Sample records for selective separation uranium

  1. Method for the separation of uranium isotope compounds already converted isotope-selectively

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. Niemann; J. Sprehe

    1985-01-01

    Separation of heavier uranium isotope compounds from lighter uranium isotope compounds in a gas jet having supersonic velocity after one isotope is converted selectively by laser radiation. The gas jet is subjected to an oblique compression shock to abruptly change direction causing the lighter isotope compounds to be deflected unrestrained by guiding walls with the heavier isotope compounds continuing on

  2. Selective Excitation of Branched Vibrational Ladder in Uranium Hexafluoride Laser Isotope Separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitsutoshi SUZUKI; Yasuaki MIYAMOTO; Makoto HASEGAWA; Yoshihiro SHIMAZAKI

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical investigation was made on the dynamics of initial excitation process in molecular laser isotope separation for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) based on the generalized N-level density-matrix equation derived by Goodman et al. Branched vibrational model due to anharmonic-splitting components for the v3 mode of UF6 molecule were formalized and phase interferences of density-matrix elements were considered to analyze the selective

  3. Method for the separation of uranium isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2009-01-01

    A method for the separation of uranium isotopes, particularly U235 is disclosed. The method employs a frequency selective laser irradiation of an adiabatically cooled beam of UF6 molecules, followed by the 'chemionization' i.e., SbF5 + UF6 SbF6(-) + UF5(+) of the selectively irradiated UF6 molecules, and finally separates the favored U235F5(+) product.

  4. The use of selective extraction chromatographic columns as an alternative to solvent extraction for the separation of uranium followed by the use of Arsenazo III as a calorimetric reagent for uranium determination

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.J.; Del Mastro, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    The use of U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec columns as an alternative to solvent extraction for separation of uranium prior to its determination by various techniques (calorimetric, phosphorescence, and mass spectroscopy) was investigated. U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec columns have several advantages over the widely used 4-methyl-2-pentanone solvent extraction method. Among the advantages are: (1) no hazardous liquid organic waste, that creates regulatory waste disposal problems, is generated; (2) a clean separation of U from Zr, F, and fission products is obtained; (3) the sample preparation time is reduced; and (4) the exposure of analysts to ionizing radiation is reduced because the entire procedure may be performed in a hot cell using remote operations. This study also investigated the use of Arsenazo III (1,8-dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid-2,7-bis [<-azo-2>-phenylarsonic acid]) as a calorimetric reagent to determine uranium concentrations over a wide range in waste streams and product streams at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Process and waste stream samples were passed through a U/TEVA{reg_sign} Spec column to selectively remove the uranium. The uranium bearing fraction is compatible with the pH range for color development with Arsenazo III. Arsenazo III may be added to the uranium fraction, at a 3:1 mole ratio (Arsenazo:Uranium) at the high end of the method (10 {mu}/mL). Arsenazo III forms a highly stable complex with uranium. Stability tests from this and other studies show that the colored complex of Arsenazo III with U(VI) forms within one minute and remains stable for several hours. The complex with U(VI) varies in color with pH. However, with excess reagent, the color is varying shades of purple. Since the samples were passed through a highly selective extraction chromatographic column prior to adding the calorimetric reagent, no interferences were observed.

  5. Laser separation of uranium chosen for scaleup. [Atomic vapor laser isotope separation, molecular laser isotope separation, and plasma separation process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rawls

    1982-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) has been selected by the Department of Energy to go into large-scale engineering development and demonstration over two other advanced technologies, molecular laser isotope separation and plasma separation. DOE will continue to support development of another uranium enrichment technology, gas centrifugation. By or around 1990, the most promising gas centrifuge technique will be compared

  6. Laser separation of uranium chosen for scaleup. [Atomic vapor laser isotope separation, molecular laser isotope separation plasma separation process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rawls

    1982-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) has been selected by the Department of Energy to go into large-scale engineering development and demonstration over two other advanced technologies, molecular laser isotope separation and plasma separation. DOE will continue to support development of another uranium enrichment technology, gas centrifugation. By or around 1990, the most promising gas centrifuge technique will be compared

  7. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O solid solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Chiotti; M. C. Jha

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally

  8. Magnetic separation of uranium from magnesium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegler, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The attraction or repulsion of particles by a magnetic gradient, based on the respective susceptibilities, provides the basis for physical separation of particles that are comprised predominantly of uranium from those that are predominantly magnesium fluoride (MgF/sub 2/). To determine the effectiveness of this approach, a bench-scale magnetic separator from the S.G. Frantz Co., Inc. was used. In the Frantz Model L-1, particles are fed through a funnel onto a vibration tray and through a magnetic field. The specific design of the Frantz magnet causes the magnetic field strength to vary along the width of the magnet, setting up a gradient. The tray in the magnetic field is split at a point about half way down its length so that the separated material does not recombine. A schematic is presented of Frantz Model L-1 CN - the same magnet configured for high gradient magnetic separation of liquid-suspended particles. Here different pole pieces create a uniform magnetic field, and stainless steel wood in the canister between the pole pieces creates the high gradient. 1 ref., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. SEPARATION OF URANIUM IN CHLORIDE-NITRATE MEDIUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Novak; V. Pekarek

    1959-01-01

    An extraction of a uranium ore containing calcium carbonate with the aid ; of a surplus of a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids in different ; concentrations and digestion time was carried out. The separation was carried ; out by means of Czechoslovah strong basic anex L of the lutidine-formaldehyde ; type in nitrate cycle. Uranium was separated from

  10. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  11. The quantitative ion exchange separation of uranium from impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, U.I.; Mason, P.B.; Zebrowski, J.P.; Rocca, M.; Frank, I.W.; Smith, M.M.; Johnson, K.D.; Orlowicz, G.J.; Dallmann, E.

    1995-03-01

    Two methods were tested for the quantitative separation of uranium from elemental impurities using commercially available resins. The sorption and elution behavior of uranium and the separation of it from a variety of other elements was studied. The first method utilized an anion exchange resin while the second method employed an extraction resin. The first method, the anion exchange of uranium (VI) in an acid chloride medium, was optimized and statistically tested for quantitative recovery of uranium. This procedure involved adsorption of uranium onto Blo-Rad AG 1-X8 or MP-1 ion exchange resins in 8 M HCl, separation of uncompleted or weakly complexed matrix ions with an 8 M HCI wash, and subsequent elution of uranium with 1 M HCl. Matrix ions more strongly adsorbed than uranium were left on the resin. Uranium recoveries with this procedure averaged greater than 99.9% with a standard deviation of 0.1%. In the second method, recovery of uranium on the extraction resin did not meet the criteria of this study and further examination was terminated.

  12. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used, reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

  13. Laser isotope separation: Non-uranium applications. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning isotope separation by laser irradiation of elements other than uranium. Among the topics examined are variations in gas lasers for selective infrared dissociation of molecules, high-power laser applications, selectivity considerations, laser isotope separation apparatus and layouts for large facilities, temperature influence on selectivity, and efficiency of processing. Applications for boron, tritium, chlorine, and deuterium are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Laser isotope separation: Non-uranium applications. (Latest citations from the Inspec database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning isotope separation by laser irradiation of elements other than uranium. Among the topics examined are variations in gas lasers for selective infrared dissociation of molecules, high-power laser applications, selectivity considerations, laser isotope separation apparatus and layouts for large facilities, temperature influence on selectivity, and efficiency of processing. Applications for boron, tritium, chlorine, and deuterium are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Laser isotope separation: Non-uranium applications. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning isotope separation by laser irradiation of elements other than uranium. Among the topics examined are variations in gas lasers for selective infrared dissociation of molecules, high-power laser applications, selectivity considerations, laser isotope separation apparatus and layouts for large facilities, temperature influence on selectivity, and efficiency of processing. Applications for boron, tritium, chlorine, and deuterium are included. (Contains a minimum of 203 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Research and development prospects for the atomic uranium laser isotope separation process. Research report 442

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Janes; H. K. Forsen; R. H. Levy

    1977-01-01

    Research and development activities are being conducted on many aspects of the atomic uranium laser isotope separation process. Extensive laser spectroscopy studies have been made in order to identify attractive multi-step selective ionization schemes. Using low density (10¹° atoms\\/cm³) apparatus, the excited state spectra of atomic uranium have been investigated via multiple step laser excitation and photoionization studies using two,

  17. Age determination of highly enriched uranium: separation and analysis of 231Pa.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, A; Apostolidis, C; Mayer, K

    2002-11-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed for the age determination of highly enriched uranium samples exploiting the mother/daughter pair 235U/231Pa. Protactinium is separated from bulk uranium through highly selective sorption to silica gel and is subsequently quantified using alpha-spectrometry. The method has been validated using uranium standard reference materials of known ages. It affords decontamination factors exceeding 2.5 x 10(7), overall recoveries in the range of 80-85%, and a combined uncertainty below 5%. PMID:12433081

  18. Pulsed CO laser for isotope separation of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, Igor Y.; Koptev, Andrey V. [Rocket-Space Technics Department, Baltic State Technical University, 1, 1st Krasnoarmeyskaya st.,St. Petersburg, 190005 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-30

    This article proposes a technical solution for using a CO laser facility for the industrial separation of uranium used in the production of fuel for nuclear power plants, employing a method of laser isotope separation of uranium with condensation repression in a free jet. The laser operation with nanosecond pulse irradiation can provide an acceptable efficiency in the separating unit and a high efficiency of the laser with the wavelength of 5.3 {mu}m. In the present work we also introduce a calculation model and define the parameters of a mode-locked CO laser with a RF discharge in the supersonic stream. The average pulsed CO laser power of 3 kW is sufficient for efficient industrial isotope separation of uranium in one stage.

  19. Uranium isotope separation from 1941 to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier-Komor, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Uranium isotope separation was the key development for the preparation of highly enriched isotopes in general and thus became the seed for target development and preparation for nuclear and applied physics. In 1941 (year of birth of the author) large-scale development for uranium isotope separation was started after the US authorities were warned that NAZI Germany had started its program for enrichment of uranium and might have confiscated all uranium and uranium mines in their sphere of influence. Within the framework of the Manhattan Projects the first electromagnetic mass separators (Calutrons) were installed and further developed for high throughput. The military aim of the Navy Department was to develop nuclear propulsion for submarines with practically unlimited range. Parallel to this the army worked on the development of the atomic bomb. Also in 1941 plutonium was discovered and the production of 239Pu was included into the atomic bomb program. 235U enrichment starting with natural uranium was performed in two steps with different techniques of mass separation in Oak Ridge. The first step was gas diffusion which was limited to low enrichment. The second step for high enrichment was performed with electromagnetic mass spectrometers (Calutrons). The theory for the much more effective enrichment with centrifugal separation was developed also during the Second World War, but technical problems e.g. development of high speed ball and needle bearings could not be solved before the end of the war. Spying accelerated the development of uranium separation in the Soviet Union, but also later in China, India, Pakistan, Iran and Iraq. In this paper, the physical and chemical procedures are outlined which lead to the success of the project. Some security aspects and Non-Proliferation measures are discussed.

  20. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O.sub.2 solid solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Premo Chiotti; Mahesh Chandra Jha

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally

  1. Cost analyses of uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norihiko Ozaki; Kimio Yamada; Manabu Yamamoto; Shunsuke Tomiyama; Kiichi Ueyanagi

    1976-01-01

    The probability of the selective two-step photoionisation of 235U atoms by laser and ultraviolet radiations is estimated from the rate equations for uranium atoms with two isotopes with three levels. The population of 235U ions is obtained by linearising the rate equations. We have calculated the ion production rates for three cases in which the laser and ultraviolet powers are

  2. Bio-/Photo-Chemical Separation and Recovery of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2008-03-12

    Citric acid forms bidentate, tridentate, binuclear or polynuclear species with transition metals and actinides. Biodegradation of metal citrate complexes is influenced by the type of complex formed with metal ions. While bidentate complexes are readily biodegraded, tridentate, binuclear and polynuclear species are recalcitrant. Likewise certain transition metals and actinides are photochemically active in the presence of organic acids. Although the uranyl citrate complex is not biodegraded, in the presence of visible light it undergoes photochemical oxidation/reduction reactions which result in the precipitation of uranium as UO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O. Consequently, we developed a process where uranium is extracted from contaminated soils and wastes by citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, whereas uranyl citrate which is recalcitrant remains in solution. Photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex resulted in the precipitation of uranium. Thus the toxic metals and uranium in mixed waste are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of naturally-occurring compounds and the combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in cost.

  3. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Separation of Uranium from Other Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of separating uranium from other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of an extraction and counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for used nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)) were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, the separation of uranium from plutonium in sc-CO2 modified with TBP was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, and the separation of uranium from neptunium was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid, oxalic acid, or sodium nitrite.

  4. Spectral considerations in the laser isotope separation of Uranium Hexafluoride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Eerkens

    1976-01-01

    Key spectral features important in the laser isotope separation of Uranium Hexafluoride are reviewed. Specifically the (v\\u000a 3+v\\u000a 4+v\\u000a 6) band lying in the frequency range of the CO2 laser, the 3v\\u000a 3 band which is covered by the CO laser, and the fundamentalv\\u000a 3 band of UF6 are considered. Computer-calculated spectra show that the ternary combination bands (v\\u000a 3+v

  5. Development of a Ceramic-Lined Crucible for the Separation of Salt from Uranium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian R. Westphal; K. C. Marsden; J. C. Price

    2009-01-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment program at the Idaho National Laboratory, alternate crucible materials are being developed for the processing of uranium and salt. The separation of salt (LiCl\\/KCl based) from uranium is performed in an inductively heated furnace capable of distillation under vacuum conditions. Historically, salt and uranium have been processed in graphite crucibles coated with a

  6. SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2007-05-31

    H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for <200 mg Mo/g U (200 ppm). Since natural U has about 10 mg Mo/g U, the required purity of the 1EU product prior to blending is about 800 mg Mo/g U, allowing for uncertainties. HCE requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) define a flowsheet for the safe and efficient processing of the U-10Mo material. This report presents a computational model of the solvent extraction portion of the proposed flowsheet. The two main objectives of the computational model are to demonstrate that the Mo impurity requirement can be met and to show that the solvent feed rates in the proposed flowsheet, in particular to 1A and 1D Banks, are adequate to prevent refluxing of U and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety. SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction), a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that supports Argonne National Laboratory's proprietary AMUSE (Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction) code, was selected to model the U/Mo separation flowsheet. SASSE spreadsheet models of H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction show that a standard unirradiated fuel flowsheet is capable of separating U from Mo in dissolved solutions of a U/Mo alloy. The standard unirradiated fuel flowsheet is used, except for increases in solvent feed rates to prevent U refluxing and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety and substitution of higher HNO{sub 3} concentrations for aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3})){sub 3} in the feed to 1A Bank. (Unlike Savanah River Site (SRS) fuels, the U/Mo material contains no aluminum (Al). As a result, higher HNO3 concentrations are required in the 1AF to provide the necessary salting.) The TVA limit for the final blended product is 200 {micro}g Mo/g U, which translates to approximately 800 mg Mo/g U for the Second Cycle product solution. SASSE calculations give a Mo impurity level of 4 {micro}g Mo/g U in the Second Cycle product solution, conservatively based on Mo organic-to-aqueous distributions measured during minibank testing for previous processing of Piqua reactor fuel. The calculated impurity level is slightly more than two orders of magnitude lower than the required level. The Piqua feed solution contained a significant concentration of Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, which is not present in the feed solution for the proposed flowsheet. Measured distribution data indicate that, without Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} or other salting agents present, Mo extracts into the organic phase to a much lesser extent, so that the overall U/Mo separation is better and the Mo impurities in the Second Cycle product drop to negligible concentrations. The 1DF U concentration of 20 g/L specified by the proposed flowsheet requires an increased 1DX organic feed rate to satisfy H-Canyon Double Contingency Analysis (DCA) guidelines for the prevention of U refluxing. The ranges for the 1AX, 1BS, and 1DX organic flow rates in the proposed flowsheet are set so that the limiting ratios of organic/aqueous flow rates exactly meet the minimum values specified by the DCA.

  7. Ultratrace Uranium Fingerprinting with Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Summer L. Ziegler; Bruce A. Bushaw

    2008-01-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry (ISLIS) for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes 234U, 235U, and 236U with respect to 238U. Optical isotopic selectivity in three-step excitation with single-mode

  8. Investigation of uranium binding forms in selected German mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Osman, Alfatih A A; Geipel, Gerhard; Bernhard, Gert; Worch, Eckhard

    2013-12-01

    Cryogenic time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy was successfully used to identify uranium binding forms in selected German mineral waters of extremely low uranium concentrations (<2.0 ?g/L). The measurements were performed at a low temperature of 153 K. The spectroscopic data showed a prevalence of aquatic species Ca2UO2(CO3)3 in all investigated waters, while other uranyl-carbonate complexes, viz, UO2CO3(aq) and UO2(CO3)2 (2-), only existed as minor species. The pH value, alkalinity (CO3 (2-)), and the main water inorganic constituents, specifically the Ca(2+) concentration, showed a clear influence on uranium speciation. Speciation modeling was performed using the most recent thermodynamic data for aqueous complexes of uranium. The modeling results for the main uranium binding form in the investigated waters indicated a good agreement with the spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23702572

  9. Selected uranium and uranium-thorium occurrences in New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Secondary uranium mineralization occurs in a northwest-trending fracture zone in the Devonian Concord Granite in recent rock cuts along Interstate Highway 89 near New London, New Hampshire. A detailed plane table map of this occurrence was prepared. Traverses using total gamma ray scintillometers throughout the pluton of Concord Granite identified two additional areas in which very small amounts of secondary mineralization occurs in the marginal zones of the body. All three areas lie along the same northwest trend. A ground radiometry survey of a large part of the Jurassic White Mountain batholith was conducted. Emphasis was placed on those areas from which earlier sampling by Butler (1975) had been done. No unusual geological characteristics were apparent around sample localities from which anomalous U and Th had been reported.. The results of this survey confirm previous conclusions that the red, coarse-grained, biotite granite phase of the Conway Granite is more radioactive than other phases of the Conway Granite or other rock types of the White Mountain Plutonic-Volcanic Series. Aplites associated with the Conway Granite were found .generally to be as radioactive as the red Conway Granite.

  10. Selective solid-phase extraction of uranium by salicylideneimine-functionalized hydrothermal carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Ma, Lijian; Cao, Kecheng; Geng, Junxia; Liu, Jun; Song, Qiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Li, Shoujian

    2012-08-30

    A new salicylideneimine-functionalized hydrothermal-carbon-based solid-phase extractant was developed for the purpose of separating uranium selectively for sustainability of uranium resources. The resulting adsorption material was obtained via hydrothermal carbonization, calcination at mild temperature (573.15K), amination, and grafting with salicylaldehyde in sequence. Both Fourier transform infrared spectra and elemental analysis proved the successful grafting of salicylideneimine onto hydrothermal carbon matrix. Adsorption behaviors of the extractant on uranium(VI) were investigated by varying pH values of solution, adsorbent amounts, contact times, initial metal concentrations, temperatures, and ionic strengths. An optimum adsorption capacity of 1.10 mmol g(-1) (261 mg g(-1)) for uranium(VI) was obtained at pH 4.3. The present adsorption process obeyed pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters (?H=+8.81 kJ mol(-1), ?S=+110 J K(-1)mol(-1), ?G=-23.0 kJ mol(-1)) indicated the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. Results from batch adsorption test in simulated nuclear industrial effluent, containing Cs(+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), and Gd(3+), showed the adsorbent could separate uranium(VI) from those competitive ions with high selectivity. The adsorbent might be promising for use in certain key steps in any future sustainable nuclear fuel cycle. PMID:22770585

  11. Development of a Ceramic-Lined Crucible for the Separation of Salt from Uranium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian R. Westphal; K. C. Marsden; J. C. Price

    2009-01-01

    As part of the spent fuel treatment program at the Idaho National Laboratory, alternate crucible materials are being developed\\u000a for the processing of uranium and salt. The separation of salt (LiCl\\/KCl based) from uranium is performed in an inductively\\u000a heated furnace capable of distillation under vacuum conditions. Historically, salt and uranium have been processed in graphite\\u000a crucibles coated with a

  12. Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); McTaggart, Donald R. (Knoxville, TN)

    1984-01-01

    Uranium and technetium in the product stream of the Purex process for recovery of uranium in spent nuclear fuel are separated by (1) contacting the aqueous Purex product stream with hydrazine to reduce Tc.sup.+7 therein to a reduced species, and (2) contacting said aqueous stream with an organic phase containing tributyl phosphate and an organic diluent to extract uranium from said aqueous stream into said organic phase.

  13. Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical Transformation

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Karsten

    Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical of diphenyldiazomethane with [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIII ] (1) results in an 2 -bound diphenyldiazomethane uranium complex-shell ligand, [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIV (2 -NNCPh2)] (2). Treating Ph2CN2 with a uranium complex that contains

  14. Surface selective membranes for carbon dioxide separation

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Myers, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    In this study, hybrid membranes have been developed for the selective separation of CO2 from mixtures containing H2. Beginning with commercially available Pall alumina membrane tubes with nominal pore diameter of 5 nm, hybrids were produced by silation with a variety of functionalities designed to facilitate the selective adsorption of CO2 onto the pore surface. The goal is to produce a membrane which can harness the power of surface diffusion to give the selectivity of polymer membranes with the permeance of inorganic membranes.

  15. Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li

    2010-09-01

    A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl 1 wt% Li2O at 650 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

  16. Laser isotope separation: Uranium. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and assessment of laser separation of uranium isotopes, compounds, oxides, and alloys. Topics include uranium enrichment plants, isotope enriched materials, gaseous diffusion, centrifuge enrichment, reliability and safety, and atomic vapor separation. Citations also discuss commercial enrichment, market trends, licensing, international competition, and waste management. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Status of Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hao-Lin; Feinberg, R.M.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses demonstrations of plant-scale hardware embodying AVLIS technology which were completed in 1992. These demonstrations, designed to provide key economic and technical bases for plant deployment, produced significant quantities of low enriched uranium which could be used for civilian power reactor fuel. We are working with industry to address the integration of AVLIS into the fuel cycle. To prepare for deployment, a conceptual design and cost estimate for a uranium enrichment plant were also completed. The U-AVLIS technology is ready for commercialization.

  18. Evaluating ion exchange resin efficiency and oxidative capacity for the separation of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously described methods to separate dissolved U(IV) from dissolved U(VI) under acidic anoxic conditions prior to laboratory analysis were ineffective with materials currently available commercially. Three strong anion exchange resins were examined for their efficiency in separating, recovering, and preserving both redox states during separation. Results Under oxic conditions, recovery of U(VI) from three exchange resins (Bio-Rad AG 1x8 Poly-Prep prefilled columns, Bio-Rad AG 1x8 powder, and Dowex 1x8 powder) ranged from 72% to 100% depending on the dosed mass, eluent volume, and resin selected. Dowex 1x8 resin was the only resin found to provide 100% recovery of U(VI) with fewer than 5 bed volumes of eluent. Under anoxic conditions, all three resins oxidized U(IV) in aqueous solutions with relatively low U(IV) concentrations (<3x10-6 M). Resin-induced oxidation was observed visually using a leuco dye, safranin-o. Oxidants associated with the resin were irreversibly reduced by the addition of Ti(III). After anoxic resin pre-treatment, a series of U(IV)/U(VI) mixtures at micro-molar levels were prepared and separated using the Dowex 1x8 resin with 100% recovery of both U(IV) and U(VI) with no resin-induced changes in oxidation state. Conclusions Currently available anion exchange resins with apparently identical physical properties were found to have significantly different recoveries for hexavalent uranium at micro-molar concentrations. A novel qualitative technique was developed to visually assess oxidative capacities of anion exchange resins under acidic anoxic conditions. A protocol was developed for pre-treatment and use of currently available anion exchange resins to achieve quantitative separation of U(IV) and U(VI) in aqueous solutions with low U(IV) concentrations. This method can be applied to future work to quantitatively assess dissolved U(IV) and U(VI) concentrations in both laboratory and field samples. PMID:23363052

  19. Ultratrace Uranium Fingerprinting with Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Summer L.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2008-08-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry (ISLIS) for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes 234U, 235U, and 236U with respect to 238U. Optical isotopic selectivity in three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers is capable of measuring the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm, and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as 235UH+ during measurement of 236U. This relative abundance limit approaches the threshold for measurement of uranium minor isotopes with conventional mass spectrometry, typically 10-7, but without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 g total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes.

  20. Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, H.A.

    1984-06-13

    A method for decontaminating uranium product from the Purex 5 process comprises addition of hydrazine to the product uranyl nitrate stream from the Purex process, which contains hexavalent (UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/) uranium and heptavalent technetium (TcO/sub 4/-). Technetium in the product stream is reduced and then complexed by the addition of oxalic acid (H/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/), and the Tc-oxalate complex is readily separated from the 10 uranium by solvent extraction with 30 vol % tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane.

  1. Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Horace A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01

    A method for decontaminating uranium product from the Purex process comprises addition of hydrazine to the product uranyl nitrate stream from the Purex process, which contains hexavalent (UO.sub.2.sup.2+) uranium and heptavalent technetium (TcO.sub.4 -). Technetium in the product stream is reduced and then complexed by the addition of oxalic acid (H.sub.2 C.sub.2 O.sub.4), and the Tc-oxalate complex is readily separated from the uranium by solvent extraction with 30 vol. % tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane.

  2. Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

    1995-09-06

    A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

  3. Site evaluations for the uranium-atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS) production plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Wolsko; M. Absil; R. Cirillo; S. Folga; J. Gillette; L. Habegger; R. Whitfield

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a uranium-atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS) production plant siting study conducted during 1990 to identify alternative plant sites for examination in later environmental impact studies. A siting study methodology was developed in early 1990 and was implemented between June and December. This methodology had two parts. The first part -- a series of screening analyses that

  4. Supercritical fluid extraction and separation of uranium from other actinides.

    PubMed

    Quach, Donna L; Mincher, Bruce J; Wai, Chien M

    2014-06-15

    The feasibility of separating U from nitric acid solutions of mixed actinides using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)-modified supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. The actinides U, Np, Pu, and Am were extracted into sc-CO2 modified with TBP from a range of nitric acid concentrations, in the absence of, or in the presence of, a number of traditional reducing and/or complexing agents to demonstrate the separation of these metals from U under sc-CO2 conditions. The separation of U from Pu using sc-CO2 was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) or oxalic acid (OA) to mitigate Pu extraction, and the separation of U from Np was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1M in the presence of AHA, OA, or sodium nitrite to mitigate Np extraction. Americium was not well extracted under any condition studied. PMID:24801893

  5. Quantum criticality in selected uranium intermetallic and organometallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasreen, Farzana

    My thesis presents the studies of the bulk properties of materials that exhibit unusual low-temperature properties due to the proximity of a quantum-critical point (QCP), for which long-range magnetic order can be suppressed to 0 K as a consequence of quantum fluctuations. A material can be tuned to the QCP by variation of a non-thermal control parameter such as hydrostatic pressure, magnetic field and chemical pressure/doping. Most of my experimental studies were performed at extreme conditions, such as high magnetic fields, low temperatures and/or high pressures. Two classes of materials were studied, namely uranium intermetallics and organometallics. The investigations on uranium intermetallics were done on compounds close to the edge of magnetism, i.e. the UCu4+xAl 8-x, UCuxAl5-x and UFe1-xNixAl compounds. Several of those compounds exhibit deviations from traditional Fermi-liquid theory and show non-Fermi liquid (NFL) scaling at low temperatures. Field-induced magnetic transitions were studied for some selected uranium compounds (UNiAl, UNiGa, UNiGe and UIrGe) as well. Furthermore, a study of organometallic quantum magnet (DTN: NiCl2-4SC(NH 2)2), which exhibits field-induced quantum criticality, is presented. In DTN, the magnetic-field induced polarization shows magneto-electric couplings between the antiferromagnetic Ni spins and the soft organic lattice.

  6. Radiometric Determination of Uranium in Natural Waters after Enrichment and Separation by Cation-Exchange and Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    E-print Network

    I. Pashalidis; H. Tsertos

    2003-04-28

    The alpha-radiometric determination of uranium after its pre-concentration from natural water samples using the cation-exchange resin Chelex-100, its selective extraction by tributylphosphate and electrodeposition on stainless steel discs is reported. The validity of the separation procedure and the chemical recoveries were checked by addition of uranium standard solution as well as by tracing with U-232. The average uranium yield was determined to be (97 +- 2) % for the cation-exchange, (95 +- 2) % for the liquid-liquid extraction, and more than 99% for the electrodeposition. Employing high-resolution alpha-spectroscopy, the measured activity of the U-238 and U-234 radioisotopes was found to be of similar magnitude; i.e. ~7 mBq/L and ~35 mBq/L for ground- and seawater samples, respectively. The energy resolution (FWHM) of the alpha-peaks was 22 keV, while the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) was estimated to be 1 mBq/L (at the 95% confidence limit).

  7. Uranium and thorium sequential separation from norm samples by using a SIA system.

    PubMed

    Mola, M; Nieto, A; Pealver, A; Borrull, F; Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a sequential radiochemical separation method for uranium and thorium isotopes using a novel Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) system with an extraction chromatographic resin (UTEVA). After the separation, uranium and thorium isotopes have been quantified by using alpha-particle spectrometry. The developed method has been tested by analyzing an intercomparison sample (phosphogypsum sample) from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with better recoveries for uranium and thorium than the obtained by using a classical method (93% for uranium using the new methodology and 82% with the classical method, and in the case of thorium the recoveries were 70% for the semi-automated method and 60% for the classical strategy). Afterwards, the method was successfully applied to different Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) samples, in particular sludge samples taken from a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and also sediment samples taken from an area of influence of the dicalcium phosphate (DCP) factory located close to the Ebro river reservoir in Flix (Catalonia). The obtained results have also been compared with the obtained by the classical method and from that comparison it has been demonstrated that the presented strategy is a good alternative to existing methods offering some advantages as minimization of sample handling, reduction of solvents volume and also an important reduction of the time per analysis. PMID:24172603

  8. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  9. Dissolution of metal oxides and separation of uranium from lanthanides and actinides in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Quach, D.L.; Wai, C.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Mincher, B.J. [Idaho National Lab, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO{sub 2} modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO{sub 2} and counter current stripping columns is presented. (authors)

  10. Sample selection and testing of separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Phase partitioning, which has become an important tool for the separation and purification of biological materials, was studied. Instruments available for this technique were researched and a countercurrent distribution apparatus, the Biosheff MK2N, was purchased. Various proteins, polysaccharides and cells were studied as models to determine operating procedures and conditions for this piece of equipment. Results were compared with those obtained from other similar equipment, including a nonsynchronous coil planet centrifuge device. Additionally, work was done with affinity ligands attached to PEG, which can further enhance the separation capabilities of phase partitioning.

  11. ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? D2EHPA SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM TRISODIUM PHOSPHATE SOLUTION BY D2EHPA IMPREGNATED RESINS ????????? ???????????1, ??????? ??????????1 ??? ????? ????????????1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uthaiwan Injarean; Pipat Pichestapong; Wannee Srinuttrakul

    In the monazite ore breakdown by alkali process to separate nuclear elements and rare earth elements composed in this phosphate ore, trisodium phosphate byproduct from the digestion process may contain uranium up to 300 ppm. Therefore, it is necessary to purify this trisodium phosphate. This study has used di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) impregnated resins to extract uranium from the trisodium

  12. Selective recovery of uranium and thorium ions from dilute aqueous solutions by animal biopolymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shin-Ichi Ishikawa; Kyozo Suyama; Keizo Arihara; Makoto Itoh

    2002-01-01

    Selective actinide ion recovery from dilute, aqueous, multication waste streams is an important problem. The recovery of uranium\\u000a (U) and thorium (Th) by various animal biopolymers was examined. Of four species of biopolymers tested, a high uptake of uranium\\u000a and thorium was found in hen eggshell membrane (ESM) and silk proteins, with the maximum uranium and thorium recovery exceeding\\u000a 98%

  13. Engineering High-Fidelity Residue Separations for Selective Harvest

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; Reed L. Hoskinson; J. Rochard Hess; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2006-07-01

    Composition and pretreatment studies of corn stover and wheat stover anatomical fractions clearly show that some corn and wheat stover anatomical fractions are of higher value than others as a biofeedstock. This premise, along with soil sustainability and erosion control concerns, provides the motivation for the selective harvest concept for separating and collecting the higher value residue fractions in a combine during grain harvest. This study recognizes the analysis of anatomical fractions as theoretical feedstock quality targets, but not as practical targets for developing selective harvest technologies. Rather, practical quality targets were established that identified the residue separation requirements of a selective harvest combine. Data are presented that shows that a current grain combine is not capable of achieving the fidelity of residue fractionation established by the performance targets. However, using a virtual engineering approach, based on an understanding of the fluid dynamics of the air stream separation, the separation fidelity can be significantly improved without significant changes to the harvester design. A virtual engineering model of a grain combine was developed and used to perform simulations of the residue separator performance. The engineered residue separator was then built into a selective harvest test combine, and tests performed to evaluate the separation fidelity. Field tests were run both with and without the residue separator installed in the test combine, and the chaff and straw residue streams were collected during harvest of Challis soft white spring wheat. The separation fidelity accomplished both with and without the residue separator was quantified by laboratory screening analysis. The screening results showed that the engineered baffle separator did a remarkable job of effecting high-fidelity separation of the straw and chaff residue streams, improving the chaff stream purity and increasing the straw stream yield.

  14. Control structure selection for Reactor, Separator and Recycle Process

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control structure selection for Reactor, Separator and Recycle Process T. Larsson M.S. Govatsmark S to control", for a simple plant with a liquid phase reactor, a distillation column and recycle of unreacted processes is the presence of recycle. Variations of a plant with reaction, separation and mass recycle, see

  15. Studies on stannic selenoarsenate. II. Separation of uranium from numerous metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, S.A.; Siddiqi, Z.M.; Rao, R.A.K.

    1982-12-01

    Stannic selenoarsenate has been synthesized by adding 0.05 M sodium selenite and 0.05 M sodium arsenate to a 0.05 M solution of stannic chloride in a volume ratio of 1:1:1 at pH 1. A tentative structure has been proposed on the basis of chemical composition, pH titrations, and infrared and thermogravimetric analyses. Distribution coefficients of several metal ions have been studied in hydrochloric acid, citric acid, ammonium citrate-citric acid, and water-dioxane systems. The unusual adsorption behavior or uranium has been utilized for its quantitative separation from several metal ions.

  16. Collisionally assisted, highly selective laser isotope separation of carbon-13

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Polianski; O. V. Boyarkin; T. R. Rizzo

    2004-01-01

    We have further developed our recently reported two-laser technique for highly selective molecular isotope separation of carbon-13 [Boyarkin, Kowalczyk, and Rizzo, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 93 (2003)] with the objective of increasing the yield. An essential feature of this approach in its original conception is the significant increase of isotopic selectivity that occurs through collisions during the time between the

  17. Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Patton; E. J. Hanrahan; C. E. Bradley

    1995-01-01

    A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe

  18. Separation of Uranium from Nitric and Hydrochloric-Acid Solutions with Extractant-Coated Magnetic Microparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. KAMINSKI; L. NUEZ

    2000-01-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process utilizes selective magnetic microparticle composites to separate dissolved metals from solution. In this study, MACS particles were coated with neutral and acidic organophosphorus extractants,octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO), tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA or HDEHP) and were evaluated for the separation of uranyl ions from nitric- and hydrochloric-acid solutions.

  19. Determination of uranium and thorium in complex samples using chromatographic separation, ICP-MS and spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Rozmari?, Martina; Ivsi?, Astrid Gojmerac; Grahek, Zeljko

    2009-11-15

    The paper describes a research of possible application of UTEVA and TRU resins and anion exchanger AMBERLITE CG-400 in nitrate form for the isolation of uranium and thorium from natural samples. The results of determination of distribution coefficient have shown that uranium and thorium bind on TRU and UTEVA resins from the solutions of nitric and hydrochloric acids, and binding strength increases proportionally to increase the concentration of acids. Uranium and thorium bind rather strongly to TRU resin from the nitric acid in concentration ranging from 0.5 to 5 mol L(-1), while large quantities of other ions present in the sample do not influence on the binding strength. Due to the difference in binding strength in HCl and HNO(3) respectively, uranium and thorium can be easily separated from each other on the columns filled with TRU resin. Furthermore, thorium binds to anion exchanger in nitrate form from alcohol solutions of nitric acid very strongly, while uranium does not, so they can be easily separated. Based on these results, we have created the procedures of preconcentration and separation of uranium and thorium from the soil, drinking water and seawater samples by using TRU and UTEVA resins and strong base anion exchangers in nitrate form. In one of the procedures, uranium and thorium bind directly from the samples of drinking water and seawater on the column filled with TRU resin from 0.5 mol L(-1) HNO(3) in a water sample. After binding, thorium is separated from uranium with 0.5 mol L(-1) HCl, and uranium is eluted with deionised water. By applying the described procedure, it is possible to achieve the concentration factor of over 1000 for the column filled with 1g of resin and splashed with 2L of the sample. Spectrophotometric determination with Arsenazo III, with this concentration factor results in detection limits below 1 microg L(-1) for uranium and thorium. In the second procedure, uranium and thorium are isolated from the soil samples with TRU resin, while they are separated from each other on the column filled with anion exchanger in alcohol solutions. Anion exchanger combined with alcohol solutions enables isolation of thorium from soil samples and its separation from a wide range of elements, as well as spectrophotometric determination, ICP-MS determination, and other determination techniques. PMID:19782236

  20. The selective use of thorium and heterogeneity in uranium-efficient pressurized water reactors

    E-print Network

    Kamal, Altamash

    1982-01-01

    Systematic procedures have been developed and applied to assess the uranium utilization potential of a broad range of options involving the selective use of thorium in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) operating on the ...

  1. Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Horton; Hayden Jr. Howard W

    1995-01-01

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine

  2. Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

  3. Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

    1995-05-30

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

  4. Sequential separation of lanthanides, thorium and uranium using novel solid phase extraction method from high acidic nuclear wastes.

    PubMed

    Kesava Raju, Ch Siva; Subramanian, M S

    2007-06-25

    A novel grafted polymer for selective extraction and sequential separation of lanthanides, thorium and uranium from high acidic wastes has been developed by grafting Merrifield chloromethylated (MCM) resin with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO) (MCM-CMPO). The grafting process is well characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy, (31)P and (13)C CPMAS (cross-polarized magic angle spin) NMR spectroscopy and CHNPS elemental analysis. The influence of various physico-chemical parameters during metal ion extraction by the resin phase are studied and optimized by both static and dynamic methods. The resin shows very high sorption capacity values of 0.960mmolg(-1) for U(VI), 0.984mmolg(-1) for Th(IV), 0.488mmolg(-1) for La(III) and 0.502mmolg(-1) for Nd(III) under optimum HNO(3) medium, respectively. The grafted polymer shows faster rate exchange kinetics (<5min is sufficient for 50% extraction) and greater preconcentration ability, with reusability exceeding 20 cycles. During desorption process, sequential separation of the analytes is possible with varying eluting agents. The developed grafted resin has been successfully applied in extracting Th(IV) from high matrix monazite sand, U(VI) and Th(IV) from simulated nuclear spent fuel mixtures. All the analytical data is based on triplicate analysis and measurements are within 3.5% rsd reflecting the reproducibility and reliability of the developed method. PMID:17178189

  5. Site evaluations for the uranium-atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS) production plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wolsko, T.; Absil, M.; Cirillo, R.; Folga, S.; Gillette, J.; Habegger, L.; Whitfield, R.

