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Sample records for selective separation uranium

  1. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Beaver, R.J.; Cherubini, J.H.

    1963-05-14

    A process is described for separating uranium from a nuclear fuel element comprising a uranium-containing core and a ferritic stainless steel clad by heating said element in a non-carburizing atmosphere at a temperature in the range 850-1050 un. Concent 85% C, rapidly cooling the heated element through the temperature range 815 un. Concent 85% to 650 EC to avoid annealing said steel, and then contacting the cooled element with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to selectively dissolve the uranium. (AEC)

  2. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM, PROTACTINIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY PEROXIDE DISSOLUTION METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is described for separating U/sup 233/ from thorium and fission products. The separation is effected by forming a thorium-nitric acid solution of about 3 pH, adding hydrogen peroxide to precipitate uranium and thorium peroxide, treating the peroxides with sodium hydroxide to selectively precipitate the uranium peroxide, and reacting the separated solution with nitric acid to re- precipitate the uranium peroxide.

  3. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Lyon, W.L.

    1962-04-17

    A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

  4. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

    1959-03-10

    The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

  5. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

  6. SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Bane, R.W.

    1959-09-01

    A description is given for the separation of thorium from uranium by forming an aqueous acidic solution containing ionic species of thorium, uranyl uranium, and hydroxylamine, flowing the solution through a column containing the phenol-formaldehyde type cation exchange resin to selectively adsorb substantially all the thorium values and a portion of the uranium values, flowing a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid through the column to desorb the uranium values, and then flowing a dilute aqueous acidic solution containing an ion, such as bisulfate, which has a complexing effect upon thortum through the column to desorb substantially all of the thorium.

  7. SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM BY EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Bohlmann, E.G.

    1959-07-28

    A method is presented for the recovery and separation of uranium and thorium values contained in an aqueous nitric acid solution which is more than 3 M in nitric acid. The uranium and thorium containing solution preferable about 7 M in nitric acid is contacted with tributyl phosphatekerosene mixture. Both U and Th are extracted by the immiscible organic. After phase separation the Th is selectively back extracted by contacting with an aqueous nitric acid solution preferably between 0.1 to 1.5 M in nitric acid. The uranium which is still in the organic extractant phase may be recovered by contacting with water.

  8. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hellman, N.N.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for separating uranium from thorium wherein the ratio of thorium to uranium is between 100 to 10,000. According to the invention the thoriumuranium mixture is dissolved in nitric acid, and the solution is prepared so as to obtain the desired concentration within a critical range of from 4 to 8 N with regard to the total nitrate due to thorium nitrate, with or without nitric acid or any nitrate salting out agent. The solution is then contacted with an ether, such as diethyl ether, whereby uranium is extracted into ihe organic phase while thorium remains in the aqueous phase.

  9. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Nuttall, R.L.

    1959-12-15

    A process is described for extracting plutonium from powdered neutron- irradiated urarium metal by contacting the latter, while maintaining it in the solid form, with molten magnesium which takes up the plutonium and separating the molten magnesium from the solid uranium.

  10. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM AND PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Musgrave, W.K.R.

    1959-06-30

    This patent relates to the separation of uranium from thorium and protactinium; such mixtures of elements usually being obtained by neutron irradiation of thorium. The method of separating the constituents has been first to dissolve the mixture of elements in concertrated nitric acid and then to remove the protactinium by absorption on manganese dioxide and the uranium by solvent extraction with ether. Prior to now, comparatively large amounts of thorium were extracted with the uranium. According to the invention this is completely prevented by adding sodium diethyldithiocarbamate to the mixture of soluble nitrate salts. The organic salt has the effect of reacting only with the uranyl nitrate to form the corresponding uranyl salt which can then be selectively extracted from the mixture with amyl acetate.

  11. SEPARATION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM, AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Spence, R.; Lister, M.W.

    1958-12-16

    Uranium and plutonium can be separated from neutron-lrradiated uranium by a process consisting of dissolvlng the lrradiated material in nitric acid, saturating the solution with a nitrate salt such as ammonium nitrate, rendering the solution substantially neutral with a base such as ammonia, adding a reducing agent such as hydroxylamine to change plutonium to the trivalent state, treating the solution with a substantially water immiscible organic solvent such as dibutoxy diethylether to selectively extract the uranium, maklng the residual aqueous solutlon acid with nitric acid, adding an oxidizing agent such as ammonlum bromate to oxidize the plutonium to the hexavalent state, and selectlvely extracting the plutonium by means of an immlscible solvent, such as dibutoxy dlethyletber.

  12. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

    1959-03-10

    The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

  13. SEPARATION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Nicholls, C.M.; Wells, I.; Spence, R.

    1959-10-13

    The separation of uranium and plutonium from neutronirradiated uranium is described. The neutron-irradiated uranium is dissolved in nitric acid to provide an aqueous solution 3N in nitric acid. The fission products of the solution are extruded by treating the solution with dibutyl carbitol substantially 1.8N in nitric acid. The organic solvent phase is separated and neutralized with ammonium hydroxide and the plutonium reduced with hydroxylamine base to the trivalent state. Treatment of the mixture with saturated ammonium nitrate extracts the reduced plutonium and leaves the uranium in the organic solvent.

  14. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM OTHER METALS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.

    1959-07-01

    The separation of uranium from other elements, such as ruthenium, zirconium, niobium, cerium, and other rare earth metals is described. According to the invention, this is accomplished by adding hydrazine to an acid aqueous solution containing salts of uranium, preferably hexavalent uranium, and then treating the mixture with a substantially water immiscible ketone, such as hexone. A reaction takes place between the ketone and the hydrazine whereby a complex, a ketazine, is formed; this complex has a greater power of extraction for uranium than the ketone by itself. When contaminating elements are present, they substantially remain in ihe aqueous solution.

  15. METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM VALUES, PLUTONIUM VALUES AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY CHLORINATION

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of plutonium and uranium from each other and from other substances is described. In general, the method comprises the steps of contacting the uranium with chlorine in the presence of a holdback material selected from the group consisting of lanthanum oxide and thorium oxide to form a uranium chloride higher than uranium tetrachloride, and thereafter heating the uranium chloride thus formed to a temperature at which the uranium chloride is volatilized off but below the volatilizalion temperature of plutonium chloride.

  16. METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM FROM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chiotti, P.; Shoemaker, H.E.

    1960-06-28

    Uranium can be recovered from metallic uraniumthorium mixtures containing uranium in comparatively small amounts. The method of recovery comprises adding a quantity of magnesium to a mass to obtain a content of from 48 to 85% by weight; melting and forming a magnesium-thorium alloy at a temperature of between 585 and 800 deg C; agitating the mixture, allowing the mixture to settle whereby two phases, a thorium-containing magnesium-rich liquid phase and a solid uranium-rich phase, are formed; and separating the two phases.

  17. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Adamson, A.W.; Schubert, J.; Russell, E.R.

    1958-10-01

    A chromatographic adsorption process is presented for the separation of plutonium from other fission products formed by the irradiation of uranium. The plutonium and the lighter element fission products are adsorbed on a sulfonated phenol-formaldehyde resin bed from a nitric acid solution containing the dissolved uranium. Successive washes of sulfuric, phosphoric, and nitric acids remove the bulk of the fission products, then an eluate of dilute phosphoric and nitric acids removes the remaining plutonium and fission products. The plutonium is selectively removed by passing this solution through zirconium phosphate, from which the plutonium is dissolved with nitric acid. This process provides a convenient and efficient means for isolating plutonium.

  18. COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

  19. A novel benzimidazole-functionalized 2-D COF material: synthesis and application as a selective solid-phase extractant for separation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Yang, Xiaodan; Bai, Chiyao; Tian, Yin; Li, Bo; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Xiaoyu; Ding, Songdong; Xia, Chuanqin; Tan, Xinyu; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian

    2015-01-01

    A novel COF-based material (COF-COOH) containing large amounts of carboxylic groups was prepared for the first time by using a simple and effective one-step synthetic method, in which the cheap and commercially available raw materials, trimesoyl chloride and p-phenylenediamine, were used. The as-synthesized COF-COOH was modified with previously synthesized 2-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-benzimidazole (HBI) by "grafting to" method, and a new solid-phase extractant (COF-HBI) with highly efficient sorption performance for uranium(VI) was consequently obtained. A series of characterizations demonstrated that COF-COOH and COF-HBI exhibited great thermostabilities and irradiation stabilities. Sorption behavior of the COF-based materials toward U(VI) was compared in simulated nuclear industrial effluent containing UO2(2+) and 11 undesired ions, and the UO2(2+) sorption amount of COF-HBI was 81 mg g(-1), accounting for approximately 58% of the total sorption amount, which was much higher than the sorption selectivity of COF-COOH to UO2(2+) (39%). Batch sorption experiment results indicated that the uranium(VI) sorption on COF-HBI was a pH dependent, rapid (sorption equilibrium was reached in 30 min), endothermic and spontaneous process. In the most favorable conditions, the equilibrium sorption capacity of the adsorbent for uranium could reach 211 mg g(-1). PMID:25313486

  20. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM URANIUM AND FISSION PRODUCT VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Maddock, A.G.; Booth, A.H.

    1960-09-13

    Separation of plutonium present in small amounts from neutron irradiated uranium by making use of the phenomenon of chemisorption is described. Plutonium in the tetravalent state is chemically absorbed on a fluoride in solid form. The steps for the separation comprise dissolving the irradiated uranium in nitric acid, oxidizing the plutonium in the resulting solution to the hexavalent state, adding to the solution a soluble calcium salt which by the common ion effect inhibits dissolution of the fluoride by the solution, passing the solution through a bed or column of subdivided calcium fluoride which has been sintered to about 8OO deg C to remove the chemisorbable fission products, reducing the plutonium in the solution thus obtained to the tetravalent state, and again passing the solution through a similar bed or column of calcium fluoride to selectively absorb the plutonium, which may then be recovered by treating the calcium fluoride with a solution of ammonium oxalate.

  1. METHOD OF SEPARATING ISOTOPES OF URANIUM IN A CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, F.A.

    1958-05-01

    Mass separation devices of the calutron type and the use of uranium hexachloride as a charge material in the calutron ion source are described. The method for using this material in a mass separator includes heating the uranium hexachloride to a temperature in the range of 60 to 100 d C in a vacuum and thereby forming a vapor of the material. The vaporized uranium hexachloride is then ionized in a vapor ionizing device for subsequent mass separation processing.

  2. Separation of rubidium from irradiated aluminum-encapsulated uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E. P.; Schmitz, F. J.; Rokop, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure was developed for separating rubidium from irradiated aluminum encapsulated uranium. The separations procedure produces a final ultra-high purity RbCl product for subsequent high performance mass spectrometric analysis. The procedure involves first removing most of the macro-components and fission products by strong base anion exchange using, first, concentrated HCl, then oxalic acid media and second, selectively separating rubidium from alkaline-earth ions and other alkali-metal ions, including cesium, using Bio-Rex-40 cation-exchange resin. The resultant RbCl is then put through a final vacuum sublimation step. Ultra-pure reagents and specially clean glassware are used throughout the procedure to minimize contamination by naturally-occurring rubidium.

  3. SEPARATION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NEUTRON- BOMBARDED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.E.; Johnson, I.; Burris, L. Jr.; Winsch, I.O.; Feder, H.M.

    1962-11-13

    A process is given for removing plutonium and/or fission products from uranium fuel. The fuel is dissolved in molten zinc--magnesium (10 to 18% Mg) alloy, more magnesium is added to obtain eutectic composition whereby uranium precipitates, and the uranium are separated from the Plutoniumand fission-product- containing eutectic. (AEC)

  4. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  5. Three novel triazine-based materials with different O/S/N set of donor atoms: One-step preparation and comparison of their capability in selective separation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chiyao; Zhang, Meicheng; Li, Bo; Tian, Yin; Zhang, Shuang; Zhao, Xiaosheng; Li, Yang; Wang, Lei; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian

    2015-12-30

    Cyanuric chloride was chosen as a core skeleton which reacted with desired linker molecules, urea, thiourea and thiosemicarbazide, to prepare three novel functional covalent triazine-based frameworks, CCU (O-donor set), CCTU (S-donor set) and CCTS (S, N-donor set) respectively, designed for selective adsorption of U(VI). The products have high nitrogen concentration (>30 wt%), regular structure, relatively high chemical and thermal stability. Adsorption behaviors of the products on U(VI) were examined by batch experiments. CCU and CCTU can extract U(VI) from simulated nuclear industrial effluent containing 12 co-existing cations with relatively high selectivity (54.4% and 54.2%, respectively). Especially, effects of donor atoms O/S on adsorption were investigated, and the outcomes indicate that the difference in coordinating ability between the donor atoms is weakened in large conjugated systems, and the related functional groups with originally very strong coordination abilities may not be the best choice for the application in selective adsorption of uranium and also other metals. The as-proposed approach can easily be expanded into design and preparation of new highly efficient adsorbents for selective separation and recovery of uranium through adjusting the structures, types and amounts of functional groups of adsorbents by choosing suitable linkers. PMID:26218304

  6. Separation of uranium isotopes by chemical exchange

    DOEpatents

    Ogle, P.R. Jr.

    1974-02-26

    A chemical exchange method is provided for separating /sup 235/U from / sup 238/U comprising contacting a first phase containing UF/sub 6/ with a second phase containing a compound selected from the group consisting of NOUF/sub 6/, NOUF/sub 7/, and NO/sub 2/UF/sub 7/ until the U Fsub 6/ in the first phase becomes enriched in the /sup 235/U isotope. (Official Gazette)

  7. The quantitative ion exchange separation of uranium from impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, U.I.; Mason, P.B.; Zebrowski, J.P.; Rocca, M.; Frank, I.W.; Smith, M.M.; Johnson, K.D.; Orlowicz, G.J.; Dallmann, E.

    1995-03-01

    Two methods were tested for the quantitative separation of uranium from elemental impurities using commercially available resins. The sorption and elution behavior of uranium and the separation of it from a variety of other elements was studied. The first method utilized an anion exchange resin while the second method employed an extraction resin. The first method, the anion exchange of uranium (VI) in an acid chloride medium, was optimized and statistically tested for quantitative recovery of uranium. This procedure involved adsorption of uranium onto Blo-Rad AG 1-X8 or MP-1 ion exchange resins in 8 M HCl, separation of uncompleted or weakly complexed matrix ions with an 8 M HCI wash, and subsequent elution of uranium with 1 M HCl. Matrix ions more strongly adsorbed than uranium were left on the resin. Uranium recoveries with this procedure averaged greater than 99.9% with a standard deviation of 0.1%. In the second method, recovery of uranium on the extraction resin did not meet the criteria of this study and further examination was terminated.

  8. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    , reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

  9. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Willard, J.E.

    1958-01-01

    A method is presented for the separation of plutonium from solutions containing that element in a valence state not higher than 41 together with uranium ions and fission products. This separation is accomplished by contacting the solutions with diatomaceous earth which preferentially adsorbs the plutonium present. Also mentioned as effective for this adsorbtive separation are silica gel, filler's earth and alumina.

  10. PROCESS OF TREATING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE AND PLUTONIUM HEXAFLUORIDE MIXTURES WITH SULFUR TETRAFLUORIDE TO SEPARATE SAME

    DOEpatents

    Steindler, M.J.

    1962-07-24

    A process was developed for separating uranium hexafluoride from plutonium hexafluoride by the selective reduction of the plutonium hexafluoride to the tetrafluoride with sulfur tetrafluoride at 50 to 120 deg C, cooling the mixture to --60 to -100 deg C, and volatilizing nonreacted sulfur tetrafluoride and sulfur hexafluoride formed at that temperature. The uranium hexafluoride is volatilized at room temperature away from the solid plutonium tetrafluoride. (AEC)

  11. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.P. |

    1993-06-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminate or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. The objective was to selectively extract uranium using a soil washing/extraction process without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating a secondary waste form that would be difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. One of the soils is from near the Plant 1 storage pad and the other soil was taken from near a waste incinerator used to burn low-level contaminated trash. The third soil was a surface soil from an area formally used as a landfarm for the treatment of spent oils at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The sediment sample was material sampled from a storm sewer sediment trap at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Uranium concentrations in the Fernald soils ranged from 450 to 550 {mu}g U/g of soil while the samples from the Y-12 Plant ranged from 150 to 200 {mu}g U/g of soil.

  12. Pulsed CO laser for isotope separation of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, Igor Y.; Koptev, Andrey V.

    2012-07-30

    This article proposes a technical solution for using a CO laser facility for the industrial separation of uranium used in the production of fuel for nuclear power plants, employing a method of laser isotope separation of uranium with condensation repression in a free jet. The laser operation with nanosecond pulse irradiation can provide an acceptable efficiency in the separating unit and a high efficiency of the laser with the wavelength of 5.3 {mu}m. In the present work we also introduce a calculation model and define the parameters of a mode-locked CO laser with a RF discharge in the supersonic stream. The average pulsed CO laser power of 3 kW is sufficient for efficient industrial isotope separation of uranium in one stage.

  13. Uranium isotope separation from 1941 to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier-Komor, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Uranium isotope separation was the key development for the preparation of highly enriched isotopes in general and thus became the seed for target development and preparation for nuclear and applied physics. In 1941 (year of birth of the author) large-scale development for uranium isotope separation was started after the US authorities were warned that NAZI Germany had started its program for enrichment of uranium and might have confiscated all uranium and uranium mines in their sphere of influence. Within the framework of the Manhattan Projects the first electromagnetic mass separators (Calutrons) were installed and further developed for high throughput. The military aim of the Navy Department was to develop nuclear propulsion for submarines with practically unlimited range. Parallel to this the army worked on the development of the atomic bomb. Also in 1941 plutonium was discovered and the production of 239Pu was included into the atomic bomb program. 235U enrichment starting with natural uranium was performed in two steps with different techniques of mass separation in Oak Ridge. The first step was gas diffusion which was limited to low enrichment. The second step for high enrichment was performed with electromagnetic mass spectrometers (Calutrons). The theory for the much more effective enrichment with centrifugal separation was developed also during the Second World War, but technical problems e.g. development of high speed ball and needle bearings could not be solved before the end of the war. Spying accelerated the development of uranium separation in the Soviet Union, but also later in China, India, Pakistan, Iran and Iraq. In this paper, the physical and chemical procedures are outlined which lead to the success of the project. Some security aspects and Non-Proliferation measures are discussed.

  14. PROCESS OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Hill, O.F.

    1958-09-01

    A process is presented for recovering plutonium values from aqueous solutions. It comprises forming a uranous hydroxide precipitate in such a plutonium bearing solution, at a pH of at least 5. The plutonium values are precipitated with and carried by the uranium hydroxide. The carrier precipitate is then redissolved in acid solution and the pH is adjusted to about 2.5, causing precipitation of the uranous hydroxide but leaving the still soluble plutonium values in solution.

  15. Age determination of highly enriched uranium: separation and analysis of 231Pa.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, A; Apostolidis, C; Mayer, K

    2002-11-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed for the age determination of highly enriched uranium samples exploiting the mother/daughter pair 235U/231Pa. Protactinium is separated from bulk uranium through highly selective sorption to silica gel and is subsequently quantified using alpha-spectrometry. The method has been validated using uranium standard reference materials of known ages. It affords decontamination factors exceeding 2.5 x 10(7), overall recoveries in the range of 80-85%, and a combined uncertainty below 5%. PMID:12433081

  16. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM PROTACTINIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Rainey, R.H.; Moore, J.G.

    1962-08-14

    A liquid-liquid extraction process was developed for recovering thorium and uranium values from a neutron irradiated thorium composition. They are separated from a solvent extraction system comprising a first end extraction stage for introducing an aqueous feed containing thorium and uranium into the system consisting of a plurality of intermediate extractiorr stages and a second end extractron stage for introducing an aqueous immiscible selective organic solvent for thorium and uranium in countercurrent contact therein with the aqueous feed. A nitrate iondeficient aqueous feed solution containing thorium and uranium was introduced into the first end extraction stage in countercurrent contact with the organic solvent entering the system from the second end extraction stage while intro ducing an aqueous solution of salting nitric acid into any one of the intermediate extraction stages of the system. The resultant thorium and uranium-laden organic solvent was removed at a point preceding the first end extraction stage of the system. (AEC)

  17. PROCESS OF SEPARATING URANIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Warf, J.C.

    1958-08-19

    A process is described for separating uranium values from aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions. The process consists in contacting the uramium bearing solution with an organic solvent, tributyl phosphate, preferably diluted with a less viscous organic liquida whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the organic solvent phase. The uranvl nitrate may be recovered from the solvent phase bv back extracting with an aqueous mediuin.

  18. SEPARATION OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM OXIDES

    DOEpatents

    Benedict, G.E.; Lyon, W.L.

    1961-12-01

    ABS>A method of separating a mixture of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/ is given which comprises immersing the mixture in a fused NaCl-KCl bath, chlorinating with chlorine or phosgene, and preferentially electrolytically or chemically reducing the UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ so produced to UO/sub 2/ and filtering it out. (AEC)

  19. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM AND NIOBIUM BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Voiland, E.E.

    1958-05-01

    A process for separation of the uranium from zirconium and/or niobium values contained in 3 to 7M aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. This is accomplished by adding phosphoric acid anions to the nitric acid solution containing the uranium, zirconium, and/or niobium in an amount sufficient to make the solution 0.05 to 0.2M in phosphate ion and contacting the solution with an organic water-immiscible solvent such as MEK, whereby the uranyl values are taken up by the extract phase while the zirconium and niobium preferentially remain in the aqueous raffinate.

  20. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING THORIUM VALUES FROM URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Schubert, J.

    1959-08-01

    An improved ion exchange method is described for recovery of uranium and thorium values as separate functions from an aqueous acidic solution containing less than 10/sup -3/ M thorium ions and between 0.1 and 1 M uranyl ions. The solution is passed through a bed of cation exchange resin in the acid form to adsorb all the thorium ions and a portion of the uranyl ions. The uranium is eluted by means of aqueous 0.1 to 0.4 M sulfuric acid. The thorium may then be stripped from the resin by elution with aqueous 0.5 M oxalic acid.

  1. Bio-/Photo-Chemical Separation and Recovery of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2008-03-12

    Citric acid forms bidentate, tridentate, binuclear or polynuclear species with transition metals and actinides. Biodegradation of metal citrate complexes is influenced by the type of complex formed with metal ions. While bidentate complexes are readily biodegraded, tridentate, binuclear and polynuclear species are recalcitrant. Likewise certain transition metals and actinides are photochemically active in the presence of organic acids. Although the uranyl citrate complex is not biodegraded, in the presence of visible light it undergoes photochemical oxidation/reduction reactions which result in the precipitation of uranium as UO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O. Consequently, we developed a process where uranium is extracted from contaminated soils and wastes by citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, whereas uranyl citrate which is recalcitrant remains in solution. Photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex resulted in the precipitation of uranium. Thus the toxic metals and uranium in mixed waste are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of naturally-occurring compounds and the combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in cost.

  2. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, F.R.

    1962-07-24

    A solvent extraction process was developed for separating actinide elements including plutonium and uranium from fission products. By this method the ion content of the acidic aqueous solution is adjusted so that it contains more equivalents of total metal ions than equivalents of nitrate ions. Under these conditions the extractability of fission products is greatly decreased. (AEC)

  3. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Separation of Uranium from Other Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of separating uranium from other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of an extraction and counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for used nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)) were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, the separation of uranium from plutonium in sc-CO2 modified with TBP was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, and the separation of uranium from neptunium was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid, oxalic acid, or sodium nitrite.

  4. CO-laser-induced photochemical reaction of UF6 with HCl for the isotope separation of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong-Bin; Shen, Z. Y.; Zhang, Cun H.

    1993-05-01

    In this paper, we report the results of CO-laser induced photochemical reaction of UF6 with HCl for the isotope separation of uranium hexafluoride, we also discussed that the molecular collision inducing V-T, V-V relaxation process affects on the selectivity of the isotope separation. The obtained quantum coefficiency of the reaction is about 0.34.

  5. METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY BROMINATION AND DISTILLATION

    DOEpatents

    Jaffey, A.H.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1958-12-23

    The method for separation of plutonium from uranium and radioactive fission products obtained by neutron irradiation of uranlum consists of reacting the lrradiated material with either bromine, hydrogen bromide, alumlnum bromide, or sulfur and bromine at an elevated temperature to form the bromides of all the elements, then recovering substantlally pure plutonium bromide by dlstillatlon in combinatlon with selective condensatlon at prescribed temperature and pressure.

  6. Uranium-preextraction in zirconium/hafnium separations processs

    SciTech Connect

    Feuling, R.J.

    1990-04-03

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for recovering zirconium values from uranium containing zircon ore. The process comprising a fluidized bed carbochlorination of the zircon ore at 800{degrees}--1250{degrees} C., producing a relatively impure, hafnium-containing zirconium tetrachloride stream and by-product silicon tetrachloride, which silicon tetrachloride by-product is separated by differential condensation, and wherein uranium chloride is volatilized at the ore chlorinator temperature and follows as an impurity in the zirconium-hafnium tetrachloride stream, mixing the zirconium-hafnium tetrachloride with water to produce a zirconium-hafnium oxychloride solution, and removing iron impurities by liquid--liquid iron extraction with a methyl isobutyl ketone extractant.

  7. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O.sub.2 solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Chiotti, Premo; Jha, Mahesh Chandra

    1976-09-28

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally insoluble high-density sol-gel thoria-urania nuclear reactor fuel pellets.

  8. PROCESSES FOR SEPARATING AND RECOVERING CONSTITUENTS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Connick, R.E.; Gofman, J.W.; Pimentel, G.C.

    1959-11-10

    Processes are described for preparing plutonium, particularly processes of separating plutonium from uranium and fission products in neutron-irradiated uraniumcontaining matter. Specifically, plutonium solutions containing uranium, fission products and other impurities are contacted with reducing agents such as sulfur dioxide, uranous ion, hydroxyl ammonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and ferrous ion whereby the plutoninm is reduced to its fluoride-insoluble state. The reduced plutonium is then carried out of solution by precipitating niobic oxide therein. Uranium and certain fission products remain behind in the solution. Certain other fission products precipitate along with the plutonium. Subsequently, the plutonium and fission product precipitates are redissolved, and the solution is oxidized with oxidizing agents such as chlorine, peroxydisulfate ion in the presence of silver ion, permanganate ion, dichromate ion, ceric ion, and a bromate ion, whereby plutonium is oxidized to the fluoride-soluble state. The oxidized solution is once again treated with niobic oxide, thus precipitating the contamirant fission products along with the niobic oxide while the oxidized plutonium remains in solution. Plutonium is then recovered from the decontaminated solution.

  9. METHOD OF SEPARATING FISSION PRODUCTS FROM FUSED BISMUTH-CONTAINING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Wiswall, R.H.

    1958-06-24

    A process is described for removing metal selectively from liquid metal compositions. The method effects separation of flssion product metals selectively from dilute solution in fused bismuth, which contains uraniunn in solution without removal of more than 1% of the uranium. The process comprises contacting the fused bismuth with a fused salt composition consisting of sodium, potassium and lithium chlorides, adding to fused bismuth and molten salt a quantity of bismuth chloride which is stoichiometrically required to convert the flssion product metals to be removed to their chlorides which are more stable in the fused salt than in the molten metal and are, therefore, preferentially taken up in the fused salt phase.

  10. SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2007-05-31

    H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for <200 mg Mo/g U (200 ppm). Since natural U has about 10 mg Mo/g U, the required purity of the 1EU product prior to blending is about 800 mg Mo/g U, allowing for uncertainties. HCE requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) define a flowsheet for the safe and efficient processing of the U-10Mo material. This report presents a computational model of the solvent extraction portion of the proposed flowsheet. The two main objectives of the computational model are to demonstrate that the Mo impurity requirement can be met and to show that the solvent feed rates in the proposed flowsheet, in particular to 1A and 1D Banks, are adequate to prevent refluxing of U and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety. SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction), a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that supports Argonne National Laboratory's proprietary AMUSE (Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction) code, was selected to model the U/Mo separation flowsheet. SASSE spreadsheet models of H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent

  11. Innovative lasers for uranium isotope separation. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1991-06-01

    Copper vapor lasers have important applications to uranium atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). The authors have spent the first two years of their project investigating two innovative methods of exciting/pumping copper vapor lasers which have the potential to improve the efficiency and scaling of large laser systems used in uranium isotope separation. Experimental research has focused on the laser discharge kinetics of (1) microwave, and (2) electron beam excitation/pumping of large-volume copper vapor lasers. During the first year, the experiments have been designed and constructed and initial data has been taken. During the second year these experiments have been diagnosed. Highlights of some of the second year results as well as plans for the future include the following: Microwave resonant cavity produced copper vapor plasmas at 2.45 GHz, have been investigated. A CW (0--500 W) signal heats and vaporizes the copper chloride to provide the atomic copper vapor. A pulsed (5 kW, 0.5--5kHz) signal is added to the incoming CW signal via a hybrid mixer to excite the copper states to the laser levels. An enhancement of the visible radiation has been observed during the pulsed pardon of the signal. Electrical probe measurements have been implemented on the system to verify the results of the electromagnetic model formulated last year. Laser gain measurements have been initiated with the use of a commercial copper vapor laser. Measurements of the spatial profile of the emission are also currently being made. The authors plan to increase the amount of pulsed microwave power to the system by implementing a high power magnetron. A laser cavity will be designed and added to this system.

  12. Mesoporous Carbon Membranes for Selective Gas Separations

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose focus is on translating a novel class of material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory—selfassembled mesoporous carbon—into robust, efficient membrane systems for selective industrial gas separations.

  13. Selective oxoanion separation using a tripodal ligand

    DOEpatents

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Rajbanshi, Arbin

    2016-02-16

    The present invention relates to urea-functionalized crystalline capsules self-assembled by sodium or potassium cation coordination and by hydrogen-bonding water bridges to selectively encapsulate tetrahedral divalent oxoanions from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions and methods using this system for selective anion separations from industrial solutions. The method involves competitive crystallizations using a tripodal tris(urea) functionalized ligand and, in particular, provides a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  14. Selected uranium and uranium-thorium occurrences in New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Secondary uranium mineralization occurs in a northwest-trending fracture zone in the Devonian Concord Granite in recent rock cuts along Interstate Highway 89 near New London, New Hampshire. A detailed plane table map of this occurrence was prepared. Traverses using total gamma ray scintillometers throughout the pluton of Concord Granite identified two additional areas in which very small amounts of secondary mineralization occurs in the marginal zones of the body. All three areas lie along the same northwest trend. A ground radiometry survey of a large part of the Jurassic White Mountain batholith was conducted. Emphasis was placed on those areas from which earlier sampling by Butler (1975) had been done. No unusual geological characteristics were apparent around sample localities from which anomalous U and Th had been reported.. The results of this survey confirm previous conclusions that the red, coarse-grained, biotite granite phase of the Conway Granite is more radioactive than other phases of the Conway Granite or other rock types of the White Mountain Plutonic-Volcanic Series. Aplites associated with the Conway Granite were found .generally to be as radioactive as the red Conway Granite.

  15. Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pruett, D.J.; McTaggart, D.R.

    1983-08-31

    Uranium and technetium in the product stream of the Purex process for recovery of uranium in spent nuclear fuel are separated by (1) contacting the aqueous Purex product stream with hydrazine to reduce Tc/sup +7/ therein to a reduced species, and (2) contacting said aqueous stream with an organic phase containing tributyl phosphate and an organic diluent to extract uranium from said aqueous stream into said organic phase.

  16. Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pruett, David J.; McTaggart, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium and technetium in the product stream of the Purex process for recovery of uranium in spent nuclear fuel are separated by (1) contacting the aqueous Purex product stream with hydrazine to reduce Tc.sup.+7 therein to a reduced species, and (2) contacting said aqueous stream with an organic phase containing tributyl phosphate and an organic diluent to extract uranium from said aqueous stream into said organic phase.

  17. Surface selective membranes for carbon dioxide separation

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Myers, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    In this study, hybrid membranes have been developed for the selective separation of CO2 from mixtures containing H2. Beginning with commercially available Pall alumina membrane tubes with nominal pore diameter of 5 nm, hybrids were produced by silation with a variety of functionalities designed to facilitate the selective adsorption of CO2 onto the pore surface. The goal is to produce a membrane which can harness the power of surface diffusion to give the selectivity of polymer membranes with the permeance of inorganic membranes.

  18. Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li

    2010-09-01

    A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O at 650 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

  19. ARSENATE CARRIER PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM AND RADIOACTIVE FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, S.G.; Miller, D.R.; James, R.A.

    1961-06-20

    A process is described for precipitating Pu from an aqueous solution as the arsenate, either per se or on a bismuth arsenate carrier, whereby a separation from uranium and fission products, if present in solution, is accomplished.

  20. Ligand-grafted biomaterials for adsorptive separations of uranium in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.C.; Reeves, M.

    1999-11-01

    Many organic molecules, particularly biologicals, contain functional groups (ligands) that actively interact with metal ions in solution by adsorption, ion exchange, or chelation/coordination/complexation. Water-soluble organics have limitations as reagents for metal-ion separations from aqueous solutions. However, if the ligand molecule(s) are grafted on to an insoluble matrix, the resulting ligand(s)-containing product becomes useful for separations applications related to metal recovery or remediation. It was discovered that biomolecules containing a primary amino group, secondary amino group, or hydroxyl group could be grafted into a polyurethane polymeric network via in situ polymerization reactions. With carboxyl groups, grafted material showed good selectivity among a group of divalent metal cations, and a uranium-binding capacity of more than 10 mg/g of polymer. The material can be regenerated by sodium bicarbonate or sodium carbonate solution and reused. Data from a stirred-tank reactor showed fast uranium-binding kinetics, and breakthrough-elution studies with a packed-column reactor indicated promising process behavior.

  1. Separator profile selection for optimal battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whear, J. Kevin

    Battery performance, depending on the application, is normally defined by power delivery, electrical capacity, cycling regime and life in service. In order to meet the various performance goals, the Battery Design Engineer can vary things such as grid alloys, paste formulations, number of plates and methods of construction. Another design option available to optimize the battery performance is the separator profile. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate how separator profile selection can be utilized to optimize battery performance and manufacturing efficiencies. Also time will be given to explore novel separator profiles which may bring even greater benefits in the future. All major lead-acid application will be considered including automotive, motive power and stationary.

  2. Extraction and separation of uranium and lead with liquid anion-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthi, N M; Shinde, V M

    1991-02-01

    A method is proposed for the extraction and separation of microgram amounts of uranium(VI) and lead(II) from sodium salicylate solution with high molecular-weight amines such as Aliquat 336, TOA, TIOA, Amberlite LA-1 or Amberlite LA-2 dissolved in xylene. From a critical study of pH, salicylate concentration, amine concentration, diluent and period of equilibration, the optimum conditions were identified. The method permits separation of uranium and lead from binary mixtures with metal ions commonly associated with them, the determination of uranium, and of lead in air samples. PMID:18965132

  3. Status of Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hao-Lin; Feinberg, R.M.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses demonstrations of plant-scale hardware embodying AVLIS technology which were completed in 1992. These demonstrations, designed to provide key economic and technical bases for plant deployment, produced significant quantities of low enriched uranium which could be used for civilian power reactor fuel. We are working with industry to address the integration of AVLIS into the fuel cycle. To prepare for deployment, a conceptual design and cost estimate for a uranium enrichment plant were also completed. The U-AVLIS technology is ready for commercialization.

  4. Evaluating ion exchange resin efficiency and oxidative capacity for the separation of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously described methods to separate dissolved U(IV) from dissolved U(VI) under acidic anoxic conditions prior to laboratory analysis were ineffective with materials currently available commercially. Three strong anion exchange resins were examined for their efficiency in separating, recovering, and preserving both redox states during separation. Results Under oxic conditions, recovery of U(VI) from three exchange resins (Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 Poly-Prep® prefilled columns, Bio-Rad AG® 1x8 powder, and Dowex® 1x8 powder) ranged from 72% to 100% depending on the dosed mass, eluent volume, and resin selected. Dowex® 1x8 resin was the only resin found to provide 100% recovery of U(VI) with fewer than 5 bed volumes of eluent. Under anoxic conditions, all three resins oxidized U(IV) in aqueous solutions with relatively low U(IV) concentrations (<3x10-6 M). Resin-induced oxidation was observed visually using a leuco dye, safranin-o. Oxidants associated with the resin were irreversibly reduced by the addition of Ti(III). After anoxic resin pre-treatment, a series of U(IV)/U(VI) mixtures at micro-molar levels were prepared and separated using the Dowex® 1x8 resin with 100% recovery of both U(IV) and U(VI) with no resin-induced changes in oxidation state. Conclusions Currently available anion exchange resins with apparently identical physical properties were found to have significantly different recoveries for hexavalent uranium at micro-molar concentrations. A novel qualitative technique was developed to visually assess oxidative capacities of anion exchange resins under acidic anoxic conditions. A protocol was developed for pre-treatment and use of currently available anion exchange resins to achieve quantitative separation of U(IV) and U(VI) in aqueous solutions with low U(IV) concentrations. This method can be applied to future work to quantitatively assess dissolved U(IV) and U(VI) concentrations in both laboratory and field samples. PMID:23363052

  5. Ultratrace Uranium Fingerprinting with Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Summer L.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2008-08-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry (ISLIS) for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes 234U, 235U, and 236U with respect to 238U. Optical isotopic selectivity in three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers is capable of measuring the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm, and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as 235UH+ during measurement of 236U. This relative abundance limit approaches the threshold for measurement of uranium minor isotopes with conventional mass spectrometry, typically 10-7, but without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 µg total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes.

  6. Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Horace A.

    1985-01-01

    A method for decontaminating uranium product from the Purex process comprises addition of hydrazine to the product uranyl nitrate stream from the Purex process, which contains hexavalent (UO.sub.2.sup.2+) uranium and heptavalent technetium (TcO.sub.4 -). Technetium in the product stream is reduced and then complexed by the addition of oxalic acid (H.sub.2 C.sub.2 O.sub.4), and the Tc-oxalate complex is readily separated from the uranium by solvent extraction with 30 vol. % tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane.

  7. Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, H.A.

    1984-06-13

    A method for decontaminating uranium product from the Purex 5 process comprises addition of hydrazine to the product uranyl nitrate stream from the Purex process, which contains hexavalent (UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/) uranium and heptavalent technetium (TcO/sub 4/-). Technetium in the product stream is reduced and then complexed by the addition of oxalic acid (H/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/), and the Tc-oxalate complex is readily separated from the 10 uranium by solvent extraction with 30 vol % tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane.

  8. Depleted uranium particles in selected Kosovo samples.

    PubMed

    Danesi, P R; Markowicz, A; Chinea-Cano, E; Burkart, W; Salbu, B; Donohue, D; Ruedenauer, F; Hedberg, M; Vogt, S; Zahradnik, P; Ciurapinski, A

    2003-01-01

    Selected soil samples, collected in Kosovo locations where DU ammunition was expended during the 1999 Balkan conflict, have been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray fluorescence imaging using a micro-beam (micro-XRF) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence detector (SEM-EDXRF), with the objective to test the suitability of these techniques to identify the presence of small DU particles and measure their size distribution and the 235U/238U isotopic ratio (SIMS). Although the results do not permit any legitimate extrapolation to all the sites hit by the DU rounds used during the conflict, they indicated that there can be "spots ' where hundreds of thousands of particles may be present in a few milligrams of DU contaminated soil. The particle size distribution showed that most of the DU particles were <5 microm in diameter and more than 50% of the particles had a diameter <1.5 microm. Knowledge on DU particles is needed as a basis for the assessment of the potential environmental and health impacts of military use of DU, since it provides information on possible re-suspension and inhalation. PMID:12500801

  9. SEPARATING URANIUM CONTAINING SOLIDS SUSPENDED IN A LIQUID

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; Wigner, E.P.

    1958-05-01

    A process is described for separating uraniumcontaining solids suspended in a liquid. It consists of adding to the liquid a wetting agent for the U- containing solids in an amount sufficient to form a separate liquid phase, the wetting agent having a density greater than the density of the liquid. Ethyl dibromoacetate is noted as one preferred wetting agent.

  10. Ultratrace uranium fingerprinting with isotope selective laser ionization spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Summer L; Bushaw, Bruce A

    2008-08-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of isotope selective laser ionization spectrometry for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes (234)U, (235)U, and (236)U with respect to (238)U. The inherent isotopic selectivity of three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers results in measurement of the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as (235)UH(+) during measurement of (236)U. This relative abundance limit is attained without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 microg total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes. PMID:18613650

  11. Separation of tc from Uranium and development of metallic Technetium waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mausolf, Edward John

    The isotope Technetium-99 (99Tc) is a major fission product of the nuclear industry. In the last decade, approximately 20 tons of 99Tc have been produced by the US nuclear industry. Due to its long half-life (t1/2 = 214,000 yr), beta radiotoxicity, and high mobility as pertechnetate [TcO4]-, Tc represents long-term concern to the biosphere. Various options have been considered to manage 99Tc. One of them is its separation from spent fuel, conversion to the metal and incorporation into a metallic waste form for long-term disposal. After dissolution of spent fuel in nitric acid and extraction of U and Tc in organic media, previously developed methods can be used to separate Tc from U, convert the separate Tc stream to the metal and reuse the uranium component of the fuel. A variety of metallic waste forms, ranging from pure Tc metal to ternary Tc alloys combined with stainless steel (SS) and Zr are proposed. The goal of this work was to examine three major questions: What is the optimal method to separate Tc from U? After separation, what is the most efficient method to convert the Tc stream to Tc metal? Finally, what is the corrosion behavior of Tc metal, Tc-SS alloys and Tc-Zr-SS alloys in 0.01M NaCl? The goal is to predict the long term behavior of Tc metallic waste in a hypothetical storage environment. In this work, three methods have been used to separate Tc from U: anionic exchange resin, liquid-liquid extraction and precipitation. Of the three methods studied, anionic exchange resins is the most selective. After separation of Tc from U, three different methods were studied to convert the Tc stream to the metal: thermal treatment under hydrogen atmosphere, electrochemical and chemical reduction of pertechnetate in aqueous media. The thermal treatment of the Tc stream under hydrogen atmosphere is the preferred method to produce Tc metal. After Tc metal is isolated, it will be incorporated into a metal host phase. Three different waste forms were produced for

  12. Selective Recovery of Enriched Uranium from Inorganic Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, R. T.

    2003-02-26

    Uranium as U(IV) and U(VI) can be selectively recovered from liquids and sludge containing metal precipitates, inorganic salts, sand and silt fines, debris, other contaminants, and slimes, which are very difficult to de-water. Chemical processes such as fuel manufacturing and uranium mining generate enriched and natural uranium-bearing wastes. This patented Framatome ANP (FANP) uranium recovery process reduces uranium losses, significantly offsets waste disposal costs, produces a solid waste that meets mixed-waste disposal requirements, and does not generate metal-contaminated liquids. At the head end of the process is a floating dredge that retrieves liquids, sludge, and slimes in the form of a slurry directly from the floor of a lined surface impoundment (lagoon). The slurry is transferred to and mixed in a feed tank with a turbine mixer and re-circulated to further break down the particles and enhance dissolution of uranium. This process uses direct steam injection and sodium hypochlorite addition to oxidize and dissolves any U(IV). Cellulose is added as a non-reactive filter aid to help filter slimes by giving body to the slurry. The slurry is pumped into a large recessed-chamber filter press then de-watered by a pressure cycle-controlled double-diaphragm pump. U(VI) captured in the filtrate from this process is then precipitated by conversion to U(IV) in another Framatome ANP-patented process which uses a strong reducing agent to crystallize and settle the U(IV) product. The product is then dewatered in a small filter press. To-date, over 3,000 Kgs of U at 3% U-235 enrichment were recovered from a 8100 m2 hypalon-lined surface impoundment which contained about 10,220 m3 of liquids and about 757 m3 of sludge. A total of 2,175 drums (0.208 m3 or 55 gallon each) of solid mixed-wastes have been packaged, shipped, and disposed. In addition, 9463 m3 of low-U liquids at <0.001 KgU/m3 were also further processed and disposed.

  13. Supercritical fluid extraction and separation of uranium from other actinides.

    PubMed

    Quach, Donna L; Mincher, Bruce J; Wai, Chien M

    2014-06-15

    The feasibility of separating U from nitric acid solutions of mixed actinides using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)-modified supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. The actinides U, Np, Pu, and Am were extracted into sc-CO2 modified with TBP from a range of nitric acid concentrations, in the absence of, or in the presence of, a number of traditional reducing and/or complexing agents to demonstrate the separation of these metals from U under sc-CO2 conditions. The separation of U from Pu using sc-CO2 was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) or oxalic acid (OA) to mitigate Pu extraction, and the separation of U from Np was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1M in the presence of AHA, OA, or sodium nitrite to mitigate Np extraction. Americium was not well extracted under any condition studied. PMID:24801893

  14. Development of a Ceramic-Lined Crucible for the Separation of Salt from Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Brian R.; Marsden, K. C.; Price, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment program at the Idaho National Laboratory, alternate crucible materials are being developed for the processing of uranium and salt. The separation of salt (LiCl/KCl based) from uranium is performed in an inductively heated furnace capable of distillation under vacuum conditions. Historically, salt and uranium have been processed in graphite crucibles coated with a zirconia mold wash. Although the coated crucibles have performed adequately considering the reactive nature of salt and uranium at high temperature, the operations required for multiple use of the crucibles are quite labor intensive. Thus, an alternate ceramic-lined crucible has been developed to simplify remote operations. Two ceramic-lined crucibles have been tested using irradiated materials to verify their compatibility and determine an ultimate life cycle. Although minor process losses and crucible deterioration have occurred with the ceramic-lined crucibles, the overall performance of the crucibles has been adequate for the separation of salt during uranium processing.

  15. Investigation of the Photochemical Method for Uranium Isotope Separation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Urey, H. C.

    1943-07-10

    To find a process for successful photochemical separation of isotopes several conditions have to be fulfilled. First, the different isotopes have to show some differences in the spectrum. Secondly, and equally important, this difference must be capable of being exploited in a photochemical process. Parts A and B outline the physical and chemical conditions, and the extent to which one might expect to find them fulfilled. Part C deals with the applicability of the process.

  16. Enhanced Method for Molybdenum Separation and Isotopic Determination in Geological Samples and Uranium-Rich Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migeon, V.; Bourdon, B.; Pili, E.

    2014-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) shares analogous geochemical properties with uranium. Mo ispresent as a minor or a trace element in uranium ores under two main oxidation states: +IVand +VI. Mo has seven stable isotopes (92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 and 100). In natural systems,Mo and Mo isotopes were shown to fractionate during redox reactions. Because Morepresents an impurity difficult to separate in the nuclear fuel cycle, it has the potential to beused as an indicator of the origins of uranium concentrates, in the framework of nuclearforensics. This work focuses on developing an enhanced separation method for Mo from auranium-rich matrix (uranium ore, uranium concentrate) in order to analyze the massfractionation induced by processes typical of the nuclear fuel cycle. Purification of Mo forisotope ratio measurements is performed with a three-step separation on ion-exchange resins,with yields between 45 and 82%. Matrix and isobaric interferences (Zr, Ru) were reduced ingeological and uranium standards, such as U/Mo ≤ 2*10-4, Zr/Mo ≤ 1*10-3, Ru/Mo ≤ 6*10-4and Fe/Mo ≤ 4*10-3. Mo isotopic compositions were measured on a Neptune Plus MC-ICPMSequipped with Jet cones, for a concentration of 30 ng/ml. The achieved sensitivity is~1200-1800 V/ppm with interferences below 10 mV and an overall reproducibility of 0.02 ‰on the δ98Mo values. A double spike, with 97Mo and 100Mo, was added to the samples beforethe purification. It allows for correction of the chemical and instrumental mass fractionations,without requiring a quantitative yield. For igneous rocks, δ98Mo values range between -0.55and -0.03 ‰, relative to the NIST-SRM 3134 molybdenum standard. Fractionation amonguranium ore concentrates is higher, with δ98Mo ranging between 0.02 and -2.84 ‰.

  17. SEPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE FROM ORGANIC FLUORO COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Libby, W.F.

