithium. For oxygen and carbon, mean kinetic energies can also be obtained directly from the neutron data, as demonstrated by a detailed analysis of mass- resolved data from squaric acid. From an instrumentation point of view, this work provides a suitable platform for a detailed assessment of existing capabilities and future developments in mass-selective neutron spectroscopy on the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy of mass-selected metal carbonyl cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricks, A. M.; Reed, Z. E.; Duncan, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    Metal carbonyl cations of the form M(CO)n+ are produced in a molecular beam by laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source. These ions, and their corresponding rare gas atom "tagged" analogs, M(CO)n(RG)m+, are studied with mass-selected infrared photodissociation spectroscopy in the carbonyl stretching region and with density functional theory computations. The number of infrared-active bands, their frequency positions, and their relative intensities provide distinctive patterns allowing determination of the geometries and electronic structures of these complexes. Cobalt penta carbonyl and manganese hexacarbonyl cations are compared to isoelectronic iron pentacarbonyl and chromium hexacarbonyl neutrals. Gold and copper provide examples of "non-classical" carbonyls. Seven-coordinate carbonyls are explored for the vanadium group metal cations (V +, Nb + and Ta +), while uranium cations provide an example of an eight-coordinate carbonyl.

  20. Evaluating Reflectance Spectroscopy as a Method of Rapid Cryptotephra Identification using Component Analysis: Tephrochronology of the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The reactivation of Montserrat's South Soufrière-Soufrière Hills volcanic complex has impelled the creation of tephrochronologic records in the Lesser Antilles Arc in order to assess volcanic hazards to human safety. Developing an eruptive history of Montserrat by recording tephra layers preserved in marine sediment is hindered by the lack of a rapid, non-destructive method for detecting cryptotephra, tephra deposits invisible to the naked eye, in marine cores. Identifying cryptotephra is important because some cryptotephra layers represent primary tephra emplacement from small proximal eruptions, events that if excluded from a volcanic record could mischaracterize a volcano's eruptive frequency over time. VSWIR [0.4-2.5 μm] reflectance spectroscopy is a candidate for rapid, non-destructive cryptotephra detection in marine sediment cores because it can detect tephra in hemipelagic sediment using summary parameters sensitive to iron content and clay minerals (McCanta et al. 2014, AGU abstract OS53D-1086). Spectra from marine cores U1396C-1H-1A through U1396C-1H-5A, collected during International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) mission 340, reveal 29 potential cryptotephra layers (McCanta et al. 2014, AGU abstract OS53D-1086). This study seeks to determine the effectiveness of reflectance spectroscopy at identifying cryptotephra by measuring the abundance of volcanic materials (i.e., glass shards/vesicular pumice and non-vesicular lava clasts) in these layers ( LeFriant et al. 2008; Cassidy et al. 2014). Component analysis was conducted on select core intervals with both cryptotephra-identifying peaks in reflectance parameters, and tephra-indicative peaks in core scanning XRF and magnetic susceptibility parameters (McCanta et al. 2014, AGU abstract OS53D-1086). Samples in this subset show abundances of non-vesicular lava and vesicular pumice clasts above expected background abundances, supporting the existence of cryptotephra at these locations (Fig. 1; LeFriant et

  1. High-Throughput Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for Predicting Quantitative and Qualitative Composition Phenotypes of Individual Maize Kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy can be used for fast and reliable prediction of organic compounds in complex biological samples. We used a recently developed NIR spectroscopy instrument to predict starch, protein, oil, and weight of individual maize (Zea mays) seeds. The starch, prote...

  2. Modeling changes in the hemoglobin concentration of skin with total diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, Diana L.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Farrell, Thomas J.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to monitor changes in the concentration of hemoglobin in the blood of the skin in real time is a key component to personalized patient care. Since hemoglobin has a unique absorption spectrum in the visible light range, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is the most common approach. Although the collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an integrating sphere (IS) has several calibration challenges, this collection method is sufficiently user-friendly that it may be worth overcoming the initial difficulty. Once the spectrum is obtained, it is commonly interpreted with a log-inverse-reflectance (LIR) or "absorbance" analysis that can only accurately monitor changes in the hemoglobin concentration when there are no changes to the nonhemoglobin chromophore concentrations which is not always the case. We address the difficulties associated with collection of the diffuse reflectance spectrum with an IS and propose a model capable of retrieving relative changes in hemoglobin concentration from the visible light spectrum. The model is capable of accounting for concentration changes in the nonhemoglobin chromophores and is first characterized with theoretical spectra and liquid phantoms. The model is then used in comparison with a common LIR analysis on temporal measurements from blanched and reddened human skin.

  3. Multitemporal spectroscopy for crop stress detection using band selection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Thorsten; Franke, Jonas; Menz, Gunter

    2008-08-01

    A fast and precise sensor-based identification of pathogen infestations in wheat stands is essential for the implementation of site-specific fungicide applications. Several works have shown possibilities and limitations for the detection of plant stress using spectral sensor data. Hyperspectral data provide the opportunity to collect spectral reflectance in contiguous bands over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Individual phenomena like the light absorption of leaf pigments can be examined in detail. The precise knowledge of stress-dependent shifting in certain spectral wavelengths provides great advantages in detecting fungal infections. This study focuses on band selection techniques for hyperspectral data to identify relevant and redundant information in spectra regarding a detection of plant stress caused by pathogens. In a laboratory experiment, five 1 sqm boxes with wheat were multitemporarily measured by a ASD Fieldspec® 3 FR spectroradiometer. Two stands were inoculated with Blumeria graminis - the pathogen causing powdery mildew - and one stand was used to simulate the effect of water deficiency. Two stands were kept healthy as control stands. Daily measurements of the spectral reflectance were taken over a 14-day period. Three ASD Pro Lamps were used to illuminate the plots with constant light. By applying band selection techniques, the three types of different wheat vitality could be accurately differentiated at certain stages. Hyperspectral data can provide precise information about pathogen infestations. The reduction of the spectral dimension of sensor data by means of band selection procedures is an appropriate method to speed up the data supply for precision agriculture.

  4. Identification of mineral composition and weathering product of tuff using reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, C.; Park, H.