    1991-07-01

    This report describes a uranium-atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS) production plant siting study conducted during 1990 to identify alternative plant sites for examination in later environmental impact studies. A siting study methodology was developed in early 1990 and was implemented between June and December. This methodology had two parts. The first part -- a series of screening analyses that included exclusionary and other criteria -- was conducted to identify a reasonable number of candidates sites. This slate of candidate sites was then subjected to more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. To fully appreciate the siting study methodology, it is important to understand the U-AVLIS program and site requirements. 16 refs., 29 figs., 54 tabs.

  6. Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

    2014-03-11

    This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring of clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.

  7. Determination of uranium and rare-earth metals separation coefficients in LiCl KCl melt by electrochemical transient techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Hayashi, H.; Minato, K.; Gaune-Escard, M.

    2005-09-01

    The main step in the pyrometallurgical process of spent nuclear fuel recycling is a molten salt electrorefining. The knowledge of separation coefficients of actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) and rare-earth metals (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) is very important for this step. Usually the separation coefficients are evaluated from the formal standard potentials of metals in melts containing their own ions, values obtained by potentiometric method. Electrochemical experiments were carried out at 723-823 K in order to estimate separation coefficients in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing uranium and lanthanum trichlorides. It was shown that for the calculation of uranium and lanthanum separation coefficients it is necessary to determine the voltammetric peak potentials of U(III) and La(III), their concentration in the melt and the kinetic parameters relating to U(III) discharge such as transfer and diffusion coefficients, and standard rate constants of charge transfer.

  8. Collisionally assisted, highly selective laser isotope separation of carbon-13.

    PubMed

    Polianski, M; Boyarkin, O V; Rizzo, T R

    2004-12-15

    We have further developed our recently reported two-laser technique for highly selective molecular isotope separation of carbon-13 [Boyarkin, Kowalczyk, and Rizzo, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 93 (2003)] with the objective of increasing the yield. An essential feature of this approach in its original conception is the significant increase of isotopic selectivity that occurs through collisions during the time between the overtone preexcitation laser pulse and the multiphoton dissociation pulse. We demonstrate here that under certain conditions, this collisional enhancement of the selectivity works equally well when the two pulses are overlapped in time, allowing the overall isotopic selectivity of the process to remain high while achieving a significant increase in the absolute dissociation yield. We also find that proper shaping of the CO2 laser dissociation pulse makes the fluence required for dissociation sufficiently low to allow irradiation of a large reaction volume by unfocused laser beams. Together, these factors may make this laser isotope separation scheme competitive with existing separation methods. PMID:15634141

  9. New data on separation and position angle of selected binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Rafael J.; Lopez, Andy J.; Torres, Brian S.; Mendoza, Lizyan; Vergara, Nelson; Cersosimo, Juan; Martinez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report on a sample of the data aquired on may 2012 at the 31 inch NURO telescope at Anderson Mesa near Flagstaff, Arizona pertaining the separation and position angle of selected binary stars. A CCD camera coupled to the NURO telescope allows for a simple and straightforward procedure for obtaining the images of the binaries. Analysis of the images is straigthforward and both direct and software methodology yield the separation and position angle of the binary stars. The data obtained is suitable for insertion in the Washington Double Star Catalog of the US Naval Observatory.

  10. Separation of simple sugars by selectivity inverted parametric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, P.; Costa, C.A.V. [Univ. of Porto (Portugal). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Porto (Portugal). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-12-01

    An alternative process to separate the isomeric mixture of fructose and glucose is presented. A laboratory study of a two-column, selectivity inverted, direct-mode parametric pump is reported. An anionic resin in carbonate form and a cationic resin in calcium form are used as adsorbents for the columns. The experimental results show that it is possible to simultaneously obtain separation and concentration with this system. A kinetic model assuming linear equilibrium, intraparticle pore diffusion, and axial dispersion is proposed and solved. The model solutions are compared with experimental results, and the comparisons indicate good prediction capabilities.

  11. Efficient, highly selective laser isotope separation of carbon-13

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. Polianski; T. R. Rizzo; O. V. Boyarkin

    2006-01-01

    We recently demonstrated an original approach to highly selective laser isotope separation of carbon-13 that employs vibrational overtone pre-excitation of CF3H together with infrared multiphoton dissociation [O.V. Boyarkin, M. Kowalczyk, T.R. Rizzo, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 93 (2003)]. The practical implementation of this approach was complicated by the long absorption path length needed for the overtone excitation laser beam. In

  12. (1) Selective separation and solidification of radioactive nuclides by zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Hitoshi; Sato, Nobuaki; Kirishima, Akira

    Massive tsunami generated by the Great East Japan Earthquake attacked the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused the nuclear accident of level 7 to overturn the safety myth of the nuclear power generation. The domestic worst accident does not yet reach the convergence, and many inhabitants around the power plant are forced to double pains of earthquake disaster and nuclear accident. Large amounts of high-activity-level water over 200,000 tons are accumulated on the basement floor of each turbine building, which is a serious obstacle to take measures for the nuclear accident. For the decontamination of high-activity-level water containing seawater, the inorganic ion-exchangers having high selectivity are effective especially for the selective removal of radioactive Cs. On the other hand, radioactive Cs and I released into the atmosphere from the power plant spread widely around Fukushima prefecture, and the decontamination of rainwater and soil become the urgent problem. At present, passing about four months after nuclear accident, the radioactive nuclides of 137Cs and 134Cs are mainly contained in the high-activity-level water and the selective adsorbents for radioactive Cs play an important part in the decontamination. Since the construction of original decontamination system is an urgent necessity, selective separation methods using inorganic ion-exchangers are greatly expected. From the viewpoint of cost efficiency and high Cs-selectivity, natural zeolites are effective for the decontamination of radioactive Cs. This special issue deals with the selective separation and solidification of radioactive Cs and Sr using zeolites.

  13. Process for producing enriched uranium having a ²³⁵U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Horton; H. W. Jr. Hayden

    1995-01-01

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a ²³⁵U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower ²³⁵U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The

  14. The synthesis, characterization and application of iron oxide nanocrystals in magnetic separations for arsenic and uranium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, John Thomas

    Arsenic and uranium in the environment are hazardous to human health and require better methods for detection and remediation. Nanocrystalline iron oxides offer a number of advantages as sorbents for water purification and environmental remediation. First, highly uniform and crystalline iron oxide nanocrystals (nMAG) were prepared using thermal decomposition of iron salts in organic solutions; for the applications of interest in this thesis, a central challenge was the adaptation of these conventional synthetic methods to the needs of low infrastructure and economically disadvantaged settings. We show here that it is possible to form highly uniform and magnetically responsive nanomaterials using starting reagents and equipment that are readily available and economical. The products of this approach, termed the 'Kitchen Synthesis', are of comparable quality and effectiveness to laboratory materials. The narrow size distributions of the iron oxides produced in the laboratory synthesis made it possible to study the size-dependence of the magnetic separation efficiency of nanocrystals; generally as the diameter of particles increased they could be removed under lower applied magnetic fields. In this work we take advantage of this size-dependence to use magnetic separation as a tool to separate broadly distributed populations of magnetic materials. Such work makes it possible to use these materials in multiplexed separation and sensing schemes. With the synthesis and magnetic separation studies of these materials completed, it was possible to optimize their applications in water purification and environmental remediation. These materials removed both uranium and arsenic from contaminated samples, and had remarkably high sorption capacities --- up to 12 wt% for arsenic and 30 wt% for uranium. The contaminated nMAG is removed from the drinking water by either retention in a sand column, filter, or by magnetic separation. The uranium adsorption process was also utilized for the enhanced detection of uranium in environmental matrices. By relying on alpha-particle detection in well-formed and dense nMAG films, it was possible to improve soil detection of uranium by more than ten-thousand-fold. Central for this work was a detailed understanding of the chemistry at the iron oxide interface, and the role of the organic coatings in mediating the sorption process.

  15. How Many Separable Sources? Model Selection In Independent Components Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Roger P.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Strother, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mixtures consisting solely of non-Gaussian sources, mixtures including two or more Gaussian components cannot be separated using standard independent components analysis methods that are based on higher order statistics and independent observations. The mixed Independent Components Analysis/Principal Components Analysis (mixed ICA/PCA) model described here accommodates one or more Gaussian components in the independent components analysis model and uses principal components analysis to characterize contributions from this inseparable Gaussian subspace. Information theory can then be used to select from among potential model categories with differing numbers of Gaussian components. Based on simulation studies, the assumptions and approximations underlying the Akaike Information Criterion do not hold in this setting, even with a very large number of observations. Cross-validation is a suitable, though computationally intensive alternative for model selection. Application of the algorithm is illustrated using Fisher's iris data set and Howells' craniometric data set. Mixed ICA/PCA is of potential interest in any field of scientific investigation where the authenticity of blindly separated non-Gaussian sources might otherwise be questionable. Failure of the Akaike Information Criterion in model selection also has relevance in traditional independent components analysis where all sources are assumed non-Gaussian. PMID:25811988

  16. Feature Subset Selection, Class Separability, and Genetic Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2004-01-21

    The performance of classification algorithms in machine learning is affected by the features used to describe the labeled examples presented to the inducers. Therefore, the problem of feature subset selection has received considerable attention. Genetic approaches to this problem usually follow the wrapper approach: treat the inducer as a black box that is used to evaluate candidate feature subsets. The evaluations might take a considerable time and the traditional approach might be unpractical for large data sets. This paper describes a hybrid of a simple genetic algorithm and a method based on class separability applied to the selection of feature subsets for classification problems. The proposed hybrid was compared against each of its components and two other feature selection wrappers that are used widely. The objective of this paper is to determine if the proposed hybrid presents advantages over the other methods in terms of accuracy or speed in this problem. The experiments used a Naive Bayes classifier and public-domain and artificial data sets. The experiments suggest that the hybrid usually finds compact feature subsets that give the most accurate results, while beating the execution time of the other wrappers.

  17. Use of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate columns for cation exchange separation of metal ions interfering in the spectrophotometric determination of uranium with sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Agrawal, S.; Anwar, S.; Varshney, K.

    1985-01-01

    A simple cation exchange method has been developed for the quantitative separation of uranium from some metal ions which generally interfere in its spectrophotometric determination using sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate as a reagent. The method requires only a single bed operation and enables a satisfactory (Error + or - separation of uranium (UO/sub 2/ (II)) up to 1080 ..mu..g from ten metal ions on a 2 g column of zirconium (IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger in H(I) form.

  18. Method for producing a selectively permeable separation module

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-03-14

    A method and apparatus is provided for casting a polymeric membrane on the inside surface of porous tubes to provide a permeate filter system capable of withstanding hostile operating conditions and having excellent selectivity capabilities. Any polymer in solution, by either solvent means or melt processing means, is capable of being used in the present invention to form a thin polymer membrane having uniform thickness on the inside surface of a porous tube. Multiple tubes configured as a tubular module can also be coated with the polymer solution. By positioning the longitudinal axis of the tubes in a substantially horizontal position and rotating the tube about the longitudinal axis, the polymer solution coats the inside surface of the porous tubes without substantially infiltrating the pores of the porous tubes, thereby providing a permeate filter system having enhanced separation capabilities.

  19. Phosphonated cross-linked polyethylenimine for selective removal of uranium ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Saad, Dalia M G; Cukrowska, Ewa M; Tutu, Hlanganani

    2012-01-01

    Among many remediation techniques for metal ion removal, polymeric adsorbents are efficient and widely applied. This has made them comparable with other remediation techniques in terms of technical and economic efficiency, feasibility as well as green technology. This study was dedicated to the development of an insoluble modified chelating polymer for use as an adsorbent for abstraction of uranium from wastewaters. Cross-linked polyethylenimine (CPEI) was phosphonated by phosphorous acid for selective removal of uranium ions. The binding affinity of the phosphonated cross-linked polyethylenimine (PCPEI) to uranium ions was assessed as well as its ability to be regenerated for reuse. It exhibited high removal percentage for uranium ions up to 99% with high selectivity even in the presence of competing ions (Mn, Ni, As). The Freundlich isotherm was found to be the best fit describing the adsorption process of uranyl ions onto the PCPEI. The pseudo-second-order equation was found to better explain the adsorption kinetics, implying chemisorption. The thermodynamic study of the adsorption revealed high activation energies which confirmed the chemisorption as the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:22678208

  20. Wire anode for isotope separation apparatus. [laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Janes; J. P. Dotson

    1976-01-01

    In uranium enrichment, an electrode structure of thin, tensioned, parallel wires is claimed for use in applying an electric field to a region of a flowing uranium plasma including selectively ionized particles in order to accelerate the ionized particles for separate collection without interfering with the motion of neutral particles. 24 claims, 3 drawing figures.

  1. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from semiconductor wastewater.

    PubMed

    Warmadewanthi, B; Liu, J C

    2009-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) and phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) are widely used in semiconductor industry for etching and rinsing purposes. Consequently, significant amount of wastewater containing phosphate and fluoride is generated. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from the semiconductor wastewater, containing 936 mg/L of fluoride, 118 mg/L of phosphate, 640 mg/L of sulfate, and 26.7 mg/L of ammonia, was studied. Chemical precipitation and flotation reactions were utilized in the two-stage treatment processes. The first-stage reaction involved the addition of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2)) to induce selective precipitation of magnesium phosphate. The optimal condition was pH 10 and molar ratio, [Mg(2 + )]/[(PO(4) (3-))], of 3:1, and 66.2% of phosphate was removed and recovered as bobierrite (Mg(3)(PO(4))(2).8H(2)O). No reaction was found between MgCl(2) and fluoride. Calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) was used in the second-stage reaction to induce precipitation of calcium fluoride and calcium phosphate. The optimum molar ratio, [Ca(2 + )]/[F(-)], was 0.7 at pH 10, and residual fluoride concentration of 10.7 mg/L and phosphate concentration of lower than 0.5 mg/L was obtained. Thermodynamic equilibrium was modeled with PHREEQC and compared with experimental results. Sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) was an effective collector for subsequent solid-liquid removal via dispersed air flotation (DiAF). The study demonstrated that phosphate can be selectively recovered from the wastewater. Potential benefits include recovery of phosphate for reuse, lower required dosage of calcium for fluoride removal, and less amount of CaF(2) sludge. PMID:19474500

  2. Enriched Uranium

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wikipedia

    This Wikipedia website provides information about the various concentrations of uranium used for different applications. Topics include a brief description of the grades of uranium and methods of isotope separation. There are also links to other aspects of uranium enrichment and related information. This information lays the foundation for informed discussion about the potential of nuclear energy and the risks of nuclear proliferation.

  3. Determination of hexavalent and tetravalent uranium in phosphate ores through hydrochloric acid selective leaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hisham K. Fouad

    2010-01-01

    The tetravalent and hexavalent uranium content of three Egyptian phosphate type ore samples namely; Sebayia, Abu Tartur and\\u000a Qatrani have been studied through selective leaching by hydrochloric acid at normal, oxidized and reduced conditions at an\\u000a amount of hydrochloric acid less than the stoichiometric value i.e. before phosphoric acid production. Oxidizing condition\\u000a is attained by incorporating 2% of manganese dioxide

  4. Removal of toxic substances by a selective membrane plasma separator.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Hajime; Hattori, Tomoko; Igarashi, Toshiko; Okuyama, Manabu; Tajimi, Kimitaka

    2014-06-01

    We devised a method of plasma exchange with dialysis (PED), in which selective plasma exchange (sPE) is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator (EC-2A) with an albumin-sieving coefficient of 0.3 while the dialysate flows outside the hollow fibers, and reported the usefulness of the system for treating acute liver failure. Thereafter, EC-4A with an albumin-sieving coefficient of 0.6 was developed, which was expected to be even more effective for removing protein-bound substances. In order to examine whether or not EC-4A might be applicable to blood purification therapy against drug poisoning, we compared the efficacies of sPE, PED, and direct hemoperfusion (DHP) using an activated carbon column for the removal of phenobarbital and lithium. Subjects undergoing the extracorporeal circulation study were assigned to the sPE group, PED group, or DHP group, and the changes in the blood concentrations of phenobarbital and lithium were measured over 180?min. A significant decrease of the phenobarbital concentration over time was seen in the PED group, as compared to that in the sPE group (P?

  5. Laser isotope separation: Non-uranium applications. (Latest citations from the SPIN (Searchable Physics Information Notices) database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of laser isotope separation technology. Applications for boron, hydrogen, nitrogen, potassium, and sulfur are examined. Thermal effects generated by the laser on the separation process, selectivity of dissociation, efficiency evaluations of the separation process, and theoretical investigations into the process are also included. (Contains a minimum of 181 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Laser isotope separation: Non-uranium applications. (Latest citations from the Searchable Physics Information Notices database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of laser isotope separation technology. Applications for boron, hydrogen, nitrogen, potassium, and sulfur are examined. Thermal effects generated by the laser on the separation process, selectivity of dissociation, efficiency evaluations of the separation process, and theoretical investigations into the process are also included. (Contains a minimum of 183 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Laser isotope separation: Non-uranium applications. (Latest citations from the Searchable Physics Information Notices database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of laser isotope separation technology. Applications for boron, hydrogen, nitrogen, potassium, and sulfur are examined. Thermal effects generated by the laser on the separation process, selectivity of dissociation, efficiency evaluations of the separation process, and theoretical investigations into the process are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. Evaluation of uranium transitions for isotopically-selective laser induced fluorescence with diode lasers (Technical Report for ST064)

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, B.D.

    1993-10-01

    Isotopically-selective excitation of uranium atoms by diode lasers can be the basis for a portable instrument to perform uranium isotopic assays in the field. Such an instrument would improve the ability of on-site inspections to detect and deter nuclear proliferation. Published and unpublished spectroscopic data on atomic uranium were examined to identify candidate transitions for isotopically-selective laser excitation with diode lasers. Eleven candidate transitions were identified and evaluated for their potential usefulness for a portable uranium assay instrument. Eight of these transitions are suitable for laser induced fluorescence using different excitation and detection wavelengths, which will improve sensitivity and elemental selectivity. Data sheets on the 25 uranium transitions in the wavelength range 629 nm to 1,000 nm that originate in the ground or first excited states of neutral atomic uranium are included. Each data sheet provides the wavelength, upper and lower energy levels, angular momentum quantum numbers, {sup 235}U isotope shift (relative to {sup 238}U), and high-resolution spectra of weapons-grade uranium (93% {sup 235}U and 7% {sup 238}U).

  9. Exceptional Selectivity of Agilent ZORBAX Eclipse Plus Phenyl-Hexyl Columns to Separate Estrogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. Henderson Jr; William J. Long

    A new ZORBAX stationary phase, Agilent ZORBAX Eclipse Plus Phenyl-Hexyl, separated five estrogen type steroids better than a C18 and better than three other phenyl columns under identical conditions, due to its unique selectivity for analytes containing phenyl groups. The comparisons support selectivity as the most important factor to optimize resolution, to separate peaks com- pletely. Selectivity can be quickly

  10. Application of ion-exchange separations to determination of trace elements in natural waters-IX: simultaneous isolation and determination of uranium and thorium.

    PubMed

    Korkisch, J; Krivanec, H

    1976-04-01

    A method is described for the determination of uranium and thorium in samples of natural waters. After acidification with citric acid the water sample is filtered and sodium citrate and ascorbic acid are added. The resulting solution of pH 3 is passed through a 4-g column of Dowex 1 x 8 (citrate form) on which both uranium and thorium are adsorbed as anionic citrate complexes. Thorium is eluted with 8M hydrochloric acid and separated from co-eluted substances by anion-exchange in 8M nitric acid medium on a separate 2-g column of the same resin in the nitrate form. After complete removal of iron by washing with a mixture consisting of IBMK, acetone and 1M hydrochloric acid (1:8:1 v v ) and treatment of the resin with 6M hydrochloric acid, the uranium is eluted from the 4-g column with 1M hydrochloric acid. In the eluate thorium is determined spectrophotometrically (arsenazo III method) while fluorimetry is employed for the assay of uranium. The procedure was used for the determination of uranium and thorium in numerous water samples collected in Austria, including samples of mineral-waters. The results indicate that a simple relationship exists between the uranium and thorium contents of waters which makes it possible to calculate the approximate thorium content of a sample on the basis of its uranium concentration and vice versa. PMID:18961858

  11. An improved radiochemical separation of uranium and thorium in environmental samples involving peroxide fusion.

    PubMed

    Galindo, C; Mougin, L; Nourreddine, A

    2007-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the accurate determination of uranium and thorium using peroxide fusion followed by ion exchange and extraction chromatography is described. The method of extraction of the element from solid samples is the most important factor in the investigation. It is demonstrated, by measuring a number of reference materials, that fusion with Na(2)O(2) ensures a complete destruction of the mineral lattice and greatly improves the determination of the true activity of actinides. PMID:16831555

  12. Optimal cluster selection based on Fisher class separability measure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xudong Wang; Vassilis L. Syrmos

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hierarchical clustering algorithm is proposed, where the number of clusters is optimally determined according to the Fisher class separability measure. The clustering algorithm consists of two phases: (1) Generation of sub-clusters based on the similarity metric; (2) Merging of sub-clusters based on the Fisher class separability measure. The proximity matrices are constructed. Each subcluster comprises

  13. Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

    2012-08-22

    This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

  14. Selected Hanford reactor and separations operating data for 1960--1964

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this letter report is to reconstruct from available information that data which can be used to develop daily reactor operating history for 1960--1964. The information needed for source team calculations (as determined by the Source Terms Task Leader) were extracted and included in this report. The data on the amount of uranium dissolved by the separations plants (expressed both as tons and as MW) is also included in this compilation.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanoporous graphene for selective gas separation

    E-print Network

    Au, Harold (Harold S.)

    2012-01-01

    Graphene with sub-nanometer sized pores has the potential to act as a filter for gas separation with considerable efficiency gains compared to traditional technologies. Nanoporous graphene membranes are expected to yield ...

  16. The use of Zeeman effect for increasing the selectivity of laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachev, Aleksei N; Yakovlenko, Sergei I [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-31

    It is proposed to use the Zeeman effect for increasing the selectivity of laser isotope separation. It is shown on the basis of the available spectroscopic data that the selectivity of laser separation of the palladium isotope {sup 102}Pd can be increased significantly by using the Zeeman effect. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  17. The use of Zeeman effect for increasing the selectivity of laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aleksei N Tkachev; Sergei I Yakovlenko

    2002-01-01

    It is proposed to use the Zeeman effect for increasing the selectivity of laser isotope separation. It is shown on the basis of the available spectroscopic data that the selectivity of laser separation of the palladium isotope Pd can be increased significantly by using the Zeeman effect. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  18. Prospects for principles of size and shape selective separations using zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Mohanty; A. V McCormick

    1999-01-01

    Despite extensive investigation of zeolites beds and membranes, many aspects of separation using zeolites are not yet well understood. There is a pressing need to state general principles of size and shape selective separations. This work collates important experimental, theoretical and simulation contributions to size and shape selectivity. We review aspects that are well understood, highlight conflicting ideas that have

  19. Helicity Selective Separation of Zeolite-supported Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized from

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Helicity Selective Separation of Zeolite-supported Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized on metal supported Zeolite.10,11 Purification and helicity selective separation of SWNTs is still an important challenge. Two methods for purification, removal of metal catalysts and Zeolite, of SWNTs produced

  20. Method of separating isotopes from a gas mixture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Chatelet; M. Clerc; A. Coste; P. Rigny

    1983-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of separating isotopes from a gas mixture, of once ionized uranium the isotopes being separated by the combined effect of photon irradiation by laser light followed by penning ionization of ions selectively excited by the laser light. According to the invention a gas of once ionized uranium isotopes is irradiated with laser light made

  1. Treatability studies for uranium and plutonium contaminated soils using physical separation methods. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1992-07-01

    The Nevada Field Office of the Department of Energy (DOE/NV) has stated in the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) Site Specific Plan for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that DOE/NV is committed to achieving compliance with all applicable environmental laws, regulations, guidelines, and agreements covering operations at the NTS. The primary DOE/NV objective identified by the Site-Specific Plan is to comply with all laws and regulations aimed at protecting human health and the environment. These include Nevada statutes and regulations which may be applicable, including federally delegated authorities. This environmental assessment discusses limited bench-scale soil treatability testing of physical processes for decontamination of plutonium- and uranium-contaminated soil. The proposed location of these studies would be the Treatability Testing Facility (TTF), Building 3124 at Test Cell ``All in Area 25 of the NTS.

  2. Laser isotope separation: the plutonium connection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Palmer; D. I. Bolef

    1984-01-01

    A new process that promises to enrich uranium more cheaply and easily than either of the technologies currently used is described. The new process, called laser isotope separation (LIS), uses lasers to selectively excite and ionize uranium-235 and then accumulates that isotope on collectors. The advantages of the LIS process are discussed. It is concluded that the government's growing support

  3. Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits. A selected, annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, P.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Daniel, E.W. (comps.)

    1980-06-01

    A bibliography of 479 references encompassing the fields of uranium and thorium geochemistry and mineralogy, geology of uranium deposits, uranium mining, and uranium exploration techniques has been compiled by the Ecological Sciences Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The bibliography was produced for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, which is funded by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. The references contained in the bibliography have been divided into the following eight subject categories: (1) geology of deposits, (2) geochemistry, (3) genesis O deposits, (4) exploration, (5) mineralogy, (6) uranium industry, (7) reserves and resources, and (8) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas. All categories specifically refer to uranium and thorium; the last category contains basic geologic information concerning areas which the Grand Junction Office feels are particularly favorable for uranium deposition. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

  4. Fast-steering mirror systems for the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Watson; Kenneth Avicola; Anthony Page; Roger L. Peterson; Richard L. Ward

    1995-01-01

    We have successfully deployed several fast steering mirror systems in the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These systems employ 25 mm to 150 mm optics and piezoelectric actuators to achieve microradian pointing accuracy with disturbance rejection bandwidths to a few hundred hertz.

  5. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S; Chong, Samantha Y; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M; Thallapally, Praveen K; Cooper, Andrew I

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation. PMID:25038731

  6. Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Zewu [XOS; Wei, Fuzhong [XOS

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

  7. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Highly Selective Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2009-09-28

    This grant was focused on the study of metal-organic frameworks with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the use of MOFs with well-defined open metal sites for binding of gases and small organics. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs that combine large pore size with high surface area for their use in gas adsorption and separation of polycyclic organic compounds. (3) To functionalize MOFs for the storage of inert gases such as methane. A brief outline of our progress towards these objectives is presented here as it forms part of the basis for the ideas to be developed under the present proposal.

  8. Natural Gamma Emitters after a Selective Chemical Separation of a TENORM residue: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Antonio Alves; dos Santos, Adir Janete Godoy; Pecequilo, Brigitte Roxana Soreanu; Abro, Alcdio

    2008-08-01

    An analytical procedure was established in order to obtain selective fractions containing radium isotopes (228Ra), thorium (232Th), and rare earths from RETOTER (REsduo de Trio e TErras Raras), a solid residue rich in rare earth elements, thorium isotopes and small amount of natural uranium generated from the operation of a thorium pilot plant for purification and production of pure thorium nitrate at IPEN -CNEN/SP. The paper presents preliminary results of 228Ra, 226Ra, 238U, 210Pb, and 40K concentrations in the selective fractions and total residue determined by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, considering radioactive equilibrium of the samples.

  9. Natural Gamma Emitters after a Selective Chemical Separation of a TENORM residue: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alves de Freitas, Antonio; Abrao, Alcidio [Centro de Quimica e do Meio Ambiente (Brazil); Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete; Pecequilo, Brigitte Roxana Soreanu [Centro de Metrologia das Radiacoes Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria-Zip Code 05508-000 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-07

    An analytical procedure was established in order to obtain selective fractions containing radium isotopes ({sup 228}Ra), thorium ({sup 232}Th), and rare earths from RETOTER (REsiduo de TOrio e TErras Raras), a solid residue rich in rare earth elements, thorium isotopes and small amount of natural uranium generated from the operation of a thorium pilot plant for purification and production of pure thorium nitrate at IPEN -CNEN/SP. The paper presents preliminary results of {sup 228}Ra, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 238}U, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 40}K concentrations in the selective fractions and total residue determined by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, considering radioactive equilibrium of the samples.

  10. Separation of thorium and uranium from silicate rock samples using two commercial extraction chromatographic resins.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, T; Makishima, A; Nakamura, E

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical separation technique to isolate Th and U from silicate rocks was established by using two kinds of commercial extraction chromatographic resins. In the first column procedure, with U/TEVAspec resin, almost all elements except Th and U were eluted by 4 M HNO(3). Th was then separated by using 5 M HCl, and U was finally isolated by successive addition of 0.1 M HNO(3). A significant amount of Zr still remained in the Th fraction, which was then further purified in the second column stage using TEVAspec resin. In the second procedure, Zr was eluted first by using 2 M HNO(3), and then Th was collected by 0.1 M HNO(3). Both the Th and U fractions obtained by these procedures were sufficiently pure for thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis. Recovery yields of Th and U exceeded 90%, and total blanks were <19 pg for Th and <10 pg for U. Our method has advantages over previous methods in terms of matrix effects, tailing problems, and degree of isolation. Since Th and U are effectively separated without suffering any matrix interference from coexisting cations and anions, this technique can be used not only for the analysis of igneous rock samples but also for the analysis of soils, marine sediments, carbonates, phosphates and seawater, groundwater, and surface water. PMID:21662935

  11. Biomonitoring of environmental pollution by thorium and uranium in selected regions of the Republic of Kazakhstan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Zoriy; P. Ostapczuk; H. Dederichs; J. Hbig; R. Lennartz; M. Zoriy

    2010-01-01

    Two former uranium mines and a uranium reprocessing factory in the city of Aktau, Kazakhstan, may represent a risk of contaminating the surrounding areas by uranium and its daughter elements. One of the possible fingerprinting tools for studying the environmental contamination is using plant samples, collected in the surroundings of this city in 2007 and 2008. The distribution pattern of

  12. Loading Capacities for Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium in High Caustic Nuclear Waste Storage Tanks Containing Selected Sorbents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2004-01-01

    In this study the loading capacities of selected actinides onto some of the most common sorbent materials which are present in caustic nuclear waste storage tanks have been determined. Some of these transition metal oxides and activated carbons easily absorb or precipitate plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, which if care is not taken may lead to unwanted accumulation of some

  13. Oil/Water separation with selective superantiwetting/superwetting surface materials.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zonglin; Feng, Yujun; Seeger, Stefan

    2015-02-16

    The separation of oil from oily water is an important pursuit because of increasing worldwide oil pollution. Separation by the use of materials with selective oil/water absorption is a relatively recent area of development, yet highly promising. Owing to their selective superantiwetting/superwetting properties towards water and oil, superhydrophobic/superoleophilic surfaces and underwater superoleophobic surfaces have been developed for the separation of oil/water-free mixtures and emulsions. In this Review, after a short introduction to oil/water separation, we describe the principles of materials with selective oil/water absorption and outline recent advances in oil/water separation with superwetting/superantiwetting materials, including their design, their fabrication, and models of experimental setups. Finally, we discuss the current state of this new field and point out the remaining problems and future challenges. PMID:25425089

  14. Costs of antibiotic resistance separating trait effects and selective effects

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alex R; Angst, Daniel C; Schiessl, Konstanze T; Ackermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can impair bacterial growth or competitive ability in the absence of antibiotics, frequently referred to as a cost of resistance. Theory and experiments emphasize the importance of such effects for the distribution of resistance in pathogenic populations. However, recent work shows that costs of resistance are highly variable depending on environmental factors such as nutrient supply and population structure, as well as genetic factors including the mechanism of resistance and genetic background. Here, we suggest that such variation can be better understood by distinguishing between the effects of resistance mechanisms on individual traits such as growth rate or yield (trait effects) and effects on genotype frequencies over time (selective effects). We first give a brief overview of the biological basis of costs of resistance and how trait effects may translate to selective effects in different environmental conditions. We then review empirical evidence of genetic and environmental variation of both types of effects and how such variation may be understood by combining molecular microbiological information with concepts from evolution and ecology. Ultimately, disentangling different types of costs may permit the identification of interventions that maximize the cost of resistance and therefore accelerate its decline.

  15. Molecularly imprinted polymers for RGD selective recognition and separation.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Emmanuel; Koutsas, Christos; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria

    2009-03-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers that could recognize the tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp have been produced with the use of two functional monomers and three different cross-linkers, respectively. Methacrylic acid and acrylamide were used as functional monomers and the role of the ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, trimethylpropane trimethacrylate and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide as crosslinking monomers, was investigated on their recognition capability. The % net rebinding and the imprinting factor values were obtained, giving for the methacrylic acid-trimethylpropane trimethacrylate polymer the highest values 12.3% and 2.44, respectively. In addition, this polymer presented lower dissociation constant (K(D)) value and the higher B (max)% of theoretical total binding sites than all the other polymers. Rebinding experiments with Lys-Gly-Asp, an analogue of Arg-Gly-Asp, and other different peptides, such as cholecystokinin C-terminal tri- and pentapeptide and gramicidin, further indicated the selectivity of methacrylic acid-trimethylpropane trimethacrylate copolymer for Arg-Gly-Asp giving specific selectivity factor values 1.27, 1.98, 1.31 and 1.67, respectively. PMID:18592344

  16. Selective aqueous extraction of organics coupled with trapping by membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    van Eikeren, Paul (Bend, OR); Brose, Daniel J. (Bend, OR); Ray, Roderick J. (Bend, OR)

    1991-01-01

    An improvement to processes for the selective extractation of organic solutes from organic solvents by water-based extractants is disclosed, the improvement comprising coupling various membrane separation processes with the organic extraction process, the membrane separation process being utilized to continuously recycle the water-based extractant and at the same time selectively remove or concentrate organic solute from the water-based extractant.

  17. Novel Synergistic Agent for Selective Separation of Yttrium from Other Rare Earth Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terufumi Miyata; Masahiro Goto; Fumiyuki Nakashio

    1995-01-01

    An oil-soluble synergistic agent has been developed for the selective separation of yttrium (Y) from the other rare earth metals. The synergistic agent is a polyaminocarboxylic acid alkylderivative and has interfacial activity like that of surfactants. Separation of yttrium from heavy rare earth metals [erbium (Er) and holmium (Ho)] in the presence of the synergistic agent was carried out with

  18. Recovery of uranium(VI) from acidic wastes using tri- n-octylphosphine oxide and sodium carbonate based liquid membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S Kulkarni

    2003-01-01

    Acidic wastes containing low concentrations of uranium are generated during uranium purification and processing. This study has been initiated to develop a suitable emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) technique for selective separation and recovery of uranium from such wastes using tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in paraffin as a carrier and sodium carbonate as a stripping agent. The waste, having a composition of

  19. Biomonitoring of environmental pollution by thorium and uranium in selected regions of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Zoriy, P; Ostapczuk, P; Dederichs, H; Hbig, J; Lennartz, R; Zoriy, M

    2010-05-01

    Two former uranium mines and a uranium reprocessing factory in the city of Aktau, Kazakhstan, may represent a risk of contaminating the surrounding areas by uranium and its daughter elements. One of the possible fingerprinting tools for studying the environmental contamination is using plant samples, collected in the surroundings of this city in 2007 and 2008. The distribution pattern of environmental pollution by uranium and thorium was evaluated by determining the thorium and uranium concentrations in plant samples (Artemisia austriaca) from the city of Aktau and comparing these results with those obtained for the same species of plants from an unpolluted area (town of Kurchatov). The determination of the uranium and thorium concentrations in different parts of A. austriaca plants collected from the analyzed areas demonstrated that the main contamination of the flora in areas surrounding the city of Aktau was due to dust transported by the wind from the uranium mines. The results obtained demonstrate that all the areas surrounding Aktau have a higher pollution level due to thorium and uranium than the control area (Kurchatov). A few "hot points" with high concentrations of uranium and thorium were found near the uranium reprocessing factory and the uranium mines. PMID:20346550

  20. Ultrafiltration of uranyl peroxide nanoclusters for the separation of uranium from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Ernest M; Peruski, Kathryn M; Weidman, Jacob L; Phillip, William A; Burns, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Uranyl peroxide cluster species were produced in aqueous solution by the treatment of uranyl nitrate with hydrogen peroxide, lithium hydroxide, and potassium chloride. Ultrafiltration of these cluster species using commercial sheet membranes with molecular mass cutoffs of 3, 8, and 20 kDa (based on polyethylene glycol) resulted in U rejection values of 95, 85, and 67% by mass, respectively. Ultrafiltration of untreated uranyl nitrate solutions using these membranes resulted in virtually no rejection of U. These results demonstrate the ability to use the filtration of cluster species as a means for separating U from solutions on the basis of size. Small-angle X-ray scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of uranyl peroxide cluster species in solution and were used to characterize their size, shape, and dispersity. PMID:24313601

  1. A simple-rapid method to separate uranium, thorium, and protactinium for U-series age-dating of materials.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew W; Eitrheim, Eric S; Nelson, Andrew W; Nelson, Steven; Schultz, Michael K

    2014-08-01

    Uranium-series dating techniques require the isolation of radionuclides in high yields and in fractions free of impurities. Within this context, we describe a novel-rapid method for the separation and purification of U, Th, and Pa. The method takes advantage of differences in the chemistry of U, Th, and Pa, utilizing a commercially-available extraction chromatographic resin (TEVA) and standard reagents. The elution behavior of U, Th, and Pa were optimized using liquid scintillation counting techniques and fractional purity was evaluated by alpha-spectrometry. The overall method was further assessed by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry for the preliminary age determination of an ancient carbonate sample obtained from the Lake Bonneville site in western Utah (United States). Preliminary evaluations of the method produced elemental purity of greater than 99.99% and radiochemical recoveries exceeding 90% for U and Th and 85% for Pa. Excellent purity and yields (76% for U, 96% for Th and 55% for Pa) were also obtained for the analysis of the carbonate samples and the preliminary Pa and Th ages of about 39,000 years before present are consistent with (14)C-derived age of the material. PMID:24681438

  2. Magnetic field effect on laser isotope separation of gadolinium based on polarization selection rules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Tokita; Y. Izawa; H. Niki

    2003-01-01

    In the laser isotope separation based on the polarization selection rules, the dependence of magnetic field strength on the isotopic selectivity was experimentally measured by using atomic Gd vapor. The Lande factor for the high-lying exited level was newly determined.