    1958-10-01

    A method is presented for removing perfiuoroorganic compounds such as C/ sub 7/F/sub 16/ from UF/sub 6/. The physical and chemical properties of the perfluoro compounds are such as to render their removal from UF/sub 6/ difficulty by conventional techniques. The mixture containing UF/sub 6/ and the perfluoro compounds is pyrolyzed in an inert container at high temperature and pressure. The properties of the products obtained by pyrolysis differ from the properties of UF/sub 6/ to a sufficient degree to render their separation possible by ordinary methods.

  18. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.

    1962-05-15

    A process is given for separating fission products from uranium by extracting the former into molten aluminum. Phase isolation can be accomplished by selectively hydriding the uranium at between 200 and 300 deg C and separating the hydride powder from coarse particles of fissionproduct-containing aluminum. (AEC)

  19. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  20. Dissolution of metal oxides and separation of uranium from lanthanides and actinides in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Quach, D.L.; Wai, C.M.; Mincher, B.J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO{sub 2} and counter current stripping columns is presented. (authors)

  1. Uranium and thorium sequential separation from norm samples by using a SIA system.

    PubMed

    Mola, M; Nieto, A; Peñalver, A; Borrull, F; Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a sequential radiochemical separation method for uranium and thorium isotopes using a novel Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) system with an extraction chromatographic resin (UTEVA). After the separation, uranium and thorium isotopes have been quantified by using alpha-particle spectrometry. The developed method has been tested by analyzing an intercomparison sample (phosphogypsum sample) from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with better recoveries for uranium and thorium than the obtained by using a classical method (93% for uranium using the new methodology and 82% with the classical method, and in the case of thorium the recoveries were 70% for the semi-automated method and 60% for the classical strategy). Afterwards, the method was successfully applied to different Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) samples, in particular sludge samples taken from a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and also sediment samples taken from an area of influence of the dicalcium phosphate (DCP) factory located close to the Ebro river reservoir in Flix (Catalonia). The obtained results have also been compared with the obtained by the classical method and from that comparison it has been demonstrated that the presented strategy is a good alternative to existing methods offering some advantages as minimization of sample handling, reduction of solvents volume and also an important reduction of the time per analysis. PMID:24172603

  2. Sample selection and testing of separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Phase partitioning, which has become an important tool for the separation and purification of biological materials, was studied. Instruments available for this technique were researched and a countercurrent distribution apparatus, the Biosheff MK2N, was purchased. Various proteins, polysaccharides and cells were studied as models to determine operating procedures and conditions for this piece of equipment. Results were compared with those obtained from other similar equipment, including a nonsynchronous coil planet centrifuge device. Additionally, work was done with affinity ligands attached to PEG, which can further enhance the separation capabilities of phase partitioning.

  3. Separation of Molybdenum-Uranium by a Process Combining Ion Exchange Resin and Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, A.; Setti, L.; Djennane, A.; Melikchi, R.

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the electrodeionization with ion-exchange resin is suitable for removing uranium from a solution containing molybdenum. A hybrid process combining ion exchange (resins and membranes) using electric current. For this electroextraction process, the cation exchange resin is introduced into an electrodialysis cell and compressed between two cations exchange membranes. We have investigated a continuous electroextraction process. As important result we note that: The factor of selectivity,r, for molybdenum versus uranium is superior to 3; the concentration in radio active element (U3O8) is lower than 1.5 mg L-1 and small cell voltage is observed.

  4. THE EFFECT OF BURNUP AND SEPARATION EFFICIENCY ON URANIUM UTILIZATION AND RADIOTOXICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Steven Piet

    2001-11-01

    This paper addresses two fundamental issues of fuel cycle sustainability. The two primary issues of interest are efficient use of the natural uranium resource (cradle), and management of nuclear waste radiotoxicity (grave). Both uranium utilization and radiotoxicity are directly influenced by the burnup achieved during irradiation (transmutation related) and where applicable the separation efficiency (partitioning related). Burnup influences the in-growth of transuranics by breeding them into the fuel cycle. Transuranic breeding is virtually essential to resource sustainability because it increases utilization of naturally abundant fertile U-238. However, the direct consequence of this build-up is the in-growth of transuranic isotopes which generally increase the source of future geologically committed radiotoxicity. For scenarios involving recycle, separation efficiency influences the degree to which this transuranic source term is removed from active service in the fuel stream and made a disposal legacy of human activity.

  5. THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE

    DOEpatents

    Jury, S.H.

    1964-03-17

    A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

  6. Zeolite shape selectivity in the uptake of uranium from solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, C.W.; Szostak, R.; Cleare, K.

    1996-12-31

    Various synthetic zeolites (KL, LZY, 13X, and mordenite), as well as a natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) were evaluated for the uptake of uranium from solution. Mordenite, LZY and KL were most effective for uranium uptake. The relative effectiveness of the zeolites was a function of their pore dimensions, chemical compositions and cation concentration. Mordenite showed superior performance to a clay-soil for uranium uptake. With time, initially sorbed uranium later re-dissolve from the clay, but remained anchored in the matrix of the zeolite. Mordenite therefore demonstrated potential for use as an in situ trap for preventing uranium migration in soils.

  7. Analysis of civilian processing programs in reduction of excess separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation is to explore alternatives and strategies aimed at the gradual reduction of the excess inventories of separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium (HEU) in the civilian nuclear power industry. The study attempts to establish a technical and economic basis to assist in the formation of alternative approaches consistent with nonproliferation and safeguards concerns. The analysis addresses several options in reducing the excess separated plutonium and HEU, and the consequences on nonproliferation and safeguards policy assessments resulting from the interacting synergistic effects between fuel cycle processes and isotopic signatures of nuclear materials.

  8. Isotope separation by selective photodissociation of glyoxal

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1976-01-01

    Dissociation products, mainly formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, enriched in a desired isotope of carbon, oxygen, or hydrogen are obtained by the selective photodissociation of glyoxal wherein glyoxal is subjected to electromagnetic radiation of a predetermined wavelength such that photon absorption excites and induces dissociation of only those molecules of glyoxal containing the desired isotope.

  9. Development of non-denaturing off-gel isoelectric focusing for the separation of uranium-protein complexes in fish.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Guillaume; Frelon, Sandrine; Simon, Olivier; Lobinski, Ryszard; Mounicou, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    An off-gel non-denaturing isoelectric focusing (IEF) method was developed to separate uranium-biomolecule complexes from biological samples as a first step in a multidimensional metalloproteomic approach. Analysis of a synthetic uranium-bovine serum albumin complex demonstrated the focusing ability of the liquid-phase IEF method and the preservation of most of the uranium-protein interactions. The developed method was applied to gill cytosol prepared from zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to depleted uranium. The results were compared in terms of resolution, recovery, and protein identities with those obtained by in-gel IEF using an immobilized pH gradient gel strip. PMID:24691723

  10. Validation of Electrochemically Modulated Separations Performed On-Line with MC-ICP-MS for Uranium and Plutonium Isotopic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Liezers, Martin; Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2010-08-11

    The most time consuming process in uranium or plutonium isotopic analyses is performing the requisite chromatographic separation of the actinides. Filament preparation for thermal ionization (TIMS) adds further delays, but is generally accepted due to the unmatched performance in trace isotopic analyses. Advances in Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) are beginning to rival the performance of TIMS. Methods, such as Electrochemically Modulated Separations (EMS) can efficiently pre-concentrate U or Pu quite selectively from small solution volumes in a matrix of 0.5 M nitric acid. When performed in-line with ICP-MS, the rapid analyte release from the electrode is fast, and large transient analyte signal enhancements of >100 fold can be achieved as compared to more conventional continuous nebulization of the original starting solution. This makes the approach ideal for very low level isotope ratio measurements. In this paper, some aspects of EMS performance are described. These include low level Pu isotope ratio behavior versus concentration by MC-ICP-MS and uranium rejection characteristics that are also important for reliable low level Pu isotope ratio determinations.

  11. Direct Separation of Molybdenum from Solid Uranium Matrices Employing Pyrohydrolysis, a Green Separation Method, and Its Determination by Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vivekchandra G; Thakur, Uday K; Shah, Dipti J; Gupta, Neeraj K; Jeyakumar, Subbiah; Tomar, Bhupendra S; Ramakumar, Karanam L

    2015-11-01

    Pyrohydrolysis is a well-established separation method, and it is being used as a sample preparation method for several materials for further determination of non-metals such as halogens, boron, and sulfur. Analytes are retained in a diluted solution that is suitable for carrying out analysis by several determination techniques and minimizing the use of concentrated reagents. Pyrohydrolysis separation of metals has not been reported yet. The present study demonstrates the pyrohydrolysis separation of Mo as MoO4(2-) from uranium materials and its subsequent determination using ion chromatography coupled with suppressed conductivity detector. With use of TGA and XRD the volatilization behavior of Mo was studied. Important parameters for the pyrohydrolysis method required for the quantitative separation of Mo were evaluated. The precision of the method was better than 5% at 25 ppm of Mo. The accuracy was evaluated by analysis of a CRM (U3O8-ILCE-IV). The method was applied to determine Mo in ammonium diuranate samples, where the conventional methods suffer from the loss of Mo. PMID:26465172

  12. METHOD FOR SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Blaedel, W.J.; Walling, M.T. Jr.

    1960-08-23

    A process is given for separating from each other uranium, plutonium, and fission products in an aqueous nitric acid solution by the so-called Redox process. The plutonium is first oxidized to the hexavalent state, e.g., with a water-soluble dichromate or sodium bismuthate, preferably together with a holding oxidant such as potassium bromate. potassium permanganate, or an excess of the oxidizing agent. The solution is then contacted with a water-immiscible organic solvent, preferably hexone. whereby uranium and plutonium are extracted while the fission products remain in the aqueous solution. The separated organic phase is then contacted with an aqueous solution of a reducing agent, with or without a holding reductant (e.g., with a ferrous salt plus hydrazine or with ferrous sulfamate), whereby plutonium is reduced to the trivalent state and back- extracted into the aqueous solution. The uranium may finally be back-extracted from the organic solvent (e.g., with a 0.1 N nitric acid).

  13. Extraction of uranium from soil using selective chelators with secondary concentration using water soluble polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, B.L.; Ehler, D.S.; Sauer, N.N.

    1997-12-31

    Studies have investigated the extraction and recovery of uranium from contaminated soil containing both sorbed and metallic uranium. Our goal was to selectively bind and recover uranium from this soil and minimize secondary waste generation. Our approach was to determine optimal chelators for uranium extraction using contaminated soil taken from an area at LANL where open air testing of explosives containing depleted uranium was conducted. Uranium concentrations range in the soil from 1000-5000ppm. We have found that equimolar carbonate/bicarbonate solution in conjunction with an oxidant, sodium hypochlorite, is an excellent extractant for uranium from this soil, removing 90+% of the uranium. Our present focus is on the recovery and concentration of uranium from the extractant solution using a large water soluble polymer (>10,000 MW) as a secondary chelator for complexing the extracted uranium:carbonate complex. Using ultrafiltration, the volume of waste can be reduced 100+ fold. These commercially available polymers can then be regenerated and re-used. Using this approach, we are able to recover 90+% of the uranium in a minimal volume.

  14. Engineering High-Fidelity Residue Separations for Selective Harvest

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; Reed L. Hoskinson; J. Rochard Hess; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2006-07-01

    Composition and pretreatment studies of corn stover and wheat stover anatomical fractions clearly show that some corn and wheat stover anatomical fractions are of higher value than others as a biofeedstock. This premise, along with soil sustainability and erosion control concerns, provides the motivation for the selective harvest concept for separating and collecting the higher value residue fractions in a combine during grain harvest. This study recognizes the analysis of anatomical fractions as theoretical feedstock quality targets, but not as practical targets for developing selective harvest technologies. Rather, practical quality targets were established that identified the residue separation requirements of a selective harvest combine. Data are presented that shows that a current grain combine is not capable of achieving the fidelity of residue fractionation established by the performance targets. However, using a virtual engineering approach, based on an understanding of the fluid dynamics of the air stream separation, the separation fidelity can be significantly improved without significant changes to the harvester design. A virtual engineering model of a grain combine was developed and used to perform simulations of the residue separator performance. The engineered residue separator was then built into a selective harvest test combine, and tests performed to evaluate the separation fidelity. Field tests were run both with and without the residue separator installed in the test combine, and the chaff and straw residue streams were collected during harvest of Challis soft white spring wheat. The separation fidelity accomplished both with and without the residue separator was quantified by laboratory screening analysis. The screening results showed that the engineered baffle separator did a remarkable job of effecting high-fidelity separation of the straw and chaff residue streams, improving the chaff stream purity and increasing the straw stream yield.

  15. Methods for selective functionalization and separation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Marek, legal representative, Irene Marie (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  16. Studies on stannic selenoarsenate. II. Separation of uranium from numerous metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, S.A.; Siddiqi, Z.M.; Rao, R.A.K.

    1982-12-01

    Stannic selenoarsenate has been synthesized by adding 0.05 M sodium selenite and 0.05 M sodium arsenate to a 0.05 M solution of stannic chloride in a volume ratio of 1:1:1 at pH 1. A tentative structure has been proposed on the basis of chemical composition, pH titrations, and infrared and thermogravimetric analyses. Distribution coefficients of several metal ions have been studied in hydrochloric acid, citric acid, ammonium citrate-citric acid, and water-dioxane systems. The unusual adsorption behavior or uranium has been utilized for its quantitative separation from several metal ions.

  17. Innovative lasers for uranium isotope separation. Final report, September 1, 1989--April 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1993-07-01

    Copper vapor laser have important applications to uranium atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). We have investigated two innovative methods of exciting/pumping copper vapor lasers which have the potential to improve the efficiency and scaling of large laser systems used in uranium isotope separation. Experimental research has focused on the laser discharge kinetics of (1) microwave, and (2) electron beam excitation/pumping of large-volume copper vapor lasers. Microwave resonant cavity produced copper vapor plasmas at 2.45 GHz, have been investigated in three separate experimental configurations. The first examined the application of CW (0-500W) power and was found to be an excellent method for producing an atomic copper vapor from copper chloride. The second used a pulsed (5kW, 0.5--5 kHz) signal superimposed on the CW signal to attempt to produce vaporization, dissociation and excitation to the laser states. Enhanced emission of the optical radiation was observed but power densities were found to be too low to achieve lasing. In a third experiment we attempted to increase the applied power by using a high power magnetron to produce 100 kW of pulsed power. Unfortunately, difficulties with the magnetron power supply were encountered leaving inconclusive results. Detailed modeling of the electromagnetics of the system were found to match the diagnostics results well. An electron beam pumped copper vapor system (350 kV, 1.0 kA, 300 ns) was investigated in three separate copper chloride heating systems, external chamber, externally heated chamber and an internally heated chamber. Since atomic copper spectral lines were not observed, it is assumed that a single pulse accelerator is not capable of both dissociating the copper chloride and exciting atomic copper and a repetitively pulsed electron beam generator is needed.

  18. New chromatographic materials for the separation and concentration of uranium from environmental matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Chiarizia, R.; Diamond, H.

    1991-01-01

    Extraction chromatography, in which an inert support is impregnated with an extractant solution to form a chromatographic resin, combines the specificity of extraction with the ease of operation of an ion exchange column, thereby overcoming the principal drawbacks of the two methods when used alone. Previous work in this laboratory on the design of selective extractants for use in nuclear fuel reprocessing and in nuclear waste treatment has led to the development of several new phosphorus-based neutral organic extractants. In this report, we examine the use of two of these materials as stationary phases in extraction chromatography for the isolation of uranium from environmental samples. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Optimized Chemical Separation and Measurement by TE TIMS Using Carburized Filaments for Uranium Isotope Ratio Measurements Applied to Plutonium Chronometry.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Monika; Richter, Stephan; Aregbe, Yetunde; Wellum, Roger; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    An optimized method is described for U/Pu separation and subsequent measurement of the amount contents of uranium isotopes by total evaporation (TE) TIMS with a double filament setup combined with filament carburization for age determination of plutonium samples. The use of carburized filaments improved the signal behavior for total evaporation TIMS measurements of uranium. Elevated uranium ion formation by passive heating during rhenium signal optimization at the start of the total evaporation measurement procedure was found to be a result from byproducts of the separation procedure deposited on the filament. This was avoided using carburized filaments. Hence, loss of sample before the actual TE data acquisition was prevented, and automated measurement sequences could be accomplished. Furthermore, separation of residual plutonium in the separated uranium fraction was achieved directly on the filament by use of the carburized filaments. Although the analytical approach was originally tailored to achieve reliable results only for the (238)Pu/(234)U, (239)Pu/(235)U, and (240)Pu/(236)U chronometers, the optimization of the procedure additionally allowed the use of the (242)Pu/(238)U isotope amount ratio as a highly sensitive indicator for residual uranium present in the sample, which is not of radiogenic origin. The sample preparation method described in this article has been successfully applied for the age determination of CRM NBS 947 and other sulfate and oxide plutonium samples. PMID:27240571

  20. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  1. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  2. Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.; Hayden, Jr., Howard W.

    1995-01-01

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

  3. Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

    1995-05-30

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

  4. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  5. EXTRACTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING URANIUM, PLUTONIUM, AND FISSION PRODUCTS FROM COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING SAME

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1957-10-29

    Methods for separating plutonium from the fission products present in masses of neutron irradiated uranium are reported. The neutron irradiated uranium is first dissolved in an aqueous solution of nitric acid. The plutonium in this solution is present as plutonous nitrate. The aqueous solution is then agitated with an organic solvent, which is not miscible with water, such as diethyl ether. The ether extracts 90% of the uraryl nitrate leaving, substantially all of the plutonium in the aqueous phase. The aqueous solution of plutonous nitrate is then oxidized to the hexavalent state, and agitated with diethyl ether again. In the ether phase there is then obtained 90% of plutonium as a solution of plutonyl nitrate. The ether solution of plutonyl nitrate is then agitated with water containing a reducing agent such as sulfur dioxide, and the plutonium dissolves in the water and is reduced to the plutonous state. The uranyl nitrate remains in the ether. The plutonous nitrate in the water may be recovered by precipitation.

  6. Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

    2014-03-11

    This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring ofmore » clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.« less

  7. Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

    2014-03-11

    This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring of clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.

  8. Sequential separation of lanthanides, thorium and uranium using novel solid phase extraction method from high acidic nuclear wastes.

    PubMed

    Kesava Raju, Ch Siva; Subramanian, M S

    2007-06-25

    A novel grafted polymer for selective extraction and sequential separation of lanthanides, thorium and uranium from high acidic wastes has been developed by grafting Merrifield chloromethylated (MCM) resin with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO) (MCM-CMPO). The grafting process is well characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy, (31)P and (13)C CPMAS (cross-polarized magic angle spin) NMR spectroscopy and CHNPS elemental analysis. The influence of various physico-chemical parameters during metal ion extraction by the resin phase are studied and optimized by both static and dynamic methods. The resin shows very high sorption capacity values of 0.960mmolg(-1) for U(VI), 0.984mmolg(-1) for Th(IV), 0.488mmolg(-1) for La(III) and 0.502mmolg(-1) for Nd(III) under optimum HNO(3) medium, respectively. The grafted polymer shows faster rate exchange kinetics (<5min is sufficient for 50% extraction) and greater preconcentration ability, with reusability exceeding 20 cycles. During desorption process, sequential separation of the analytes is possible with varying eluting agents. The developed grafted resin has been successfully applied in extracting Th(IV) from high matrix monazite sand, U(VI) and Th(IV) from simulated nuclear spent fuel mixtures. All the analytical data is based on triplicate analysis and measurements are within 3.5% rsd reflecting the reproducibility and reliability of the developed method. PMID:17178189

  9. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, D.

    1958-04-15

    A process of recovering uranium from very low-grade ore residues is described. These low-grade uraniumcontaining hydroxide precipitates, which also contain hydrated silica and iron and aluminum hydroxides, are subjected to multiple leachings with aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate at a pH of at least 9. This leaching serves to selectively extract the uranium from the precipitate, but to leave the greater part of the silica, iron, and aluminum with the residue. The uranium is then separated from the leach liquor by the addition of an acid in sufficient amount to destroy the carbonate followed by the addition of ammonia to precipitate uranium as ammonium diuranate.

  10. Determination of uranium and rare-earth metals separation coefficients in LiCl KCl melt by electrochemical transient techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Hayashi, H.; Minato, K.; Gaune-Escard, M.

    2005-09-01

    The main step in the pyrometallurgical process of spent nuclear fuel recycling is a molten salt electrorefining. The knowledge of separation coefficients of actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) and rare-earth metals (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) is very important for this step. Usually the separation coefficients are evaluated from the formal standard potentials of metals in melts containing their own ions, values obtained by potentiometric method. Electrochemical experiments were carried out at 723-823 K in order to estimate separation coefficients in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing uranium and lanthanum trichlorides. It was shown that for the calculation of uranium and lanthanum separation coefficients it is necessary to determine the voltammetric peak potentials of U(III) and La(III), their concentration in the melt and the kinetic parameters relating to U(III) discharge such as transfer and diffusion coefficients, and standard rate constants of charge transfer.

  11. Separation of simple sugars by selectivity inverted parametric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, P.; Costa, C.A.V.

    1998-12-01

    An alternative process to separate the isomeric mixture of fructose and glucose is presented. A laboratory study of a two-column, selectivity inverted, direct-mode parametric pump is reported. An anionic resin in carbonate form and a cationic resin in calcium form are used as adsorbents for the columns. The experimental results show that it is possible to simultaneously obtain separation and concentration with this system. A kinetic model assuming linear equilibrium, intraparticle pore diffusion, and axial dispersion is proposed and solved. The model solutions are compared with experimental results, and the comparisons indicate good prediction capabilities.

  12. Uranium*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenthe, Ingmar; Drożdżyński, Janusz; Fujino, Takeo; Buck, Edgar C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Wolf, Stephen F.

    Uranium compounds have been used as colorants since Roman times (Caley, 1948). Uranium was discovered as a chemical element in a pitchblende specimen by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, who published the results of his work in 1789. Pitchblende is an impure uranium oxide, consisting partly of the most reduced oxide uraninite (UO2) and partly of U3O8. Earlier mineralogists had considered this mineral to be a complex oxide of iron and tungsten or of iron and zinc, but Klaproth showed by dissolving it partially in strong acid that the solutions yielded precipitates that were different from those of known elements. Therefore he concluded that it contained a new element (Mellor, 1932); he named it after the planet Uranus, which had been discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, who named it after the ancient Greek deity of the Heavens.

  13. Biometric approach in selecting plants for phytoaccumulation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Mirjana; Pezo, Lato; Lačnjevac, Časlav; Mihajlović, Marija; Petrović, Jelena; Milojković, Jelena; Stanojević, Marija

    2016-01-01

    This paper promotes the biometric classification system of plant cultivars, unique characteristics, in terms of the uranium (U) uptake, primarily in the function of the application for phytoremediation. It is known that the degree of adoption of U depends on the plant species and its morphological and physiological properties, but it is less known what impact have plants cultivars, sorts, and hybrids. Therefore, we investigated the U adoption in four cultivars of three plant species (corn, sunflower and soy bean). "Vegetation experiments were carried out in a plastic-house filled with soil (0.66 mgU) and with tailing (15.3 mgU kg(-1)) from closed uranium mine Gabrovnica-Kalna southeast of Serbia". Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Cluster Analysis (CA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for assessing the effect of different substrates cultivars, plant species and plant organs (root or shoot) on U uptake. Obtained results showed that a difference in U uptake by three investigated plant species depends not only of the type of substrate types and plant organs but also of their cultivars. Biometrics techniques provide a good opportunity for a better understanding the behavior of plants and obtaining much more useful information from the original data. PMID:26606604

  14. (1) Selective separation and solidification of radioactive nuclides by zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Hitoshi; Sato, Nobuaki; Kirishima, Akira

    Massive tsunami generated by the Great East Japan Earthquake attacked the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused the nuclear accident of level 7 to overturn the safety myth of the nuclear power generation. The domestic worst accident does not yet reach the convergence, and many inhabitants around the power plant are forced to double pains of earthquake disaster and nuclear accident. Large amounts of high-activity-level water over 200,000 tons are accumulated on the basement floor of each turbine building, which is a serious obstacle to take measures for the nuclear accident. For the decontamination of high-activity-level water containing seawater, the inorganic ion-exchangers having high selectivity are effective especially for the selective removal of radioactive Cs. On the other hand, radioactive Cs and I released into the atmosphere from the power plant spread widely around Fukushima prefecture, and the decontamination of rainwater and soil become the urgent problem. At present, passing about four months after nuclear accident, the radioactive nuclides of 137Cs and 134Cs are mainly contained in the high-activity-level water and the selective adsorbents for radioactive Cs play an important part in the decontamination. Since the construction of original decontamination system is an urgent necessity, selective separation methods using inorganic ion-exchangers are greatly expected. From the viewpoint of cost efficiency and high Cs-selectivity, natural zeolites are effective for the decontamination of radioactive Cs. This special issue deals with the selective separation and solidification of radioactive Cs and Sr using zeolites.

  15. The synthesis, characterization and application of iron oxide nanocrystals in magnetic separations for arsenic and uranium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, John Thomas

    Arsenic and uranium in the environment are hazardous to human health and require better methods for detection and remediation. Nanocrystalline iron oxides offer a number of advantages as sorbents for water purification and environmental remediation. First, highly uniform and crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (nMAG) were prepared using thermal decomposition of iron salts in organic solutions; for the applications of interest in this thesis, a central challenge was the adaptation of these conventional synthetic methods to the needs of low infrastructure and economically disadvantaged settings. We show here that it is possible to form highly uniform and magnetically responsive nanomaterials using starting reagents and equipment that are readily available and economical. The products of this approach, termed the 'Kitchen Synthesis', are of comparable quality and effectiveness to laboratory materials. The narrow size distributions of the iron oxides produced in the laboratory synthesis made it possible to study the size-dependence of the magnetic separation efficiency of nanocrystals; generally as the diameter of particles increased they could be removed under lower applied magnetic fields. In this work we take advantage of this size-dependence to use magnetic separation as a tool to separate broadly distributed populations of magnetic materials. Such work makes it possible to use these materials in multiplexed separation and sensing schemes. With the synthesis and magnetic separation studies of these materials completed, it was possible to optimize their applications in water purification and environmental remediation. These materials removed both uranium and arsenic from contaminated samples, and had remarkably high sorption capacities --- up to 12 wt% for arsenic and 30 wt% for uranium. The contaminated nMAG is removed from the drinking water by either retention in a sand column, filter, or by magnetic separation. The uranium adsorption process was also utilized

  16. How Many Separable Sources? Model Selection In Independent Components Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Roger P.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Strother, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mixtures consisting solely of non-Gaussian sources, mixtures including two or more Gaussian components cannot be separated using standard independent components analysis methods that are based on higher order statistics and independent observations. The mixed Independent Components Analysis/Principal Components Analysis (mixed ICA/PCA) model described here accommodates one or more Gaussian components in the independent components analysis model and uses principal components analysis to characterize contributions from this inseparable Gaussian subspace. Information theory can then be used to select from among potential model categories with differing numbers of Gaussian components. Based on simulation studies, the assumptions and approximations underlying the Akaike Information Criterion do not hold in this setting, even with a very large number of observations. Cross-validation is a suitable, though computationally intensive alternative for model selection. Application of the algorithm is illustrated using Fisher's iris data set and Howells' craniometric data set. Mixed ICA/PCA is of potential interest in any field of scientific investigation where the authenticity of blindly separated non-Gaussian sources might otherwise be questionable. Failure of the Akaike Information Criterion in model selection also has relevance in traditional independent components analysis where all sources are assumed non-Gaussian. PMID:25811988

  17. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  18. On separation of heavy isotopes by means of selective ICRH

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Kuzmin, S.G.; Volosov, V.I.

    1998-12-31

    The authors present a theoretical study of the isotope separation by means of isotopically selective ion cyclotron resonance plasma heating (ICRH). The special attention is devoted to the separation of gadolinium isotopes. The ions are supposed to pass through the device shown on Fig. 1 where they are heated by the full-turn-loop antenna that excites RF field with azimuthal number m = 0. They calculate the distribution function of ions in a plasma stream at the orifice of the device. A satisfactory separation is achieved for the following values of parameters. The length of heating zone {ell} = 200 cm, initial temperature of plasma stream T{sub {parallel}} = 5 eV, T{sub {perpendicular}} = 60 eV, the plasma radius a = 10 cm, plasma density n = 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, external magnetic field B = 30 kGs. The energy of resonance ions W = 100 {divided_by} 200 eV. The latter value is achieved if a current in the antenna loops is equal to 60A with full number of loops N = 150. With the specified parameters, the current in the plasma stream is equal to 15 {divided_by} 20A. Then the production rate equals to 100 kg of Gd{sup 157} per year. Energy of Gd`s ions after pass through the heating zone vs. their axial velocity.

  19. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2015-04-15

    By means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H{sub 2}>CO{sub 2}≫N{sub 2}>Ar>CH{sub 4}, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. This trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene. - Graphical abstract: Classical molecular dynamics simulations show the flux trend of H{sub 2}>CO{sub 2}≫N{sub 2}>Ar>CH{sub 4} for their permeation through a porous graphene, in excellent agreement with a recent experiment. - Highlights: • Classical MD simulations show the flux trend of H{sub 2}>CO{sub 2}≫N{sub 2}>Ar>CH{sub 4} for their permeation through a porous graphene. • Free energy calculations yield permeation barriers for those gases. • Selectivities for several gas pairs are estimated from the free-energy barriers and the kinetic theory of gases. • The selectivity trend is in excellent agreement with a recent experiment.

  20. Nonproliferation and safeguards aspects of fuel cycle programs in reduction of excess separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation is to explore alternatives and strategies aimed at the gradual reduction of the excess inventories of separated plutonium and high-enriched uranium (HEU) in the civilian nuclear power industry. The study attempts to establish a technical and economic basis to assist in the formation of alternative approaches consistent with nonproliferation and safeguards concerns. Reference annual mass flows and inventories for a representative 1,400 Mwe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel cycle have been investigated for three cases: the 100 percent uranium oxide UO{sub 2} fuel loading once through cycle, and the 33 percent mixed oxide MOX loading configuration for a first and second plutonium recycle. The analysis addresses fuel cycle developments; plutonium and uranium inventory and flow balances; nuclear fuel processing operations; UO{sub 2} once-through and MOX first and second recycles; and the economic incentives to draw-down the excess separated plutonium stores. The preliminary analysis explores several options in reducing the excess separated plutonium arisings and HEU, and the consequences of the interacting synergistic effects between fuel cycle processes and isotopic signatures of nuclear materials on nonproliferation and safeguards policy assessments.

  1. Evaluation of polymer inclusion membranes containing crown ethers for selective cesium separation from nuclear waste solution.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, P K; Lakshmi, D S; Bhattacharyya, A; Manchanda, V K

    2009-09-30

    Transport behaviour of (137)Cs from nitric acid feed was investigated using cellulose triacetate plasticized polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) containing several crown ether carriers viz. di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6), di-benzo-21-crown-7 (DB21C7) and di-tert-butylbenzo-18-crown-6 (DTBB18C6). The PIM was prepared from cellulose triacetate (CTA) with various crown ethers and plasticizers. DTBB18C6 and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) were found to give higher transport rate for (137)Cs as compared to other carriers and plasticizers. Effect of crown ether concentration, nitric acid concentration, plasticizer and CTA concentration on the transport rate of Cs was also studied. The Cs selectivity with respect to various fission products obtained from an irradiated natural uranium target was found to be heavily dependent on the nature of the plasticizer. The present work shows that by choosing a proper plasticizer, one can get either good transport efficiency or selectivity. Though TBP plasticized membranes showed good transport efficiency, it displayed poor selectivities. On the other hand, an entirely opposite separation behaviour was observed with 2-nitrophenyloctylether (NPOE) plasticized membranes suggesting the possible application of the later membranes for the removal of bulk (137)Cs from the nuclear waste. The stability of the membrane was tested by carrying out transport runs for nearly 25 days. PMID:19398153

  2. Feature Subset Selection, Class Separability, and Genetic Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2004-01-21

    The performance of classification algorithms in machine learning is affected by the features used to describe the labeled examples presented to the inducers. Therefore, the problem of feature subset selection has received considerable attention. Genetic approaches to this problem usually follow the wrapper approach: treat the inducer as a black box that is used to evaluate candidate feature subsets. The evaluations might take a considerable time and the traditional approach might be unpractical for large data sets. This paper describes a hybrid of a simple genetic algorithm and a method based on class separability applied to the selection of feature subsets for classification problems. The proposed hybrid was compared against each of its components and two other feature selection wrappers that are used widely. The objective of this paper is to determine if the proposed hybrid presents advantages over the other methods in terms of accuracy or speed in this problem. The experiments used a Naive Bayes classifier and public-domain and artificial data sets. The experiments suggest that the hybrid usually finds compact feature subsets that give the most accurate results, while beating the execution time of the other wrappers.

  3. Use of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate columns for cation exchange separation of metal ions interfering in the spectrophotometric determination of uranium with sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Agrawal, S.; Anwar, S.; Varshney, K.

    1985-01-01

    A simple cation exchange method has been developed for the quantitative separation of uranium from some metal ions which generally interfere in its spectrophotometric determination using sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate as a reagent. The method requires only a single bed operation and enables a satisfactory (Error + or - separation of uranium (UO/sub 2/ (II)) up to 1080 ..mu..g from ten metal ions on a 2 g column of zirconium (IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger in H(I) form.

  4. [Selection of Suitable Microalgal Species for Sorption of Uranium in Radioactive Wastewater Treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Hu, Hong-ying; Yu, Jun-yi; Zhao, Wen-yu

    2016-05-15

    The amount of radioactive wastewater discharge was increasing year by year, with the quick development of nuclear industry. Therefore, the proper treatment and disposal of radioactive wastewater are essentially important for environmental safety and human health. Microalgal biosorption of nuclide has drawn much attention in the area of radioactive wastewater treatment recently, and the selection of a proper microalgal species for uranium biosorption is the basis for the research and application of this technology. The selection principle was set up from the view of practical application, and 11 species of microalgae were prepared for the selection work. Scenedesmus sp. LX1 has the highest biosorption capacity of 40.7 mg · g⁻¹ for uranium; and its biomass production in mBG11 medium (simulating the nitrogen and phosphorus limits in the first-class A discharge standard of pollutants for municipal wastewater treatment plant) was 0.32 g · L⁻¹, which was relatively high among the 11 microalgal species; when grown into stable phase it also showed a good precipitation capability with the precipitation ratio of 45.3%. Above all, in our selection range of the 11 microalgal species, Scenedesmus sp. LX1 could be considered as the suitable species for uranium biosorption in radioactive wastewater treatment. PMID:27506041

  5. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from semiconductor wastewater.

    PubMed

    Warmadewanthi, B; Liu, J C

    2009-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) and phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) are widely used in semiconductor industry for etching and rinsing purposes. Consequently, significant amount of wastewater containing phosphate and fluoride is generated. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from the semiconductor wastewater, containing 936 mg/L of fluoride, 118 mg/L of phosphate, 640 mg/L of sulfate, and 26.7 mg/L of ammonia, was studied. Chemical precipitation and flotation reactions were utilized in the two-stage treatment processes. The first-stage reaction involved the addition of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2)) to induce selective precipitation of magnesium phosphate. The optimal condition was pH 10 and molar ratio, [Mg(2 + )]/[(PO(4) (3-))], of 3:1, and 66.2% of phosphate was removed and recovered as bobierrite (Mg(3)(PO(4))(2).8H(2)O). No reaction was found between MgCl(2) and fluoride. Calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) was used in the second-stage reaction to induce precipitation of calcium fluoride and calcium phosphate. The optimum molar ratio, [Ca(2 + )]/[F(-)], was 0.7 at pH 10, and residual fluoride concentration of 10.7 mg/L and phosphate concentration of lower than 0.5 mg/L was obtained. Thermodynamic equilibrium was modeled with PHREEQC and compared with experimental results. Sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) was an effective collector for subsequent solid-liquid removal via dispersed air flotation (DiAF). The study demonstrated that phosphate can be selectively recovered from the wastewater. Potential benefits include recovery of phosphate for reuse, lower required dosage of calcium for fluoride removal, and less amount of CaF(2) sludge. PMID:19474500

  6. Selective recovery of uranium and thorium ions from dilute aqueous solutions by animal biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Suyama, Kyozo; Arihara, Keizo; Itoh, Makoto

    2002-06-01

    Selective actinide ion recovery from dilute, aqueous, multication waste streams is an important problem. The recovery of uranium (U) and thorium (Th) by various animal biopolymers was examined. Of four species of biopolymers tested, a high uptake of uranium and thorium was found in hen eggshell membrane (ESM) and silk proteins, with the maximum uranium and thorium recovery exceeding 98% and 79%, respectively. The uptake of U and Th was significantly affected by the pH of the solution. The optimum pH values were 6 and 3 for the uptake of U and Th, respectively. The effect of temperature differed with the metal. The uptake of U decreased with increasing temperature (30-50 degrees C), whereas the Th uptake increased with increasing temperature. Selective recovery of U and Th from dilute aqueous binary and multimetal solutions was also examined. ESM and silk proteins tested were effective and selective for removing each metal by controlling the pH and temperature of the solution. In multimetal systems, the order of sorption of ESM proteins was preferential: U > Cu > Cd > Mn > Pb > Th > Ni > Co > Zn at pH 6 and Th > U > Cu > Pb > Cd > Mn > Co > Ni = Zn at pH 3. These biopolymers appear to have potential for use in a commercial process for actinide recovery from actinide-containing wastewater. PMID:12019520

  7. A catalytic beacon sensor for uranium with parts-per-trillion sensitivity and millionfold selectivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juewen; Brown, Andrea K; Meng, Xiangli; Cropek, Donald M; Istok, Jonathan D; Watson, David B; Lu, Yi

    2007-02-13

    Here, we report a catalytic beacon sensor for uranyl (UO2(2+)) based on an in vitro-selected UO2(2+)-specific DNAzyme. The sensor consists of a DNA enzyme strand with a 3' quencher and a DNA substrate with a ribonucleotide adenosine (rA) in the middle and a fluorophore and a quencher at the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. The presence of UO2(2+) causes catalytic cleavage of the DNA substrate strand at the rA position and release of the fluorophore and thus dramatic increase of fluorescence intensity. The sensor has a detection limit of 11 parts per trillion (45 pM), a dynamic range up to 400 nM, and selectivity of >1-million-fold over other metal ions. The most interfering metal ion, Th(IV), interacts with the fluorescein fluorophore, causing slightly enhanced fluorescence intensity, with an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 230 microM. This sensor rivals the most sensitive analytical instruments for uranium detection, and its application in detecting uranium in contaminated soil samples is also demonstrated. This work shows that simple, cost-effective, and portable metal sensors can be obtained with similar sensitivity and selectivity as much more expensive and sophisticated analytical instruments. Such a sensor will play an important role in environmental remediation of radionuclides such as uranium. PMID:17284609

  8. A Catalytic Beacon Sensor for Uranium with Parts-per-Trillion Sensitivity and Millionfold Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Juewen; Brown, Andrea K.; Meng, Xiangli; Cropek, Donald M.; IstokD., Jonathan; Watson, David B; Liu, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Here, we report a catalytic beacon sensor for uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) based on an in vitro-selected UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-specific DNAzyme. The sensor consists of a DNA enzyme strand with a 3' quencher and a DNA substrate with a ribonucleotide adenosine (rA) in the middle and a fluorophore and a quencher at the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. The presence of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} causes catalytic cleavage of the DNA substrate strand at the rA position and release of the fluorophore and thus dramatic increase of fluorescence intensity. The sensor has a detection limit of 11 parts per trillion (45 pM), a dynamic range up to 400 nM, and selectivity of >1-million-fold over other metal ions. The most interfering metal ion, Th(IV), interacts with the fluorescein fluorophore, causing slightly enhanced fluorescence intensity, with an apparent dissociation constant of {approx}230 {micro}M. This sensor rivals the most sensitive analytical instruments for uranium detection, and its application in detecting uranium in contaminated soil samples is also demonstrated. This work shows that simple, cost-effective, and portable metal sensors can be obtained with similar sensitivity and selectivity as much more expensive and sophisticated analytical instruments. Such a sensor will play an important role in environmental remediation of radionuclides such as uranium.

  9. Removal of toxic substances by a selective membrane plasma separator.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Hajime; Hattori, Tomoko; Igarashi, Toshiko; Okuyama, Manabu; Tajimi, Kimitaka

    2014-06-01

    We devised a method of plasma exchange with dialysis (PED), in which selective plasma exchange (sPE) is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator (EC-2A) with an albumin-sieving coefficient of 0.3 while the dialysate flows outside the hollow fibers, and reported the usefulness of the system for treating acute liver failure. Thereafter, EC-4A with an albumin-sieving coefficient of 0.6 was developed, which was expected to be even more effective for removing protein-bound substances. In order to examine whether or not EC-4A might be applicable to blood purification therapy against drug poisoning, we compared the efficacies of sPE, PED, and direct hemoperfusion (DHP) using an activated carbon column for the removal of phenobarbital and lithium. Subjects undergoing the extracorporeal circulation study were assigned to the sPE group, PED group, or DHP group, and the changes in the blood concentrations of phenobarbital and lithium were measured over 180 min. A significant decrease of the phenobarbital concentration over time was seen in the PED group, as compared to that in the sPE group (P < 0.0001), while no significant difference in the concentration was observed between the PED and DHP groups. The PED group showed a significant decrease of the lithium concentration over time, as compared to the DHP group (P < 0.0001), while no significant difference in the concentration was observed between the PED and sPE groups. Thus, PED was as effective as DHP for removing phenobarbital and was as effective as sPE for removing lithium. These results suggest that PED therapy using EC-4A may be a feasible modality for the treatment of drug poisoning. PMID:24965293

  10. Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

    2012-08-22

    This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

  11. Selected Hanford reactor and separations operating data for 1960--1964. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this letter report is to reconstruct from available information that data which can be used to develop daily reactor operating history for 1960--1964. The information needed for source team calculations (as determined by the Source Terms Task Leader) were extracted and included in this report. The data on the amount of uranium dissolved by the separations plants (expressed both as tons and as MW) is also included in this compilation.

  12. Selected Hanford reactor and separations operating data for 1960--1964

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this letter report is to reconstruct from available information that data which can be used to develop daily reactor operating history for 1960--1964. The information needed for source team calculations (as determined by the Source Terms Task Leader) were extracted and included in this report. The data on the amount of uranium dissolved by the separations plants (expressed both as tons and as MW) is also included in this compilation.

  13. "Stereoscopic" 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based covalent organic framework: Design, synthesis and selective sorption towards uranium at high acidic condition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhao, Xiaosheng; Li, Bo; Bai, Chiyao; Li, Yang; Wang, Lei; Wen, Rui; Zhang, Meicheng; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian

    2016-08-15

    So far, only five primary elements (C, H, O, N and B) and two types of spatial configuration (C2-C4, C6 and Td) are reported to build the monomers for synthesis of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which have partially limited the route selection for accessing COFs with new topological structure and novel properties. Here, we reported the design and synthesis of a new "stereoscopic" 2D super-microporous phosphazene-based covalent organic framework (MPCOF) by using hexachorocyclotriphosphazene (a P-containing monomer in a C3-like spatial configuration) and p-phenylenediamine (a linker). The as-synthesized MPCOF shows high crystallinity, relatively high heat and acid stability and distinctive super-microporous structure with narrow pore-size distributions ranging from 1.0-2.1nm. The results of batch sorption experiments with a multi-ion solution containing 12 co-existing cations show that in the pH range of 1-2.5, MPCOF exhibits excellent separation efficiency for uranium with adsorption capacity more than 71mg/g and selectivity up to record-breaking 92%, and furthermore, an unreported sorption capacity (>50mg/g) and selectivity (>60%) were obtained under strong acidic condition (1M HNO3). Studies on sorption mechanism indicate that the uranium separation by MPCOF in acidic solution is realized mainly through both intra-particle diffusion and size-sieving effect. PMID:27107239

  14. Treatability studies for uranium and plutonium contaminated soils using physical separation methods. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1992-07-01

    The Nevada Field Office of the Department of Energy (DOE/NV) has stated in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) Site Specific Plan for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that DOE/NV is committed to achieving compliance with all applicable environmental laws, regulations, guidelines, and agreements covering operations at the NTS. The primary DOE/NV objective identified by the Site-Specific Plan is to comply with all laws and regulations aimed at protecting human health and the environment. These include Nevada statutes and regulations which may be applicable, including federally delegated authorities. This environmental assessment discusses limited bench-scale soil treatability testing of physical processes for decontamination of plutonium- and uranium-contaminated soil. The proposed location of these studies would be the Treatability Testing Facility (TTF), Building 3124 at Test Cell ``All in Area 25 of the NTS.

  15. Dynamic graphene filters for selective gas-water-oil separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Seo, Keumyoung; Kwon, Cho-Ah; Park, Ju Hyun; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ju, Sanghyun

    2015-09-01

    Selective filtration of gas, water, and liquid or gaseous oil is essential to prevent possible environmental pollution and machine/facility malfunction in oil-based industries. Novel materials and structures able to selectively and efficiently filter liquid and vapor in various types of solutions are therefore in continuous demand. Here, we investigate selective gas-water-oil filtration using three-dimensional graphene structures. The proposed approach is based on the adjustable wettability of three-dimensional graphene foams. Three such structures are developed in this study; the first allows gas, oil, and water to pass, the second blocks water only, and the third is exclusively permeable to gas. In addition, the ability of three-dimensional graphene structures with a self-assembled monolayer to selectively filter oil is demonstrated. This methodology has numerous potential practical applications as gas, water, and/or oil filtration is an essential component of many industries.

  16. Dynamic graphene filters for selective gas-water-oil separation

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Jihye; Lim, Taekyung; Seo, Keumyoung; Kwon, Cho-Ah; Park, Ju Hyun; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ju, Sanghyun

    2015-01-01

    Selective filtration of gas, water, and liquid or gaseous oil is essential to prevent possible environmental pollution and machine/facility malfunction in oil-based industries. Novel materials and structures able to selectively and efficiently filter liquid and vapor in various types of solutions are therefore in continuous demand. Here, we investigate selective gas-water-oil filtration using three-dimensional graphene structures. The proposed approach is based on the adjustable wettability of three-dimensional graphene foams. Three such structures are developed in this study; the first allows gas, oil, and water to pass, the second blocks water only, and the third is exclusively permeable to gas. In addition, the ability of three-dimensional graphene structures with a self-assembled monolayer to selectively filter oil is demonstrated. This methodology has numerous potential practical applications as gas, water, and/or oil filtration is an essential component of many industries. PMID:26394930

  17. Innovative lasers for uranium isotope separation. Progress report for the period September 1, 1989--May 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brake, M.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1990-06-01

    Copper vapor lasers have important applications to uranium atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). The authors have spent the first year of the project investigating two innovative methods of exciting/pumping copper vapor lasers which have the potential to improve the efficiency and scaling of large laser systems used in uranium isotope separation. Experimental research has focused on the laser discharge kinetics of (1) microwave and (2) electron beam excitation/pumping of large-volume copper vapor lasers. During the first year, the experiments have been designed and constructed and initial data has been taken. Highlights of some of the first year results as well as plans for the future include the following: Microwave resonant cavity produced copper vapor plasmas at 2.45 GHz, both pulsed (5 kW, 5kHz) and CW (0--500 Watts) have been investigated using heated copper chloride as the copper source. The visible emitted light has been observed and intense lines at 510.6 nm and 578.2 nm have been observed. Initial measurements of the electric field strengths have been taken with probes, the plasma volume has been measured with optical techniques, and the power has been measured with power meters. A self-consistent electromagnetic model of the cavity/plasma system which uses the above data as input shows that the copper plasma has skin depths around 100 cm, densities around 10{sup 12} {number_sign}/cc, collisional frequencies around 10{sup 11}/sec., conductivities around 0.15 (Ohm-meter){sup {minus}1}. A simple model of the heat transfer predicts temperatures of {approximately}900 K. All of these parameters indicate that microwave discharges may be well suited as a pump source for copper lasers. These preliminary studies will be continued during the second year with additional diagnostics added to the system to verify the model results. Chemical kinetics of the system will also be added to the model.