    2009-12-01

    Tuff is intricately composed of various types of rock blocks and ash matrixes during volcanic formation processes. Qualitative identification and quantitative assessment of mineral composition of tuff usually have been done using manual inspection with naked-eyes and various chemical analyses. Those conventional methods are destructive to objects, time consuming and sometimes carry out biased results from subjective decision making. To overcome limits from conventional methods, assessment technique using reflectance spectroscopy was applied to tuff specimens. Reflectance spectroscopy measures electromagnetic reflectance on rock surface and can extract diagnostic absorption features originated from chemical composition and crystal structure of constituents in the reflectance curve so mineral species can be discriminated qualitatively. The intrinsic absorption feature from particular mineral can be converted to absorption depth representing relative coverage of the mineral in the measurement area by removing delineated convex hull from raw reflectance curve. The spectral measurements were performed with field spectrometer FieldSpec®3 of ASD Inc. and the wavelength range of measurement was form 350nm to 2500nm. Three types of tuff blocks, ash tuff, green lapilli tuff and red lapilli tuff, were sampled from Hwasun County in Korea and the types of tuffs. The differences between green tuff and red tuff are from the color of their matrixes. Ash tuff consists of feldspars and quartz and small amount of chalcedony, calcite, dolomite, epidote and basalt fragments. Green lapilli tuff consists of feldspar, quartz and muscovite and small amount of calcite, chalcedony, sericite, chlorite, quartzite and basalt fragments. Red lapilli tuff consists of feldspar, quartz and muscovite and small amount of calcite, chalcedony, limonite, zircon, chlorite, quartzite and basalt fragments. The tuff rocks were coarsely crushed and blocks and matrixes were separated to measure standard

  5. Evaluation of thermal stability of indinavir sulphate using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parul; Premkumar, L; Mehrotra, Ranjana; Kandpal, H C; Bakhshi, A K

    2008-06-01

    Indinavir sulphate is a potent and specific protease inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is used for the treatment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). At elevated temperature the drug which otherwise remains crystalline undergoes a phase transition to an amorphous phase to form degradation products. In the present study, thermal stability of indinavir sulphate is evaluated using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of the drug before and after the exposure to thermal radiation at different temperatures were acquired in the diffuse reflectance mode using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were used as complimentary techniques to adequately implement and assist the interpretation of the infrared spectroscopy results. The DRIFT spectra reveal that the drug remains stable up to 100 degrees C, degrades slightly at 125 degrees C and undergoes complete degradation at about 150 degrees C to produce degradation products. The degradation products can easily be characterized using the infrared spectra. PMID:18280078

  6. Time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy for nondestructive assessment of fruit and vegetable quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Vanoli, Maristella; Rizzolo, Anna; Eccher Zerbini, Paola

    2007-09-01

    In the majority of food and feed, due to the microscopic spatial changes in the refractive index, visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) light undergoes multiple scattering events and the overall light distribution is determined more by scattering rather than absorption. Conventional steady state VIS/NIR reflectance spectroscopy can provide information on light attenuation, which depends both on light absorption and light scattering, but cannot discriminate these two effects. On the contrary, time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy (TRS) provides a complete optical characterisation of diffusive media in terms of their absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient. From the assessment of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, information can then be derived on the composition and internal structure of the medium. Main advantages of the technique are the absolute non-invasiveness, the potentiality for non-contact measurements, and the capacity to probe internal properties with no influence from the skin. In this work we review the physical and technical issues related to the use of TRS for nondestructive quality assessment of fruit and vegetable. A laboratory system for broadband TRS, based on tunable mode-locked lasers and fast microchannel plate photomultiplier, and a portable setup for TRS measurements, based on pulsed diode lasers and compact metal-channel photomultiplier, will be described. Results on broadband optical characterisation of fruits and applications of TRS to the detection of internal defects in pears and to maturity assessment in nectarines will be presented.

  7. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers. PMID:26385430

  8. Characterizing the Moisture Content of Tea with Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy Using Wavelet Transform and Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Xie, Chuanqi; He, Yong; Qiu, Zhengjun; Zhang, Yanchao

    2012-01-01

    Effects of the moisture content (MC) of tea on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy were investigated by integrated wavelet transform and multivariate analysis. A total of 738 representative samples, including fresh tea leaves, manufactured tea and partially processed tea were collected for spectral measurement in the 325–1,075 nm range with a field portable spectroradiometer. Then wavelet transform (WT) and multivariate analysis were adopted for quantitative determination of the relationship between MC and spectral data. Three feature extraction methods including WT, principal component analysis (PCA) and kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) were used to explore the internal structure of spectral data. Comparison of those three methods indicated that the variables generated by WT could efficiently discover structural information of spectral data. Calibration involving seeking the relationship between MC and spectral data was executed by using regression analysis, including partial least squares regression, multiple linear regression and least square support vector machine. Results showed that there was a significant correlation between MC and spectral data (r = 0.991, RMSEP = 0.034). Moreover, the effective wavelengths for MC measurement were detected at range of 888–1,007 nm by wavelet transform. The results indicated that the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of tea is highly correlated with MC. PMID:23012574

  9. Classification of the waxy condition of durum wheat by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy using wavelets and a genetic algorithm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been applied to the problem of differentiating four genotypes of durum wheat: ‘waxy’, wx-A1 null, wx-B1 null and wild type. The test data consisted of 95 NIR reflectance spectra of wheat samples obtained from a USDA-ARS wheat breeding program. A two...

  10. The Use of UV-Visible Reflectance Spectroscopy as an Objective Tool to Evaluate Pearl Quality

    PubMed Central

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the quality of pearls involves the use of various tools and methods, which are mainly visual and often quite subjective. Pearls are normally classified by origin and are then graded by luster, nacre thickness, surface quality, size, color and shape. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to classify and estimate the quality of 27 different pearls from their UV-Visible spectra. Due to the opaque nature of pearls, spectroscopy measurements were performed using the Diffuse Reflectance UV-Visible spectroscopy technique. The spectra were acquired at two different locations on each pearl sample in order to assess surface homogeneity. The spectral data (inputs) were smoothed to reduce the noise, fed into ANNs and correlated to the pearl’s quality/grading criteria (outputs). The developed ANNs were successful in predicting pearl type, mollusk growing species, possible luster and color enhancing, donor condition/type, recipient/host color, donor color, pearl luster, pearl color, origin. The results of this study shows that the developed UV-Vis spectroscopy-ANN method could be used as a more objective method of assessing pearl quality (grading) and may become a valuable tool for the pearl grading industry. PMID:22851919