  3. Selective fluorescence derivatization and capillary electrophoretic separation of amidated amino acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lei Feng; Mitchell E Johnson

    1999-01-01

    Selectively derivatized amide-terminated amino acids were separated by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). The amides were selectively derivatized by deactivating all primary amines in the sample mixture by acetylation, converting the amides to primary amines by Hofmann rearrangement, and tagging the resultant amines with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The fluorescent amide derivatives were detected by confocal laser-induced fluorescence. The use of

  4. Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard W. Baker; Ingo Pinnau; Zhenjie He; Andre R. Da Costa; Ramin Daniels; Karl D. Amo; Johannes G. Wijmans

    2003-01-01

    A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The

  5. A selective electromembrane extraction of uranium (VI) prior to its fluorometric determination in water.

    PubMed

    Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Moazami, Hamid Reza; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Banitaba, Mohammad Hossein; Nojavan, Saeed

    2013-06-14

    A novel method for the selective electromembrane extraction (EME) of U(6+) prior to fluorometric determination has been proposed. The effect of extraction conditions including supported liquid membrane (SLM) composition, extraction time and extraction voltage were investigated. An SLM composition of 1% di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid in nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE) showed good selectivity, recovery and enrichment factor. The best performance was achieved at an extraction potential of 80 volts and an extraction time of 14 minutes Under the optimized conditions, a linear range from 1 to 1000 ng mL(-1) and LOD of 0.1 ng mL(-1) were obtained for the determination of U(6+). The EME method showed good performance in sample cleanup and the reduction of the interfering effects of Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Cl(-) and PO4(3-) ions during fluorometric determination of uranium in real water samples. The recoveries above 54% and enrichment factors above 64.7 were obtained by the proposed method for real sample analysis. PMID:23726102

  6. Determination of Uranium Metal Concentration in Irradiated Fuel Storage Basin Sludge Using Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Welsh, Terri L.; Pool, Karl N.

    2014-03-01

    Uranium metal corroding in water-saturated sludges now held in the US Department of Energy Hanford Site K West irradiated fuel storage basin can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage. Knowledge of uranium metal concentration in sludge thus is essential to safe sludge management and process design, requiring an expeditious routine analytical method to detect uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of 30 wt% or higher total uranium concentrations.

  7. Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. [474 references

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.M.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W.

    1980-09-01

    This bibliography, a compilation of 474 references, is the fourth in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base was created for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Project by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The references in the bibliography are arranged by subject category: (1) geochemistry, (2) exploration, (3) mineralogy, (4) genesis of deposits, (5) geology of deposits, (6) uranium industry, (7) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas, and (8) reserves and resources. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, and keyword.

  8. Sequential separation of light rare-earth elements, thorium and uranium by miniaturized extraction chromatography: Application to isotopic analyses of silicate rocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Pin; JosFrancisco Santos Zalduegui

    1997-01-01

    A new method for the concomitant separation of the light rare-earth elements (LREEs), thorium and uranium is described, and applied to the determination of 143Nd144Nd ratios, and concentrations of Sm, Nd, Th and U in silicate rocks, using isotope dilution and thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The proposed scheme is based on two recently introduced extraction chromatographic materials, referred to as

  9. Improvement of multi jet low pressure impactor for high collection efficiency of UF5 in the molecular laser isotope separation of uranium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshikazu Kuga; Benjamin Jurcik; Sakae Satooka; Kazuo Takeuchi

    1995-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study for the collection of photo-produced UF5 particles was performed for the low pressure impactors which have different design factors at typical flow conditions (upstream pressure of the impactor = 1015 Torr, pressure ratio of downstream to upstream of the impactor, PdownPup = 0.20.5) in the molecular laser isotope separation of uranium at RIKEN (RIMLIS). Smaller

  10. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Duerksen, Walter K. (Norris, TN)

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  11. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  12. In-line and selective phase separation of medium-chain carboxylic acids using membrane electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiajie; Guzman, Juan J L; Andersen, Stephen J; Rabaey, Korneel; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-04-01

    We had extracted n-caproate from bioreactor broth. Here, we introduced in-line membrane electrolysis that utilized a pH gradient between two chambers to transfer the product into undissociated n-caproic acid without chemical addition. Due to the low maximum solubility of this acid, selective phase separation occurred, allowing simple product separation into an oily liquid containing ?90% n-caproic and n-caprylic acid. PMID:25792085

  13. Highly Selective Membranes For The Separation Of Organic Vapors Using Super-Glassy Polymers

    DOEpatents

    Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid (Menlo Park, CA); Nguyen, Phuong (Fremont, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-11-18

    A process for separating hydrocarbon gases of low boiling point, particularly methane, ethane and ethylene, from nitrogen. The process is performed using a membrane made from a super-glassy material. The gases to be separated are mixed with a condensable gas, such as a C.sub.3+ hydrocarbon. In the presence of the condensable gas, improved selectivity for the low-boiling-point hydrocarbon gas over nitrogen is achieved.

  14. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Functional Sorbents for Selective Capture of Plutonium, Americium, Uranium, and Thorium in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Creim, Jeffery A; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Wiacek, Robert J; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, R Shane; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) are hybrid materials created from attachment of organic moieties onto very high surface area mesoporous silica. SAMMS with surface chemistries including three isomers of hydroxypyridinone, diphosphonic acid, acetamide phosphonic acid, glycinyl urea, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) analog were evaluated for chelation of actinides (239Pu, 241Am, uranium, thorium) from blood. Direct blood decorporation using sorbents does not have toxicity or renal challenges associated with traditional chelation therapy and may have potential applications for critical exposure cases, reduction of nonspecific dose during actinide radiotherapy, and for sorbent hemoperfusion in renal insufficient patients, whose kidney clear radionuclides at very slow rate. Sorption affinity (Kd), sorption rate, selectivity, and stability of SAMMS were measured in batch contact experiments. An isomer of hydroxypyridinone (3,4-HOPO) on SAMMS demonstrated the highest affinity for all four actinides from blood and plasma and greatly outperformed the DTPA analog on SAMMS and commercial resins. In batch contact, a fifty percent reduction of actinides in blood was achieved within minutes, and there was no evidence of protein fouling or material leaching in blood after 24 hr. The engineered form of SAMMS (bead format) was further evaluated in a 100-fold scaled-down hemoperfusion device and showed no blood clotting after 2 hr. A 0.2 g quantity of SAMMS could reduce 50 wt.% of 100 ppb uranium in 50 mL of plasma in 18 min and that of 500 dpm mL?1 in 24 min. 3,4-HOPO-SAMMS has a long shelf-life in air and at room temperature for at least 8 years, indicating its feasibility for stockpiling in preparedness for an emergency. The excellent efficacy and stability of SAMMS materials in complex biological matrices suggest that SAMMS can also be used as orally administered drugs and for wound decontamination. By changing the organic groups of SAMMS, they can be used not only for actinides but also for other radionuclides. By using the mixture of these SAMMS materials, broad spectrum decorporation of radionuclides is very feasible. PMID:20699706

  16. Highly selective biomechanical separation of cancer cells from leukocytes using microfluidic ratchets and hydrodynamic concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bill K.; McFaul, Sarah M.; Jin, Chao; Black, Peter C.; Ma, Hongshen

    2013-01-01

    The separation of cells based on their biomechanical properties, such as size and deformability, is important in applications such as the identification of circulating tumor cells, where morphological differences can be used to distinguish target cancer cells from contaminant leukocytes. Existing filtration-based separation processes are limited in their selectivity and their ability to extract the separated cells because of clogging in the filter microstructures. We present a cell separation device consisting of a hydrodynamic concentrator and a microfluidic ratchet mechanism operating in tandem. The hydrodynamic concentrator removes the majority of the fluid and a fraction of leukocytes based on size, while the microfluidic ratchet mechanism separates cancer cells from leukocytes based on a combination of size and deformability. The irreversible ratcheting process enables highly selective separation and robust extraction of separated cells. Using cancer cells spiked into leukocyte suspensions, the complete system demonstrated a yield of 97%, while enriching the concentration of target cancer cells 3000 fold relative to the concentration of leukocytes. PMID:24404034

  17. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Comaskey; J. Crane; G. Erbert; C. Haynam; M. Johnson; J. Morris; J. Paisner; R. Solarz; E. Worden

    1986-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is

  18. Molecularly imprinted adsorbents for selective separation and/or concentration of environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takuya; Hosoya, Ken; Otsuka, Koji

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the development of molecularly imprinted materials for selective separation and/or concentration of environmental pollutants, the quantitative concentration of which is usually difficult to determine because of their low level of concentration and existence of a large number of contaminants in environmental water. The fragment imprinting technique allowed for the selective separation of endocrine disrupters and halogenated aromatic compounds, including bisphenol A, and chlorinated/brominated aromatic compounds by the specific structural recognition based on the breeds, position, and number of the substituents. Also, the interval immobilization technique provided the specific materials enabling selective concentration based on the interval recognition of ionic functional groups in the targeting compounds, so that the effective determinations were achieved for natural toxins and pharmaceuticals in environmental water. Additionally, a selective photodegradation of toxins and a stimulus responsible hydrogel by the similar molecular recognition ability were successfully carried out. We have summarized these techniques including our recent studies. PMID:24420250

  19. EFFECT OF SULFOBUTYL ETHER BETA-CYCLODEXTRIN MODIFIER ON SELECTIVITY OF REVERSED PHASE HPLC SEPARATIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenley K. Ngim; Qiqing Zhong; Kavita Mistry; Nik Chetwyn

    2012-01-01

    Selectivity changes imparted by sulfobutyl ether beta-cyclodextrin (SBECD) modifier were evaluated in reversed phase HPLC separations. The mixed mode capabilities of SBECD, including cation exchange and an orthogonal hydrophobic interaction (i.e., via inclusion complex), altered the typical retention properties of a C18 column. This enabled several racemates (fenoterol, idazoxan hydrolyzate, orciprenaline, terbutaline, tranylcypromine, imazalil) to be resolved. The selectivity of

  20. Separation of phenoxy acid herbicides and their enantiomers in the presence of selectively methylated cyclodextrin derivatives by capillary zone electrophoresis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaru Miura; Yuichi Terashita; Koichi Funazo; Minoru Tanaka

    1999-01-01

    The chiral and mutual separation of nine phenoxy acid herbicides including seven pairs of phenoxy acid enantiomers was examined by capillary zone electrophoresis using unmodified and selectively methylated ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD), ?-CD and ?-CD derivatives as separation additives. The selective methylation of the secondary hydroxyl groups on the rim of the CD cavities produced remarkable selectivity changes for the phenoxy acid

  1. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Paisner

    1988-01-01

    Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique applicable to many elements. A major present application to the enrichement of uranium for lightwater power reactor fuel has been under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1973. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet future

  2. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

  3. Modifying microphase separation of PVA based membranes for improving proton\\/methanol selectivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chia-Chin Shen; Jorphin Joseph; Yun-Chih Lin; Sheng-Horng Lin; Chi-Wen Lin; Bing Joe Hwang

    2008-01-01

    The microstructural changes associated with the lowering of hydrophilic\\/hydrophobic phase separation in the ionomer can reduce the molecular permeation without compensating the ionic conductivity significantly. Motivated by this idea, a hydrophilic polymer, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was selected as the polymer matrix of the proton exchange membranes and the protogenic sulfonic acid groups were introduced by chlorosulfonic acid through a condensation

  4. Modeling the selectivity of activated carbons for efficient separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jianzhong

    the separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide via adsorption in activated carbons. In the simulations, both hydrogen and carbon dioxide molecules are modeled as Lennard-Jones spheres, and the activated carbons essentially no preference over the two gases and the selectivity of carbon dioxide relative to hydrogen falls

  5. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  6. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard D. Noble; John L. Falconer

    2006-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H{sub 2} separation from other light gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO). However, zeolite membranes have not been successful for H{sub 2} separation from light gases because the zeolite pores are either too big or the membranes have a large number of defects. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H{sub 2} separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H{sub 2} selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO{sub 2}CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} were separated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one BZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO{sub 2} separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated B-ZSM-5 membrane was activated, but the CO{sub 2} and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H{sub 2} permeance and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sup 2} /CH{sub 4} separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 molxm-2xs-1xPa-1, and the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation selectivity was 47. Above 673 K, the silylated membrane catalyzed reverse water gas shift reaction and still separated H{sub 2} with high selectivity; and it was thermally stable. However, silylation decreased H{sub 2} permeance more than one order of magnitude. The H{sub 2} separation performance of the silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes depended on the initial membrane quality and acidity, as well as the silane precursors. Increasing the membrane feed pressure also increased the H{sub 2} flux and the H{sub 2} mole fraction in the permeate stream for both mixtures. Another approach used in this study is optimizing the synthesis of small-pore SAPO-34 (CHA) membranes and/or modifying SAPO-34 membranes by silylation or ion exchange. For SAPO-34 membranes, strong CO{sub 2} adsorption inhibited H{sub 2} adsorption and decreased H2 permeances, especially at low temperatures. At 253 K, CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} separation selectivities of a SAPO-34 membrane were greater than 100 with CO{sub 2} permeances of about 3 x 10-8 mol m-2 s-1 Pa-1. The high reverse-selectivity of the SAPO-34 membranes can minimize H{sub 2} recompression because H{sub 2} remained in the retentate stream at a higher pressure. The CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} separation selectivity exhibited a maximum with CO{sub 2} feed concentration possibly caused by a maximum in the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} sorption selectivity with increased CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The SAPO-34 membrane separated H{sub 2} from CH{sub 4} because CH{sub 4} is close to the SAPO-34 pore size so its diffusivity is much lower than the H{sup 2} diffusivity. The H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation selectivity was almost independent of temperature, pressure, and feed composition. Silylation on SAPO-34 membranes increased H{sup 2}/CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivities but did not increase H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities because silylation only blocked defects in SAPO-34 membranes. Hydr

  7. Selective Separation of Rare Earth Metals by Solvent Extraction in the Presence of New Hydrophilic Chelating Polymers Functionalized with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid. II. Separation Properties by Solvent Extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HIDETO MATSUYAMA; YOSHIKAZU MIYAMOTO; MASAAKI TERAMOTO; MASAHIRO GOTO; FUMIYUKI NAKASHIO

    1996-01-01

    The selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction including chelating polymers in the aqueous phase was investigated. The chelating polymers were synthesized in this laboratory by introducing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) onto water-soluble polyallylamine. The highest selectivity obtained for the Y\\/Er separation system was 14.7, which was much higher than that in conventional solvent extraction (about 1.4) and also

  8. Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2003-06-03

    A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

  9. Isotopic composition and origin of uranium and plutonium in selected soil samples collected in Kosovo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Danesi; A. Bleise; W. Burkart; T. Cabianca; M. J. Campbell; M. Makarewicz; J. Moreno; C. Tuniz; M. Hotchkis

    2003-01-01

    Soil samples collected from locations in Kosovo where depleted uranium (DU) ammunition was expended during the 1999 Balkan conflict were analysed for uranium and plutonium isotopes content (234U,235U,236U,238U,238Pu,239+240Pu). The analyses were conducted using gamma spectrometry (235U,238U), alpha spectrometry (238Pu,239+240Pu), inductively coupled plasmamass spectrometry (ICPMS) (234U,235U,236U,238U) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) (236U). The results indicated that whenever the U concentration exceeded

  10. Selective Separation and Determination of Heavy Metals (Cd, Pb, Cr) Speciation Forms from Hortic Antrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgariu, D.; Bulgariu, L.

    2009-04-01

    The speciation, inter-phases distribution and biodisponibility of heavy metals in soils represent one of main problem of environmental geochemistry and agro-chemistry. This problem is very important in case of hortic antrosols (soils from glasshouses) for the elimination of agricultural products (fruits, vegetables) contamination with heavy metals. In soils from glass houses, the speciation and inter-phases distribution processes of heavy metals have a particular dynamic, different in comparison with those from non-protected soils. The predominant distribution forms of heavy metals in such soils types are: complexes with low mass organic molecules, organic-mineral complexes, complexes with inorganic ligands (hydroxide-complexes, carbonate-complexes, sulphate-complexes, etc.) and basic salts. All of these have high stabilities in conditions of soils from glass houses, and in consequence, the separation and determination of speciation forms (which is directly connected with biodisponibility of heavy metals) by usual methods id very difficult and has a high uncertain degree. In this study is presented an original method for the selective separation and differentiation of speciation forms of heavy metals from glass houses soils, which is based by the combination of solid-liquid sequential extraction (SPE) with the extraction in aqueous polymer-inorganic salt two-phase systems (ABS). The soil samples used for this study have been sampled from three different locations (glass houses from Iasi, Barlad and Bacau - Romania) where the vegetables cultivation have bee performed by three different technologies. In this way was estimated the applicability and the analytical limits of method proposed by as, in function of the chemical-mineralogical and physical-chemical characteristics of soils. As heavy metals have been studied cadmium, lead and chromium, all being known for their high toxicity. The procedure used for the selective separation and differentiation of speciation forms of heavy metals from glass houses soils has two main steps: (i) non-destructive separation of chemical-mineralogical associations and aggregates from soils samples - for this the separation method with heavy liquids (bromophorme) and isodynamic magnetic method have been used; (ii) sequential extraction of heavy metals from soil fractions separated in the first step, by using combined SPE-ABS procedure. For the preparation of combined extraction systems was used polyethylene glycol (with different molecular mass: 2000, 4000 and 8000). As phase-forming inorganic salts and as selective extracting agents we have used different usual inorganic reagents. The type and concentration of phase-forming salts have been selected in function of, both nature of extracted heavy metals and chemical-mineralogical characteristics of soil samples. The experimental parameters investigated in this study are: molecular mass of polyethylene glycol and the concentration of polymeric solutions, nature and concentration of phase-forming salts, nature and concentration of extracting agents, pH in extraction system phase, type of extracted heavy metals, type of speciation forms of heavy metals and their concentrations. All these factors can influence significantly the efficiency and the selectivity of separation process. The experimental results have indicate that the combined SPE-ABS extraction systems have better separation efficiency, in comparison with traditional SPE systems and ca realized a accurate discrimination between speciation forms of heavy metals from soils. Under these conditions, the estimation of inter-phases distribution and biodisponibility of heavy metals has a high precision. On the other hand, when the combined SPE-ABS systems are used, the concomitant extraction of the elements from the same geochemical association with studied heavy metals (inevitable phenomena in case of separation by SPE procedures) is significant diminished. This increases the separation selectivity and facilitated the more accurate determination of speciation forms concentration. By adequat

  11. Selective comprehensive multidimensional separation for resolution enhancement in high performance liquid chromatography. Part II: applications.

    PubMed

    Groskreutz, Stephen R; Swenson, Michael M; Secor, Laura B; Stoll, Dwight R

    2012-03-01

    In this second paper of a two-part series, we demonstrate the utility of an approach to enhancing the resolution of select portions of conventional 1D-LC separations, which we refer to as selective comprehensive two-dimensional HPLC (sLC LC), in three quite different example applications. In the first paper of the series we described the principles of this approach, which breaks the long-standing link in online multi-dimensional chromatography between the timescales of sampling the first dimension (D) separation and the separation of fractions of D effluent in the second dimension. In the first example, the power of the sLC LC approach to significantly reduce the analysis time and method development effort is demonstrated by selectively enhancing the resolution of critical pairs of peaks that are unresolved by a one-dimensional separation (1D-LC) alone. Transfer and subsequent D separations of multiple fractions of a particular D peak produces a two-dimensional chromatogram that reveals the coordinates of the peaks in the 2D separation space. The added time dimension of sLC LC chromatograms also facilitates the application of sophisticated chemometric curve resolution algorithms to further resolve peaks that are otherwise chromatographically unresolved. This is demonstrated in this work by the targeted analysis of phenytoin in urban wastewater effluent using UV diode array detection. Quantitation by both standard addition and external calibration methods yielded results that were not statistically different from 2D-LC/MS/MS analysis of the same samples. Next, we demonstrate the utility of sLC LC for reducing ion suppression due to matrix effects in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry through the analysis of cocaine in urban wastewater effluent. Finally, we explore the flexibility of the approach in its application to two select regions of a single D separation of triclosan and cocaine. The diversity of these applications demonstrates the power and versatility of the sLC LC approach, which will benefit tremendously from further optimization and advances in valve technology that specifically address the needs of this new technique. PMID:21816400

  12. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  13. Loading Capacities for Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium in High Caustic Nuclear Waste Storage Tanks Containing Selected Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    OJI, LAWRENCE

    2004-11-16

    In this study the loading capacities of selected actinides onto some of the most common sorbent materials which are present in caustic nuclear waste storage tanks have been determined. Some of these transition metal oxides and activated carbons easily absorb or precipitate plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, which if care is not taken may lead to unwanted accumulation of some of these fissile materials in nuclear waste tanks during waste processing. Based on a caustic synthetic salt solution simulant bearing plutonium, uranium and neptunium and ''real'' nuclear waste supernate solution, the loading capacities of these actinides onto iron oxide (hematite), activated carbon and anhydrous sodium phosphate have been determined. The loading capacities for plutonium onto granular activated carbon and iron oxide (hematite) in a caustic synthetic salt solution were, respectively, 3.4 0.22 plus or minus and 5.5 plus or minus 0.38 microgram per gram of sorbent. The loading capacity for plutonium onto a typical nuclear waste storage tank sludge solids was 2.01 microgram per gram of sludge solids. The loading capacities for neptunium onto granular activated carbon and iron oxide (hematite) in a caustic synthetic salt solution were, respectively, 7.9 plus or minus 0.52 and greater than 10 microgram per gram of sorbent. The loading capacity for neptunium onto a typical nuclear waste storage tank sludge solids was 4.48 microgram per gram of sludge solids. A typical nuclear waste storage tank solid material did not show any significant affinity for uranium. Sodium phosphate showed significant affinity for both neptunium and uranium, with loading capacities of 6.8 and 184.6 plus or minus 18.5 microgram per gram of sorbent, respectively.

  14. Separation of Barium Isotopes by Selective Two-Step Photoionization Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimio YAMADA; Norihiko OZAKI; Manabu YAMAMOTO; Ki-ichi UEYANAGI

    1988-01-01

    Separation of barium isotopes with a selective two-step photoionization process was accomplished using a continuous wave dye laser and ultra-high pressure mercury lamp. Narrow line-width laser light was tuned to the 6s S0--6s6p P1 resonance line (553.6 nm), and only a single isotopic component in an atomic beam was excited through the isotope shift. The excited atoms were successively ionized

  15. The Application of Systems with Different Selectivity for the Separation and Isolation of some Furocoumarins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Wawrzynowicz; M. Waksmundzka-hajnos

    1990-01-01

    Using thin layer chromatography in flat chamber or liquid column chromatography on the micropreparative scale the separation and isolation of furocoumarins from Angelica Archangelica off.(L) and Pastinaca sativa (L) fruit extracts was carried out.The best results were obtained using chromatography and rechromatography in different systems (e.g., different selectivity of reversed and normal phase systems). Close analogy of polarity and molecular

  16. Selective separation of germanium(IV) by 2,3-dihydroxypropyl chitosan resin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshinari Inukai; Toyotaka Chinen; Toshio Matsuda; Yasuhiko Kaida; Seiji Yasuda

    1998-01-01

    2,3-Dihydroxypropyl chitosan resin, prepared from chitosan and a 1,2-diol, adsorbed only germanium(IV) from aqueous solutions containing semimetals over the range of acidic to weakly basic media. The adsorption capacities of the chitosan resin were up to about 1.4mmolg?1. The selective separation of germanium(IV) from tellurium(VI) and boron was achieved with a column method using the chitosan resin. The breakthrough points

  17. CO 2\\/C 2H 6 separation using solubility selective membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Kelman; Haiqing Lin; Edgar S. Sanders; Benny D. Freeman

    2007-01-01

    Ethane can be a major component of natural gas, and it forms a maximum pressure azeotrope with carbon dioxide, which can hinder carbon dioxide removal if distillation is used. This paper describes a solubility selective membrane material for this separation. A crosslinked poly(ethylene oxide) [PEO] material [XLPEO] was prepared from a prepolymer solution containing 71wt.% poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate

  18. In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, S.A.

    1980-03-21

    An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from uranium-235. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen.

  19. Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

    2007-09-24

    Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1, and the H2/CO2 separation selectivity was 47. Above 673 K, the silylated membrane catalyzed reverse water gas shift reaction and still separated H2 with high selectivity; and it was thermally stable. However, silylation decreased H2 permeance more than one order of magnitude. Increasing the membrane feed pressure increased the H2 flux and the H2 mole fraction in the permeate stream for both H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 mixtures. The H2 separation performance of the silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes depended on the initial membrane quality and acidity, as well as the silane precursors. Another approach used in this study is optimizing the synthesis of small-pore SAPO-34 (CHA) membranes and/or modifying SAPO-34 membranes by silylation or ion exchange. For SAPO-34 membranes, strong CO2 adsorption inhibited H2 adsorption and decreased H2 permeances, especially at low temperatures. At 253 K, CO2/H2 separation selectivities of a SAPO-34 membrane were greater than 100 with CO2 permeances of about 3 x 10-8 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1. The high reverse-selectivity of the SAPO-34 membranes can minimize H2 recompression because H2 remained in the retentate stream at a higher pressure. The CO2/H2 separation selectivity exhibited a maximum with CO2 feed concentration possibly caused by a maximum in the CO2/H2 sorption selectivity with increased CO2 partial pressure. The SAPO-34 membrane separated H2 from CH4 because CH4 is close to the SAPO-34 pore size so its diffusivity (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  20. New influence factor inducing difficulty in selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiu-shuai; Mao, Ying-bo; Wen, Shu-ming; Liu, Jian; Xian, Yong-jun; Feng, Qi-cheng

    2015-02-01

    Selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfides has been proven to be difficult. Thus far, researchers have found no satisfactory way to separate Cu-Zn mixed sulfides by selective flotation, mainly because of the complex surface and interface interaction mechanisms in the flotation solution. Undesired activation occurs between copper ions and the sphalerite surfaces. In addition to recycled water and mineral dissolution, ancient fluids in the minerals are observed to be a new source of metal ions. In this study, significant amounts of ancient fluids were found to exist in Cu-Zn sulfide and gangue minerals, mostly as gas-liquid fluid inclusions. The concentration of copper ions released from the ancient fluids reached 1.02 10-6 mol/L, whereas, in the cases of sphalerite and quartz, this concentration was 0.62 10-6 mol/L and 0.44 10-6 mol/L, respectively. As a result, the ancient fluid is a significant source of copper ions compared to mineral dissolution under the same experimental conditions, which promotes the unwanted activation of sphalerite. Therefore, the ancient fluid is considered to be a new factor that affects the selective flotation separation of Cu-Zn mixed sulfide ores.

  1. Flame treatment for the selective wetting and separation of PVC and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Pascoe, R.D.; O'Connell, B

    2003-07-01

    Flame treatment has been used for many years to modify the surface of plastics to allow coatings to be added. The effect of the treatment is to produce hydrophilic species on the surface of the plastic making it water-wettable. The production of hydrophilic plastic surfaces is also required in the selective separation of plastics by froth flotation. For the process to be selective one plastic must be rendered hydrophilic while another remains hydrophobic. In this study the potential for separation of PVC and PET has been investigated. Flame treatment was shown to be very effective in producing a hydrophilic surface on both plastics, although the process was not selective under the conditions investigated. Raising the temperature of the plastics above their softening point produced a hydrophobic recovery. As the softening point of PVC was significantly lower than for PET it was possible to produce a significant difference in hydrophobicity, as judged using contact angle measurement. When immersed in water the contact angle of the PVC was found to be strongly dependent on the pH. Good separation efficiency of the two plastics was achieved by froth flotation from pH 4 to 9. One particular advantage of the technique is that no chemical reagents may be required in the flotation stage. The practicalities of designing a flake treatment system however have to be addressed before considering it to be a viable industrial process.

  2. Novel syntergistic agent for selective separation of yttrium from other rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Terufumi; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    An oil-soluble synergistic agent has been developed for the selective separation of yttrium (Y) from the other rare earth metals. The synergistic agent is a polyaminocarboxylic acid alkylderivative and has interfacial activity like that of surfactants. Separation of yttrium from heavy rare earth metals (erbium (Er) and holmium (Ho)) in the presence of the synergistic agent was carried out with a 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester as a carrier using a hollow-fiber membrane extractor. The new agent shows a synergistic effect on the permeation rate of rare earth metals at the oil-water interface. By the addition of a small amount of the agent, the selectivity for yttrium from the two rare earth metals was enhanced remarkably, because of the permeation rate of Y was selectively decreased compared with those of Er and Ho. The synergistic effect is discussed from the viewpoint of the stability constant for rare earth metals and the interfacial activity of the synergistic agent. The difference in interaction between the synergistic agent and rare earth ions at the oil-water interface results in an increase in the separation efficiency.

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: The use of Zeeman effect for increasing the selectivity of laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aleksei N. Tkachev; Sergei I. Yakovlenko

    2002-01-01

    It is proposed to use the Zeeman effect for increasing the selectivity of laser isotope separation. It is shown on the basis of the available spectroscopic data that the selectivity of laser separation of the palladium isotope 102Pd can be increased significantly by using the Zeeman effect. Bibtex entry for this abstract Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences) Find

  4. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C. W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

  5. Appraisal of selected epidemiologic issues from studies of lung cancer among uranium and hard rock miners

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G R; Sever, L E

    1982-04-01

    An extensive body of published information about lung cancer among uranium miners was reviewed and diverse information, useful in identifying important issues but not in resolving them was found. Measuring exposure and response; thresholds of exposure; latency or the period from first mining experience to death; effort to predict excess risk of death, using a model; effects of smoking and radon daughter exposure on the histology of lung tumors; and the interplay of factors on the overall risk of death were all examined. The general concept of thresholds; that is, an exposure level below which risk does not increase was considered. The conclusion is that it should be possible to detect and estimate an epidemiologic threshold when the cohorts have been followed to the death of all members. Issues concerning latency in the studies of uranium miners published to date were examined. It is believed that the induction-latent period for lung cancer among uranium miners may be: as little as 10 to more than 40 years; dependent on age at which exposure begins; exposure rate; and ethnicity or smoking habits. Although suggested as factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been factual, their existence is uncertain. An effect due to the exposure rate may exist although it has not been confirmed. The median induction-latent period appears to be in excess of the 15 years frequently cited for US uranium miner. A distinct pattern of shorter induction-latent periods with increasing age at first mining exposure is reported. The evidence for and against an unusual histologic pattern of lung cancers among uranium miners was examined. The ratio of epidermoid to small cell types was close to 1:2; the ratio in the general population is nearer 2:1. The histologic pattern warrants closer attention of pathologists and epidemiologists. (ERB) (ERB)

  6. Selective separation of virgin and post-consumer polymers (PET and PVC) by flotation method

    SciTech Connect

    Burat, Firat; Gueney, Ali [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Mines, Mineral Processing Engineering Department, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Olgac Kangal, M. [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Mines, Mineral Processing Engineering Department, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: kangal@itu.edu.tr

    2009-06-15

    More and more polymer wastes are generated by industry and householders today. Recycling is an important process to reduce the amount of waste resulting from human activities. Currently, recycling technologies use relatively homogeneous polymers because hand-sorting waste is costly. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. At present, most waste polymers cause serious environmental problems. Burning polymers for recycling is not practiced since poisonous gases are released during the burning process. Particularly, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) materials among waste polymers generate hazardous HCl gas, dioxins containing Cl, etc., which lead to air pollution and shorten the life of the incinerator. In addition, they make other polymers difficult to recycle. Both polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and PVC have densities of 1.30-1.35 g/cm{sup 3} and cannot be separated using conventional gravity separation techniques. For this reason, polymer recycling needs new techniques. Among these techniques, froth flotation, which is also used in mineral processing, can be useful because of its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this research is to recycle PET and PVC selectively from post-consumer polymer wastes and virgin polymers by using froth flotation. According to the results, all PVC particles were floated with 98.8% efficiency in virgin polymer separation while PET particles were obtained with 99.7% purity and 57.0% efficiency in post-consumer polymer separation.

  7. Selective separation of virgin and post-consumer polymers (PET and PVC) by flotation method.

    PubMed

    Burat, Firat; Gney, Ali; Olga Kangal, M

    2009-06-01

    More and more polymer wastes are generated by industry and householders today. Recycling is an important process to reduce the amount of waste resulting from human activities. Currently, recycling technologies use relatively homogeneous polymers because hand-sorting waste is costly. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. At present, most waste polymers cause serious environmental problems. Burning polymers for recycling is not practiced since poisonous gases are released during the burning process. Particularly, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) materials among waste polymers generate hazardous HCl gas, dioxins containing Cl, etc., which lead to air pollution and shorten the life of the incinerator. In addition, they make other polymers difficult to recycle. Both polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and PVC have densities of 1.30-1.35g /cm(3) and cannot be separated using conventional gravity separation techniques. For this reason, polymer recycling needs new techniques. Among these techniques, froth flotation, which is also used in mineral processing, can be useful because of its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this research is to recycle PET and PVC selectively from post-consumer polymer wastes and virgin polymers by using froth flotation. According to the results, all PVC particles were floated with 98.8% efficiency in virgin polymer separation while PET particles were obtained with 99.7% purity and 57.0% efficiency in post-consumer polymer separation. PMID:19155169

  8. Successive LEM Separation of Copper and Uranium From Abu Zeneima Mineralized Dolostone Using LIX-973N and Aliquat-336

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maysa S. El-Sayed; Afaf Rezk

    2011-01-01

    We processed a technological sample of a mineralized dolostone rock facies of SW Sinai, assaying 5000ppm copper and 750ppm uranium for the purpose of recovering of its metal values. The prepared sulfuric acid leach liquor was successfully subjected to two successive emulsion liquid membrane procedures using LIX-973N encapsulating sulfuric acid followed by Aliquat-336 encapsulating sodium carbonate solution for copper and

  9. Hyperfine structure and isotope shift measurements on 235U and laser separation of uranium isotopes by two-step photoionization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H.-D. V. Bhm; W. Michaelis; C. Weitkamp

    1978-01-01

    Two-step photoionization of an atomic beam and quadrupole mass analysis have been used for the precise measurement of the isotope shift between uranium isotopes 235 and 238 and the hyperfine structure of 235U. For the 5915 ground-state transition 15 hfs components were found. The residual atomic beam was isotopically enriched by factors 2.5 and 10 for 235U and 238U,

  10. Layered double hydroxide functionalized textile for effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Ge, Lei; Li, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhong; Li, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The removal of oil and organic pollutants from water is highly desired due to frequent oil spill accidents, as well as the increase of industrial oily wastewater. Here, superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile has been successfully prepared for the application of effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption. This textile was fabricated by functionalizing the commercial textile with layered double hydroxide (LDH) microcrystals and low surface energy molecules. The LDH microcrystals were immobilized on the microfibers of the textile through an in situ growth method, and they formed a nestlike microstructure. The combination of the hierarchical structure and the low surface energy molecules made the textile superhydrophobic and superoleophilic. Further experiments demonstrated that the as-prepared textile not only can be applied as effective membrane materials for the separation of oil and water mixtures with high separation efficiency (>97%), but also can be used as a bag for the selective oil adsorption from water. Thus, such superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile is a very promising material for the application of oil spill cleanup and industrial oily wastewater treatment. PMID:25490110

  11. Investigation of thermal treatment on selective separation of post consumer plastics prior to froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Guney, Ali; Poyraz, M. Ibrahim; Kangal, Olgac, E-mail: kangal@itu.edu.tr; Burat, Firat

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: Both PET and PVC have nearly the same densities. The best pH value will be 4 for optimizing pH values. Malic acid gave the best results for selective separation of PET and PVC. - Abstract: Plastics have become the widely used materials because of their advantages, such as cheapness, endurance, lightness, and hygiene. However, they cause waste and soil pollution and they do not easily decompose. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. Depending on their surface characteristics, these plastics can be separated from each other by flotation method which is useful mineral processing technique with its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this study is to investigate the flotation characteristics of PET and PVC and determine the effect of plasticizer reagents on efficient plastic separation. For that purpose, various parameters such as pH, plasticizer concentration, plasticizer type, conditioning temperature and thermal conditioning were investigated. As a result, PET particles were floated with 95.1% purity and 65.3% efficiency while PVC particles were obtained with 98.1% purity and 65.3% efficiency.

  12. Highly selective separation of aminoglycoside antibiotics on a zwitterionic Click TE-Cys column.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Shen, Aijin; Wan, Huihui; Yan, Jingyu; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2014-07-01

    Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography has emerged as a valuable alternative approach to ion-pair chromatography for the separation of aminoglycoside antibiotics in recent years. However, the resolution of structurally related aminoglycosides is a great challenge owing to the limited selectivity. In this work, a cysteine-based zwitterionic stationary phase (named Click TE-Cys) was utilized and compared with five commonly used hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography columns. Click TE-Cys displayed much better selectivity for structurally similar aminoglycosides. The retention behaviors of aminoglycosides were investigated in detail, revealing that low pH (2.7 or 3.0) and high buffer concentration (?50 mM) were preferable for achieving good peak shape and selectivity. Effective resolution of ten aminoglycosides including spectinomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, streptomycin, gentamicin C1, gentamicin C2/C2a, gentamicin C1a, kanamycin, paromonycin, tobramycin, and neomycin was realized at optimized conditions. Additionally, spectinomycin and its related impurities were successfully resolved. The results indicated the great potential of the Click TE-Cys column in the separation of aminoglycoside mixtures and related impurities. PMID:24798626

  13. Imprint-coating synthesis of selective functionalized ordered mesoporous sorbents for separation and sensors

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Burleigh, Mark C. (Lenoir City, TN); Shin, Yongsoon (Richland, WA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to mesoporous sorbent materials having high capacity, high selectivity, fast kinetics, and molecular recognition capability. The invention also relates to a process for preparing these mesoporous substrates through molecular imprinting techniques which differ from convention techniques in that a template molecule is bound to one end of bifunctional ligands to form a complex prior to binding of the bifunctional ligands to the substrate. The present invention also relates to methods of using the mesoporous sorbent materials, for example, in the separation of toxic metals from process effluents, paints, and other samples; detection of target molecules, such as amino acids, drugs, herbicides, fertilizers, and TNT, in samples; separation and/or detection of substances using chromatography; imaging agents; sensors; coatings; and composites.