  18. Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits. A selected, annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, P.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Daniel, E.W.

    1980-06-01

    A bibliography of 479 references encompassing the fields of uranium and thorium geochemistry and mineralogy, geology of uranium deposits, uranium mining, and uranium exploration techniques has been compiled by the Ecological Sciences Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The bibliography was produced for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, which is funded by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. The references contained in the bibliography have been divided into the following eight subject categories: (1) geology of deposits, (2) geochemistry, (3) genesis O deposits, (4) exploration, (5) mineralogy, (6) uranium industry, (7) reserves and resources, and (8) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas. All categories specifically refer to uranium and thorium; the last category contains basic geologic information concerning areas which the Grand Junction Office feels are particularly favorable for uranium deposition. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

  19. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2014-01-29

    We demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations,. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H2>CO2>>N2>Ar>CH4, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. Moreover, this trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO2/N2 mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene.

  20. Selectivity trend of gas separation through nanoporous graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hongjun; Chen, Zhongfang; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2014-01-29

    We demonstrate that porous graphene can efficiently separate gases according to their molecular sizes using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations,. The flux sequence from the classical MD simulation is H2>CO2>>N2>Ar>CH4, which generally follows the trend in the kinetic diameters. Moreover, this trend is also confirmed from the fluxes based on the computed free energy barriers for gas permeation using the umbrella sampling method and kinetic theory of gases. Both brute-force MD simulations and free-energy calcualtions lead to the flux trend consistent with experiments. Case studies of two compositions of CO2/N2 mixtures further demonstrate the separation capability of nanoporous graphene.

  1. Isotope separation by selective charge conversion and field deflection

    DOEpatents

    Hickman, Robert G.

    1978-01-01

    A deuterium-tritium separation system wherein a source beam comprised of positively ionized deuterium (D.sup.+) and tritium (T.sup.+) is converted at different charge-exchange cell sections of the system to negatively ionized deuterium (D.sup.-) and tritium (T.sup.-). First, energy is added to the beam to accelerate the D.sup.+ ions to the velocity that is optimum for conversion of the D.sup.+ ions to D.sup.- ions in a charge-exchange cell. The T.sup.+ ions are accelerated at the same time, but not to the optimum velocity since they are heavier than the D.sup.+ ions. The T.sup.+ ions are, therefore, not converted to T.sup.- ions when the D.sup.+ ions are converted to D.sup.- ions. This enables effective separation of the beam by deflection of the isotopes with an electrostatic field, the D.sup.- ions being deflected in one direction and the T.sup.+ ions being deflected in the opposite direction. Next, more energy is added to the deflected beam of T.sup.+ ions to bring the T.sup.+ ions to the optimum velocity for their conversion to T.sup.- ions. In a particular use of the invention, the beams of D.sup.- and T.sup.- ions are separately further accelerated and then converted to energetic neutral particles for injection as fuel into a thermonuclear reactor. The reactor exhaust of D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ and the D.sup.+ and T.sup.+ that was not converted in the respective sections is combined with the source beam and recycled through the system to increase the efficiency of the system.

  2. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Highly Selective Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2009-09-28

    This grant was focused on the study of metal-organic frameworks with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the use of MOFs with well-defined open metal sites for binding of gases and small organics. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs that combine large pore size with high surface area for their use in gas adsorption and separation of polycyclic organic compounds. (3) To functionalize MOFs for the storage of inert gases such as methane. A brief outline of our progress towards these objectives is presented here as it forms part of the basis for the ideas to be developed under the present proposal.

  3. Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J; Collins, Michael L; Montoya, Velma M; Chen, Zewu; Wei, Fuzhong

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

  4. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM IMPURITIES

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, A.C.

    1957-11-12

    A method is described for separating plutonium from aqueous solutions containing uranium. It has been found that if the plutonium is reduced to its 3+ valence state, and the uranium present is left in its higher valence state, then the differences in solubility between certain salts (e.g., oxalates) of the trivalent plutonium and the hexavalent uranium can be used to separate the metals. This selective reduction of plutonium is accomplished by adding iodide ion to the solution, since iodide possesses an oxidation potential sufficient to reduce plutonium but not sufficient to reduce uranium.

  5. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S; Chong, Samantha Y; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M; Thallapally, Praveen K; Cooper, Andrew I

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation. PMID:25038731

  6. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation.

  7. Natural Gamma Emitters after a Selective Chemical Separation of a TENORM residue: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alves de Freitas, Antonio; Abrao, Alcidio; Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete; Pecequilo, Brigitte Roxana Soreanu

    2008-08-07

    An analytical procedure was established in order to obtain selective fractions containing radium isotopes ({sup 228}Ra), thorium ({sup 232}Th), and rare earths from RETOTER (REsiduo de TOrio e TErras Raras), a solid residue rich in rare earth elements, thorium isotopes and small amount of natural uranium generated from the operation of a thorium pilot plant for purification and production of pure thorium nitrate at IPEN -CNEN/SP. The paper presents preliminary results of {sup 228}Ra, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 238}U, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 40}K concentrations in the selective fractions and total residue determined by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, considering radioactive equilibrium of the samples.

  8. Selective Metal Deposition on a Phase-Separated Polymer Blend Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2013-07-01

    We report selective metal deposition on a phase-separated polymer blend surface. A polymer blend film consisting of polystyrene (PS) and a polystyrene-block-polybutadiene copolymer (PS-BR) was annealed, and a micro-phase-separated film was obtained. Pb was evaporated onto the phase-separated surface without an evaporation mask and was selectively deposited on the PS phase but not on the PS-BR phase. We achieved fine metal patterns corresponding to the microphase separation. This result suggests a novel method of preparing fine metal patterns for electronics and photonics.

  9. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY CYCLOALKYLDITHIO-CARBAMATE COMPLEXING

    DOEpatents

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-06-30

    The separation of uranium-233 from an aqueous nitric acid solution of neutron irradiated thorium by selectively complexing the uranium is described. The separation is carried out by contacting the thorium solution with a non- aromatic organic dithiocarbamate selected from the group which consists of alkali and alkaline earth cycloalkyldithiocarbamates and recovering the resulting uranyl cycloalkyldithiocarbamate complex by organic solvent extraction such as with methyl ethyl ketone. The complexed uranium may be stripped from the separated organic phase by scrubbing with one normal nitric acid solution.

  10. Sulfate Separation by Selective Crystallization of a Urea-Functionalized Metal-Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Sellin, Vincent; Moyer, Bruce A

    2007-01-01

    Encapsulation of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} into a Ni coordination framework functionalized with urea anion-binding groups allows selective separation of this strongly hydrophilic anion from a highly competitive aqueous environment.

  11. Functional Sorbents for Selective Capture of Plutonium, Americium, Uranium, and Thorium in Blood

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Wiacek, Robert J.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-09-01

    Nano-engineered solid sorbents for chelation of actinides (239Pu, 241Am, uranium, thorium) from human blood were developed and evaluated in vitro. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMSTM), are hybrid materials created from attachment of organic moieties onto extremely high surface area mesoporous silica. The organic moieties known to be effective at capturing actinides including three isomers of hydroxypyridinone, diphosphonic acid, acetamide phosphonic acid, glycinyl urea, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate analog were evaluated. SAMMS are being reported elsewhere as potential candidates for orally administered drug for radionuclide decorporation. Herein, actinide decorporation of SAMMS in blood were evaluated to assess their viability for sorbent hemoperfusion in renal insufficient patients, whose kidney clear radionuclides at very slow rate. Sorption affinity (Kd), sorption rate, selectivity, and stability of SAMMS were measured in batch contact experiments. An isomer of hydroxypyridinone (3,4-HOPO) on SAMMS demonstrated the highest affinity for decorporation of all four actinides and outperformed the DTPA analog on SAMMS and on commercial resins by a factor of 103-fold in term of affinity. A fifty percent reduction of actinides in blood was achieved within minutes with no evidence of protein fouling and material leaching in blood after 24 hr of contact time. Less than 0.4 wt.% of Si was dissolved from 3,4-HOPO-SAMMS across the pH of 0 to 8. The engineered form of SAMMS (bead format) was further evaluated in a 100-fold scaled-down hemoperfusion device and showed no blood clotting after 2 hr. A 0.2 g of SAMMS could reduce 50 wt.% of 100 ppb uranium in 50 mL of plasma in just 18 min and that of 500 dpm mL-1 in just 24 min. 3,4-HOPO-SAMMS has a long shelf-life in air and at room temperature for at least 8 years, indicating their feasibility for stockpiling in preparedness for emergency.

  12. Selective aqueous extraction of organics coupled with trapping by membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    van Eikeren, Paul; Brose, Daniel J.; Ray, Roderick J.

    1991-01-01

    An improvement to processes for the selective extractation of organic solutes from organic solvents by water-based extractants is disclosed, the improvement comprising coupling various membrane separation processes with the organic extraction process, the membrane separation process being utilized to continuously recycle the water-based extractant and at the same time selectively remove or concentrate organic solute from the water-based extractant.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of new biopolymeric microcapsules containing DEHPA-TOPO extractants for separation of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Outokesh, Mohammad; Tayyebi, Ahmad; Khanchi, Alireza; Grayeli, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Ghodrat

    2011-01-01

    A novel microcapsule adsorbent for separation of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions was developed by immobilizing the di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid-trioctyl phosphine oxide extractants in the polymeric matrix of calcium alginate. Physical characterization of the microcapsules was accomplished by scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric techniques. Equilibrium experiments revealed that both ion exchange and solvent extraction mechanisms were involved in the adsorption of [Formula: see text] ions, but the latter prevailed in a wider range of acid concentration. According to the results of kinetics study, at low acidity level, the rate controlling step was slow chemical reaction of [Formula: see text] ions with the microdroplets of extractant, whereas it changed to intraparticle diffusion at higher acid concentration. The study also attempted identification of the diffusion paths of the ions within the microcapsules, and the mechanism of change of mass transfer rate during the uptake process. The prepared microcapsules preserved their entire capacity after three cycles of adsorption, and their breakthrough behaviour was well fitted by a new formula derived from shrinking core model. PMID:21545316

  14. A simple-rapid method to separate uranium, thorium, and protactinium for U-series age-dating of materials.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew W; Eitrheim, Eric S; Nelson, Andrew W; Nelson, Steven; Schultz, Michael K

    2014-08-01

    Uranium-series dating techniques require the isolation of radionuclides in high yields and in fractions free of impurities. Within this context, we describe a novel-rapid method for the separation and purification of U, Th, and Pa. The method takes advantage of differences in the chemistry of U, Th, and Pa, utilizing a commercially-available extraction chromatographic resin (TEVA) and standard reagents. The elution behavior of U, Th, and Pa were optimized using liquid scintillation counting techniques and fractional purity was evaluated by alpha-spectrometry. The overall method was further assessed by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry for the preliminary age determination of an ancient carbonate sample obtained from the Lake Bonneville site in western Utah (United States). Preliminary evaluations of the method produced elemental purity of greater than 99.99% and radiochemical recoveries exceeding 90% for U and Th and 85% for Pa. Excellent purity and yields (76% for U, 96% for Th and 55% for Pa) were also obtained for the analysis of the carbonate samples and the preliminary Pa and Th ages of about 39,000 years before present are consistent with (14)C-derived age of the material. PMID:24681438

  15. A selective electromembrane extraction of uranium (VI) prior to its fluorometric determination in water.

    PubMed

    Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Moazami, Hamid Reza; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Banitaba, Mohammad Hossein; Nojavan, Saeed

    2013-06-14

    A novel method for the selective electromembrane extraction (EME) of U(6+) prior to fluorometric determination has been proposed. The effect of extraction conditions including supported liquid membrane (SLM) composition, extraction time and extraction voltage were investigated. An SLM composition of 1% di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid in nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE) showed good selectivity, recovery and enrichment factor. The best performance was achieved at an extraction potential of 80 volts and an extraction time of 14 minutes Under the optimized conditions, a linear range from 1 to 1000 ng mL(-1) and LOD of 0.1 ng mL(-1) were obtained for the determination of U(6+). The EME method showed good performance in sample cleanup and the reduction of the interfering effects of Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Cl(-) and PO4(3-) ions during fluorometric determination of uranium in real water samples. The recoveries above 54% and enrichment factors above 64.7 were obtained by the proposed method for real sample analysis. PMID:23726102

  16. Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. [474 references

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.M.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W.

    1980-09-01

    This bibliography, a compilation of 474 references, is the fourth in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base was created for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Project by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The references in the bibliography are arranged by subject category: (1) geochemistry, (2) exploration, (3) mineralogy, (4) genesis of deposits, (5) geology of deposits, (6) uranium industry, (7) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas, and (8) reserves and resources. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, and keyword.

  17. Determination of Uranium Metal Concentration in Irradiated Fuel Storage Basin Sludge Using Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Welsh, Terri L.; Pool, Karl N.

    2014-03-01

    Uranium metal corroding in water-saturated sludges now held in the US Department of Energy Hanford Site K West irradiated fuel storage basin can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage. Knowledge of uranium metal concentration in sludge thus is essential to safe sludge management and process design, requiring an expeditious routine analytical method to detect uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of 30 wt% or higher total uranium concentrations.

  18. [Determination of 235U/238U isotope ratios in camphor tree bark samples by MC-ICP-MS after separation of uranium from matrix elements].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Ji-Long

    2007-07-01

    Twelve camphor (cinnamomum camphora) tree bark samples were collected from Hiroshima and Kyoto, and the matrix element composition and morphology of the outer surface of these camphor tree bark samples were studied by EDXS and SEM respectively. After a dry decomposition, DOWEX 1-X8 anion exchange resin was used to separate uranium from matrix elements in these camphor tree bark samples. Finally, 235U/238 U isotope ratios in purified uranium solutions were determined by MC-ICP-MS. It was demonstrated that the outer surface of these camphor tree bark samples is porous and rough, with Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Si, C, O and S as its matrix element composition. Uranium in these camphor tree bark samples can be efficiently separated and quantitatively recovered from the matrix element composition. Compared with those collected from Kyoto, the camphor tree bark samples collected from Hiroshima have significantly higher uranium contents, which may be due to the increased aerosol mass concentration during the city reconstruction. Moreover, the 235 U/23.U isotope ratios in a few camphor tree bark samples collected from Hiroshima are slightly higher than 0.007 25. PMID:17944430

  19. PROCESS FOR RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    MacWood, G.E.; Wilder, C.D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process is described for recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickels copper, and iron is treated with excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitatc the uranium, irons and chromium and convert thc nickel and copper to soluble ammonia complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried, and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/ sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temprrature of about 300 to400 deg C.

  20. Process for recovering uranium

    DOEpatents

    MacWood, G. E.; Wilder, C. D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process useful in recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons is presented. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickel, copper, and iron is treated with an excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitnte the uranium, iron, and chromium and convert the nickel and copper to soluble ammonio complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/ sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temperature of about 500 to 400 deg C.

  1. Hybrid Ultra-Microporous Materials for Selective Xenon Adsorption and Separation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mona H; Elsaidi, Sameh K; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Schaef, Herbert T; Hogan, Adam; Wojtas, Lukasz; Xu, Wenqian; Space, Brian; Zaworotko, Michael J; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2016-07-11

    The demand for Xe/Kr separation continues to grow due to the industrial significance of high-purity Xe gas. Current separation processes rely on energy intensive cryogenic distillation. Therefore, less energy intensive alternatives, such as physisorptive separation, using porous materials, are required. Herein we show that an underexplored class of porous materials called hybrid ultra-microporous materials (HUMs) affords new benchmark selectivity for Xe separation from Xe/Kr mixtures. The isostructural materials, CROFOUR-1-Ni and CROFOUR-2-Ni, are coordination networks that have coordinatively saturated metal centers and two distinct types of micropores, one of which is lined by CrO4 (2-) (CROFOUR) anions and the other is decorated by the functionalized organic linker. These nets offer unprecedented selectivity towards Xe. Modelling indicates that the selectivity of these nets is tailored by synergy between the pore size and the strong electrostatics afforded by the CrO4 (2-) anions. PMID:27238977

  2. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

    1958-02-01

    This patent deals with the separation of rare earth and other fission products from neutron bombarded uranium. This is accomplished by melting the uranium in contact with either thorium oxide, maguesium oxide, alumnum oxide, beryllium oxide, or uranium dioxide. The melting is preferably carried out at from 1150 deg to 1400 deg C in an inert atmosphere, such as argon or helium. During this treatment a scale of uranium dioxide forms on the uranium whtch contains most of the fission products.

  3. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  4. Microscale phase separator for selective extraction of CO2 from methanol solution flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Abdolreza; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2014-12-01

    This study is aimed at understanding the limits in reducing the size of a membrane-based CO2 separator and its pressure head needs and energy consumption, while maximizing its selectivity. The separator consists of a flow channel capped by a hydrophobic nanoporous membrane through which CO2 exits the anode flow stream of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). A systematic study is conducted to determine the effect of differential pressure across the membrane, flow velocity, and flow channel dimensions on the separation process. The extraction flux was found to change linearly with pressure difference across the membrane. The effect of flow velocity on the extraction flux was negligible up to a critical velocity beyond which the separation process ceased. The separation selectivity enhanced by increasing the differential pressure across the membrane but did not change with varying the flow velocity and channel depth. Using the findings of the first part of the study, an optimal micro-separator (with a footprint of approximately 10 × 1 mm2) was designed/fabricated for a 20 W DMFC and its performance was experimentally analyzed. An unprecedented separation selectivity of close to 200 was achieved at a differential pressure of about 10 kPa and negligible energy consumption.

  5. Functional sorbents for selective capture of plutonium, americium, uranium, and thorium in blood.

    PubMed

    Yantasee, Wassana; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Creim, Jeffery A; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Wiacek, Robert J; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, R Shane; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-09-01

    Self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) are hybrid materials created from attachment of organic moieties onto very high surface area mesoporous silica. SAMMS with surface chemistries including three isomers of hydroxypyridinone, diphosphonic acid, acetamide phosphonic acid, glycinyl urea, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) analog were evaluated for chelation of actinides ((239)Pu, (241)Am, uranium, thorium) from blood. Direct blood decorporation using sorbents does not have the toxicity or renal challenges associated with traditional chelation therapy and may have potential applications for critical exposure cases, reduction of nonspecific dose during actinide radiotherapy, and for sorbent hemoperfusion in renal insufficient patients, whose kidneys clear radionuclides at a very slow rate. Sorption affinity (K(d)), sorption rate, selectivity, and stability of SAMMS were measured in batch contact experiments. An isomer of hydroxypyridinone (3,4-HOPO) on SAMMS demonstrated the highest affinity for all four actinides from blood and plasma and greatly outperformed the DTPA analog on SAMMS and commercial resins. In batch contact, a fifty percent reduction of actinides in blood was achieved within minutes, and there was no evidence of protein fouling or material leaching in blood after 24 h. The engineered form of SAMMS (bead format) was further evaluated in a 100-fold scaled-down hemoperfusion device and showed no blood clotting after 2 h. A 0.2 g quantity of SAMMS could reduce 50 wt.% of 100 ppb uranium in 50 mL of plasma in 18 min and that of 500 dpm mL(-1) in 24 min. 3,4-HOPO-SAMMS has a long shelf-life in air and at room temperature for at least 8 y, indicating its feasibility for stockpiling in preparedness for an emergency. The excellent efficacy and stability of SAMMS materials in complex biological matrices suggest that SAMMS can also be used as orally administered drugs and for wound decontamination. By changing the organic groups of

  6. Functional Sorbents for Selective Capture of Plutonium, Americium, Uranium, and Thorium in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Creim, Jeffery A; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Wiacek, Robert J; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, R Shane; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS™) are hybrid materials created from attachment of organic moieties onto very high surface area mesoporous silica. SAMMS with surface chemistries including three isomers of hydroxypyridinone, diphosphonic acid, acetamide phosphonic acid, glycinyl urea, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) analog were evaluated for chelation of actinides (239Pu, 241Am, uranium, thorium) from blood. Direct blood decorporation using sorbents does not have toxicity or renal challenges associated with traditional chelation therapy and may have potential applications for critical exposure cases, reduction of nonspecific dose during actinide radiotherapy, and for sorbent hemoperfusion in renal insufficient patients, whose kidney clear radionuclides at very slow rate. Sorption affinity (Kd), sorption rate, selectivity, and stability of SAMMS were measured in batch contact experiments. An isomer of hydroxypyridinone (3,4-HOPO) on SAMMS demonstrated the highest affinity for all four actinides from blood and plasma and greatly outperformed the DTPA analog on SAMMS and commercial resins. In batch contact, a fifty percent reduction of actinides in blood was achieved within minutes, and there was no evidence of protein fouling or material leaching in blood after 24 hr. The engineered form of SAMMS (bead format) was further evaluated in a 100-fold scaled-down hemoperfusion device and showed no blood clotting after 2 hr. A 0.2 g quantity of SAMMS could reduce 50 wt.% of 100 ppb uranium in 50 mL of plasma in 18 min and that of 500 dpm mL−1 in 24 min. 3,4-HOPO-SAMMS has a long shelf-life in air and at room temperature for at least 8 years, indicating its feasibility for stockpiling in preparedness for an emergency. The excellent efficacy and stability of SAMMS materials in complex biological matrices suggest that SAMMS can also be used as orally administered drugs and for wound decontamination. By changing the organic groups of SAMMS

  7. Impact of Electron Donor selection on In-situ Biosequestration of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, S.; Zhong, H.; Abel, E. J.; Field, J.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ biosequestration, wherein electron-donating substrates are injected to promote microbial-associated sequestration of contaminants, is one promising enhanced-attenuation technique for remediation of groundwater containing arsenic, uranium, selenium, and similar constituents. A pilot-scale test of in-situ biosequestration for uranium in groundwater is in process at a former uranium mining site in Monument Valley, Arizona. Complementary bench experiments were conducted to examine the impact of different electron donors on the effectiveness of biosequestration. Aqueous and sediment samples were collected before and after the injection for monitoring changes in sediment properties, mineral geochemical composition, microbial community composition, and microbial activity.

  8. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  9. Highly Selective Membranes For The Separation Of Organic Vapors Using Super-Glassy Polymers

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid; Nguyen, Phuong; Segelke, Scott

    1997-11-18

    A process for separating hydrocarbon gases of low boiling point, particularly methane, ethane and ethylene, from nitrogen. The process is performed using a membrane made from a super-glassy material. The gases to be separated are mixed with a condensable gas, such as a C.sub.3+ hydrocarbon. In the presence of the condensable gas, improved selectivity for the low-boiling-point hydrocarbon gas over nitrogen is achieved.

  10. Effects Of Touch Key Size And Separation On Menu-Selection Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Robert J.; Welman, Novia

    1985-05-01

    Two experiments were performed to assess the effects of touch key design parameters on menu-selection error rates, The first experiment determined that the optimal design consisted of touch keys 10,16-mm high, either 10,16- or 20, 2- wide, and separated vertically by less than 10,16 mm, The second experiment extended the investigation by including the effects of viewing angle, These latter results replicated the first experiment, but also favored the 2012-mm wide key for off-axis viewing conditions, In both experiments, the horizontal separation between touch keys did not affect menu-selection accuracy; however, subjective selection favored a 20.32-mm horizontal separation.

  11. Microphase separated structures of block copolymer thin film with non-volatile selective solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Umegaki, Naoya; Matsutani, Taito; Takagi, Hideaki; Ito, Eri; Sakurai, Shinichi

    2010-11-01

    Microphase separated structures of block copolymer, polystyrene-b-polyisoprene (PS-b-PI, phiPS = 14%) including non-volatile selective solvent thin films were investigated using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering technique. The diethyl phthalate (DEP) was used as a non-volatile selective solvent which solves PS only. The DEP swelled PS phase selectively and the microphase separated structure transited from the PS spherical domain to the lamellar domain with an increase in DEP content in the bulk state. Similarly, the phase separated structure in the thin film prepared by spin cast on a silicon wafer from the mixture of toluene/DEP and block copolymer changed according to the initial DPE concentration. However, the morphologies developed in the thin film were shifted to the structures at lower DEP concentration than that expected from the initial concentration. Moreover, the cylindrical and lamellar domains were aligned parallel and perpendicularly to the substrate, respectively.

  12. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Selective separation of Eu{sup 3+} using polymer-enhanced ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M.V.

    1994-03-01

    A process to selectively remove {sup 241}Am from liquid radioactive waste was investigated as an actinide separation method applicable to Hanford and other waste sites. The experimental procedures involved removal of Eu, a nonradioactive surrogate for Am, from aqueous solutions at pH 5 using organic polymers in conjunction with ultrafiltration. Commercially available polyacrylic acid (60,000 MW) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) synthesized E3 copolymer ({approximately}10,000 MW) were tested. Test solutions containing 10 {mu}g/mL of Eu were dosed vath each polymer at various concentrations in order to bind Eu (i.e., by complexation and/or cation exchange) for subsequent rejection by an ultrafiltration coupon. Test solutions were filtered with and without polymer to determine if enhanced Eu separation could be achieved from polymer treatment. Both polymers significantly increased Eu removal. Optimum concentrations were 20 {mu}g/mL of polyacrylic acid and 100 {mu}g/mL of E3 for 100% Eu rejection by the Amicon PM10 membrane at 55 psi. In addition to enhancement of removal, the polymers selectively bound Eu over Na, suggesting that selective separation of Eu was possible. This suggests that polymer-enhanced ultrafiltration is a potential process for separation of {sup 241}Am from Hanford tank waste, further investigation of binding agents and membranes effective under very alkaline and high ionic strength is warranted. This process also has potential applications for selective separation of toxic metals from industrial process streams.

  14. Molecularly imprinted adsorbents for selective separation and/or concentration of environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takuya; Hosoya, Ken; Otsuka, Koji

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the development of molecularly imprinted materials for selective separation and/or concentration of environmental pollutants, the quantitative concentration of which is usually difficult to determine because of their low level of concentration and existence of a large number of contaminants in environmental water. The fragment imprinting technique allowed for the selective separation of endocrine disrupters and halogenated aromatic compounds, including bisphenol A, and chlorinated/brominated aromatic compounds by the specific structural recognition based on the breeds, position, and number of the substituents. Also, the interval immobilization technique provided the specific materials enabling selective concentration based on the interval recognition of ionic functional groups in the targeting compounds, so that the effective determinations were achieved for natural toxins and pharmaceuticals in environmental water. Additionally, a selective photodegradation of toxins and a stimulus responsible hydrogel by the similar molecular recognition ability were successfully carried out. We have summarized these techniques including our recent studies. PMID:24420250

  15. Laboratory Enrichment of Radioactive Assemblages and Estimation of Thorium and Uranium Radioactivity in Fractions Separated from Placer Sands in Southeast Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Rajib, Mohammad; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Taishi; Takagi, Ikuji; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Zaman, Md. Mashrur

    2015-06-15

    The present study reports the likely first attempt of separating radioactive minerals for estimation of activity concentration in the beach placer sands of Bangladesh. Several sand samples from heavy mineral deposits located at the south-eastern coastal belt of Bangladesh were processed to physically upgrade their radioactivity concentrations using plant and laboratory equipment. Following some modified flow procedure, individual fractions were separated and investigated using gamma-ray spectrometry and powder-XRD analysis. The radioactivity measurements indicated contributions of the thorium and uranium radioactive series and of {sup 40}K. The maximum values of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, estimated from the radioactivity of {sup 208}Tl and {sup 234}Th in secular equilibrium, were found to be 152,000 and 63,300 Bq/kg, respectively. The fraction of the moderately conductive part in electric separation contained thorium predominantly, while that of the non-conductive part was found to be uranium rich. The present arrangement of the pilot plant cascade and the fine tuning of setting parameters were found to be effective and economic separation process of the radioactive minerals from placer sands in Bangladesh. Probable radiological impacts and extraction potentiality of such radioactive materials are also discussed.

  16. Acquisition of improved reference values for cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in selected NIST reference materials.

    PubMed

    Parr, R M; Kawamura, H; Iyengar, G V

    1999-01-01

    As part of a study on the ingestion and organ content of some trace elements of importance in radiological protection, additional work has been undertaken to acquire improved reference values for cesium, iodine, strontium, thorium, and uranium in four selected reference materials provided by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. The materials are SRM-1548 Total Diet, SRM-1548a Typical Diet, SRM-1486 Bone Meal, and RM-8414 Bovine Muscle. A coordinated study was undertaken with the help of seven selected laboratories in five countries. Instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry were the analytical main techniques used. PMID:10676473

  17. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

  18. STRIPPING OF URANIUM FROM ORGANIC EXTRACTANTS

    DOEpatents

    Crouse, D.J. Jr.

    1962-09-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is given for recovering uranium values from uranium-containing solutions. Uranium is removed from a uranium-containing organic solution by contacting said organic solution with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution substantially saturated in uranium values. A uranium- containing precipitate is thereby formed which is separated from the organic and aqueous phases. Uranium values are recovered from this separated precipitate. (AE C)

  19. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  20. Balancing Selection in Species with Separate Sexes: Insights from Fisher’s Geometric Model

    PubMed Central

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    How common is balancing selection, and what fraction of phenotypic variance is attributable to balanced polymorphisms? Despite decades of research, answers to these questions remain elusive. Moreover, there is no clear theoretical prediction about the frequency with which balancing selection is expected to arise within a population. Here, we use an extension of Fisher’s geometric model of adaptation to predict the probability of balancing selection in a population with separate sexes, wherein polymorphism is potentially maintained by two forms of balancing selection: (1) heterozygote advantage, where heterozygous individuals at a locus have higher fitness than homozygous individuals, and (2) sexually antagonistic selection (a.k.a. intralocus sexual conflict), where the fitness of each sex is maximized by different genotypes at a locus. We show that balancing selection is common under biologically plausible conditions and that sex differences in selection or sex-by-genotype effects of mutations can each increase opportunities for balancing selection. Although heterozygote advantage and sexual antagonism represent alternative mechanisms for maintaining polymorphism, they mutually exist along a balancing selection continuum that depends on population and sex-specific parameters of selection and mutation. Sexual antagonism is the dominant mode of balancing selection across most of this continuum. PMID:24812306

  1. Selective separation of patchouli alcohol from the essential oil of Cablin potchouli by inclusion crystalline method.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jian; Yuan, Lei; Guo, Fang; Wang, Zhong-Hua; Jin, Lan; Guo, Wen-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we have focused on the application of non-traditional separation approach, the host-guest inclusion method, into the separation of the active component patchouli alcohol from the essential oil of Cablin potchouli Herb. The host molecule 1,1,6,6-tetraphenylhexa-2,4-diyne-1,6-diol (A) was used to selectively recognise the guest molecule patchouli alcohol (B) in the essential oil of Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth through two strong hydrogen bonding. The inclusion compound was structurally determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction. The separation effect was examined by gas chromatography for the whole essential oil and the inclusion compound, showing that the inclusion crystalline method is simple, rapid and effective for the separation of patchouli alcohol from the essential oil of C. potchouli Herb. PMID:22304229

  2. Strategy for selection of methods for separation of bioparticles from particle mixtures.

    PubMed

    van Hee, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; van der Wielen, L A M

    2006-07-01

    The desired product of bioprocesses is often produced in particulate form, either as an inclusion body (IB) or as a crystal. Particle harvesting is then a crucial and attractive form of product recovery. Because the liquid phase often contains other bioparticles, such as cell debris, whole cells, particulate biocatalysts or particulate by-products, the recovery of product particles is a complex process. In most cases, the particulate product is purified using selective solubilization or extraction. However, if selective particle recovery is possible, the already high purity of the particles makes this downstream process more favorable. This work gives an overview of typical bioparticle mixtures that are encountered in industrial biotechnology and the various driving forces that may be used for particle-particle separation, such as the centrifugal force, the magnetic force, the electric force, and forces related to interfaces. By coupling these driving forces to the resisting forces, the limitations of using these driving forces with respect to particle size are calculated. It shows that centrifugation is not a general solution for particle-particle separation in biotechnology because the particle sizes of product and contaminating particles are often very small, thus, causing their settling velocities to be too low for efficient separation by centrifugation. Examples of such separation problems are the recovery of IBs or virus-like particles (VLPs) from (microbial) cell debris. In these cases, separation processes that use electrical forces or fluid-fluid interfaces show to have a large potential for particle-particle separation. These methods are not yet commonly applied for large-scale particle-particle separation in biotechnology and more research is required on the separation techniques and on particle characterization to facilitate successful application of these methods in industry. PMID:16570310

  3. Recent Development of Advanced Materials with Special Wettability for Selective Oil/Water Separation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qinglang; Cheng, Hongfei; Fane, Anthony G; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Hua

    2016-04-27

    The increasing number of oil spill accidents have a catastrophic impact on our aquatic environment. Recently, special wettable materials used for the oil/water separation have received significant research attention. Due to their opposing affinities towards water and oil, i.e., hydrophobic and oleophilic, or hydrophilic and oleophobic, such materials can be used to remove only one phase from the oil/water mixture, and simultaneously repel the other phase, thus achieving selective oil/water separation. Moreover, the synergistic effect between the surface chemistry and surface architecture can further promote the superwetting behavior, resulting in the improved separation efficiency. Here, recently developed materials with special wettability for selective oil/water separation are summarized and discussed. These materials can be categorized based on their oil/water separating mechanisms, i.e., filtration and absorption. In each section, representative studies will be highlighted, with emphasis on the materials wetting properties and innovative aspects. Finally, challenges and future research directions in this emerging and promising research field will be briefly described. PMID:27000640

  4. Adsorbate shape selectivity: Separation of the HF/134a azeotrope over carbogenic molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, A.; Mariwala, R.K.; Kane, M.S.; Foley, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    Experimental evidence is provided for adsorptive shape selectivity in the separation of the azeotrope between HF and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (134a) over pyrolyzed poly(furfuryl alcohol)-derived carbogenic molecular sieve (PPFA-CMS). The separation can be accomplished over coconut charcoal or Carbosieve G on the basis of the differences in the extent of equilibrium adsorption of HF and 134a. On these adsorbents 134a is more strongly bound than HF, thus it elutes much more slowly from the bed. The heat of adsorption for 134a in the vicinity of 200 C on Carbosieve G is {approximately}8.8 kcal/mol. In contrast, when the same azeotropic mixture is separated over PPFA-CMS prepared at 500 C, 134a is not adsorbed. As a result 134a elutes from the bed first, followed by HF. The reversal is brought about by the narrower pore size and pore size distribution of the PPFA-CMS versus that for Carbosieve G. Thus the separation over PPFA-CMS is an example of adsorbate shape selectivity and represents a limiting case of kinetic separation.

  5. Large-Flow-Area Flow-Selective Liquid/Gas Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Bradley, Karla F.

    2010-01-01

    This liquid/gas separator provides the basis for a first stage of a fuel cell product water/oxygen gas phase separator. It can separate liquid and gas in bulk in multiple gravity environments. The system separates fuel cell product water entrained with circulating oxygen gas from the outlet of a fuel cell stack before allowing the gas to return to the fuel cell stack inlet. Additional makeup oxygen gas is added either before or after the separator to account for the gas consumed in the fuel cell power plant. A large volume is provided upstream of porous material in the separator to allow for the collection of water that does not exit the separator with the outgoing oxygen gas. The water then can be removed as it continues to collect, so that the accumulation of water does not impede the separating action of the device. The system is designed with a series of tubes of the porous material configured into a shell-and-tube heat exchanger configuration. The two-phase fluid stream to be separated enters the shell-side portion of the device. Gas flows to the center passages of the tubes through the porous material and is then routed to a common volume at the end of the tubes by simple pressure difference from a pumping device. Gas flows through the porous material of the tubes with greater ease as a function of the ratio of the dynamic viscosity of the water and gas. By careful selection of the dimensions of the tubes (wall thickness, porosity, diameter, length of the tubes, number of the tubes, and tube-to-tube spacing in the shell volume) a suitable design can be made to match the magnitude of water and gas flow, developed pressures from the oxygen reactant pumping device, and required residual water inventory for the shellside volume.

  6. Selective separation of similarly sized proteins with tunable nanoporous block copolymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Haizhou; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Pradeep, Neelakanda; Nunes, Suzana P; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2013-01-22

    An integral asymmetric membrane was fabricated in a fast and one-step process by combining the self-assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer (PS-b-P4VP) with nonsolvent-induced phase separation. The structure was found to be composed of a thin layer of densely packed highly ordered cylindrical channels with uniform pore sizes perpendicular to the surface on top of a nonordered sponge-like layer. The as-assembled membrane obtained a water flux of more than 3200 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), which was at least an order of magnitude higher than the water fluxes of commercially available membranes with comparable pore sizes, making this membrane particularly well suited to size-selective and charge-based separation of biomolecules. To test the performance of the membrane, we conducted diffusion experiments at the physiological pH of 7.4 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and globulin-γ, two proteins with different diameters but too close in size (2-fold difference in molecular mass) to be efficiently separated via conventional dialysis membrane processes. The diffusion rate differed by a factor of 87, the highest value reported to date. We also analyzed charge-based diffusive transport and separation of two proteins of similar molecular weight (BSA and bovine hemoglobin (BHb)) through the membrane as a function of external pH. The membrane achieved a selectivity of about 10 at pH 4.7, the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA. We then positively charged the membrane to improve the separation selectivity. With the modified membrane BSA was completely blocked when the pH was 7.0, the pI of BHb, while BHb was completely blocked at pH 4.7. Our results demonstrate the potential of our asymmetric membrane to efficiently separate biological substances/pharmaceuticals in bioscience, biotechnology, and biomedicine applications. PMID:23252799

  7. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

    1958-04-15

    The production of uranium metal by the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride is described. Massive uranium metal of high purily is produced by reacting uranium tetrafluoride with 2 to 20% stoichiometric excess of magnesium at a temperature sufficient to promote the reaction and then mantaining the reaction mass in a sealed vessel at temperature in the range of 1150 to 2000 d C, under a superatomospheric pressure of magnesium for a period of time sufficient 10 allow separation of liquid uranium and liquid magnesium fluoride into separate layers.

  8. Loading Capacities for Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium in High Caustic Nuclear Waste Storage Tanks Containing Selected Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    OJI, LAWRENCE

    2004-11-16

    In this study the loading capacities of selected actinides onto some of the most common sorbent materials which are present in caustic nuclear waste storage tanks have been determined. Some of these transition metal oxides and activated carbons easily absorb or precipitate plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, which if care is not taken may lead to unwanted accumulation of some of these fissile materials in nuclear waste tanks during waste processing. Based on a caustic synthetic salt solution simulant bearing plutonium, uranium and neptunium and ''real'' nuclear waste supernate solution, the loading capacities of these actinides onto iron oxide (hematite), activated carbon and anhydrous sodium phosphate have been determined. The loading capacities for plutonium onto granular activated carbon and iron oxide (hematite) in a caustic synthetic salt solution were, respectively, 3.4 0.22 plus or minus and 5.5 plus or minus 0.38 microgram per gram of sorbent. The loading capacity for plutonium onto a typical nuclear waste storage tank sludge solids was 2.01 microgram per gram of sludge solids. The loading capacities for neptunium onto granular activated carbon and iron oxide (hematite) in a caustic synthetic salt solution were, respectively, 7.9 plus or minus 0.52 and greater than 10 microgram per gram of sorbent. The loading capacity for neptunium onto a typical nuclear waste storage tank sludge solids was 4.48 microgram per gram of sludge solids. A typical nuclear waste storage tank solid material did not show any significant affinity for uranium. Sodium phosphate showed significant affinity for both neptunium and uranium, with loading capacities of 6.8 and 184.6 plus or minus 18.5 microgram per gram of sorbent, respectively.

  9. Radiation synthesis of a new amidoximated UHMWPE fibrous adsorbent with high adsorption selectivity for uranium over vanadium in simulated seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qianhong; Hu, Jiangtao; Li, Rong; Xing, Zhe; Xu, Lu; Wang, Mouhua; Guo, Xiaojing; Wu, Guozhong

    2016-05-01

    A new kind of highly efficient adsorbent material has been fabricated in this study for the purpose of extracting uranium from seawater. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber was used as a trunk material for the adsorbent, which was prepared by a series of modification reactions, as follows: (1) grafting of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and methyl acrylate (MA) onto UHMWPE fibers via 60Co γ-ray pre-irradiation; (2) aminolyzation of UHMWPE fiber by the ring-opening reaction between of epoxy groups PGMA and ethylene diamine (EDA); (3) Michael addition of amino groups with acrylonitrile (AN) to yield nitrile groups; (4) amidoximation of the attached nitrile moieties by hydroxylamine in dimethyl sulfoxide-water mixture. Modified UHMWPE fibers were characterized by means of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to confirm the attachment of amidoxime (AO) groups onto the UHMWPE fibers. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and single fiber tensile strength verified that the modified UHMWPE fiber retained excellent mechanical properties at a low absorbed radiation dose. The adsorption performance of the UHMWPE fibrous adsorbent was evaluated by subjecting it to an adsorption test in simulated seawater using a continuous-flow mode. The amount of uranium adsorbed by this AO-based UHMWPE fibrous adsorbent was 1.97 mg-U/g after 42 days. This new adsorbent also showed high selectivity for the uranyl ion, and its selectivity for metal ions was found to decrease in the following order: U>Cu>Fe>Ca>Mg>Ni>Zn>Pb>V>Co. The adsorption selectivity for uranium is significantly higher than that for vanadium. In addition, preparation of this modified adsorbent consumes much smaller amounts of the toxic acrylonitrile monomer than the conventional preparation methods of AO-based polyethylene fibers.

  10. Design and Development of Selective Extractants for An/Ln Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Robert T. Paine

    2009-12-04

    This study has succeeded in further developing phosphinoylmethyl pyridine compounds as selective recognition and separations agents for trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions present in nuclear materials. The parameters for efficient separations have been further elucidated and factors important to further development have been identified. Further development will lead to optimal extractant design for effective actinide ion partitioning under process practical conditions. The primary objective of the project involved the design, synthesis, and characterization of the extraction performance of 2,6-bis(phosphinomethyl)pyridine N,P,P{prime}-trioxides (NOPOPO) as potential reagents for the separation of Am, Cm, and fission product lanthanides from other transuranics and fission products and for acting as a separations 'platform' for the mutual separation of Am/Cm from the lanthanides. The secondary but critical objective of the project focused on the characterization of aqueous acid and radiation stability of NOPOPO ligands. Further, the project served as a interdisciplinary training vehicle for new, young investigators in actinide separations chemistry.

  11. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G R; Sever, L E

    1982-04-01

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB) (ERB)

  12. Uranium geochemistry of selected rock units from the Marysvale Volcanic Field, Piute County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Marysvale Volcanic Field is an area rich in uranium. This study was undertaken to determine if the uranium deposits might be of volcanogenic origin. This geochemical study consisted of determining the major, minor and trace element concentrations of the major volcanic units, and the relationships of the rock chemistry to uranium mineralization. The units in the Marysvale Volcanic Field, consist of ash-flow tuffs, intermediate lava flows, and associated intrusives of the Bullion Canyon volcanics and ash-flow tuffs, volcaniclastic deposits, domes and stocks of the Mount Belknap volcanics. When compared to overlaying welded tuff or rhyolitic units, the vitrophyric samples from the Mount Belknap volcanic units, are all enriched in F, Cs, and U, and that 50% of the vitrophyres are enriched in Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Zr, Pb, Sr, V, and Zn. Overlying untis have been devitrified and have released U as well as other trace elements into the volcanogenic system. This study has reevaluated the Marysvale Central Mining District and has proposed another theory as to the origin of the uranium deposits in that area. This hypothesis places a previously unidentified caldera around the area, and this author has named it the Marysvale caldera. Evidence for this caldera includes: arcurate faults which surround the region; alteration patterns which appear to form a circular pattern along the boundary of the proposed caldera; the presence of small monzonite intrusive bodies appear to ring the caldera; the presence of ash-flow tuffs which thicken appreciably along the northeast boundary of the caldera; and the central intrusive which may represent a resurgent phase of the proposed caldera. This seems to be a viable alternative to the magmatic hydrothermal origin for the uranium deposits presently proposed for the Central Mining District.

  13. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  14. Isotope separation by laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Isotope separation processes operate on very small differences, given either by the Quotient of masses with the same number of electrons or by their mass difference. When separating isotopes of light elements in mass quantities, thermodynamic processes accounting for the quotient, either in diffusion, chemical reactivity or distillation are used. For heavy elements those quotients are very small. Therefore they need a large number of separation steps. Large plants with high energy consumption result from that. As uranium isotope separation is the most important industrial field, alternatives, taking account for the mass difference, as e.g. gas centrifuges, have been developed. They use only a fraction of the energy input, but need a very large number of machines, as the individual throughput is small. Since it was discovered, that molecules of high symmetry like Uranium-Hexafluoride as a deep-cooled gas stream can be ionized by multiple photon excitation, this process was studied in detail and in competition to the selective ionization of metal vapors, as already demonstrated with uranium. The paper reports about the principles of the laser excitation for both processes, the different laboratory scale and prototypical plants built, the difficulties with materials, as far as the metal vapor laser separation is concerned, and the difficulties experienced in the similarity in molecular spectra. An overview of the relative economic merits of the different processes and the auspices in a saturated market for uranium isotope separation, together with other potential markets for molecular laser separation, is contained in the conclusions.

  15. Improved Fat Water Separation with Water Selective Inversion Pulse for Inversion Recovery Imaging in Cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Havla, Lukas; Basha, Tamer; Rayatzadeh, Hussein; Shaw, Jaime L.; Manning, Warren J.; Reeder, Scott B.; Kozerke, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop an improved chemical shift-based water-fat separation sequence using a water-selective inversion pulse for inversion-recovery 3D contrast-enhanced cardiac MR. Materials and Methods In inversion-recovery sequences, the fat signal is substantially reduced due to the application of a non-selective inversion pulse. Therefore, for simultaneous visualization of water, fat, and myocardial enhancement in inversion-recovery based sequences such as late Gadolinium enhancement imaging, two separate scans are used. To overcome this, the non-selective inversion pulse is replaced with a water-selective inversion pulse. Imaging was performed in phantoms, 9 healthy subjects and 9 patients with suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy plus 1 patient for tumor/mass imaging. In patients, images with conventional turbo-spin echo (TSE) with and without fat saturation were acquired prior to contrast injection for fat assessment. Subjective image scores (1=poor, 4=excellent) were used for image assessment. Results Phantom experiments showed a fat SNR increase between 1.7 to 5.9 times for inversion times of 150 and 300ms, respectively. The water-selective inversion pulse retains the fat signal in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR, allowing improved visualization of fat in the water-fat separated images of healthy subjects with a score of 3.7 ± 0.6. Patient images acquired with the proposed sequence were scored higher when compared with TSE sequence (3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 2.2 ± 0.5, p<0.05). Conclusion The water-selective inversion pulse retains the fat signal in inversion-recovery based contrast-enhanced cardiac MR, allowing simultaneous visualization of water and fat. PMID:22927327

  16. Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Pinnau, Ingo; He, Zhenjie; Da Costa, Andre R.; Daniels, Ramin; Amo, Karl D.; Wijmans, Johannes G.