  11. Evaluation of vitamin C content in kiwifruit by diffuse reflectance FT-NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin; Lu, Huishan; Yu, Haiyan; Liu, Yande

    2005-11-01

    Vitamin C is considered an important nutrition component of fruits, especially of kiwifruit. Traditional destructive method for vitamin C measurement is very complex and fussy. Near Infrared (NIR)spectroscopy is a promising technique for nondestructive measurement of fruit internal qualities, such as soluble solid content (SSC), valid acidity (VA). The objective of this research was to study the potential of NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a way for nondestructive measurement of vitamin C content in "Qinmei" kiwifruit. NIR spectral data were collected in the spectral range of 800-2500 nm with different combinations of resolution (4 cm-1, 16 cm-1 and 32 cm-1) and scan number (32, 64 and 128). Statistical models were developed using partial least square (PLS) method. The combination with resolution of 4 cm-1 and scan number of 64 gave the best result when all samples were used in calibration sample set. Then two spectral pretreatments multiplicative signal correction (MSC) and standard normal variate (SNV), and three kinds of mathematical treatment of original spectra, first derivative spectra and second derivative spectra were discussed. The PLS model of second derivative spectra using SNV pretreatment turned out better prediction results: correlation coefficient (r) of 0. 93, root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 9.24 mg/100g and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 10.3 mg/100g. The results of this study showed that NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could be used for kiwifruit vitamin C prediction. The higher the resolution, the better the results, but longer time will be taken, which may not be suitable for on-line use. Therefore, further research still needs to be done.

  12. On the prediction of threshold friction velocity of wind erosion using soil reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Flagg, Cody; Okin, Gregory S.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dintwe, Kebonye; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-12-01

    Current approaches to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of soil particle movement, including both experimental and empirical methods, suffer from various disadvantages, and they are particularly not effective to estimate TFVs at regional to global scales. Reflectance spectroscopy has been widely used to obtain TFV-related soil properties (e.g., moisture, texture, crust, etc.), however, no studies have attempted to directly relate soil TFV to their spectral reflectance. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil TFV and soil reflectance in the visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR, 350-2500 nm) spectral region, and to identify the best range of wavelengths or combinations of wavelengths to predict TFV. Threshold friction velocity of 31 soils, along with their reflectance spectra and texture were measured in the Mojave Desert, California and Moab, Utah. A correlation analysis between TFV and soil reflectance identified a number of isolated, narrow spectral domains that largely fell into two spectral regions, the VIS area (400-700 nm) and the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) area (1100-2500 nm). A partial least squares regression analysis (PLSR) confirmed the significant bands that were identified by correlation analysis. The PLSR further identified the strong relationship between the first-difference transformation and TFV at several narrow regions around 1400, 1900, and 2200 nm. The use of PLSR allowed us to identify a total of 17 key wavelengths in the investigated spectrum range, which may be used as the optimal spectral settings for estimating TFV in the laboratory and field, or mapping of TFV using airborne/satellite sensors.

  13. On the prediction of threshold friction velocity of wind erosion using soil reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Junran; Flagg, Cody B.; Okin, Gregory S.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dintwe, Kebonye; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to estimate threshold friction velocity (TFV) of soil particle movement, including both experimental and empirical methods, suffer from various disadvantages, and they are particularly not effective to estimate TFVs at regional to global scales. Reflectance spectroscopy has been widely used to obtain TFV-related soil properties (e.g., moisture, texture, crust, etc.), however, no studies have attempted to directly relate soil TFV to their spectral reflectance. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between soil TFV and soil reflectance in the visible and near infrared (VIS–NIR, 350–2500 nm) spectral region, and to identify the best range of wavelengths or combinations of wavelengths to predict TFV. Threshold friction velocity of 31 soils, along with their reflectance spectra and texture were measured in the Mojave Desert, California and Moab, Utah. A correlation analysis between TFV and soil reflectance identified a number of isolated, narrow spectral domains that largely fell into two spectral regions, the VIS area (400–700 nm) and the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) area (1100–2500 nm). A partial least squares regression analysis (PLSR) confirmed the significant bands that were identified by correlation analysis. The PLSR further identified the strong relationship between the first-difference transformation and TFV at several narrow regions around 1400, 1900, and 2200 nm. The use of PLSR allowed us to identify a total of 17 key wavelengths in the investigated spectrum range, which may be used as the optimal spectral settings for estimating TFV in the laboratory and field, or mapping of TFV using airborne/satellite sensors.

  14. Ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells in atomic spectroscopy: reflection, transmission, fluorescence, and nonadiabatic transitions at the walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazgalev, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Cartaleva, S.; Przhibelskii, S.; Vartanyan, T.

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-narrow cells with the thicknesses in the range from several wavelengths to the small fractions of the wavelength brought a number of new opportunities for atomic spectroscopy. Depending on the cell thickness, spectral lines recorded in ultra-narrow cells are either Doppler-free or Doppler-broadened. With careful selection of the cell thickness hyperfine structure may be easily resolved without resorting on the multibeam nonlinear optical techniques. Moreover, frequent collisions with the walls leads to the important modifications of velocity selective optical pumping resonances. Finally, ultra-narrow cells provide with the unique opportunity to study collisions of the excited atoms with the solid surfaces. In this contribution several examples of the use of the ultra-narrow spectroscopic cells filled with the alkali atomic vapour is presented. First, we discuss general aspects of the transient polarisation that defines all peculiarities of an ultra-narrow cell as a spectroscopic tool. Second, we demonstrate the resolution of the magnetic sublevels in the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime in the Cs hyperfine structure. Third, new aspects of velocity selective optical pumping resonances in reflection and transmission of resonant radiation by the 6 wavelengths thick cell filled with Cs are discussed. Forth, the experimental evidences of the nonadiabatic transitions between excited states of Rb atoms in the course of collisions with the sapphire surface are presented.