  14. Separation of plutonium(IV) from uranium(VI) using phosphonate-based task-specific ionic liquid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rout; K. A. Venkatesan; T. G. Srinivasan; P. R. Vasudeva Rao

    2012-01-01

    The extraction behavior of plutonium(IV) and uranium(VI) from nitric acid medium by a solution of diethyl-2-(3-methylimidazolium)ethylphosphonate bis(trifl uoromethanesulfonyl)imide (ImPNTf2) ionic liquid in the room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifl uoromethanesulfonyl)imide (alkyl = butyl, hexyl or octyl) was studied. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) in ImPNTf2\\/amimNTf2 increased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid reached a maximum at 0.5

  15. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  16. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  17. Membrane-based hybrid processes for high water recovery and selective inorganic pollutant separation.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, S M C; Bhattacharyya, D

    2002-05-01

    The removal of heavy metals (e.g. Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), etc.) and oxyanions (e.g. nitrate, As(III, V), Cr(VI), etc.) is of immense interest for treatment of groundwater and other dilute aqueous systems. However, the presence of non-toxic components, such as hardness (Ca, Mg) and sulfate, can interfere with the separation of toxic species. For example, pressure-driven membrane processes, such as reverse osmosis (RO), have been limited for water treatment due to problems that these extraneous components cause with water recovery and ionic strength (osmotic pressure) of the retentate. In addition, nitrate rejection by RO is considerably lower than NaCl rejection, resulting in permeate concentrations that may be too high for groundwater recharging. Other separation systems that rely solely on sorption of toxic species (e.g. ion exchange resins) may not have sufficient selectivity for efficient use in the presence of competing ions. Hence, implementation of pressure-driven membrane separations and high capacity sorbents in hybrid processes shows much promise for remedying these difficulties. For example, selective separation of nitrate may be achieved by combining nanofiltration (NF) for sulfate removal, followed by RO or ion exchange for nitrate removal (see example 1). When small concentrations of toxic metals are present, the large retentate volumes of RO processes may be reduced by selective removal of toxic species with a high capacity sorbent, thus permitting disposal of a lower volume, non-toxic stream (see example 2). The use of microfiltration membrane-based sorbents containing multiple polymeric functional groups is a novel technique to achieve high metal sorption capacity under convective flow conditions. These sorbents are formed by the attachment of various polyamino acids (MW: 2500-10,000), such as polyaspartic acid (cation sorption), polyarginine (oxyanion sorption), and polycysteine (chelation exchange), directly on the membrane pore surfaces. Since these sorbents have also been found to have high selectivity over non-toxic metals, such as calcium, they are ideal candidates for hybrid processing with RO/NF. PMID:11975996

  18. A simple and selective method for the separation of Cu radioisotopes from nickel.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xianfeng; Parker, David J; Smith, Mike D; Ingram, Andy; Yang, Zhufang; Seville, Jonathan P K

    2006-10-01

    Separation of copper radioisotopes from a nickel target is normally performed using solvent extraction or anion exchange rather than using cationic exchange. A commonly held opinion is that cationic exchangers have very similar thermodynamic complexation constants for metallic ions with identical charges, therefore making the separation very difficult or impossible. The results presented in this article indicate that the selectivity of Chelex-100 (a cationic ion exchanger) for Cu radioisotope and Ni ions not only depends on the thermodynamic complexation constant in the resin but also markedly varies with the concentration of mobile H+. In our developed method, separation of copper radioisotopes from a nickel target was fulfilled in a column filled with Chelex-100 via controlling the HNO3 concentration of the eluent, and the separation is much more effective, simple and economical in comparison with the common method of anion exchange. For an irradiated nickel target with 650 mg Ni, after separation, the loss of Cu radioisotopes in the nickel portion was reduced from 30% to 0.33% of the total initial radioactivity and the nickel mixed into the radioactive products was reduced from 9.5 to 0.5 mg. This significant improvement will make subsequent labeling much easier and reduce consumption of chelating agents and other chemicals during labeling. If the labeled agent is used in human medical applications, the developed method will significantly decrease the uptake of Ni and chelating agents by patients, therefore reducing both the stress on human body associated with clearing the chemicals from blood and tissue and the risk of various types of acute and chronic disorder due to exposure to Ni. PMID:17045175

  19. A recyclable supramolecular membrane for size-selective separation of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Elisha; Weissman, Haim; Shirman, Elijah; Shimoni, Eyal; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2011-03-01

    Most practical materials are held together by covalent bonds, which are irreversible. Materials based on noncovalent interactions can undergo reversible self-assembly, which offers advantages in terms of fabrication, processing and recyclability, but the majority of noncovalent systems are too fragile to be competitive with covalent materials for practical applications, despite significant attempts to develop robust noncovalent arrays. Here, we report nanostructured supramolecular membranes prepared from fibrous assemblies in water. The membranes are robust due to strong hydrophobic interactions, allowing their application in the size-selective separation of both metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. A thin (12 m) membrane is used for filtration (~5 nm cutoff), and a thicker (45 m) membrane allows for size-selective chromatography in the sub-5 nm domain. Unlike conventional membranes, our supramolecular membranes can be disassembled using organic solvent, cleaned, reassembled and reused multiple times.

  20. Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matthern, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

  1. Theoretical stability assessment of uranyl phosphates and apatites: selection of amendments for in situ remediation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Raicevic, S; Wright, J V; Veljkovic, V; Conca, J L

    2006-02-15

    Addition of an amendment or reagent to soil/sediment is a technique that can decrease mobility and reduce bioavailability of uranium (U) and other heavy metals in the contaminated site. According to data from literature and results obtained in field studies, the general mineral class of apatites was selected as a most promising amendment for in situ immobilization/remediation of U. In this work we presented theoretical assessment of stability of U(VI) in four apatite systems (hydroxyapatite (HAP), North Carolina Apatite (NCA), Lisina Apatite (LA), and Apatite II) in order to determine an optimal apatite soil amendment which could be used for in situ remediation of uranium. In this analysis we used a theoretical criterion which is based on calculation of the ion-ion interaction potential, representing the main term of the cohesive energy of the matrix/pollutant system. The presented results of this analysis indicate (i) that the mechanism of immobilization of U by natural apatites depends on their chemical composition and (ii) that all analyzed apatites represent, from the point of view of stability, promising materials which could be used in field remediation of U-contaminated sites. PMID:15885755

  2. Sorption profile and chromatographic separation of uranium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions onto date pits solid sorbent.

    PubMed

    Saad, E M; Mansour, R A; El-Asmy, A; El-Shahawi, M S

    2008-09-15

    The retention profile of uranium (VI) as uranyl ions (UO(2)(2+)) from the aqueous media onto the solid sorbent date pits has been investigated. The sorption of UO(2)(2+) ions onto the date pits was achieved quantitatively (98+/-3.4%, n=5) after 15 min of shaking at pH 6-7. The sorption of UO(2)(2+) onto the used sorbent was found fast, followed by a first order rate equation with an overall rate constant, k of 4.8+/-0.05 s(-1). The sorption data were explained in a manner consistent with a "solvent extraction" mechanism. The sorption data were also subjected to Freundlich isotherm model over a wide range of equilibrium concentration (1-20 microgmL(-1)) of UO(2)(2+). The results revealed that, a "dual-mode" of sorption mechanism involving absorption related to "solvent extraction" and an added component for "surface adsorption" is most likely operated simultaneously for uranyl ions uptaking the solid sorbent. The thermodynamic parameters (-DeltaH, DeltaS and DeltaG) of the uranyl ions uptake onto the date pits indicated that, the process is endothermic and proceeds spontaneously. The interference of some diverse ions on the sorption UO(2)(2+) from the aqueous media onto the date pits packed column was critically investigated and the data revealed quantitative collection of UO(2)(2+) at 5 mLmin(-1) flow rate. The retained UO(2)(2+) was recovered quantitatively with HCl (3.0 molL(-1)) from the column at 5 mLmin(-1) flow rate. The mode of binding of the date pits with UO(2)(2+) was determined from the IR spectral date bits before and after extraction of uranium (VI). The height equivalent (HETP) and the number (N) of theoretical plates of the date pits packed column were determined from the chromatograms. Complete retention and recovery of UO(2)(2+) spiked to wastewater samples by the date pits packed column was successfully achieved. The capacity of the used sorbent towards retention of uranium (VI) from aqueous solutions was much better than the most common sorbents. PMID:18761152

  3. Rationally tuned micropores within enantiopure metal-organic frameworks for highly selective separation of acetylene and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Sheng-Chang; Zhang, Zhangjing; Zhao, Cong-Gui; Hong, Kunlun; Zhao, Xuebo; Ding, De-Rong; Xie, Ming-Hua; Wu, Chuan-De; Das, Madhab C; Gill, Rachel; Thomas, K Mark; Chen, Banglin

    2011-01-01

    Separation of acetylene and ethylene is an important industrial process because both compounds are essential reagents for a range of chemical products and materials. Current separation approaches include the partial hydrogenation of acetylene into ethylene over a supported Pd catalyst, and the extraction of cracked olefins using an organic solvent; both routes are costly and energy consuming. Adsorption technologies may allow separation, but microporous materials exhibiting highly selective adsorption of C(2)H(2)/C(2)H(4) have not been realized to date. Here, we report the development of tunable microporous enantiopure mixed-metal-organic framework (M'MOF) materials for highly selective separation of C(2)H(2) and C(2)H(4). The high selectivities achieved suggest the potential application of microporous M'MOFs for practical adsorption-based separation of C(2)H(2)/C(2)H(4). PMID:21343922

  4. Calix[4]pyrroles: highly selective stationary phases for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Wang, Zhenzhong; Li, Qian; Qi, Meiling; Shao, Shijun; Fu, Ruonong

    2014-10-01

    Calix[4]pyrroles offer a great potential as stationary phases for gas chromatography (GC) due to their unique structures and physicochemical properties. Herein we present the first report of using two calix[4]pyrroles, namely meso-tetra-cyclohexylcalix[4]pyrrole (THCP) and meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (OMCP). These stationary phases were statically coated onto capillary columns and investigated in terms of column efficiency, polarity, separation performance, thermal stability and repeatability. The columns achieved column efficiencies of 2200-3000plates/m and exhibited nonpolar nature with an average polarity of 67 for THCP and 64 for OMCP, respectively. THCP stationary phase shows high selectivity for analytes of different polarity and exhibits nice peak shapes, especially for aldehydes, alcohols and anilines that are prone to severe peak tailing in GC analysis. Interestingly, THCP stationary phase possesses superior resolving ability for aniline and benzenediol positional isomers while OMCP shows preferential selectivity for nonpolar analytes such as hexane isomers. Moreover, calix[4]pyrrole columns also have good thermal stability up to 260C and repeatability with a relative standard deviation (RSD%) of less than 0.10% for run-to-run and less than 5.2% for column-to-column. This work demonstrates the unique separation performance of calix[4]pyrroles and their promising future as a new class of GC stationary phases. PMID:25173993

  5. Approach for selective separation of thiophenic and sulfidic sulfur compounds from petroleum by methylation/demethylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhao, Suoqi; Chung, Keng H; Xu, Chunming; Shi, Quan

    2015-01-20

    Detailed characterization of petroleum derived sulfur compounds has been challenging, due to the complex composition of the hydrocarbon matrix. A novel method was developed for selective separation of thiophenic and sulfidic compounds from petroleum. Sulfur compounds were methylated to sulfonium salts by AgBF4 and CH3I, then the polar salts were separated by precipitation from petroleum matrix. The thiophenic and sulfidic sulfonium salts were sequentially demethylated with 7-azaindole and 4-dimethylaminopyridine, obtaining original thiophenic and sulfidic compounds, respectively. The method was validated by model compounds, and applied to a diesel and a vacuum distillation petroleum fraction. Sulfur fractions were characterized by gas chromatography (GC) coupled with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) and quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS), and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). The technique was effective to selectively obtain high-purity thiophenic and sulfidic compounds and showed rare discrimination among sulfur compounds with ranging molecular weights and degrees of unsaturation. The method would facilitate multifaceted detailed characterization of sulfur compounds in an organic complex matrix. PMID:25519193

  6. Summary report on reprocessing evaluation of selected inactive uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assisting the Department of Energy in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program (UMTRAP) the purpose of which is to implement the provisions of Title I of Public Law 95-604, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.'' As part of this program, there was a need to evaluate the mineral concentration of the residual radioactive materials at some of the designated processing sites to determine whether mineral recovery would be practicable. Accordingly, Sandia contracted Mountain States Research and Development (MSRD), a division of Mountain States Mineral Enterprises, to drill, sample, and test tailings at 12 sites to evaluate the cost of and the revenue that could be derived from mineral recovery. UMTRAP related environmental and engineering sampling and support activities were performed in conjunction with the MSRD operations. This summary report presents a brief description of the various activities in the program and of the data and information obtained and summarizes the results. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  7. Selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction in the presence of new hyrophilic chelating polymers functionalized with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. II. Separation properties by solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Miyamoto, Yoshikazu; Teramoto, Masaaki [Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction including chelating polymers in the aqueous phase was investigated. The chelating polymers were synthesized in this laboratory by introducing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) onto water-soluble polyallylamine. The highest selectivity obtained for the Y/Er separation system was 14.7, which was much higher than that in extraction including EDTA (about 5.0). This means that the number of extraction stages required can be considerably reduced by the addition of chelating polymers. The effects of several experimental conditions such as pH, extractant concentrations, chelating polymer concentrations, and initial total rare earth metal concentrations, chelating polymer concentrations, and initial total rare earth metal concentrations on the separation factors and the distribution ratios for the Y/Er system were studied in detail. Furthermore, this extraction method was applied to other separation systems (Y/Dy, Y/Ho, Y/Tm). A remarkably high separation factor (12.6) was obtained for the Y/Tm system and the Y/Er system, although the separation factors were comparable to those in the presence of EDTA in the Y/Dy and Y/Ho systems.

  8. Control Structure Selection for Reactor, Separator, and Recycle T. Larsson, M. S. Govatsmark, S. Skogestad,* and C. C. Yu

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control Structure Selection for Reactor, Separator, and Recycle Processes T. Larsson, M. S to control", for a simple plant with a liquid-phase reactor, a distillation column, and recycle of unreacted processes is the presence of recycle. Variations of a plant with reaction, separation, and mass recycle (see

  9. Selective separation of lambdacyhalothrin by porous/magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hang, Hui; Li, Chunxiang; Pan, Jianming; Li, Linzi; Dai, Jiangdong; Dai, Xiaohui; Yu, Ping; Feng, Yonghai

    2013-10-01

    Porous/magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (PM-MIPs) were prepared by Pickering emulsion polymerization. The reaction was carried out in an oil/water emulsion using magnetic halloysite nanotubes as the stabilizer instead of a toxic surfactant. In the oil phase, the imprinting process was conducted by radical polymerization of functional and cross-linked monomers, and porogen chloroform generated steam under the high reaction temperature, which resulted in some pores decorated with easily accessible molecular binding sites within the as-made PM-MIPs. The characterization demonstrated that the PM-MIPs were porous and magnetic inorganic-polymer composite microparticles with magnetic sensitivity (M(s) = 0.7448 emu/g), thermal stability (below 473 K) and magnetic stability (over the pH range of 2.0-8.0). The PM-MIPs were used as a sorbent for the selective binding of lambdacyhalothrin (LC) and rapidly separated under an external magnetic field. The Freundlich isotherm model gave a good fit to the experimental data. The adsorption kinetics of the PM-MIPs was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics, indicating that the chemical process could be the rate-limiting step in the adsorption of LC. The selective recognition experiments exhibited the outstanding selective adsorption effect of the PM-MIPs for target LC. Moreover, the PM-MIPs regeneration without significant loss in adsorption capacity was demonstrated by at least four repeated cycles. PMID:23894024

  10. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Marmer; C. P. Dunn; T. H. Filley; K. L. Moeller; J. M. Pfingston; A. J. Policastro; J. H. Cleland

    1991-01-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope

  11. An evaluation of CO 2 and H 2 selective polymeric membranes for CO 2 separation in IGCC processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Franz; V. Scherer

    2010-01-01

    The potential of CO2 and H2 selective polymeric membranes to separate CO2 from integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants is examined. As a reference power plant a modified version of the Puertollano gasification plant has been defined. A detailed ASPEN model for the reference case has been developed. For the CO2 selective membranes single membrane module concepts as well

  12. A Facile Approach Towards Multicomponent Supramolecular Structures: Selective Self-Assembly via Charge Separation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yao-Rong; Zhao, Zhigang; Wang, Ming; Ghosh, Koushik; Pollock, J. Bryant; Cook, Timothy R.; Stang, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel approach towards the construction of multicomponent two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) metallosupramolecules is reported. Simply by mixing carboxylate and pyridyl ligands with cis-Pt(PEt3)2(OTf)2 in a proper ratio, coordination-driven self-assembly occurs, allowing for selective generation of discrete multicomponent structures via charge separation on the metal centers. Using this method, a variety of 2-D rectangles and 3-D prisms were prepared under mild conditions. Moreover, multicomponent self-assembly can also be achieved by supramolecule-to-supramolecule transformations. The products were characterized by 31P and 1H multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and pulsed-field-gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR techniques together with computational simulations. PMID:21053935

  13. Unique Toxicological Behavior from Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Separated via Selective Adsorption on Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Clar, Justin G; Gustitus, Sarah A; Youn, Sejin; Silvera Batista, Carlos A; Ziegler, Kirk J; Bonzongo, Jean Claude J

    2015-03-17

    Over the past decade, extensive research has been completed on the potential threats of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to living organisms upon release to aquatic systems. However, these studies have focused primarily on the link between adverse biological effects in exposed test organisms on the length, diameter, and metallic impurity content of SWCNTs. In contrast, few studies have focused on the bioeffects of the different SWCNTs in the as-produced mixture, which contain both metallic (m-SWCNT) and semiconducting (s-SWCNT) species. Using selective adsorption onto hydrogels, high purity m-SWCNT and s-SWCNT fractions were produced and their biological impacts determined in dose-response studies with Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as test organism. The results show significant differences in the biological responses of P. subcapitata exposed to high purity m- and s-SWCNT fractions. Contrary to the biological response observed using SWCNTs separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation, it is found that the high-pressure CO conversion (HiPco) s-SWCNT fraction separated by selective adsorption causes increased biological impact. These findings suggest that s-SWCNTs are the primary factor driving the adverse biological responses observed from P. subcapitata cells exposed to our as-produced suspensions. Finally, the toxicity of the s-SWCNT fraction is mitigated by increasing the concentration of biocompatible surfactant in the suspensions, likely altering the nature of surfactant coverage along SWCNT sidewalls, thereby reducing potential physical interaction with algal cells. These findings highlight the need to couple sample processing and toxicity response studies. PMID:25710331

  14. Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) for highly selective separations

    SciTech Connect

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-09-17

    Metal-organic and zeolite imidazolate frameworks (MOFs and ZIFs) have been investigated for the realization as separation media with high selectivity. These structures are held together with strong bonds, making them architecturally, chemically, and thermally stable. Therefore, employing well designed building units, it is possible to discover promising materials for gas and vapor separation. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs and ZIFs with these specific objectives: (i) to develop a strategy for producing MOFs and ZIFs that combine high surface areas with active sites for their use in gas adsorption and separation of small organic compounds, (ii) to introduce active sites in the framework by a post-synthetic modification and metalation of MOFs and ZIFs, and (iii) to design and synthesize MOFs with extremely high surface areas and large pore volumes to accommodate large amounts of guest molecules. By the systematic study, this effort demonstrated how to introduce active functional groups in the frameworks, and this is also the origin of a new strategy, which is termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. One of the solutions to overcome this challenge is an isoreticular expansion of a MOF???????¢????????????????s structure. With triangular organic linker and square building units, we demonstrated that MOF-399 has a unit cell volume 17 times larger than that of the first reported material isoreticular to it, and it has the highest porosity (94%) and lowest density (0.126 g cm-3) of any MOF reported to date. MOFs are not just low density materials; the guest-free form of MOF-210 demonstrates an ultrahigh porosity, whose BET surface area was estimated to be 6240 m2 g-1 by N2 adsorption measurements.

  15. Synthesis of novel polymer type sulfoxide solid phase combined with the porogen imprinting for enabling selective separation of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Yuichi; Kubo, Takuya; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Yasuda, Koji; Kato, Keita; Hosoya, Ken

    2012-10-01

    We developed a novel polymer type sulfoxide-modified solid phase enabling to achieve selective separation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from insulation oil. In this study, firstly we prepared base-polymer based on the concept of the molecular imprinting to capture PCBs in selectively, then, the sulfoxide groups were modified on the pore surface of base-polymers by changing preparation methods. As results of liquid chromatographic analyses for the polymers as columns, the base-polymer prepared by xylene as a porogenic solvent showed selective retention ability for chlorinated aromatic compounds by the porogen imprinting effect. Additionally, the polymer-type sulfoxide solid phases showed highly retention ability for PCBs by increasing amount of introduced sulfoxide groups. Consequently, the results of separation of PCBs comparing to insulation oil suggested that the prepared solid phase can be used for the selective separation of PCBs at the same level as a commercially available media utilized for the regulated method. PMID:22732300

  16. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. FAHP ranking and selection of pretreatment module for membrane separation processes in textile cluster.

    PubMed

    Manekar, Pravin; Nandy, Tapas; Sargaonkar, Abha; Rathi, Barkha; Karthik, Manikavasagam

    2011-01-01

    Recent development in membrane manufacturing and extensive application of membranes in effluent treatment has opened up a new water resource. The effluent pretreatment module plays a critical role in membrane performance. Appropriate selection of conventional and advanced pretreatment modules in membrane separation processes (MSP) is significant to the success of zero effluent discharge (ZED). This study addresses performance assessment of eight conventional and advanced pretreatment modules implemented for wastewater management in a textile cluster in South India. The comparative pollutant reduction, capital, operation and maintenance (OM) cost of pretreatment modules are discussed. The ranking and interdependence of the pretreatment modules were analyzed through fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (FAHP) with MATLAB software. The pretreatment module IV ranked third with a composite weight of 15.46%. The integrated study of performance assessment and FAHP resulted in an optimum pretreatment module IV comprising the sequence of chemical precipitation, bio-oxidation processes (activated sludge processes) followed by chemical precipitation, to achieve the ZED. This study provides a techno-economically feasible solution for selection of an effective pretreatment module for MSP in the textile cluster. PMID:20728348

  19. Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

    1985-10-03

    Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Ghate, Madhav R. (Morgantown, WV); Yang, Ralph T. (Williamsville, NY)

    1987-01-01

    Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

  1. Flotation selectivity of novel alkyl dicarboxylate reagents for apatite-calcite separation.

    PubMed

    Karlkvist, Tommy; Patra, Anuttam; Rao, Kota Hanumantha; Bordes, Romain; Holmberg, Krister

    2015-05-01

    The investigation aims to demonstrate the conceptual thoughts behind developing mineral specific reagents for use in flotation of calcium containing ores. For this purpose, a series of dicarboxylate-based surfactants with varying distance between the carboxylate groups (one, two or three methylene groups) was synthesized. A surfactant with the same alkyl chain length but with only one carboxylate group was also synthesized and evaluated. The adsorption behavior of these new reagents on pure apatite and pure calcite surfaces was studied using Hallimond tube flotation, FTIR and ? potential measurements. The relation between the adsorption behavior of a given surfactant at a specific mineral surface and its molecular structure over a range of concentrations and pH values, as well as the region of maximum recovery, was established. It was found that one of the reagents, with a specific distance between the carboxylate groups, was much more selective for a particular mineral surface than the other homologues. For example, out of the four compounds synthesized, only the one where the carboxylate groups were separated by a single methylene group floated apatite but not calcite, whereas calcite was efficiently floated with the monocarboxylic reagent, but not with the other reagents synthesized. This selective adsorption of a given surfactant to a particular mineral surface relative to other mineral surfaces as evidenced in the flotation studies was substantiated by ? potential and infra-red spectroscopy data. PMID:25596367

  2. Synthesis of homoveratric acid-imprinted polymers and their evaluation as selective separation materials.

    PubMed

    Dana, Mariusz; Luli?ski, Piotr; Maciejewska, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    A bulk polymerization method was used to easily and efficiently prepare homoveratric acid (3,4-dimethoxyphenylacetic acid)-imprinted polymers from eight basic monomers: 2-vinylpyridine, 4-vinylpyridine, 1-vinylimidazole, N-allylaniline, N-allylpiperazine, allylurea, allylthiourea, and allylamine, in the presence of homoveratric acid as a template in N,N-dimethylformamide as a porogen. The imprinted polymer prepared from allylamine had the highest affinity to the template, showing an imprinting factor of 3.43, and allylamine polymers MIP8/NIP8 were selected for further studies. Their binding properties were analyzed using the Scatchard method. The results showed that the imprinted polymers have two classes of heterogeneous binding sites characterized by two pairs of K(d), B(max) values: K(d)(1) = 0.060 ?mol/mL, B(max)(1) = 0.093 ?mol/mg for the higher affinity binding sites, and K(d)(2) = 0.455 ?mol/mL, B(max)(2) = 0.248 ?mol/mg for the lower affinity binding sites. Non-imprinted polymer has only one class of binding site, with K(d) = 0.417 ?mol/mL and B(max) = 0.184 ?mol/mg. A computational analysis of the energies of the prepolymerization complexes was in agreement with the experimental results. It showed that the selective binding interactions arose from cooperative three point interactions between the carboxylic acid and the two methoxy groups in the template and amino groups in the polymer cavities. Those results were confirmed by the recognition studies performed with the set of structurally related compounds. Allylamine polymer MIP8 had no affinity towards biogenic amines. The obtained imprinted polymer could be used for selective separation of homoveratric acid. PMID:21546882

  3. Selective liquid chromatographic separation of yttrium from heavier rare earth elements using acetic acid as a novel eluent.

    PubMed

    Kifle, Dejene; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2013-09-13

    One of the major difficulties in the rare earth elements separation is purification of yttrium from heavy rare earth elements. Thus, an HPLC method using acetic acid as novel eluent was explored for selective separation of yttrium form the heavy rare earth elements. When acetic acid is used as a mobile phase yttrium eluted with the lighter lanthanides. This is contrary to its relative position amongst heavier lanthanides when eluents commonly used for separation of rare earth elements were employed. The shift in elution position of yttrium with acetic acid as eluent may reflect a relatively lower stability constant of the yttrium-AcOH complex (in the same order as for the lighter lanthanides) compared to the corresponding AcOH complexes with heavy lanthanides, enabling selective separation of yttrium from the latter. The method was successfully used for selective separation of yttrium in mixed rare earth sample containing about 80% of yttrium and about 20% of heavy rare earth oxides. Thus, the use of AcOH as eluent is an effective approach for separating and determining the trace amounts of heavy rare earth elements in large amounts of yttrium matrix. Separation was performed on C18 column by running appropriate elution programs. The effluent from the column was monitored with diode array detector at absorbance wavelength of 658nm after post column derivatization with Arsenazo III. PMID:23932372

  4. Buffer effects in the desionoselective\\/ionoselective\\/duoselective separation selectivity model-assisted optimization of the capillary electrophoretic separation of enantiomers I. Low-pH phosphate buffers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert L. Williams; Gyula Vigh

    1995-01-01

    The complexation of aromatic permanently charged anions by ?-cyclodextrin in capillary electrophoresis has been studied using phosphate background electrolytes in which the pH was varied from 2.0 to 3.6. The complex formation constants and ionic mobilities proved independent of the pH, indicating that the electrophoretically determined parameters of the multiple equilibria-based separation selectivity model (DID model) are meaningful and should

  5. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  6. Selection and Characterization of Carbon Black and Surfactants for Development of Small Scale Uranium Oxicarbide Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    This report supports the effort for development of small scale fabrication of UCO (a mixture of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2}) fuel kernels for the generation IV high temperature gas reactor program. In particular, it is focused on optimization of dispersion conditions of carbon black in the broths from which carbon-containing (UO{sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O + C) gel spheres are prepared by internal gelation. The broth results from mixing a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) and urea solution with an acid-deficient uranyl nitrate (ADUN) solution. Carbon black, which is previously added to one or other of the components, must stay dispersed during gelation. The report provides a detailed description of characterization efforts and results, aimed at identification and testing carbon black and surfactant combinations that would produce stable dispersions, with carbon particle sizes below 1 {micro}m, in aqueous HMTA/urea and ADUN solutions. A battery of characterization methods was used to identify the properties affecting the water dispersability of carbon blacks, such as surface area, aggregate morphology, volatile content, and, most importantly, surface chemistry. The report introduces the basic principles for each physical or chemical method of carbon black characterization, lists the results obtained, and underlines cross-correlations between methods. Particular attention is given to a newly developed method for characterization of surface chemical groups on carbons in terms of their acid-base properties (pK{sub a} spectra) based on potentiometric titration. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic. In addition, background information on carbon black properties and the mechanism by which surfactants disperse carbon black in water is also provided. A list of main physical and chemical properties characterized, samples analyzed, and results obtained, as well as information on the desired trend or range of values generally associated with better dispersability, is provided in the Appendix. Special attention was given to characterization of several surface-modified carbon blacks produced by Cabot Corporation through proprietary diazonium salts chemistry. As demonstrated in the report, these advanced carbons offer many advantages over traditional dispersions. They disperse very easily, do not require intensive mechanical shearing or sonication, and the particle size of the dispersed carbon black aggregates is in the target range of 0.15-0.20 {micro}m. The dispersions in water and HMTA/urea solutions are stable for at least 30 days; in conditions of simulated broth, the dispersions are stable for at least 6 hours. It is proposed that the optimization of the carbon black dispersing process is possible by replacing traditional carbon blacks and surfactants with surface-modified carbon blacks having suitable chemical groups attached on their surface. It is recognized that the method advanced in this report for optimizing the carbon black dispersion process is based on a limited number of tests made in aqueous and simulated broth conditions. The findings were corroborated by a limited number of tests carried out with ADUN solutions by the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). More work is necessary, however, to confirm the overall recommendation based on the findings discussed in this report: namely, that the use of surface-modified carbon blacks in the uranium-containing broth will not adversely impact the chemistry of the gelation process, and that high quality uranium oxicarbide (UCO) kernels will be produced after calcination.

  7. Macrocyclic polyamine as a selective modifier in a bonded-phase capillary column for the electrophoretic separation of aromatic acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei-Hsi Chen; Chuen-Ying Liu

    1999-01-01

    The use of a macrocyclic polyamine, 28[ane]-N6O2, as a selective modifier in a bonded-phase capillary column for the electrophoretic separation of 14 aromatic acids is described. Parameters that affect the performance of the separations, such as the type of buffer, the pH and concentration of buffer, the applied potential and the injection mode were studied. By changing the buffer pH

  8. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  9. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Munich, DE); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  10. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

    1987-04-28

    A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

  11. Uranium purchases report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-19

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B ``Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data.

  12. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Marmer; C. P. Dunn; K. L. Moeller; J. M. Pfingston; A. J. Policastro; C. R. Yuen; J. H. Cleland

    1991-01-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power,

  13. Pre-selection of flocculants by the LUMiFuge separation analyser 114.

    PubMed

    Sobisch, T; Lerche, D

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on lab-scale investigations in relation to pre-selection of flocculants for sludge dewatering with decanter centrifuges. Results obtained were compared with CST-measurements and discussed in relation to findings under field conditions. Experiments were carried out with sewage sludges of different origin and characteristics and a number of commercial flocculants. Kinetics of sedimentation and clarification were measured as well as the compression behaviour and shear sensitivity of sludge sediments. To measure flocculant performance stability against intensive shearing, total solids in the sludge cake obtained and dewaterability of the sludge cake during the first 20-50 s of centrifugation were compared. A screening test procedure was developed. Efficient flocculants should produce high residual total solids and good initial compressibility. Lab-scale investigations deliver more reliable results if the dynamic behaviour of the sludge under centrifugal acceleration is also investigated. The separation analyser LUMiFuge 114 can provide results about the compression behaviour of sludges in the range between 10 and 100 s. So far no other method or device is known which can deliver such results. PMID:12361046

  14. Fluorous microgel star polymers: selective recognition and separation of polyfluorinated surfactants and compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yuta; Terashima, Takaya; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    Immiscible with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic solvents, polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are generally "fluorous", some of which have widely been employed as surfactants and water/oil repellents. Given the prevailing concern about the environmental pollution and the biocontamination by PFCs, their efficient removal and recycle from industrial wastewater and products are critically required. This paper demonstrates that fluorous-core star polymers consisting of a polyfluorinated microgel core and hydrophilic PEG-functionalized arms efficiently and selectively capture PFCs in water into the cores by fluorous interaction. For example, with over 10?000 fluorine atoms in the core and approximately 100 hydrophilic arms, the fluorous stars remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and related PFCs in water from 10 ppm to as low as a parts per billion (ppb) level, or an over 98% removal. Dually functionalized microgel-core star polymers with perfluorinated alkanes and additional amino (or ammonium) groups cooperatively recognize PFOA or its ammonium salt and, in addition, release the guests upon external stimuli. The "smart" performance shows that the fluorous-core star polymers are promising PFC separation, recovery, and recycle materials for water purification toward sustainable society. PMID:25300369

  15. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  16. Selective separation of tryptic beta-casein peptides through ultrafiltration membranes: Influence of ionic interactions.

    PubMed

    Nau, F; Kerherv, F L; Leonil, J; Daufin, G

    1995-05-01

    Peptide separation by selective membrane filtration has numerous potential applications such as production of peptides with biological activities or spectific enrichment in compounds acting as flavoring agents or as growth factors required by the fermentation industry. The retention of peptides arising from tryptic hdroysis of beta-casein using an M5 Carbosep membrane (molecular wieght cutoll = 10,000 D) has been studied. The peptides with known sequences were characterized by their molecular weight, isoelectric point, and hydrophobicity. Our experiments highlighted that their transmission involves mechanisms other than size exclusion as developed elsewhere. The effect of ionic interactions between peptides and membrance has been investgated by vrying pH, ionic strength of bulk, and electric potential of filtering material. The charge of both peptides and membrane plays an important role in the transmission, particularly with small size and high or lkow isoelectric point. Then, peptides with the same sign as the membrane have lower transmission than expected from the size xclusion model, whereas peptides with opposite sign have higher trnsmission than expected, and even higher than 1 with some of them. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623308

  17. In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01

    An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The monitor is intended for uses such as safeguard applications to assure that weapons grade uranium is not being produced in an enrichment cascade. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from the uranium-235 present in the specimen. Simultaneously, the gamma emissions from the uranium-235 of the specimen and the source emissions transmitted through the sample are counted and stored in a multiple channel analyzer. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from the comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and the reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen. The process eliminates the necessity of knowing the system operating conditions and yet obtains the necessary data without need for large scintillation crystals and sophisticated mechanical designs.

  18. Charts and graphs: NUKEM Uranium price ange data; NUKEM Uranium historical price graph; U.S. DOE & euratom average contract prices for natural uranium; NUKEM SWU historical price graph; NUKEM SWU spot/secondary price range; U.S. DOE separative work prices data

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This article is the uranium market data summary. It contains data for the following subjects: (1) March 1996 transactions, (2) Uranium price range data, (3) Historical uranium price range data, (4) DOE and Euratom average contract prices for natural uranium, (5) SWU historical price data, (6) SWU/spot/secondary price range data, and (7) DOE SWU prices data.

  19. Chemical separations

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.C.; Navratil, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    This volume collects papers presented at a conference on chemical separation. Topics include: field-flow fractionation, chromatography, electrophoresis, solvent extraction in metals recovery, extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid, modeling of flow fields in oscillating droplets, inclusion, and membrane processes.

  20. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, Geology report: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  1. Separation and Recovery of Uranium, Neptunium, and Plutonium from High Level Waste Using Tributyl Phosphate: Countercurrent Studies with Simulated Waste Solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Chitnis; P. K. Wattal; A. Ramanujam; P. S. Dhami; V. Gopalakrishnan; J. N. Mathur; M. S. Murali

    1998-01-01

    The present work deals with countercurrent extraction studies on the partitioning of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium using 30% tributyl phosphate (TBP) from simulated high level waste solution generated during reprocessing of spent uranium fuel from pressurized heavy water reactors. The oxidation states of neptunium and plutonium were adjusted either by 0.01 M potassium dichromate or 0.01 M dioxovanadium ion. Neptunium

  2. FOURTH VAVILOV CONFERENCE: SELECTIVE LASER PHOTOPHYSICS AND PHOTOCHEMISTRY: Separation of isotopes in a strong infrared laser field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafael V. Ambartsumyan; Yu A. Gorokhov; V. S. Letokhov; Grigorii N. Makarov; Evgenii A. Ryabov; N. V. Chekalin

    1976-01-01

    The results are reported of an experimental study of isotope separation by dissociation of polyatomic molecules in the field of high-power CO2 laser pulses. Some problems in selective infrared photochemistry are discussed. Bibtex entry for this abstract Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences) Find Similar Abstracts: Use: Authors Title Abstract Text Return: Query Results Return items starting with number

  3. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  4. Magnetically separable nanocomposites with photocatalytic activity under visible light for the selective transformation of biomass-derived platform molecules

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel magnetically separable TiO2-guanidine-(Ni,Co)Fe2O4 nanomaterials were prepared and characterised by a series of techniques including XRD, SEM, TEM, N2 physisorption as well as XPS and subsequently tested for their photocatalytic activities in the selective transformation of...

  5. Evaluation of selected detector systems for products formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bostick, D.T.

    1987-03-01

    Sensitive detection of UF/sub 6/ hydrolysis products, either by discontinuous sampling or by continuous or near real-time monitoring, is an important safety consideration for DOE contractors handling large quantities of UF/sub 6/. Automated continuous or rapid intermittent remote sensing of these reaction products can provide an alarm signal when a preselected threshold value has been exceeded (absolute response) or when a significant emission excursion has occurred (rate of change of response). This report evaluates the performance of selected devices for the detection of airborne materials formed in the release of liquid UF/sub 6/ (approx. =1.3 g) into an enclosed volume of 6 m/sup 3/; these experiments were initiated on October 23, 1986. The detection principles investigated are: photometric, gas detector tubes, and electrochemical sensor.

  6. Mass, charge, and energy separation by selective acceleration with a traveling potential hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, L. Schwager; Barr, W. L.; Lowder, R. S.; Post, R. F.

    1996-10-01

    A traveling electric potential hill has been used to generate an ion beam with an energy distribution that is mass dependent from a monoenergetic ion beam of mixed masses. This effect can be utilized as a novel method for mass separation applied to identification or enrichment of ions (e.g., of elements, isotopes, or molecules). This theory for mass-selective acceleration is presented here and is shown to be confirmed by experiment and by a time-dependent particle-in-cell computer simulation. Results show that monoenergetic ions with the particular mass of choice are accelerated by controlling the hill potential and the hill velocity. The hill velocity is typically 20%-30% faster than the ions to be accelerated. The ability of the hill to pickup a particular mass uses the fact that small kinetic energy differences in the lab frame appear much larger in the moving hill frame. Ions will gain energy from the approaching hill if their relative energy in the moving hill frame is less than the peak potential of the hill. The final energy of these accelerated ions can be several times the source energy, which facilitates energy filtering for mass purification or identification. If the hill potential is chosen to accelerate multiple masses, the heaviest mass will have the greatest final energy. Hence, choosing the appropriate hill potential and collector retarding voltage will isolate ions with the lightest, heaviest, or intermediate mass. In the experimental device, called a Solitron, purified 20Ne and 22Ne are extracted from a ribbon beam of neon that is originally composed of 20Ne:22Ne in the natural ratio of 91:9. The isotopic content of the processed beam is determined by measuring the energy distribution of the detected current. These results agree with the theory. In addition to mass selectivity, our theory can also be applied to the filtration of an ion beam according to charge state or energy. Because of this variety of properties, the Solitron is envisioned to have broad applications. The primary application is for the enrichment of stable isotopes for medical and industrial tracers. Other applications include mass analysis of unknown gases (atomic and molecular) and metals, extracting single charge states from a multiply charged beam, accelerating the high energy tail in a beam or plasma with a velocity distribution, and beam bunching.