    2003-06-03

    A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

  17. Selective separation of oil and water with mesh membranes by capillarity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuanlie; Chen, Hua; Liu, Yun; Craig, Vincent S J; Lai, Zhiping

    2016-09-01

    The separation of oil and water from wastewater generated in the oil-production industries, as well as in frequent oil spillage events, is important in mitigating severe environmental and ecological damage. Additionally, a wide arrange of industrial processes require oils or fats to be removed from aqueous systems. The immiscibility of oil and water allows for the wettability of solid surfaces to be engineered to achieve the separation of oil and water through capillarity. Mesh membranes with extreme, selective wettability can efficiently remove oil or water from oil/water mixtures through a simple filtration process using gravity. A wide range of different types of mesh membranes have been successfully rendered with extreme wettability and applied to oil/water separation in the laboratory. These mesh materials have typically shown good durability, stability as well as reusability, which makes them promising candidates for an ever widening range of practical applications. PMID:27246717

  18. Size-selective crystallization of homochiral camphorate metal-organic frameworks for lanthanide separation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Wong, Matthew; Mao, Chengyu; Trieu, Thuong Xinh; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Pingyun; Bu, Xianhui

    2014-09-10

    Lanthanides (Ln) are a group of important elements usually found in nature as mixtures. Their separation is essential for technological applications but is made challenging by their subtly different properties. Here we report that crystallization of homochiral camphorate metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is highly sensitive to ionic radii of lanthanides and can be used to selectively crystallize a lanthanide element into predesigned MOFs. Two series of camphorate MOFs were synthesized with acetate (Type 1 with early lanthanides La-Dy) or formate (Type 2 with late lanthanides Tb-Lu and Y) as the auxiliary ligand, respectively. The Ln coordination environment in each type exhibits selectivity for Ln(3+) of different sizes, which could form the basis for a new cost-effective method for Ln separation. PMID:25164942

  19. Site-selective nanoscale-polymerization of pyrrole on gold nanoparticles via plasmon induced charge separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, Y.; Ishida, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs.We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01531j

  20. The Use of Polyacrylamide as a Selective Depressant in the Separation of Chalcopyrite and Galena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    High molecular weight polyacrylamide (PAM) was tested as a potential selective depressant in the differential flotation separation of galena and chalcopyrite using potassium ethyl xanthate (KEX) as a collector. In single mineral flotation, PAM depressed chalcopyrite while galena was floatable. Mechanism study indicated that PAM could adsorb on galena through hydrogen bonding, and on chalcopyrite through hydrogen bonding as well as ammonium-copper complexation. KEX could only break up the galena-PAM bonding. It is the combined use of PAM and KEX that caused the selectivity. In mineral mixture flotation, galena and chalcopyrite could be separated by PAM and KEX only after EDTA treatment of the mineral mixtures. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometric (ToF-SIMS) measurements indicated that when galena and chalcopyrite were present together in the suspension, PAM adsorbed on both galena and chalcopyrite. However, after prior treatment of the mineral mixture by EDTA, PAM mainly adsorbed on chalcopyrite.

  1. Selection and separation of X- and Y- chromosome-bearing mammalian sperm.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, B L

    1988-07-01

    Preselection of the gender of offspring is a subject that has held man's attention since the beginning of recorded history. Most scientific hypotheses for producing the desired sex of offspring address separation of X- and Y-bearing sperm, and most have had limited, if any success. Eight of these hypotheses and their experimental verifications are discussed here. Three hypotheses are based on physical characteristics of sperm, one on supposed differences in size and shape, another on differences in density, and a third on differences in surface charge. There has been no experimental verification of differences based on size and shape, and the results from attempts to verify separation of X- and Y-bearing sperm based on density have been mixed. Electrophoresis may provide a method for separating X- and Y-bearing sperm, but it is currently unproven and would be of little practical utility, since sperm motility is lost. A fourth hypothesis employs H-Y antigen to select preimplantation embryos. This method reliably produces female offspring, but does not permit the selection of male offspring and does not work on sperm. There are two applications of the theory that X- and Y-bearing sperm should be separable by flow fractionation. Flow fractionation using thermal convection, counter-streaming sedimentation, and galvanization is highly promoted by its originator but has not gained wide acceptance due to lack of independent confirmation. Flow fractionation by laminar flow is said to provide up to 80% enrichment of both X- and Y-bearing sperm; however, this method also has not been confirmed by other workers or tested in breeding trials. The sixth theory discussed is that of separation through Sephadex gel filtration. This method may provide enrichment of X-bearing sperm, but, again, other experimenters have not been able to adequately confirm the enrichment. The best-known approach to sperm separation is that employing albumin centrifugation, yet even with this method

  2. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

    2007-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center

  3. METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Heal, H.G.

    1960-02-16

    BS>A method of separating plutonium from aqueous nitrate solutions of plutonium, uranium. and high beta activity fission products is given. The pH of the aqueous solution is adjusted between 3.0 to 6.0 with ammonium acetate, ferric nitrate is added, and the solution is heated to 80 to 100 deg C to selectively form a basic ferric plutonium-carrying precipitate.

  4. New influence factor inducing difficulty in selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiu-shuai; Mao, Ying-bo; Wen, Shu-ming; Liu, Jian; Xian, Yong-jun; Feng, Qi-cheng

    2015-02-01

    Selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfides has been proven to be difficult. Thus far, researchers have found no satisfactory way to separate Cu-Zn mixed sulfides by selective flotation, mainly because of the complex surface and interface interaction mechanisms in the flotation solution. Undesired activation occurs between copper ions and the sphalerite surfaces. In addition to recycled water and mineral dissolution, ancient fluids in the minerals are observed to be a new source of metal ions. In this study, significant amounts of ancient fluids were found to exist in Cu-Zn sulfide and gangue minerals, mostly as gas-liquid fluid inclusions. The concentration of copper ions released from the ancient fluids reached 1.02 × 10-6 mol/L, whereas, in the cases of sphalerite and quartz, this concentration was 0.62 × 10-6 mol/L and 0.44 × 10-6 mol/L, respectively. As a result, the ancient fluid is a significant source of copper ions compared to mineral dissolution under the same experimental conditions, which promotes the unwanted activation of sphalerite. Therefore, the ancient fluid is considered to be a new factor that affects the selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfide ores.

  5. Novel syntergistic agent for selective separation of yttrium from other rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Terufumi; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1995-06-01

    An oil-soluble synergistic agent has been developed for the selective separation of yttrium (Y) from the other rare earth metals. The synergistic agent is a polyaminocarboxylic acid alkylderivative and has interfacial activity like that of surfactants. Separation of yttrium from heavy rare earth metals (erbium (Er) and holmium (Ho)) in the presence of the synergistic agent was carried out with a 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester as a carrier using a hollow-fiber membrane extractor. The new agent shows a synergistic effect on the permeation rate of rare earth metals at the oil-water interface. By the addition of a small amount of the agent, the selectivity for yttrium from the two rare earth metals was enhanced remarkably, because of the permeation rate of Y was selectively decreased compared with those of Er and Ho. The synergistic effect is discussed from the viewpoint of the stability constant for rare earth metals and the interfacial activity of the synergistic agent. The difference in interaction between the synergistic agent and rare earth ions at the oil-water interface results in an increase in the separation efficiency.

  6. Flame treatment for the selective wetting and separation of PVC and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Pascoe, R.D.; O'Connell, B

    2003-07-01

    Flame treatment has been used for many years to modify the surface of plastics to allow coatings to be added. The effect of the treatment is to produce hydrophilic species on the surface of the plastic making it water-wettable. The production of hydrophilic plastic surfaces is also required in the selective separation of plastics by froth flotation. For the process to be selective one plastic must be rendered hydrophilic while another remains hydrophobic. In this study the potential for separation of PVC and PET has been investigated. Flame treatment was shown to be very effective in producing a hydrophilic surface on both plastics, although the process was not selective under the conditions investigated. Raising the temperature of the plastics above their softening point produced a hydrophobic recovery. As the softening point of PVC was significantly lower than for PET it was possible to produce a significant difference in hydrophobicity, as judged using contact angle measurement. When immersed in water the contact angle of the PVC was found to be strongly dependent on the pH. Good separation efficiency of the two plastics was achieved by froth flotation from pH 4 to 9. One particular advantage of the technique is that no chemical reagents may be required in the flotation stage. The practicalities of designing a flake treatment system however have to be addressed before considering it to be a viable industrial process.

  7. Flame treatment for the selective wetting and separation of PVC and PET.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, R D; O'Connell, B

    2003-01-01

    Flame treatment has been used for many years to modify the surface of plastics to allow coatings to be added. The effect of the treatment is to produce hydrophilic species on the surface of the plastic making it water-wettable. The production of hydrophilic plastic surfaces is also required in the selective separation of plastics by froth flotation. For the process to be selective one plastic must be rendered hydrophilic while another remains hydrophobic. In this study the potential for separation of PVC and PET has been investigated. Flame treatment was shown to be very effective in producing a hydrophilic surface on both plastics, although the process was not selective under the conditions investigated. Raising the temperature of the plastics above their softening point produced a hydrophobic recovery. As the softening point of PVC was significantly lower than for PET it was possible to produce a significant difference in hydrophobicity, as judged using contact angle measurement. When immersed in water the contact angle of the PVC was found to be strongly dependent on the pH. Good separation efficiency of the two plastics was achieved by froth flotation from pH 4 to 9. One particular advantage of the technique is that no chemical reagents may be required in the flotation stage. The practicalities of designing a flake treatment system however have to be addressed before considering it to be a viable industrial process. PMID:14583247

  8. Selective separation of virgin and post-consumer polymers (PET and PVC) by flotation method.

    PubMed

    Burat, Firat; Güney, Ali; Olgaç Kangal, M

    2009-06-01

    More and more polymer wastes are generated by industry and householders today. Recycling is an important process to reduce the amount of waste resulting from human activities. Currently, recycling technologies use relatively homogeneous polymers because hand-sorting waste is costly. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. At present, most waste polymers cause serious environmental problems. Burning polymers for recycling is not practiced since poisonous gases are released during the burning process. Particularly, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) materials among waste polymers generate hazardous HCl gas, dioxins containing Cl, etc., which lead to air pollution and shorten the life of the incinerator. In addition, they make other polymers difficult to recycle. Both polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and PVC have densities of 1.30-1.35g /cm(3) and cannot be separated using conventional gravity separation techniques. For this reason, polymer recycling needs new techniques. Among these techniques, froth flotation, which is also used in mineral processing, can be useful because of its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this research is to recycle PET and PVC selectively from post-consumer polymer wastes and virgin polymers by using froth flotation. According to the results, all PVC particles were floated with 98.8% efficiency in virgin polymer separation while PET particles were obtained with 99.7% purity and 57.0% efficiency in post-consumer polymer separation. PMID:19155169

  9. Selective separation of virgin and post-consumer polymers (PET and PVC) by flotation method

    SciTech Connect

    Burat, Firat; Gueney, Ali; Olgac Kangal, M.

    2009-06-15

    More and more polymer wastes are generated by industry and householders today. Recycling is an important process to reduce the amount of waste resulting from human activities. Currently, recycling technologies use relatively homogeneous polymers because hand-sorting waste is costly. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. At present, most waste polymers cause serious environmental problems. Burning polymers for recycling is not practiced since poisonous gases are released during the burning process. Particularly, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) materials among waste polymers generate hazardous HCl gas, dioxins containing Cl, etc., which lead to air pollution and shorten the life of the incinerator. In addition, they make other polymers difficult to recycle. Both polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and PVC have densities of 1.30-1.35 g/cm{sup 3} and cannot be separated using conventional gravity separation techniques. For this reason, polymer recycling needs new techniques. Among these techniques, froth flotation, which is also used in mineral processing, can be useful because of its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this research is to recycle PET and PVC selectively from post-consumer polymer wastes and virgin polymers by using froth flotation. According to the results, all PVC particles were floated with 98.8% efficiency in virgin polymer separation while PET particles were obtained with 99.7% purity and 57.0% efficiency in post-consumer polymer separation.

  10. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY AROMATIC DITHIOCARBAMATE COMPLEXING

    DOEpatents

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-08-11

    A selective complexing organic solvent extraction process is presented for the separation of uranium values from an aqueous nitric acid solution of neutron irradiated thorium. The process comprises contacting the solution with an organic aromatic dithiccarbamaie and recovering the resulting urancdithiccarbamate complex with an organic solvent such as ethyl acetate.

  11. In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, S.A.

    1980-03-21

    An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from uranium-235. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen.

  12. Selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes from aqueous solution on polydopamine microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianwei; Xin, Qianqian; Wu, Xuechen; Chen, Zhonghui; Yan, Ya; Liu, Shujun; Wang, Minghuan; Xu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) microspheres, synthesized by a facile oxidation polymerization route, were evaluated as a potential adsorbent for selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes. The adsorption processes towards nine water-soluble dyes (anionic dyes: methyl orange (MO), eosin-Y (EY), eosin-B (EB), acid chrome blue K (ACBK), neutral dye: neutral red (NR), and cationic dyes: rhodamine B (RhB), malachite green (MG), methylene blue (MB), safranine T (ST)) were thoroughly investigated. The adsorption selectivity of organic dyes onto PDA microspheres was successfully applied for the separation of dyes mixtures. Various influential factors such as solution pH, temperature, and contact time were employed to ascertain the optimal condition for adsorption of representative organic dyes including MB, MG and NR. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were used to fit the adsorption kinetics process. Five isothermal adsorption models (Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich, Temkin, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura) were used to investigate the adsorption thermodynamics properties. The results showed that the PDA microspheres owned good selective adsorption ability towards cationic dyes. The adsorption kinetics process conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model and the Langmuir isotherm model was more appropriate for tracing the adsorption behavior than other isotherm models. Thus, we can conclude PDA microspheres may be a high-efficiency selective adsorbent towards some cationic dyes. PMID:26407057

  13. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C. W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

  14. Magnetic deep eutectic solvents molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective recognition and separation of protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjin; Wang, Yuzhi; Dai, Qingzhou; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-09-14

    A novel and facile magnetic deep eutectic solvents (DES) molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the selective recognition and separation of Bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was prepared. The new-type DES was adopted as the functional monomer which would bring molecular imprinted technology to a new direction. The amounts of DES were optimized. The obtained magnetic DES-MIPs were characterized with fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), elemental analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results suggested that the imprinted polymers were successfully formed and possessed a charming magnetism. The maximum adsorption capability (Qmax) and dissociation constant (KL) were analyzed by Langmuir isotherms (R(2) = 0.9983) and the value were estimated to be 175.44 mg/g and 0.035 mg/mL for the imprinted particles. And the imprinted particles showed a high imprinting factor of 4.77. In addition, the magnetic DES-MIPs presented outstanding recognition specificity and selectivity so that it can be utilized to separate template protein from the mixture of proteins and real samples. Last but not least, the combination of deep eutectic solvents and molecular imprinted technology in this paper provides a new perspective for the recognition and separation of proteins. PMID:27566352

  15. Investigation of thermal treatment on selective separation of post consumer plastics prior to froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Guney, Ali; Poyraz, M. Ibrahim; Kangal, Olgac Burat, Firat

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Both PET and PVC have nearly the same densities. • The best pH value will be 4 for optimizing pH values. • Malic acid gave the best results for selective separation of PET and PVC. - Abstract: Plastics have become the widely used materials because of their advantages, such as cheapness, endurance, lightness, and hygiene. However, they cause waste and soil pollution and they do not easily decompose. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. Depending on their surface characteristics, these plastics can be separated from each other by flotation method which is useful mineral processing technique with its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this study is to investigate the flotation characteristics of PET and PVC and determine the effect of plasticizer reagents on efficient plastic separation. For that purpose, various parameters such as pH, plasticizer concentration, plasticizer type, conditioning temperature and thermal conditioning were investigated. As a result, PET particles were floated with 95.1% purity and 65.3% efficiency while PVC particles were obtained with 98.1% purity and 65.3% efficiency.

  16. Ultrathin self-assembled anionic polymer membranes for superfast size-selective separation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Zhang, Qiu Gen; Han, Guang Lu; Gong, Yi; Zhu, Ai Mei; Liu, Qing Lin

    2013-11-21

    Nanoporous membranes with superior separation performance have become more crucial with increasing concerns in functional nanomaterials. Here novel ultrahigh permeable nanoporous membranes have been fabricated on macroporous supports by self-assembly of anionic polymer on copper hydroxide nanostrand templates in organic solution. This facile approach has a great potential for the fabrication of ultrathin anionic polymer membranes as a general method. The as-fabricated self-assembled membranes have a mean pore size of 5-12 nm and an adjustable thickness as low as 85 nm. They allow superfast permeation of water, and exhibit excellent size-selective separation properties and good fouling resistance for negatively-charged solutes during filtration. The 85 nm thick membrane has an ultrahigh water flux (3306 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1)) that is an order of magnitude larger than commercial membranes, and can highly efficiently separate 5 and 15 nm gold nanoparticles from their mixtures. The newly developed nanoporous membranes have a wide application in separation and purification of biomacromolecules and nanoparticles. PMID:24072040

  17. Removal Characteristics of Immunoadsorption With the Immusorba TR-350 Column Using Conventional and Selective Plasma Separators.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Miyamoto, Satoko; Goto, Keigo; Yamamoto, Motoki; Maeda, Takuma; Itagaki, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Kurashima, Naoki; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2016-08-01

    In Japan, immunoadsorption (IA) is performed using a conventional plasma separator and Immusorba TR-350 column (TR-350) for the treatment of neurological immune diseases. By this method, TR-350 has the limited maximal capacity of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) adsorption, and fibrinogen (Fbg) is reduced remarkably. Evacure EC-4A10 (EC-4A) is a selective plasma separator and the sieving coefficients of IgG and Fbg using EC-4A were 0.5 and 0, respectively. Here, we investigated the removal characteristics of IgG and Fbg in IA by TR-350 using two different plasma membrane separators: conventional plasma separator (PE-IA) and EC-4A (EC-IA). In vitro filtration using plasma effluent was performed with a closed circuit. When the processed volume was 3 L, estimated removal amounts by PE-IA were 3172 mg for IgG and 3329 mg for Fbg, respectively. When the processed volume was 3 L, estimated removal amounts by EC-IA were 4946 mg and 1916 mg, respectively. EC-IA can be considered useful for the removal of IgG, including auto-antibodies, while retaining Fbg, thereby allowing even daily use. PMID:27523076

  18. Selective Separation and Determination of Heavy Metals (Cd, Pb, Cr) Speciation Forms from Hortic Antrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgariu, D.; Bulgariu, L.

    2009-04-01

    The speciation, inter-phases distribution and biodisponibility of heavy metals in soils represent one of main problem of environmental geochemistry and agro-chemistry. This problem is very important in case of hortic antrosols (soils from glasshouses) for the elimination of agricultural products (fruits, vegetables) contamination with heavy metals. In soils from glass houses, the speciation and inter-phases distribution processes of heavy metals have a particular dynamic, different in comparison with those from non-protected soils. The predominant distribution forms of heavy metals in such soils types are: complexes with low mass organic molecules, organic-mineral complexes, complexes with inorganic ligands (hydroxide-complexes, carbonate-complexes, sulphate-complexes, etc.) and basic salts. All of these have high stabilities in conditions of soils from glass houses, and in consequence, the separation and determination of speciation forms (which is directly connected with biodisponibility of heavy metals) by usual methods id very difficult and has a high uncertain degree. In this study is presented an original method for the selective separation and differentiation of speciation forms of heavy metals from glass houses soils, which is based by the combination of solid-liquid sequential extraction (SPE) with the extraction in aqueous polymer-inorganic salt two-phase systems (ABS). The soil samples used for this study have been sampled from three different locations (glass houses from Iasi, Barlad and Bacau - Romania) where the vegetables cultivation have bee performed by three different technologies. In this way was estimated the applicability and the analytical limits of method proposed by as, in function of the chemical-mineralogical and physical-chemical characteristics of soils. As heavy metals have been studied cadmium, lead and chromium, all being known for their high toxicity. The procedure used for the selective separation and differentiation of speciation

  19. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  20. Imprint-coating synthesis of selective functionalized ordered mesoporous sorbents for separation and sensors

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Burleigh, Mark C.; Shin, Yongsoon

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to mesoporous sorbent materials having high capacity, high selectivity, fast kinetics, and molecular recognition capability. The invention also relates to a process for preparing these mesoporous substrates through molecular imprinting techniques which differ from convention techniques in that a template molecule is bound to one end of bifunctional ligands to form a complex prior to binding of the bifunctional ligands to the substrate. The present invention also relates to methods of using the mesoporous sorbent materials, for example, in the separation of toxic metals from process effluents, paints, and other samples; detection of target molecules, such as amino acids, drugs, herbicides, fertilizers, and TNT, in samples; separation and/or detection of substances using chromatography; imaging agents; sensors; coatings; and composites.

  1. Size-selective separation of DNA fragments by using lysine-functionalized silica particles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingling; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Zhenzhen; Zhuang, Jiaqi; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a facile and efficient approach has been demonstrated for size-selective separation of DNA fragments by using lysine-functionalized silica particles. At a given pH, the environmental ionic strength can be utilized to alter the electrostatic interactions of lysine-functionalized silica particles with DNA fragments and in turn the DNA fragments on the silica particle surfaces, which exhibits a clear dependence on the DNA fragment sizes. By carefully adjusting the environmental pH and salt concentration, therefore, the use of the lysine-functionalized silica particles allows effective separation of binary and ternary DNA mixtures, for example, two different DNA fragments with sizes of 101 and 1073 bp, 101 and 745 bp, 101 and 408 bp, respectively, and three different DNA fragments with sizes of 101, 408 and 1073 bp. PMID:26911527

  2. Fabrication of microchannels by space-selective control of phase separation in glass.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongze; Chen, Yeqin; Chen, Jiejie; Lv, Shichao; Feng, Xu; Qi, Yuzhong; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhou, Shifeng

    2016-07-15

    Microchannels have important scientific applications in many fields, because they enable precise control, manipulation, and analysis of fluid on a micrometer scale. Herein, we demonstrate an effective strategy for fabrication of microchannels, based on the space-selective phase separation in glass induced by a femtosecond laser. The proposed method shows its abilities in fabrication of three-dimensional microchannels with ∼5  mm length scale and a uniform cross section. Moreover, we also achieve the modulation of the morphology on the inner surface of microchannels by using objective lenses with various numerical-apertures. The physical mechanism of the phase separation and microstructure evolution is discussed. Our method provides new opportunities to fabricate microchannels with complex structures and multifunctional integration. PMID:27420538

  3. Size-selective separation of DNA fragments by using lysine-functionalized silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingling; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Zhenzhen; Zhuang, Jiaqi; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a facile and efficient approach has been demonstrated for size-selective separation of DNA fragments by using lysine-functionalized silica particles. At a given pH, the environmental ionic strength can be utilized to alter the electrostatic interactions of lysine-functionalized silica particles with DNA fragments and in turn the DNA fragments on the silica particle surfaces, which exhibits a clear dependence on the DNA fragment sizes. By carefully adjusting the environmental pH and salt concentration, therefore, the use of the lysine-functionalized silica particles allows effective separation of binary and ternary DNA mixtures, for example, two different DNA fragments with sizes of 101 and 1073 bp, 101 and 745 bp, 101 and 408 bp, respectively, and three different DNA fragments with sizes of 101, 408 and 1073 bp.

  4. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  5. Summary report on reprocessing evaluation of selected inactive uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assisting the Department of Energy in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program (UMTRAP) the purpose of which is to implement the provisions of Title I of Public Law 95-604, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.'' As part of this program, there was a need to evaluate the mineral concentration of the residual radioactive materials at some of the designated processing sites to determine whether mineral recovery would be practicable. Accordingly, Sandia contracted Mountain States Research and Development (MSRD), a division of Mountain States Mineral Enterprises, to drill, sample, and test tailings at 12 sites to evaluate the cost of and the revenue that could be derived from mineral recovery. UMTRAP related environmental and engineering sampling and support activities were performed in conjunction with the MSRD operations. This summary report presents a brief description of the various activities in the program and of the data and information obtained and summarizes the results. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  6. Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions by Selective Crystallization of Alkali Metal Coordination Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Rajbanshi, Arbin; Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of a tris(urea) anion receptor with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} yields crystalline capsules held together by coordinating Na{sup +} or K{sup +} cations and hydrogen-bonding water bridges, with the sulfate anions encapsulated inside urea-lined cavities. The sodium-based capsules can be selectively crystallized in excellent yield from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions ({approx}6 M Na{sup +}, pH 14), thereby providing for the first time a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  7. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  8. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Yeager, J.H.

    1958-08-12

    In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

  9. Theoretical stability assessment of uranyl phosphates and apatites: selection of amendments for in situ remediation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Raicevic, S; Wright, J V; Veljkovic, V; Conca, J L

    2006-02-15

    Addition of an amendment or reagent to soil/sediment is a technique that can decrease mobility and reduce bioavailability of uranium (U) and other heavy metals in the contaminated site. According to data from literature and results obtained in field studies, the general mineral class of apatites was selected as a most promising amendment for in situ immobilization/remediation of U. In this work we presented theoretical assessment of stability of U(VI) in four apatite systems (hydroxyapatite (HAP), North Carolina Apatite (NCA), Lisina Apatite (LA), and Apatite II) in order to determine an optimal apatite soil amendment which could be used for in situ remediation of uranium. In this analysis we used a theoretical criterion which is based on calculation of the ion-ion interaction potential, representing the main term of the cohesive energy of the matrix/pollutant system. The presented results of this analysis indicate (i) that the mechanism of immobilization of U by natural apatites depends on their chemical composition and (ii) that all analyzed apatites represent, from the point of view of stability, promising materials which could be used in field remediation of U-contaminated sites. PMID:15885755

  10. Separating Metallic Beryllium from Plutonium by Selective Dissolution with Ammonium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, R A

    2006-11-29

    Plutonium metal is stabilized for long-term storage by calcining to produce PuO{sub 2}. However, if beryllium is present, the calcined product may have a high neutron dose rate because of the {sup 9}Be({alpha},n){sup 12}C reaction in the finely divided oxide mixture. (At LLNL, inadvertent calcining of a mixture of {approx}500 g Pu/50 g Be produced a neutron source of {approx}5 R/hr.) Therefore, for health physics reasons, we would like a convenient procedure to remove beryllium from plutonium with high selectivity. Two reagents, sodium hydroxide and ammonium fluoride, were considered for aqueous processing. Each reagent selectively dissolves beryllium, which can be separated from the insoluble plutonium by decanting/filtering operations followed by water washes to remove the excess reagent. The washed plutonium is calcined for storage; the beryllium and wash fractions are solidified for disposal.

  11. METHOD OF SEPARATING Pu FROM METATHESIZED BiPO$sub 4$ CARRIER

    DOEpatents

    Knox, W.J.; Thompson, S.G.

    1960-05-31

    A process is given for separating uranium, neptunium, and/or plutonium from a bismuth hydroxide carrier by selective dissolution of these actinides with nitric acid of a concentration of from 0.05 to 0.5N.

  12. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  13. Selecting a Separable Parametric Spatiotemporal Covariance Structure for Longitudinal Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    George, Brandon; Aban, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies allow great insight into how the structure and function of a subject’s internal anatomy changes over time. Unfortunately, the analysis of longitudinal imaging data is complicated by inherent spatial and temporal correlation: the temporal from the repeated measures, and the spatial from the outcomes of interest being observed at multiple points in a patients body. We propose the use of a linear model with a separable parametric spatiotemporal error structure for the analysis of repeated imaging data. The model makes use of spatial (exponential, spherical, and Matérn) and temporal (compound symmetric, autoregressive-1, Toeplitz, and unstructured) parametric correlation functions. A simulation study, inspired by a longitudinal cardiac imaging study on mitral regurgitation patients, compared different information criteria for selecting a particular separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structure as well as the effects on Type I and II error rates for inference on fixed effects when the specified model is incorrect. Information criteria were found to be highly accurate at choosing between separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structures. Misspecification of the covariance structure was found to have the ability to inflate the Type I error or have an overly conservative test size, which corresponded to decreased power. An example with clinical data is given illustrating how the covariance structure procedure can be done in practice, as well as how covariance structure choice can change inferences about fixed effects. PMID:25293361

  14. Fast separation of selected cathinones and phenylethylamines by supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pauk, Volodymyr; Žihlová, Veronika; Borovcová, Lucie; Havlíček, Vladimír; Schug, Kevin; Lemr, Karel

    2015-12-01

    The chromatographic behaviour of eleven synthetic cathinones and four phenylethylamines under supercritical/subcritical fluid conditions was investigated. Four stationary phases with sub-2μm particles (Waters Acquity UPC(2) BEH silica, BEH 2-ethylpyridine, CSH Fluoro-Phenyl, and HSS C18SB) were evaluated in terms of isomer resolution, chromatographic peak shape, and analysis time. Methanol, water, formic acid, ammonium hydroxide, ammonium acetate, and ammonium formate were mixed with carbon dioxide to test their influence on analyte retention and peak shapes. Methanol and ammonium cations were essential for successful separations. Efficient separations of four isomeric pairs (R>1), and most of the remaining analytes, were achieved in less than 3.3min on BEH and Fluoro-Phenyl columns with gradient of methanolic ammonium hydroxide in CO2. Drugs were detected by positive electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode. Added detection specificity and faster separation of isomers on the BEH column using a steep gradient and high flow rate reduced analysis time of the mixture of 15 drugs to 1.6min. PMID:26585202

  15. Effect of microwave irradiation on selective heating behavior and magnetic separation characteristics of Panzhihua ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Jin; Chang, Xiaodong; Guo, Shenghui; Srinivasakannan, C.; Chen, Guo; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-05-01

    The influences of microwave irradiation on the surface characteristics of Panzhihua ilmenite were systematically investigated. The crystal structures, surface morphology and surface chemical functional groups of ilmenite were characterized before and after microwave irradiation and magnetic separation for different microwave treatment times by using various methods, such as XRD, SEM, and FT-IR, respectively. XRD analysis showed that the microwave treated ilmenite has the strongest peaks of phase more than that of raw samples, indicates that the crystalline compound of ilmenite increased with the microwave irradiation time. SEM analysis showed the micro-cracking appeared at many grain boundaries of ilmenite after being pretreated by microwave treatment. The separations of ilmenite from gangue minerals were completed and the micro-fissure within ilmenite minerals were also formed, which could be attributed to the microwave selective heating characteristics of the different minerals and compounds, and the thermal stresses were caused by the uniform heat rate disturbed under microwave irradiation. The mineral processing results showed that the magnetic separation characteristics and properties of microwave treated ilmenite samples were better than that of microwave untreated ilmenite samples. It was concluded that microwave irradiation can be applied effectively and efficiently to the irradiation processes of Panzhihua ilmenite.

  16. Upgrading of Low-Grade Manganese Ore by Selective Reduction of Iron Oxide and Magnetic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yubo; Olivas-Martinez, M.; Sohn, H. Y.; Kim, Hang Goo; Kim, Chan Wook

    2012-12-01

    The utilization of low-grade manganese ores has become necessary due to the intensive mining of high-grade ores for a long time. In this study, calcined ferruginous low-grade manganese ore was selectively reduced by CO, which converted hematite to magnetite, while manganese oxide was reduced to MnO. The iron-rich component was then separated by magnetic separation. The effects of the various reduction parameters such as particle size, reduction time, temperature, and CO content on the efficiency of magnetic separation were studied by single-factor experiments and by a comprehensive full factorial experiment. Under the best experimental conditions tested, the manganese content in the ore increased from around 36 wt pct to more than 44 wt pct, and almost 50 wt pct of iron was removed at a Mn loss of around 5 pct. The results of the full factorial experiments allowed the identification of the significant effects and yielded regression equations for pct Fe removed, Mn/Fe, and pct Mn loss that characterize the efficiency of the upgrading process.

  17. Calix[4]pyrroles: highly selective stationary phases for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Wang, Zhenzhong; Li, Qian; Qi, Meiling; Shao, Shijun; Fu, Ruonong

    2014-10-01

    Calix[4]pyrroles offer a great potential as stationary phases for gas chromatography (GC) due to their unique structures and physicochemical properties. Herein we present the first report of using two calix[4]pyrroles, namely meso-tetra-cyclohexylcalix[4]pyrrole (THCP) and meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (OMCP). These stationary phases were statically coated onto capillary columns and investigated in terms of column efficiency, polarity, separation performance, thermal stability and repeatability. The columns achieved column efficiencies of 2200-3000plates/m and exhibited nonpolar nature with an average polarity of 67 for THCP and 64 for OMCP, respectively. THCP stationary phase shows high selectivity for analytes of different polarity and exhibits nice peak shapes, especially for aldehydes, alcohols and anilines that are prone to severe peak tailing in GC analysis. Interestingly, THCP stationary phase possesses superior resolving ability for aniline and benzenediol positional isomers while OMCP shows preferential selectivity for nonpolar analytes such as hexane isomers. Moreover, calix[4]pyrrole columns also have good thermal stability up to 260°C and repeatability with a relative standard deviation (RSD%) of less than 0.10% for run-to-run and less than 5.2% for column-to-column. This work demonstrates the unique separation performance of calix[4]pyrroles and their promising future as a new class of GC stationary phases. PMID:25173993

  18. [Hyperspectral Band Selection Based on Spectral Clustering and Inter-Class Separability Factor].

    PubMed

    Qin, Fang-pu; Zhang, Ai-wu; Wang, Shu-min; Meng, Xian-gang; Hu, Shao-xing; Sun, Wei-dong

    2015-05-01

    With the development of remote sensing technology and imaging spectrometer, the resolution of hyperspectral remote sensing image has been continually improved, its vast amount of data not only improves the ability of the remote sensing detection but also brings great difficulties for analyzing and processing at the same time. Band selection of hyperspectral imagery can effectively reduce data redundancy and improve classification accuracy and efficiency. So how to select the optimum band combination from hundreds of bands of hyperspectral images is a key issue. In order to solve these problems, we use spectral clustering algorithm based on graph theory. Firstly, taking of the original hyperspectral image bands as data points to be clustered , mutual information between every two bands is calculated to generate the similarity matrix. Then according to the graph partition theory, spectral decomposition of the non-normalized Laplacian matrix generated by the similarity matrix is used to get the clusters, which the similarity between is small and the similarity within is large. In order to achieve the purpose of dimensionality reduction, the inter-class separability factor of feature types on each band is calculated, which is as the reference index to choose the representative bands in the clusters furthermore. Finally, the support vector machine and minimum distance classification methods are employed to classify the hyperspectral image after band selection. The method in this paper is different from the traditional unsupervised clustering method, we employ spectral clustering algorithm based on graph theory and compute the interclass separability factor based on a priori knowledge to select bands. Comparing with traditional adaptive band selection algorithm and band index based on automatically subspace divided algorithm, the two sets of experiments results show that the overall accuracy of SVM is about 94. 08% and 94. 24% and the overall accuracy of MDC is about 87

  19. Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W.; Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A.; Chaiko, D.J.; Matthern, G.

    1994-09-01

    An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

  20. Heterostructured magnetite-titanate nanosheets for prompt charge selective binding and magnetic separation of mixed proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinhua; Lu, Zhufeng; Cao, Xuebo

    2014-02-01

    We reported the prompt charge selective binding and magnetic separation of mixed proteins by utilizing heterostructured Fe3O4-Na2Ti3O7 nanosheets. Fe3O4-Na2Ti3O7 nanosheets are found to combine a variety of structure and property merits, such as the increased interlayer galleries, exposed exchange sites, flexible framework, and magnetic manipulability. Probing the dissociation dynamics of Na(+) inside the nanosheets reveals that they possess remarkably enhanced Na(+) dissociation capability and the dissociation rate of Na(+) reaches 7.9×10(-)(6)mol g(-)(1)s(-)(1), much superior to titanate nanotubes. In model protein separation experiments, we utilize mixed proteins containing albumin and hemoglobin to assess Fe3O4-Na2Ti3O7 nanosheets. It is found that, by controlling the pH of the sample at 6, positively charged hemoglobin and negatively charged albumin are immediately separated (∼5s) by the nanosheets and the saturated loading capacity of hemoglobin on the nanosheets reaches 4.7±0.61g g(-)(1). Furthermore, hemoglobin bound to the nanosheets can be readily released after buffer wash and is not damaged, while the nanosheets are recyclable and maintain their high efficiency. The outstanding performance of Fe3O4-Na2Ti3O7 nanosheets in separating mixed proteins is attributed to the ultrafast Na(+) dissociation rate, flexible titanate framework, open geometry, and aqueous-like environment to stabilize proteins. These merits, together with the recyclability and cost effectiveness, should make Fe3O4-Na2Ti3O7 nanosheets ideal candidates for biological recognition, isolation, and purification under technologically useful conditions. PMID:24267329

  1. Valence-associated uranium isotope fractionation of uranium enriched phosphate in a shallow aquifer, Lee County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, J.M. ); Levine, B.R. ); Cowart, J.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    The source of anomalously high concentrations of uranium, characterized by U-234/U-238 activity ratios significantly less than unity, in shallow groundwaters of Lee County, Florida, was investigated. Uranium in cores samples was separated into U(IV) and U(VI) oxidation state fractions, and uranium analyses were conducted by alpha spectrometry. Uranium mobility was also studied in selected leaching experiments. Results indicate that mobilization of unusually soluble uranium, present in uranium enriched phosphate of the Pliocene age Tamiami Formation at determined concentrations of up to 729 ppm, is the source for high uranium concentrations in groundwater. In leaching experiments, approximately one-third of the uranium present in the uranium enriched phosphate was mobilized into the aqueous phase. Results of previous investigations suggest that U-234, produced in rock by U-238 decay, is selectively oxidized to U(VI). The uranium enriched phosphate studied in this investigation is characterized by selective reduction of U-234, with a pattern of increasing isotopic fractionation with core depth. As a consequence, U-234/U-238 activity ratios greater than 1.0 in the U(IV) fraction, and less than 1.0 in the U(VI) fraction have developed in the rock phase. In leaching experiments, the U(VI) fraction from the rock was preferentially mobilized into the aqueous phase, suggesting that U-234/U-238 activity ratios of leaching groundwaters are strongly influenced by the isotopic characteristics of the U(VI) fraction of rock. It is suggested that preferential leaching of U(VI), present in selectivity reduced uranium enriched phosphate, is the source for low activity ratio groundwaters in Lee County.

  2. Separate visual signals for saccade initiation during target selection in the primate superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    White, Brian J; Munoz, Douglas P

    2011-02-01

    The primary function of the superior colliculus (SC) is to orient the visual system toward behaviorally relevant stimuli defined by features such as color. However, a longstanding view has held that visual activity in the SC arises exclusively from achromatic pathways. Recently, we reported evidence that the primate SC is highly sensitive to signals originating from chromatic pathways, but these signals are delayed relative to luminance signals (White et al., 2009). Here, we describe a functional consequence of this difference in visual arrival time on the processes leading to target selection and saccade initiation. Two rhesus monkeys performed a simple color-singleton selection task in which stimuli carried a chromatic component only (target and distractors were isoluminant with the background, but differed in chromaticity) or a combined chromatic-achromatic component (36% luminance contrast added equally to all stimuli). Although visual responses were delayed in the chromatic-only relative to the combined chromatic-achromatic condition, SC neurons discriminated the target from distractors at approximately the same time provided stimulus chromaticity was held constant. However, saccades were triggered sooner, and with more errors, with the chromatic-achromatic condition, suggesting that luminance signals associated with these stimuli increased the probability of triggering a saccade before the target color was adequately discriminated. These results suggest that separate mechanisms may independently influence the saccadic command in the SC, one linked to the arrival time of pertinent visual signals, and another linked to the output of the visual selection process. PMID:21289164

  3. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  4. Selective detection of uranium by laser-induced fluorescence: a potential remote-sensing technique. 1: Optical characteristics of uranyl geologic targets.

    PubMed

    Deneufville, J P; Kasdan, A; Chimenti, R J

    1981-04-15

    The remote sensing of laser-induced uranyl ion fluorescence is examined as a potential indicator of uranium occurring in geologic materials at the earth's surface. The lifetime and brightness of the fluorescence from a wide variety of rocks, minerals, and soils are reported. The distinctive characteristics of uranyl ion absorption and fluorescence were observed in diverse geologic materials such as chalcedonies and opals containing 15-3000 ppm of uranium and in surface coatings of uranyl minerals such as metaautunite, liebigite, and an-dersonite. The conditions which permit the excitation and selective detection of uranyl ion fluorescence from such targets are described. PMID:20309303

  5. Rapid and selective separation for mixed proteins with thiol functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Thiol group functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Si-MNPs@SH) were synthesized for rapid and selective magnetic field-based separation of mixed proteins. The highest adsorption efficiencies of binary proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA; 66 kDa; pI = 4.65) and lysozyme (LYZ; 14.3 kDa; pI = 11) were shown at the pH values corresponding to their own pI in the single-component protein. In the mixed protein, however, the adsorption performance of BSA and LYZ by Si-MNPs@SH was governed not only by pH but also by the molecular weight of each protein in the mixed protein. PMID:22650609

  6. Separability of stimulus parameter encoding by on-off directionally selective rabbit retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Przemyslaw; Dobbins, Allan C.; Gawne, Timothy J.; Grzywacz, Norberto M.

    2011-01-01

    The ganglion cell output of the retina constitutes a bottleneck in sensory processing in that ganglion cells must encode multiple stimulus parameters in their responses. Here we investigate encoding strategies of On-Off directionally selective retinal ganglion cells (On-Off DS RGCs) in rabbits, a class of cells dedicated to representing motion. The exquisite axial discrimination of these cells to preferred vs. null direction motion is well documented: it is invariant with respect to speed, contrast, spatial configuration, spatial frequency, and motion extent. However, these cells have broad direction tuning curves and their responses also vary as a function of other parameters such as speed and contrast. In this study, we examined whether the variation in responses across multiple stimulus parameters is systematic, that is the same for all cells, and separable, such that the response to a stimulus is a product of the effects of each stimulus parameter alone. We extracellularly recorded single On-Off DS RGCs in a superfused eyecup preparation while stimulating them with moving bars. We found that spike count responses of these cells scaled as independent functions of direction, speed, and luminance. Moreover, the speed and luminance functions were common across the whole sample of cells. Based on these findings, we developed a model that accurately predicted responses of On-Off DS RGCs as products of separable functions of direction, speed, and luminance (r = 0.98; P < 0.0001). Such a multiplicatively separable encoding strategy may simplify the decoding of these cells' outputs by the higher visual centers. PMID:21325684

  7. Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) for highly selective separations

    SciTech Connect

    Yaghi, Omar M

    2012-09-17

    Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) have been investigated for the realization as separation media with high selectivity. These structures are held together with strong bonds, making them architecturally, chemically, and thermally stable. Therefore, employing well designed building units, it is possible to discover promising materials for gas and vapor separation. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs and ZIFs with these specific objectives: (i) to develop a strategy for producing MOFs and ZIFs that combine high surface areas with active sites for their use in gas adsorption and separation of small organic compounds, (ii) to introduce active sites in the framework by a post-synthetic modification and metalation of MOFs and ZIFs, and (iii) to design and synthesize MOFs with extremely high surface areas and large pore volumes to accommodate large amounts of guest molecules. By the systematic study, this effort demonstrated how to introduce active functional groups in the frameworks, and this is also the origin of a new strategy, which is termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. One of the solutions to overcome this challenge is an isoreticular expansion of a MOF's structure. With triangular organic linker and square building units, we demonstrated that MOF-399 has a unit cell volume 17 times larger than that of the first reported material isoreticular to it, and it has the highest porosity (94%) and lowest density (0.126 g cm-3) of any MOF reported to date. MOFs are not just low density materials; the guest-free form of MOF-210 demonstrates an ultrahigh porosity, whose BET surface area was estimated to be 6240 m2 g-1 by N2 adsorption measurements.

  8. DNA aptamers for selective identification and separation of flame retardant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kim, Byoung Chan

    2016-09-14

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are group of chemicals which are representative persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and used as brominated flame retardants for many consumer products. PBDEs were phased out since 2009 but are still frequently observed in various environmental matrices and human body. Here, we report ssDNA aptamers which bind to BDE47, one of the PBDE congeners commonly found in various environmental matrices, and show affinity to other major tri-to hepta- BDE congeners. The PBDE specific aptamers were isolated from random library of ssDNA using Mag-SELEX. Two out of 15 sequences, based on their alignment and hairpin loop structures, were chosen to determine dissociation constant with BDE47 and showed from picomolar to nanomolar affinities (200 pM and 1.53 nM). The aptamers displayed high selectivity to the original target, BDE47, and implying general specificity to PBDE backbone with varying affinities to other congeners. Further, we showed that the use of two aptamers together could enhance the separation efficiency of BDE47 and other BDE congeners when dissolved in a solvent compared to use of single aptamer. These aptamers are expected to provide a tool for preliminary screening or quick separation of PBDEs in environmental samples prior to trace quantitative analysis. PMID:27566357

  9. Ultrathin pH-sensitive nanoporous membranes for superfast size-selective separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu Gen; Deng, Chao; Liu, Rong Rong; Lin, Zhen; Li, Hong Mei; Zhu, Ai Mei; Liu, Qing Lin

    2015-05-01

    Stimuli-responsive nanoporous membranes have attracted increasing interest in various fields due to their abrupt changes of permeation/separation in response to the external environment. Here we report ultrathin pH-sensitive nanoporous membranes that are easily fabricated by the self-assembly of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in a metal hydroxide nanostrand solution. PAA-adsorbed nanostrands (2.5-5.0 nm) and PAA-Cu(II) nanogels (2.0-2.5 nm) grow competitively during self-assembly. The PAA-adsorbed nanostrands are deposited on a porous support to fabricate ultrathin PAA membranes. The membranes display ultrafast water permeation and good rejection as well as significant pH-sensitivity. The 28 nm-thick membrane has a water flux decrease from 3740 to 1350 L m(-1)  h(-1)  bar(-1) (pH 2.0 to 7.0) with a sharp decrease at pH 5.0. This newly developed pH-sensitive nanoporous membranes may find a wide range of applications such as controlled release and size- and charge-selective separation. PMID:25736206

  10. Unique toxicological behavior from single-wall carbon nanotubes separated via selective adsorption on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Clar, Justin G; Gustitus, Sarah A; Youn, Sejin; Silvera Batista, Carlos A; Ziegler, Kirk J; Bonzongo, Jean Claude J

    2015-03-17

    Over the past decade, extensive research has been completed on the potential threats of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to living organisms upon release to aquatic systems. However, these studies have focused primarily on the link between adverse biological effects in exposed test organisms on the length, diameter, and metallic impurity content of SWCNTs. In contrast, few studies have focused on the bioeffects of the different SWCNTs in the as-produced mixture, which contain both metallic (m-SWCNT) and semiconducting (s-SWCNT) species. Using selective adsorption onto hydrogels, high purity m-SWCNT and s-SWCNT fractions were produced and their biological impacts determined in dose-response studies with Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as test organism. The results show significant differences in the biological responses of P. subcapitata exposed to high purity m- and s-SWCNT fractions. Contrary to the biological response observed using SWCNTs separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation, it is found that the high-pressure CO conversion (HiPco) s-SWCNT fraction separated by selective adsorption causes increased biological impact. These findings suggest that s-SWCNTs are the primary factor driving the adverse biological responses observed from P. subcapitata cells exposed to our as-produced suspensions. Finally, the toxicity of the s-SWCNT fraction is mitigated by increasing the concentration of biocompatible surfactant in the suspensions, likely altering the nature of surfactant coverage along SWCNT sidewalls, thereby reducing potential physical interaction with algal cells. These findings highlight the need to couple sample processing and toxicity response studies. PMID:25710331

  11. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. METHOD FOR RECOVERING URANIUM FROM OILS

    DOEpatents

    Gooch, L.H.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for recovering uranium from hydrocarbon oils, wherein the uranium is principally present as UF/sub 4/. According to the invention, substantially complete removal of the uranium from the hydrocarbon oil may be effected by intimately mixing one part of acetone to about 2 to 12 parts of the hydrocarbon oil containing uranium and separating the resulting cake of uranium from the resulting mixture. The uranium in the cake may be readily recovered by burning to the oxide.

  13. Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I

    2006-01-01

    range of values generally associated with better dispersability, is provided in the Appendix. Special attention was given to characterization of several surface-modified carbon blacks produced by Cabot Corporation through proprietary diazonium salts chemistry. As demonstrated in the report, these advanced carbons offer many advantages over traditional dispersions. They disperse very easily, do not require intensive mechanical shearing or sonication, and the particle size of the dispersed carbon black aggregates is in the target range of 0.15-0.20 {micro}m. The dispersions in water and HMTA/urea solutions are stable for at least 30 days; in conditions of simulated broth, the dispersions are stable for at least 6 hours. It is proposed that the optimization of the carbon black dispersing process is possible by replacing traditional carbon blacks and surfactants with surface-modified carbon blacks having suitable chemical groups attached on their surface. It is recognized that the method advanced in this report for optimizing the carbon black dispersion process is based on a limited number of tests made in aqueous and simulated broth conditions. The findings were corroborated by a limited number of tests carried out with ADUN solutions by the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). More work is necessary, however, to confirm the overall recommendation based on the findings discussed in this report: namely, that the use of surface-modified carbon blacks in the uranium-containing broth will not adversely impact the chemistry of the gelation process, and that high quality uranium oxicarbide (UCO) kernels will be produced after calcination.