  15. Reflectance spectroscopy for the assessment of soil salt content in soils of the yellow river delta of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weng, Yongling; Gong, P.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of reflectance spectroscopy as a rapid and inexpensive tool for soil characterization. In this study, we collected 95 soil samples from the Yellow River Delta of China to investigate the level of soil salinity in relation to soil spectra. Sample plots were selected based on a field investigation and the corresponding soil salinity classification map to maximize variations of saline characteristics in the soil. Spectral reflectances of air-dried soil samples were measured using an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer (350-2500 nm) with an artificial light source. In the Yellow River Delta, the dominant chemical in the saline soil was NaCl and MgCl2. Soil spectra were analysed using two-thirds of the available samples, with the remaining one-third withheld for validation purposes. The analysis indicated that with some preprocessing, the reflectance at 1931-2123 nm and 2153-2254 nm was highly correlated with soil salt content (SSC). In the spectral region of 1931-2123 nm, the correlation R ranged from -0.80 to -0.87. In the region of 2153-2254 nm, the SSC was positively correlated with preprocessed reflectance (0.79-0.88). The preprocessing was done by fitting a convex hull to the reflectance curve and dividing the spectral reflectance by the value of the corresponding convex hull band by band. This process is called continuum removal, and the resulting ratio is called continuum removed reflectance (CR reflectance). However, the SSC did not have a high correlation with the unprocessed reflectance, and the correlation was always negative in the entire spectrum (350-2500 nm) with the strongest negative correlation at 1981 nm (R = -0.63). Moreover, we found a strong correlation (R=0.91) between a soil salinity index (SSI: Constructed using CR reflectance at 2052 nm and 2203 nm) and SSC. We estimated SSC as a function of SSI and SSI' (SSI': Constructed using unprocessed reflectance at 2052 nm and 2203 nm) using

  16. Spoilage of foods monitored by native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    The modern food processing and storage environments require the real-time monitoring and rapid microbiological testing. Optical spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelengths can be the basis of a novel, rapid, reagent less, noncontact and non-destructive technique for monitoring the food spoilage. The native fluorescence spectra of muscle foods stored at 2-4°C (in refrigerator) and 20-24°C (in room temperature) were measured as a function of time with a selective excitation wavelength of 340nm. The contributions of the principal molecular components to the native fluorescence spectra of meat were measured spectra of each fluorophore: collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. The responsible components were extracted using a method namely Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares (MCR-ALS). The native fluorescence combined with MCR-ALS can be used directly on the surface of meat to produce biochemically interpretable "fingerprints", which reflects the microbial spoilage of foods involved with the metabolic processes. The results show that with time elapse, the emission from NADH in meat stored at 24°C increases much faster than that at 4°C. This is because multiplying of microorganisms and catabolism are accompanied by the generation of NADH. This study presents changes of relative content of NADH may be used as criterion for detection of spoilage degree of meat using native fluorescence spectroscopy.

  17. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Edwards, J. O.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Froschl, H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mossbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mossbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mossbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the water

  18. Coherence selection in double CP MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Hsien; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tzou, Der-Lii M.

    2008-11-01

    Applications of double cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, via 1H/ 15N and then 15N/ 13C coherence transfers, for 13C coherence selection are demonstrated on a 15N/ 13C-labeled N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) compound. The 15N/ 13C coherence transfer is very sensitive to the settings of the experimental parameters. To resolve explicitly these parameter dependences, we have systematically monitored the 13C{ 15N/ 1H} signal as a function of the rf field strength and the MAS frequency. The data reveal that the zero-quantum coherence transfer, with which the 13C effective rf field is larger than that of the 15N by the spinning frequency, would give better signal sensitivity. We demonstrate in one- and two-dimensional double CP experiments that spectral editing can be achieved by tailoring the experimental parameters, such as the rf field strengths and/or the MAS frequency.

  19. Study of Spectral Modifications in Acidified Ignitable Liquids by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martín-Alberca, Carlos; Ojeda, Fernando Ernesto Ortega; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the spectral characteristics of two types of acidified gasoline and acidified diesel fuel are discussed. Neat and acidified ignitable liquids (ILs) infrared absorption spectra obtained by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were compared in order to identify the modifications produced by the reaction of the ILs with sulfuric acid. Several bands crucial for gasoline identification were modified, and new bands appeared over the reaction time. In the case of acidified diesel fuel, no significant modifications were observed. Additionally, the neat and acidified ILs spectra were used to perform a principal components analysis in order to confirm objectively the results. The complete discrimination among samples was successfully achieved, including the complete differentiation among gasoline types. Taking into account the results obtained in this work, it is possible to propose spectral fingerprints for the identification of non-burned acidified ILs in forensic investigations related with arson or the use of improvised incendiary devices (IIDs). PMID:26810182

  20. Structural charge transfer in the aluminophosphate molecular sieves by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjanchi, M. A.; Rashidi, M. K.

    1999-05-01

    Influence of water adsorption in AlPO-5, SAPO-5, AlPO-11 and SAPO-11 has been studied with UV diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The observed UV absorption spectra in the as-synthesized, template free and hydrated materials are related to the charge transfer processes between aluminum and oxygen atoms of the aluminophosphate and water molecules. As-synthesised materials show two distinct and well-defined bands at about 220 and 260-280 nm correlated to framework aluminum and organic templates, respectively. Upon calcination, the band of occluded template disappears and the band assigned to the framework aluminum shifts at about 240 nm. When the calcined samples are completely hydrated, broadening of the aluminum charge transfer band is observed. This is due to coordination of water molecules to the part of the framework aluminum. Broadening occurs more in AlPO-5 possibly because of higher water capacity and homogenity with respect to SAPO-5.

  1. Monitoring laser cleaning of titanium alloys by probe beam reflection and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, D. J.; Crouse, P. L.; Schmidt, M. J. J.; Li, L.; Turner, M. W.; Smith, A. J. E.

    2008-10-01

    Studies have shown excimer laser cleaning to be an effective non-chemical alternative method for removing contaminants from surfaces of titanium alloys in preparation for electron beam welding and diffusion bonding, with reference to aerospace applications. Among several important criteria for process acceptability, is the absence of oxide formation. This paper investigates the viability of using a probe beam reflection (PBR) system and laser plume emission spectroscopy (PES) for detection of incipient oxide formation on three typical aerospace titanium alloys, viz. Ti64, Ti6246, and IMI834. These diagnostic techniques have been shown to be capable of sensing different components in the emission plume and yield quantitative results. Results from this work correlate closely with previously reported cleaning mechanisms. The oxidation threshold, as well as the operating window for successful decontamination, is discussed.