  7. Evidence for isolated evolution of deep-sea ciliate communities through geological separation and environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are isolated habitats at the bottom of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, which originate from the ancient dissolution of Messinian evaporites. The different basins have recruited their original biota from the same source, but their geological evolution eventually constituted sharp environmental barriers, restricting genetic exchange between the individual basins. Therefore, DHABs are unique model systems to assess the effect of geological events and environmental conditions on the evolution and diversification of protistan plankton. Here, we examine evidence for isolated evolution of unicellular eukaryote protistan plankton communities driven by geological separation and environmental selection. We specifically focused on ciliated protists as a major component of protistan DHAB plankton by pyrosequencing the hypervariable V4 fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA. Geospatial distributions and responses of marine ciliates to differential hydrochemistries suggest strong physical and chemical barriers to dispersal that influence the evolution of this plankton group. Results Ciliate communities in the brines of four investigated DHABs are distinctively different from ciliate communities in the interfaces (haloclines) immediately above the brines. While the interface ciliate communities from different sites are relatively similar to each other, the brine ciliate communities are significantly different between sites. We found no distance-decay relationship, and canonical correspondence analyses identified oxygen and sodium as most important hydrochemical parameters explaining the partitioning of diversity between interface and brine ciliate communities. However, none of the analyzed hydrochemical parameters explained the significant differences between brine ciliate communities in different basins. Conclusions Our data indicate a frequent genetic exchange in the deep-sea water above the brines. The isolated island character of the different brines, that resulted from geological events and contemporary environmental conditions, create selective pressures driving evolutionary processes, and with time, lead to speciation and shape protistan community composition. We conclude that community assembly in DHABs is a mixture of isolated evolution (as evidenced by small changes in V4 primary structure in some taxa) and species sorting (as indicated by the regional absence/presence of individual taxon groups on high levels in taxonomic hierarchy). PMID:23834625

  8. Combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of uranium prior to its fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry determination.

    PubMed

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Shakerian, Farid; Shiralian Esfahani, Golnaz

    2013-12-15

    A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5 mL of nitric acid (2 mol L(-1)) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621 nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500 mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40 ng L(-1), and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n=6) at 400 ng L(-1) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranium in mineral water, river water, well water, spring water and sea water samples. PMID:24231318

  9. Highly selective separation and purification of anthocyanins from bilberry based on a macroporous polymeric adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lijuan; Zhang, Na; Wang, Chenbiao; Wang, Chunhong

    2015-04-01

    Powdered bilberry extract (United States Pharmacopoeia, USP35-NF30), which is prepared from ripe bilberry fruits (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), is the main ingredient of drugs alleviating visual fatigue and diabetic retinopathy because of the rich anthocyanins (purity of 36%). In this study, a method based on a macroporous polymeric adsorbent was established to obtain anthocyanin compounds from bilberry, in which the purity of the anthocyanins was improved to 96%, conducive to further pharmacological research and improvement of the efficiency of the drug. On the basis of the structure of anthocyanins, we designed a series of macroporous polymeric adsorbents based on the copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and ethylene glycol dimethyl acrylate (EGDMA). In this situation, EGDMA not only regulated the polarity of the adsorbent but also acted as the cross-linking agent to ensure the matrix structure of the adsorbent, which had a high specific surface area and could provide more interaction sites during adsorption with anthocyanins. Among the synthesized polymeric adsorbents with different contents of EGDMA, the one with 20% EGDMA content (DE-20) was demonstrated to exhibit optimal adsorption capacity and selectivity to anthocyanins compared to various commercial adsorbents through static adsorption and desorption experiments. In addition, the optimum condition of the dynamic adsorption-desorption experiment was further explored. The results indicated that the purity of anthocyanins after rinsing with 20% ethanol was determined to be approximately 96% at a desorption ratio of 83%, which was clearly higher than that in powdered bilberry extract. The established separation and purification method of anthocyanins with high purity is expected to be applied in industrial production. PMID:25786117

  10. A multi-functional oil-water separator from a selectively pre-wetted superamphiphobic paper.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dengteng; Yang, Lili; Wang, Chenbo; Lee, Elaine; Zhang, Yongquan; Yang, Shu

    2015-03-24

    A multi-functional oil-water separator is prepared from a paper towel spray coated with superamphiphobic (i.e., superhydrophobic and superoleophobic) nanoparticles. After the separator is pre-wetted with ethanol, followed by water, water can be removed from the light oil-water mixture and emulsions by gravity with high separation efficiency (99.9%) and separation flux. Vice versa, heavy oil can be removed by gravity on an ethanol-oil pre-wetted SA-paper. PMID:25750982

  11. Selective extraction of metal ions from aqueous phase to ionic liquids: a novel thermodynamic approach to separations.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Camiel H C; Snchez, Antonio; Kobrak, Mark N

    2014-11-10

    The selective extraction of metals from aqueous mixtures has generally relied on the use of selective ionophores. We present an alternative strategy that exploits a recently developed approach to extraction into an ionic liquid phase, and show that a high degree of control over selectivity can be obtained by tuning the relative concentrations of extraction agents. A thermodynamic model for the approach is presented, and an experimental separation of strontium and potassium ions is performed. It is shown that tuning the concentrations of the species involved can shift the ratio of potassium to strontium in the ionic liquid phase from 4:1 to 3:4. This extraction is performed under mild conditions with relatively common reagents. The result is a proof-of-concept for a novel separations scheme that could have great importance in a wide range of technological applications. PMID:25155578

  12. Reversed phase extraction chromatographic separation of scandium with amberlite LA-1 from malonate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, P.; Khopkar, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Scandium was extracted at pH 5.0 from 0.01 M malonic acid on silica gel column impregnated with Amberlite LA-1. Nickel, zinc, cadmium, mercury, lead, tin, aluminium, and lanthanum in binary mixtures passed through the cadmium because they could not form malonato complexes. It was separated by the process of selective elution from elements such as zirconium, thorium, uranium, iron(III), gallium, indium, cerium(III), and titanium by exploiting difference in stability of malonato complexes. Scandium was separated from multicomponent mixture containing yttrium, titanium, zirconium, thorium, uranium and aluminium by a process of selective sorbtion and selective elution.

  13. Pervaporation and Vapor Permeation Tutorial: Membrane Processes for the Selective Separation of Liquid and Vapor Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation and vapor permeation are membrane-based processes proposed as alternatives to conventional separation technologies. Applications range from organic solvent removal from water, ethanol or butanol recovery from fermentation broths, solvent/biofuel dehydration to meet ...

  14. Pervaporation & Vapor Permeation Membrane Processes for the Selective Separation of Liquid and Vapor Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation and vapor permeation are membrane-based processes which have been proposed as alternatives to conventional separation technologies. Applications range from organic solvent removal from water, ethanol or butanol recovery from dilute fermentation broths, solvent/biofu...

  15. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Nash; Sue B. Clark; Gregg Lumetta

    2009-09-23

    With increased application of MOX fuels and longer burnup times for conventional fuels, higher concentrations of the transplutonium actinides Am and Cm (and even heavier species like Bk and Cf) will be produced. The half-lives of the Am isotopes are significantly longer than those of the most important long-lived, high specific activity lanthanides or the most common Cm, Bk and Cf isotopes, thus the greatest concern as regards long-term radiotoxicity. With the removal and transmutation of Am isotopes, radiation levels of high level wastes are reduced to near uranium mineral levels within less than 1000 years as opposed to the time-fram if they remain in the wastes.

  16. Optimization of feed flow parameters in separation of neodymium isotopes by atomic vapor selective laser photoionization and analysis of results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Kovalevich; V. P. Labozin; G. O. Tsvetkov

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data for separation of neodymium isotopes by atomic vapor selective laser photoionization are analyzed. Atom\\u000a scattering in the working volume and the Doppler shift of the atom absorption line are shown to be the basic deselecting processes\\u000a in the experimental cell studied. A data processing technique that allows one to determine the effect of either deselecting\\u000a process on the

  17. Selective separation of arsenic species from aqueous solutions with immobilized macrocyclic material containing solid phase extraction columns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ismail M. M. Rahman; Zinnat A. Begum; Masayoshi Nakano; Yoshiaki Furusho; Teruya Maki; Hiroshi Hasegawa; Ismail M. M. Rahman

    2011-01-01

    A combination of solid phase extraction (SPE) columns was used for selective separation of water-soluble arsenic species: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). The SPE columns, namely AnaLig TE-01 (TE-01), AnaLig AN-01 Si (AN-01) and AnaLig As-01 PA (As-01), con- tain immobilized macrocyclic material as the sorbent and commonly known as molecular recognition technology (MRT) gel. The

  18. Weak affinity ligands selection using quartz crystal microbalance biosensor: multi-hydroxyl amine ligands for protein separation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Yin, Yueyan; Quan, Li; Li, Na; Li, Kean; Liu, Feng

    2011-10-10

    Multi-hydroxyl amines including tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), serinol and ethanolamine were selected as weak affinity ligands using a rapid screening by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor. Based on the specific recognition between the ligands and two proteins, lysozyme (LZM) and cytochrome c (Cyt c), a weak affinity chromatography method was developed for specific separation of the two proteins. The frontal analysis results showed that the apparent dissociation constants (K(D)) of ligand-protein complexes were all in the order of weak affinity (10(-4) M). By weak affinity columns modified with the three multi-hydroxyl amines individually, LZM and Cyt c were baseline separated as retarded peaks from non-specific protein and each other in a single cycle of loading and eluting. Moreover, the Tris-modified column typically showed the satisfactory repeatability and stability as a new type of weak affinity columns. The present strategy composed of QCM selecting and affinity chromatography separating was promising to extend the variety of weak affinity ligands and develop inexpensive specific affinity methods for separation and purification of multiple proteins on one single column. PMID:21889642

  19. Effect of chromatographic conditions on the separation and system efficiency for HPLC of selected alkaloids on different stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Petruczynik, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Retention parameters of alkaloid standards were determined on different stationary phases, i.e., octadecyl silica, base-deactivated octadecyl silica, cyanopropyl silica, preconditioned cyanopropyl silica, and pentafluorophenyl, using different aqueous eluant systems: acetonitrile-water mixtures; buffered aqueous mobile phases at pH 3 or 7.8; and aqueous eluants containing ion-pairing reagents (octane-1-sulfonic acid sodium salt and pentane-1-sulfonic acid sodium salt) or silanol blockers (tetrabutyl ammonium chloride and diethylamine). Improved peak symmetry and separation selectivity for basic solutes was observed when basic buffer, ion-pairing reagents, and, especially, silanol blockers as mobile phase additives were applied. The best separation selectivity and most symmetric peaks for the investigated alkaloids were obtained in systems containing diethylamine in the mobile phase. The influence of acetonitrile concentration and kind and concentration of ion-pairing reagents or silanol blockers on retention, peak symmetry, and system efficiency was also examined. The most efficient and selective systems were used for separation of the investigated alkaloids and analysis of Fumaria officinalis and Glaucium flavum plant extracts. PMID:21391483

  20. Use of ligand-modified micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration to selectively separate copper ions from wastewater streams

    SciTech Connect

    Shadizadeh, S.B.

    1992-12-31

    The selective removal of target ions from an aqueous solution containing ions of like charge by ligand-modified micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration (LM-MEUF), is presented. In LM-MEUF, surfactant and specially tailored ligand are added to the contaminated stream. The surfactant forms aggregates called micelles, the hydrocarbon core of which the ligand complexed with the target species will solubilize. The surfactant is chosen to have the same charge type as the target ion; therefore, other ions (with similar charge) will not associate with the micelle, which makes the separation of the target ion selective. The solution is then processed by ultrafiltration, using a membrane with pore size small enough to block the passage of the micelles. In this study the divalent copper is the target ion in the solution containing divalent calcium. The surfactant is cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and the ligand is 4-hexadecyloxybenzyliminodiacetic acid (C{sub 16}BIDA). Experiments were conducted with batch stirred cells and the results have been compared to separation that take place under a variety of conditions in the LM-MEUF process. Rejections of copper of up to 99.8% are observed, with almost no rejection of calcium, showing that LM-MEUF has excellent selectivity and separation efficiency.

  1. Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

    2012-06-27

    In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the inorganic membrane field. Further, this newly developed full scale bundle concept can be extended to other thin film inorganic membrane technology (Pd, zeolite, etc), providing a potential commercialization pathway for these membrane materials that demonstrate high potential in a variety of separation applications yet remain a laboratory 'novelty' for lack of a full scale support. Overall, the project has been highly successful and all of the project objectives have been met. We have developed the first of its kind commercial scale carbon molecular sieve membrane and demonstrated its performance in field testing under aggressive operating conditions and in the presence of chemical contaminants that would rapidly destroy alternative organic and inorganic membranes. This innovative membrane permits H{sub 2} recovery from gas streams that up until now have not been successfully treated with membrane or conventional technology. Our end user participant is currently pursuing the field demonstration of this membrane for hydrogen recovery at its refinery site.

  2. Transfer and the Part-Time Student: The Gulf Separating Community Colleges and Selective Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    When representatives from community colleges and selective four-year institutions gather, there is no greater flashpoint than the topic of part-time enrollment. This issue--that students coming from an institution comprising mostly part-time students should be enabled to transfer to selective four-year institutions in which full-time enrollment is

  3. Investigation of the role of chelating ligand in the synthesis of ion-imprinted polymeric resins on the selective enrichment of uranium(VI).

    PubMed

    Metilda, P; Gladis, J Mary; Venkateswaran, G; Prasada Rao, T

    2007-03-28

    Uranyl ion-imprinted polymeric (IIP) resins were prepared by dissolving stoichiometric amounts of uranyl nitrate and selected chelating ligands, viz. salicylaldoxime, catechol, succinicacid, 5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol and 4-vinyl pyridine in 2-methoxy ethanol (porogen) and copolymerizing thermally in the presence of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and ethyleneglycol-dimethacrylate (EGDMA), using 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). Again, IIP resins were also prepared on similar lines by utilizing ternary [uranium-non-vinylated ligand-vinylated ligand (4-vinyl pyridine)] complexes. Non-imprinted polymeric resins were identically prepared in both cases without the use of uranyl imprint ion. The percent enrichment and retention capacity studies showed significant imprinting effect in all cases. However, ion-imprinted polymeric resins formed with succinic acid (SA) or 5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol (DCQ) and 4-vinylpyridine (VP) alone gave quantitative enrichment and various parameters that influence the enrichment and elution were then optimized. The percent enrichment of uranium from synthetic seawater solutions was found to be 25.0+/-0.5 and 83.0+/-0.8 for SA-VP and DCQ-VP systems, respectively. The DCQ-VP-based IIP resins were successfully tested for the recovery of uranium from real seawater samples. PMID:17386782

  4. Hyperlayer separation in hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation: effect of membrane materials on resolution and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung Ryul; Kim, Seok Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2002-03-15

    Hollow fiber flow FFF (HF FlFFF) has recently shown its capability to separate and characterize the size of submicrometer particles and has demonstrated the potential to be developed into a disposable flow FFF channel. In this work, HF FIFFF was used for the hyperlayer separation of micron-sized particles and the separation capability was examined by using various hollow fiber membrane materials (Polysulfones, cPVC, and PAN). From the experiments, PAN (polyacrylonitriles) showed an outstanding performance in particle separation compared to the other membranes. By orienting the fiber module in an upright direction, the upstream flow migration reduced band broadening of eluted peaks. When the efficiency of the PAN hollow fiber system was tested by varying the ratio of outflow-rate to radial flow-rate, it was found that optimum separation in hyperlayer HF FlFFF can be obtained at the ratio of about 6-7. From the examination of retention at or around steric inversion diameter, it was observed that experiments showed a good agreement with predictions by semi-empirical calculation. In hyperlayer HF FlFFF the diameter based selectivity values were shown to be 1.2-1.7 depending on the type of membranes and the field strength (the radial flow-rate) conditions. PMID:11990991

  5. Female sex selection using clomiphene citrate and albumin separation of human sperm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Y. Silverman; S. R. Stephens; M. T. Drouin; R. G. Zack; J. Osborne; S. A. Ericsson

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was undertaken to assess whether the use of clomiphene citrate in conjunction with albumin-separated sperm would alter the sex ratio (expressed as the proportion of males) towards females and, if so, whether this skewing was due solely to the induction of ovulation. METHODS: The sex ratios of 184 single and 42 twin births at five assisted reproduction

  6. High-Dimensional Gaussian Graphical Model Selection: Walk Summability and Local Separation Criterion

    E-print Network

    Willsky, Alan S.

    We consider the problem of high-dimensional Gaussian graphical model selection. We identify a set of graphs for which an efficient estimation algorithm exists, and this algorithm is based on thresholding of empirical ...

  7. Effect of acyl chain length on selective biocatalytic deacylation on O-aryl glycosides and separation of anomers.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neha; Arya, Anu; Mathur, Divya; Singh, Sukhdev; Tyagi, Abhilash; Kumar, Rajesh; Rana, Neha; Singh, Rajendra; Prasad, Ashok K

    2014-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that Lipozyme TL IM (Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase immobilised on silica) can selectively deacylate the ester function involving the C-5' hydroxyl group of ?-anomers over the other acyl functions of anomeric mixture of peracylated O-aryl ?,?-D-ribofuranoside. The analysis of results of biocatalytic deacylation reaction revealed that the reaction time decreases with the increase in the acyl chain length from C1 to C4. The unique selectivity of Lipozyme TL IM has been harnessed for the separation of anomeric mixture of peracylated O-aryl ?,?-D-ribofuranosides, The lipase mediated selective deacylation methodology has been used for the synthesis of O-aryl ?-D-ribofuranosides and O-aryl ?-D-ribofuranosides in pure forms, which can be used as chromogenic substrate for the detection of pathogenic microbial parasites containing glycosidases. PMID:24632507

  8. Selected values of chemical thermodynamic properties: compounds of uranium, protactinium, thorium, actinium, and the alkali metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagman, D.D.; Evans, W.H.; Parker, V.B.; Schumm, R.H.; Nuttall, R.L.

    1981-05-01

    This publication contains tables of recommended values for the standard enthalpies (heats) of formation, Gibbs (free) energies of formation, entropies, enthalpy contents and heat capacities at 298.15 K, and enthalpies of formation at O K for compounds of uranium, protactinium, thorium, actinium, lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium.

  9. Geomorphic criteria for selecting stable uranium tailings disposal sites in New Mexico. Volume 1. Technical report. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. G. Wells; T. W. Gardner

    1985-01-01

    Essential to the disposal of uranium mill tailings in northwestern New Mexico is the geomorphic stability of the disposal site. Geomorphic stability assessment involves 3 steps: (1) evaluating the site's past geomorphic stability by determining the age of the landscape and its associated deposits; (2) quantifying short- and long-term geomorphic processes operating in the site area; and (3) evaluating the

  10. Size-selective separations of biological macromolecules on mesocylinder silica arrays.

    PubMed

    El-Safty, Sherif; Shenashen, M A

    2011-05-23

    In order to control the design functionality of mesocylinder filters for molecular sieving of proteins, we fabricated tight mesocylinder silica nanotube (NT) arrays as promising filter candidates for size-exclusion separation of high-concentration macromolecules, such as insulin (INS), ?-amylase (AMY), ?-lactoglobulin (?-LG), and myosin (MYO) proteins. In this study, hexagonal mesocylinder structures were fabricated successfully inside anodic alumina membrane (AAM) nanochannels using a variety of cationic and nonionic surfactants as templates. The systematic design of the nanofilters was based on densely patterned polar silane coupling agents ("linkers") onto the AAM nanochannels, leading to the fabrication of mesocylinder silica arrays with vertical alignment and open surfaces of top-bottom ends inside AAM. Further surface coating of silica NTs hybrid AAM with hydrophobic agents facilitated the production of extremely robust constructed sequences of membranes without the formation of air gaps among NT arrays. The fabricated membranes with impermeable coated layers, robust surfaces, and uniformly multidirectional cylinder pores in nanoscale sizes rapidly separate large quantities of proteins within seconds. Meanwhile, comprehensive factors that affect the performance of the molecular transport, diffusivity, and filtration rate through nanofilter membranes were discussed. The mesocylinder filters of macromolecules show promise for the efficient separation and molecular transport of large molecular weight and size as well as concentrations of proteins. PMID:21565316

  11. Preparation of Uranium and Plutonium Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshii KOBAYASHI; Akira SAITO

    1975-01-01

    A new process for preparing uranium and plutonium metals has been developed. The process is based on the high extractability of the elements with sodium amalgam from aqueous solutions. After extracting the uranium or plutonium with sodium amalgam, the resulting amalgam was heated in vacuum so that mercury and sodium were separated to produce uranium or plutonium metal. The mercury

  12. Preparation and characterization of superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polymers for selective adsorption and separation of vanillin in food samples.

    PubMed

    Ning, Fangjian; Peng, Hailong; Dong, Liling; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin; Xiong, Hua

    2014-11-19

    Novel water-compatible superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (M-MIPs) were prepared by coating superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with MIPs in a methanol-water reaction system. The M-MIPs were used for the selective adsorption and separation of vanillin from aqueous solution. The M-MIPs were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicated that a core-shell structure of M-MIPs was obtained by coating a layer of silica and MIPs on the surface of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The obtained M-MIPs possess a loose and porous structure and can be rapidly separated from the solution using a magnet. The adsorption experiments showed that the binding capacity of the M-MIPs was significantly higher than that of the superparamagnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (M-NIPs). Meanwhile, the adsorption of M-MIPs reached equilibrium within 100 min, and the apparent maximum adsorption quantity (Qmax) and dissociation constant (Kd) were 64.12 ?mol g(-1) and 58.82 ?mol L(-1), respectively. The Scatchard analysis showed that homogeneous binding sites were formed on the M-MIP surface. The recoveries of 83.39-95.58% were achieved when M-MIPs were used for the pre-concentration and selective separation of vanillin in spiked food samples. These results provided the possibility for the separation and enrichment of vanillin from complicated food matrices by M-MIPs. PMID:25352428

  13. A study of isotopically selective photoionization of ytterbium atoms for laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Borisov; M. A. Kuz'mina; V. A. Mishin

    1996-01-01

    Atomic-vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is studied experimentally and theoretically for ytterbium vapors. The optimum ionization scheme and the process dynamics are determined. The photoionization scheme uses the transitions\\u000a$$6^1 S_0 \\\\mathop \\\\to \\\\limits^{555.648nm} 6^3 P_1 \\\\mathop \\\\to \\\\limits^{581.067nm} (7\\/2,3\\/2)_2 \\\\mathop \\\\to \\\\limits^{582.79nm} (52353cm^{ - 1} ).$$\\u000a For a numerical study of photoionization dynamics, the mathematical model of the AVLIS

  14. Selective Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides by Aqueous Processing with Introduction of Soft Donor Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Nash

    2009-09-22

    Implementation of a closed loop nuclear fuel cycle requires the utilization of Pu-containing MOX fuels with the important side effect of increased production of the transplutonium actinides, most importantly isotopes of Am and Cm. Because the presence of these isotopes significantly impacts the long-term radiotoxicity of high level waste, it is important that effective methods for their isolation and/or transmutation be developed. Furthermore, since transmutation is most efficiently done in the absence of lanthanide fission products (high yield species with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections) it is important to have efficient procedures for the mutual separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanides. The chemistries of these elements are nearly identical, differing only in the slightly stronger strength of interaction of trivalent actinides with ligand donor atoms softer than O (N, Cl-, S). Research being conducted around the world has led to the development of new reagents and processes with considerable potential for this task. However, pilot scale testing of these reagents and processes has demonstrated the susceptibility of the new classes of reagents to radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation. In this project, separations of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides have been investigated in studies of 1) the extraction and chemical stability properties of a class of soft-donor extractants that are adapted from water-soluble analogs, 2) the application of water soluble soft-donor complexing agents in tandem with conventional extractant molecules emphasizing fundamental studies of the TALSPEAK Process. This research was conducted principally in radiochemistry laboratories at Washington State University. Collaborators at the Radiological Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have contributed their unique facilities and capabilities, and have supported student internships at PNNL to broaden their academic experience. New information has been developed to qualify the extraction potential of a class of pyridine-functionalized tetraaza complexants indicating potential single contact Am-Nd separation factors of about 40. The methodology developed for characterization will find further application in our continuing efforts to synthesize and characterize new reagents for this separation. Significant new insights into the performance envelope and supporting information on the TALSPEAK process has also been developed.

  15. Evaluation of health risks associated with proposed ground water standards at selected inactive uranium mill-tailings sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Nagy, J.; Lackey, K.

    1989-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed ground water standards applicable to all inactive uranium mill-tailings sites. The proposed standards include maximum concentration limits (MCL) for currently regulated drinking water contaminants, as well as the addition of standards for molybdenum, uranium, nitrate, and radium-226 plus radium-228. The proposed standards define the point of compliance to be everywhere downgradient of the tailings pile, and require ground water remediation to drinking water standards if MCLs are exceeded. This document presents a preliminary description of the Phase 2 efforts. The potential risks and hazards at Gunnison, Colorado and Lakeview, Oregon were estimated to demonstrate the need for a risk assessment and the usefulness of a cost-benefit approach in setting supplemental standards and determining the need for and level of restoration at UMTRA sites. 8 refs., 12 tabs.

  16. Isotope separation by laser means

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul (Los Alamos, NM); Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cotter, Theodore P. (Los Alamos, NM); Greiner, Norman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-06-15

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  17. Coupling of non-selective adsorption with selective elution for novel in-line separation and detection of cadmium by vapour generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2015-05-01

    Non-selective adsorption of Cd(2+) ions on a cation exchange fiber and subsequent selective elution with a KI solution has been strategically utilized to develop a highly selective in-line separation of Cd(2+) ions from other metal ions for its rapid and reliable quantification by cold vapour-atomic absorption spectrometry. After retention of Cd(2+) with a high efficiency on cation exchange fiber, selective elution of the retained Cd(2+) was subsequently accomplished with 0.3M KI. Vapour generation of Cd for in-line CV-AAS determination was then achieved by merging the eluate with HCl and NaBH4. Interferences from most base metals with the vapour generation of Cd were eliminated by this approach, with the exception of Pb(2+)ions which was removed by co-precipitation with BaSO4 prior to the in-line separation. Substantial improvement in sensitivity of the in-line CV-AAS determination of Cd was achieved by increasing the sample loading time. A detection limit of 0.6ngL(-1) (3?) was obtained with sample loading time of 120s, corresponding to a consumption of 24mL of sample solution. Application of the method to the determination of Cd in certified sediment and fish samples gave a good agreement with the certified values. Further validation by recovery study in real fish sample digests and water gave average Cd recoveries of 98.71.0% for fish and 923% for water with RSD of 1.5% for fish and 4% for water, respectively. PMID:25770618

  18. Magnetic Field Effect on Laser Isotope Separation Based on Polarization Selection Rules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideaki Niki; Iwao Kitazima; Yasukazu Izawa

    1998-01-01

    Excitation dynamics of atoms by linearly polarized lasers were analyzed for J=2-->2-->1-->0 multistep transition under a magnetic field. The time evolution of the population in each magnetic substate was calculated by solving the rate equations under the condition where the atomic alignment is gradually destroyed by the precession motion of the angular momentum around the magnetic field. Isotopic selectivity in

  19. Separation of Boron from Geothermal Water Using a Boron Selective Macroporous Weak Base Anion Exchange Resin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Idil Yilmaz-Ipek; Pelin Koseoglu; Umran Yuksel; Nazl? Yasar; Gzde Yolseven; Mithat Yuksel; Nalan Kabay

    2010-01-01

    In this study, batch and column mode tests were performed to evaluate the efficiency of boron removal from geothermal water containing 10-11mgB\\/L using Lewatit MK 51 which is a macroporous weak base anion exchange resin with polyhydroxyl groups showing a very high selectivity and capacity for boron. The optimum resin amount for boron removal from geothermal water was determined as

  20. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  1. Ion imprinted polymeric nanoparticles for selective separation and sensitive determination of zinc ions in different matrices.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Roushani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of Zn(2+) ion-imprinted polymer (Zn-IIP) nanoparticles is presented in this report. The Zn-IIP nanoparticles are prepared by dissolving stoichiometric amounts of zinc nitrate and selected chelating ligand, 3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone, in 15 mL ethanol-acetonitrile (2:1; v/v) mixture as a porogen solvent in the presence of ethylene glycol-dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linking, methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. After polymerization, Cavities in the polymer particles corresponding to the Zn(2+) ions were created by leaching the polymer in HCl aqueous solution. The synthesized IIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal analysis techniques. Also, the pH range for rebinding of Zn(2+) ion on the IIP and equilibrium binding time were optimized, using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In selectivity study, it was found that imprinting results increased affinity of the material toward Zn(2+) ion over other competitor metal ions with the same charge and close ionic radius. The prepared IIPs were repeatedly used and regenerated for six times without any significant decrease in polymer binding affinities. Finally, the prepared sorbent was successfully applied to the selective recognition and determination of zinc ion in different real samples. PMID:23981411

  2. Ion imprinted polymeric nanoparticles for selective separation and sensitive determination of zinc ions in different matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Roushani, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of Zn2+ ion-imprinted polymer (Zn-IIP) nanoparticles is presented in this report. The Zn-IIP nanoparticles are prepared by dissolving stoichiometric amounts of zinc nitrate and selected chelating ligand, 3,5,7,20,40-pentahydroxyflavone, in 15 mL ethanol-acetonitrile (2:1; v/v) mixture as a porogen solvent in the presence of ethylene glycol-dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linking, methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. After polymerization, Cavities in the polymer particles corresponding to the Zn2+ ions were created by leaching the polymer in HCl aqueous solution. The synthesized IIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal analysis techniques. Also, the pH range for rebinding of Zn2+ ion on the IIP and equilibrium binding time were optimized, using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In selectivity study, it was found that imprinting results increased affinity of the material toward Zn2+ ion over other competitor metal ions with the same charge and close ionic radius. The prepared IIPs were repeatedly used and regenerated for six times without any significant decrease in polymer binding affinities. Finally, the prepared sorbent was successfully applied to the selective recognition and determination of zinc ion in different real samples.

  3. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

  4. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  5. Selectivity Sequence of Multivalent Lanthanides for Their Separation on Antimonate Based Exchangers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. Ibrahim; M. I. Ahmad; B. El-Gammal; I. M. El-Naggar

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of trivalent lanthanide ions, Ln (La, Pr, Nd, Gd, and Er), using two antimonate based exchangers, namely, silicon antimonate (SiSb) and poly(acrylamide titanium antimonate), PAmTA, was studied from their nitrate solutions at pH 3.50.1. The formation constants in Ln\\/SiSb and Ln\\/PAmTA systems, logKS1 and logKS2, were calculated for the above mentioned lanthanides. The Kd values of the selected

  6. Oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium particles from Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Salbu; K. Janssens; O. C. Lind; K. Proost; L. Gijsels; P. R. Danesi

    2004-01-01

    The oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium (DU) particles were determined by synchrotron radiation based ?-XANES, applied to individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kuwait. Based on scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis prior to ?-XANES, DU particles ranging from submicrons to several hundred micrometers were observed. The median particle size depended on sources

  7. Selective separation of deltamethrin by molecularly imprinted polymers using a ?-cyclodextrin derivative as the functional monomer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi F; Wen, Ge; Kuang, Dai Z; Zhang, Fu X; Tang, Si P

    2013-01-01

    A deltamethrin-imprinted polymer (MIP(1)) was prepared using bis(-6-O-butanediacid monoester)-?-cyclodextrin (BBA-?-CD) as the functional monomer and toluene 2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) as the cross-linker. In comparison to the molecularly imprinted polymer where ?-CD was applied as the functional monomer (MIP(2)), MIP(1) showed a higher specific binding capacity (?C(P)) and an improved imprinting factor (IF) for deltamethrin. The selective recognition experiments demonstrated that compared to MIP(2), MIP(1) could better recognize its template over other substrates that had similar chemical structures. The solid phase extraction (SPE) of deltamethrin using MIP(1) as the adsorbent was further investigated. The recoveries of the molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) column for deltamethrin were 83.2-93.4% with relative standard deviations (RSD) of 2.03-6.19%. The method has been successfully applied to the enrichment of trace deltamethrin from real water samples. PMID:23431972

  8. Hydrothermal alteration of organic matter in uranium ores, Elliot Lake, Canada: Implications for selected organic-rich deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, D.J. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville (Canada)] [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville (Canada); Nagy, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States)] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States); Davis, D.W. [Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1993-07-01

    Organic matter in the uraniferous Matinenda Formation, Elliot Lake, is preserved in the forms of syngenetic kerogen and solid bitumen as it is in many of the Oklo uranium deposits and in the Witwatersrand gold-uranium ores. The Elliot Lake kerogen is a vitrinite-like material considered to be remnants of the Precambrian cyanobacterial mats. The kerogen at Elliot Lake has reflectances (in oil) ranging from 2.63-7.31% RO{sub max}, high aromaticity, relatively low (0.41-0.60) atomic H/C ratios, and it contains cryptocrystalline graphite. Bitumen, present primarily as dispersed globules (up to 0.5 mm dia.), has reflectances from 0.72-1.32% RO{sub max}, atomic H/C ratios of 0.71-0.81, and is somewhat less aromatic than the kerogen. Overall similarity in molecular compositions indicates that liquid bitumen was derived from kerogen by processes similar to hydrous pyrolysis. The carbon isotopic composition of kerogen ({minus}15.62 to {minus}24.72%), and the now solid bitumen ({minus}25.91 to {minus}33.00%) are compatible with these processes. Despite having been subjected to several thermal episodes, ca. 2.45 Ga old kerogen of microbiological origin here survived as testimony of the antiquity of life on Earth. U-Pb isotopic data from discrete kerogen grains at Elliot Lake form a scattered array intersecting concordia at 2130 {+-} 100 Ma, correspond to the Nipissing event. U-Pb systems were totally reset by this event. Uranium and lead show subsequently partial mobility, the average of which is indicated by the lower concordia intersect of 550 {+-} 260 Ma. The migrated bitumen contains virtually no uranium and thorium but has a large excess of {sup 206}Pb, which indicates that the once liquid bitumen must have acted as a sink for mobile intermediate decay products of {sup 238}U. Emplacement of the Nipissing diabase may have been responsible for producing the bitumen and, indirectly, for its enrichment in {sup 206}Pb as a result of outgassing of {sup 222}Rn.

  9. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-09-30

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  10. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.R

    2005-01-31

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  11. Size-selective separation of polydisperse gold nanoparticles in supercritical ethane.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dylan P; Satherley, John

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to use supercritical ethane to selectively disperse alkanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles of one size from a polydisperse sample in order to recover a monodisperse fraction of the nanoparticles. A disperse sample of metal nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 1-5 nm was prepared using established techniques then further purified by Soxhlet extraction. The purified sample was subjected to supercritical ethane at a temperature of 318 K in the pressure range 50-276 bar. Particles were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, TEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. The results show that with increasing pressure the dispersibility of the nanoparticles increases, this effect is most pronounced for smaller nanoparticles. At the highest pressure investigated a sample of the particles was effectively stripped of all the smaller particles leaving a monodisperse sample. The relationship between dispersibility and supercritical fluid density for two different size samples of alkanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles was considered using the Chrastil chemical equilibrium model. PMID:19708251

  12. Using a Buffer Gas Modifier to Change Separation Selectivity in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernndez-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2010-01-01

    The mobilities of a set of common ?-amino acids, four tetraalkylammonium ions, 2,4-dimethyl pyridine (2,4-lutidine), 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and valinol were determined using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-QMS) while introducing 2-butanol into the buffer gas. The mobilities of the test compounds decreased by varying extents with 2-butanol concentration in the mobility spectrometer. When the concentration of 2-butanol increased from 0.0 to 6.8 mmol m?3 (2.5102 ppmv), percentage reductions in mobilities were: 13.6% (serine), 12.2% (threonine), 10.4% (methionine), 10.3% (tyrosine), 9.8% (valinol), 9.2% (phenylalanine), 7.8% (tryptophan), 5.6% (2,4-lutidine), 2.2% (DTBP), 1.0% (tetramethylammonium ion, TMA, and tetraethylammonium ion, TEA), 0.0% (tetrapropylammonium ion, TPA), and 0.3% (tetrabutylammonium ion, TBA). These variations in mobility depended on the size and steric hindrance on the charge of the ions, and were due to formation of large ion-2-butanol clusters. This selective variation in mobilities was applied to the resolution of a mixture of compounds with similar reduced mobilities such as serine and valinol, which overlapped in N2-only buffer gas in the IMS spectrum. The relative insensitivity of tetraalkylammonium ions and DTBP to the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas was explained by steric hindrance of the four alkyl substituents in tetraalkylammonium ions and the two tert-butyl groups in DTBP, which shielded the positive charge of the ion from the attachment of 2-butanol molecules. Low buffer gas temperatures (100 C) produced the largest reductions in mobilities by increasing ion-2-butanol interactions and formation of clusters; high temperatures (250 C) prevented the formation of clusters, and no reduction in ion mobility was obtained with the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas. Low temperatures and high concentrations of 2-butanol produced a series of ion clusters with one to three 2-butanol molecules in compounds without steric hindrance. Clusters of two and three molecules of 2-butanol were also visible. Ligand-saturation on the positive ions with 2-butanol molecules occurred at high concentrations of modifier (6.8 mmol m?3 at 150C); when saturated, no further reduction in mobility occurred when 2-butanol was introduced into the buffer gas. PMID:21344065

  13. Wide Angle, Single Screen, Gridded Square-Loop Frequency Selective Surface for Diplexing Two Closely Separated Frequency Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The design and performance of a wide angle, single screen, frequency selective surface (FSS) with gridded square-loop path elements are described for diplexing closely separated signal bands, for example, X- and Ku-band signals in an Orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer (OVLBI) earth station reflector antenna system, as well as other applications such as military and commercial communications via satellites. Excellent agreement is obtained between the predicted and measured results of this FSS design using the gridded square-loop patch elements sandwiched between 0.0889 cm thick tetrafluoroethylene fluorocarbon polymer (PTFE) slabs. Resonant frequency drift is reduced by 1 GHz with an incidence angle from 0 deg normal to 40 deg from normal.

  14. STUDIES ON THE PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF URANIUM(IV) NITRATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. R. Bhat; B. S. Mathur

    1963-01-01

    Uranium(IV) nitrate was prepared by photochemical reduction of uranyl ; nitrate in the presence of ethanol and by reacting uraniun(IV) sulfate and barium ; nitrate or uranium(IV) chloride with silver nitrate. Hexavalent uranium was ; separated from the tetravalent uranium by, solvent extraction with 5 to 10% ; tributyl phosphate (TBP) solution in kerosene and later uranium(IV) nitrate was ;

  15. Selective Breeding for Infant Rat Separation-Induced Ultrasonic Vocalizations: Developmental Precursors of Passive and Active Coping Styles

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Susan A.; Hofer, Myron A.

    2009-01-01

    Human depression and anxiety disorders show inherited biases across generations, as do antisocial disorders characterized by aggression. Each condition is preceded in children by behavioral inhibition or aggressive behavior, respectively, and both are characterized by separation anxiety disorders. In affected families, adults and children exhibit different forms of altered autonomic nervous system regulation and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in response to stress. Because it is difficult to determine mechanisms accounting for these associations, animal studies are useful for studying the fundamental relationships between biological and behavioral traits. Pharmacologic and behavioral studies suggest that infant rat ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) are a measure of an early anxiety-like state related to separation anxiety. However, it was not known whether or not early ultrasound emissions in infant rats are markers for genetic risk for anxiety states later in life. To address these questions, we selectively bred two lines of rats based on high and low rates of USV to isolation at postnatal (P) 10 days of age. To our knowledge, ours is the only laboratory that has ever selectively bred on the basis of an infantile trait related to anxiety. The High and Low USV lines show two distinct sets of patterns of behavior, physiology and neurochemistry from infancy through adulthood. As adults High line rats demonstrate anxious/depressed phenotypes in behavior and autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation to standard laboratory tests. In Lows, on the other hand, behavior and autonomic regulation are consistent with an aggressive phenotype. The High and Low USV lines are the first genetic animal models implicating long-term associations of contrasting coping styles with early attachment responses. They thus present a potentially powerful model for examining gene-environment interactions in the development of life-long affective regulation. PMID:17543397

  16. Well-defined nanostructured surface-imprinted polymers for highly selective magnetic separation of fluoroquinolones in human urine.