  14. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  15. Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Ghate, Madhav R.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1987-01-01

    Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

  16. Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

    1985-10-03

    Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Flotation selectivity of novel alkyl dicarboxylate reagents for apatite-calcite separation.

    PubMed

    Karlkvist, Tommy; Patra, Anuttam; Rao, Kota Hanumantha; Bordes, Romain; Holmberg, Krister

    2015-05-01

    The investigation aims to demonstrate the conceptual thoughts behind developing mineral specific reagents for use in flotation of calcium containing ores. For this purpose, a series of dicarboxylate-based surfactants with varying distance between the carboxylate groups (one, two or three methylene groups) was synthesized. A surfactant with the same alkyl chain length but with only one carboxylate group was also synthesized and evaluated. The adsorption behavior of these new reagents on pure apatite and pure calcite surfaces was studied using Hallimond tube flotation, FTIR and ζ potential measurements. The relation between the adsorption behavior of a given surfactant at a specific mineral surface and its molecular structure over a range of concentrations and pH values, as well as the region of maximum recovery, was established. It was found that one of the reagents, with a specific distance between the carboxylate groups, was much more selective for a particular mineral surface than the other homologues. For example, out of the four compounds synthesized, only the one where the carboxylate groups were separated by a single methylene group floated apatite but not calcite, whereas calcite was efficiently floated with the monocarboxylic reagent, but not with the other reagents synthesized. This selective adsorption of a given surfactant to a particular mineral surface relative to other mineral surfaces as evidenced in the flotation studies was substantiated by ζ potential and infra-red spectroscopy data. PMID:25596367

  18. Partition Coefficients of Selected Compounds Using Ion Exchange Separation of Cesium From High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J.; Blanchard, David L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Urie, Michael W.

    2004-04-24

    The removal of cesium radioisotope (137Cs) from the High Level Waste stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site is a formidable chemical separations challenge for the Waste Treatment Plant. An eluatable organic-based ion exchange resin was selected as the baseline technology (1). The baseline technology design employs a proprietary macrocyclic weak-acid ion exchange resin to adsorb the cesium (137Cs) during the process loading cycle in a fixed bed column design. Following loading, the cesium is eluted from the resin using a nitric acid eluant. Previous work provided limited understanding of the performance of the resin, processed with actual wastes, and under multiple load and elute conditions, which are required for the ion exchange technology to be underpinned sufficiently for resolution of all process-related design issues before flowsheet and construction drawings can be released. By performing multiple ion exchange column tests with waste feeds, and measuring the chemical and radionuclide compositions of the waste feeds, column effluents and column eluants, ion exchange stream composition information can be provided for supporting resolution of selected design issues.

  19. Selectivity differences of water-soluble vitamins separated on hydrophilic interaction stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the retention behavior and selectivity differences of water-soluble vitamins were evaluated with three types of polar stationary phases (i.e. an underivatized silica phase, an amide phase, and an amino phase) operated in the hydrophilic interaction chromatographic mode with ESI mass spectrometric detection. The effects of mobile phase composition, including buffer pH and concentration, on the retention and selectivity of the vitamins were investigated. In all stationary phases, the neutral or weakly charged vitamins exhibited very weak retention under each of the pH conditions, while the acidic and more basic vitamins showed diverse retention behaviors. With the underivatized silica phase, increasing the salt concentration of the mobile phase resulted in enhanced retention of the acidic vitamins, but decreased retention of the basic vitamins. These observations thus signify the involvement of secondary mechanisms, such as electrostatic interaction in the retention of these analytes. Under optimized conditions, a baseline separation of all vitamins was achieved with excellent peak efficiency. In addition, the effects of water content in the sample on retention and peak efficiency were examined, with sample stacking effects observed when the injected sample contained a high amount of water. PMID:23554360

  20. Separable Sustained and Selective Attention Factors Are Apparent in 5-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Underbjerg, Mette; George, Melanie S.; Thorsen, Poul; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.; Mortensen, Erik L.; Manly, Tom

    2013-01-01

    In adults and older children, evidence consistent with relative separation between selective and sustained attention, superimposed upon generally positive inter-test correlations, has been reported. Here we examine whether this pattern is detectable in 5-year-old children from the healthy population. A new test battery (TEA-ChJ) was adapted from measures previously used with adults and older children and administered to 172 5-year-olds. Test-retest reliability was assessed in 60 children. Ninety-eight percent of the children managed to complete all measures. Discrimination of visual and auditory stimuli were good. In a factor analysis, the two TEA-ChJ selective attention tasks (one visual, one auditory) loaded onto a common factor and diverged from the two sustained attention tasks (one auditory, one motor), which shared a common loading on the second factor. This pattern, which suggests that the tests are indeed sensitive to underlying attentional capacities, was supported by the relationships between the TEA-ChJ factors and Test of Everyday Attention for Children subtests in the older children in the sample. It is possible to gain convincing performance-based estimates of attention at the age of 5 with the results reflecting a similar factor structure to that obtained in older children and adults. The results are discussed in light of contemporary models of attention function. Given the potential advantages of early intervention for attention difficulties, the findings are of clinical as well as theoretical interest. PMID:24376591

  1. FAHP ranking and selection of pretreatment module for membrane separation processes in textile cluster.

    PubMed

    Manekar, Pravin; Nandy, Tapas; Sargaonkar, Abha; Rathi, Barkha; Karthik, Manikavasagam

    2011-01-01

    Recent development in membrane manufacturing and extensive application of membranes in effluent treatment has opened up a new water resource. The effluent pretreatment module plays a critical role in membrane performance. Appropriate selection of conventional and advanced pretreatment modules in membrane separation processes (MSP) is significant to the success of zero effluent discharge (ZED). This study addresses performance assessment of eight conventional and advanced pretreatment modules implemented for wastewater management in a textile cluster in South India. The comparative pollutant reduction, capital, operation and maintenance (OM) cost of pretreatment modules are discussed. The ranking and interdependence of the pretreatment modules were analyzed through fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP) with MATLAB software. The pretreatment module IV ranked third with a composite weight of 15.46%. The integrated study of performance assessment and FAHP resulted in an optimum pretreatment module IV comprising the sequence of chemical precipitation, bio-oxidation processes (activated sludge processes) followed by chemical precipitation, to achieve the ZED. This study provides a techno-economically feasible solution for selection of an effective pretreatment module for MSP in the textile cluster. PMID:20728348

  2. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  3. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR THORIUM SALTS

    DOEpatents

    Bridger, G.L.; Whatley, M.E.; Shaw, K.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process is described for the separation of uranium, thorium, and rare earths extracted from monazite by digesting with sulfuric acid. By carefully increasing the pH of the solution, stepwise, over the range 0.8 to 5.5, a series of selective precipitations will be achieved, with the thorium values coming out at lower pH, the rare earths at intermediate pH and the uranium last. Some mixed precipitates will be obtained, and these may be treated by dissolving in HNO/sub 3/ and contacting with dibutyl phosphate, whereby thorium or uranium are taken up by the organic phase while the rare earths preferentially remain in the aqueous solution.

  4. Uranium purchases report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-19

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B ``Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data.

  5. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  6. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  7. Feature Selection and Blind Source Separation in an EEG-Based Brain-Computer Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David A.; Knight, James N.; Kirby, Michael J.; Anderson, Charles W.; Thaut, Michael H.

    2005-12-01

    Most EEG-based BCI systems make use of well-studied patterns of brain activity. However, those systems involve tasks that indirectly map to simple binary commands such as "yes" or "no" or require many weeks of biofeedback training. We hypothesized that signal processing and machine learning methods can be used to discriminate EEG in a direct "yes"/"no" BCI from a single session. Blind source separation (BSS) and spectral transformations of the EEG produced a 180-dimensional feature space. We used a modified genetic algorithm (GA) wrapped around a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to search the space of feature subsets. The GA-based search found feature subsets that outperform full feature sets and random feature subsets. Also, BSS transformations of the EEG outperformed the original time series, particularly in conjunction with a subset search of both spaces. The results suggest that BSS and feature selection can be used to improve the performance of even a "direct," single-session BCI.

  8. Fluorous microgel star polymers: selective recognition and separation of polyfluorinated surfactants and compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yuta; Terashima, Takaya; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    Immiscible with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic solvents, polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are generally "fluorous", some of which have widely been employed as surfactants and water/oil repellents. Given the prevailing concern about the environmental pollution and the biocontamination by PFCs, their efficient removal and recycle from industrial wastewater and products are critically required. This paper demonstrates that fluorous-core star polymers consisting of a polyfluorinated microgel core and hydrophilic PEG-functionalized arms efficiently and selectively capture PFCs in water into the cores by fluorous interaction. For example, with over 10 000 fluorine atoms in the core and approximately 100 hydrophilic arms, the fluorous stars remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and related PFCs in water from 10 ppm to as low as a parts per billion (ppb) level, or an over 98% removal. Dually functionalized microgel-core star polymers with perfluorinated alkanes and additional amino (or ammonium) groups cooperatively recognize PFOA or its ammonium salt and, in addition, release the guests upon external stimuli. The "smart" performance shows that the fluorous-core star polymers are promising PFC separation, recovery, and recycle materials for water purification toward sustainable society. PMID:25300369

  9. Separation and immobilization of lipase from Penicillium simplicissimum by selective adsorption on hydrophobic supports.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Aline G; Fernández-Lorente, Gloria; Gutarra, Melissa L E; Bevilaqua, Juliana V; Almeida, Rodrigo V; Paiva, Lúcia M C; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, Jose M; Freire, Denise M G

    2009-05-01

    Lipases are an enzyme class of a great importance as biocatalysts applied to organic chemistry. However, it is still necessary to search for new enzymes with special characteristics such as good stability towards high temperatures, organic solvents, and high stereoselectivity presence. The present work's aim was to immobilize the lipases pool produced by Penicillium simplissicimum, a filamentous fungi strain isolated from Brazilian babassu cake residue. P. simplissicimum lipases were separated into three different fractions using selective adsorption method on different hydrophobic supports (butyl-, phenyl-, and octyl-agarose) at low ionic strength. After immobilization, it was observed that these fractions' hyperactivation is in the range of 131% to 1133%. This phenomenon probably occurs due to enzyme open form stabilization when immobilized onto hydrophobic supports. Those fractions showed different thermal stability, specificity, and enantioselectivity towards some substrates. Enantiomeric ratio for the hydrolysis of (R,S) 2-O-butyryl-2-phenylacetic acid ranged from 1 to 7.9 for different immobilized P. simplissicimum lipase fractions. Asymmetry factor for diethyl 2-phenylmalonate hydrolysis ranged from 11.8 to 16.4 according to the immobilized P. simplissicimum lipase fractions. Those results showed that sequential adsorption methodology was an efficient strategy to obtain new biocatalysts with different enantioselectivity degrees, thermostability, and specificity prepared with a crude extract produced by a simple and low-cost technology. PMID:19037600

  10. Ultrafast separation of fluorinated and desfluorinated pharmaceuticals using highly efficient and selective chiral selectors bonded to superficially porous particles.

    PubMed

    Barhate, Chandan L; Breitbach, Zachary S; Pinto, Eduardo Costa; Regalado, Erik L; Welch, Christopher J; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2015-12-24

    The separation of fluorinated active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) from their desfluoro analogs is a challenging analytical task due to their structural similarity. In this work, fluorine containing APIs and their corresponding desfluorinated impurities were separated on five new 2.7μm superficially porous particles (SPPs) functionalized with bonded chiral selectors. The unique shape selectivity of bonded macrocyclic glycopeptides and oligosaccharides was utilized to separate seven pairs of fluoro/desfluoro APIs resulting in some unprecedented selectivity values. For example, SPP bonded isopropyl cyclofructan 6 yielded a selectivity of 2.73 for voriconazole and desfluoro voriconazole. Further, the SPP based columns allowed for rapid separations ranging from 9 to 55s with very high efficiencies ranging from 45,000 to 70,000plates/m (at high flow rates) in both reversed phase and polar organic modes. Chromatographic separation and detection by HPLC-ESI-MS was demonstrated using ezetimibe and voriconazole and their desfluorinated impurities. Among the tested phases, SPP hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin separated the most fluorinated and desfluorinated analogs with baseline resolution. PMID:26643720

  11. Separators for automotive lead/acid batteries: selection of suitable types for different climate zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endoh, H.

    World climates are divided broadly into cold, temperate and tropical zones. It is well known that the performance of automotive batteries under cold, warm or hot conditions is determined by the characteristics of the chosen separators. In the battery tests reported here, polyethylene envelope separators are found to be beneficial in cold environments. By contrast, leaf-type, polyethylene, synthetic pulp separators with glass mat give better results in warm conditions and very good peformance at high temperatures. Therefore, it is concluded that polyethylene envelope separators are suitable for cold climates, while leaf-type, polyethylene, synthetic pulp separators with glass mat are more appropriate for warm and hot climates.

  12. Evaluation of selected detector systems for products formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bostick, D.T.

    1987-03-01

    Sensitive detection of UF/sub 6/ hydrolysis products, either by discontinuous sampling or by continuous or near real-time monitoring, is an important safety consideration for DOE contractors handling large quantities of UF/sub 6/. Automated continuous or rapid intermittent remote sensing of these reaction products can provide an alarm signal when a preselected threshold value has been exceeded (absolute response) or when a significant emission excursion has occurred (rate of change of response). This report evaluates the performance of selected devices for the detection of airborne materials formed in the release of liquid UF/sub 6/ (approx. =1.3 g) into an enclosed volume of 6 m/sup 3/; these experiments were initiated on October 23, 1986. The detection principles investigated are: photometric, gas detector tubes, and electrochemical sensor.

  13. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report. Revised final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  14. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  15. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, Geology report: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  16. Separated at birth: the interlinked origins of Darwin's unconscious selection concept and the application of sexual selection to race.

    PubMed

    Alter, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    This essay traces the interlinked origins of two concepts found in Charles Darwin's writings: "unconscious selection," and sexual selection as applied to humanity's anatomical race distinctions. Unconscious selection constituted a significant elaboration of Darwin's artificial selection analogy. As originally conceived in his theoretical notebooks, that analogy had focused exclusively on what Darwin later would call "methodical selection," the calculated production of desired changes in domestic breeds. By contrast, unconscious selection produced its results unintentionally and at a much slower pace. Inspiration for this concept likely came from Darwin's early reading of works on both animal breeding and physical ethnology. Texts in these fields described the slow and unplanned divergence of anatomical types, whether animal or human, under the guidance of contrasting ideals of physical perfection. These readings, it is argued, also led Darwin to his theory of sexual selection as applied to race, a theme he discussed mainly in his book The Descent of Man (1871). There Darwin described how the racial version of sexual selection operated on the same principle as unconscious selection. He thereby effectively reunited these kindred concepts. PMID:18175603

  17. URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, C.D.; Opie, J.V.

    1958-07-01

    The recovery of uranium values from uranium ore such as pitchblende is described. The ore is first dissolved in nitric acid, and a water soluble nitrate is added as a salting out agent. The resulting feed solution is then contacted with diethyl ether, whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate and a portion of the impurities are taken up by the ether. This acid ether extract is then separated from the aqueous raffinate, and contacted with water causing back extractioa of the uranyl nitrate and impurities into the water to form a crude liquor. After separation from the ether extract, this crude liquor is heated to about 118 deg C to obtain molten uranyl nitrate hexahydratc. After being slightly cooled the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is contacted with acid free diethyl ether whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate is dissolved into the ethcr to form a neutral ether solution while most of the impurities remain in the aqueous waste. After separation from the aqueous waste, the resultant ether solution is washed with about l0% of its volume of water to free it of any dissolved impurities and is then contacted with at least one half its volume of water whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the water to form an aqueous product solution.

  18. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Boyer, Keith; Greiner, Norman R.

    1988-01-01

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  19. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Greiner, Norman R.; Boyer, Keith

    1987-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  20. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

    1987-04-28

    A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

  1. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

    1975-11-26

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  2. Evidence for isolated evolution of deep-sea ciliate communities through geological separation and environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are isolated habitats at the bottom of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, which originate from the ancient dissolution of Messinian evaporites. The different basins have recruited their original biota from the same source, but their geological evolution eventually constituted sharp environmental barriers, restricting genetic exchange between the individual basins. Therefore, DHABs are unique model systems to assess the effect of geological events and environmental conditions on the evolution and diversification of protistan plankton. Here, we examine evidence for isolated evolution of unicellular eukaryote protistan plankton communities driven by geological separation and environmental selection. We specifically focused on ciliated protists as a major component of protistan DHAB plankton by pyrosequencing the hypervariable V4 fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA. Geospatial distributions and responses of marine ciliates to differential hydrochemistries suggest strong physical and chemical barriers to dispersal that influence the evolution of this plankton group. Results Ciliate communities in the brines of four investigated DHABs are distinctively different from ciliate communities in the interfaces (haloclines) immediately above the brines. While the interface ciliate communities from different sites are relatively similar to each other, the brine ciliate communities are significantly different between sites. We found no distance-decay relationship, and canonical correspondence analyses identified oxygen and sodium as most important hydrochemical parameters explaining the partitioning of diversity between interface and brine ciliate communities. However, none of the analyzed hydrochemical parameters explained the significant differences between brine ciliate communities in different basins. Conclusions Our data indicate a frequent genetic exchange in the deep-sea water above the brines. The “isolated island

  3. Selective separation of trivalent f-ions using 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxamide ligands in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Dehaudt, Jérémy; Williams, Neil J; Shkrob, Ilya A; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    1,10-Phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxamide complexants decorated with alkyl chains and imidazolium cations have been studied for extraction of trivalent f-ions into imidazolium ionic liquids. The dicationic complexants are shown to extract Am over Eu with separation factors >50 and high extraction efficiencies. The different size selectivities for lanthanide ions were observed for these two types of complexants, highlighting the importance of the positive charge in controlling both extraction efficiencies and extraction selectivities. PMID:27305063

  4. In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven A.

    1981-01-01

    An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The monitor is intended for uses such as safeguard applications to assure that weapons grade uranium is not being produced in an enrichment cascade. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from the uranium-235 present in the specimen. Simultaneously, the gamma emissions from the uranium-235 of the specimen and the source emissions transmitted through the sample are counted and stored in a multiple channel analyzer. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from the comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and the reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen. The process eliminates the necessity of knowing the system operating conditions and yet obtains the necessary data without need for large scintillation crystals and sophisticated mechanical designs.

  5. Highly selective separation and purification of anthocyanins from bilberry based on a macroporous polymeric adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lijuan; Zhang, Na; Wang, Chenbiao; Wang, Chunhong

    2015-04-01

    Powdered bilberry extract (United States Pharmacopoeia, USP35-NF30), which is prepared from ripe bilberry fruits (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), is the main ingredient of drugs alleviating visual fatigue and diabetic retinopathy because of the rich anthocyanins (purity of 36%). In this study, a method based on a macroporous polymeric adsorbent was established to obtain anthocyanin compounds from bilberry, in which the purity of the anthocyanins was improved to 96%, conducive to further pharmacological research and improvement of the efficiency of the drug. On the basis of the structure of anthocyanins, we designed a series of macroporous polymeric adsorbents based on the copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and ethylene glycol dimethyl acrylate (EGDMA). In this situation, EGDMA not only regulated the polarity of the adsorbent but also acted as the cross-linking agent to ensure the matrix structure of the adsorbent, which had a high specific surface area and could provide more interaction sites during adsorption with anthocyanins. Among the synthesized polymeric adsorbents with different contents of EGDMA, the one with 20% EGDMA content (DE-20) was demonstrated to exhibit optimal adsorption capacity and selectivity to anthocyanins compared to various commercial adsorbents through static adsorption and desorption experiments. In addition, the optimum condition of the dynamic adsorption-desorption experiment was further explored. The results indicated that the purity of anthocyanins after rinsing with 20% ethanol was determined to be approximately 96% at a desorption ratio of 83%, which was clearly higher than that in powdered bilberry extract. The established separation and purification method of anthocyanins with high purity is expected to be applied in industrial production. PMID:25786117

  6. A critical overview of non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis. Part I: mobility and separation selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kenndler, Ernst

    2014-03-28

    This two-part review critically gives an overview on the theoretical and practical advances in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) achieved over the recent five years. Part I starts out by reviewing the aspects relevant to electromigration in organic solvents and evaluates potential advantages of the latter in comparison to aqueous solvent systems. The crucial role of solubility for the species involved in CE - analytes and back ground electrolyte constituents - is discussed both for ionic and neutral compounds. The impact of organic solvents on the electrophoretic and electroosmotic mobility and on the ionization (pKa values) of weak acids and bases is highlighted. Special emphasis is placed on methanol, acetonitrile and mixtures of these solvents, being the most frequent employed media for NACE applications. In addition, also solvents less commonly used in NACE will be covered, including other alcohols, amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, N,N-dimethylacetamide), propylene carbonate, dimethylsulphoxide, and nitromethane. The discussions address the consequences of dramatic pKa shifts frequently seen for weak acids and bases, and the important contributions of medium-specific electroosmotic flow (EOF) to electromigration in nonaqueous media. Important for NACE, the role of the water content on pKa and mobility is analyzed. Finally, association phenomena rather specific to nonaqueous solvents (ion pairing, homo- and heteroconjugation) will be addressed, along with their potential advantages for the development of NACE separation protocols. It is pointed out that this review is not intended as a listing of all papers that have been published on NACE in the period mentioned above. It rather deals with general aspects of migration and selectivity in organic solvent systems, and discusses - critically - examples from the literature with particular interest to the topic. An analog discussion about the role of the solvent on efficiency

  7. A multi-functional oil-water separator from a selectively pre-wetted superamphiphobic paper.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dengteng; Yang, Lili; Wang, Chenbo; Lee, Elaine; Zhang, Yongquan; Yang, Shu

    2015-04-11

    A multi-functional oil-water separator is prepared from a paper towel spray coated with superamphiphobic (i.e., superhydrophobic and superoleophobic) nanoparticles. After the separator is pre-wetted with ethanol, followed by water, water can be removed from the light oil-water mixture and emulsions by gravity with high separation efficiency (99.9%) and separation flux. Vice versa, heavy oil can be removed by gravity on an ethanol-oil pre-wetted SA-paper. PMID:25750982

  8. Line selection and parameter optimization for trace analysis of uranium in glass matrices by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Choi, Inhee; Chan, George C-Y; Mao, Xianglei; Perry, Dale L; Russo, Richard E

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been evaluated for the determination of uranium in real-world samples such as uraninite. NIST Standard Reference Materials were used to evaluate the spectral interferences on detection of uranium. The study addresses the detection limit of LIBS for several uranium lines and their relationship to non-uranium lines, with emphasis on spectral interferences. The data are discussed in the context of optimizing the choice of emission lines for both qualitative and quantitative analyses from a complex spectrum of uranium in the presence of other elements. Temporally resolved spectral emission intensities, line width, and line shifts were characterized to demonstrate the parameter influence on these measurements. The measured uranium line width demonstrates that LIBS acquired with moderately high spectral resolution (e.g., by a 1.25 m spectrometer with a 2400 grooves/mm grating) can be utilized for isotope shift measurements in air at atmospheric pressure with single to tens of parts per million (ppm) level detection limits, as long as an appropriate transition is chosen for analysis. PMID:24160879

  9. Rationally tuned micropores within enantiopure metal-organic frameworks for highly selective separation of acetylene and ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Sheng-Chang; Zhang, Zhangjing; Zhao, Cong-Gui; Hong, Kunlun; Zhao, Xuebo; Ding, De-Rong; Xie, Ming-Hua; Wu, Chuan-De; Madhab, Das; Gill, Rachel; Thomas, K Mark; Chen, Banglin

    2011-01-01

    Separation of acetylene and ethylene is an important industrial process because both compounds are essential reagents for a range of chemical products and materials. Current separation approaches include the partial hydrogenation of acetylene into ethylene over a supported Pd catalyst, and the extraction of cracked olefins using an organic solvent; both routes are costly and energy consuming. Adsorption technologies may allow separation, but microporous materials exhibiting highly selective adsorption of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} have not been realized to date. Here, we report the development of tunable microporous enantiopure mixed-metal-organic framework (M'MOF) materials for highly selective separation of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The high selectivities achieved suggest the potential application of microporous M'MOFs for practical adsorption-based separation of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  10. Separation of Californium from other Actinides

    DOEpatents

    Mailen, J C; Ferris, L M

    1973-09-25

    A method is provided for separating californium from a fused fluoride composition containing californium and at least one element selected from the group consisting of plutonium, americium, curium, uranium, thorium, and protactinium which comprises contacting said fluoride composition with a liquid bismuth phase containing sufficient lithium or thorium to effect transfer of said actinides to the bismuth phase and then contacting the liquid bismuth phase with molten LiCl to effect selective transfer of californium to the chloride phase.

  11. Magnetically separable nanocomposites with photocatalytic activity under visible light for the selective transformation of biomass-derived platform molecules

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel magnetically separable TiO2-guanidine-(Ni,Co)Fe2O4 nanomaterials were prepared and characterised by a series of techniques including XRD, SEM, TEM, N2 physisorption as well as XPS and subsequently tested for their photocatalytic activities in the selective transformation of...

  12. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  13. Self-Report Measures of Parent-Adolescent Attachment and Separation-Individuation: A Selective Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Frederick G.; Gover, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews and critiques three self-report measures of parent-adolescent attachment (Parental Bonding Instrument, Parental Attachment Questionnaire, Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment) and three self-report measures of parent-adolescent separation-individuation (Psychological Separation Inventory, Personal Authority in the Family System…

  14. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  15. Electrospun polystyrene nanofiber membrane with superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity for selective separation of water and low viscous oil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; An, Seongpil; Latthe, Sanjay S; Lee, Changmin; Hong, Seungkwan; Yoon, Sam S

    2013-11-13

    The ability to prepare solid surfaces with well-controlled superhydrophobic and superoleophilic properties is of paramount importance to water-oil separation technology. Herein, we successfully prepared superhydrophobic-superoleophilic membranes by single-step deposition of polystyrene (PS) nanofibers onto a stainless steel mesh via electrospinning. The contact angles of diesel and water on the prepared PS nanofiber membrane were 0° and 155° ± 3°, respectively. Applications of the PS nanofiber membrane toward separating liquids with low surface tension, such as oil, from water were investigated in detail. Gasoline, diesel, and mineral oil were tested as representative low-viscosity oils. The PS nanofiber membranes efficiently separated several liters of oil from water in a single step, of only a few minutes' duration. The superhydrophobic PS nanofiber membrane selectively absorbs oil, and is highly efficient at oil-water separation, making it a very promising material for oil spill remediation. PMID:24090059

  16. Fabrication of COF-MOF Composite Membranes and Their Highly Selective Separation of H2/CO2.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingru; Das, Saikat; Xing, Guolong; Ben, Teng; Valtchev, Valentin; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-06-22

    The search for new types of membrane materials has been of continuous interest in both academia and industry, given their importance in a plethora of applications, particularly for energy-efficient separation technology. In this contribution, we demonstrate for the first time that a metal-organic framework (MOF) can be grown on the covalent-organic framework (COF) membrane to fabricate COF-MOF composite membranes. The resultant COF-MOF composite membranes demonstrate higher separation selectivity of H2/CO2 gas mixtures than the individual COF and MOF membranes. A sound proof for the synergy between two porous materials is the fact that the COF-MOF composite membranes surpass the Robeson upper bound of polymer membranes for mixture separation of a H2/CO2 gas pair and are among the best gas separation MOF membranes reported thus far. PMID:27225027

  17. Selective separation of beta-lactoglobulin from sweet whey using CGAs generated from the cationic surfactant CTAB.

    PubMed

    Fuda, Elisabeth; Bhatia, Divesh; Pyle, D L; Jauregi, Paula

    2005-06-01

    The selective separation of whey proteins was studied using colloidal gas aphrons generated from the cationic surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). From the titration curves obtained by zeta potential measurements of individual whey proteins, it was expected to selectively adsorb the major whey proteins, i.e., bovine serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin to the aphrons and elute the remaining proteins (lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase) in the liquid phase. A number of process parameters including pH, ionic strength, and mass ratio of surfactant to protein (M(CTAB)/M(TP)) were varied in order to evaluate their effect on protein separation. Under optimum conditions (2 mmol/l CTAB, M(CTAB)/M(TP) = 0.26-0.35, pH 8, and ionic strength = 0.018 mol/l), 80-90% beta-lactoglobulin was removed from the liquid phase as a precipitate, while about 75% lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase, 80% bovine serum albumin, 95% immunoglobulin, and 65% alpha-lactalbumin were recovered in the liquid fraction. Mechanistic studies using zeta potential measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy proved that electrostatic interactions modulate only partially the selectivity of protein separation, as proteins with similar surface charges do not separate to the same extent between the two phases. The selectivity of recovery of beta-lactoglobulin probably occurs in two steps: the first being the selective interaction of the protein with opposite-charged surfactant molecules by means of electrostatic interactions, which leads to denaturation of the protein and subsequent formation and precipitation of the CTAB-beta-lactoglobulin complex. This is followed by the separation of CTAB-beta-lactoglobulin aggregates from the bulk liquid by flotation in the aphron phase. In this way, CGAs act as carriers which facilitate the removal of protein precipitate. PMID:15816026

  18. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Nash; Sue B. Clark; Gregg Lumetta

    2009-09-23

    With increased application of MOX fuels and longer burnup times for conventional fuels, higher concentrations of the transplutonium actinides Am and Cm (and even heavier species like Bk and Cf) will be produced. The half-lives of the Am isotopes are significantly longer than those of the most important long-lived, high specific activity lanthanides or the most common Cm, Bk and Cf isotopes, thus the greatest concern as regards long-term radiotoxicity. With the removal and transmutation of Am isotopes, radiation levels of high level wastes are reduced to near uranium mineral levels within less than 1000 years as opposed to the time-fram if they remain in the wastes.

  19. Pervaporation & Vapor Permeation Membrane Processes for the Selective Separation of Liquid and Vapor Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation and vapor permeation are membrane-based processes which have been proposed as alternatives to conventional separation technologies. Applications range from organic solvent removal from water, ethanol or butanol recovery from dilute fermentation broths, solvent/biofu...

  20. Pervaporation and Vapor Permeation Tutorial: Membrane Processes for the Selective Separation of Liquid and Vapor Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation and vapor permeation are membrane-based processes proposed as alternatives to conventional separation technologies. Applications range from organic solvent removal from water, ethanol or butanol recovery from fermentation broths, solvent/biofuel dehydration to meet ...

  1. Chemistry, spectroscopy, and isotope-selective infrared photochemistry of volatile uranium compound tailored for 10-. mu. m absorption: U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Cuellar, E.A.; Miller, S.S.; Marks, T.J.; Weitz, E.

    1983-07-13

    This contribution reports on the chemical, vibrational spectroscopic, and infrared multiphoton photochemical properties of uranium hexamethoxide, U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/, a prototype molecule for laser-induced uranium isotope separation with a carbon dioxide laser. Uranium hexamethoxide can be prepared from UCl/sub 4/ by conversion to Li/sub 2/U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/, followed by oxidation with lead tetraacetate. Vapor pressure studies on U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ indicate that at 33/sup 0/C, the vapor pressure is 17 mtorr. The vibrational spectra of U(/sup 16/OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ and U(/sup 18/OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ have been assigned by using infrared and laser Raman data. Under idealized O/sub h/ symmetry, the U(/sup 16/OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ U-O stretching fundamentals are assigned at 505.0 (A/sub lg/), 464.8(T/sub 1u/, and 414.0 cm/sup -1/ (E/sub g/). Tentative assignments are also made for several of the overtone and combination transitions evidence for possible lowering of the symmetry is presented. In gas-phase infrared photochemical experiments, the predominant U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ photoproducts isolated are U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 5/, methanol, and formaldhyde. These are suggestive of multiphoton U-O bond homolysis to produce uranium pentamethoxide and methoxy radicals. The enrichment of unreacted U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ in /sup 235/U is maximum at ca 927 cm/sup -1/ (near what may be a U-O stretching overtone transition) and exhibits both a low fluence threshold and diminution at high fluence.

  2. Chemistry, spectroscopy, and isotope-selective infrared photochemistry of a volatile uranium compound tailored for 10-mm absorption: U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Cuellar, E.A.; Miller, S.S.; Marks, T.J.; Weitz, E.

    1983-07-13

    This contribution reports on the chemical, vibrational spectroscopic, and infrared multiphoton photochemical properties of uranium hexamethoxide, U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/, a prototype molecule for laser-induced uranium isotope separation with a carbon dioxide laser. Uranium hexamethoxide can be prepared from UCl/sub 4/ by conversion to Li/sub 2/U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/, followed by oxidation with lead tetraacetate. Vapor pressure studies on U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ indicate that ..delta..H/sub sub//sup 0/ = 23 +/- 3 kcal/mol and ..delta..S/sub sub//sup 0/ = 76 +/- 4 eu; at 33/sup 0/C, the vapor pressure is 17 mtorr. The vibrational spectra of U(/sup 16/OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ and U(/sup 18/OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ have been assigned by using infrared and laser Raman data. Under idealized O/sub h/ symmetry, the U(/sup 16/OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/U-O stretching fundamentals are assigned at 505.0 (A/sub 1g/), 464.8 (T/sub 1u/), and 414.0 cm/sup -1/ (E/sub g/). Tentative assignments are also made for several of the overtone and combination transitions evidence for possible lowering of the symmetry is presented. In gas-phase infrared photochemical experiments, the predominant U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ photoproducts isolated are U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 5/, methanol, and formaldehyde. These are suggestive of multiphoton U-O bond homolysis to produce uranium pentamethoxide and methoxy radicals. The enrichment of unreacted U(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 6/ in /sup 235/U is maximum at ca. 927 cm/sup -1/ (near what may be a U-O stretching overtone transition) and exhibits both a low fluence threshold and dimunution at high fluence.

  3. Assessing ligand selectivity for uranium over vanadium ions to aid in the discovery of superior adsorbents for extraction of UO2(2+) from seawater.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander S; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S

    2016-06-28

    Uranium is used as the basic fuel for nuclear power plants, which generate significant amounts of electricity and have life cycle carbon emissions that are as low as renewable energy sources. However, the extraction of this valuable energy commodity from the ground remains controversial, mainly because of environmental and health impacts. Alternatively, seawater offers an enormous uranium resource that may be tapped at minimal environmental cost. Nowadays, amidoxime polymers are the most widely utilized sorbent materials for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater, but they are not perfectly selective for uranyl, UO2(2+). In particular, the competition between UO2(2+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) cations poses a significant challenge to the efficient mining of UO2(2+). Thus, screening and rational design of more selective ligands must be accomplished. One of the key components in achieving this goal is the establishment of computational techniques capable of assessing ligand selectivity trends. Here, we report an approach based on quantum chemical calculations that achieves high accuracy in reproducing experimental aqueous stability constants for VO(2+)/VO2(+) complexes with ten different oxygen donor ligands. The predictive power of the developed computational protocol is demonstrated for amidoxime-type ligands, providing greater insights into new design strategies for the development of the next generation of adsorbents with high selectivity toward UO2(2+) over VO(2+)/VO2(+) ions. Importantly, the results of calculations suggest that alkylation of amidoxime moieties present in poly(acrylamidoxime) sorbents can be a potential route to better discrimination between the uranyl and competing vanadium ions in seawater. PMID:27285397

  4. Separating selection by diurnal and nocturnal pollinators on floral display and spur length in Gymnadenia conopsea.

    PubMed

    Sletvold, Nina; Trunschke, Judith; Wimmergren, Carolina; Agren, Jon

    2012-08-01

    Most plants attract multiple flower visitors that may vary widely in their effectiveness as pollinators. Floral evolution is expected to reflect interactions with the most important pollinators, but few studies have quantified the contribution of different pollinators to current selection on floral traits. To compare selection mediated by diurnal and nocturnal pollinators on floral display and spur length in the rewarding orchid Gymnadenia conopsea, we manipulated the environment by conducting supplemental hand-pollinations and selective pollinator exclusions in two populations in central Norway. In both populations, the exclusion of diurnal pollinators significantly reduced seed production compared to open pollination, whereas the exclusion of nocturnal pollinators did not. There was significant selection on traits expected to influence pollinator attraction and pollination efficiency in both the diurnal and nocturnal pollination treatment. The relative strength of selection among plants exposed to diurnal and nocturnal visitors varied among traits and populations, but the direction of selection was consistent. The results suggest that diurnal pollinators are more important than nocturnal pollinators for seed production in the study populations, but that both categories contribute to selection on floral morphology. The study illustrates how experimental manipulations can link specific categories of pollinators to observed selection on floral traits, and thus improve our understanding of how species interactions shape patterns of selection. PMID:22928416

  5. Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

    2012-06-27

    In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the

  6. Separation of Niobium and Tantalum Pentafluoride by Selective Precipitation Using p-Phenylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nete, M.; Purcell, W.; Nel, J. T.

    2016-07-01

    The similarity between Ta and Nb chemistry makes it difficult to find the appropriate reagents and chemical reactions for the separation of the two elements. This study investigated the precipitation behavior of TaF5 and NbF5 with p-phenylenediamine (PPDA). PPDA preferentially precipitated Nb from a 1:1 ratio of NbF5 and TaF5. Niobium recoveries of >80%, and only 4% Ta, were found in the precipitate of the reaction between (Nb/Ta)F5 and PPDA in ethanol. A separation factor of 100(9) indicated the potential for successful separation of Nb and Ta in a fluoride environment. A spectrophotometric study of the formation ratio of the newly formed Nb compound indicated a 1:1 metal:ligand ratio.

  7. Investigation of thermal treatment on selective separation of post consumer plastics prior to froth flotation.

    PubMed

    Guney, Ali; Poyraz, M Ibrahim; Kangal, Olgac; Burat, Firat

    2013-09-01

    Plastics have become the widely used materials because of their advantages, such as cheapness, endurance, lightness, and hygiene. However, they cause waste and soil pollution and they do not easily decompose. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. Depending on their surface characteristics, these plastics can be separated from each other by flotation method which is useful mineral processing technique with its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this study is to investigate the flotation characteristics of PET and PVC and determine the effect of plasticizer reagents on efficient plastic separation. For that purpose, various parameters such as pH, plasticizer concentration, plasticizer type, conditioning temperature and thermal conditioning were investigated. As a result, PET particles were floated with 95.1% purity and 65.3% efficiency while PVC particles were obtained with 98.1% purity and 65.3% efficiency. PMID:23747135

  8. Transfer and the Part-Time Student: The Gulf Separating Community Colleges and Selective Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    When representatives from community colleges and selective four-year institutions gather, there is no greater flashpoint than the topic of part-time enrollment. This issue--that students coming from an institution comprising mostly part-time students should be enabled to transfer to selective four-year institutions in which full-time enrollment is…

  9. A highly-efficient imprinted magnetic nanoparticle for selective separation and detection of 17β-estradiol in milk.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruixia; Cui, Xihui; Hao, Yi; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Dechun; Tang, Yuhai

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we prepared molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) combining surface molecular imprinting technique and magnetic separation for separation and determination of 17β-estradiol (E2) from milk. During the synthesis process, the acryloyl chloride was specially used to graft double bonds on Fe3O4 nanoparticles and served as co-functional monomer cooperating with acrylamide. The morphology, structure property, and the best polymerization and adsorption conditions of the prepared magnetic nanoparticles were investigated in detail. The obtained nanomaterials displayed high adsorption capacity of 12.62mg/g, fast equilibrium time of 10min, and satisfactory selectivity for target molecule. What's more, the MIPs was successfully applied as sorbents to specifically separate and enrich E2 from milk with a relatively high recovery (88.9-92.1%), demonstrating the potential application of the MIPs as solid phase extractant for rapid, highly-efficient, and cost-effective sample analysis. PMID:26471651

  10. Solvent selection for cyclohexane-cyclohexene-benzene separation by extractive distillation using non-steady-state gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, A.; Diez, F.; Esteban, R.; Coca, J.

    1997-03-01

    The infinite-dilution activity coefficients of cyclohexane, cyclohexene, and benzene in N,N-dimethylformamide, N-methylpyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, phenyl acetate, and dimethyl malonate have been determined at temperatures ranging from 40 to 80 C, by non-steady-state gas chromatography. From these data, the limiting selectivity-solvency properties for cyclohexane-benzene, cyclohexene-benzene, and cyclohexane-cyclohexene, in the presence of the aforementioned solvents, are studied, and the solvents tested are considered for the cyclohexane-cyclohexene-benzene separation by extractive distillation. According to the results, N,N-dimethylacetamide seems to be an adequate solvent for the cyclohexane-benzene and cyclohexene-benzene separations. The separation of cyclohexane-cyclohexene is the most difficult, in spite of the difference of boiling points, much higher than for cyclohexane-benzene.

  11. Theoretical prediction of Am(iii)/Eu(iii) selectivity to aid the design of actinide-lanthanide separation agents.

    PubMed

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Hay, Benjamin P

    2015-05-01

    Selective extraction of minor actinides from lanthanides is a critical step in the reduction of radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuels. However, the design of suitable ligands for separating chemically similar 4f- and 5f-block trivalent metal ions poses a significant challenge. First-principles calculations should play an important role in the design of new separation agents, but their ability to predict metal ion selectivity has not been systematically evaluated. In this work, we examine the ability of several density functional theory methods to predict selectivity of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) with oxygen, mixed oxygen-nitrogen, and sulfur donor ligands. The results establish a computational method capable of predicting the correct order of selectivities obtained from liquid-liquid extraction and aqueous phase complexation studies. To allow reasonably accurate predictions, it was critical to employ sufficiently flexible basis sets and provide proper account of solvation effects. The approach is utilized to estimate the selectivity of novel amide-functionalized diazine and 1,2,3-triazole ligands. PMID:25824656

  12. Theoretical Prediction of Am(III)/Eu(III) Selectivity to Aid the Design of Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Agents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2015-03-20

    Selective extraction of minor actinides from lanthanides is a critical step in the reduction of radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuels. However, the design of suitable ligands for separating chemically similar 4f- and 5f-block trivalent metal ions poses a significant challenge. Furthermore, first-principles calculations should play an important role in the design of new separation agents, but their ability to predict metal ion selectivity has not been systematically evaluated. We examine the ability of several density functional theory methods to predict selectivity of Am(III) and Eu(III) with oxygen, mixed oxygen–nitrogen, and sulfur donor ligands. The results establish a computational method capablemore » of predicting the correct order of selectivities obtained from liquid–liquid extraction and aqueous phase complexation studies. To allow reasonably accurate predictions, it was critical to employ sufficiently flexible basis sets and provide proper account of solvation effects. The approach is utilized to estimate the selectivity of novel amide-functionalized diazine and 1,2,3-triazole ligands.« less

  13. Theoretical Prediction of Am(III)/Eu(III) Selectivity to Aid the Design of Actinide-Lanthanide Separation Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2015-03-20

    Selective extraction of minor actinides from lanthanides is a critical step in the reduction of radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuels. However, the design of suitable ligands for separating chemically similar 4f- and 5f-block trivalent metal ions poses a significant challenge. Furthermore, first-principles calculations should play an important role in the design of new separation agents, but their ability to predict metal ion selectivity has not been systematically evaluated. We examine the ability of several density functional theory methods to predict selectivity of Am(III) and Eu(III) with oxygen, mixed oxygen–nitrogen, and sulfur donor ligands. The results establish a computational method capable of predicting the correct order of selectivities obtained from liquid–liquid extraction and aqueous phase complexation studies. To allow reasonably accurate predictions, it was critical to employ sufficiently flexible basis sets and provide proper account of solvation effects. The approach is utilized to estimate the selectivity of novel amide-functionalized diazine and 1,2,3-triazole ligands.

  14. Selected values of chemical thermodynamic properties: compounds of uranium, protactinium, thorium, actinium, and the alkali metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagman, D.D.; Evans, W.H.; Parker, V.B.; Schumm, R.H.; Nuttall, R.L.

    1981-05-01

    This publication contains tables of recommended values for the standard enthalpies (heats) of formation, Gibbs (free) energies of formation, entropies, enthalpy contents and heat capacities at 298.15 K, and enthalpies of formation at O K for compounds of uranium, protactinium, thorium, actinium, lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium.

  15. Synthesis of surface imprinted nanospheres for selective removal of uranium from simulants of Sambhar salt lake and ground water.

    PubMed

    Milja, Thazhathuparambil Elias; Prathish, Krishnapillai Padmajakumari; Prasada Rao, Talasila

    2011-04-15

    Imprinted polymer nanospheres for uranium were prepared by complexing uranyl ion on to quinoline-8-ol functionalized 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane modified silica nanoparticles followed by surface imprinting with 4-VP (4-vinyl pyridine), HEMA (2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) and EGDMA (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) as the functional monomers and cross linking agent respectively with AIBN (2,2'-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile) as initiator and 2-methoxyethanol as the porogen. Non-imprinted polymer material was also prepared under similar conditions omitting uranyl ion. The above materials were used for solid phase extraction of uranium. Recent realization that its chemical toxicity is dominant than radiation hazards makes decontamination a relevant topic for environmental point of view, particularly in the light of projected global thrust for uranium fuel based atomic power plants. The material offers high retention capacity of 97.1 μmol g(-1) for 10 mg L(-1) of uranium that does not require tedious grinding and sieving steps, is water compatible and works in the pH range of 5-7, making it ideal for possible use in decontamination of polluted natural water samples or front end effluents of nuclear power reactors. PMID:21345587

  16. Direct Observation of Charge Separation on Anatase TiO2 Crystals with Selectively Etched {001} Facets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Dong, Guojun; Li, Shaopeng; Lu, Gongxuan; Bi, Yingpu

    2016-03-01

    Synchronous illumination X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SIXPS) was employed for the first time to directly identify the photogenerated charge separation and transfer on anatase TiO2 single-crystals with selectively etched {001} facets. More specifically, for the TiO2 crystals with intact {001} and {101} facets, most of photogenerated charge carriers rapidly recombined, and no evident electron-hole separation was detected. With selectively etching on {001} facets, high efficient charge separation via hole transfer to titanium and electron to oxygen was clearly observed. However, when the {001} facets were completely etched into a hollow structure, the recombination for photogenerated electron-hole pairs would dominate again. These demonstrations clearly reveal that the appropriate corrosion on {001} facets could facilitate more efficient electron-hole separation and transfer. As expected, the optimized TiO2 microcrystals with etched {001} facets could achieve a hydrogen generation rate of 74.3 μmol/h/g, which is nearly 7 times higher than the intact-TiO2 crystals. PMID:26924454

  17. Use of ligand-modified micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration to selectively separate copper ions from wastewater streams

    SciTech Connect

    Shadizadeh, S.B.

    1992-12-31

    The selective removal of target ions from an aqueous solution containing ions of like charge by ligand-modified micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (LM-MEUF), is presented. In LM-MEUF, surfactant and specially tailored ligand are added to the contaminated stream. The surfactant forms aggregates called micelles, the hydrocarbon core of which the ligand complexed with the target species will solubilize. The surfactant is chosen to have the same charge type as the target ion; therefore, other ions (with similar charge) will not associate with the micelle, which makes the separation of the target ion selective. The solution is then processed by ultrafiltration, using a membrane with pore size small enough to block the passage of the micelles. In this study the divalent copper is the target ion in the solution containing divalent calcium. The surfactant is cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and the ligand is 4-hexadecyloxybenzyliminodiacetic acid (C{sub 16}BIDA). Experiments were conducted with batch stirred cells and the results have been compared to separation that take place under a variety of conditions in the LM-MEUF process. Rejections of copper of up to 99.8% are observed, with almost no rejection of calcium, showing that LM-MEUF has excellent selectivity and separation efficiency.