  2. Estimation of blood alcohol concentration by horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kakali; Sharma, Shiba P; Lahiri, Sujit C

    2010-06-01

    Numerous methods like distillation followed by iodometric titrations, gas chromatograph (GC)-flame ionization detector, gas chromatograph-mass spectrophotometer, GC-Headspace, Breath analyzer, and biosensors including alcohol dehydrogenase (enzymatic) have been used to determine blood alcohol concentration (BAC). In the present study, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy had been used to determine BAC in whole blood. The asymmetric stretching frequency of C-C-O group of ethanol in water (1,045 cm(-1)) had been used to calculate BAC using Beer's Law. A seven-point calibration curve of ethanol was drawn in the concentration range 24-790 mg dL(-1). The curve showed good linearity over the concentration range used (r(2)=0.999, standard deviation=0.0023). The method is accurate, reproducible, rapid, simple, and nondestructive in nature. PMID:20541351

  3. Strategies for Detecting Organic Liquids on Soils Using Mid-Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Neal B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2008-06-25

    Stand-off monitoring for chemical spills can provide timely information for clean-up efforts and mid-infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy is one approach being investigated. Anomaly and target detection strategies were examined for detection of four different low-volatility organic liquids on two different soil types. Several preprocessing and signal weighting strategies were studied. Anomaly detection for C-H bands was very good using second derivative preprocessing and provided similar performance to target detection approaches such as generalized least squares (GLS) and partial least squares (PLS) with detections at soil loads of approximately 0.6 to 1.5 mg/cm2. Good performance was also found for detection of P=O, O–H and C=O bands but the optimal strategy varied. The simplicity and generality of anomaly detection is attractive, however target detection provides more capability for classification.

  4. Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy: Principles and Applications to Lipid-Protein Interaction in Langmuir Films

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  5. Detection of whitening agents in illegal cosmetics using attenuated total reflectance-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Bothy, J L; Desmedt, B; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O

    2014-09-01

    Cosmetic products containing illegal whitening agents are still found on the European market. They represent a considerable risk to public health, since they are often characterised by severe side effects when used chronically. The detection of such products at customs is not always simple, due to misleading packaging and the existence of products containing only legal components. Therefore there is a need for easy to use equipment and techniques to perform an initial screening of samples. The use of attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, combined with chemometrics, was evaluated for that purpose. It was found that the combination of ATR-IR with the simple chemometric technique k-nearest neighbours gave good results. A model was obtained in which a minimum of illegal samples was categorised as legal. The correctly classified illegal samples could be attributed to the illegal components present. PMID:24927403

  6. {ital In} {ital situ} wafer temperature monitoring of silicon etching using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.L.; Beard, B.T.; Stevens, J.E.; Blain, M.G.; Meisenheimer, T.L.

    1996-07-01

    Real time, {ital in} {ital situ} temperature measurements during chemical downstream etching of silicon wafers have been performed using a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy based sensor [Weilmeier {ital et} {ital al}., Can. J. Phys. {bold 69}, 422 (1991)]. The spectrometer has a spatial resolution of 1 cm{sup 2}, updates the temperature every 2 s, and has a temperature resolution of better than 1{degree}C. The thermal time constant the wafers and the thermally regulated electrostatic chuck (10{degree}C{lt}{ital T}{lt}90{degree}C) varied between 7 and 30 s depending on clamping and backside gas pressure. The exothermic etch process is accompanied by increases in the silicon wafer temperature consistent with the thermal conductivity conditions and with the etch chemistry. The temperature uniformity across the wafers was better than 2{degree}C during the entire etch process. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  7. Applications of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.C.; Noel, D.; Hechler, J.J.

    1988-12-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to obtain infrared spectra directly from the surface of composite materials, with little or no sample preparation. It is thus of interest as a nondestructive method for industrial inspection. In many cases, the IR spectra provide detailed information concerning the chemical composition and molecular structure of the material. The technique works particularly well for carbon-fiber composites. This paper describes the principles involved, some factors which influence the quality of the spectra, and a number of examples of applications. These include the characterization of epoxy matrices (composition, curing, degradation), the detection of surface contamination, and the determination of the degree of crystallinity in poly(phenylene sulfide)-based composites. 24 references.

  8. [Use of visible and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy to identify the cashmere and wool].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Ru; Zhang, Li-Ping; Wang, Jian-Fu; Wu, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Rong

    2013-08-01

    The wool and cashmere samples (n = 130) from different areas of Gansu province were identified by visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (Vis/NIRs). The result shows that principal component-mahalanobis distance pattern can identify the wool and cashmere, and the boundary between two categories was clear; The calibration set samples were used to establish calibration qualitative model using PCR combined with the best pretreatment of the spectra and math, including multivariate scattering correction (MSC), first derivative, eight for the best principal component factor, one for uncertainty factor, this calibration model of the predicted was the best, and the result of the external validation was correct completely. Results from this experiment indicate that Vis/NIRs can be utilized to identify the wool and cashmere. PMID:24159853

  9. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  10. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy of thin films using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with <1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  11. Combining total internal reflection sum frequency spectroscopy spectral imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allgeyer, Edward S; Sterling, Sarah M; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Hess, Samuel T; Neivandt, David J; Mason, Michael D

    2015-01-27

    Understanding surface and interfacial lateral organization in material and biological systems is critical in nearly every field of science. The continued development of tools and techniques viable for elucidation of interfacial and surface information is therefore necessary to address new questions and further current investigations. Sum frequency spectroscopy (SFS) is a label-free, nonlinear optical technique with inherent surface specificity that can yield critical organizational information on interfacial species. Unfortunately, SFS provides no spatial information on a surface; small scale heterogeneities that may exist are averaged over the large areas typically probed. Over the past decade, this has begun to be addressed with the advent of SFS microscopy. Here we detail the construction and function of a total internal reflection (TIR) SFS spectral and confocal fluorescence imaging microscope directly amenable to surface investigations. This instrument combines, for the first time, sample scanning TIR-SFS imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25506739

  12. Fast determination of total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-cai; Chen, Xing-dan; Lu, Yong-jun; Cao, Zhi-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was used to develop a fast determination method for total ginsenosides in Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) powder. The spectra were analyzed with multiplicative signal correction (MSC) correlation method. The best correlative spectra region with the total ginsenosides content was 1660 nm~1880 nm and 2230nm~2380 nm. The NIR calibration models of ginsenosides were built with multiple linear regression (MLR), principle component regression (PCR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression respectively. The results showed that the calibration model built with PLS combined with MSC and the optimal spectrum region was the best one. The correlation coefficient and the root mean square error of correction validation (RMSEC) of the best calibration model were 0.98 and 0.15% respectively. The optimal spectrum region for calibration was 1204nm~2014nm. The result suggested that using NIR to rapidly determinate the total ginsenosides content in ginseng powder were feasible.