    PubMed

    He, Yonghuan; Huang, Yanyan; Jin, Yulong; Liu, Xiangjun; Liu, Guoquan; Zhao, Rui

    2014-06-25

    The construction of molecularly imprinted polymers on magnetic nanoparticles gives access to smart materials with dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the superparamagnetic surface-molecularly imprinted nanoparticles were prepared via surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using ofloxacin (OFX) as template for the separation of fluoroquinolones (FQs). Benefiting from the living/controlled nature of RAFT reaction, distinct core-shell structure was successfully constructed. The highly uniform nanoscale MIP layer was homogeneously grafted on the surface of RAFT agent TTCA modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, which favors the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The target binding assays demonstrate the desirable adsorption capacity and imprinting efficiency of Fe3O4@MIP. High selectivity of Fe3O4@MIP toward FQs (ofloxacin, pefloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and gatifloxacin) was exhibited by competitive binding assay. The Fe3O4@MIP nanoparticles were successfully applied for the direct enrichment of five FQs from human urine. The spiked human urine samples were determined and the recoveries ranging from 83.1 to 103.1% were obtained with RSD of 0.8-8.2% (n = 3). This work provides a versatile approach for the fabrication of well-defined MIP on nanomaterials for the analysis of complicated biosystems. PMID:24853973

  17. Mechanistic Investigation of Solvent Extraction Based on Anion-Functionalized Ionic Liquids for Selective Separation of Rare-Earth Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaoqi [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In this study, solvation has been found to be a dominant mechanism in a comprehensive ionic liquid based extraction system for rare earth elements (REEs). Trioctylmethylammonium di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate ([TOMA][DEHP]), an ionic-liquid extractant, was used in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidizolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([Cnmim][NTf2], n = 4, 6, 8, 10) and 1-alkyl-3-methylimidizolium bis(perfluoroethanesulfonyl)imide ([Cnmim][BETI], n = 4, 6, 8, 10) for the separation of REEs. Surprisingly, a very similar extraction behavior was observed even as the carbon chain length on the ionic-liquid (IL) cation increased from butyl (C4) to hexyl (C6), to octyl (C8), to decyl (C10). This behavior is in sharp contrast to that exhibited by the conventional neutral extractants, whose extraction efficiencies are strongly dependent on the hydrophobicity of IL cations. Furthermore, the addition of IL cations ([Cnmim]+) or IL anions ([NTf2]- or [BETI]-) to the aqueous phase had little effect on the extraction behavior of the above extraction system, ruling out the strong involvement of the ion-exchange mechanism associated with traditional IL-based extraction systems. Results showed that the extractabilities and selectivities of REEs using [TOMA][DEHP] in [C10mim][NTf2]/[BETI] are several orders of magnitude better than those achieved using conventional organic solvent, diisopropylbenzene (DIPB). This study highlights the potential of developing a comprehensive IL-based extraction strategy for REEs separations.

  18. Neutron-rich isotope production using a uranium carbide - carbon nanotubes SPES target prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, S.; Biasetto, L.; Manzolaro, M.; Scarpa, D.; Carturan, S.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.; Vasquez, J.; Zanonato, P.; Colombo, P.; Jost, C. U.; Stracener, D. W.

    2013-05-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project, under development at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL), is a new-generation Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facility for the production of radioactive ion beams by means of the proton-induced fission of uranium. In the framework of the research on the SPES target, seven uranium carbide discs, obtained by reacting uranium oxide with graphite and carbon nanotubes, were irradiated with protons at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the following, the yields of several fission products obtained during the experiment are presented and discussed. The experimental results are then compared to those obtained using a standard uranium carbide target. The reported data highlights the capability of the new type of SPES target to produce and release isotopes of interest for the nuclear physics community.

  19. Effects of precursor and support variation in the genesis of uranium oxide catalysts for CO oxidation and selective reduction of NO: Synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Tom; Newton, Mark A; Boyd, Vicky; Lee, Darren F; Evans, John

    2005-02-24

    A range of uranium oxide-based catalysts, derived from UO2(NO3)2.6H2O and UCl4 precursors, and supported on gamma-Al2O3, SiO2 and mesoporous H1SiO2, have been synthesized and then characterized using the following methods: isothermal nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements, diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS), gas titration of surface hydroxyl groups using Grignard reagents, U L(III) extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. Brij76-templated H1SiO2 mesoporous silicas are found to be essentially stable under flowing oxygen after 16 h at 1073 K. At temperatures above this, however, extensive structural collapse, together with extensive dehydroxylation, ensues. Titration of the accessible hydroxyl group concentrations shows that in these materials the density of OH groups is considerably lower than in their amorphous counterparts. The adsorption of uranyl nitrate onto these dispersants results in a supported, and partially dehydrated, phase of the parent molecule with little obvious structural distortion; however, the adsorption of UCl4 leads to a complex adstructure which may best be described as U(O)2Cl2. The subsequent formation of the uranium oxide phase, nominally active for the oxidation of CO and selective reduction of NO (generally accepted to be U3O8), is found to be a considerable function of both the precursor and support system employed. Calcination of such systems to 1073 K results in extensive extrusion of the supported uranium phase from mesoporous supports, resulting in the formation of very large orthorhombic U3O8 domains. PXRD, however, shows that on amorphous SiO2 and gamma-Al2O3 similar treatment results in the formation of a hexagonal phase of U3O8. The formation of U3O8 is found to be promoted in mesoporous systems and by the presence of Cl in the catalyst make up. Some evidence is also found that suggests that a persistence of Cl limits the growth of U3O8 domains. PMID:16851301

  20. Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound

    DOEpatents

    Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

  1. Laser Isotope Separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reed J. Jensen; J. Al Sullivan; Frank T. Finch

    1980-01-01

    A brief background on the history and motivation of laser isotope separation is presented. Methods of molecular laser isotope separation are reviewed, and the Los Alamos process for separation of uranium isotopes as well as the general problems with this approach are covered. A short summary on critical uv cross-section-enhancement results is given and the implications of infrared cross-section dependence

  2. Effect of interwire separation on growth kinetics and properties of site-selective GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D.; Schweickert, L.; Morktter, S.; Loitsch, B.; Hertenberger, S.; Becker, J.; Bichler, M.; Finley, J. J.; Koblmller, G., E-mail: Gregor.Koblmueller@wsi.tum.de [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik Department, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Garching 85748 (Germany); Abstreiter, G. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik Department, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Garching 85748 (Germany); Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Garching 85748 (Germany)

    2014-07-21

    We report tuning of the growth kinetics, geometry, and properties of autocatalytic GaAs nanowires (NW) by precisely controlling their density on SiO{sub 2}-mask patterned Si (111) substrates using selective area molecular beam epitaxy. Using patterned substrates with different mask opening size (40120?nm) and pitch (0.253??m), we find that the NW geometry (length, diameter) is independent of the opening size, in contrast to non-catalytic GaAs NWs, whereas the NW geometry strongly depends on pitch, i.e., interwire separation and NW density. In particular, two distinct growth regimes are identified: a diffusion-limited regime for large pitches (low NW density) and a competitive growth regime for smaller pitches (high NW density), where axial and radial NW growth rates are reduced. The transition between these two regimes is significantly influenced by the growth conditions and shifts to smaller pitches with increasing As/Ga flux ratio. Ultimately, the pitch-dependent changes in growth kinetics lead to distinctly different photoluminescence properties, highlighting that mask template design is a very critical parameter for tuning intrinsic NW properties.

  3. A rod-packing microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework for highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2 at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; He, Yabing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Weng, Linhong; Wang, Hailong; Krishna, Rajamani; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; O'Keeffe, Michael; Han, Yu; Chen, Banglin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of a trigonal building subunit with diaminotriazines (DAT) functional groups leads to a unique rod-packing 3D microporous hydrogen-bonded organic framework (HOF-3). This material shows permanent porosity and demonstrates highly selective separation of C2H2/CO2 at ambient temperature and pressure. PMID:25394888

  4. Uranium complex recycling method of purifying uranium liquors. [ceramic grade U by recycling (NH)UO(CO) from wet-process phosphoric acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Elikan; W. L. Lyon; P. S. Sundar

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from contaminating cations in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is mixed with sufficient recycled uranium complex to raise the weight ratio of uranium to said cations preferably to at least about three. The liquor is then extracted with at least enough non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent to theoretically extract about all of the uranium in

  5. Evidence for Natural Selection in Nucleotide Content Relationships Based on Complete Mitochondrial Genomes: Strong Effect of Guanine Content on Separation between Terrestrial and Aquatic Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sorimachi, Kenji; Okayasu, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    The complete vertebrate mitochondrial genome consists of 13 coding genes. We used this genome to investigate the existence of natural selection in vertebrate evolution. From the complete mitochondrial genomes, we predicted nucleotide contents and then separated these values into coding and non-coding regions. When nucleotide contents of a coding or non-coding region were plotted against the nucleotide content of the complete mitochondrial genomes, we obtained linear regression lines only between homonucleotides and their analogs. On every plot using G or A content purine, G content in aquatic vertebrates was higher than that in terrestrial vertebrates, while A content in aquatic vertebrates was lower than that in terrestrial vertebrates. Based on these relationships, vertebrates were separated into two groups, terrestrial and aquatic. However, using C or T content pyrimidine, clear separation between these two groups was not obtained. The hagfish (Eptatretus burgeri) was further separated from both terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates. Based on these results, nucleotide content relationships predicted from the complete vertebrate mitochondrial genomes reveal the existence of natural selection based on evolutionary separation between terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate groups. In addition, we propose that separation of the two groups might be linked to ammonia detoxification based on high G and low A contents, which encode Glu rich and Lys poor proteins. PMID:25853054

  6. INFORMATION: Management Alert on Environmental Management's Select Strategy for Disposition of Savannah River Site Depleted Uranium Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2010-04-01

    The Administration and the Congress, through policy statements and passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), have signaled that they hope that proactive actions by agency Inspectors General will help ensure that Federal Recovery Act activities are transparent, effective and efficient. In that context, the purpose of this management alert is to share with you concerns that have been raised to the Office of Inspector General regarding the planned disposition of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) inventory of Depleted Uranium (DU) oxides. This inventory, generated as a by-product of the nuclear weapons production process and amounting to approximately 15,600 drums of DU oxides, has been stored at SRS for decades. A Department source we deem reliable and credible recently came to the Office of Inspector General expressing concern that imminent actions are planned that may not provide for the most cost effective disposition of these materials. During April 2009, the Department chose to use funds provided under the Recovery Act to accelerate final disposition of the SRS inventory of DU oxides. After coordination with State of Utah regulators, elected officials and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department initiated a campaign to ship the material to a facility operated by EnergySolutions in Clive, Utah. Although one shipment of a portion of the material has already been sent to the EnergySolutions facility, the majority of the product remains at SRS. As had been planned, both for the shipment already made and those planned in the near term, the EnergySolutions facility was to have been the final disposal location for the material. Recently, a member of Congress and various Utah State officials raised questions regarding the radioactive and other constituents present in the DU oxides to be disposed of at the Clive, Utah, facility. These concerns revolved around the characterization of the material and its acceptability under existing licensing criteria. As a consequence, the Governor of Utah met with Department officials to voice concerns regarding further shipments of the material and to seek return of the initial shipment of DU oxides to SRS. Utah's objections and the Department's agreement to accede to the State's demands effectively prohibit the transfer of the remaining material from South Carolina to Utah. In response, the Department evaluated its options and issued a draft decision paper on March 1, 2010, which outlined an alternative for temporary storage until the final disposition issue could be resolved. Under the terms of the proposed option, the remaining shipments from SRS are to be sent on an interim basis to a facility owned by Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews, Texas. Clearly, this choice carries with it a number of significant logistical burdens, including substantial additional costs for, among several items, repackaging at SRS, transportation to Texas, storage at the interim site, and, repackaging and transportation to the yet-to-be-determined final disposition point. The Department source expressed the concern that the proposal to store the material on an interim basis in Texas was inefficient and unnecessary, asserting: (1) that the materials could remain at SRS until a final disposition path is identified, and that this could be done safely, securely and cost effectively; and, (2) that the nature of the material was not subject to existing compliance agreements with the State of South Carolina, suggesting the viability of keeping the material in storage at SRS until a permanent disposal site is definitively established. We noted that, while the Department's decision paper referred to 'numerous project and programmatic factors that make it impractical to retain the remaining inventory at Savannah River,' it did not outline the specific issues involved nor did it provide any substantive economic or environmental analysis supporting the need for the planned interim storage action. The only apparent driver in this case was a Recovery Act-related goal esta

  7. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-08-25

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

  8. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

  9. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Carpenter; T. Kan

    1994-01-01

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (1) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (2) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser

  10. Effect of gamma-irradiation of ion imprinted polymer (IIP) particles for the preconcentrative separation of dysprosium from other selected lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Biju, V M; Gladis, J Mary; Rao, T Prasada

    2003-07-01

    The selectivity of zinc with respect to copper ions was improved by gamma-irradiation of surface imprinted polymer particles. We have reported the preparation of dysprosium ion imprinted polymer (IIP) particles by covalent approach during molecular imprinting. This paper reports the results obtained after gamma-irradiation of dysprosium IIP particles and their use in the preconcentration/separation of dysprosium from dilute aqueous solutions containing other selected lanthanides. Further, the characterisation of blank and dysprosium IIP particles was carried out either with and without irradiation by IR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), XRD and surface area and pore size analysis techniques. The significant features observed in these experiments in the non-selectivity of blank polymer particles for dysprosium over other lanthanide ions and 35-180-fold enhancement in selectivity coefficients of irradiated dysprosium IIPs formed by covalent approach. In addition, the selectivity coefficients obtainable by gamma-irradiated were compared with unirradiated dysprosium IIP particles and separation factors obtained by liquid-liquid extraction separation using di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid as extractant. PMID:18969099

  11. Combination of three-stage sink-float method and selective flotation technique for separation of mixed post-consumer plastic waste.

    PubMed

    Pongstabodee, Sangobtip; Kunachitpimol, Napatr; Damronglerd, Somsak

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to separate the different plastics of a mixed post-consumer plastic waste by the combination of a three-stage sink-float method and selective flotation. By using the three-stage sink-float method, six mixed-plastic wastes, belonging to the 0.3-0.5 cm size class and including high density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), polyvinylchloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers (ABS) were separated into two groups, i.e., a low density plastic group (HDPE and PP) and a high density plastic group (PET, PVC, PS and ABS) by tap water. Plastic whose density is less than that of the medium solution floats to the surface, while the one whose density is greater than that of the medium solution sinks to the bottom. The experimental results elucidated that complete separation of HDPE from PP was achieved by the three-stage sink-float method with 50% v/v ethyl alcohol. To succeed in the separation of a PS/ABS mixture from a PET/PVC mixture by the three-stage sink-float method, a 30% w/v calcium chloride solution was employed. To further separate post-consumer PET/PVC and PS/ABS based on plastic type, selective flotation was carried out. In order to succeed in selective flotation separation, it is necessary to render hydrophilic the surface of one or more species while the others are kept in a hydrophobic state. In flotation studies, the effects of wetting agent, frother, pH of solution and electrolyte on separation were determined. The selective flotation results showed that when using 500 mg l(-1) calcium lignosulfonate, 0.01 ppm MIBC, and 0.1 mg l(-1) CaCl2 at pH 11, PET could be separated from PVC. To separate ABS from PS, 200 mg l(-1) calcium lignosulfonate and 0.1 mg l(-1) CaCl2 at pH 7 were used as a flotation solution. Wettability of plastic increases when adding CaCl2 and corresponds to a decrease in its contact angles and to a reduction in the recovery of plastic in the floated product. PMID:17493796

  12. Laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. T. Greenland

    1990-01-01

    This work describes the atomic route to laser isotope separation. This is a process which uses intense pulsed lasers to photoionize one isotopic species of a chemical element, after which these ions are extracted electromagnetically. The paper describes only the isotopic enrichment of uranium for nuclear fuel cycles. It makes brief mention of the traditional cascade processes used at present,

  13. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    A recent Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study identified 59 waste sites at 14 DOE facilities across the nation that exhibit radionuclide contamination in excess of established limits. The rapid and efficient characterization of these sites, and the potentially contaminated regions that surround them represents a technological challenge with no existing solution. In particular, the past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of surface and subsurface soils. Such contamination commonly occurs within waste burial sites, cribs, pond bottom sediments and soils surrounding waste tanks or uranium scrap, ore, tailings, and slag heaps. The objective of the Uranium In Soils Integrated Demonstration is to develop optimal remediation methods for soils contaminated with radionuclides, principally uranium (U), at DOE sites. It is examining all phases involved in an actual cleanup, including all regulatory and permitting requirements, to expedite selection and implementation of the best technologies that show immediate and long-term effectiveness specific to the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and applicable to other radionuclide contaminated DOE sites. The demonstration provides for technical performance evaluations and comparisons of different developmental technologies at FEMP sites, based on cost-effectiveness, risk-reduction effectiveness, technology effectiveness, and regulatory and public acceptability. Technology groups being evaluated include physical and chemical contaminant separations, in situ remediation, real-time characterization and monitoring, precise excavation, site restoration, secondary waste treatment, and soil waste stabilization.

  14. Lab on valve-multisyringe flow injection system (LOV-MSFIA) for fully automated uranium determination in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Avivar, Jessica; Ferrer, Laura; Casas, Montserrat; Cerd, Vctor

    2011-06-15

    The hyphenation of lab-on-valve (LOV) and multisyringe flow analysis (MSFIA), coupled to a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC), allows the spectrophotometric determination of uranium in different types of environmental sample matrices, without any manual pre-treatment, and achieving high selectivity and sensitivity levels. On-line separation and preconcentration of uranium is carried out by means of UTEVA resin. The potential of the LOV-MSFIA makes possible the fully automation of the system by the in-line regeneration of the column. After elution, uranium(VI) is spectrophotometrically detected after reaction with arsenazo-III. The determination of levels of uranium present in environmental samples is required in order to establish an environmental control. Thus, we propose a rapid, cheap and fully automated method to determine uranium(VI) in environmental samples. The limit of detection reached is 1.9 ?g of uranium and depending on the preconcentrated volume; it results in ppt levels (10.3 ?g L(-1)). Different water sample matrices (seawater, well water, freshwater, tap water and mineral water) and a phosphogypsum sample (with natural uranium content) were satisfactorily analyzed. PMID:21641430

  15. Extraction of Uranium, Neptunium and Plutonium from Caustic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia H.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Engle, Nancy L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jade

    2004-03-28

    5 Fundamental research on uranium, neptunium and plutonium separation from alkaline media using solvent extraction is being conducted. Specific extractants for these actinides from alkaline media have been synthesized to investigate the feasibility of selective removal of these elements. Two families of extractants have been studied: terephthalamide and tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives. Fundamental studies were conducted to characterize their extraction behavior from a wide variety of aqueous conditions. The terephthalamide derivatives exhibit a significant extraction strength along with a discriminatory behavior among the actinides, plutonium being extracted the most strongly. Quantitative extraction of plutonium and moderate extraction of neptunium and uranium was achieved from a simple caustic solution. Interestingly, strontium is also quantitatively extracted by these derivatives. However, their stability to highly caustic solutions still needs to be imp roved. Tetra(hydroxybenzyl)ethylene diamine derivatives exhibit a very good stability to caustic conditions and are currently being studied.

  16. Highly selective adsorption and separation of aniline/phenol from aqueous solutions by microporous MIL-53(Al): a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuanlong; Han, Tongtong; Xiao, Gang; Ying, Yunpan; Huang, Hongliang; Yang, Qingyuan; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2014-10-21

    Experimental measurements have been combined with molecular simulations to investigate the adsorption and separation of aniline/phenol mixtures from aqueous solutions by the aluminum terephthalate MIL-53. The results show that the framework flexibility of this material plays a crucial role in the adsorption process and thus can greatly enhance the separation of the aniline/phenol mixture from their solutions. Compared with the conventional adsorbents, MIL-53(Al) shows the best performance for such systems of interest, from the points of view of both the adsorption capacities and the selectivities for aniline. The findings obtained in this work may facilitate more investigations in connection with the application of flexible nanoporous materials for the separation of organic compounds from liquid-phase environments. PMID:25251810

  17. Immobilization of Ag(i) into a metal-organic framework with -SO3H sites for highly selective olefin-paraffin separation at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ganggang; Huang, Minhui; Su, Ye; Xing, Huabin; Su, Baogen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Yang, Qiwei; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong; Bao, Zongbi; Chen, Banglin

    2015-02-18

    Introduction of Ag(i) ions into a sulfonic acid functionalized MOF ((Cr)-MIL-101-SO3H) significantly enhances its interactions with olefin double bonds, leading to its much higher selectivities for the separation of C2H4-C2H6 and C3H6-C3H8 at room temperature over the original (Cr)-MIL-101-SO3H and other adsorbents at room temperature. PMID:25581083

  18. Molecular laser isotope separation versus atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Parvin; B. Sajad; K. Silakhori; M. Hooshvar; Z. Zamanipour

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the competitive molecular and atomic laser isotope separation methods are investigated to evaluate the potential of each une for more economical fuel fabrication of enriched uranium celas which can be practically used in light water reactors (LWR). The advantages, drawbacks and feasibility of various techniques of laser isotope separation including AVLIS and the main MLIS methods such

  19. Identifying important structural features of ionic liquid stationary phases for the selective separation of nonpolar analytes by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Ingram, Isaiah C; Hantao, Leandro W; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-03-20

    A series of dicationic ionic liquid (IL)-based stationary phases were evaluated as secondary columns in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCGC) for the separation of aliphatic hydrocarbons from kerosene. In order to understand the role that structural features of ILs play on the selectivity of nonpolar analytes, the solvation parameter model was used to probe the solvation properties of the IL-based stationary phases. It was observed that room temperature ILs containing long free alkyl side chain substituents and long linker chains between the two cations possess less cohesive forces and exhibited the highest resolution of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The anion component of the IL did not contribute significantly to the overall separation, as similar selectivities toward aliphatic hydrocarbons were observed when examining ILs with identical cations and different anions. In an attempt to further examine the separation capabilities of the IL-based GC stationary phases, columns of the best performing stationary phases were prepared with higher film thickness and resulted in enhanced selectivity of aliphatic hydrocarbons. PMID:25698381

  20. Systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient model for real-life counter-current chromatography separation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Bing; Yi, Lun-Zhao; Qin, Yan-Hua; Yun, Yong-Huan; Deng, Bai-Chuan; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-05-01

    Solvent system selection is the first step toward a successful counter-current chromatography (CCC) separation. This paper introduces a systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient (NRTL-SAC) model, which is efficient in predicting the solute partition coefficient. Firstly, the application of the NRTL-SAC method was extended to the ethyl acetate/n-butanol/water and chloroform/methanol/water solvent system families. Moreover, the versatility and predictive capability of the NRTL-SAC method were investigated. The results indicate that the solute molecular parameters identified from hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water solvent system family are capable of predicting a large number of partition coefficients in several other different solvent system families. The NRTL-SAC strategy was further validated by successfully separating five components from Salvia plebeian R.Br. We therefore propose that NRTL-SAC is a promising high throughput method for rapid solvent system selection and highly adaptable to screen suitable solvent system for real-life CCC separation. PMID:25818557

  1. Selectivity of bis-triazinyl bipyridine ligands for americium(III) in Am/Eu separation by solvent extraction. Part 1. Quantum mechanical study on the structures of BTBP complexes and on the energy of the separation.

    PubMed

    Narbutt, Jerzy; Oziminski, Wojciech P

    2012-12-21

    Theoretical studies were carried out on two pairs of americium and europium complexes formed by tetra-N-dentate lipophilic BTBP ligands, neutral [ML(NO(3))(3)] and cationic [ML(2)](3+) where M = Am(III) or Eu(III), and L = 6,6'-bis-(5,6-diethyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine (C2-BTBP). Molecular structures of the complexes have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level and total energies of the complexes in various media were estimated using single point calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) and MP2/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory. In the calculations americium and europium ions were treated using pseudo-relativistic Stuttgart-Dresden effective core potentials and the accompanying basis sets. Selectivity in solvent extraction separation of two metal ions is a co-operative function of contributions from all extractable metal complexes, which depend on physico-chemical properties of each individual complex and on its relative amount in the system. Semi-quantitative analysis of BTBP selectivity in the Am/Eu separation process, based on the contributions from the two pairs of Am(III) and Eu(III) complexes, has been carried out. To calculate the energy of Am/Eu separation, a model of the extraction process was used, consisting of complex formation in water and transfer of the formed complex to the organic phase. Under the assumptions discussed in the paper, this simple two-step model results in reliable values of the calculated differences in the energy changes for each pair of the Am/Eu complexes in both steps of the process. The greater thermodynamic stability (in water) of the Am-BTBP complexes, as compared with the analogous Eu species, caused by greater covalency of the Am-N than Eu-N bonds, is most likely the main reason for BTBP selectivity in the separation of the two metal ions. The other potential reason, i.e. differences in lipophilic properties of the analogous complexes of Am and Eu, is less important with regard to this selectivity. PMID:23104258

  2. Actinide Lanthanide Separation Process ALSEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gelis, Artem V.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2014-01-29

    Separation of the minor actinides (Am, Cm) from the lanthanides at an industrial scale remains a significant technical challenge for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. To increase the safety of used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing, as well as reduce associated costs, a novel solvent extraction process has been developed. The process allows for partitioning minor actinides, lanthanides and fission products following uranium/plutonium/neptunium removal; minimizing the number of separation steps, flowsheets, chemical consumption, and waste. This new process, Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP), uses an organic solvent consisting of a neutral diglycolamide extractant, either N,N,N',N'-tetra(2 ethylhexyl)diglycolamide (T2EHDGA) or N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA), and an acidic extractant 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP]), dissolved in an aliphatic diluent (e.g. n-dodecane). The An/Ln co-extraction is conducted from moderate-to-strong nitric acid, while the selective stripping of the minor actinides from the lanthanides is carried out using a polyaminocarboxylic acid/citrate buffered solution at pH anywhere between 3 and 4.5. The extraction and separation of the actinides from the fission products is very effective in a wide range of HNO3 concentrations and the minimum separation factors for lanthanide/Am exceed 30 for Nd/Am, reaching > 60 for Eu/Am under some conditions. The experimental results presented here demonstrate the great potential for a combined system, consisting of a neutral extractant such as T2EHDGA or TODGA, and an acidic extractant such as HEH[EHP], for separating the minor actinides from the lanthanides.

  3. Investigation of the particle selectivity of a traveling potential wave; neon isotope separation with the Solitron process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, R.S.

    1994-07-26

    The specific goal of this three year effort was to investigate this novel isotope separation process itself: to determine whether isotopes could indeed be separated and, if so, with what limitations--space charge effects, instabilities, and, in particular, with what throughput limitations. Termed the Solitron process, the concept is based on the strong isotopic variation in wave/ion interaction for a potential wave passing through an ion beam when the wave speed is near the ion speed. The ion`s charge-to-mass ratio determines not only which ions are picked up by the wave but also the final energy of those ions that are picked up (accelerated to a higher energy); thus, this method can be used for isotope separation. Much progress was made regarding separation and throughput, concluding that separation works well in conjunction with electrostatic focusing used to obtain enough throughput (enough beam current) to make a practical device. The next step would likely be a production device, although development of an appropriate metal ion source would be useful. Funding is an issue; development cost estimates run around two million dollars for a market only several times that cost. Although there is much concern about the future supply of isotopes such as could be produced by the Solitron process, as well as costs, at present the supply from Oak Ridge and Russian sources is adequate for US needs. Should demand grow, these LDRD studies would strongly support proposals for further development of this Solitron process and help assure its likely success. For example, a point design for a magnesium mission was formulated to obtain a consistent set of design numbers that would optimize performance without pushing any constraints seen in these studies. A similar design could be formulated for other missions (magnesium was just a convenient target).

  4. Experiences in Hong Kong with the theory and practice of the albumin column method of sperm separation for sex selection.

    PubMed

    Rose, G A; Wong, A

    1998-01-01

    Controversy still surrounds the human serum albumin (HSA) method for separation of X- and Y-bearing human spermatozoa. There is doubt about whether the procedure does enrich sperm samples for the chosen sex chromosome. We have applied the HSA separation method in a clinic in Hong Kong, using the method as described by Ericsson et al. [Nature, 246, 421-424 (1973)] taking care to keep the sperm recovery to <5% of the initial number. Aliquots of separated spermatozoa were examined for X- and Y-bearing spermatozoa by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) using appropriate DNA probes. Of 18 couples wanting boys, 13 had single boys, one had twin boys, and one had twins comprising one boy and one girl. Only three single girls were born. This success rate of 83% is significantly different (P < 0.001) from the usual expected ratio. There were four miscarriages, one in the third and one in the fourth week of pregnancy. The times of the others are not definitely known, but are thought to have occurred early in pregnancy. We lack information on three couples. The FISH procedure showed no change in the normal and equal numbers of X- and Y-bearing spermatozoa after the HSA separation procedure. This study confirmed that the HSA sperm separation method can bias the number of babies in favour of males. However, the theory that it does so by enriching the sperm samples with Y-bearing spermatozoa appears to be incorrect and some other theory has to be postulated. It is tentatively proposed that passage through the HSA inactivates X-bearing spermatozoa more than Y-bearing spermatozoa, even though this is not apparent simply on inspection of sperm motility. PMID:9512247

  5. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial Action Selection Report, Appendix B of Attachment 2: Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section} 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which describes the proposed remedial action for the Naturita site. An extensive amount of data and supporting information has been generated and evaluated for this remedial action. These data and supporting information are not incorporated into this single document but are included or referenced in the supporting documents. The RAP consists of this RAS and four supporting documents or attachments. This Attachment 2, Geology Report describes the details of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Dry Flats disposal site.

  6. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. Derived enriched uranium market

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rutkowski

    1996-01-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived

  8. Selection of optimal conditions for separating lignan-containing extract from oil flax seed by thin-layer chromatography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. V. Stasevich; S. G. Mikhalenok; V. P. Kurchenko

    2009-01-01

    The optimum conditions for separating a lignan-containing extract from seeds of the oil flax (Linum usitatissimum) by thin-layer chromatography were identified. Elution using the method proposed here allowed identification of a brilliant\\u000a blue fluorescent spot associated with the main lignan, which was secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), giving clear identification\\u000a of this component in mixtures even without a standard. This method can

  9. Uniform-size hydrophobic polymer-based separation media selectively modified with a hydrophilic external polymeric layer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken Hosoya; Yutaka Kishii; Kazuhiro Kimata; Takeo Araki; Nobuo Tanaka; Frantisek Svec; Jean M. J. Frchet

    1995-01-01

    A simple procedure for the preparation of macroporous hydrophobic styrene-divinylbenzene polymeric separation media with a hydrophilic outer surface has been developed. A hydrophilic monomer and water-soluble polymerization initiator are added to the reaction mixture during the final polymerization step of the preparation of size-monodisperse particles. Because the hydrophobic styrene-divinylbenzene framework of the beads is already formed, and the hydrophilic monomer

  10. Extraction of uranium(VI) by N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (DEHIBA): from the batch experimental data to the countercurrent process

    SciTech Connect

    Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Cames, B.; Bisel, I.; Baron, P. [CEA Valrho, DEN/DRCP/SCPS, BP 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze, 30207 (France)

    2008-07-01

    The selective separation of uranium(VI) in the first cycle of the GANEX process is operated by a hydrometallurgical process using a monoamide extractant DEHiBA (N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide). Distribution ratios of uranium(VI) and nitric acid in 1 M DEHiBA/HTP were determined with macro-concentrations of uranium, and the experimental data were modelled by taking into account the activity coefficients of the constituents in aqueous phases. A flowsheet was designed and tested in a countercurrent process in laboratory-scale mixer-settlers on a surrogate U(VI)/HNO 3 feed. More than 99.999% of the uranium was recovered. (authors)

  11. Mortality among uranium enrichment workers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.P.; Bloom, T.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted on workers at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment facility in Pike County, Ohio, in response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Local 3-689 for information on long-term health effects. Primary hazards included inhalation exposure to uranyl fluoride containing uranium-235 and uranium-234, technetium-99 compounds, and hydrogen-fluoride. Uranium-238 presented a nephrotoxic hazard. Statistically significant mortality deficits based on U.S. death rates were found for all causes, accidents, violence, and diseases of nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems. Standardized mortality rates were 85 and 54 for all malignant neoplasms and for other genitourinary diseases, respectively. Deaths from stomach cancer and lymphatic/hematopoietic cancers were insignificantly increased. A subcohort selected for greatest potential uranium exposure has reduced deaths from these malignancies. Insignificantly increased stomach cancer mortality was found after 15 years employment and after 15 years latency. Routine urinalysis data suggested low internal uranium exposures.

  12. Magnetic, Durable, and Superhydrophobic Polyurethane@Fe3O4@SiO2@Fluoropolymer Sponges for Selective Oil Absorption and Oil/Water Separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Li, Lingxiao; Li, Bucheng; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponges were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) to bind the Fe3O4 nanoparticles tightly on the sponge and then dip-coating in a fluoropolymer (FP) aqueous solution. The sponges were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and other analytical techniques. The effects of CVD time of TEOS and FP concentration on wettability, mechanical properties, oil absorbency, and oil/water selectivity of the sponges were also investigated. The sponges exhibit fast magnetic responsivity and excellent superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity (CAwater = 157 and CAoil ? 0). The sponges also show very high efficiency in oil/water separation and could, driven by a magnet, quickly absorb floating oils on the water surface and heavy oils under water. Moreover, the PU@Fe3O4@SiO2@FP sponges could be used as membranes for oil/water separation and for continuous separation of large amounts of oil pollutants from the water surface with the help of a pump. The in turn binding of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, SiO2, and FP can also improve mechanical properties of the PU sponge. The sponges maintain the superhydrophobicity even when they are stretched with 200% strain or compressed with 50% strain. The sponges also show excellent mechanical stability, oil stability, and reusability in terms of superhydrophobicity and oil absorbency. The magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic PU sponges are very promising materials for practical oil absorption and oil/water separation. PMID:25671386

  13. Selective CO[sub 2] separation from CO[sub 2]-N[sub 2] mixtures by immobilized carbonate-glycerol membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Kovvali, A.S.; Majumdar, S.; Sirkar, K.K. (New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States))

    1999-09-01

    Acid gases present in numerous industrial waste gas streams have caused increasing global environmental concerns. To alleviate the pollution problems, acid gases in such streams need to be removed. The increased demand for acid gas treating and the cost of purification by conventional processes suggest a need for energy-efficient and selective gas-treating technology. Recent application of membrane separation of CO[sub 2] has been attracting attention due to its inherent simplicity, ease of control, compact modular nature, and great potential for lower cost and energy efficiency compared to traditional separation methods. These attractive features have stimulated significant research in gas separation using polymeric as well as liquid membranes. Separation of carbon dioxide from a humid mixture of CO[sub 2]-N[sub 2] through membranes containing immobilized solutions of Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3]-glycerol in porous and hydrophilic poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) substrate was experimentally studied. The effects of Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] concentration, CO[sub 2] partial pressure, and feed stream relative humidity (RH) were investigated.

  14. Selective CO{sub 2} separation from CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixtures by immobilized carbonate-glycerol membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Kovvali, A.S.; Majumdar, S.; Sirkar, K.K. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States)] [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Acid gases present in numerous industrial waste gas streams have caused increasing global environmental concerns. To alleviate the pollution problems, acid gases in such streams need to be removed. The increased demand for acid gas treating and the cost of purification by conventional processes suggest a need for energy-efficient and selective gas-treating technology. Recent application of membrane separation of CO{sub 2} has been attracting attention due to its inherent simplicity, ease of control, compact modular nature, and great potential for lower cost and energy efficiency compared to traditional separation methods. These attractive features have stimulated significant research in gas separation using polymeric as well as liquid membranes. Separation of carbon dioxide from a humid mixture of CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2} through membranes containing immobilized solutions of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-glycerol in porous and hydrophilic poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) substrate was experimentally studied. The effects of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} concentration, CO{sub 2} partial pressure, and feed stream relative humidity (RH) were investigated.

  15. Separating ISI and CCI in a two-step FIR Bezout equalizer for MIMO systems of frequency-selective channels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiteng Huang; J. Benesty; Jingdong Chen

    2004-01-01

    The use of multiple antennas at both the transmitter and the receiver in wireless communications implies a great channel capacity, but the signal detection is a crucial problem in achieving channel capacity, particularly in the general case of frequency selective channels, where both intersymbol interference (ISI) and cochannel interference (CCI) are significant. We show that ISI and CCI can be

  16. Development of an Ionization Scheme for Gold using the Selective Laser Ion Source at the On-Line Isotope Separator ISOLDE

    E-print Network

    Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B A; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2006-01-01

    At the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility, the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) can be used to ionize reaction products as they effuse from the target. The RILIS process of laser step-wise resonance ionization of atoms in a hot metal cavity provides a highly element selective stage in the preparation of the radioactive ion beam. As a result, the ISOLDE mass separators can provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. The number of elements available at RILIS has been extended to 26, with the addition of a new three-step ionization scheme for gold. The optimal ionization scheme was determined during an extensive study of the atomic energy levels and auto-ionizing states of gold, carried out by means of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy. Details of the ionization scheme and a summary of the spectroscopy study are presented.

  17. Tungstate as complex-forming reagent facilitating separation of selected polyphenols by capillary electrophoresis and its comparison with borate.