  18. Selective separation and purification of highly polar basic compounds using a silica-based strong cation exchange stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhen; Guo, Zhimou; Xue, Xingya; Zhang, Xiuli; Nordahl, Lilly; Liang, Xinmiao

    2013-12-01

    Compared to moderately and weakly hydrophilic bases, highly polar basic compounds are even more difficult to separate due to their poor retention in reversed phase (RP) mode. This study described the successful applications of a strong cation exchange (SCX) stationary phase to achieve symmetric peak shape, adequate retention and selectivity in the separation of very polar basic compounds. Salt and acetonitrile concentrations were adjusted to optimize the separation. Good correlations (R(2)=0.998-1.000) between the logarithm of the retention factor and the logarithm of salt or acetonitrile concentration were obtained. Gradients generated by changing salt or acetonitrile concentration were compared for the analysis of different highly polar bases. Although all of the analytes were eluted more quickly with an acetonitrile gradient, the effect of the gradients tested on peak width and peak shape varied with respect to analyte. In addition, the effects of different types of cation and anion additives were also investigated. After separation parameters were acquired, the SCX-based method was utilized to analyze highly hydrophilic alkaloids from Scopolia tangutica Maxim with high separation efficiency (plate numbers>32,000 m(-1)). Concurrently, one very polar alkaloid fraction was purified with symmetric peak shape using the current method. Our results suggest that SCX stationary phase can be used as an alternative to RP stationary phase in the analysis and purification of highly hydrophilic basic compounds. PMID:24267097

  19. Separation of neutral compounds by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography: fundamental studies on selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gabel-Jensen, C; Honoré Hansen, S; Pedersen-Bjergaard, S

    2001-04-01

    The selectivity of microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) was studied utilizing some uncharged model compounds like aromatic amides, steroids, and esters of nicotinic acid. The cosurfactant of the microemulsion was found to be the most important factor affecting the selectivity, and alteration between 6.6% of 1-propanol, 1-butanol, tetrahydrofuran, and 2-ethoxyethanol caused several substantial changes in the migration order. In addition, the nature of the surfactant was found to significantly affect the selectivity. In this case, changes in order of migration was observed by replacement of half the content of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with either sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS), 3-(N,N-dimethylmyristylammonio) propanesulfonate (MAPS), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 21), and polyoxyethylene 23 lauryl ether (Brij 35). MEEKC was also accomplished with 3.3% of the anionic surfactant sodium cholate and with the cationic surfactant N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTMA). Both provided substantial differences in selectivity as compared to the SDS-based systems. With SDS as surfacant, the concentration was varied within 1.0-4.5%. Minor selectivity changes were observed as the concentration of the surfacant was reduced, but the major effect was a reduction in the total migration time. The organic solvent of the microemulsion droplets was found only to have minor impact on the selectivity. PMID:11379955

  20. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  1. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM OTHER METAL VALUES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY SELECTIVE COMPLEXING AND ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1960-06-28

    A process is given for separating tri- or tetravalent plutonium from fission products in an aqueous solution by complexing the fission products with oxalate, tannate, citrate, or tartrate anions at a pH value of at least 2.4 (preferably between 2.4 and 4), and contacting a cation exchange resin with the solution whereby the plutonium is adsorbed while the complexed fission products remain in solution.

  2. Salt tolerant chromatography provides salt tolerance and a better selectivity for protein monomer separations.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Noriko; Itoh, Daisuke; Isakari, Yu; Podgornik, Ales; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Salt tolerant chromatography (STC) is an attractive method as buffer exchange during protein purification processes can be skipped; however, the retention and separation mechanism of such STC are still not fully understood. We carried out linear gradient elution (LGE) experiments of bovine serum albumin (BSA) including its dimer form by using poly-amine ligand STC. The peak salt concentration IR was measured as a function of normalized gradient slope GH, and the number of binding sites B was determined. The separation performance of monomer and dimer was much higher for STC. The IR values of BSA monomer and dimer for STC were much higher (IR > 0.5M) than those for conventional IEC. The IR values of arginine-Cl gradient decreased markedly compared to those of NaCl gradient whereas they did not change for conventional IEC. This might be due to combined effects of electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction to the retention of proteins in STC. Adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the mobile phase of IEC also increased the retention (salt tolerance) and the resolution of BSA monomer and dimer. Higher viscosity and low solubility of proteins due to PEG were disadvantages of this method. STC with poly-amine ligand might be also suited for the continuous flow-through separation of monomer. PMID:26472648

  3. Reactive Separations via a Hydrothermally Stable Hydrogen Selective Membrane. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ciora, R. J.; Liu, P. KT.

    2002-10-29

    In this SBIR Phase I program, we have successfully completed the fabrication of SiC-based hydrogen selective membranes suitable for use as a membrane reactor for steam-methane reforming applications. Hydrothermal stability was performed for selected membrane to demonstrate their stability for appx. 50 hours under the proposed reforming condition. In addition, several mechanistic study was conducted to elucidate the SiC membrane formation mechanism. This understanding will facilitate membrane optimization work to be proposed for the Phase II study. The reaction study was postponed to the Phase II study.

  4. BASIC PEROXIDE PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINANTS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

    1959-02-10

    A process is described for the separation from each other of uranyl values, tetravalent plutonium values and fission products contained in an aqueous acidic solution. First the pH of the solution is adjusted to between 2.5 and 8 and hydrogen peroxide is then added to the solution causing precipitation of uranium peroxide which carries any plutonium values present, while the fission products remain in solution. Separation of the uranium and plutonium values is then effected by dissolving the peroxide precipitate in an acidic solution and incorporating a second carrier precipitate, selective for plutonium. The plutonium values are thus carried from the solution while the uranium remains flissolved. The second carrier precipitate may be selected from among the group consisting of rare earth fluorides, and oxalates, zirconium phosphate, and bismuth lihosphate.

  5. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  6. Selection of a hydride former for the separation of hydrogen isotopes from inerts

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, I.A.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of four hydride-forming materials have been investigated to determine their applicability for use in a process to separate hydrogen isotopes from inerts. These materials are Zr{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}Ni, Zr{sub 0.65}Ti{sub 0.35}Co, NdCo{sub 3}, and ErFe{sub 2}. The properties investigated while surveying these materials include ease of activation, isotherm characteristics, kinetics, cycling stability, and oxygen stability. The results of the survey indicate NdCo{sub 3} to be the hydride former of choice for use in the inert separation process. It is the most easily activated and has the most favorable isotherm characteristics (the largest usable capacity, flat plateaux, small hysteresis, and negligible heel) as well as the fastest absorption kinetics of the materials tested. NdCo{sub 3} also has good cycling and oxygen stability. As with most intermetallic alloys NdCo{sub 3} decrepitates into a fine powder after only a few sorption cycles in hydrogen and therefore must be consolidated in order to be used in the fixed-bed absorber envisioned for the inert separation process. Consolidation was achieved through support of the NdCo{sub 3} in a sinter-bonded aluminum matrix. Stable compacts of NdCo{sub 3} have been made consisting of 40 wt % Al in NdCo{sub 3} pellets, pressed at 27 kpsi, sintered under vacuum for 2 hr at 450{degree}C. These compacts retained the full absorptive capacity of NdCo{sub 3} and remained 99 wt % intact after 15 sorption cycles in protium. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Nash

    2009-09-22

    Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of 1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, 2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their

  8. Ion Selective Ceramics for Waste Separations. Input for Annual Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-10-01

    This report discusses“Ion-Selective Ceramics for Waste Separations” which aims to develop an electrochemical approach to remove fission product waste (e.g., Cs+ ) from the LiCl-KCl molten salts used in the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

  9. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Banerjee, Debasis; Liu, Jian; Schaef, Herbert T; Crum, Jarrod V; Fernandez, Carlos A; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Nie, Zimin; Nune, Satish K; Motkuri, Radha K; Chapman, Karena W; Engelhard, Mark H; Hayes, James C; Silvers, Kurt L; Krishna, Rajamani; McGrail, B Peter; Liu, Jun; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2016-05-01

    A redox-active metal-organic composite material shows improved and selective O2 adsorption over N2 with respect to individual components (MIL-101 and ferrocene). The O2 sensitivity of the composite material arises due to the formation of maghemite nanoparticles with the pore of the metal-organic framework material. PMID:26953336

  10. Sustained Selective Attention Skills of Preschool Children with Specific Language Impairment: Evidence for Separate Attentional Capacities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, Tammie J.; Plante, Elena; Vance, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the performance of preschool children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their typically developing (TD) peers on sustained selective attention tasks. Method: This study included 23 children diagnosed with SLI and 23 TD children matched for age, gender, and maternal education level.…

  11. Magnetically separable polymer (Mag-MIP) for selective analysis of biotin in food samples.

    PubMed

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina; Khan, Sabir; Wong, Ademar; Picasso, Gino; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar Taboada

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an efficient method for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles modified with molecularly imprinted polymers (Mag-MIP) through core-shell method for the determination of biotin in milk food samples. The functional monomer acrylic acid was selected from molecular modeling, EGDMA was used as cross-linking monomer and AIBN as radical initiator. The Mag-MIP and Mag-NIP were characterized by FTIR, magnetic hysteresis, XRD, SEM and N2-sorption measurements. The capacity of Mag-MIP for biotin adsorption, its kinetics and selectivity were studied in detail. The adsorption data was well described by Freundlich isotherm model with adsorption equilibrium constant (KF) of 1.46 mL g(-1). The selectivity experiments revealed that prepared Mag-MIP had higher selectivity toward biotin compared to other molecules with different chemical structure. The material was successfully applied for the determination of biotin in diverse milk samples using HPLC for quantification of the analyte, obtaining the mean value of 87.4% recovery. PMID:26212997

  12. Selectivity Principles in Anion Separation by Crystallization of Hydrogen-Bonding Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Bock, Aurelien; Moyer, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental factors controlling anion selectivity in the crystallization of hydrogen-bonding capsules [Mg(H2O)6][X L2] (X = SO42-, 1a; SeO42-, 1b; SO32-, 1c; CO32-, 1d; L = tris[2-(3-pyridylurea)ethyl]-amine) from water have been investigated by solution and solid-state thermodynamic measurements, anion competition experiments, and X-ray structural analysis. The crystal structures of 1a-d are isomorphous, thereby simplifying the interpretation of the observed selectivities based on differences in anion coordination geometries. The solubilities of 1a-d in water follow the order: 1a < 1b < 1c < 1d, which is consistent with the selectivity for the tetrahedral sulfate and selenate anions observed in competitive crystallization experiments. Crystallization of the capsules is highly exothermic, with the most favorable {Delta}H{sub cryst}{sup o} of -99.1 and -108.5 kJ/mol corresponding to SO42- and SeO42-, respectively, in agreement with the X-ray structural data showing shape complementarity between these tetrahedral anions and the urea-lined cavities of the capsules. Sulfite, on the other hand, has a significantly less negative {Delta}H{sub cryst}{sup o} of -64.6 kJ/mol, which may be attributed to its poor fit inside the capsules, involving repulsive interactions. The more favorable entropy of crystallization for this anion, however, partly offsets the enthalpic disadvantage, resulting in a solubility product very similar to that of the selenate complex. Because of their very similar shape and size, SO42- and SeO42- have a propensity to form solid solutions, which limits the selectivity between these two anions in competitive crystallizations. In the end, a comprehensive picture of contributing factors to anion selectivity in crystalline hydrogen-bonding capsules emerges.

  13. Separation by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Jr., Charles H.

    1976-04-06

    17. A process for separating fission product values from uranium and plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution, comprising adding an oxidizing agent to said solution to secure uranium and plutonium in their hexavalent state; contacting said aqueous solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent while agitating and maintaining the temperature at from -1.degree. to -2.degree. C. until the major part of the water present is frozen; continuously separating a solid ice phase as it is formed; separating a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing plutonium and uranium values from each other; melting at least the last obtained part of said ice phase and adding it to said separated liquid phase; and treating the resulting liquid with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of uranium and plutonium.

  14. RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Brown, K.B.; Crouse, D.J. Jr.; Moore, J.G.

    1959-03-10

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine in the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected amine dissolved in a nonpolar water-immiscible organic solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely exiracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by waters and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

  15. Recovery of uranium values

    DOEpatents

    Brown, K. B.; Crouse, Jr., D. J.; Moore, J. G.

    1959-03-10

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine fn the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected anine dissolved in a nonpolar waterimmiscible organfc solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely extracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by water, and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

  16. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for separating and recovering uranium from a complex mixure of impurities. The uranium is dissolved to produce an aqueous acidic solution including various impurities. In accordance with one method, with the uranium in the uranyl state, hydrogen cyanide is introduced into the solution to complex the impurities. Subsequently, ammonia is added to the solution to precipitate the uraniunn as ammonium diuranate away from the impurities in the solution. Alternatively, the uranium is precipitated by adding an alkaline metal hydroxide. In accordance with the second method, the uranium is reduced to the uranous state in the solution. The reduced solution is then treated with solid alkali metal cyanide sufficient to render the solution about 0.1 to 1.0 N in cyanide ions whereat cyanide complex ions of the metal impurities are produced and the uranium is simultaneously precipituted as uranous hydroxide. Alternatively, hydrogen cyanide may be added to the reduced solution and the uranium precipitated subsequently by adding ammonium hydroxide or an alkali metal hydroxide. Other refinements of the method are also disclosed.

  17. Metal-organic framework with optimally selective xenon adsorption and separation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debasis; Simon, Cory M; Plonka, Anna M; Motkuri, Radha K; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xianyin; Smit, Berend; Parise, John B; Haranczyk, Maciej; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear energy is among the most viable alternatives to our current fossil fuel-based energy economy. The mass deployment of nuclear energy as a low-emissions source requires the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel to recover fissile materials and mitigate radioactive waste. A major concern with reprocessing used nuclear fuel is the release of volatile radionuclides such as xenon and krypton that evolve into reprocessing facility off-gas in parts per million concentrations. The existing technology to remove these radioactive noble gases is a costly cryogenic distillation; alternatively, porous materials such as metal-organic frameworks have demonstrated the ability to selectively adsorb xenon and krypton at ambient conditions. Here we carry out a high-throughput computational screening of large databases of metal-organic frameworks and identify SBMOF-1 as the most selective for xenon. We affirm this prediction and report that SBMOF-1 exhibits by far the highest reported xenon adsorption capacity and a remarkable Xe/Kr selectivity under conditions pertinent to nuclear fuel reprocessing. PMID:27291101

  18. Metal–organic framework with optimally selective xenon adsorption and separation

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Debasis; Simon, Cory M.; Plonka, Anna M.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xianyin; Smit, Berend; Parise, John B.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear energy is among the most viable alternatives to our current fossil fuel-based energy economy. The mass deployment of nuclear energy as a low-emissions source requires the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel to recover fissile materials and mitigate radioactive waste. A major concern with reprocessing used nuclear fuel is the release of volatile radionuclides such as xenon and krypton that evolve into reprocessing facility off-gas in parts per million concentrations. The existing technology to remove these radioactive noble gases is a costly cryogenic distillation; alternatively, porous materials such as metal–organic frameworks have demonstrated the ability to selectively adsorb xenon and krypton at ambient conditions. Here we carry out a high-throughput computational screening of large databases of metal–organic frameworks and identify SBMOF-1 as the most selective for xenon. We affirm this prediction and report that SBMOF-1 exhibits by far the highest reported xenon adsorption capacity and a remarkable Xe/Kr selectivity under conditions pertinent to nuclear fuel reprocessing. PMID:27291101

  19. Ion imprinted polymeric nanoparticles for selective separation and sensitive determination of zinc ions in different matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Roushani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of Zn2+ ion-imprinted polymer (Zn-IIP) nanoparticles is presented in this report. The Zn-IIP nanoparticles are prepared by dissolving stoichiometric amounts of zinc nitrate and selected chelating ligand, 3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone, in 15 mL ethanol-acetonitrile (2:1; v/v) mixture as a porogen solvent in the presence of ethylene glycol-dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linking, methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. After polymerization, Cavities in the polymer particles corresponding to the Zn2+ ions were created by leaching the polymer in HCl aqueous solution. The synthesized IIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal analysis techniques. Also, the pH range for rebinding of Zn2+ ion on the IIP and equilibrium binding time were optimized, using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In selectivity study, it was found that imprinting results increased affinity of the material toward Zn2+ ion over other competitor metal ions with the same charge and close ionic radius. The prepared IIPs were repeatedly used and regenerated for six times without any significant decrease in polymer binding affinities. Finally, the prepared sorbent was successfully applied to the selective recognition and determination of zinc ion in different real samples.

  20. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Haynam, C.; Johnson, M.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1986-09-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. We discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques that we use. We illustrate the methodology adopted with examples of other elements that are under study in our program.

  1. A study of separation selectivity using embedded ester-bonded stationary phases for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Szymon; Krzemińska, Katarzyna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-07-01

    A new type of stationary bonded phase for liquid chromatography with various functional groups bonded to diol-modified silica via ester bond was synthesized. The structures of the proposed stationary phases contain: alkyl chains (C10, C18), phenyl, and cholesterol groups. The structures of the synthesized materials were confirmed by different physico-chemical techniques such as elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (13)C CP/MAS NMR and liquid chromatography under reversed phase conditions (RP) and with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Depending on the type of functionalities bonded to the Diol-Ester, the stationary phases are capable of separating various groups of compounds in RP and HILC, even using pure water as a mobile phase. PMID:27170946

  2. Selective interfacial synthesis of metal-organic frameworks on a polybenzimidazole hollow fiber membrane for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Bishnu P.; Bhaskar, Anand; Banerjee, Rahul; Kharul, Ulhas K.

    2015-04-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have gained immense attention as new age materials due to their tuneable properties and diverse applicability. However, efforts on developing promising materials for membrane based gas separation, and control over the crystal growth positions on polymeric hollow fiber membranes still remain key challenges. In this investigation, a new, convenient and scalable room temperature interfacial method for growing MOFs (ZIF-8 and CuBTC) on either the outer or inner side of a polybenzimidazole based hollow fiber (PBI-BuI-HF) membrane surface has been achieved in a controlled manner. This was made possible by the appropriate selection of an immiscible solvent pair and the synthetic conditions. The growth of MOFs on the PBI-BuI-HF membrane by the interfacial method was continuous and showed an appreciable gas separation performance, conveying promise for their applicability.Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have gained immense attention as new age materials due to their tuneable properties and diverse applicability. However, efforts on developing promising materials for membrane based gas separation, and control over the crystal growth positions on polymeric hollow fiber membranes still remain key challenges. In this investigation, a new, convenient and scalable room temperature interfacial method for growing MOFs (ZIF-8 and CuBTC) on either the outer or inner side of a polybenzimidazole based hollow fiber (PBI-BuI-HF) membrane surface has been achieved in a controlled manner. This was made possible by the appropriate selection of an immiscible solvent pair and the synthetic conditions. The growth of MOFs on the PBI-BuI-HF membrane by the interfacial method was continuous and showed an appreciable gas separation performance, conveying promise for their applicability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00299k

  3. Selective Template Wetting Routes to Hierarchical Polymer Films: Polymer Nanotubes from Phase-Separated Films via Solvent Annealing.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hao-Wen; Cheng, Ming-Hsiang; Chi, Mu-Huan; Chang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jiun-Tai

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel wetting method to prepare hierarchical polymer films with polymer nanotubes on selective regions. This strategy is based on the selective wetting abilities of polymer chains, annealed in different solvent vapors, into the nanopores of porous templates. Phase-separated films of polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), two commonly used polymers, are prepared as a model system. After anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates are placed on the films, the samples are annealed in vapors of acetic acid, in which the PMMA chains are swollen and wet the nanopores of the AAO templates selectively. As a result, hierarchical polymer films containing PMMA nanotubes can be obtained after the AAO templates are removed. The distribution of the PMMA nanotubes of the hierarchical polymer films can also be controlled by changing the compositions of the polymer blends. This work not only presents a novel method to fabricate hierarchical polymer films with polymer nanotubes on selective regions, but also gives a deeper understanding in the selective wetting ability of polymer chains in solvent vapors. PMID:26831764

  4. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols I: uranium concentration in aerosols as a function of time and particle size.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Traub, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing DU were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time, particularly within the first minute after a shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s after perforation, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% after 30 min. The initial and maximum uranium concentrations were lower in the Bradley vehicle than those observed in the Abrams tank, and the concentration levels decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in a cyclone sampler, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h after perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages ranged from 38 to 72% for the Abrams tank with conventional armor. In most cases, it varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Neither the Abrams tank with DU armor nor the Bradley vehicle results were specifically correlated with particle size and can best be represented by their average uranium mass concentrations of 65

  5. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

  6. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR URANIUM RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-17

    A process is described for extracting uranium from uranium ore, wherein the uranium is substantially free from molybdenum contamination. In a solvent extraction process for recovering uranium, uranium and molybdenum ions are extracted from the ore with ether under high acidity conditions. The ether phase is then stripped with water at a lower controiled acidity, resaturated with salting materials such as sodium nitrate, and reextracted with the separation of the molybdenum from the uranium without interference from other metals that have been previously extracted.

  7. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  8. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  9. Developing imprinted polymer nanoparticles for the selective separation of antidiabetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Haq, Isma; Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Iqbal, Naseer; Bajwa, Sadia Zafar; Hussain, Tajamal; Shehzad, Khurram; Ashraf, Hadia

    2015-10-01

    In this study, new molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles are designed for selective recognition of different drugs used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, i.e. sitagliptin (SG) and metformin (MF). The SG- and MF-imprinted polymer nanoparticles are synthesized by free-radical initiated polymerization of the functional monomers: methacrylic acid and methyl methacrylate; and the crosslinker: ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The surface morphology of resultant MIP nanoparticles is studied by atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectra of MIP nanoparticles suggest the presence of reversible, non-covalent interactions between the template and the polymer. The effect of pH on the rebinding of antidiabetic drugs with SG- and MF-imprinted polymers is investigated to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The molecular recognition characteristics of SG- and MF-imprinted polymers for the respective drug targets are determined at low concentrations of SG (50-150 ppm) and MF (5-100 ppm). In both cases, the MIP nanoparticles exhibit higher binding response compared to non-imprinted polymers. Furthermore, the MIPs demonstrate high selectivity with four fold higher responses toward imprinted drugs targets, respectively. Recycled MIP nanoparticles retain 90% of their drug-binding efficiency, which makes them suitable for successive analyses with significantly preserved recognition features. PMID:26179897

  10. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  11. Multiple resistance to sulfonylureas and imidazolinones conferred by an acetohydroxyacid synthase gene with separate mutations for selective resistance.

    PubMed

    Hattori, J; Rutledge, R; Labbé, H; Brown, D; Sunohara, G; Miki, B

    1992-03-01

    The acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) gene from the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant line GH90 carrying the imidazolinone resistance allele imr1 was cloned. Expression of the AHAS gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco resulted in selective imidazolinone resistance, confirming that the single base-pair change found near the 3' end of the coding region of this gene is responsible for imidazolinone resistance. A chimeric AHAS gene containing both the imr1 mutation and the csr1 mutation, responsible for selective resistance to sulfonylurea herbicides, was constructed. It conferred on transgenic tobacco plants resistance to both sulfonylurea and imidazolinone herbicides. The data illustrate that a multiple-resistance phenotype can be achieved in an AHAS gene through combinations of separate mutations, each of which individually confers resistance to only one class of herbicides. PMID:1557022

  12. Hydrothermal alteration of organic matter in uranium ores, Elliot Lake, Canada: Implications for selected organic-rich deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, D.J.; Nagy, B.; Davis, D.W.

    1993-07-01

    Organic matter in the uraniferous Matinenda Formation, Elliot Lake, is preserved in the forms of syngenetic kerogen and solid bitumen as it is in many of the Oklo uranium deposits and in the Witwatersrand gold-uranium ores. The Elliot Lake kerogen is a vitrinite-like material considered to be remnants of the Precambrian cyanobacterial mats. The kerogen at Elliot Lake has reflectances (in oil) ranging from 2.63-7.31% RO{sub max}, high aromaticity, relatively low (0.41-0.60) atomic H/C ratios, and it contains cryptocrystalline graphite. Bitumen, present primarily as dispersed globules (up to 0.5 mm dia.), has reflectances from 0.72-1.32% RO{sub max}, atomic H/C ratios of 0.71-0.81, and is somewhat less aromatic than the kerogen. Overall similarity in molecular compositions indicates that liquid bitumen was derived from kerogen by processes similar to hydrous pyrolysis. The carbon isotopic composition of kerogen ({minus}15.62 to {minus}24.72%), and the now solid bitumen ({minus}25.91 to {minus}33.00%) are compatible with these processes. Despite having been subjected to several thermal episodes, ca. 2.45 Ga old kerogen of microbiological origin here survived as testimony of the antiquity of life on Earth. U-Pb isotopic data from discrete kerogen grains at Elliot Lake form a scattered array intersecting concordia at 2130 {+-} 100 Ma, correspond to the Nipissing event. U-Pb systems were totally reset by this event. Uranium and lead show subsequently partial mobility, the average of which is indicated by the lower concordia intersect of 550 {+-} 260 Ma. The migrated bitumen contains virtually no uranium and thorium but has a large excess of {sup 206}Pb, which indicates that the once liquid bitumen must have acted as a sink for mobile intermediate decay products of {sup 238}U. Emplacement of the Nipissing diabase may have been responsible for producing the bitumen and, indirectly, for its enrichment in {sup 206}Pb as a result of outgassing of {sup 222}Rn.

  13. Selective separation and concentration of antihypertensive peptides from rapeseed protein hydrolysate by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Girgih, Abraham T; Rozoy, Elodie; Bazinet, Laurent; Ju, Xing-Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2016-04-15

    Rapeseed protein isolate was subjected to alcalase digestion to obtain a protein hydrolysate that was separated into peptide fractions using electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) technology. The EDUF process (6h duration) led to isolation of three peptide fractions: anionic (recovered in KCl-1 compartment), cationic (recovered in KCl-2 compartment), and those that remained in the feed compartment, which was labeled final rapeseed protein hydrolysate (FRPH). As expected the KCl-1 peptides were enriched in negatively-charged (43.57%) while KCl-2 contained high contents of positively-charged (28.35%) amino acids. All the samples inhibited angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities in dose-dependent manner with original rapeseed protein hydrolysate having the least ACE-inhibitory IC50 value of 0.0932±0.0037 mg/mL while FRPH and KCl-2 had least renin-inhibitory IC50 values of 0.47±0.05 and 0.55±0.06 mg/mL, respectively. Six hours after oral administration (100 mg/kg body weight) to spontaneously hypertensive rats, the FRPH produced the maximum systolic blood pressure reduction of -51 mmHg. PMID:26617047

  14. Objective source selection in Blind Source Separation of AEPs in children with Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Villa, N; James, C J

    2007-01-01

    Multi-channel Auditory Evoked Potentials (AEPs) are a useful methodology for evaluating the auditory performance of children with Cochlear Implants (CIs). These recordings are generally contaminated, not only with well known physiological artifacts (blinking, muscle) and line noise etc., but also by CI artifact. The CI induces an artifact in the recording at the electrodes in the temporal lobe area (where it is implanted) when specific tones are presented, this artifact in particular makes the detection and analysis of AEPs much more challenging. This paper evaluates the convenience of using Blind Source Separation (BSS) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) in order to identify the AEPs from ongoing recordings and to isolate the artifact when testing a child with a CI. We propose a new procedure to elicit an objective differentiation between the independent components (ICs) related to the AEPs and CI artifact; two concepts are fundamental in this procedure Mutual Information (MI) and Clustering. Finally, the variability of three BSS/ICA algorithms is assessed; in order to determine which one is more convenient to isolate the respective ICs of interest. Temporal decorrelation based ICA showed the least change in the estimation of both the AEPs and the CI artifact; this has allowed for considerable autonomy in the construction of relevant, consistent clusters. PMID:18003443

  15. URANIUM RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, F.T.; Cruikshank, A.J.

    1958-10-28

    A process for recovering uranium from a solution of a diethyl dithiocarbaruate of uranium in an orgakic solvent substantially immiscible with water is presented. The process comprises brlnging the organic solutlon into intimate contact wlth an aqueous solution of ammonium carbonate, whereby the uranium passes to the aqueous carbonate solution as a soluble uranyl carbonate.

  16. Recent Progress in Monolithic Silica Columns for High-Speed and High-Selectivity Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegami, Tohru; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    Monolithic silica columns have greater (through-pore size)/(skeleton size) ratios than particulate columns and fixed support structures in a column for chemical modification, resulting in high-efficiency columns and stationary phases. This review looks at how the size range of monolithic silica columns has been expanded, how high-efficiency monolithic silica columns have been realized, and how various methods of silica surface functionalization, leading to selective stationary phases, have been developed on monolithic silica supports, and provides information on the current status of these columns. Also discussed are the practical aspects of monolithic silica columns, including how their versatility can be improved by the preparation of small-sized structural features (sub-micron) and columns (1 mm ID or smaller) and by optimizing reaction conditions for in situ chemical modification with various restrictions, with an emphasis on recent research results for both topics.

  17. Recent Progress in Monolithic Silica Columns for High-Speed and High-Selectivity Separations.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tohru; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2016-06-12

    Monolithic silica columns have greater (through-pore size)/(skeleton size) ratios than particulate columns and fixed support structures in a column for chemical modification, resulting in high-efficiency columns and stationary phases. This review looks at how the size range of monolithic silica columns has been expanded, how high-efficiency monolithic silica columns have been realized, and how various methods of silica surface functionalization, leading to selective stationary phases, have been developed on monolithic silica supports, and provides information on the current status of these columns. Also discussed are the practical aspects of monolithic silica columns, including how their versatility can be improved by the preparation of small-sized structural features (sub-micron) and columns (1 mm ID or smaller) and by optimizing reaction conditions for in situ chemical modification with various restrictions, with an emphasis on recent research results for both topics. PMID:27306311

  18. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although

  19. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-09-30

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  20. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.R

    2005-01-31

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  1. DISSOLUTION OF URANIUM FUELS BY MONOOR DIFLUOROPHOSPHORIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, R.; Horn, F.L.; Strickland, G.

    1963-05-01

    A method of dissolving and separating uranium from a uranium matrix fuel element by dissolving the uraniumcontaining matrix in monofluorophosphoric acid and/or difluorophosphoric acid at temperatures ranging from 150 to 275 un. Concent 85% C, thereafter neutralizing the solution to precipitate uranium solids, and converting the solids to uranium hexafluoride by treatment with a halogen trifluoride is presented. (AEC)

  2. Geomorphic criteria for selecting stable uranium tailings disposal sites in New Mexico. Volume 1. Technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; Gardner, T.W.

    1985-03-01

    Essential to the disposal of uranium mill tailings in northwestern New Mexico is the geomorphic stability of the disposal site. Geomorphic stability assessment involves 3 steps: (1) evaluating the site's past geomorphic stability by determining the age of the landscape and its associated deposits; (2) quantifying short- and long-term geomorphic processes operating in the site area; and (3) evaluating the impact of mining activity and reclamation on the geomorphic stability of the site area. A heirarchy of geomorphic hazards which might impact a site area include: (1) drainage network extension/channel headcutting, (2) piping and gullying, (3) bank erosion and meander growth, (4) drainage network and channel incision, (5) channel aggradation, and (6) valley floor deposition and wind erosion. All of these processes operate on a scale of meters of change per year over historic time periods. Landscapes which have undergone significant changes in historic and Holocene time periods are valley floors. Valley floors are considered one of the most unstable landscapes for siting of uranium mill tailings.

  3. Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, Howard; Seltzer, Steven F.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

  4. Isotope separation by laser means

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Greiner, Norman R.; Boyer, Keith

    1982-06-15

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  5. Expeditious method to determine uranium in the process control samples of chemical plant separating (233)U from thoria irradiated in power reactors.

    PubMed

    Kedari, C S; Kharwandikar, B K; Banerjee, K

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of U in the samples containing a significant proportion of (232)U and high concentration of Th is of great concern. Transmutation of Th in the nuclear power reactor produces a notable quantity of (232)U (half life 68.9 years) along with fissile isotope (233)U. The decay series of (232)U is initiated with (228)Th (half life 1.9 year) and it is followed by several short lived α emitting progenies, (224)Ra, (220)Rn, (216)Po, (212)Bi and (212)Po. Even at the smallest contamination of (228)Th in the sample, a very high pulse rate of α emission is obtained, which is to be counted for the radiometric determination of [U]. A commercially available anionic type of extractant Alamine®336 is used to obtain the selective extraction of U from other alpha active elements and fission products present in the sample. Experimental conditions of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are optimized for obtaining maximum decontamination and recovery of U in the organic phase. The effect of some interfering ionic impurities in the sample on the process of separation is investigated. Depending on the level of the concentration of U in the samples, spectrophotometry or radiometry methods are adopted for its determination after separation by LLE. Under optimized experimental conditions, i.e. 5.5M HCl in the aqueous phase and 0.27M Alamin®336 in the organic phase, the recovery of U is about 100%, the decontamination factor with respect to Th is >2000 and the extraction of fission products like (90)Sr, (144)Ce and (134,137)Cs is negligible. The detection limit for [U] using α radiometry is 10mg/L, even in presence of >100g/L of Th in the sample. Accuracy and precision for the determination of U is also assessed. Reproducibility of results is within 5%. This method shows very good agreement with the results obtained by mass spectrometry. PMID:27591623

  6. Using a Buffer Gas Modifier to Change Separation Selectivity in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2010-01-01

    The mobilities of a set of common α-amino acids, four tetraalkylammonium ions, 2,4-dimethyl pyridine (2,4-lutidine), 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and valinol were determined using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-QMS) while introducing 2-butanol into the buffer gas. The mobilities of the test compounds decreased by varying extents with 2-butanol concentration in the mobility spectrometer. When the concentration of 2-butanol increased from 0.0 to 6.8 mmol m−3 (2.5×102 ppmv), percentage reductions in mobilities were: 13.6% (serine), 12.2% (threonine), 10.4% (methionine), 10.3% (tyrosine), 9.8% (valinol), 9.2% (phenylalanine), 7.8% (tryptophan), 5.6% (2,4-lutidine), 2.2% (DTBP), 1.0% (tetramethylammonium ion, TMA, and tetraethylammonium ion, TEA), 0.0% (tetrapropylammonium ion, TPA), and 0.3% (tetrabutylammonium ion, TBA). These variations in mobility depended on the size and steric hindrance on the charge of the ions, and were due to formation of large ion-2-butanol clusters. This selective variation in mobilities was applied to the resolution of a mixture of compounds with similar reduced mobilities such as serine and valinol, which overlapped in N2-only buffer gas in the IMS spectrum. The relative insensitivity of tetraalkylammonium ions and DTBP to the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas was explained by steric hindrance of the four alkyl substituents in tetraalkylammonium ions and the two tert-butyl groups in DTBP, which shielded the positive charge of the ion from the attachment of 2-butanol molecules. Low buffer gas temperatures (100 °C) produced the largest reductions in mobilities by increasing ion-2-butanol interactions and formation of clusters; high temperatures (250 °C) prevented the formation of clusters, and no reduction in ion mobility was obtained with the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas. Low temperatures and high concentrations of 2-butanol produced a series of

  7. Charge separation in facet-engineered chalcogenide photocatalyst: a selective photocorrosion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Naixu; Liu, Maochang; Zhou, Zhaohui; Zhou, Jiancheng; Sun, Yueming; Guo, Liejin

    2014-07-01

    Finding active sites for photocatalytic reduction and oxidation allows the mechanistic understanding of a given reaction, ensuring the rational design and fabrication of an efficient photocatalyst. Herein, using well-shaped Cu2WS4 decahedra as model photocatalysts, we demonstrated that photoinduced oxidative etching could be considered as an indication of the photooxidation reaction sites of chalcogenide photocatalyst as it only occurred on {101} facets of Cu2WS4 during photocatalytic hydrogen production. The photocatalytic reduction reaction, in contrast, was confined on its {001} facets. Based on this finding, the photocatalytic activity of Cu2WS4 decahedra could be further tailored by controlling the ratio of {001}/{101} facets. Thus, this work provides a general route to the determination of reactive sites on shaped chalcogenide photocatalysts.Finding active sites for photocatalytic reduction and oxidation allows the mechanistic understanding of a given reaction, ensuring the rational design and fabrication of an efficient photocatalyst. Herein, using well-shaped Cu2WS4 decahedra as model photocatalysts, we demonstrated that photoinduced oxidative etching could be considered as an indication of the photooxidation reaction sites of chalcogenide photocatalyst as it only occurred on {101} facets of Cu2WS4 during photocatalytic hydrogen production. The photocatalytic reduction reaction, in contrast, was confined on its {001} facets. Based on this finding, the photocatalytic activity of Cu2WS4 decahedra could be further tailored by controlling the ratio of {001}/{101} facets. Thus, this work provides a general route to the determination of reactive sites on shaped chalcogenide photocatalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD pattern, UV-vis spectrum, partial density of states (DOS) of S, W, and Cu on the (A-C) {001} and (E and F) {101} facets, TEM image viewed from [010] direction, and corresponding selected-area electron diffraction (SAED

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL DECONTAMINATION AND RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    McLaren, J.A.; Goode, J.H.

    1958-05-13

    An electrochemical process is described for separating uranium from fission products. The method comprises subjecting the mass of uranium to anodic dissolution in an electrolytic cell containing aqueous alkali bicarbonate solution as its electrolyte, thereby promoting a settling from the solution of a solid sludge from about the electrodes and separating the resulting electrolyte solution containing the anodically dissolved uranium from the sludge which contains the rare earth fission products.

  9. Room-temperature oxidation of hypostoichiometric uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x - A depth-selective approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauchy, Romain; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Belin, Renaud C.; Martin, Philippe M.; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, TGA, XAS and XRD were used to evidence the spontaneous oxidation of biphasic U1-yPuyO2-x samples, with y = 0.28 and 0.45, at room temperature and upon exposure to low moisture and oxygen contents. The oxidation occurs within very short timescales (e.g. O/M ratio increasing from 1.94 to 1.98 within ∼1 μm surface layer in ∼50 h). The combined use of these three complementary methods offered a depth-selective approach from the sample's bulk to its surface and allowed a thorough understanding of the underlying processes involved during the formation of the oxidized layer and of its thickening with time. We believe our results to be of interest in the prospect of fabricating hypo-stoichiometric uranium-plutonium mixed oxides since mastering the oxygen content is a crucial point for many of the fuel properties.

  10. A microporous six-fold interpenetrated hydrogen-bonded organic framework for highly selective separation of C2H4/C2H6.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; He, Yabing; Arman, Hadi D; Krishna, Rajamani; Wang, Hailong; Weng, Linhong; Chen, Banglin

    2014-11-01

    A unique six-fold interpenetrated hydrogen-bonded organic framework (HOF) has been developed, for the first time, for highly selective separation of C2H4/C2H6 at room temperature and normal pressure. PMID:25223376

  11. Selective extractants for the separation of thiophene and 2- and 3-methylthiophene from aromatic hydrocarbons by extraction and extractive distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Miroshnichenko, A.A.; Fedosyuk, L.G.

    1980-08-01

    Separation of high S hydrocarbon raw materials in the petrochemical and coal-tar chemical industries by processes whereby the S can be obtained for use as a raw material in organic syntheses is needed. Results of studies of various extractants for recovery of thiophene and 2- and 3-methylthiphene from industrial mixtures of C/sub 6/ - C/sub 7/ aromatic hydrocarbons are reported. Lactams, amines, and sulfoxides were some of the classes of compounds studied as extractants. The selectivity of the solvents was found to be determined by their functional groups, and within a functional-selective class of compounds the regular increase of selectivity was related to the increase of the specific contribution of the functional group to the molecular weight of the solvent. The effect of water on the solvent systems was investigated. According to practical parameters, ternary mixtures, N-methylpyrrolidone-ethylene carbamide-water and 2-pyrrolidone-ethylene carbamide-water were found to be optimum solvents and to be more effective than the individual solvents with or without water. (BLM)

  12. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  13. METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Hill, O.F.

    1958-02-01

    Plutonium hexafluoride is a satisfactory fluorinating agent and may be reacted with various materials capable of forming fluorides, such as copper, iron, zinc, etc., with consequent formation of the metal fluoride and reduction of the plutonium to the form of a lower fluoride. In accordance with the present invention, it has been found that the reactivity of plutonium hexafluoride with other fluoridizable materials is so great that the process may be used as a method of separating plutonium from mixures containing plutonium hexafluoride and other vaporized fluorides even though the plutonium is present in but minute quantities. This process may be carried out by treating a mixture of fluoride vapors comprising plutonium hexafluoride and fluoride of uranium to selectively reduce the plutonium hexafluoride and convert it to a less volatile fluoride, and then recovering said less volatile fluoride from the vapor by condensation.

  14. On the photodissociation of uranium hexafluoride in the B band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menghini, M.; Morales, P.; Dore, P.; Schisano, M. I.

    1986-06-01

    The rate of photodissociation of uranium hexafluoride is measured for the first time as a function of wavelength in the B band. The experimental technique used tests the collision-free behavior and, with the addition of a buffer gas, the collisional effects on molecular relaxation. In both cases, the dissociation yield is strongly nonuniform. A qualitative interpretation of these results is attempted. Their relevance to the subject of laser isotopic separation and more generally of selective photochemistry is outlined.

  15. Soil decontamination using aqueous biphasic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.; Gupta, D.

    1994-02-01

    This paper summarizes efforts to develop a biphasic extraction process for separating ultrafine particulate contaminants from soils having high amounts of silt and clay. This work has thus far dealt with the removal of refractory uranium particles from the soils at Fernald, Ohio. The separation process involves the selective partitioning of ultra-fine particles between two immiscible aqueous phases. The authors have conducted batch extraction studies and are now beginning to scaleup the process for pilot-plant testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The results of these extraction studies are discussed.

  16. The analysis of various size, visually selected and density and magnetically separated fractions of Luna 16 and 20 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eglinton, G.; Gowar, A. P.; Jull, A. J. T.; Pillinger, C. T.; Agrell, S. O.; Agrell, J. E.; Long, J. V. P.; Bowie, S. H. U.; Simpson, P. R.; Beckinsale, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Samples of Luna 16 and 20 have been separated according to size, visual appearance, density, and magnetic susceptibility. Selected aliquots were examined in eight British laboratories. The studies included mineralogy and petrology, selenochronology, magnetic characteristics, Mossbauer spectroscopy, oxygen isotope ratio determinations, cosmic ray track and thermoluminescence investigations, and carbon chemistry measurements. Luna 16 and 20 are typically mare and highland soils, comparing well with their Apollo counterparts, Apollo 11 and 16, respectively. Both soils are very mature (high free iron, carbide, and methane and cosmogenic Ar), while Luna 16, but not Luna 20, is characterized by a high content of glassy materials. An aliquot of anorthosite fragments, handpicked from Luna 20, had a gas retention age of about 4.3 plus or minus 0.1 Gy.

  17. Wide Angle, Single Screen, Gridded Square-Loop Frequency Selective Surface for Diplexing Two Closely Separated Frequency Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The design and performance of a wide angle, single screen, frequency selective surface (FSS) with gridded square-loop path elements are described for diplexing closely separated signal bands, for example, X- and Ku-band signals in an Orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer (OVLBI) earth station reflector antenna system, as well as other applications such as military and commercial communications via satellites. Excellent agreement is obtained between the predicted and measured results of this FSS design using the gridded square-loop patch elements sandwiched between 0.0889 cm thick tetrafluoroethylene fluorocarbon polymer (PTFE) slabs. Resonant frequency drift is reduced by 1 GHz with an incidence angle from 0 deg normal to 40 deg from normal.

  18. Development of a fast and selective separation method to determine histamine in tuna fish samples using capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Luciano; Valese, Andressa Camargo; Azevedo, Mônia Stremel; Gonzaga, Luciano Valdemiro; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Piovezan, Marcel; Vistuba, Jacqueline Pereira; Micke, Gustavo A

    2013-03-15

    This paper reports on the development of a fast and selective separation method by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) for the determination of histamine in tuna fish samples. The background electrolyte was composed of 60 mmol L(-1) hydroxyisobutyric acid and 10 mmol L(-1) sodium hydroxide at pH 3.3. The internal standard used was imidazole. Separations were performed in a fused uncoated silica capillary (32 cm total length, 8.5 cm effective length and 50 μm internal diameter) with direct UV detection at 210 nm. The samples and standards were injected hydrodynamically (50 mbar, 3s) from the outlet capillary end (nearest to the detector) and the electrophoretic system was operated under normal polarity and constant voltage conditions of 30 kV (positive polarity on the injection side). The migration time of histamine in the proposed method was only 0.34 min. The method was then validated and different tuna fish samples were analyzed. Good linearity (R(2)>0.999), a limit of detection 0.14 mg L(-1), intra-day precision better than 3.5% (peak area of sample), and recovery in the range of 94-108% were obtained. The results of the histamine concentration determined in the samples by the CZE method were compared with the LC-MS/MS method. PMID:23598114

  19. Mechanistic Investigation of Solvent Extraction Based on Anion-Functionalized Ionic Liquids for Selective Separation of Rare-Earth Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, solvation has been found to be a dominant mechanism in a comprehensive ionic liquid based extraction system for rare earth elements (REEs). Trioctylmethylammonium di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate ([TOMA][DEHP]), an ionic-liquid extractant, was used in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidizolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([Cnmim][NTf2], n = 4, 6, 8, 10) and 1-alkyl-3-methylimidizolium bis(perfluoroethanesulfonyl)imide ([Cnmim][BETI], n = 4, 6, 8, 10) for the separation of REEs. Surprisingly, a very similar extraction behavior was observed even as the carbon chain length on the ionic-liquid (IL) cation increased from butyl (C4) to hexyl (C6), to octyl (C8), to decyl (C10). This behavior is in sharp contrast to that exhibited by the conventional neutral extractants, whose extraction efficiencies are strongly dependent on the hydrophobicity of IL cations. Furthermore, the addition of IL cations ([Cnmim]+) or IL anions ([NTf2]- or [BETI]-) to the aqueous phase had little effect on the extraction behavior of the above extraction system, ruling out the strong involvement of the ion-exchange mechanism associated with traditional IL-based extraction systems. Results showed that the extractabilities and selectivities of REEs using [TOMA][DEHP] in [C10mim][NTf2]/[BETI] are several orders of magnitude better than those achieved using conventional organic solvent, diisopropylbenzene (DIPB). This study highlights the potential of developing a comprehensive IL-based extraction strategy for REEs separations.