  13. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy: principles and applications to lipid-protein interaction in Langmuir films.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Flach, Carol R

    2010-04-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) of lipid/protein monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface provides unique molecular structure and orientation information from the film constituents. The technique is thus well suited for studies of lipid/protein interaction in a physiologically relevant environment. Initially, the nature of the IRRAS experiment is described and the molecular structure information that may be obtained is recapitulated. Subsequently, several types of applications, including the determination of lipid chain conformation and tilt as well as elucidation of protein secondary structure are reviewed. The current article attempts to provide the reader with an understanding of the current capabilities of IRRAS instrumentation and the type of results that have been achieved to date from IRRAS studies of lipids, proteins, and lipid/protein films of progressively increasing complexity. Finally, possible extensions of the technology are briefly considered. PMID:20004639

  14. Depth profile characterization technique for electron density in GaN films by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijoh, Takaaki; Ma, Bei; Morita, Ken; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a noncontact measurement method for carrier density and mobility. In this article, the model determination procedure of layer-type nonuniform electron distribution is investigated, since the spectrum fitting hitherto has been conducted on the basis of a multilayer model defined in advance. A simplified case of a high-electron-density GaN layer embedded in a GaN matrix is mainly studied. The following procedure is found to be applicable. The first step is the determination of the high-density layer position in the vicinity of the surface, in the middle region, or in the vicinity of the interface. This is followed by the specification of the sheet electron density and the layer thickness of the high-density region. It is found that this procedure is also applicable to the characterization of two-dimensional electron gases in the vicinity of AlGaN/GaN heterointerfaces.

  15. Determination of in vivo skin moisture level by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saknite, Inga; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has a potential for noninvasive determination of skin moisture level due to high water absorption. In this study, diffuse reflectance spectra of in vivo skin were acquired in the spectral range of 900 nm to 1700 nm by using near-infrared spectrometer, optical fiber and halogen bulb light source. Absorption changes after applying skin moisturizers were analyzed over time at different body sites. Results show difference in absorption when comparing dry and normal skin. Comparison of absorption changes over time after applying moisturizer at different body sites is analyzed and discussed. Some patterns of how skin reacts to different skin moisturizers are shown, although no clear pattern can be seen due to signal noise.

  16. Andreev Reflection Spectroscopy of Nb-doped Bi2Se3 Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurter, C.; Finck, A. D. K.; Qiu, Y.; Huemiller, E.; Weis, A.; Atkinson, J.; Medvedeva, J.; Hor, Y. S.; van Harlingen, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    Doped topological insulators are speculated to realize p-wave superconductivity with unusual low energy quasiparticles, such as surface Andreev bound states. We present point contact spectroscopy of thin exfoliated flakes of Nb-doped Bi2Se3 where superconductivity persists up to ~ 1 K, compared to 3.2 K in bulk crystals. The critical magnetic field is strongly anisotropic, consistent with quasi-2D behavior. Andreev reflection measurements of devices with low resistance contacts result in prominent BTK-like behavior with an enhanced conductance plateau at low bias. For high resistance contacts, we observe a split zero bias conductance anomaly and additional features at the superconducting gap. Our results suggest that this material is a promising platform for studying topological superconductivity. We acknowledge support from Microsoft Project Q.

  17. [Quantitative analysis of contents in compound fertilizer and application research using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Song, Le; Zhang, Hong; Ni, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Bin-Mei; Yu, Li-Xiang; Wang, Qi; Wu, Yue-Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a new approach to fast determining the content of urea, biuret and moisture in compound fertilizer composed of urea, ammonium dihydrogenphosphate and potassium chloride was proposed by using near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. After preprocessing the original spectrum, partial least squares (PLS) models of urea, biuret and moisture were built with the R2 values of 0.9861, 0.9770 and 0.9713 respectively, the root mean square errors of cross validation were 2.59, 0.38, 0.132 respectively. And the prediction correlation factors were 0.9733, 0.9215 and 0.9679 respectively. The authors detected six kinds of compound fertilizer in market for the model verification, the correlation factors were 0.9237, 0.9786 and 0.9874 respectively. The data implied that the new method can be used for situ quality control in the production process of compound fertilizer. PMID:24783536

  18. Electrostatic Interactions of Fluorescent Molecules with Dielectric Interfaces Studied by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Chmyrov, Andriy; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between dielectric surfaces and different fluorophores used in ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy are investigated using objective-based Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). The interfacial dynamics of cationic rhodamine 123 and rhodamine 6G, anionic/dianionic fluorescein, zwitterionic rhodamine 110 and neutral ATTO 488 are monitored at various ionic strengths at physiological pH. As analyzed by means of the amplitude and time-evolution of the autocorrelation function, the fluorescent molecules experience electrostatic attraction or repulsion at the glass surface depending on their charges. Influences of the electrostatic interactions are also monitored through the triplet-state population and triplet relaxation time, including the amount of detected fluorescence or the count-rate-per-molecule parameter. These TIR-FCS results provide an increased understanding of how fluorophores are influenced by the microenvironment of a glass surface, and show a promising approach for characterizing electrostatic interactions at interfaces. PMID:20386645

  19. In-vivo reflection spectroscopy measurements in pig brain during stereotactic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsson, Johan; Eriksson, Ola; Wardell, Karin

    2003-07-01

    Radio frequency (RF) lesioning in the human brain is a common surgical therapy for relieving severe pain as well as for movement disorders such as Parkinsonia. During the procedure a small electrode is introduced by stereotactic means towards a target area localized by CT or MRI. An RF-current is applied through the electrode tip when positioned in the target area. The tissue in the proximity of the tip is heated by the current and finally coagulated. The overall aim of this study was to improve the RF-technique and its ability to estimate lesion size by means of optical methods. Therefore, the optical differences between white and gray matter, as well as lesioned and unlesioned tissue were investigated. Reflection spectroscopy measurements in the range of 450-800 nm were conducted on fully anesthetized pigs during stereotactic RF-lesioning (n=6). Light from a tungsten lamp was guided to the electrode tip through optical fibers, inserted along a 2 mm in diameter monopolar RF-electrode. Measurements were performed in steps of 0-10 mm from the target in each hemisphere towards the entry point of the skull. In the central gray of the porcine brain measurements were performed both before and after the creation of a lesion. A total of 55 spectra were collected during this study. Correlation to tissue type was done using post-operative MR-images. The spectral signature for white and gray matter differs significantly for the entire spectral range of 450-800 nm. Pre- and post-lesioning reflection spectroscopy showed the largest differences below 600 and above 620 nm, which implies that lasers within this wavelength range may be useful for in-vivo measurements of tissue optical changes during RF-lesioning.