    PubMed

    Jc, Pavel; Polsek, Miroslav; Batista, Ana I V; Kaderov, Lenka

    2008-02-01

    A novel electrophoretic BGE containing tungstate as complex-forming reagent is suitable for the separation of polyphenols. Similar to molybdate-containing BGE reported earlier (cf. M. Polsek, et al.., Talanta 2006, 69, 192) addition of tungstate to BGE affects significantly migration of compounds/ligands with vicinal -OH groups due to the formation of negatively charged complexes involving W(VI) as central ion. Baseline separation of mixtures of flavonoids (apigenin, luteolin, hyperoside, quercetin, and rutin) and phenolic acids (chlorogenic and p-coumaric acid) was achieved within 15 min with optimized BGE of pH 7.4 containing 50 mM N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-2'-(2-ethanesulfonic acid) (HEPES), 2.2 mM tungstate, and 25% v/v of methanol. The separation was performed in a 75 cm (effective length 42 cm)x 75 microm id uncoated fused-silica capillary at 30 kV with spectrophotometric detection at 275 nm. The calibration curves were rectilinear for 25-175 microg/mL of all analytes (cinnamic acid as the internal standard). The LODs ranged from 1.8 to 6 microg/mL for all analytes except for chlorogenic acid. Intraday precision (n = 6) of migration times (RSD < or = 1.2%) and peak areas (RSD < or = 5.6%) was evaluated. The tungstate-based BGEs can be alternatively utilized for the analysis of polyphenols at considerably lower pH than with conventional alkaline borate-based BGEs. PMID:18203248

  18. A generic analysis of energy use and solvent selection for CO2 separation from post-combustion flue gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic calculation was performed to determine the theoretical minimum energy used to separate CO2 from a coal combustion flue gas in a typical adsorption-desorption system. Under ideal conditions, the minimum energy required to separate CO2 from post-combustion flue gas and produce pure CO2 at 1 atmospheric pressure was only about 1183 kJ/kg CO2. This amount could double with the addition of the driving forces of mass and heat transfer and the adverse impacts of absorption heat release on adsorption capacity. Thermodynamic analyses were also performed for the aqueous amine-based absorption process. Two CO2 reaction mechanisms, the carbamate formation reaction with primary/secondary amines and the CO2 hydration reaction with tertiary amines, were included in the absorption reaction. The reaction heat, sensible heat, and stripping heat were all important to the total heat requirement. The heat use of an ideal tertiary amine amounted to 2786 kJ/kg, compared to 3211 kJ/kg for an ideal primary amine. The heat usage of an ideal amine was about 20% lower than that of commercially available amines. Optimizing the absorption process configuration could further reduce energy use. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 2008 AIChE Spring National Meeting (New Orleans, LA 4/6-10/2008).

  19. Preparation of zirconium oxy ion-imprinted particle for the selective separation of trace zirconium ion from water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yueming; Liu, Pingxin; Liu, Xiaoli; Feng, Jing; Fan, Zhuangjun; Luan, Tianzhu

    2014-10-01

    Zr(IV) oxy ion-imprinted particle (Zr-IIP) was prepared using the metal ion imprinting technique in a sol-gel process on the surface of amino-silica. The dosages of zirconium ions as imprinted target, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) as a functional monomer and teraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a cross-linker were optimized. The prepared Zr-IIP and Zr(IV) oxy ion non-imprinted particle (Zr-NIP) were characterized. pH effect, binding ability and the selectivity were investigated in detail. The results showed that the Zr-IIP had an excellent binding capacity and selectivity in the water. The equilibrium data fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic and the Langmuir model for Zr(IV) binding onto Zr-IIP, respectively. The saturate binding capacity of Zr-IIP was found to be 196.08 ?mol g(-1), which was 18 times higher than that of Zr-NIP. The sequence of binding efficiency of Zr-IIP for various ions was Zr(IV)>Cu(II)>Sb(III)>Eu(III). The coordination number has an important effect on the dimensional binding capacity. The equilibrium binding capacity of Zr-IIP for Zr(IV) decreased little under various concentrations of Pb(II) ions. The analysis of relative selectivity coefficient (Kr) indicated that the Zr-IIP had an appreciable binding specificity towards Zr(IV) although the competitive ions coexisted in the water. The Zr-IIP could serve as an efficient selective material for recovering or removing zirconium from the water environment. PMID:25004058

  20. A biotin-conjugated pyridine-based isatoic anhydride, a selective room temperature RNA-acylating agent for the nucleic acid separation.

    PubMed

    Ursuegui, S; Yougnia, R; Moutin, S; Burr, A; Fossey, C; Cailly, T; Laayoun, A; Laurent, A; Fabis, F

    2015-03-11

    Isatoic anhydride derivatives, including a biotin and a disulfide linker were specifically designed for nucleic acid separation. 2'-OH selective RNA acylation, capture of biotinylated RNA adducts by streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and disulfide chemical cleavage led to isolation of highly enriched RNA samples from an initial 9/1 DNA-RNA mixture. Starting from the parent compound N-methylisatoic anhydride which was used at 65 C, we improved the extraction process by designing a new generation of isatoic anhydrides that are able to react under smoother conditions. Among them, a pyridine-based isatoic anhydride derivative was found to be reactive at room temperature, leading to enhance the efficiency and selectivity of the extraction process by significantly reducing DNA side extraction. The extracted and purified RNAs can then be detected by RT-PCR. PMID:25671759

  1. Process for the production of ceramic plutonium-uranium nuclear fuel in the form of sintered pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, K.; Stratton, R.W.

    1980-11-04

    Ceramic plutonium-uranium fuels are made by sintering wetchemical microspheres of plutonium-uranium solid-solution oxides, carbides, nitrides, or the like, or by sintering separate plutonium- and uranium-compound microspheres mixed together, the uranium compound alternatively being in a fine-grained to pulverulent form.

  2. Affinity dialysis - a method of continuous, rapid metal ion separation using dialysis membranes and selective, water-soluble polymers as extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Valus, R.J.; Lawrence, E.G.

    1988-08-01

    A membrane process utilizing dialysis and selective complexation by water-soluble polymers has been developed. This process, termed affinity dialysis, has been shown to be selectively extract and concentrate both cations and anions in a manner similar to ion exchange or solvent extraction. The selective removal of calcium from sodium with selectivity of about 30, removal of chromate ion from dilute streams, and separation of transition metal ions such as Cu/Fe and Cu/Zn have all been successfully demonstrated. Effects of different polymers, polymer concentration, temperature, and flow rates have been studied. The effect of increased polymer concentration is to increase product concentration if appropriate changes in feed, polymer solution, and strip flow rates are made. A continuous polymer solution recycle and regeneration system has been constructed and operated with Cu/Zn and chromate/chloride feed streams. Removal of over 95% of the desired ion in one pass and concentration factors of product over effluent in excess of 100 have been achieved at feed flow rates of 24 gal/d. Product concentrations of greater than 3% from as little as 400 ppm feed have been demonstrated in a continuous process. In addition, the degree of polymer loss to the effluent stream has been shown to be less than 0.01%/d for a typical system. Metal removal from typical feeds is about 0.9 g/m/sup 2/ per 1000 ppm metal in the feed. It is expected that this technique may be useful in the separation of organic and biological materials, as well as for ionic species.

  3. Alga-Derived Substrates Select for Distinct Betaproteobacterial Lineages and Contribute to Niche Separation in Limnohabitans Strains?

    PubMed Central

    imek, Karel; Kasalick, Vojt?ch; Zapom?lov, Elika; Hor?k, Karel

    2011-01-01

    We examined the proportions of major Betaproteobacteria subgroups within bacterial communities in diverse nonaxenic, monospecific cultures of algae or cyanobacteria: four species of cryptophyta (genera Cryptomonas and Rhodomonas), four species of chlorophyta (genera Pediastrum, Staurastrum, and Chlamydomonas), and two species of cyanobacteria (genera Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon). In the cryptophyta cultures, Betaproteobacteria represented 48 to 71% of total bacteria, the genus Limnohabitans represented 18 to 26%, and the Polynucleobacter B subcluster represented 5 to 16%. In the taxonomically diverse chlorophyta group, the genus Limnohabitans accounted for 7 to 45% of total bacteria. In contrast, cyanobacterial cultures contained significantly lower proportions of the Limnohabitans bacteria (1 to 3% of the total) than the cryptophyta and chlorophyta cultures. Notably, largely absent in all of the cultures was Polynucleobacter necessarius (Polynucleobacter C subcluster). Subsequently, we examined the growth of Limnohabitans strains in the presence of different algae or their extracellular products (EPP). Two strains, affiliated with Limnohabitans planktonicus and Limnohabitans parvus, were separately inoculated into axenic cultures of three algal species growing in an inorganic medium: Cryptomonas sp., Chlamydomonas noctigama, and Pediastrum boryanum. The Limnohabitans strains cocultured with these algae or inoculated into their EPP consistently showed (i) pronounced population growth compared to the control without the algae or EPP and (ii) stronger growth stimulation of L. planktonicus than of L. parvus. Overall, growth responses of the Limnohabitans strains cultured with algae were highly species specific, which suggests a pronounced niche separation between two closely related Limnohabitans species likely mediated by different abilities to utilize the substrates produced by different algal species. PMID:21873481

  4. Alga-derived substrates select for distinct Betaproteobacterial lineages and contribute to niche separation in Limnohabitans strains.

    PubMed

    Simek, Karel; Kasalick, Vojt?ch; Zapom?lov, Eliska; Hornk, Karel

    2011-10-01

    We examined the proportions of major Betaproteobacteria subgroups within bacterial communities in diverse nonaxenic, monospecific cultures of algae or cyanobacteria: four species of cryptophyta (genera Cryptomonas and Rhodomonas), four species of chlorophyta (genera Pediastrum, Staurastrum, and Chlamydomonas), and two species of cyanobacteria (genera Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon). In the cryptophyta cultures, Betaproteobacteria represented 48 to 71% of total bacteria, the genus Limnohabitans represented 18 to 26%, and the Polynucleobacter B subcluster represented 5 to 16%. In the taxonomically diverse chlorophyta group, the genus Limnohabitans accounted for 7 to 45% of total bacteria. In contrast, cyanobacterial cultures contained significantly lower proportions of the Limnohabitans bacteria (1 to 3% of the total) than the cryptophyta and chlorophyta cultures. Notably, largely absent in all of the cultures was Polynucleobacter necessarius (Polynucleobacter C subcluster). Subsequently, we examined the growth of Limnohabitans strains in the presence of different algae or their extracellular products (EPP). Two strains, affiliated with Limnohabitans planktonicus and Limnohabitans parvus, were separately inoculated into axenic cultures of three algal species growing in an inorganic medium: Cryptomonas sp., Chlamydomonas noctigama, and Pediastrum boryanum. The Limnohabitans strains cocultured with these algae or inoculated into their EPP consistently showed (i) pronounced population growth compared to the control without the algae or EPP and (ii) stronger growth stimulation of L. planktonicus than of L. parvus. Overall, growth responses of the Limnohabitans strains cultured with algae were highly species specific, which suggests a pronounced niche separation between two closely related Limnohabitans species likely mediated by different abilities to utilize the substrates produced by different algal species. PMID:21873481

  5. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  6. Advanced reactor design study. Assessing nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, R.M.; Goldsmith, S.; Newman, D.F.; Trapp, T.J.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1981-09-01

    The objective of the Advanced Reactor Design Study (ARDS) is to identify and evaluate nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors (LWRs). The results of this study provide a basis for selecting and demonstrating specific nonbackfittable concepts that have good potential for implementation. Lead responsibility for managing the study was assigned to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle were selected separately for PWRs and BWRs due to basic differences in the way specific concepts apply to those plants. Nonbackfittable concepts are those that are too costly to incorporate in existing plants, and thus, could only be economically incorporated in new reactor designs or plants in very early stages of construction. Essential results of the Advanced Reactor Design Study are summarized.

  7. Selective ionic liquid ferrofluid based dispersive-solid phase extraction for simultaneous preconcentration/separation of lead and cadmium in milk and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fasih Ramandi, Negin; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, a selective ionic liquid ferrofluid has been used in dispersive solid phase extraction (IL-FF-D-SPE) for simultaneous preconcentration and separation of lead and cadmium in milk and biological samples combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. To improve the selectivity of the ionic liquid ferrofluid, the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles with a magnetic core as sorbent was modified by loading 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphtol. Due to the rapid injection of an appropriate amount of ionic liquid ferrofluid into the aqueous sample by a syringe, extraction can be achieved within a few seconds. In addition, based on the attraction of the ionic liquid ferrofluid to a magnet, no centrifugation step is needed for phase separation. The experimental parameters of IL-FF-D-SPE were optimized using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) after a Plackett-Burman screening design. Under the optimum conditions, the relative standard deviations of 2.2% and 2.4% were obtained for lead and cadmium, respectively (n=7). The limit of detections were 1.21 g L(-1) for Pb(II) and 0.21 g L(-1) for Cd(II). The preconcentration factors were 250 for lead and 200 for cadmium and the maximum adsorption capacities of the sorbent were 11.18 and 9.34 mg g(-1) for lead and cadmium, respectively. PMID:25281121

  8. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

  9. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A process for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  10. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  11. Collision-Induced Release, Ion Mobility Separation, and Amino Acid Sequence Analysis of Subunits from Mass-Selected Noncovalent Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Deepali; Dodds, Eric D.

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, mass spectrometry has become a valuable tool for detecting and characterizing protein-protein interactions and for measuring the masses and subunit stoichiometries of noncovalent protein complexes. The gas-phase dissociation of noncovalent protein assemblies via tandem mass spectrometry can be useful in confirming subunit masses and stoichiometries; however, dissociation experiments that are able to yield subunit sequence information must usually be conducted separately. Here, we furnish proof of concept for a method that allows subunit sequence information to be directly obtained from a protein aggregate in a single gas-phase analysis. The experiments were carried out using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a traveling-wave ion mobility separator. This instrument configuration allows for a noncovalent protein assembly to be quadrupole selected, then subjected to two successive rounds of collision-induced dissociation with an intervening stage of ion mobility separation. This approach was applied to four model proteins as their corresponding homodimers: glucagon, ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and ?-lactoglobulin. In each case, b- and y-type fragment ions were obtained upon further collisional activation of the collisionally-released subunits, resulting in up to 50% sequence coverage. Owing to the incorporation of an ion mobility separation, these results also suggest the intriguing possibility of measuring complex mass, complex collisional cross section, subunit masses, subunit collisional cross sections, and sequence information for the subunits in a single gas-phase experiment. Overall, these findings represent a significant contribution towards the realization of protein interactomic analyses, which begin with native complexes and directly yield subunit identities.

  12. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  13. Meniscus membranes for separations

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C. (Irvine, CA); Jorgensen, Betty (Jemez Springs, NM); Pesiri, David R. (Aliso Viejo, CA)

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  14. Cherenkov light detection as a velocity selector for uranium fission products at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Enomoto, A.; Kouno, J.; Yamaki, S.; Matsunaga, S.; Suzaki, F.; Suzuki, T.; Abe, Y.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S.; Ozawa, A.; Saito, Y.; Sawahata, K.; Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.

    2014-12-01

    The in-flight particle separation capability of intermediate-energy radioactive ion (RI) beams produced at a fragment separator can be improved with the Cherenkov light detection technique. The cone angle of Cherenkov light emission varies as a function of beam velocity. This can be exploited as a velocity selector for secondary beams. Using heavy ion beams available at the HIMAC synchrotron facility, the Cherenkov light angular distribution was measured for several thin radiators with high refractive indices (n = 1.9 ~ 2.1). A velocity resolution of ~10-3 was achieved for a 56Fe beam with an energy of 500 MeV/nucleon. Combined with the conventional rigidity selection technique coupled with energy-loss analysis, the present method will enable the efficient selection of an exotic species from huge amounts of various nuclides, such as uranium fission products at the BigRIPS fragment separator located at the RI Beam Factory.

  15. Chiral separation of selected proline derivatives using a polysaccharide-type stationary phase by supercritical fluid chromatography and comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanqun; Pritts, Wayne A; Zhang, Shuhong

    2008-05-01

    Chiral separation of selected proline derivatives was conducted on a polysaccharide-type chiral stationary phase (CSP) using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Effect of both modifier percentage and column temperature was studied. As modifier content decreased, the retention and selectivity increased. However, retention was decreased as temperature increased from 30 degrees C to 40 degrees C. In comparison to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), better resolution was achieved for Boc-2-methylproline using SFC along with a shorter run time. Selectivity is impacted less by change of ethanol content in the mobile phase under SFC conditions than with HPLC. Chiral recognition mechanism under SFC and HPLC conditions was also examined. With SFC, the contribution from hydrogen bonding is most likely a dominant interaction for retention rather than chiral recognition. This is supported by the limited thermodynamic data and the elution order change for Boc-proline between SFC and HPLC. Linearity, injection repeatability and limit of quantitation were determined for Boc-2-methylproline. PMID:18054949

  16. The selective cleanup of complex matrices and simultaneous separation of benzo[a]pyrene by solid-phase extraction with MgO microspheres as sorbents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Li, Yun; Zhang, Zhiping; Su, Fan; Qi, Peipei; Lu, Xianbo; Chen, Jiping

    2011-12-23

    A new method for the selective cleanup of complex matrices and simultaneous separation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) was developed in this study. This method was based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) using magnesium oxide microspheres as sorbents, and it eliminated interferences from various impurities, such as lipids, sulphur, pigments, halobenzenes, polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorodibenzofurans. Several parameters, including the volume of rinsing and eluting solvents, the type of loading solvents and SPE sorbents, were optimized systematically. The capability for impurity removal was verified by gel permeation chromatography, gas chromatography, and liquid chromatography. Compared to commercial sorbents (silica gel, florisil and alumina), MgO microspheres exhibited excellent performance in the selective isolation of BaP and removal of impurities. The proposed method was applied to detect BaP in complex samples (sediments, soils, fish, and porcine liver). The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 1.04 ngL(-1), and the resulting regression coefficient (r(2)) was greater than 0.999 over a broad concentration range (9.5-7600 ngL(-1)). In contrast to traditional methods, the proposed method can give rise to higher recovery (85.1-100.8%) and better selectivity with simpler operation and less consumption of organic solvents (20-40 mL). PMID:22099224

  17. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (1) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (2) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994.

  18. Diffusion and Leaching of Selected Radionuclides (Iodine-129, Technetium-99, and Uranium) Through Category 3 Waste Encasement Concrete and Soil Fill Material

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Whyatt, Greg A.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Martin, P. F.; Schwab, Kristen E.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2001-09-24

    An assessment of long-term performance of Category 3 waste-enclosing cement grouts requires data about the leachability/diffusion of radionuclide species (iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium) when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. Leachability data were collected by conducting dynamic (ANS-16.1) and static leach tests on radionuclide-containing cement specimens. The diffusivity of radionuclides in soil and concrete media was collected by conducting soil-soil and concrete-soil half-cell experiments.

  19. Evaluation of the analysis of plutonium materials for low-level uranium using a modified Scintrex uranium analyzer (laser fluorometer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, C. E.; Weiss, J. R.

    1985-09-01

    Evaluation and analysis of low-level uranium in plutonium materials using a modified Scintrex UA-3 Uranium Analyzer are described. Two liquid/liquid procedures for the separation of uranium from plutonium are compared. They are 0.1M tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in cyclohexane and 20% (v/v) tributyl phosphate (TBP) in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (iso-octane).

  20. Evaluation of the analysis of plutonium materials for low-level uranium using a modified Scintrex uranium analyzer (laser fluorometer)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Michel; J. R. Weiss

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation and analysis of low-level uranium in plutonium materials using a modified Scintrex UA-3 Uranium Analyzer are described. Two liquid\\/liquid procedures for the separation of uranium from plutonium are compared. They are 0.1M tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in cyclohexane and 20% (v\\/v) tributyl phosphate (TBP) in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (iso-octane).

  1. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid-liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions. PMID:25576783

  2. Process for recovering niobium from uranium-niobium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, S.A.; Creech, E.T.; Northcutt, W.G.

    1982-09-27

    Niobium is recovered from scrap uranium-niobium alloy by melting the scrap with tin, solidifying the billet thus formed, heating the billet to combine niobium with tin therein, placing the billet in hydrochloric acid to dissolve the uranium and form a precipitate of niobium stannide, then separating the precipitate from the acid.

  3. Process for recovering niobium from uranium-niobium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN); Creech, Edward T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Northcutt, Walter G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    Niobium is recovered from scrap uranium-niobium alloy by melting the scrap with tin, solidifying the billet thus formed, heating the billet to combine niobium with tin therein, placing the billet in hydrochloric acid to dissolve the uranium and leave an insoluble residue of niobium stannide, then separating the niobium stannide from the acid.

  4. Whole-rock uranium analysis by fission track activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Haines, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    We report a whole-rock uranium method in which the polished sample and track detector are separated in a vacuum chamber. Irradiation with thermal neutrons induces uranium fission in the sample, and the detector records the integrated fission track density. Detection efficiency and geometric factors are calculated and compared with calibration experiments.

  5. New reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatographic method for selective separation of yttrium from all rare earth elements employing nitrilotriacetate complexes in anion exchange mode.

    PubMed

    Dybczy?ski, Rajmund S; Kulisa, Krzysztof; Pyszynska, Marta; Bojanowska-Czajka, Anna

    2015-03-20

    Separation of Y from other rare earth elements (REE) is difficult because of similarity of its ionic radius to ionic radii of Tb, Dy and Ho. In the new RP-HPLC system with C18 column, tetra-n-butyl ammonium hydroxide (TBAOH) as an ion interaction reagent (IIR), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as a complexing agent at pH=2.8-3.5, and post column derivatization with Arsenazo III, yttrium is eluted in the region of light REE, between Nd and Sm and is base line separated from Nd and Sm and even from promethium. Simple model employing literature data on complex formation of REE with NTA and based on anion exchange mechanism was developed to foresee the order of elution of individual REE. The model correctly predicted that lanthanides up to Tb will be eluted in the order of increasing Atomic Number (At.No.) but all heavier REE will show smaller retention factors than Tb. Concurrent UV/VIS detection at 658nm and the use of radioactive tracers together with ?-ray spectrometric measurements made possible to establish an unique elution order of elution of REE: La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Y, Sm, Er, Ho, Tm, Yb, Eu, Lu, Dy+Gd, Tb, Sc. The real place of Y however, in this elution series differs from that predicted by the model (Y between Sm and Eu). The method described in this work enables selective separation of Y from La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm and all heavier REE treated as a group. PMID:25700726

  6. Laser separation of medical isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Eerkens; D. A. Puglishi; W. H. Miller

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for different separated isotopes as feed material for reactor and cyclotron-produced radioisotopes used by a fast-growing radiopharmaceutical industry. One new technology that may meet future demands for medical isotopes is molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS). This method was investigated for the enrichment of uranium in the 1970`s and 1980s by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Isotope

  7. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  8. Uranium mineralization in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Dreschhoff, G.A.M.; Zeller, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    For the past 10 antarctic field seasons, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey has been conducted over widely separated parts of the continent. Localized accumulations of both primary and secondary uranium minerals have been discovered at several localities scattered along the Transantarctic Mountains from the Scott Glacier to northern Victoria Land. A number of highly significant radiation anomalies have been discovered in the area between the Koettlitz Glacier and the Pyramid Trough. The occurrences consist of pegmatite vein complexes which contain an association of primary uranium and thorium minerals. Of still greater significance is the fact that abundant secondary uranium minerals were found in association with the primary deposits, and they indicate clearly that uranium is geochemically mobile under the conditions imposed by the arid polar climate that now exists in southern Victoria Land. Preliminary results of a uranium analysis performed by neutron activation indicate a concentration of 0.12% uranium in a composite sample from the two veins. Even higher levels of thorium are present. The nature of the primary uranium mineralization is currently under investigation. Preliminary results are discussed.

  9. Selective separation of uranyl ion from TRU`s in a combined solvent extraction process using tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Diamond, H.; Rickert, P.G.; Muntean, J.V.; Mendoza, M.D.; Giuseppe, G. di [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Selective partitioning of uranyl from transuranic elements in a solvent extraction system which employs a neutral organophosphorus extractant and an aqueous complexant has been demonstrated in a previous report. The extractant solution combines octyl(phenyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), diamyl(amyl)phosphonate (or tributylphosphate), and di(t-butylcyclohexano)-18-crown-6 in Isopar L, and is designed for simultaneous removal of strontium, technetium, lanthanides and actinides from radioactive wastes. The aqueous complexant is tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA). In this report, the separation of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} from Np(IV), Eu(III), Am(III), and Pu(IV) using the Combined Process Solvent has been optimized. Potentiometric titration and NMR spectroscopic results describe the distribution of THFTCA into the organic phase as a function of acidity and [THFTCA]. Further potentiometric titration experiments have determined the stoichiometry and stability of uranyl complexes in the aqueous phase. The thermodynamic data indicate that the uranyl complexes are anomalously weak which partially accounts for the selectivity. Ternary complexes involving UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, CMPO, and THFTCA in the extractant phase also appear to play a role. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Remedial Action Selection Report. Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This proposed remedial action plan incorporates the results of detailed investigation of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the proposed disposal site. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/waterborne materials to a permanent repository at the proposed Burro Canyon disposal cell. The proposed disposal site will be geomorphically stable. Seismic design parameters were developed for the geotechnical analyses of the proposed cell. Cell stability was analyzed to ensure long-term performance of the disposal cell in meeting design standards, including slope stability, settlement, and liquefaction potential. The proposed cell cover and erosion protection features were also analyzed and designed to protect the RRM (residual radioactive materials) against surface water and wind erosion. The location of the proposed cell precludes the need for permanent drainage or interceptor ditches. Rock to be used on the cell top-, side-, and toeslopes was sized to withstand probable maximum precipitation events.

  11. Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15

    A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

  12. The Navajo Uranium Mining Experience, 2003-1952

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chris Shuey

    This bibliography, compiled by the Southwest Research and Information Center, contains resources related to Navajo uranium issues and communities affected by uranium mining impacts since the mid-1970s. Entries were selected for their relevancy to Navajo community concerns, Navajo Nation policies, and health and environmental effects of uranium development on Navajo lands. Topics for resources include articles, books, policy statements, reports, presentations, testimony, and published medical, scientific and sociological literature.

  13. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  14. Interplay of metalloligand and organic ligand to tune micropores within isostructural mixed-metal organic frameworks (M'MOFs) for their highly selective separation of chiral and achiral small molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhab C; Guo, Qunsheng; He, Yabing; Kim, Jaheon; Zhao, Cong-Gui; Hong, Kunlun; Xiang, Shengchang; Zhang, Zhangjing; Thomas, K Mark; Krishna, Rajamani; Chen, Banglin

    2012-05-23

    Four porous isostructural mixed-metal-organic frameworks (M'MOFs) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The pores within these M'MOFs are systematically tuned by the interplay of both the metalloligands and organic ligands which have enabled us not only to direct their highly selective separation of chiral alcohols 1-phenylethanol (PEA), 2-butanol (BUT), and 2-pentanol (2-PEN) with the highest ee up to 82.4% but also to lead highly selective separation of achiral C(2)H(2)/C(2)H(4) separation. The potential application of these M'MOFs for the fixed bed pressure swing adsorption (PSA) separation of C(2)H(2)/C(2)H(4) has been further examined and compared by the transient breakthrough simulations in which the purity requirement of 40 ppm in the outlet gas can be readily fulfilled by the fixed bed M'MOF-4a adsorber at ambient conditions. PMID:22545712

  15. Plant-uptake of uranium: Hydroponic and soil system studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramaswami, A.; Carr, P.; Burkhardt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available on screening and selection of terrestrial plants for uptake and translocation of uranium from soil. This article evaluates the removal of uranium from water and soil by selected plants, comparing plant performance in hydroponic systems with that in two soil systems (a sandy-loam soil and an organic-rich soil). Plants selected for this study were Sunflower (Helianthus giganteus), Spring Vetch (Vicia sativa), Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa), Juniper (Juniperus monosperma), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea), and Bush Bean (Phaseolus nanus). Plant performance was evaluated both in terms of the percent uranium extracted from the three systems, as well as the biological absorption coefficient (BAC) that normalized uranium uptake to plant biomass. Study results indicate that uranium extraction efficiency decreased sharply across hydroponic, sandy and organic soil systems, indicating that soil organic matter sequestered uranium, rendering it largely unavailable for plant uptake. These results indicate that site-specific soils must be used to screen plants for uranium extraction capability; plant behavior in hydroponic systems does not correlate well with that in soil systems. One plant species, Juniper, exhibited consistent uranium extraction efficiencies and BACs in both sandy and organic soils, suggesting unique uranium extraction capabilities.

  16. Innovative Separations Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    J. Tripp; N. Soelberg; R. Wigeland

    2011-05-01

    Reprocessing used nuclear fuel (UNF) is a multi-faceted problem involving chemistry, material properties, and engineering. Technology options are available to meet a variety of processing goals. A decision about which reprocessing method is best depends significantly on the process attributes considered to be a priority. New methods of reprocessing that could provide advantages over the aqueous Plutonium Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) and Uranium Extraction + (UREX+) processes, electrochemical, and other approaches are under investigation in the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Separations Campaign. In an attempt to develop a revolutionary approach to UNF recycle that may have more favorable characteristics than existing technologies, five innovative separations projects have been initiated. These include: (1) Nitrogen Trifluoride for UNF Processing; (2) Reactive Fluoride Gas (SF6) for UNF Processing; (3) Dry Head-end Nitration Processing; (4) Chlorination Processing of UNF; and (5) Enhanced Oxidation/Chlorination Processing of UNF. This report provides a description of the proposed processes, explores how they fit into the Modified Open Cycle (MOC) and Full Recycle (FR) fuel cycles, and identifies performance differences when compared to 'reference' advanced aqueous and fluoride volatility separations cases. To be able to highlight the key changes to the reference case, general background on advanced aqueous solvent extraction, advanced oxidative processes (e.g., volumetric oxidation, or 'voloxidation,' which is high temperature reaction of oxide UNF with oxygen, or modified using other oxidizing and reducing gases), and fluorination and chlorination processes is provided.

  17. Depleted Uranium Technical Brief

    E-print Network

    Depleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation Washington, DC 20460 EPA-402-R-06-011 December 2006 #12;#12;Depleted Uranium Technical Brief EPA of Radiation and Indoor Air Radiation Protection Division ii #12;iii #12;FOREWARD The Depleted Uranium

  18. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  19. Field ionization for laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. Gallagher; R. M. Hill; S. A. Edelstein

    1976-01-01

    Research into an aspect of the uranium fuel cycle, the separation of the fissionable U235 fuel from the more abundant, stable U238 is discussed. It was demonstrated by laboratory experiments that, by using electric field ionization of atoms excited by lasers, the efficiency of atomic laser isotope separation can be improved a thousandfold over the direct photoionization method. Both atomic

  20. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small town of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated UMTRA sites at Slick Rock, the Union Carbide (UC) site and the North Continent (NC) site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The UC site is approximately 1 mile (mi) [2 kilometers (km)] downstream of the NC site. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres (ac) [22 hectares (ha)] at the UC site and 12 ac (4.9 ha) at the NC site. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 620, 000 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) [470,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3})]. In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, four vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into groundwater.

  1. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Tolt, T.L. (Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (United States))

    1993-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

  2. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tolt, T.L. [Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (United States)

    1993-02-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology.

  3. Speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental samples determined by selective separation and preconcentration on silica gel chemically modified with niobium(V) oxide.

    PubMed

    Martendal, Edmar; Maltez, Heloisa Frana; Carasek, Eduardo

    2009-01-15

    In this study a new method for chromium speciation in water using solid phase extraction coupled to a flow injection system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The adsorption behavior of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on Nb2O5-SiO2 allowed the selective separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) in the pH range of 6-9. Thus, a method for Cr(III) preconcentration and extraction using Nb2O5-SiO2 was developed. Total chromium was determined after the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) using sodium sulfite in acidic medium. The operational variables of the preconcentration and reduction procedures were optimized through full factorial and Doehlert designs. The limit of detection for Cr(III) was 0.34microgL(-1) and the precision was below 4.6%. Results for recovery tests using different environmental samples were between 90 and 105%. Certified reference materials (NIST 1640 and NIST 1643e) were analyzed in order to check the accuracy of the proposed method, and the results were in agreement with the certified values. PMID:18455867

  4. MICRONUCLEI IN EPITHELIAL CELLS FROM SPUTUM OF URANIUM WORKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exfoliated-cell micronucleus (MN) assay was used to assess cytogenetic effects of exposure to radon progeny and cigarette smoke among 99 Colorado plateau uranium workers. ubjects were selected at random from employees in underground and open-pit uranium mines, ore mills, labo...

  5. Selective americium(III) complexation by dithiophosphinates: a density functional theoretical validation for covalent interactions responsible for unusual separation behavior from trivalent lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Ghanty, Tapan Kumar; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar; Manchanda, Vijay Kumar

    2011-05-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides is a challenging task for chemists because of their similar charge and chemical behavior. Soft donor ligands like Cyanex-301 were found to be selective for the trivalent actinides over the lanthanides. Formation of different extractable species for Am(3+) and various lanthanides (viz. La(3+), Eu(3+), and Lu(3+)) was explained on the basis of their relative stabilities as compared to their corresponding trinitrato complexes calculated using the density functional method. Further, the metal-ligand complexation energy was segregated into electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, and orbital interaction components. Higher covalence in the M-S bond in the dithiophosphinate complexes as compared to the M-O bond in the nitrate complexes was reflected in the higher orbital and lower electrostatic interactions for the complexes with increasing number of dithiophosphinate ligands. Higher affinity of the dithiophosphinate ligands for Am(3+) over Eu(3+) was corroborated with higher covalence in the Am-S bond as compared to the Eu-S bond, which was reflected in shorter bond length in the case of the former and higher ligand to metal charge transfer in Am(III)-dithiophosphinate complexes. The results were found to be consistent in gas phase density functional theory (DFT) calculations using different GGA functional. More negative complexation energies in the case of Eu(3+) complexes of Me(2)PS(2)(-) as compared to the corresponding Am(3+) complexes in spite of marginally higher covalence in the Am-S bond as compared to the Eu-S bond might be due to higher ionic interaction in the Eu(3+) complexes in the gas phase calculations. The higher covalence in the Am-S bond obtained from the gas phase studies of their geometries and electronic structures solely cannot explain the selectivity of the dithiophosphinate ligands for Am(3+) over Eu(3+). Presence of solvent may also play an important role to control the selectivity as observed from higher complexation energies for Am(3+) in the presence of solvent. Thus, the theoretical results were able to explain the experimentally observed trends in the metal-ligand complexation affinity. PMID:21449541

  6. Separations inside a cube

    E-print Network

    A. F. F. Teixeira

    2001-12-28

    Two points are randomly selected inside a three-dimensional euclidian cube. The value l of their separation lies somewhere between zero and the length of a diagonal of the cube. The probability density P(l) of the separation is obtained analytically. Also a Monte Carlo computer simulation is performed, showing good agreement with the formulas obtained.

  7. Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of thermally treated and. gamma. -irradiated phases of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate cation exchanger: separation of Al(III) from some metal ions and removal of cations from water

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1983-01-01

    Ion-exchange and selectivity behavior of zirconium(IV) arsenophosphate (ZAP) has been studied systematically after thermal and irradiation treatments. As a result, an increase in the ion-exchange capacity and a complete reversal in the selectivity sequence for some common metal ions has been observed on heating. The modified phase of ZAP has been utilized successfully for the quantitative separation of aluminum from numerous metal ions and for the removal of cations from water. 5 figures, 3 tables.

  8. On the importance of the nature of the ionic liquids in the selective simultaneous separation of the substrates and products of a transesterification reaction through supported ionic liquid membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonia P. de los Ros; Francisco J. Hernndez-Fernndez; Francisca Toms-Alonso; Manuel Rubio; Demetrio Gmez; Gloria Vllora

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we reported the selective simultaneous separation of the substrates and products of a transesterification reaction (vinyl butyrate, 1-butanol, butyl butyrate, and butyric acid) through supported liquid membranes (SLMs) based on two ionic liquids (ILs): 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [bmim+][PF6?], and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [omim+][PF6?]. The significant differences observed in the selectivity values, attributed to the different nature of the ionic liquid phase

  9. N,N'-Dialkyl-N,N'-diaryl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxamides as donor ligands for separation of rare earth elements with a high and unusual selectivity. DFT computational and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Ustynyuk, Yu A; Borisova, N E; Babain, V A; Gloriozov, I P; Manuilov, A Y; Kalmykov, S N; Alyapyshev, M Yu; Tkachenko, L I; Kenf, E V; Ustynyuk, N A

    2015-04-16

    N,N'-Dialkyl-N,N'-diaryl-1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxamides () were predicted (DFT simulation) and then were proved experimentally to be efficient donor ligands with high and unusual selectivity for the extraction separation of lanthanides. Distribution coefficients D of lanthanide cations in two-phase aqueous solution-polar organic solvent decrease with increasing Ln(3+) atomic number. The selectivity factors SFLn1/Ln2 for adjacent lanthanide ions were found to be about 3. PMID:25828700

  10. Can we predict uranium bioavailability based on soil parameters? Part 1: Effect of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Vandenhove; M. Van Hees; K. Wouters; J. Wannijn

    2007-01-01

    Present study aims to quantify the influence of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration for 238U spiked soils. Eighteen soils collected under pasture were selected such that they covered a wide range for those parameters hypothesised as being potentially important in determining U sorption. Maximum soil solution uranium concentrations were observed at alkaline pH, high inorganic carbon content and

  11. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

  12. BIOREMEDIATION OF URANIUM CONTAMINATED SOILS AND WASTES.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS,A.J.

    1998-09-17

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (i) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (ii) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste such as Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Na released into solution are removed, thus reducing the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs.

  13. Recovery of uranium from seawater by immobilized tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Nakajima, A.

    1987-06-01

    Tannin compounds having multiple adjacent hydroxy groups have an extremely high affinity for uranium. To prevent the leaching of tannins into water and to improve the adsorbing characteristics of these compounds, the authors tried to immobilize tannins. The immobilized tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability to uranium, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The immobilized tannin can recover uranium from natural seawater with high efficiency. About 2530 ..mu..g uranium is adsorbed per gram of this adsorbent within 22 h. Depending on the concentration in seawater, an enrichment of up to 766,000-fold within the adsorbent is possible. Almost all uranium adsorbed is easily desorbed with a very dilute acid. Thus, the immobilized tannin can be used repeatedly in the adsorption-desorption process.

  14. Quadrupolar waves in uranium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Carretta, S; Santini, P; Caciuffo, R; Amoretti, G

    2010-10-15

    In presence of active orbital degrees of freedom, elementary excitations around a broken-symmetry state may include multipolar waves, but none of these exotic dispersive excitation branches has ever been identified. We show that quadrupolar waves constitute a major component of the dynamics of uranium dioxide in its magnetoquadrupolar ordered phase, and that many unexplained features in existing inelastic neutron scattering data, including a whole excitation branch, are associated with these propagating quadrupolar fluctuations. Our model permits us to separate the role of Jahn-Teller and superexchange mechanisms as sources of quadrupolar interactions. PMID:21231002

  15. Amidoxime-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes by plasma techniques for efficient removal of uranium(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Gu, Zexing; Yang, Jijun; Liao, Jiali; Yang, Yuanyou; Liu, Ning; Tang, Jun

    2014-11-01

    A novel solid-phase extractant, amidoxime-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes (AO-g-MWCNTs), has been synthesized using plasma techniques to selectively separate uranium from nuclear industrial effluents. The adsorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), elemental analysis, Raman, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermal gravity analysis (TGA). Sorption behaviors of uranium(VI) on AO-g-MWCNTs were investigated by varying pH, contact time, initial uranium concentration, and temperature. An optimum sorption capacity of 145 mg g-1 (0.61 mmol g-1) for U(VI) was obtained at pH 4.5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to explore the sorption mechanism of U(VI) on AO-g-MWCNTs. Furthermore, AO-g-MWCNTs could selectively adsorb U(VI) in aqueous solution containing co-existing ions (Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Sr2+, Ba2+ and Cs+). This study shows that AO-g-MWCNTs are potential adsorbent for effective removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  16. PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1957-01-01

    A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of ; uranium is reported. In accordance with the method the higher oxides of uranium ; may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO), the latter converted into uranium ; tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF convented to ; UF by reaction with a fluorinating agent. The

  17. Synthesis of Uranium Trichloride for the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    B.R. Westphal; J.C. Price; R.D. Mariani

    2011-11-01

    The pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel via electrorefining requires the continued addition of uranium trichloride to sustain operations. Uranium trichloride is utilized as an oxidant in the system to allow separation of uranium metal from the minor actinides and fission products. The inventory of uranium trichloride had diminished to a point that production was necessary to continue electrorefiner operations. Following initial experimentation, cupric chloride was chosen as a reactant with uranium metal to synthesize uranium trichloride. Despite the variability in equipment and charge characteristics, uranium trichloride was produced in sufficient quantities to maintain operations in the electrorefiner. The results and conclusions from several experiments are presented along with a set of optimized operating conditions for the synthesis of uranium trichloride.