  20. A Tri-Band Frequency Selective Surface (FSS) to Diplex Widely Separated Bands for Millimeter Wave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poojali, Jayaprakash; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala; Chitti, Krishnamurthy V.; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2016-06-01

    A substrate-backed frequency selective surface (FSS) is presented for diplexing the widely separated frequency spectrum centered at 55, 89, and 183 GHz with varying bandwidth for spatial separation in the quasi-optical feed network of the millimeter wave sounder. A unit cell composed of a crossed dipole integrated with a circular ring and loaded inside a square ring is optimized for tri-band frequency response with transmission window at 89 GHz and rejection windows at 55 and 183 GHz. The reflection and transmission losses predicted for the optimized unit cell (728 μm × 728 μm) composed of dissimilar resonant shapes is less than 0.5 dB for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations and wide angle of incidence (0°-45°). The FSS is fabricated on a 175-μm-thick quartz substrate using microfabrication techniques. The transmission characteristics measured with continuous wave (CW) terahertz transmit receive system are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  1. Novel core-shell cerium(IV)-immobilized magnetic polymeric microspheres for selective enrichment and rapid separation of phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Cheng, Gong; Liu, Yan-Lin; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2014-03-01

    In this work, novel magnetic polymeric core-shell structured microspheres with immobilized Ce(IV), Fe3O4@SiO2@PVPA-Ce(IV), were designed rationally and synthesized successfully via a facile route for the first time. Magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 microspheres were first prepared by directly coating a thin layer of silica onto Fe3O4 magnetic particles using a sol-gel method, a poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA) shell was then coated on the Fe3O4@SiO2 microspheres to form Fe3O4@SiO2@PVPA microspheres through a radical polymerization reaction, and finally Ce(IV) ions were robustly immobilized onto the Fe3O4@SiO2@PVPA microspheres through strong chelation between Ce(IV) ions and phosphate moieties in the PVPA. The applicability of the Fe3O4@SiO2@PVPA-Ce(IV) microspheres for selective enrichment and rapid separation of phosphopeptides from proteolytic digests of standard and real protein samples was investigated. The results demonstrated that the core-shell structured Fe3O4@SiO2@PVPA-Ce(IV) microspheres with abundant Ce(IV) affinity sites and excellent magnetic responsiveness can effectively purify phosphopeptides from complex biosamples for MS detection taking advantage of the rapid magnetic separation and the selective affinity between Ce(IV) ions and phosphate moieties of the phosphopeptides. Furthermore, they can be effectively recycled and show good reusability, and have better performance than commercial TiO2 beads and homemade Fe3O4@PMAA-Ce(IV) microspheres. Thus the Fe3O4@SiO2@PVPA-Ce(IV) microspheres can benefit greatly the mass spectrometric qualitative analysis of phosphopeptides in phosphoproteome research. PMID:24407680

  2. Selective breeding for infant rat separation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations: developmental precursors of passive and active coping styles.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Susan A; Hofer, Myron A

    2007-09-01

    Human depression and anxiety disorders show inherited biases across generations, as do antisocial disorders characterized by aggression. Each condition is preceded in children by behavioral inhibition or aggressive behavior, respectively, and both are characterized by separation anxiety disorders. In affected families, adults and children exhibit different forms of altered autonomic nervous system regulation and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in response to stress. Because it is difficult to determine mechanisms accounting for these associations, animal studies are useful for studying the fundamental relationships between biological and behavioral traits. Pharmacologic and behavioral studies suggest that infant rat ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) are a measure of an early anxiety-like state related to separation anxiety. However, it was not known whether or not early ultrasound emissions in infant rats are markers for genetic risk for anxiety states later in life. To address these questions, we selectively bred two lines of rats based on high and low rates of USV to isolation at postnatal (P) 10 days of age. To our knowledge, ours is the only laboratory that has ever selectively bred on the basis of an infantile trait related to anxiety. The High and Low USV lines show two distinct sets of patterns of behavior, physiology and neurochemistry from infancy through adulthood. As adults High line rats demonstrate "anxious"/"depressed" phenotypes in behavior and autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation to standard laboratory tests. In Lows, on the other hand, behavior and autonomic regulation are consistent with an "aggressive" phenotype. The High and Low USV lines are the first genetic animal models implicating long-term associations of contrasting "coping styles" with early attachment responses. They thus present a potentially powerful model for examining gene-environment interactions in the development of life-long affective regulation. PMID:17543397

  3. Synthesis and extraction studies with a rationally designed diamide ligand selective to actinide(iv) pertinent to the plutonium uranium redox extraction process.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Panja, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Dhami, Prem S; Gandhi, Preetam M; Ghosh, Sunil K

    2016-05-01

    A new class of conformationally constrained oxa-bridged tricyclo-dicarboxamide (OTDA) ligand was rationally designed for the selective extraction of tetravalent actinides pertinent to the Plutonium Uranium Redox EXtraction (PUREX) process. Two of the designed diamide ligands were synthesized and extraction studies were performed for Pu(iv) from HNO3 medium. The mechanism of extraction was investigated by studying various parameters such as feed HNO3, NaNO3 and OTDA concentrations. The nature of the extracted species was found to be [Pu(NO3)4(OTDA)]. One of the OTDA ligands was elaborately tested and showed the selective extraction of Pu(iv) and Np(iv) over other actinide species, viz., U(vi), Np(v), Am(iii), lanthanides and fission products contained in a nuclear waste from the PUREX process. DFT calculations predicted the charge density on each of the coordinating 'O' atoms of OTDA supporting its high Pu(iv) selectivity over other ions studied and also provided the energy optimized structure of OTDA and its Pu(iv) complex. PMID:27054892

  4. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Price, T.D.; Jeung, N.M.

    1958-06-17

    An improved precipitation method is described for the recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. After removal of all but small amounts of Ni or Cu, and after complexing any iron present, the uranium is separated as the peroxide by adding H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The improvement lies in the fact that the addition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and consequent precipitation are carried out at a temperature below the freezing; point of the solution, so that minute crystals of solvent are present as seed crystals for the precipitation.

  5. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Foster, L.S.; Magel, T.T.

    1958-05-13

    A modified process is described for the production of uranium metal by means of a bomb reduction of UF/sub 4/. Difficulty is sometimes experienced in obtaining complete separation of the uranium from the slag when the process is carried out on a snnall scale, i.e., for the production of 10 grams of U or less. Complete separation may be obtained by incorporating in the reaction mixture a quantity of MnCl/sub 2/, so that this compound is reduced along with the UF/sub 4/ . As a result a U--Mn alloy is formed which has a melting point lower than that of pure U, and consequently the metal remains molten for a longer period allowing more complete separation from the slag.

  6. Nickel(II)-immobilized sulfhydryl cotton fiber for selective binding and rapid separation of histidine-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Mei; Zhu, Gang-Tian; Lu, Wei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Wang, Hong; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-31

    In the current study, a novel nickel(II)-immobilized sulfhydryl cotton fiber (SCF-Ni(2+)) was prepared in a simple way based on the coordination effect between Ni(2+) and thiol group on the surface of SCF. The composition and element mapping of SCF-Ni(2+) fibers were demonstrated by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Based on the high affinity of Ni(2+) to 6×His on histidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins, SCF-Ni(2+) fibers were then further used as an immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) adsorbent for selective binding and rapid separation of His-tagged proteins using an in- pipette-tip SPE format. Our results showed that SCF-Ni(2+) adsorbent can selectively capture His-tagged proteins from protein mixture and Escherichia coli cell lysates. Taken together, the developed method provides a rapid, convenient and efficient approach for the purification of His-tagged proteins. PMID:26087962

  7. Multifunctional inorganic-organic hybrid nanospheres for rapid and selective luminescence detection of TNT in mixed nitroaromatics via magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingxin; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Leyu

    2013-11-15

    Rapid, sensitive and selective detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution differentiating from other nitroaromatics and independent of complicated instruments is in high demand for public safety and environmental monitoring. Despite of many methods for TNT detection, it is hard to differentiate TNT from 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) due to their highly similar structures and properties. In this work, via a simple and versatile method, LaF3ːCe(3+)-Tb(3+)and Fe3O4 nanoparticle-codoped multifunctional nanospheres were prepared through self-assembly of the building blocks. The luminescence of these nanocomposites was dramatically quenched via adding nitroaromatics into the aqueous solution. After the magnetic separation, however, the interference of other nitroaromatics including 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), and nitrobenzene (NB) was effectively overcome due to the removal of these coexisting nitroaromatics from the surface of nanocomposites. Due to the formation of TNT(-)-RCONH3(+), the TNT was attached to the surface of the nanocomposites and was quantitatively detected by the postexposure luminescence quenching. Meanwhile, the luminescence intensity is negatively proportional to the concentration of TNT in the range of 0.01-5.0 μg/mL with the 3σ limit of detection (LOD) of 10.2 ng/mL. Therefore, the as-developed method provides a novel strategy for rapid and selective detection of TNT in the mixture solution of nitroaromatics by postexposure luminescence quenching. PMID:24148441

  8. Enhanced phytoextraction of uranium and selected heavy metals by Indian mustard and ryegrass using biodegradable soil amendments.

    PubMed

    Duquène, L; Vandenhove, H; Tack, F; Meers, E; Baeten, J; Wannijn, J

    2009-02-15

    The applicability of biodegradable amendments in phytoremediation to increase the uptake of uranium (U), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) was tested in a greenhouse experiment. Plants were cultivated during one month on two soils with naturally or industrially increased contaminant levels of U. Treatments with citric acid, NH4-citrate/citric acid, oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) at a rate of 5 mmol kg(-1) dry soil caused increases in soil solution concentrations that were up to 18 times higher for U and up to 1570 times higher for other heavy metals, compared to the controls. Shoot concentrations increased to a much smaller extent. With EDDS, 19-, 34-, and 37-fold increases were achieved in shoots of Indian mustard for U, Pb and Cu, respectively. The increases in plant uptake of Cd, Cr and Zn were limited to a factor of four at most. Ryegrass generally extracted less U and metals than Indian mustard. Despite a marked increase of U and metal concentrations in shoots after addition of amendments, the estimated time required to obtain an acceptable reduction in soil contaminant concentrations was impractically long. Only for Cu and Zn in one of the studied soils, could the Flemish standards for clean soil theoretically be attained in less than 100 years. PMID:19054545

  9. Effects of precursor and support variation in the genesis of uranium oxide catalysts for CO oxidation and selective reduction of NO: Synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Tom; Newton, Mark A; Boyd, Vicky; Lee, Darren F; Evans, John

    2005-02-24

    A range of uranium oxide-based catalysts, derived from UO2(NO3)2.6H2O and UCl4 precursors, and supported on gamma-Al2O3, SiO2 and mesoporous H1SiO2, have been synthesized and then characterized using the following methods: isothermal nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements, diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS), gas titration of surface hydroxyl groups using Grignard reagents, U L(III) extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. Brij76-templated H1SiO2 mesoporous silicas are found to be essentially stable under flowing oxygen after 16 h at 1073 K. At temperatures above this, however, extensive structural collapse, together with extensive dehydroxylation, ensues. Titration of the accessible hydroxyl group concentrations shows that in these materials the density of OH groups is considerably lower than in their amorphous counterparts. The adsorption of uranyl nitrate onto these dispersants results in a supported, and partially dehydrated, phase of the parent molecule with little obvious structural distortion; however, the adsorption of UCl4 leads to a complex adstructure which may best be described as U(O)2Cl2. The subsequent formation of the uranium oxide phase, nominally active for the oxidation of CO and selective reduction of NO (generally accepted to be U3O8), is found to be a considerable function of both the precursor and support system employed. Calcination of such systems to 1073 K results in extensive extrusion of the supported uranium phase from mesoporous supports, resulting in the formation of very large orthorhombic U3O8 domains. PXRD, however, shows that on amorphous SiO2 and gamma-Al2O3 similar treatment results in the formation of a hexagonal phase of U3O8. The formation of U3O8 is found to be promoted in mesoporous systems and by the presence of Cl in the catalyst make up. Some evidence is also found that suggests that a persistence of Cl

  10. Summarizing results on the performance of a selective set of atmospheric plasma jets for separation of photons and reactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Simon; Jarzina, Fabian; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Golda, Judith; Layes, Vincent; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Benedikt, Jan

    2015-11-01

    A microscale atmospheric-pressure plasma jet is a remote plasma jet, where plasma-generated reactive particles and photons are involved in substrate treatment. Here, we summarize our efforts to develop and characterize a particle- or photon-selective set of otherwise identical jets. In that way, the reactive species or photons can be used separately or in combination to study their isolated or combined effects to test whether the effects are additive or synergistic. The final version of the set of three jets—particle-jet, photon-jet and combined jet—is introduced. This final set realizes the highest reproducibility of the photon and particle fluxes, avoids turbulent gas flow, and the fluxes of the selected plasma-emitted components are almost identical in the case of all jets, while the other component is effectively blocked, which was verified by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Schlieren-imaging and a fluid dynamics simulation show the stability of the gas flow. The performance of these selective jets is demonstrated with the example of the treatment of E. coli bacteria with the different components emitted by a He-only, a He/N2 and a He/O2 plasma. Additionally, measurements of the vacuum UV photon spectra down to the wavelength of 50 nm can be made with the photon-jet and the relative comparison of spectral intensities among different gas mixtures is reported here. The results will show that the vacuum UV photons can lead to the inactivation of the E.coli bacteria.

  11. Uranium extraction selectivities of dibutyl carbitol and tributyl phosphate in the system UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O-Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}-solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, J.F.

    1999-04-01

    Historically, both the BUTEX (dibutyl carbitol-based) and PUREX (tributyl phosphate-based) processes have been used for uranium recovery and purification. Currently, BUTEX- and PUREX-type extraction processes are being used in series for recovery of isotopically enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The use of two solvents is predicated on the differing selectivities of each with regard to the contaminant elements present in the uranium source stream. As part of efforts to streamline plant operations in response to decreasing throughput requirements, the Y-12 Development Division is evaluating options for converting the existing two-solvent operation to a single-solvent process. At the request of the Y-12 Development Division, the Robotics and Process Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has undertaken evaluation of solvents for use in a single-solvent recovery process. Initial efforts have been directed toward development of a single-solvent, dibutyl carbitol- or tributyl phosphate-based process that produces a product with purity equal to or exceeding what is currently obtained in the two-cycle, two-solvent operation. The test effort has involved both laboratory equilibrium determinations and engineering-scale process demonstrations in multistage flowsheets using centrifugal solvent extraction contactors. Excellent uranium recovery results have been obtained from both dibutyl carbitol- and tributyl phosphate-based solvent extraction flowsheets. Contaminant rejection performance by the two solvents is similar for many of the elements considered. Extraction of some contaminant elements by tributyl phosphate is significant enough to conclude that the solvent is not as selective for uranium as is dibutyl carbitol. This determination does not necessarily eliminate tributyl phosphate from consideration for use in a single-solvent process but does indicate a need for effective scrubbing of contaminants from uranium-loaded tributyl phosphate, possibly by

  12. Neutron-rich isotope production using a uranium carbide - carbon nanotubes SPES target prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, S.; Biasetto, L.; Manzolaro, M.; Scarpa, D.; Carturan, S.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.; Vasquez, J.; Zanonato, P.; Colombo, P.; Jost, C. U.; Stracener, D. W.

    2013-05-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project, under development at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL), is a new-generation Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facility for the production of radioactive ion beams by means of the proton-induced fission of uranium. In the framework of the research on the SPES target, seven uranium carbide discs, obtained by reacting uranium oxide with graphite and carbon nanotubes, were irradiated with protons at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the following, the yields of several fission products obtained during the experiment are presented and discussed. The experimental results are then compared to those obtained using a standard uranium carbide target. The reported data highlights the capability of the new type of SPES target to produce and release isotopes of interest for the nuclear physics community.

  13. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FROM URANIUM/MOLYBDENUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R; Ann Visser, A; James Laurinat, J

    2007-10-15

    The Savannah River Site will recycle a nuclear fuel comprised of 90% uranium-10% molybdenum by weight. The process flowsheet calls for dissolution of the material in nitric acid to a uranium concentration of 15-20 g/L without the formation of precipitates. The dissolution will be followed by separation of uranium from molybdenum using solvent extraction with 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin. Testing with the fuel validated dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature. Batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed for the extraction, strip and wash stages with particular focus on the distribution of molybdenum.

  14. URANIUM COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Allen, N.P.; Grogan, J.D.

    1959-05-12

    This patent relates to high purity uranium alloys characterized by improved stability to thermal cycling and low thermal neutron absorption. The high purity uranium alloy contains less than 0.1 per cent by weight in total amount of any ore or more of the elements such as aluminum, silicon, phosphorous, tin, lead, bismuth, niobium, and zinc.

  15. Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound

    DOEpatents

    Rothman, Alan B.; Graczyk, Donald G.; Essling, Alice M.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2001-01-01

    A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

  16. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective separation and determination of metronidazole in cosmetic samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Li, Xiao-Yan; Li, Jun-Jie; Su, Xiao-Meng; Wu, Zong-Yuan; Li, Peng-Fei; Lei, Fu-Hou; Tan, Xue-Cai; Shi, Zhan-Wang

    2015-05-01

    In this study, novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) were developed as a sorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE) and used for the selective separation of metronidazole (MNZ) in cosmetics; MNZ was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). First, magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the co-precipitation of Fe(2+)and Fe(3+) ions in an ammonia solution; then oleic acid (OA) was modified onto the surface of Fe3O4NPs. Finally, the MMIP was prepared by aqueous suspension polymerization, involving the copolymerization of Fe3O4NPs@OA with MNZ as the template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol maleic rosinate acrylate (EGMRA) as the cross-linking agent, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The MMIP materials showed high selective adsorption capacity and fast binding kinetics for MNZ; the maximum adsorption amount of the MMIP to MNZ was 46.7 mg/g. The assay showed a linear range from 0.1 to 20.0 μg/mL for MNZ with the correlation coefficient 0.999. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of intra- and inter-day ranging from 0.71 to 2.45% and from 1.06 to 5.20% were obtained. The MMIP can be applied to the enrichment and determination of MNZ in cosmetic products with the recoveries of spiked toner, powder, and cream cosmetic samples ranging from 90.6 to 104.2, 84.1 to 91.4, and 90.3 to 100.4%, respectively, and the RSD was <3.54%. PMID:25749799

  17. Determination of uranium in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, F.; Daniels, G.J.

    1959-01-01

    A routine fluorimetric procedure is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in zircon. It employs the direct extraction of uranyl nitrate with ethyl acetate using phosphate as a retainer for zirconium. Submicrogram amounts or uranium are separated in the presence of 100,000 times the amount of zirconium. The modified procedure has been worked out using synthetic mixtures of known composition and zircon. Results of analyses have an accuracy of 97-98% of the contained uranium and a standard deviation of less than 2.5%. ?? 1959.

  18. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  19. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.T.; Hovis, V.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Pullen, W.C.

    1983-05-31

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  20. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  1. Effect of interwire separation on growth kinetics and properties of site-selective GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D.; Schweickert, L.; Morkötter, S.; Loitsch, B.; Hertenberger, S.; Becker, J.; Bichler, M.; Finley, J. J.; Koblmüller, G.; Abstreiter, G.

    2014-07-21

    We report tuning of the growth kinetics, geometry, and properties of autocatalytic GaAs nanowires (NW) by precisely controlling their density on SiO{sub 2}-mask patterned Si (111) substrates using selective area molecular beam epitaxy. Using patterned substrates with different mask opening size (40–120 nm) and pitch (0.25–3 μm), we find that the NW geometry (length, diameter) is independent of the opening size, in contrast to non-catalytic GaAs NWs, whereas the NW geometry strongly depends on pitch, i.e., interwire separation and NW density. In particular, two distinct growth regimes are identified: a diffusion-limited regime for large pitches (low NW density) and a competitive growth regime for smaller pitches (high NW density), where axial and radial NW growth rates are reduced. The transition between these two regimes is significantly influenced by the growth conditions and shifts to smaller pitches with increasing As/Ga flux ratio. Ultimately, the pitch-dependent changes in growth kinetics lead to distinctly different photoluminescence properties, highlighting that mask template design is a very critical parameter for tuning intrinsic NW properties.

  2. Identification of RNase-resistant RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts: Separation from chromosomal DNA by selective precipitation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Blanca V; Malczewskyj, Eric T; Cabiya, Joshua M; Lewis, L Kevin; Maeder, Corina

    2016-01-01

    High-quality chromosomal DNA is a requirement for many biochemical and molecular biological techniques. To isolate cellular DNA, standard protocols typically lyse cells and separate nucleic acids from other biological molecules using a combination of chemical and physical methods. After a standard chemical-based protocol to isolate chromosomal DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and then treatment with RNase A to degrade RNA, two RNase-resistant bands persisted when analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Interestingly, such resistant bands did not appear in preparations of Escherichia coli bacterial DNA after RNase treatment. Several enzymatic, chemical, and physical methods were employed in an effort to remove the resistant RNAs, including use of multiple RNases and alcohol precipitation, base hydrolysis, and chromatographic methods. These experiments resulted in the development of a new method for isolation of S. cerevisiae chromosomal DNA. This method utilizes selective precipitation of DNA in the presence of a potassium acetate/isopropanol mixture and produces high yields of chromosomal DNA without detectable contaminating RNAs. PMID:26416692

  3. Phenylboronate chromatography selectively separates glycoproteins through the manipulation of electrostatic, charge transfer, and cis-diol interactions.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rimenys J; Woo, James; Aires-Barros, M Raquel; Cramer, Steven M; Azevedo, Ana M

    2014-10-01

    Phenylboronate chromatography (PBC) has been applied for several years, however details regarding the mechanisms of interactions between the ligand and biomolecules are still scarce. The goal of this work is to investigate the various chemical interactions between proteins and their ligands, using a protein library containing both glycosylated and nonglycosylated proteins. Differences in the adsorption of these proteins over a pH range from 4 to 9 were related to two main properties: charge and presence of glycans. Acidic or neutral proteins were strongly adsorbed below pH 8 although the uncharged trigonal form of phenylboronate (PB) is less susceptible to forming electrostatic and cis-diol interactions with proteins. The glycosylated proteins were only adsorbed above pH 8 when the electrostatic repulsion between the boronate anion and the protein surface was mitigated (at 200 mM NaCl). All basic proteins were highly adsorbed above pH 8 with PB also acting as a cation-exchanger with binding occurring through electrostatic interactions. Batch adsorption performed at acidic conditions in the presence of Lewis base showed that charge-transfer interactions are critical for protein retention. This study demonstrates the multimodal interaction of PBC, which can be a selective tool for separation of different classes of proteins. PMID:25130283

  4. Disperse fine equiaxed alpha alumina nanoparticles with narrow size distribution synthesised by selective corrosion and coagulation separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Sanxu; Li, Lu; Ma, Ji; Lu, Fuliang; Li, Jiangong

    2015-07-01

    Disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution are important materials in nanotechnology and nanomaterials, but syntheses of disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles usually result in fine γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles or large α-Al2O3 nanoparticles larger than 15 nm. α-Al2O3 has a higher surface energy than γ-Al2O3 and becomes thermodynamically not stable with respect to γ-Al2O3 at specific surface areas larger than 100 m2/g (at sizes smaller than 15 nm for spherical particles) at room temperature. So disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles smaller than 15 nm with narrow size distribution are extremely difficult to synthesise. Here we show the successful synthesis of disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles with average sizes below 10 nm and narrow size distribution by selective corrosion and refined fractionated coagulation separation. An almost fully dense nanocrystalline α-Al2O3 ceramic with a relative density of 99.5% and an average grain size of 60 nm can be sintered from disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution.

  5. Disperse fine equiaxed alpha alumina nanoparticles with narrow size distribution synthesised by selective corrosion and coagulation separation

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Sanxu; Li, Lu; Ma, Ji; Lu, Fuliang; Li, Jiangong

    2015-01-01

    Disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution are important materials in nanotechnology and nanomaterials, but syntheses of disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles usually result in fine γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles or large α-Al2O3 nanoparticles larger than 15 nm. α-Al2O3 has a higher surface energy than γ-Al2O3 and becomes thermodynamically not stable with respect to γ-Al2O3 at specific surface areas larger than 100 m2/g (at sizes smaller than 15 nm for spherical particles) at room temperature. So disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles smaller than 15 nm with narrow size distribution are extremely difficult to synthesise. Here we show the successful synthesis of disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles with average sizes below 10 nm and narrow size distribution by selective corrosion and refined fractionated coagulation separation. An almost fully dense nanocrystalline α-Al2O3 ceramic with a relative density of 99.5% and an average grain size of 60 nm can be sintered from disperse fine equiaxed α-Al2O3 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. PMID:26166455

  6. SEPARATION OF URANYL AND RUTHENIUM VALUES BY THE TRIBUTYL PHOSPHATE EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranyl values from ruthenium values contained in an aqueous 3 to 4 M nitric acid solution. After the addition of hydrogen peroxide to obtain a concentration of 0.3 M, the uranium is selectively extracted with kerosene-diluted tributyl phosphate.

  7. INFORMATION: Management Alert on Environmental Management's Select Strategy for Disposition of Savannah River Site Depleted Uranium Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-01

    The Administration and the Congress, through policy statements and passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), have signaled that they hope that proactive actions by agency Inspectors General will help ensure that Federal Recovery Act activities are transparent, effective and efficient. In that context, the purpose of this management alert is to share with you concerns that have been raised to the Office of Inspector General regarding the planned disposition of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) inventory of Depleted Uranium (DU) oxides. This inventory, generated as a by-product of the nuclear weapons production process and amounting to approximately 15,600 drums of DU oxides, has been stored at SRS for decades. A Department source we deem reliable and credible recently came to the Office of Inspector General expressing concern that imminent actions are planned that may not provide for the most cost effective disposition of these materials. During April 2009, the Department chose to use funds provided under the Recovery Act to accelerate final disposition of the SRS inventory of DU oxides. After coordination with State of Utah regulators, elected officials and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department initiated a campaign to ship the material to a facility operated by EnergySolutions in Clive, Utah. Although one shipment of a portion of the material has already been sent to the EnergySolutions facility, the majority of the product remains at SRS. As had been planned, both for the shipment already made and those planned in the near term, the EnergySolutions facility was to have been the final disposal location for the material. Recently, a member of Congress and various Utah State officials raised questions regarding the radioactive and other constituents present in the DU oxides to be disposed of at the Clive, Utah, facility. These concerns revolved around the characterization of the material and its acceptability under

  8. REMOVAL OF URANIUM FROM ORGANIC LIQUIDS

    DOEpatents

    Vavalides, S.P.

    1959-08-25

    A process is described for recovering small quantities of uranium from organic liquids such as hydrocarbon oils. halogen-substituted hydrocarbons, and alcohols. The organic liquid is contacted with a comminuted alkaline earth hydroxide, calcium hydroxide particularly, and the resulting uranium-bearing solid is separated from the liquid by filtration. Uranium may then be recovered from the solid by means of dissolution in nitric acid and conventional extraction with an organic solvent such as tributyl phosphate.

  9. Smart thorium and uranium determination exploiting renewable solid-phase extraction applied to environmental samples in a wide concentration range.

    PubMed

    Avivar, Jessica; Ferrer, Laura; Casas, Montserrat; Cerdà, Víctor

    2011-07-01

    A smart fully automated system is proposed for determination of thorium and uranium in a wide concentration range, reaching environmental levels. The hyphenation of lab-on-valve (LOV) and multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA), coupled to a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell, allows the spectrophotometric determination of thorium and uranium in different types of environmental sample matrices achieving high selectivity and sensitivity levels. Online separation and preconcentration of thorium and uranium is carried out by means of Uranium and TEtraValents Actinides resin. The potential of the LOV-MSFIA makes possible the full automation of the system by the in-line regeneration of the column and its combination with a smart methodology is a step forward in automation. After elution, thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) are spectrophotometrically detected after reaction with arsenazo-III. We propose a rapid, inexpensive, and fully automated method to determine thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) in a wide concentration range (0-1,200 and 0-2,000 μg L(-1) Th and U, respectively). Limits of detection reached are 5.9 ηg L(-1) of uranium and 60 ηg L(-1) of thorium. Different water sample matrices (seawater, well water, freshwater, tap water, and mineral water), and a channel sediment reference material which contained thorium and uranium were satisfactorily analyzed with the proposed method. PMID:21573729

  10. Membrane separation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stookey, D.J.; Patton, C.J.; Malcolm, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane separations of interest here are not to be confused with barrier separations of the type employed in the uranium enrichment plant at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. There isotopes of uranium hexafluoride were separated by the free-molecular or Knudsen flow of the gas mixture through the pores and orifices created within a porous nickel media which was sometimes referred to as a membrane. In barrier separation, an enrichment of gases of differing molecular weights is accomplished by the differing gaseous diffusion rates within the porous media. By contrast the membranes of interest here are thin, dense, continuous films, typically formed from polymers. The separation of species is accomplished by the dissolution of the gases in the polymer and their diffusion across the solid film thickness under a concentration gradient according to Fick's law. This process is commonly referred to as membrane permeation.

  11. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION WITH RESPECT TO ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Vogler, S.; Beederman, M.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranium values from a nitric acid aqueous solution containing uranyl values, zirconium values and tetravalent plutonium values. The process comprises contacting said solution with a substantially water-immiscible liquid organic solvent containing alkyl phosphate, separating an organic extract phase containing the uranium, zirconium, and tetravalent plutonium values from an aqueous raffinate, contacting said organic extract phase with an aqueous solution 2M to 7M in nitric acid and also containing an oxalate ion-containing substance, and separating a uranium- containing organic raffinate from aqueous zirconium- and plutonium-containing extract phase.

  12. UTSA-74: A MOF-74 Isomer with Two Accessible Binding Sites per Metal Center for Highly Selective Gas Separation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Feng; Yan, Changsheng; Dang, Lilong; Krishna, Rajamani; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Hui; Dong, Xinglong; Han, Yu; Hu, Tong-Liang; O'Keeffe, Michael; Wang, Lingling; Luo, Mingbiao; Lin, Rui-Biao; Chen, Banglin

    2016-05-01

    A new metal-organic framework Zn2(H2O)(dobdc)·0.5(H2O) (UTSA-74, H4dobdc = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid), Zn-MOF-74/CPO-27-Zn isomer, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. It has a novel four coordinated fgl topology with one-dimensional channels of about 8.0 Å. Unlike metal sites in the well-established MOF-74 with a rod-packing structure in which each of them is in a five coordinate square pyramidal coordination geometry, there are two different Zn(2+) sites within the binuclear secondary building units in UTSA-74 in which one of them (Zn1) is in a tetrahedral while another (Zn2) in an octahedral coordination geometry. After activation, the two axial water molecules on Zn2 sites can be removed, generating UTSA-74a with two accessible gas binding sites per Zn2 ion. Accordingly, UTSA-74a takes up a moderately high and comparable amount of acetylene (145 cm(3)/cm(3)) to Zn-MOF-74. Interestingly, the accessible Zn(2+) sites in UTSA-74a are bridged by carbon dioxide molecules instead of being terminally bound in Zn-MOF-74, so UTSA-74a adsorbs a much smaller amount of carbon dioxide (90 cm(3)/cm(3)) than Zn-MOF-74 (146 cm(3)/cm(3)) at room temperature and 1 bar, leading to a superior MOF material for highly selective C2H2/CO2 separation. X-ray crystal structures, gas sorption isotherms, molecular modeling, and simulated and experimental breakthroughs comprehensively support this result. PMID:27113684

  13. JACKETING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.

    1959-07-14

    The bonding to uranium of sheathing of iron or cobalt, or nickel, or alloys thereof is described. The bonding is accomplished by electro-depositing both surfaces to be joined with a coating of silver and amalgamating or alloying the silver layer with mercury or indium. Then the silver alloy is homogenized by exerting pressure on an assembly of the uranium core and the metal jacket, reducing the area of assembly and heating the assembly to homogenize by diffusion.

  14. A Honeycomb-Structured Ti-6Al-4V Oil-Gas Separation Rotor Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting for Aero-engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Wang, Q. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Gu, J.; Liu, N.; Jia, L.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Oil -gas separation is a key process in an aero-engine lubrication system. This study reports an innovative development in oil -gas separation. A honeycomb-structured rotor with hexagonal cone-shaped pore channels has been designed, additively manufactured from Ti-6Al-4V using selective electron beam melting (SEBM) and assessed for oil -gas separation for aero-engine application. The Ti-6Al-4V honeycomb structure showed a high compressive strength of 110 MPa compared to less than 20 MPa for metal foam structures. The oil -gas separation efficiency of the honeycomb-structured separation rotor achieved 99.8% at the rotation speed of 6000 rpm with much lower ventilation resistance (17.3 kPa) than that of the separator rotor constructed using a Ni-Cr alloy foam structure (23.5 kPa). The honeycomb-structured Ti-6Al-4V separator rotor produced by SEBM provides a promising solution to more efficient oil -gas separation in the aero-engine lubrication system.

  15. PROCESS FOR CONTINUOUSLY SEPARATING IRRADIATION PRODUCTS OF THORIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, L.P.; Miles, F.T.; Sheehan, T.V.; Wiswall, R.H.; Heus, R.J.

    1959-07-01

    A method is presented for separating uranium-233 and protactinium from thorium-232 containing compositions which comprises irradiating finely divided particles of said thorium with a neutron flux to form uranium-233 and protactinium, heating the neutron-irradiated composition in a fluorine and hydrogen atmosphere to form volatile fluorides of uranium and protactinium and thereafter separating said volatile fluorides from the thorium.

  16. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Nagel, J.

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho.

  17. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Lowman, Idaho: Remedial action selection report for the Lowman UMTRA project site, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L. . Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Nagel, J. . Div. of Environmental Quality)

    1991-09-01

    The inactive uranium mill tailings site near Lowman, Idaho, was designated as one of 24 abandoned uranium tailings sites to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan and certify that the remedial action complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remedial action plan (RAP), which includes this remedial action selection report (RAS), has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Lowman, Idaho. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Idaho, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement (No. DE-FC04-85AL20535) between the DOE and the State of Idaho.

  18. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report; Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report; Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoff, A.R.; Lacker, D.K.

    1992-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

  19. Evidence for Natural Selection in Nucleotide Content Relationships Based on Complete Mitochondrial Genomes: Strong Effect of Guanine Content on Separation between Terrestrial and Aquatic Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sorimachi, Kenji; Okayasu, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    The complete vertebrate mitochondrial genome consists of 13 coding genes. We used this genome to investigate the existence of natural selection in vertebrate evolution. From the complete mitochondrial genomes, we predicted nucleotide contents and then separated these values into coding and non-coding regions. When nucleotide contents of a coding or non-coding region were plotted against the nucleotide content of the complete mitochondrial genomes, we obtained linear regression lines only between homonucleotides and their analogs. On every plot using G or A content purine, G content in aquatic vertebrates was higher than that in terrestrial vertebrates, while A content in aquatic vertebrates was lower than that in terrestrial vertebrates. Based on these relationships, vertebrates were separated into two groups, terrestrial and aquatic. However, using C or T content pyrimidine, clear separation between these two groups was not obtained. The hagfish (Eptatretus burgeri) was further separated from both terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates. Based on these results, nucleotide content relationships predicted from the complete vertebrate mitochondrial genomes reveal the existence of natural selection based on evolutionary separation between terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate groups. In addition, we propose that separation of the two groups might be linked to ammonia detoxification based on high G and low A contents, which encode Glu rich and Lys poor proteins. PMID:25853054

  20. Improved high gradient magnetic separation for the positive selection of human blood mononuclear cells using ordered wire filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, A. J.; Thomas, T. E.; Roath, O. S.; Watson, J. H. C.; Smith, R. J. S.; Lansdorp, P. M.

    1993-04-01

    CD8 + lymphocytes, fresh and previously cryopreserved, from ficolled human peripheral blood have been enriched to 99% purity with 68% recovery. The CD8 + lymphocytes were labelled with colloidal, magnetisable, Dextran-Iron particles using Tetrameric Antibody complexes. The labelled cells were magnetically separated using High Gradient Magnetic Separation with novel, ordered filters.

  1. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

    1959-07-01

    The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

  2. Uranium-Lead Zircon Ages and Sr, Nd, and Pb Isotope Geochemistry of Selected Plutonic Rocks from Western Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, Daniel M.; Lund, Karen; Kuntz, Mel A.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    Across the Salmon River suture in western Idaho, where allochthonous Permian to Cretaceous oceanic rocks are juxtaposed against Proterozoic North American rocks, a wide variety of plutonic rocks are exposed. Available data indicate much variation in composition, source, and structural state of these plutons. The plutonic rocks were long described as the western border zone of the Cretaceous Idaho batholith but limited pre-existing age data indicate more complicated origins. Because the affinity and age of the plutonic rocks cannot be reliably determined from field relations, TIMS U-Pb dating in conjunction with Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic studies of selected plutons across the suture in western Idaho were undertaken. The data indicate three general groups of plutons including (1) those that intruded the island arc terranes during the Triassic and Jurassic, those that intruded near the western edge of oceanic rocks along the suture in the Early Cretaceous, and the plutons of the Idaho batholith that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks in the Late Cretaceous. Plutons that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks commonly include xenocrystic zircons and in several cases, ages could not be determined. The least radiogenic Sr and most radiogenic Nd are found among the Blue Mountains superterrane island arc samples. Suture-zone plutons have isotopic characteristics that span the range between Idaho batholith and island arc samples but mostly follow island arc signatures. Plutons of the Idaho batholith have the most radiogenic initial Pb and Sr ratios and the least radiogenic Nd of the samples analyzed.

  3. ELUTION OF URANIUM FROM RESIN

    DOEpatents

    McLEan, D.C.

    1959-03-10

    A method is described for eluting uranium from anion exchange resins so as to decrease vanadium and iron contamination and permit recycle of the major portion of the eluats after recovery of the uranium. Diminution of vanadium and iron contamination of the major portion of the uranium is accomplished by treating the anion exchange resin, which is saturated with uranium complex by adsorption from a sulfuric acid leach liquor from an ore bearing uranium, vanadium and iron, with one column volume of eluant prepared by passing chlorine into ammonium hydroxide until the chloride content is about 1 N and the pH is about 1. The resin is then eluted with 8 to 9 column volumes of 0.9 N ammonium chloride--0.1 N hydrochloric acid solution. The eluants are collected separately and treated with ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate which is filtered therefrom. The uranium salt from the first eluant is contaminated with the major portion of ths vanadium and iron and is reworked, while the uranium recovered from the second eluant is relatively free of the undesirable vanadium and irons. The filtrate from the first eluant portion is discarded. The filtrate from the second eluant portion may be recycled after adding hydrochloric acid to increase the chloride ion concentration and adjust the pH to about 1.

  4. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-08-25

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

  5. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Ackerman, John P.; Battles, James E.; Johnson, Terry R.; Pierce, R. Dean

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

  6. Combination of three-stage sink-float method and selective flotation technique for separation of mixed post-consumer plastic waste.

    PubMed

    Pongstabodee, Sangobtip; Kunachitpimol, Napatr; Damronglerd, Somsak

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to separate the different plastics of a mixed post-consumer plastic waste by the combination of a three-stage sink-float method and selective flotation. By using the three-stage sink-float method, six mixed-plastic wastes, belonging to the 0.3-0.5 cm size class and including high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), polyvinylchloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers (ABS) were separated into two groups, i.e., a low density plastic group (HDPE and PP) and a high density plastic group (PET, PVC, PS and ABS) by tap water. Plastic whose density is less than that of the medium solution floats to the surface, while the one whose density is greater than that of the medium solution sinks to the bottom. The experimental results elucidated that complete separation of HDPE from PP was achieved by the three-stage sink-float method with 50% v/v ethyl alcohol. To succeed in the separation of a PS/ABS mixture from a PET/PVC mixture by the three-stage sink-float method, a 30% w/v calcium chloride solution was employed. To further separate post-consumer PET/PVC and PS/ABS based on plastic type, selective flotation was carried out. In order to succeed in selective flotation separation, it is necessary to render hydrophilic the surface of one or more species while the others are kept in a hydrophobic state. In flotation studies, the effects of wetting agent, frother, pH of solution and electrolyte on separation were determined. The selective flotation results showed that when using 500 mg l(-1) calcium lignosulfonate, 0.01 ppm MIBC, and 0.1 mg l(-1) CaCl2 at pH 11, PET could be separated from PVC. To separate ABS from PS, 200 mg l(-1) calcium lignosulfonate and 0.1 mg l(-1) CaCl2 at pH 7 were used as a flotation solution. Wettability of plastic increases when adding CaCl2 and corresponds to a decrease in its contact angles and to a reduction in the recovery of plastic in

  7. Column Testing and 1D Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Uranium Plume Persistence Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. H.; Morrison, S.; Morris, S.; Tigar, A.; Dam, W. L.; Dayvault, J.

    2015-12-01

    At many U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management sites, 100 year natural flushing was selected as a remedial option for groundwater uranium plumes. However, current data indicate that natural flushing is not occurring as quickly as expected and solid-phase and aqueous uranium concentrations are persistent. At the Grand Junction, Colorado office site, column testing was completed on core collected below an area where uranium mill tailings have been removed. The total uranium concentration in this core was 13.2 mg/kg and the column was flushed with laboratory-created water with no uranium and chemistry similar to the nearby Gunnison River. The core was flushed for a total of 91 pore volumes producing a maximum effluent uranium concentration of 6,110 μg/L at 2.1 pore volumes and a minimum uranium concentration of 36.2 μg/L at the final pore volume. These results indicate complex geochemical reactions at small pore volumes and a long tailing affect at greater pore volumes. Stop flow data indicate the occurrence of non-equilibrium processes that create uranium concentration rebound. These data confirm the potential for plume persistence, which is occurring at the field scale. 1D reactive transport modeling was completed using PHREEQC (geochemical model) and calibrated to the column test data manually and using PEST (inverse modeling calibration routine). Processes of sorption, dual porosity with diffusion, mineral dissolution, dispersion, and cation exchange were evaluated separately and in combination. The calibration results indicate that sorption and dual porosity are major processes in explaining the column test data. These processes are also supported by fission track photographs that show solid-phase uranium residing in less mobile pore spaces. These procedures provide valuable information on plume persistence and secondary source processes that may be used to better inform and evaluate remedial strategies, including natural flushing.

  8. Detection of uranium enrichment activities using environmental monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.L.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1993-03-30

    Uranium enrichment processes have the capability of producing weapons-grade material in the form of highly enriched uranium. Thus, detection of undeclared uranium enrichment activities is an international safeguards concern. The uranium separation technologies currently in use employ UF{sub 6} gas as a separation medium, and trace quantities of enriched uranium are inevitably released to the environment from these facilities. The isotopic content of uranium in the vegetation, soil, and water near the plant site will be altered by these releases and can provide a signature for detecting the presence of enriched uranium activities. This paper discusses environmental sampling and analytical procedures that have been used for the detection of uranium enrichment facilities and possible safeguards applications of these techniques.

  9. APPLICATION OF CYCLODEXTRIN-MODIFIED MICELLAR ELECTRONKINETIC CHROMATOGRAPHY TO THE SEPARATIONS OF SELECTED NEUTRAL PESTICIDES AND THEIR ENANTIOMERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental chemistry of chiral pesticides is receiving increased attention - enantiomeric ratios are being measured and enantioselective degradation processes are being reported. The requisite analysis involves separation of the various enantiomers. Mixtures of three class...

  10. Tramp uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrixson, E.S.; Williamson, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    Many utilities have implemented a no leaker philosophy for fuel performance and actively pursue removing leaking fuel assemblies from their reactor cores whenever a leaking fuel assembly is detected. Therefore, the only source for fission product activity in the RCS when there are no leaking fuel assemblies is tramp uranium. A technique has been developed that strips uranium impurities from ZrCl{sub 4}. Unless efforts are made to remove natural uranium impurities from reactor materials, the utilities will not be able to reduce the RCS specific {sup 131}I activity in PWRs to below the lower limit of {approximately}1.0 x 10{minus{sup 4}} {mu}Ci/g.

  11. Synthesis, Development, and Testing of High-Surface-Area Polymer-Based Adsorbents for the Selective Recovery of Uranium from Seawater

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng

    2016-02-29

    The ocean contains uranium with an approximate concentration of 3.34 ppb, which can serve as an incredible supply source to sustain nuclear energy in the United States. Unfortunately, technology currently available to recover uranium from seawater is not efficient enough and mining uranium on land is still more economical. For this study, we have developed polymer-based adsorbents with high uranium adsorption capacities by grafting amidoxime onto high-surface-area polyethylene (PE) fibers. Various process conditions have been screened, in combination with developing a rapid testing protocol (<24 h), to optimize the process. These adsorbents are synthesized through radiation-induced grafting of acrylonitrile (AN)more » and methacrylic acid (MAA) onto PE fibers, followed by the conversion of nitriles to amidoximes and basic conditioning. In addition, the uranium adsorption capacity, measured in units of gU/kgads, is greatly increased by reducing the diameter of the PE fiber or changing its morphology. An increase in the surface area of the PE polymer fiber allows for more grafting sites that are positioned in more-accessible locations, thereby increasing access to grafted molecules that would normally be located in the interior of a fiber with a larger diameter. Polymer fibers with hollow morphologies are able to adsorb beyond 1 order of magnitude more uranium from simulated seawater than current commercially available adsorbents. Finally, several high-surface-area fibers were tested in natural seawater and were able to extract 5–7 times more uranium than any adsorbent reported to date.« less

  12. Uranium bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGroot, Gerard

    2009-11-01

    Enrico Fermi was a brilliant physicist, but he did occasionally get things wrong. In 1934 he famously bombarded a sample of uranium with neutrons. The result was astounding: the experiment had, Fermi concluded, produced element 93, later called neptunium. The German physicist Ida Noddack, however, came to an even more spectacular conclusion, namely that Fermi had split the uranium nucleus to produce lighter elements. Noddack's friend Otto Hahn judged that idea preposterous and advised her to keep quiet, since ridicule could ruin a female physicist. She ignored that advice, and was, indeed, scorned.

  13. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM CARBONATE LEACH LIQUORS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.F.

    1958-07-01

    An improved process is described for the recovery of uranium from vanadifrous ores. In the prior art such ores have been digested with alkali carbonate solutions at a pH of less than 10 and then contacted with a strong base anion exchange resin to separate uranium from vanadium. It has been found that if the exchamge resin feed solution has its pH adjusted to the range 10.8 to 11.8, that vanadium adsorption on the resin is markedly decreased and the separation of uranium from the vanadium is thereby improved.

  14. METHOD OF PURIFYING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Morrison, B.H.

    1958-12-23

    The removal of lmpurities from uranlum metal can be done by a process conslstlng of contacting the metal with liquid mercury at 300 icient laborato C, separating the impunitycontalnlng slag formed, cooling the slag-free liquld substantlally below the point at which uranlum mercurlde sollds form, removlng the mercury from the solids, and recovering metallic uranium by heating the solids.

  15. Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing Technology. ISAM semiannual report, Volume 3, Number 1, October 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    1994-10-01

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (I) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (II) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Separations of corticosteroids using electrochemically modulated liquid chromatography: Selectivity enhancements at a porous graphitic carbon stationary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, E.Y.; Porter, M.D. |

    1997-02-15

    Electrochemically modulated liquid chromatography has been applied to the separation of a mixture of structurally similar corticosteroids (i.e., prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, and hydrocortisone) using a porous graphitic carbon stationary phase. Changes in the voltage applied to the column markedly affected the efficiency as well as the elution order of the separation, with the mixture fully resolved at large negative values of applied potential. Mechanistic aspects in terms of the influence of changes in the applied voltage on the extent of the interactions between these analytes and the stationary phase are briefly discussed. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  18. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-12-14

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures.

  19. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    A recent Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study identified 59 waste sites at 14 DOE facilities across the nation that exhibit radionuclide contamination in excess of established limits. The rapid and efficient characterization of these sites, and the potentially contaminated regions that surround them represents a technological challenge with no existing solution. In particular, the past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of surface and subsurface soils. Such contamination commonly occurs within waste burial sites, cribs, pond bottom sediments and soils surrounding waste tanks or uranium scrap, ore, tailings, and slag heaps. The objective of the Uranium In Soils Integrated Demonstration is to develop optimal remediation methods for soils contaminated with radionuclides, principally uranium (U), at DOE sites. It is examining all phases involved in an actual cleanup, including all regulatory and permitting requirements, to expedite selection and implementation of the best technologies that show immediate and long-term effectiveness specific to the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and applicable to other radionuclide contaminated DOE sites. The demonstration provides for technical performance evaluations and comparisons of different developmental technologies at FEMP sites, based on cost-effectiveness, risk-reduction effectiveness, technology effectiveness, and regulatory and public acceptability. Technology groups being evaluated include physical and chemical contaminant separations, in situ remediation, real-time characterization and monitoring, precise excavation, site restoration, secondary waste treatment, and soil waste stabilization.

  20. Separation and Identification of Isomeric Glycans by Selected Accumulation-Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Electron Activated Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi; Ridgeway, Mark E; Glaskin, Rebecca S; Park, Melvin A; Costello, Catherine E; Lin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    One of the major challenges in structural characterization of oligosaccharides is the presence of many structural isomers in most naturally occurring glycan mixtures. Although ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has shown great promise in glycan isomer separation, conventional IMS separation occurs on the millisecond time scale, largely restricting its implementation to fast time-of-flight (TOF) analyzers which often lack the capability to perform electron activated dissociation (ExD) tandem MS analysis and the resolving power needed to resolve isobaric fragments. The recent development of trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) provides a promising new tool that offers high mobility resolution and compatibility with high-performance Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers when operated under the selected accumulation-TIMS (SA-TIMS) mode. Here, we present our initial results on the application of SA-TIMS-ExD-FTICR MS to the separation and identification of glycan linkage isomers. PMID:26959868

  1. Uranium, natural

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , natural ; CASRN 7440 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  2. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  3. Recent developments in production of radioactive ion beams with the selective laser ion source at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherall, R.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Köster, U.; Lettry, J.; Suberlucq, G.; Marsh, B. A.; Tengborn, E.