  20. Quantifying suspended sediment sources during flood events in headwater catchments using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legout, Cédric; Poulenard, Jérôme; Nemery, Julien; Navratil, Oldrich; Grangeon, Thomas; Evrard, Olivier; Esteves, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Increasing the understanding of the hydro-sedimentary dynamics at the catchment scale requires data on the origin of suspended sediments in addition to the classical measurements of suspended sediment concentrations and discharge. In mountainous environments the extremely high spatial and temporal variability of suspended sediment fluxes suggests that the proportions of suspended sediment sources transiting at outlets may also exhibit strong variations during flood events. However, conventional fingerprinting techniques based on geochemical and radionuclide measurements are time-consuming and rather expensive. They constitute a major limitation to conduct routine characterisation of the source of suspended sediment transiting at outlets that would require the analysis of a large number of samples. We investigated how visible or infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy coupled with partial least squares chemometrics techniques could be used to predict the proportion of source material in suspended sediment samples and how it could help understanding the hydro-sedimentary processes occurring during floods. The studied catchment is located in the southern French Alps, draining an area of 22-km². It is composed of black marls, limestones, molasses, undifferentiated deposits and gypsum. Forty-eight source material samples were collected in badlands areas and 328 suspended sediment samples were collected at the outlet during 23 flood events. Spectroscopic measurements were carried out on dried samples. Given that the erosion processes are particle size selective, five size fractions of source material were measured in order to assess the potential alteration of the signatures. As the biogeochemical processes occurring in the river such as iron oxidation could also affect the signatures, source materials that were immersed in the river for durations ranging from 1 day to 9 weeks were analysed. Finally, partial least-squares regression models were constructed on 81

  1. Brain tumour differentiation: rapid stratified serum diagnostics via attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hands, James R; Clemens, Graeme; Stables, Ryan; Ashton, Katherine; Brodbelt, Andrew; Davis, Charles; Dawson, Timothy P; Jenkinson, Michael D; Lea, Robert W; Walker, Carol; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity is essential to exploit advances in new treatments to lead significant reductions in mortality and morbidity. Current cancer diagnostic tests observing tissue architecture and specific protein expression for specific cancers suffer from inter-observer variability, poor detection rates and occur when the patient is symptomatic. A new method for the detection of cancer using 1 μl of human serum, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and pattern recognition algorithms is reported using a 433 patient dataset (3897 spectra). To the best of our knowledge, we present the largest study on serum mid-infrared spectroscopy for cancer research. We achieve optimum sensitivities and specificities using a Radial Basis Function Support Vector Machine of between 80.0 and 100 % for all strata and identify the major spectral features, hence biochemical components, responsible for the discrimination within each stratum. We assess feature fed-SVM analysis for our cancer versus non-cancer model and achieve 91.5 and 83.0 % sensitivity and specificity respectively. We demonstrate the use of infrared light to provide a spectral signature from human serum to detect, for the first time, cancer versus non-cancer, metastatic cancer versus organ confined, brain cancer severity and the organ of origin of metastatic disease from the same sample enabling stratified diagnostics depending upon the clinical question asked. PMID:26874961

  2. Total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy for the detection of β-hematin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Samson, Edward B.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran D.; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Evanescent field sensing methods are currently used to detect many different types of disease markers and biologically important chemicals such as the HER2 breast cancer receptor. Hinoue et al. used Total Internal Reflection Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (TIRPAS) as a method of using the evanescent field to detect an optically opaque dye at a sample interface. Although their methods were successful at detecting dyes, the results at that time did not show a very practical spectroscopic technique, which was due to the less than typical sensitivity of TIRPAS as a spectroscopy modality given the low power (~1 to 2 W) lasers being used. Contrarily, we have used an Nd:YAG laser with a five nanosecond pulse that gives peak power of 1 MW coupled with the TIRPAS system to increase the sensitivity of this technique for biological material sensing. All efforts were focused on the eventual detection of the optically absorbing material, hemozoin, which is created as a byproduct of a malarial infection in blood. We used an optically analogous material, β-hematin, to determine the potential for detection in the TIRPAS system. In addition, four properties which control the sensitivity were investigated to increase understanding about the sensor's function as a biosensing method.

  3. Total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy for the detection of β-hematin

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Samson, Edward B.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Evanescent field sensing methods are currently used to detect many different types of disease markers and biologically important chemicals such as the HER2 breast cancer receptor. Hinoue et al. used Total Internal Reflection Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (TIRPAS) as a method of using the evanescent field to detect an optically opaque dye at a sample interface. Although their methods were successful at detecting dyes, the results at that time did not show a very practical spectroscopic technique, which was due to the less than typical sensitivity of TIRPAS as a spectroscopy modality given the low power (∼1 to 2 W) lasers being used. Contrarily, we have used an Nd:YAG laser with a five nanosecond pulse that gives peak power of 1 MW coupled with the TIRPAS system to increase the sensitivity of this technique for biological material sensing. All efforts were focused on the eventual detection of the optically absorbing material, hemozoin, which is created as a byproduct of a malarial infection in blood. We used an optically analogous material, β-hematin, to determine the potential for detection in the TIRPAS system. In addition, four properties which control the sensitivity were investigated to increase understanding about the sensor’s function as a biosensing method. PMID:22734742

  4. Investigating Ultrasonic Diffraction Grating Spectroscopy and Reflection Techniques for Characterizing Slurry Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, L.W.; Brodsky, A.M.