    2004-05-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) of the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility is based on the method of laser stepwise resonance ionization of atoms in a hot metal cavity. The atomic selectivity of the RILIS compliments the mass selection process of the ISOLDE separator magnets to provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. Using a system of dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers, ion beams of 22 elements have been generated at ISOLDE with ionization efficiencies in the range of 0.5%-30%. As part of the ongoing RILIS development, recent off-line resonance ionization spectroscopy studies have determined the optimal three-step ionization schemes for yttrium, scandium, and antimony.

  4. Challenging conventional f-element separation chemistry--reversing uranyl(VI)/lanthanide(III) solvent extraction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C A; Bustillos, C G; Copping, R; Scott, B L; May, I; Nilsson, M

    2014-08-14

    The water soluble tetradentate Schiff base, N,N'-bis(5-sulfonatosalicylidene)-diaminoethane (H2salen-SO3), will readily coordinate to the uranyl(VI) cation, but not to the same extent to trivalent lanthanide cations. This allows for the reversal of conventional solvent extraction properties and opens the possibility for novel separation processes. PMID:24958394

  5. Extraction of Uranium, Neptunium and Plutonium from Caustic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia H.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Engle, Nancy L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jade

    2004-03-28

    5 Fundamental research on uranium, neptunium and plutonium separation from alkaline media using solvent extraction is being conducted. Specific extractants for these actinides from alkaline media have been synthesized to investigate the feasibility of selective removal of these elements. Two families of extractants have been studied: terephthalamide and tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives. Fundamental studies were conducted to characterize their extraction behavior from a wide variety of aqueous conditions. The terephthalamide derivatives exhibit a significant extraction strength along with a discriminatory behavior among the actinides, plutonium being extracted the most strongly. Quantitative extraction of plutonium and moderate extraction of neptunium and uranium was achieved from a simple caustic solution. Interestingly, strontium is also quantitatively extracted by these derivatives. However, their stability to highly caustic solutions still needs to be imp roved. Tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives exhibit a very good stability to caustic conditions and are currently being studied.

  6. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    PubMed

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials. PMID:27427893

  7. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Maddock, A.G.; Smith, F.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products by treating a nitrate solution of fission products, uranium, and hexavalent plutonium with a relatively water-insoluble fluoride to adsorb fission products on the fluoride, treating the residual solution with a reducing agent for plutonium to reduce its valence to four and less, treating the reduced plutonium solution with a relatively insoluble fluoride to adsorb the plutonium on the fluoride, removing the solution, and subsequently treating the fluoride with its adsorbed plutonium with a concentrated aqueous solution of at least one of a group consisting of aluminum nitrate, ferric nitrate, and manganous nitrate to remove the plutonium from the fluoride.

  8. Selectivity of bis-triazinyl bipyridine ligands for americium(III) in Am/Eu separation by solvent extraction. Part 1. Quantum mechanical study on the structures of BTBP complexes and on the energy of the separation.

    PubMed

    Narbutt, Jerzy; Oziminski, Wojciech P

    2012-12-21

    Theoretical studies were carried out on two pairs of americium and europium complexes formed by tetra-N-dentate lipophilic BTBP ligands, neutral [ML(NO(3))(3)] and cationic [ML(2)](3+) where M = Am(III) or Eu(III), and L = 6,6'-bis-(5,6-diethyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine (C2-BTBP). Molecular structures of the complexes have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level and total energies of the complexes in various media were estimated using single point calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) and MP2/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory. In the calculations americium and europium ions were treated using pseudo-relativistic Stuttgart-Dresden effective core potentials and the accompanying basis sets. Selectivity in solvent extraction separation of two metal ions is a co-operative function of contributions from all extractable metal complexes, which depend on physico-chemical properties of each individual complex and on its relative amount in the system. Semi-quantitative analysis of BTBP selectivity in the Am/Eu separation process, based on the contributions from the two pairs of Am(III) and Eu(III) complexes, has been carried out. To calculate the energy of Am/Eu separation, a model of the extraction process was used, consisting of complex formation in water and transfer of the formed complex to the organic phase. Under the assumptions discussed in the paper, this simple two-step model results in reliable values of the calculated differences in the energy changes for each pair of the Am/Eu complexes in both steps of the process. The greater thermodynamic stability (in water) of the Am-BTBP complexes, as compared with the analogous Eu species, caused by greater covalency of the Am-N than Eu-N bonds, is most likely the main reason for BTBP selectivity in the separation of the two metal ions. The other potential reason, i.e. differences in lipophilic properties of the analogous complexes of Am and Eu, is less important with regard to this selectivity. PMID

  9. Systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient model for real-life counter-current chromatography separation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Bing; Yi, Lun-Zhao; Qin, Yan-Hua; Yun, Yong-Huan; Deng, Bai-Chuan; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-05-01

    Solvent system selection is the first step toward a successful counter-current chromatography (CCC) separation. This paper introduces a systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient (NRTL-SAC) model, which is efficient in predicting the solute partition coefficient. Firstly, the application of the NRTL-SAC method was extended to the ethyl acetate/n-butanol/water and chloroform/methanol/water solvent system families. Moreover, the versatility and predictive capability of the NRTL-SAC method were investigated. The results indicate that the solute molecular parameters identified from hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water solvent system family are capable of predicting a large number of partition coefficients in several other different solvent system families. The NRTL-SAC strategy was further validated by successfully separating five components from Salvia plebeian R.Br. We therefore propose that NRTL-SAC is a promising high throughput method for rapid solvent system selection and highly adaptable to screen suitable solvent system for real-life CCC separation. PMID:25818557

  10. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  11. An affinity-based strategy for the design of selective displacers for the chromatographic separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Vutukuru, Srinavya; Kate, Sandesh D; McCallum, Scott A; Morrison, Christopher J; Cramer, Steven M; Kane, Ravi S

    2008-06-01

    We describe an affinity-based strategy for designing selective protein displacers for the chromatographic purification of proteins. To design a displacer that is selective for a target protein, we attached a component with affinity for the target protein to a resin-binding component; we then tested the ability of such displacers to selectively retain the target protein on a resin relative to another protein having a similar retention time. In particular, we synthesized displacers based on biotin, which selectively retained avidin as compared to aprotinin on SP Sepharose high performance resin. In addition, we have extended this approach to develop an affinity-peptide-based displacer that discriminates between lysozyme and cytochrome c. Here, a selective displacer was designed from a lysozyme-binding peptide that had been identified and optimized previously using phage-display technology. Our results suggest a general strategy for designing highly selective affinity-based displacers by identifying molecules (e.g., peptides) that bind to a protein of interest and using an appropriate linker to attach these molecules to a moiety that binds to the stationary phase. PMID:18512879

  12. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial Action Selection Report, Appendix B of Attachment 2: Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section} 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which describes the proposed remedial action for the Naturita site. An extensive amount of data and supporting information has been generated and evaluated for this remedial action. These data and supporting information are not incorporated into this single document but are included or referenced in the supporting documents. The RAP consists of this RAS and four supporting documents or attachments. This Attachment 2, Geology Report describes the details of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Dry Flats disposal site.

  13. In Vivo Nanodetoxication for Acute Uranium Exposure.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Luis; Durán-Lara, Esteban F; Donoso, Wendy; Nachtigall, Fabiane M; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-01-01

    Accidental exposure to uranium is a matter of concern, as U(VI) is nephrotoxic in both human and animal models, and its toxicity is associated to chemical toxicity instead of radioactivity. We synthesized different PAMAM G4 and G5 derivatives in order to prove their interaction with uranium and their effect on the viability of red blood cells in vitro. Furthermore, we prove the effectiveness of the selected dendrimers in an animal model of acute uranium intoxication. The dendrimer PAMAM G4-Lys-Fmoc-Cbz demonstrated the ability to chelate the uranyl ion in vivo, improving the biochemical and histopathologic features caused by acute intoxication with uranium. PMID:26083036

  14. Multiyear measurements of Position Angle and Separation of selected binary stars from the Washington Double Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Rafael J.; Cersosimo, Juan C.; Lopez, Andy J.; Vergara, Nelson; Torres, Brian; Mendoza, Lizyan; Ortiz, Deliris; Del Valle, Yashira; Espinosa, Gabriela; Reyes, Marjory

    2016-01-01

    We present here the multiyear data sets on separation and position angle of binary stars obtained at the NURO telescope, located east of Flagstaff Arizona at an elevation of 7200 feet. The data was analyzed at the Humacao University Observatory of the University of Puerto Rico and will be submitted for publication at the Journal of Double Star Observations. We describe the methodology for the analysis of the images we obtained.

  15. Enantiomeric separation of tapentadol by capillary electrophoresis--study of chiral selectivity manipulation by various types of cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Znaleziona, Joanna; Fejős, Ida; Ševčík, Juraj; Douša, Michal; Béni, Szabolcs; Maier, Vítězslav

    2015-02-01

    The chiral recognition of the centrally acting analgesic agent tapentadol and its isomers with various cyclodextrins (CDs) was studied by capillary electrophoresis, focusing on the migration order of four stereoisomers. In the case of non-charged hydroxypropylated CDs (2-hydroxypropyl-β-CD, 2-hydroxypropyl-γ-CD) the beta derivative was able to discriminate the S,R- and R,S-isomers in acidic background electrolyte, whereas the gamma allowed the separation of S,S- and R,R-tapentadol, respectively. Dual CD system containing both hosts was used to separate all of four isomers. Negatively charged sulfated-α-CD at 1.0% (w/v) concentration in 100mM sodium borate buffer (pH 9.5) was capable of separating the isomers with favorable enantiomer migration order and the optimized method was able to determine 0.15% of chiral impurities of tapentadol in the presence of the last migrating clinically important R,R-isomer. PMID:25527976

  16. METHOD OF SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented fer separating uranium, plutonium, and fission products ions from uranyl nitrate solutions having a pH value between 1 and 3 obtained by dissolving neutron irradiated uranium. The method consists in passing such solutions through a bed of cation exchange resin, which may be a sulfonated phenol formaidehyde type. Following the adsorption step the resin is first treated with a solution of 0.2M to 0.3M sulfuric acid to desorb the uranium. Fission product ions are then desorbed by treating the resin in phosphoric acid and 1M in nitric acid. Lastly, the plutonium may be desorbed by treating the resin with a solution approximately 0.8M in phosphoric acid and 1M in nitric acid.

  17. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    DOEpatents

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  18. Experimental investigation of the permeability and selectivity of supported ionic liquid membranes for CO2/He separation at temperatures up to 125° C

    SciTech Connect

    Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.

    2007-07-01

    Supported liquid membranes have been prepared by impregnation of commercial porous polymer films with the ionic liquid 1-n-hexyl-3- methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. The ionic liquid has been characterized, and the membranes have been tested to determine performance in the selective separation of CO2 from He. Experiments were conducted in a constant pressure system, and pure gas permeability/selectivity data are reported. Membranes prepared with polysulfone supports have been found to be stable to 125 °C. The CO2 permeability of the membranes increases from 744 to 1200 barrer as the temperature increases from 37 to 125 °C. The CO2/He selectivity decreased from 8.7 to 3.1 over the same temperature range.

  19. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  20. Molecular recognition principles and stationary-phase characteristics of topoisomer-selective chemoaffinity materials for chromatographic separation of circular plasmid DNA topoisomers.

    PubMed

    Mahut, Marek; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2012-01-18

    We recently discovered the molecular recognition capability of a quinine carbamate ligand attached to silica as a powerful chemoaffinity material for the chromatographic separation of circular plasmid topoisomers of different linking numbers. In this paper we develop structure-selectivity relationship studies to figure out the essential structural features for topoisomer recognition. By varying different moieties of the original cinchonan-derived selector, it was shown that intercalation by the quinoline moiety of the ligand as assumed initially as the working hypothesis is not an essential feature for topoisomer recognition during chromatography. We found that the key elements for topoisomer selectivity are the presence of a rigid weak anion-exchange site and a H-donor site separated from each other in a defined distance by a 4-atom spacer. Additionally, incorporation of the weak anion-exchange site into a cyclic ring structure provides greater rigidity of the ligand molecule and turned out to be advantageous, if not mandatory, for (close to) baseline separation. PMID:22191385

  1. Mortality among uranium enrichment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.P.; Bloom, T.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted on workers at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment facility in Pike County, Ohio, in response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Local 3-689 for information on long-term health effects. Primary hazards included inhalation exposure to uranyl fluoride containing uranium-235 and uranium-234, technetium-99 compounds, and hydrogen-fluoride. Uranium-238 presented a nephrotoxic hazard. Statistically significant mortality deficits based on U.S. death rates were found for all causes, accidents, violence, and diseases of nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems. Standardized mortality rates were 85 and 54 for all malignant neoplasms and for other genitourinary diseases, respectively. Deaths from stomach cancer and lymphatic/hematopoietic cancers were insignificantly increased. A subcohort selected for greatest potential uranium exposure has reduced deaths from these malignancies. Insignificantly increased stomach cancer mortality was found after 15 years employment and after 15 years latency. Routine urinalysis data suggested low internal uranium exposures.

  2. Product separator

    DOEpatents

    Welsh, Robert A.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1976-01-20

    A secondary light sensitive photoelectric product separator for use with a primary product separator that concentrates a material so that it is visually distinguishable from adjacent materials. The concentrate separation is accomplished first by feeding the material onto a vibratory inclined surface with a liquid flow, such as a wet concentrating table. Vibrations generally perpendicular to the stream direction of flow cause the concentrate to separate from its mixture according to its color. When the concentrate and its surrounding stream reach the recovery end of the table, a detecting device notes the line of color demarcation and triggers a signal if it differs from a normal condition. If no difference is noted nothing moves on the second separator. However, if a difference is detected in the constant monitoring of the color line's location, a product splitter and recovery unit normally positioned near the color line at the recovery end, moves to a new position. In this manner the selected separated concentrate is recovered at a maximum rate regardless of variations in the flow stream or other conditions present.

  3. A generic analysis of energy use and solvent selection for CO2 separation from post-combustion flue gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic calculation was performed to determine the theoretical minimum energy used to separate CO2 from a coal combustion flue gas in a typical adsorption-desorption system. Under ideal conditions, the minimum energy required to separate CO2 from post-combustion flue gas and produce pure CO2 at 1 atmospheric pressure was only about 1183 kJ/kg CO2. This amount could double with the addition of the driving forces of mass and heat transfer and the adverse impacts of absorption heat release on adsorption capacity. Thermodynamic analyses were also performed for the aqueous amine-based absorption process. Two CO2 reaction mechanisms, the carbamate formation reaction with primary/secondary amines and the CO2 hydration reaction with tertiary amines, were included in the absorption reaction. The reaction heat, sensible heat, and stripping heat were all important to the total heat requirement. The heat use of an ideal tertiary amine amounted to 2786 kJ/kg, compared to 3211 kJ/kg for an ideal primary amine. The heat usage of an ideal amine was about 20% lower than that of commercially available amines. Optimizing the absorption process configuration could further reduce energy use. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2008 AIChE Spring National Meeting (New Orleans, LA 4/6-10/2008).

  4. Derived enriched uranium market

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-12-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market.

  5. Hybrid selective surface hydrophilization and froth flotation separation of hazardous chlorinated plastics from E-waste with novel nanoscale metallic calcium composite.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Heo, Je Haeng; Park, Min Hee

    2016-04-01

    Treatment by a nanometallic Ca/CaO composite has been found to selectively hydrophilize the surface of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), enhancing its wettability and thereby promoting its separation from E-waste plastics by means of froth flotation. The treatment considerably decreased the water contact angle of PVC, by about 18°. The SEM images of the PVC plastic after treatment displayed significant changes in their surface morphology compared to other plastics. The SEM-EDS results reveal that a markedly decrease of [Cl] concentration simultaneously with dramatic increase of [O] on the surface of the PCV samples. XPS results further confirmed an increase of hydrophilic functional groups on the PVC surface. Froth flotation at 100rpm mixing speed was found to be optimal, separating 100% of the PVC into a settled fraction of 96.4% purity even when the plastics fed into the reactor were of nonuniform size and shape. The total recovery of PVC-free plastics in E-waste reached nearly 100% in the floated fraction, significantly improved from the 20.5wt% of light plastics that can be recovered by means of conventional wet gravity separation. The hybrid method of nanometallic Ca/CaO treatment and froth flotation is effective in the separation of hazardous chlorinated plastics from E-waste plastics. PMID:26685121

  6. Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane@Fe3O4@SiO2@fluoropolymer sponges for selective oil absorption and oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Li, Lingxiao; Li, Bucheng; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponges were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) to bind the Fe3O4 nanoparticles tightly on the sponge and then dip-coating in a fluoropolymer (FP) aqueous solution. The sponges were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and other analytical techniques. The effects of CVD time of TEOS and FP concentration on wettability, mechanical properties, oil absorbency, and oil/water selectivity of the sponges were also investigated. The sponges exhibit fast magnetic responsivity and excellent superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity (CAwater = 157° and CAoil ≈ 0°). The sponges also show very high efficiency in oil/water separation and could, driven by a magnet, quickly absorb floating oils on the water surface and heavy oils under water. Moreover, the PU@Fe3O4@SiO2@FP sponges could be used as membranes for oil/water separation and for continuous separation of large amounts of oil pollutants from the water surface with the help of a pump. The in turn binding of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, SiO2, and FP can also improve mechanical properties of the PU sponge. The sponges maintain the superhydrophobicity even when they are stretched with 200% strain or compressed with 50% strain. The sponges also show excellent mechanical stability, oil stability, and reusability in terms of superhydrophobicity and oil absorbency. The magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic PU sponges are very promising materials for practical oil absorption and oil/water separation. PMID:25671386

  7. A graphene oxide/amidoxime hydrogel for enhanced uranium capture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feihong; Li, Hongpeng; Liu, Qi; Li, Zhanshuang; Li, Rumin; Zhang, Hongsen; Liu, Lianhe; Emelchenko, G A; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The efficient development of selective materials for the recovery of uranium from nuclear waste and seawater is necessary for their potential application in nuclear fuel and the mitigation of nuclear pollution. In this work, a graphene oxide/amidoxime hydrogel (AGH) exhibits a promising adsorption performance for uranium from various aqueous solutions, including simulated seawater. We show high adsorption capacities (Qm = 398.4 mg g(-1)) and high % removals at ppm or ppb levels in aqueous solutions for uranium species. In the presence of high concentrations of competitive ions such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+) and Sr(2+), AGH displays an enhanced selectivity for uranium. For low uranium concentrations in simulated seawater, AGH binds uranium efficiently and selectively. The results presented here reveal that the AGH is a potential adsorbent for remediating nuclear industrial effluent and adsorbing uranium from seawater. PMID:26758649

  8. A graphene oxide/amidoxime hydrogel for enhanced uranium capture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feihong; Li, Hongpeng; Liu, Qi; Li, Zhanshuang; Li, Rumin; Zhang, Hongsen; Liu, Lianhe; Emelchenko, G. A.; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The efficient development of selective materials for the recovery of uranium from nuclear waste and seawater is necessary for their potential application in nuclear fuel and the mitigation of nuclear pollution. In this work, a graphene oxide/amidoxime hydrogel (AGH) exhibits a promising adsorption performance for uranium from various aqueous solutions, including simulated seawater. We show high adsorption capacities (Qm = 398.4 mg g−1) and high % removals at ppm or ppb levels in aqueous solutions for uranium species. In the presence of high concentrations of competitive ions such as Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+, AGH displays an enhanced selectivity for uranium. For low uranium concentrations in simulated seawater, AGH binds uranium efficiently and selectively. The results presented here reveal that the AGH is a potential adsorbent for remediating nuclear industrial effluent and adsorbing uranium from seawater. PMID:26758649

  9. A graphene oxide/amidoxime hydrogel for enhanced uranium capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feihong; Li, Hongpeng; Liu, Qi; Li, Zhanshuang; Li, Rumin; Zhang, Hongsen; Liu, Lianhe; Emelchenko, G. A.; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The efficient development of selective materials for the recovery of uranium from nuclear waste and seawater is necessary for their potential application in nuclear fuel and the mitigation of nuclear pollution. In this work, a graphene oxide/amidoxime hydrogel (AGH) exhibits a promising adsorption performance for uranium from various aqueous solutions, including simulated seawater. We show high adsorption capacities (Qm = 398.4 mg g-1) and high % removals at ppm or ppb levels in aqueous solutions for uranium species. In the presence of high concentrations of competitive ions such as Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+, AGH displays an enhanced selectivity for uranium. For low uranium concentrations in simulated seawater, AGH binds uranium efficiently and selectively. The results presented here reveal that the AGH is a potential adsorbent for remediating nuclear industrial effluent and adsorbing uranium from seawater.

  10. Achieving Diameter-Selective Separation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanobutes by Using Polymer Conformation-Confined Helical Cavity.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yusheng; Xu, Yongqian; Perry, Kelly A; Sokolov, Alexei P; More, Karren Leslie; Pang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    A water-soluble poly[(m-phenylenevinylene)-alt-(p-phenylenevinylene)] (PmPV) 2 has been synthesized, which exhibits an unsymmetrical substitution pattern on the para-phenylene unit. With one substituent being hydrophilic while the other being hydrophobic, the polymer chain has a higher tendency to fold in aqueous solution, thereby promoting the helical conformation. The polymer is found to selectively disperse the SWNTs of small diameters (d=0.75-0.84 nm), in sharp contrast to PmPV 1 with a symmetrical substitution pattern. The intriguing diameter-based selectivity is believed to be associated with the confined helical conformation, which provides a suitable cavity to host the SWNT of proper sizes. The study thus provides a useful demonstration that the polymer conformation can have a profound impact on the SWNT sorting.

  11. Continuous reduction of uranium tetrafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    DeMint, A.L.; Maxey, A.W.

    1993-10-21

    Operation of a pilot-scale system for continuous metallothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4} or green salt) has been initiated. This activity is in support of the development of a cost- effective process to produce uranium-iron (U-Fe) alloy feed for the Uranium-Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) program. To date, five runs have been made to reduce green salt (UF{sub 4}) with magnesium. During this quarter, three runs were made to perfect the feeding system, examine feed rates, and determine the need for a crust breaker/stirrer. No material was drawn off in any of the runs; both product metal and by-product salt were allowed to accumulate in the reactor.

  12. What ‘works’ in working memory? Separate systems for the selection and updating of critical information

    PubMed Central

    Bledowski, Christoph; Rahm, Benjamin; Rowe, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Cognition depends critically on working memory, the active representation of a limited number of items over short periods of time. In addition to the maintenance of information during the course of cognitive processing, many tasks require that some of the items in working memory become transiently more important than others. Based on cognitive models of working memory, we hypothesized two complementary essential cognitive operations to achieve this: a Selection operation that retrieves the most relevant item, and an Updating operation that changes the focus of attention onto it. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, high-resolution oculometry and behavioral analysis we demonstrate that these two operations are functionally and neuroanatomically dissociated. Updating the attentional focus elicited transient activation in the caudal superior frontal sulcus and posterior parietal cortex. In contrast, increasing demands on selection selectively modulated activation in rostral superior frontal sulcus and posterior cingulate/precuneus. We conclude that prioritizing one memory item over others invokes independent mechanisms of mnemonic retrieval and attentional focusing, each with its distinct neuroanatomical basis within frontal and parietal regions. These support the developing understanding of working memory as emerging from the interaction between memory and attentional systems. PMID:19864586

  13. Highly Selective Fluorescence Determination of the Hematin Level in Human Erythrocytes with No Need for Separation from Bulk Hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lijuan; Chen, Li; Wu, Ping; Gervasio, Dominic F; Cai, Chenxin

    2016-04-01

    Hematin-induced fluorescence quenching of boron-doped graphene quantum dots (BGQDs) allows for determination of hematin concentration in human erythrocytes with no need for separating hematin from hemoglobin before performing the assay. The BGQDs are made by oxidizing a graphite anode by holding the voltage between a graphite rod and a Pt cathode at 3 V for 2 h in an aqueous borax solution at pH 7; then, the borate solution was filtered with BGQDs, and the borate was dialyzed from the filtrate, leaving a solution of BGQDs in water. The fluorescence intensity of BGQDs is measurable in real time, and its quenching is very sensitive to the concentration of hematin in the system but not to other coexisting biological substances. The analytical signal is defined as ΔF = 1 - F/F0, where F0 and F are the fluorescence intensities of the BGQDs before and after interaction with hematin, respectively. There is a good linear relationship between ΔF and hematin concentration, ranging from 0.01 to 0.92 μM, with the limit of detection (LOD) being ∼0.005 ± 0.001 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This new method is sensitive, label-free, simple, and inexpensive, and many tedious procedures related to sample separation and preparation can be omitted, implying that this method has potential for applications in clinical examinations and disease diagnoses. For example, the determination of the hematin levels in two kind of red blood cell samples, healthy human and sickle cell erythrocytes, gives average concentrations of hematin of ∼(23.1 ± 4.9) μM (average of five samples) for healthy red cell cytosols and ∼(52.5 ± 9.5) μM (average of two samples) for sickle red cell cytosols. PMID:26942664

  14. Alga-Derived Substrates Select for Distinct Betaproteobacterial Lineages and Contribute to Niche Separation in Limnohabitans Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Šimek, Karel; Kasalický, Vojtěch; Zapomělová, Eliška; Horňák, Karel

    2011-01-01

    We examined the proportions of major Betaproteobacteria subgroups within bacterial communities in diverse nonaxenic, monospecific cultures of algae or cyanobacteria: four species of cryptophyta (genera Cryptomonas and Rhodomonas), four species of chlorophyta (genera Pediastrum, Staurastrum, and Chlamydomonas), and two species of cyanobacteria (genera Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon). In the cryptophyta cultures, Betaproteobacteria represented 48 to 71% of total bacteria, the genus Limnohabitans represented 18 to 26%, and the Polynucleobacter B subcluster represented 5 to 16%. In the taxonomically diverse chlorophyta group, the genus Limnohabitans accounted for 7 to 45% of total bacteria. In contrast, cyanobacterial cultures contained significantly lower proportions of the Limnohabitans bacteria (1 to 3% of the total) than the cryptophyta and chlorophyta cultures. Notably, largely absent in all of the cultures was Polynucleobacter necessarius (Polynucleobacter C subcluster). Subsequently, we examined the growth of Limnohabitans strains in the presence of different algae or their extracellular products (EPP). Two strains, affiliated with Limnohabitans planktonicus and Limnohabitans parvus, were separately inoculated into axenic cultures of three algal species growing in an inorganic medium: Cryptomonas sp., Chlamydomonas noctigama, and Pediastrum boryanum. The Limnohabitans strains cocultured with these algae or inoculated into their EPP consistently showed (i) pronounced population growth compared to the control without the algae or EPP and (ii) stronger growth stimulation of L. planktonicus than of L. parvus. Overall, growth responses of the Limnohabitans strains cultured with algae were highly species specific, which suggests a pronounced niche separation between two closely related Limnohabitans species likely mediated by different abilities to utilize the substrates produced by different algal species. PMID:21873481

  15. Alga-derived substrates select for distinct Betaproteobacterial lineages and contribute to niche separation in Limnohabitans strains.

    PubMed

    Simek, Karel; Kasalický, Vojtĕch; Zapomĕlová, Eliska; Hornák, Karel

    2011-10-01

    We examined the proportions of major Betaproteobacteria subgroups within bacterial communities in diverse nonaxenic, monospecific cultures of algae or cyanobacteria: four species of cryptophyta (genera Cryptomonas and Rhodomonas), four species of chlorophyta (genera Pediastrum, Staurastrum, and Chlamydomonas), and two species of cyanobacteria (genera Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon). In the cryptophyta cultures, Betaproteobacteria represented 48 to 71% of total bacteria, the genus Limnohabitans represented 18 to 26%, and the Polynucleobacter B subcluster represented 5 to 16%. In the taxonomically diverse chlorophyta group, the genus Limnohabitans accounted for 7 to 45% of total bacteria. In contrast, cyanobacterial cultures contained significantly lower proportions of the Limnohabitans bacteria (1 to 3% of the total) than the cryptophyta and chlorophyta cultures. Notably, largely absent in all of the cultures was Polynucleobacter necessarius (Polynucleobacter C subcluster). Subsequently, we examined the growth of Limnohabitans strains in the presence of different algae or their extracellular products (EPP). Two strains, affiliated with Limnohabitans planktonicus and Limnohabitans parvus, were separately inoculated into axenic cultures of three algal species growing in an inorganic medium: Cryptomonas sp., Chlamydomonas noctigama, and Pediastrum boryanum. The Limnohabitans strains cocultured with these algae or inoculated into their EPP consistently showed (i) pronounced population growth compared to the control without the algae or EPP and (ii) stronger growth stimulation of L. planktonicus than of L. parvus. Overall, growth responses of the Limnohabitans strains cultured with algae were highly species specific, which suggests a pronounced niche separation between two closely related Limnohabitans species likely mediated by different abilities to utilize the substrates produced by different algal species. PMID:21873481

  16. Long-Gradient Separations Coupled with Selected Reaction Monitoring for Highly Sensitive, Large Scale Targeted Protein Quantification in a Single Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Gao, Yuqian; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Chaochao; Chambers, Justin L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Liu, Alvin Y.; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-10-01

    Long-gradient separations coupled to tandem MS were recently demonstrated to provide a deep proteome coverage for global proteomics; however, such long-gradient separations have not been explored for targeted proteomics. Herein, we investigate the potential performance of the long-gradient separations coupled with selected reaction monitoring (LG-SRM) for targeted protein quantification. Direct comparison of LG-SRM (5 h gradient) and conventional LC-SRM (45 min gradient) showed that the long-gradient separations significantly reduced background interference levels and provided an 8- to 100-fold improvement in LOQ for target proteins in human female serum. Based on at least one surrogate peptide per protein, an LOQ of 10 ng/mL was achieved for the two spiked proteins in non-depleted human serum. The LG-SRM detection of seven out of eight endogenous plasma proteins expressed at ng/mL or sub-ng/mL levels in clinical patient sera was also demonstrated. A correlation coefficient of >0.99 was observed for the results of LG-SRM and ELISA measurements for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in selected patient sera. Further enhancement of LG-SRM sensitivity was achieved by applying front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion. Besides improved sensitivity, LG-SRM offers at least 3 times higher multiplexing capacity than conventional LC-SRM due to ~3-fold increase in average peak widths for a 300-min gradient compared to a 45-min gradient. Therefore, LG-SRM holds great potential for bridging the gap between global and targeted proteomics due to its advantages in both sensitivity and multiplexing capacity.

  17. PROCESSES OF RECOVERING URANIUM FROM A CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Baird, D.O.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1958-07-15

    An improved process is described for recovering the residue of a uranium compound which has been subjected to treatment in a calutron, from the parts of the calutron disposed in the source region upon which the residue is deposited. The process may be utilized when the uranium compound adheres to a surface containing metals of the group consisting of copper, iron, chromium, and nickel. The steps comprise washing the surface with an aqueous acidic oxidizing solvent for the uranium whereby there is obtained an acidic aqueous Solution containing uranium as uranyl ions and metals of said group as impurities, treating the acidic solution with sodium acetate in the presenee of added sodium nitrate to precipitate the uranium as sodium uranyl acetate away from the impurities in the solution, and separating the sodium uranyl acetate from the solution.

  18. Extraction of uranium(VI) by N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (DEHIBA): from the batch experimental data to the countercurrent process

    SciTech Connect

    Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Cames, B.; Bisel, I.; Baron, P.

    2008-07-01

    The selective separation of uranium(VI) in the first cycle of the GANEX process is operated by a hydrometallurgical process using a monoamide extractant DEHiBA (N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide). Distribution ratios of uranium(VI) and nitric acid in 1 M DEHiBA/HTP were determined with macro-concentrations of uranium, and the experimental data were modelled by taking into account the activity coefficients of the constituents in aqueous phases. A flowsheet was designed and tested in a countercurrent process in laboratory-scale mixer-settlers on a surrogate U(VI)/HNO 3 feed. More than 99.999% of the uranium was recovered. (authors)

  19. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  20. Map Separates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are printed using up to six colors (black, blue, green, red, brown, and purple). To prepare your own maps or artwork based on maps, you can order separate black-and-white film positives or negatives for any color printed on a USGS topographic map, or for one or more of the groups of related features printed in the same color on the map (such as drainage and drainage names from the blue plate.) In this document, examples are shown with appropriate ink color to illustrate the various separates. When purchased, separates are black-and-white film negatives or positives. After you receive a film separate or composite from the USGS, you can crop, enlarge or reduce, and edit to add or remove details to suit your special needs. For example, you can adapt the separates for making regional and local planning maps or for doing many kinds of studies or promotions by using the features you select and then printing them in colors of your choice.

  1. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The term uranium feed or natural uranium feed means natural uranium in the form of UF6 suitable for...

  2. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. The term uranium feed or natural uranium feed means natural uranium in the form of UF6 suitable for...

  3. Speciation of chromium by selective separation and preconcentration of Cr(III) on an immobilized nanometer titanium dioxide microcolumn.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Ding, Qiong; Liu, Yan

    2006-02-01

    Nanometer titanium dioxide immobilized on silica gel (immobilized nanometer-scale TiO2 particles) was prepared by a sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The adsorptive behavior of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on immobilized nanometer TiO2 was assessed. Cr(III) was selectively sorbed on immobilized nanometer TiO2 in the pH range of 7-9, while Cr(VI) was found to remain in solution. A sensitive and selective method has been developed for the speciation of chromium in water samples using an immobilized nanometer TiO2 microcolumn and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Under optimized conditions (pH 7.0, flow rate 2.0 mL/min), Cr(III) was retained on the column, then eluted with 0.5 mol/L HNO3 and determined by ICP-AES. Total chromium was determined after the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by ascorbic acid. The adsorption capacity of immobilized nanometer TiO2 for Cr(III) was found to be 7.04 mg/g. The detection limit for Cr(III) was 0.22 ng/mL and the RSD was 3.5% (n = 11, c = 100 ng/ mL) with an enrichment factor of 50. The proposed method has been applied to the speciation of chromium in water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:16524098

  4. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY SECONDARY XANTHATE COMPLEXING

    DOEpatents

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-09-01

    A method is described for separating and recovering uranium values contained in an acidic aqueous solution together with thorium or protactinium values. In accordance with the invention, the acidic solution containing uranium in the uranyl form is contacted with an organic xanthate. The xanthate forms a urano-xanthate complex but is substantially non-reactive with thorium and protactinium. The urano-xanthate complex is recovered by organic solvent extraction.

  5. Probing the selective separation of potassium ion from sodium ion with cyclopentadienyl anion as receptor: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mittal L; Si, Mrinal Kanti; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2015-08-01

    A systematic computational study has been carried out using post-Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods on half sandwich (M-Cp), sandwich (Cp-M-Cp), inversed sandwich (M-Cp-M), and multi-decker chain complexes of alkali metal ions (Na(+), and K(+)). The binding affinity of cyclopentadienyl anion (Cp) with K(+) and Na(+) ions has been studied in half sandwich, sandwich, inversed sandwich, and multi-decker chain complexes. These complexes have been examined in the aqueous phase. The calculated results show that Cp anion can preferentially bind with Na(+) ion over K(+) ion in aqueous phase. The results obtained from DFT calculations have been compared with the crystal structures of Cp-Na and Cp-K complexes. The Bader's atoms in molecule (AIM) analysis were performed to characterize the non-covalent cation-π interactions in the Cp-M complexes. The calculated electron density at cage critical point indicates the strength of the Cp-M complexes. Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) has also been performed to investigate the origins of these interactions. The electrostatic interaction contributes significantly to the total interaction energy in Cp-M complexes. The relative stability difference of cyclopentadienyl anion (Cp) with K(+) and Na(+) ions in aqueous phase can be exploited for the separations from mixture such as sea bittern. The lower stability of K-Cp complex can induce to precipitate the K(+) ions more easily than the corresponding Na(+) ions. Graphical Abstract Potassium ion from sodium ion with cyclopentadienyl anion as receptor. PMID:26232185

  6. Pore-filling-dependent selectivity effects in the vapor-phase separation of xylene isomers on the metal-organic framework MIL-47.

    PubMed

    Finsy, Vincent; Verelst, Harry; Alaerts, Luc; De Vos, Dirk; Jacobs, Pierre A; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2008-06-01

    Vapor-phase adsorption and separation of the C8 alkylaromatic components p-xylene, m-xylene, o-xylene, and ethylbenzene on the metal-organic framework MIL-47 have been studied. Low coverage Henry adsorption constants and adsorption enthalpies were determined using the pulse chromatographic technique at temperatures between 230 and 290 degrees C. The four C8 alkylaromatic components have comparable Henry constants and adsorption enthalpies. Adsorption isotherms of the pure components were determined using the gravimetric technique at 70, 110, and 150 degrees C. The adsorption capacity and steepness of the isotherms differs among the components and are strongly temperature dependent. Breakthrough experiments with several binary mixtures were performed at 70-150 degrees C and varying total hydrocarbon pressure from 0.0004 to 0.05 bar. Separation of the different isomers could be achieved. In general, it was found that the adsorption selectivity increases with increasing partial pressure or degree of pore filling. The separation at a high degree of pore filling in the vapor phase is a result of differences in packing modes of the C8 alkylaromatic components in the pores of MIL-47. PMID:18470988

  7. Combination of dynamic magnetophoretic separation and stationary magnetic trap for highly sensitive and selective detection of Salmonella typhimurium in complex matrix.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pei-Lin; Tang, Man; Hong, Shao-Li; Yu, Xu; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-12-15

    Foodborne illnesses have always been a serious problem that threats public health, so it is necessary to develop a method that can detect the pathogens rapidly and sensitively. In this study, we designed a magnetic controlled microfluidic device which integrated the dynamic magnetophoretic separation and stationary magnetic trap together for sensitive and selective detection of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Coupled with immunomagnetic nanospheres (IMNs), this device could separate and enrich the target pathogens and realize the sensitive detection of target pathogens on chip. Based on the principle of sandwich immunoassays, the trapped target pathogens identified by streptavidin modified QDs (SA-QDs) were detected under an inverted fluorescence microscopy. A linear range was exhibited at the concentration from 1.0×10(4) to 1.0×10(6) colony-forming units/mL (CFU/mL), the limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 5.4×10(3) CFU/mL in milk (considering the sample volume, the absolute detection limit corresponded to 540C FU). Compared with the device with stationary magnetic trap alone, the integrated device enhanced anti-interference ability and increased detection sensitivity through dynamic magnetophoretic separation, and made the detection in complex samples more accurate. In addition, it had excellent specificity and good reproducibility. The developed system provides a rapid, sensitive and accurate approach to detect pathogens in practice samples. PMID:26201979

  8. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

  9. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado: Remedial action selection report. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Gunnison uranium mill tailings site is just south of the city limits of Gunnison, Colorado, in the south-central part of the state. The entire site covers 61 acres in the valley of the Gunnison River and Tomichi Creek. Contaminated materials at the Gunnison processing site include the tailings pile, covering about 35 acres to an average depth of nine feet and containing 459,000 cubic yards. Ore storage areas and the former mill processing area cover about 20 acres on the south side of the site. The volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 718,900 cubic yards. An interim action was approved by the US Department of Energy to eliminate existing safety hazards to the Gunnison community. These actions, started in September 1991, included demolition of mill buildings and related processing facilities, excavation of two underground storage tanks, removal of asbestos and other hazardous materials from buildings, storage of those materials in a secured area on the site, and improvements of site security.

  10. Selective ionic liquid ferrofluid based dispersive-solid phase extraction for simultaneous preconcentration/separation of lead and cadmium in milk and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fasih Ramandi, Negin; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, a selective ionic liquid ferrofluid has been used in dispersive solid phase extraction (IL-FF-D-SPE) for simultaneous preconcentration and separation of lead and cadmium in milk and biological samples combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. To improve the selectivity of the ionic liquid ferrofluid, the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles with a magnetic core as sorbent was modified by loading 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphtol. Due to the rapid injection of an appropriate amount of ionic liquid ferrofluid into the aqueous sample by a syringe, extraction can be achieved within a few seconds. In addition, based on the attraction of the ionic liquid ferrofluid to a magnet, no centrifugation step is needed for phase separation. The experimental parameters of IL-FF-D-SPE were optimized using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) after a Plackett-Burman screening design. Under the optimum conditions, the relative standard deviations of 2.2% and 2.4% were obtained for lead and cadmium, respectively (n=7). The limit of detections were 1.21 µg L(-1) for Pb(II) and 0.21 µg L(-1) for Cd(II). The preconcentration factors were 250 for lead and 200 for cadmium and the maximum adsorption capacities of the sorbent were 11.18 and 9.34 mg g(-1) for lead and cadmium, respectively. PMID:25281121

  11. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM MONOCARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Powers, R.M.

    1962-07-24

    A method of making essentially stoichiometric uranium monocarbide by pelletizing a mixture of uranium tetrafluoride, silicon, and carbon and reacting the mixture at a temperature of approximately 1500 to 1700 deg C until the reaction goes to completion, forming uranium monocarbide powder and volatile silicon tetrafluoride, is described. The powder is then melted to produce uranium monocarbide in massive form. (AEC)

  12. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, V.P.

    1958-12-16

    A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

  13. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses a process for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values which are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is re-established.

  14. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  15. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A process for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  16. Pb(II) ion-imprinted micro-porous particles for the selective separation of Pb(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Kim, Dukjoon

    2014-11-01

    Pb(II) ion-imprinted micro-porous particles were prepared from the ionic complexes formed between vinyl pyridine functional monomers and template Pb(II) ions. The self-assembled Pb(II)/monomer complex was suspension polymerized in the presence of divinylbenzene cross-linker. The prepared micro-particles were 400-600 μm in size. Their chemical and physical structures, morphologies, and adsorption capacity were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, scanningelectron microscopy (SEM), and atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS). The adsorption capacity of the imprinted polymer for the Pb(II) template ions was significantly affected by the initial concentration and the pH of the feed solution. Adsorptionis rapid in the first 1 h, after which it slowly increases to equilibrium. The imprinted particles showed high selectivity for lead ions; the adsorption capacity for the Pb(II) ions, 28 mg g(-1) polymer, was much higher than those for other metal ions such as Ni(II)Zn(II), Fe(II), or Cd(II). The imprinted particles maintain high standards of their adsorption ability after 10 repeated uses. PMID:25958566

  17. Selective separation of hydroxide from alkaline nuclear tank waste by liquid-liquid extraction with weak hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Chambliss, C Kevin; Haverlock, Tamara I; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Moyer, Bruce A

    2002-04-15

    Recovery and recycle of caustic reagents in industrial processes offer potential means of pollution prevention, as investigated herein for particular needs related to the cleanup of alkaline nuclear waste. Specifically, the recovery of hydroxide from alkaline media by liquid-liquid extraction can be effected utilizing weak hydroxy acids, as demonstrated for NaOH utilizing a series of lipophilic fluorinated alcohols and alkylated phenols dissolved in 1-octanol. Extraction efficiency follows the expected order of acidity of the hydroxy acids, the phenols being the most efficient extractants among the compounds tested. After extraction, NaOH is effectively recoverable from the organic phase upon contact with water. The weakest hydroxy acids are the most efficiently stripped, NaOH recovery being nearly quantitative in a single contact. In competitive extraction experiments, good selectivity for hydroxide recovery over other anions such as nitrate and chloride was demonstrated. Since the order of extraction favors larger anions, the exceptional preference for hydroxide implies that the extraction occurs by deprotonation of the hydroxy acids in a cation-exchange process. Stripping therefore occurs by hydrolysis to regenerate the neutral hydroxy acid, liberating NaOH to the aqueous phase. Since hydroxide equivalents rather than actual hydroxide ions are transferred to the solvent, the process is termed "pseudohydroxide extraction." Hydroxide recovery from a simulant of alkaline nuclear tank waste (Hanford DSSF simulant) was also demonstrated in repeated extraction and stripping cycles. PMID:11993889

  18. Selective separation behavior of graphene flakes in interaction with halide anions in the presence of an external electric field.

    PubMed

    Farajpour, E; Sohrabi, B; Beheshtian, J

    2016-03-14

    The adsorption of halide anions in the absence, and presence, of a perpendicularly external electric field on the C54H18 graphene surface has been investigated using M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) density functional theory (DFT). The structural characteristics, charge transfer, electric surface potential (ESP) maps, equilibrium distances between ions and the graphene surface and dipole moments of the ion-graphene complexes were investigated. The optimized structures show that halide anions (F(-) and Br(-)) adsorb on the graphene surface in contrast to the chloride anion that was stabilized on the edge area of the graphene flake. To clarify this unexpected behavior, diffusion of the chloride anion on the graphene surface was analyzed. The observations suggest that the moving of the chloride halide anion between barrier energies on the graphene flake has been facilitated as a result of the applied external electric field. In addition, an effective anion-π interaction between the fluoride anion and the graphene surface in the presence of an electric field holds out the capability of these anion-graphene complexes to design anion-selective nanoscale materials. PMID:26899635

  19. Photo-ionisation mass spectrometry as detection method for gas chromatography. Optical selectivity and multidimensional comprehensive separations.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Welthagen, Werner; Gröger, Thomas

    2008-03-14

    Mass spectrometry (MS) with soft ionisation techniques (i.e. ionisation without fragmentation of the analyte molecules) for gaseous samples exhibits interesting analytical properties for direct analysis applications (i.e. direct inlet mass spectrometric on-line monitoring) as well as mass spectrometric detection method for gas chromatography (GC-MS). Commonly either chemical ionisation (CI) or field ionisation (FI) is applied as soft ionisation technology for GC-MS. An interesting alternative to the CI and FI technologies methods are photo-ionisation (PI) methods. PI overcomes some of the limitations of CI and FI and furthermore add some unique analytical properties. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) method uses intense UV-laser pulses (wavelength range approximately 350-193 nm) for highly selective, sensitive and soft ionisation of predominately aromatic compounds. The single photon ionisation (SPI) method utilises VUV light (from lamps or laser sources, wavelengths range approximately 150-110 nm) can be used for a universal soft ionisation of organic molecules. In this article the historical development as well as the current status and concepts of gas chromatography hyphenated to photo-ionisation mass spectrometry are reviewed. PMID:17915237

  20. Increasing the Accuracy in the Measurement of the Minor Isotopes of Uranium: Care in Selection of Reference Materials, Baselines and Detector Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poths, J.; Koepf, A.; Boulyga, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    The minor isotopes of uranium (U-233, U-234, U-236) are increasingly useful for tracing a variety of processes: movement of anthropogenic nuclides in the environment (ref 1), sources of uranium ores (ref 2), and nuclear material attribution (ref 3). We report on improved accuracy for U-234/238 and U-236/238 by supplementing total evaporation protocol TIMS measurement on Faraday detectors (ref 4)with multiplier measurement for the minor isotopes. Measurement of small signals on Faraday detectors alone is limited by noise floors of the amplifiers and accurate measurement of the baseline offsets. The combined detector approach improves the reproducibility to better than ±1% (relative) for the U-234/238 at natural abundance, and yields a detection limit for U-236/U-238 of <0.2 ppm. We have quantified contribution of different factors to the uncertainties associated with these peak jumping measurement on a single detector, with an aim of further improvement. The uncertainties in the certified values for U-234 and U-236 in the uranium standard NBS U005, if used for mass bias correction, dominates the uncertainty in their isotopic ratio measurements. Software limitations in baseline measurement drives the detection limit for the U-236/U-238 ratio. This is a topic for discussion with the instrument manufacturers. Finally, deviation from linearity of the response of the electron multiplier with count rate limits the accuracy and reproducibility of these minor isotope measurements. References: (1) P. Steier et al(2008) Nuc Inst Meth(B), 266, 2246-2250. (2) E. Keegan et al (2008) Appl Geochem 23, 765-777. (3) K. Mayer et al (1998) IAEA-CN-98/11, in Advances in Destructive and Non-destructive Analysis for Environmental Monitoring and Nuclear Forensics. (4) S. Richter and S. Goldberg(2003) Int J Mass Spectrom, 229, 181-197.