    2005-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks. This waste, in the form of slurries, must be transferred and processed to a final form, such as glass logs. On-line instrumentation to measure the properties of these slurries in real-time during transport is needed in order to prevent plugging and reduce excessive dilution. The results, describes a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington to develop a completely new method for using ultrasonics to measure the particle size and viscosity of a slurry. The concepts are based on work in optics on grating-light-reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) at the University of Washington and work on ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy (UDGS) carried out at PNNL. The objective of the research was to extend the GLRS theory for optics to ultrasonics, and to demonstrate its capabilities of UDGS. The proposed ultrasonic method could result in an instrument that would be simple, rugged, and very compact, allowing it to be implemented as part of a pipeline wall at facilities across the DOE complex

  5. On-site variety discrimination of tomato plant using visible-near infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-rong; Yu, Peng; Fu, Xia-ping; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2009-02-01

    The use of visible-near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was explored as a tool to discriminate two new tomato plant varieties in China (Zheza205 and Zheza207). In this study, 82 top-canopy leaves of Zheza205 and 86 top-canopy leaves of Zheza207 were measured in visible-NIR reflectance mode. Discriminant models were developed using principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis (DA), and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) regression methods. After outliers detection, the samples were randomly split into two sets, one used as a calibration set (n=82) and the remaining samples as a validation set (n=82). When predicting the variety of the samples in validation set, the classification correctness of the DPLS model after optimizing spectral pretreatment was up to 93%. The DPLS model with raw spectra after multiplicative scatter correction and Savitzky-Golay filter smoothing pretreatments had the best satisfactory calibration and prediction abilities (correlation coefficient of calibration (R(c))=0.920, root mean square errors of calibration=0.196, and root mean square errors of prediction=0.216). The results show that visible-NIR spectroscopy might be a suitable alternative tool to discriminate tomato plant varieties on-site. PMID:19235271

  6. Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Pires, Layla; Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I Alex; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Kurachi, Cristina; Wilson, Brian C

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with significant risk of fatality. Due to its pigmentation, light-based imaging and treatment techniques are limited to near the tumor surface, which is inadequate, for example, to evaluate the microvascular density that is associated with prognosis. White-light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and near-infrared optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to evaluate the effect of a topically applied optical clearing agent (OCA) in melanoma in vivo and to image the microvascular network. DRS was performed using a contact fiber optic probe in the range from 450 to 650 nm. OCT imaging was performed using a swept-source system at 1310 nm. The OCT image data were processed using speckle variance and depth-encoded algorithms. Diffuse reflectance signals decreased with clearing, dropping by ∼ 90% after 45 min. OCT was able to image the microvasculature in the pigmented melanoma tissue with good spatial resolution up to a depth of ∼ 300 μm without the use of OCA; improved contrast resolution was achieved with optical clearing to a depth of ∼ 750 μm in tumor. These findings are relevant to potential clinical applications in melanoma, such as assessing prognosis and treatment responses. Optical clearing may also facilitate the use of light-based treatments such as photodynamic therapy. PMID:27300502

  7. Toward reliable retrieval of functional information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-02-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase function cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. To accurately recover the optical properties and functional information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis. PMID:26977361

  8. Impact of one-layer assumption on diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Ricky; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) can be used to noninvasively measure skin properties. To extract skin properties from DRS spectra, you need a model that relates the reflectance to the tissue properties. Most models are based on the assumption that skin is homogenous. In reality, skin is composed of multiple layers, and the homogeneity assumption can lead to errors. In this study, we analyze the errors caused by the homogeneity assumption. This is accomplished by creating realistic skin spectra using a computational model, then extracting properties from those spectra using a one-layer model. The extracted parameters are then compared to the parameters used to create the modeled spectra. We used a wavelength range of 400 to 750 nm and a source detector separation of 250 μm. Our results show that use of a one-layer skin model causes underestimation of hemoglobin concentration [Hb] and melanin concentration [mel]. Additionally, the magnitude of the error is dependent on epidermal thickness. The one-layer assumption also causes [Hb] and [mel] to be correlated. Oxygen saturation is overestimated when it is below 50% and underestimated when it is above 50%. We also found that the vessel radius factor used to account for pigment packaging is correlated with epidermal thickness.

  9. Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface studied by ex-situ FTIR internal reflection spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Drelich, J.; Miller, J.D.

    1998-06-15

    Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface was investigated by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared internal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR/IRS). Adsorption isotherms have been determined using an apatite internal reflection element (IRE) and it has been found that pH has a significant influence on oleate adsorption by apatite. At pH 8.0 and 20 C, oleate adsorption density increases monotonically as equilibrium oleate concentration increases from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M. These results are in contrast to the results at pH 9.5 and 20 C in which case the adsorption density is limited to that corresponding to approximately monolayer coverage. Oleate adsorption by apatite was compared to oleate adsorption by fluorite and calcite and the different adsorption behavior at these three mineral surfaces is attributed to the differences in the densities of surface calcium sites and to the differences in the solubilities of these minerals. Contact angles have been measured at the apatite IRE surface and it has been demonstrated that both the amount and the nature of the adsorbed species influence the hydrophobic state of the surface.

  10. Rapid estimation of nutritional elements on citrus leaves by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Sola, Luis; García-Sánchez, Francisco; Pérez-Pérez, Juan G.; Gimeno, Vicente; Navarro, Josefa M.; Moral, Raul; Martínez-Nicolás, Juan J.; Nieves, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient nutrient application is one of the most important factors in producing quality citrus fruits. One of the main guides in planning citrus fertilizer programs is by directly monitoring the plant nutrient content. However, this requires analysis of a large number of leaf samples using expensive and time-consuming chemical techniques. Over the last 5 years, it has been demonstrated that it is possible to quantitatively estimate certain nutritional elements in citrus leaves by using the spectral reflectance values, obtained by using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS). This technique is rapid, non-destructive, cost-effective and environmentally friendly. Therefore, the estimation of macro and micronutrients in citrus leaves by this method would be beneficial in identifying the mineral status of the trees. However, to be used effectively NIRS must be evaluated against the standard techniques across different cultivars. In this study, NIRS spectral analysis, and subsequent nutrient estimations for N, K, Ca, Mg, B, Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn concentration, were performed using 217 leaf samples from different citrus trees species. Partial least square regression and different pre-processing signal treatments were used to generate the best estimation against the current best practice techniques. It was verified a high proficiency in the estimation of N (Rv = 0.99) and Ca (Rv = 0.98) as well as achieving acceptable estimation for K, Mg, Fe, and Zn. However, no successful calibrations were obtained for the estimation of B, Cu, and Mn. PMID:26257767