  18. Laser isotope separation (review)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. S. Letokhov; C B Moore

    1976-01-01

    Part I of the review (Secs. 15) classifies the optical (photochemical and photophysical) isotope separation methods, gives the history of their development, and demonstrates the advantages of laser radiation. The problem of isotopically selective excitation and isotopic shifts in the spectra of atoms and molecules, and also limitations of the selectivity and methods for increasing it are considered in Sec.

  19. Photochemical isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Paul Robinson; Reed J. Jensen; Theodore P. Cotter; Norman R. Greiner; Keith Boyer

    1987-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a

  20. Photochemical isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. P. Robinson; R. J. Jensen; T. P. Cotter; N. R. Greiner; K. Boyer

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively

  1. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. 540.317 Section 540.317 Money...CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. 540.317 Section 540.317 Money...CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. 540.317 Section 540.317 Money...CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. 540.317 Section 540.317 Money...CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed. 540.317 Section 540.317 Money...CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  6. separationsNOW.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This separation science and chromatography Web portal from publisher John Wiley and Sons expects "to become the definitive separation science resource on the Internet, offering a wealth of valuable information, resources, and services." separationsNOW addresses electrophoresis, chromatography, and other separation techniques with frequently-updated news, Web links, conference announcements, technique-specific discussion forums, educational features, and much more. Free registration is required to access advanced features, such as a selection of free full-text articles in the online library.

  7. separationsNOW.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    This separation science and chromatography Web portal from publisher John Wiley and Sons expects "to become the definitive separation science resource on the Internet, offering a wealth of valuable information, resources, and services." separationsNOW addresses electrophoresis, chromatography, and other separation techniques with frequently-updated news, Web links, conference announcements, technique-specific discussion forums, educational features, and much more. Free registration is required to access advanced features, such as a selection of free full-text articles in the online library.

  8. Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wenbin; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn

    2014-01-08

    As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be evaluated for their uranium extraction efficiency. The initial testing of these materials for uranium binding will be carried out in the Lin group, but more detailed sorption studies will be carried out by Dr. Taylor-Pashow of Savannah River National Laboratory in order to obtain quantitative uranyl sorption selectivity and kinetics data for the proposed materials. The proposed nanostructured sorbent materials are expected to have higher binding capacities, enhanced extraction kinetics, optimal stripping efficiency for uranyl ions, and enhanced mechanical and chemical stabilities. This transformative research will significantly impact uranium extraction from seawater as well as benefit DOEs efforts on environmental remediation by developing new materials and providing knowledge for enriching and sequestering ultralow concentrations of other metals.

  9. Microbial transformation of uranium in wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Cline, J.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from the disposal of uranium processing wastes is a major national concern. Although much is known about the physico- chemical aspects of U, we have little information on the effects of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activities on the mobilization or immobilization of U and other toxic metals in mixed wastes. In order to understand the mechanisms of microbial transformations of uranium, we examined a contaminated pond sediment and a sludge sample from the uranium processing facility at Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The uranium concentration in the sediment and sludge samples was 923 and 3080 ug/g dry wt, respectively. In addition to U, the sediment and sludge samples contained high levels of toxic metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The association of uranium with the various mineral fractions of the sediment and sludge was determined by selective chemical extraction techniques. Uranium was associated to varying degrees with the exchangeable carbonate, iron oxide, organic, and inert fractions in both samples. Initial results in samples amended with carbon and nitrogen indicate immobilization of U due to enhanced indigenous microbial activity under anaerobic conditions. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Accumulation of uranium by immobilized persimmon tannin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Nakajima, Akira (Miyazaki Medical College (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered that the extracted juice of unripe astringent persimmon fruit, designated as kakishibu or shibuol, has an extremely high affinity for uranium. To develop efficient adsorbents for uranium, we tried to immobilize kakishibu (persimmon tannin) with various aldehydes and mineral acids. Persimmon tannin immobilized with glutaraldehyde can accumulate 1.71 g (14 mEq U) of uranium per gram of the adsorbent. The uranium accumulating capacity of this adsorbent is several times greater than that of commercially available chelating resins (2-3 mEq/g). Immobilized persimmon tannin has the most favorable features for uranium recovery; high selective adsorption ability, rapid adsorption rate, and applicability in both column and batch systems. The uranium retained on immobilized persimmon tannin can be quantitatively and easily eluted with a very dilute acid, and the adsorbent can thus be easily recycled in the adsorption-desorption process. Immobilized persimmon tannin also has a high affinity for thorium. 23 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Characterization of streamflow, water quality, and instantaneous dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium loads in selected reaches of the Arkansas River, southeastern Colorado, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivahnenko, Tamara; Ortiz, Roderick F.; Stogner, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of continued water-quality concerns in the Arkansas River, including metal contamination from historical mining practices, potential effects associated with storage and movement of water, point- and nonpoint-source contamination, population growth, storm-water flows, and future changes in land and water use, the Arkansas River Basin Regional Resource Planning Group (RRPG) developed a strategy to address these issues. As such, a cooperative strategic approach to address the multiple water-quality concerns within selected reaches of the Arkansas River was developed to (1) identify stream reaches where stream-aquifer interactions have a pronounced effect on water quality and (or) where reactive transport, and physical and (or) chemical alteration of flow during conveyance, is occurring, (2) quantify loading from point sources, and (3) determine source areas and mass loading for selected constituents. (To see the complete abstract, open Report PDF.)

  12. Decontamination of uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical fluid and nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jinhyun; Kim, Jungsoo; Lee, Youngbae; Seol, Jeunggun; Ryu, Jaebong; Park, Kwangheon

    2011-07-01

    The waste oil used in nuclear fuel processing is contaminated with uranium because of its contact with materials or environments containing uranium. Under current law, waste oil that has been contaminated with uranium is very difficult to dispose of at a radioactive waste disposal site. To dispose of the uranium-contaminated waste oil, the uranium was separated from the contaminated waste oil. Supercritical R-22 is an excellent solvent for extracting clean oil from uranium-contaminated waste oil. The critical temperature of R-22 is 96.15 C and the critical pressure is 49.9 bar. In this study, a process to remove uranium from the uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical R-22 was developed. The waste oil has a small amount of additives containing N, S or P, such as amines, dithiocarbamates and dialkyldithiophosphates. It seems that these organic additives form uranium-combined compounds. For this reason, dissolution of uranium from the uranium-combined compounds using nitric acid was needed. The efficiency of the removal of uranium from the uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical R-22 extraction and nitric acid treatment was determined. PMID:21493611

  13. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  14. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  15. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  16. The determination of uranium (IV) in apatite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, Roy S., Jr.; Altschuler, Zalman S.

    1956-01-01

    Geologic and mineralogic evidence indicate that the uranium present in apatite may proxy for calcium in the mineral structure as U(IV). An experimental investigation was conducted and chemical evidence was obtained that establishes the presence of U(IV) in apatite. The following analytical procedure was developed for the determination of U(IV). Carbonate-fluorapatite is dissolved in cold 1.5M orthophosphoric acid and fluorapatite is dissolved in cold 1.2M hydrochloric acid containing 1.5 g of hydroxylamine hydrochloride per 100 ml. Uranium (IV) is precipitated by cupferron using titanium as a carrier. The uranium in the precipitate is separated by use of the ethyl acetate extraction procedure and determined fluorimetrically. The validity and the limitations of the method have been established by spike experiments.

  17. Uranium provinces of North America; their definition, distribution, and models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finch, Warren Irvin

    1996-01-01

    Uranium resources in North America are principally in unconformity-related, quartz-pebble conglomerate, sandstone, volcanic, and phosphorite types of uranium deposits. Most are concentrated in separate, well-defined metallogenic provinces. Proterozoic quartz-pebble conglomerate and unconformity-related deposits are, respectively, in the Blind River?Elliot Lake (BRELUP) and the Athabasca Basin (ABUP) Uranium Provinces in Canada. Sandstone uranium deposits are of two principal subtypes, tabular and roll-front. Tabular sandstone uranium deposits are mainly in upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks in the Colorado Plateau Uranium Province (CPUP). Roll-front sandstone uranium deposits are in Tertiary rocks of the Rocky Mountain and Intermontane Basins Uranium Province (RMIBUP), and in a narrow belt of Tertiary rocks that form the Gulf Coastal Uranium Province (GCUP) in south Texas and adjacent Mexico. Volcanic uranium deposits are concentrated in the Basin and Range Uranium Province (BRUP) stretching from the McDermitt caldera at the Oregon-Nevada border through the Marysvale district of Utah and Date Creek Basin in Arizona and south into the Sierra de Pe?a Blanca District, Chihuahua, Mexico. Uraniferous phosphorite occurs in Tertiary sediments in Florida, Georgia, and North and South Carolina and in the Lower Permian Phosphoria Formation in Idaho and adjacent States, but only in Florida has economic recovery been successful. The Florida Phosphorite Uranium Province (FPUP) has yielded large quantities of uranium as a byproduct of the production of phosphoric acid fertilizer. Economically recoverable quantities of copper, gold, molybdenum, nickel, silver, thorium, and vanadium occur with the uranium deposits in some provinces. Many major epochs of uranium mineralization occurred in North America. In the BRELUP, uranium minerals were concentrated in placers during the Early Proterozoic (2,500?2,250 Ma). In the ABUP, the unconformity-related deposits were most likely formed initially by hot saline formational water related to diagenesis (?1,400 to 1,330 Ma) and later reconcentrated by hydrothermal events at ?1,280??1,000, ?575, and ?225 Ma. Subsequently in North America, only minor uranium mineralization occurred until after continental collision in Permian time (255 Ma). Three principal epochs of uranium mineralization occurred in the CPUP: (1) ??210?200 Ma, shortly after Late Triassic sedimentation; (2) ??155?150 Ma, in Late Jurassic time; and (3) ??135 Ma, after sedimentation of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. The most likely source of the uranium was silicic volcaniclastics for the three epochs derived from a volcanic island arc at the west edge of the North American continent. Uranium mineralization occurred during Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene times in the RMIBUP, GCUP, and BRUP. Volcanic activity took place near the west edge of the continent during and shortly after sedimentation of the host rocks in these three provinces. Some volcanic centers in the Sierra de Pe?a Blanca district within the BRUP may have provided uranium-rich ash to host rocks in the GCUP. Most of the uranium provinces in North America appear to have a common theme of close associations to volcanic activity related to the development of the western margin of the North American plate. The south and west margin of the Canadian Shield formed the leading edge of the progress of uranium source development and mineralization from the Proterozoic to the present. The development of favorable hosts and sources of uranium is related to various tectonic elements developed over time. Periods of major uranium mineralization in North America were Early Proterozoic, Middle Proterozoic, Late Triassic?Early Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, Oligocene, and Miocene. Tertiary mineralization was the most pervasive, covering most of Western and Southern North America.

  18. Anomalous occurrence of uranium in alpine peats, Summit County, Colorado, and results of a simple sample fractionation procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, Joel S.; Jennings, Joan K.; Lemke, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    Samples from Summit County, Colo., were fractionated for analyses of organic content and uranium. The uranium is related to organic content but not to type of organic matter. In one area uranium values are around 100 ppm in bulk samples and as much as 200 ppm in certain separated fractions of the samples; this is much higher than the 1-10 ppm normal uranium values for peat.

  19. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report, attachment 2, geology report; attachment 3, groundwater hydrology report; and attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1992-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

  20. Predicting 232U Content in Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    AJ Peurrung

    1999-01-07

    The minor isotope 232U may ultimately be used for detection or confirmation of uranium in a variety of applications. The primary advantage of 232 U as an indicator of the presence of enriched uranium is the plentiful and penetrating nature of the radiation emitted by its daughter radionuclide 208Tl. A possible drawback to measuring uranium via 232U is the relatively high uncertainty in 232U abundance both within and between material populations. An important step in assessing this problem is to ascertain what determines the 232U concentration within any particular sample of uranium. To this end, we here analyze the production and eventual enrichment of 232 U during fuel-cycle operations. The goal of this analysis is to allow approximate prediction of 232 U quantities, or at least some interpretation of the results of 232U measurements. We have found that 232U is produced via a number of pathways during reactor irradiation of uranium and is subsequently concentrated during the later enrichment of the uranium' s 235U Content. While exact calculations are nearly impossible for both the reactor-production and cascade-enrichment parts of the prediction problem, estimates and physical bounds can be provided as listed below and detailed within the body of the report. Even if precise calculations for the irradiation and enrichment were possible, the ultimate 212U concentration would still depend upon the detailed fuel-cycle history. Assuming that a thennal-diffusion cascade is used to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU), dilution of reactor-processed fuel at the cascade input and the long-term holdup of 232U within the cascade both affect the 232U concentration in the product. Similar issues could be expected to apply for the other isotope-separation technologies that are used in other countries. Results of this analysis are listed below: 0 The 232U concentration depends strongly on the uranium enrichment, with depleted uranium (DU) containing between 1600 and 8000 times less 232U than HEU does. * The 236U/232U concentration ratio in HEU is likely to be between 10{sup 6} and 2 x 10{sup 7}. 0 Plutonium-production reactors yield uranium with between I and 10 ppt of 232u. 0 Much higher 132U concentrations can be obtained in some situations. * Significant variation in the 232U concentration is inevitable. * Cascade enrichment increases the 232U concentration by a factor of at least 200, and possibly as much as 1000. 0 The actual 232U concentration depends upon the dilution at the cascade input.

  1. Uranium industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  2. Desferrithiocin Analogue Uranium Decorporation Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Raymond J.; Wiegand, Jan; Singh, Shailendra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previous systematic structure-activity studies of the desferrithiocin (DFT) platform have allowed the design and synthesis of analogues and derivatives of DFT that retain the exceptional iron-clearing activity of the parent, while eliminating its adverse effects. We hypothesized that a similar approach could be adopted to identify DFT-related analogues that could effectively decorporate uranium. Materials and Methods The decorporation properties of nine DFT-related analogues were determined in a bile duct-cannulated rat model. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) served as a positive control. Selected ligands also underwent multiple and delayed dosing regimens. Uranium excretion in urine and bile or stool was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS); tissue levels of uranium were also assessed. Results The two best clinical candidates are (S)-4,5-dihydro-2-[2-hydroxy-4-(3,6,9-trioxadecyloxy)phenyl]-4-methyl-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid [(S)-4'-(HO)-DADFT-PE (9)], with a 57% reduction in kidney uranium levels on oral (p.o.) administration and (S)-4,5-dihydro-2-[2-hydroxy-3-(3,6,9-trioxadecyloxy)phenyl]-4-methyl-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid [(S)-3'-(HO)-DADFT-PE (10)], with a 62% renal reduction on p.o. administration. The majority of the metal excretion promoted by these analogues is in the bile, thus further reducing kidney actinide exposure. Conclusions While 9 administered p.o. or subcutaneously (s.c.) immediately post-metal is an effective decorporation agent, withholding the dose (s.c.) until 4 h reduced the activity of the compound. Conversion of 9 to its isopropyl ester may circumvent this issue. PMID:19399680

  3. Application of supported liquid membranes for removal of uranium from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.G.; Hodgson, K.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The separation of uranium from Hanford site groundwater as studied by hollow-fiber supported liquid membranes, SLM. The carrier bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid, H(DTMPep), contained in the commercial extractant Cyanex{trademark} 272 was used as a membrane carrier, because of its selectivity for U over calcium and magnesium. The water soluble complexing agent, 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid, HEDPA, was used as stripping agent. Polypropylene hollow-fibers and n-dodecane were used as polymeric support and diluent, respectively. Laboratory scale hollow-fiber modules were employed in a recycling mode, using as feed synthetic groundwater at pH 2, to confirm the capability of the proposed SLM system to separate and concentrate U(VI) in the strip solution. Information was obtained on the U(VI) concentration factor and on the long-term performance of the SLMs. Encouraging results were obtained both with a conventional module and with a module containing a carrier solution reservoir. Industrial scale modules were used at Hanford to test the SLM separation of U(VI) from real contaminated groundwater. The uranium concentration was reduced from approximately 3500 ppB to about 1 ppB in a few hours. 9 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Removal of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution using iminodiacetic acid derivative functionalized SBA-15 as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Long; Song, Li-Juan; Zhu, Lu; Guo, Bo-Long; Chen, Su-Wen; Wu, Wang-Suo

    2014-03-01

    Three different functional SBA-15 were prepared by a post-grafting method using three iminodiacetic acid derivatives of ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (ED3A), diethylenetriaminetetraacetic acid (DT4A), and 1,2-cyclohexylenedinitrilotriacetic acid (CyD3A), which were used as adsorbents for removal of uranium(vi) from aqueous solution. These materials were characterized by FT-IR, NMR, TEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption experiments, and elemental analysis. The effect of pH, ionic strength, contact time, solid-liquid ratio, initial metal ion concentration, temperature, and coexisting ions on uranium(vi) sorption behaviors of the functionalized SBA-15 was studied. Typical sorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich) were determined for the sorption process, and the maximum sorption capacity was calculated. The influence of functional groups on uranium(vi) sorption was also discussed. As a result, compared with other current U(vi) sorbents (granite, kaolin, attapulgite), SBA-15-1,2-cyclohexylenedinitrilotriacetic acid (SBA-15-CyD3A) possessed good selective sorption properties, which had potential application in separation of uranium(vi). PMID:24435450

  5. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B H

    2011-09-06

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  6. Uranium and Thorium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Warren I.

    1978-01-01

    The results of President Carter's policy on non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are expected to slow the growth rate in energy consumption, put the development of the breeder reactor in question, halt plans to reprocess and recycle uranium and plutonium, and expand facilities to supply enriched uranium. (Author/MA)

  7. Uranium in river water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Palmer; J. M. Edmond

    1993-01-01

    The concentration of dissolved uranium has been determined in over 250 river waters from the Orinoco, Amazon, and Ganges basins. Uranium concentrations are largely determined by dissolution of limestones, although weathering of black shales represents an important additional source in some basins. In shield terrains the level of dissolved U is transport limited. Data from the Amazon indicate that floodplains

  8. World Uranium Reserves

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    James Hopf

    This American Energy Independence website provides a brief overview of potential supplies of uranium for nuclear energy. The author, nuclear engineer James Hopf, believes that there are large reserves of uranium available, and that more will be discovered if needed. Links to literature cited and related resources are included.

  9. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Toor, R S S; Brar, G S

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% - 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion replaces calcium in the hydroxyapatite complex of the bone crystal. Although in North India, there is a risk of radiological toxicity from orally ingested natural uranium, the principal health effects are chemical toxicity. The skeleton and kidney are the primary sites of uranium accumulation. Acute high dose of uranyl nitrate delays tooth eruption, and mandibular growth and development, probably due to its effect on target cells. Based on all previous research and recommendations, the role of a dentist is to educate the masses about the adverse effects of uranium on the overall as well as the dental health. The authors recommended that apart from the discontinuation of the addition of uranium to porcelain, the Public community water supplies must also comply with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards of uranium levels being not more than 30 ppb (parts per billion). PMID:24478959

  10. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Stevenson; R. G. Werkema

    1959-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from magnesium fluoride slag obtained as a by-; product in the production of uranium metal by the bomb reduction prccess is ; presented. Generally the recovery is accomplished by finely grinding the slag, ; roasting ihe ground slag air, and leaching the roasted slag with a hot, aqueous ; solution containing an excess of the sodium

  11. Method for separating boron isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rockwood

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes ¹°B and ¹¹B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl molecules containing a particular boron isotope is described. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  12. Method for separating boron isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rockwood; Stephen D

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  13. Investigation of Great Basin big sagebrush and black greasewood as biogeochemical indicators of uranium mineralization. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. E. Diebold; S. McGrath

    1982-01-01

    The effects of varying phosphate concentrations in natural aqueous systems upon the uptake of uranium by big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata subsp. tridentata) and black greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus (Hook) Torr.) were investigated. Two separate growth experiments with five drip-flow hyroponic units were used and plant seedlings were grown for 60 days in solutions of varying phosphate and uranium concentrations. Successful growth

  14. Inorganic separator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smatko, J. S.; Weaver, R. D.; Kalhammer, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    Testing and failure analyses of silver zinc cells with largely inorganic separators were performed. The results showed that the wet stand and cycle life objective of the silver-zinc cell development program were essentially accomplished and led to recommendations for cell composition, design, and operation that should yield further improvement in wet and cycle life. A series of advanced inorganic materials was successfully developed and formulated into rigid and semiflexible separator samples. Suitable screening tests for evaluation of largely inorganic separators were selected and modified for application to the separator materials. The results showed that many of these formulations are potentially superior to previously used materials and permitted selection of three promising materials for further evaluation in silver-zinc cells.

  15. 16. VIEW OF THE ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY SYSTEM. ENRICHED URANIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF THE ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY SYSTEM. ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESSED RELATIVELY PURE MATERIALS AND SOLUTIONS AND SOLID RESIDUES WITH RELATIVELY LOW URANIUM CONTENT. URANIUM RECOVERY INVOLVED BOTH SLOW AND FAST PROCESSES. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF URANIUM, URANIUM OXIDE AND SILICON MULTILAYER THIN FILMS

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    CHARACTERIZATION OF URANIUM, URANIUM OXIDE AND SILICON MULTILAYER THIN FILMS by David T. Oliphant. Woolley Dean, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences #12;ABSTRACT CHARACTERIZATION OF URANIUM, URANIUM OXIDE AND SILICON MULTILAYER THIN FILMS David T. Oliphant Department of Physics and Astronomy

  17. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Prescott, AZ); Williamson, Mark A. (Naperville, IL)

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  18. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology. Volume 2, No. 2, Semiannual report, April--September 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tehmanu Kan; J. Carpenter

    1993-01-01

    This is the second issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives of the ISAM Program include: the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) process, and advanced manufacturing technologies which include industrial laser materials processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically

  19. An equilibrium model for ligand-modified micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration, selective separation of metal ions using iminoacetic substituted polyamines and a theoretical model for the titration behavior of polyamines

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmawardana, U.R.

    1992-12-31

    This thesis consists of three chapters. Chapter 1, An equilibrium model for ligand-modified micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration, describes a theoretical model and experimental investigations which used the semi-equilibrium-dialysis method with N-n-dodecyl iminodiacetic acid as the ligand. In Chapter 2, Selective separation of metal ions using iminoacetic substituted polyamines, polyamines with a substituted ligand group are synthesized and used in investigating selective separation of copper ions from aqueous solution. In Chapter 3, A theoretical model for the titration behavior of polyamines, a novel approach to explain the titration behavior of polymeric amines based on the binding behavior of counterions is described. The application of this study is to the investigation of inexpensive and efficient methods of industrial waste water treatment.

  20. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Grard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially concentrated in uranium compared to the 200 000 tons of waste rock piles in the Limousin. The composition of clay minerals and the uranium content of the samples were investigated by XRD, ICP-MS, Optical microscopy, EDS and WDS punctual measurements or element mapping and SEM on both thin sections and on rock chips. The initial granite paragenesis (quartz, albite, sanidine, microcline, biotite, muscovite, apatite, rutile, zircon and monazite) was identified. Chlorite, smectite, kaolinite and secondary phosphates and sulfates are the main secondary minerals of the different stage of hydrothermal alteration and weathering. In the clay fraction, smectites are the main mineral phases. U-bearing minerals are different according to the alteration state of mine tailings. The mean content in uranium for selected samples is about 800 ppm and rises up to 5000 ppm for the separated clay fraction of the same samples. Initially and mainly hosted by monazite, uranium is found in phosphates such as autunite, or associated with smectites. Micromorphological studies reveal: The formation of protosoils from weathering processes. Different degrees of alteration in the rocks, smectite or kaolinite alteromorphose. U oxy-hydroxides, nanometric minerals or coatings associated with smectite. A complex paregenesis of submicrometric - nanometric U phosphates, suggesting uranium stabilization.

  1. Separation Anxiety

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Julie Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this activity, learners discover the primary physical properties used to separate pure substances from mixtures. Learners use test tubes, beakers, magnets, and other tools to separate a mixture of sand, iron filings, salt, popcorn kernels, and poppyseeds. This activity introduces learners to the basic properties of size, magnetism, density and solubility while emphasizing that chemistry involves separating out substances either to understand what they are or to use the pure components to create new substances.

  2. Method for fluorination of uranium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Petit, George S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1987-01-01

    Highly pure uranium hexafluoride is made from uranium oxide and fluorine. The uranium oxide, which includes UO.sub.3, UO.sub.2, U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and mixtures thereof, is introduced together with a small amount of a fluorine-reactive substance, selected from alkali chlorides, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, ferric oxide, and bromine, into a constant volume reaction zone. Sufficient fluorine is charged into the zone at a temperature below approximately 0.degree. C. to provide an initial pressure of at least approximately 600 lbs/sq. in. at the ambient atmospheric temperature. The temperature is then allowed to rise in the reaction zone until reaction occurs.

  3. Selective Separation of Rare Earth Metals by Solvent Extraction in the Presence of New Hydrophilic Chelating Polymers Functionalized with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid. I. Development of New Hydrophilic Chelating Polymers and Their Adsorption Properties for Rare Earth Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideto Matsuyama; Yoshikazu Miyamoto; Masaaki Teramoto; Masahiro Goto; Fumiyuki Nakashio

    1996-01-01

    New hydrophilic chelating polymers were synthesized by introducing ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) onto water-soluble polyallylamine. The selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction including these chelating polymers in the aqueous phase is the goal of this work. The polymers were characterized by IR analysis, elemental analysis, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurement, and pH titration. Two kinds of polymers with

  4. Separating Mixtures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,

    Students learn how to classify materials as mixtures, elements or compounds and identify the properties of each type. The concept of separation of mixtures is also introduced since nearly every element or compound is found naturally in an impure state such as a mixture of two or more substances, and it is common that chemical engineers use separation techniques to separate mixtures into their individual components. For example, the separation of crude oil into purified hydrocarbons such as natural gas, gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and/or lubricants.

  5. Economic evaluation of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, J H [Mountain States Research and Development, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [Mountain States Research and Development, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Mountain States Research and Development was contracted on March 1, 1981 to make an economic evaluation study at each of 12 abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in the western states. The objective of this work was to obtain the data necessary at each site to determine the possible revenue that could be derived from reprocessing the tailings. To accomplish this objective a drilling and sampling program was established for each site to determine the total amount of tailings and subbase material available for treatment and the amount of recoverable uranium, vanadium and molybdenum. These three metals were selected due to their common occurrence in uranium ores and common extractability in the leaching process. Laboratory leaching was then conducted on the samples obtained to determine the extractability of each of these metals and the optimum plant process to be applied. As the metal contents were generally low and represented mineral that had not been leached during previous processing, the economic evaluation is limited to consideration of the direct capital and operating costs required in connection with processing of each respective site material. Excavating, transportation and disposal of the material from each site in an environmentally acceptable location and manner was not within the scope of this project. It will be necessary to complete a separate study of these areas in order to determine the total costs involved. This report contains the results of the investigations of the Old Rifle Site.

  6. Interplay of Metalloligand and Organic Ligand to Tune Micropores within Isostructural Mixed-Metal Organic Frameworks (M MOFs) for Their Highly Selective Separation of Chiral and Achiral Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Madhab, Das [University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA); He, Yabing [University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA); Kim, Jaheon [Soongsil University, Korea; Guo, Qunsheng [University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA); Zhao, Cong-Gui [University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA); Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Xiang, Sheng-Chang [University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA); Zhang, Zhangjing [University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA); Thomas, K Mark [University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Krishna, Rajamani [Universitate Amsterdam; Chen, Banglin [University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA)

    2012-01-01

    Four porous isostructural mixed-metal-organic frameworks (M'MOFs) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. The pores within these M'MOFs are systematically tuned by the interplay of both the metalloligands and organic ligands which have enabled us not only to direct their highly selective separation of chiral alcohols 1-phenylethanol (PEA), 2-butanol (BUT), and 2-pentanol (2-PEN) with the highest ee up to 82.4% but also to lead highly selective separation of achiral C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} separation. The potential application of these M'MOFs for the fixed bed pressure swing adsorption (PSA) separation of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} has been further examined and compared by the transient breakthrough simulations in which the purity requirement of 40 ppm in the outlet gas can be readily fulfilled by the fixed bed M'MOF-4a adsorber at ambient conditions.

  7. 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    E-print Network

    2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report May 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U Administration | 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions

  8. EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities

    E-print Network

    EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities Reid J. Rosnick Environmental Protection Agency Radiation Protection Division (6608J) Washington, DC 20460 NMA/NRC Uranium Recovery Workshop July 2, 2009 #12 for underground uranium mining operations (Subpart B) EPA regulatory requirements for operating uranium mill

  9. National uranium resource evaluation, Marble Canyon Quadrangle, Arizona and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M T; Blauvelt, R P

    1982-05-01

    The Marble Canyon Quadrangle (2/sup 0/), northeast Arizona, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Known mines and prospects were examined; field reconnaissance was done in selected areas of the quadrangle; and a ground-water geochemical survey was made in the southeast third of the quadrangle. The Shinarump and Petrified Forest Members of the Triassic Chinle Formation, which is exposed in the western and northeastern parts of the quadrangle and is present beneath the surface of much of the quadrangle, were found favorable for channel-sandstone uranium deposits. A portion of the Cretaceous Toreva Formation in the southeast part of the quadrangle was found favorable for peneconcordant-sandstone uranium deposits. The western part of the quadrangle was found favorable for uranium concentrations in breccia pipes.

  10. Determine separations process strategy decision

    SciTech Connect

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    This study provides a summary level comparative analysis of selected, top-level, waste treatment strategies. These strategies include No Separations, Separations (high-level/low-level separations), and Deferred Separations of the tank waste. These three strategies encompass the full range of viable processing alternatives based upon full retrieval of the tank wastes. The assumption of full retrieval of the tank wastes is a predecessor decision and will not be revisited in this study.

  11. The effects of solid rocket motor effluents on selected surfaces and solid particle size, distribution, and composition for simulated shuttle booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Linton, R. C.; Russell, W. M.; Trenkle, J. J.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of three tests was conducted using solid rocket propellants to determine the effects a solid rocket plume would have on thermal protective surfaces (TPS). The surfaces tested were those which are baselined for the shuttle vehicle. The propellants used were to simulate the separation solid rocket motors (SSRM) that separate the solid rocket boosters (SRB) from the shuttle launch vehicle. Data cover: (1) the optical effects of the plume environment on spacecraft related surfaces, and (2) the solid particle size, distribution, and composition at TPS sample locations.

  12. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance. PMID:19891832

  13. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commissions Mid-Term Appraisal of the countrys current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of Indias uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  14. Estimation of uranium GI absorption fractions for children and adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Lariviere, D; Timmins, R; Verdecchia, K

    2011-03-01

    Uranium is ubiquitously found in drinking water and food. The gastrointestinal tract absorption fraction (f(1)) is an important parameter in risk assessment of uranium burdens from ingestion. Although absorption of uranium from ingestion has been studied extensively in the past, human data concerning children and adults are still limited. In a previous study based on measurements of uranium concentration in 73 bone-ash samples collected by Health Canada, the absorption fractions for uranium ingestion were determined to be 0.093 0.113 for infants, and 0.050 0.032 for young children ranging from 1 to 7 y of age. To extend the study, a total of 69 bone-ash samples were selected for children and adults ranging from 7 to 25 y of age and residing in the same Canadian community that is known to have an elevated level of uranium in its drinking water supply. For each bone-ash sample, the total uranium concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To solve uranium transfer in the biokinetic model for uranium given in International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 69 with estimated daily uranium intake, the program WinSAAM v3.0.1 was used. The absorption fractions were determined to be 0.030 0.022 for children (7-18 y) and 0.021 0.015 for adults (18-25 y). For anyone more than 18 y of age, the estimated f(1) value for uranium agree well with the ICRP recommended value of 0.02. PMID:21123245

  15. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denis Doizi; Jean Jaraudias; E. Pochon; G. Salvetat

    1993-01-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator

  16. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  17. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael (Longmont, CO); Xie, Xiaobing (Foster City, CA); Evenson, IV, Carl (Lafayette, CO); Grimmer, Paul (Longmont, CO); Wright, Harold (Longmont, CO)

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  18. Entropic separations of mixtures of aromatics by selective face-to-face molecular stacking in one-dimensional channels of metal-organic frameworks and zeolites.

    PubMed

    Torres-Knoop, Ariana; Balestra, Salvador R G; Krishna, Rajamani; Calero, Sofa; Dubbeldam, David

    2015-02-23

    Separation of challenging mixtures using metal-organic frameworks can be achieved by an entropy-driven mechanism, where one of the components can arrange into a "face-to-face" stacking, thus reducing its "footprint" and reaching a higher saturation loading. PMID:25504615

  19. Computational modeling of distinct neocortical oscillations driven by cell-type selective optogenetic drive: separable resonant circuits controlled by low-threshold spiking and fast-spiking interneurons

    E-print Network

    Vierling-Claassen, Dorea L.

    Selective optogenetic drive of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons (INs) leads to enhanced local field potential (LFP) power across the traditional gamma frequency band (2080 Hz; Cardin et al., 2009). In contrast, drive to ...

  20. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  1. Laser separation of isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V S Letokhov

    1977-01-01

    A survey approach to the field of laser separation of isotopes is the basis of this review which supplements at least two previous reviews that are cited. The important ideas, methods, and experimental results in the field are considered without an examination of secondary problems and doubtful results being undertaken. It is emphasized that selective photophysical and photochemical methods for

  2. Laser isotope separation (review). II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V S Letokhov; C B Moore

    1976-01-01

    Part II of the review (sec. 611) deals with isotope separation by the method of selective dissociation of polyatomic molecules in a strong pulse CO2 laser field (sec. 6), on the basis of selective photochemical reactions of electronically excited atoms and molecules (sec. 7) and vibrationally excited molecules (sec. 8), and by the method of selective deflection of atoms by

  3. Uranium purchases report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

  4. Fault Separation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carol Ormand

    Students use gestures to explore the relationship between fault slip direction and fault separation by varying the geometry of faulted layers, slip direction, and the perspective from which these are viewed.

  5. Stereoisomers Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Piotr

    The use of capillary electrophoresis for enantiomer separation and optical purity determination is presented. The contents start with basic information about the nature of stereoizomers and the mechanism of enantioseparation using capillary electrophoresis techniques. The molecules to be separated show identical chemical structure and electrochemical behavior. Therefore, the chiral recognition of enantiomers is possible only by bonding to chiral selector and the separation based on very small differences in complexation energies of diastereomer complexes formed. This method is useful for this purpose due to the fact that different compounds can be used as chiral selectors. The mostly used chiral selectors like cyclodextrins, crown ethers, chiral surfactants, macrocyclic antibiotics, transition metal complexes, natural, and synthetic polymers and their application for this purpose is also discussed. Finally, examples of practical applications of electromigration techniques for enantiomers separation and determination are presented.

  6. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1982-10-27

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  7. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Kreuzmann, Alvin B. (Cincinnati, OH)

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  8. Preliminary survey of separations technology applicable to the pretreatment of Hanford tank waste (1992--1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.E.; Kurath, D.E.

    1994-04-01

    The US Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to manage and dispose of radioactive wastes stored at the Hanford Site. Within this program are evaluations of pretreatment system alternatives through literature reviews. The information in this report was collected as part of this project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A preliminary survey of literature on separations recently entered into the Hanford electronic databases (1992--1993) that have the potential for pretreatment of Hanford tank waste was conducted. Separation processes that can assist in the removal of actinides (uranium, plutonium, americium), lanthanides, barium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr,{sup 129 }I, {sup 63}Ni, and {sup 99}Tc were evaluated. Separation processes of interest were identified through literature searches, journal reviews, and participation in separation technology conferences. This report contains brief descriptions of the potential separation processes, the extent and/or selectivity of the separation, the experimental conditions, and observations. Information was collected on both national and international separation studies to provide a global perspective on recent research efforts.

  9. An ion-exchange method for selective separation of palladium, platinum and rhodium from solutions obtained by leaching automotive catalytic converters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romulus Gaita; Sargon J. Al-Bazi

    1995-01-01

    An ion-exchange method has been developed for the separation of palladium, platinum and rhodium from a solution that is highly acidic and contains a considerable amount of lead, aluminum, iron and cerium, obtained by leaching a used honeycomb type automotive catalytic converter. A column of Amberlite IRA-93 anion-exchange resin was found appropriate to recover platinum metals from the pregnant solution.

  10. Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry - Synthetic Pursuit Of A Rare Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This feature article presents a comprehensive overview of pentavalent uranium systems in non-aqueous solution with a focus on the various synthetic avenues employed to access this unusual and very important oxidation state. Selected characterization data and theoretical aspects are also included. The purpose is to provide a perspective on this rapidly evolving field and identify new possibilities for future developments in pentavalent uranium chemistry.

  11. Removal of fluoride and uranium by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Shen, Junjie; Schfer, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Inorganic contamination in drinking water, especially fluoride and uranium, has been recognized as a worldwide problem imposing a serious threat to human health. Among several treatment technologies applied for fluoride and uranium removal, nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) have been studied extensively and proven to offer satisfactory results with high selectivity. In this review, a comprehensive summary and critical analysis of previous NF and RO applications on fluoride and uranium removal is presented. Fluoride retention is generally governed by size exclusion and charge interaction, while uranium retention is strongly affected by the speciation of uranium and size exclusion usually plays a predominant role for all species. Adsorption on the membrane occurs as some uranium species interact with membrane functional groups. The influence of operating conditions (pressure, crossflow velocity), water quality (concentration, solution pH), solutesolute interactions, membrane characteristics and membrane fouling on fluoride and uranium retention is critically reviewed. PMID:25461935

  12. Standard test methods for analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Section Carbon (Total) by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity Method C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion-Selective Electrode Method C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Gadolinia Content by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry C1456 Test Method for Determination of Uranium or Gadolinium, or Both, in Gadolinium Oxide-Uranium Oxide Pellets or by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Hydrogen by Inert Gas Fusion C1457 Test Method for Determination of Total Hydrogen Content of Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets by Carrier Gas Extraction Isotopic Uranium Composition by Multiple-Filament Surface-Ioni...

  13. Separation science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.; Sauer, N.; Chamberlin, R.M.; Gottesfeld, S.; Mattes, B.R.; Li, D.Q.; Swanson, B.

    1998-12-31

    The focus of this project is the demonstration and advancement of membrane-based separation and destruction technologies. The authors are exploring development of membrane systems for gas separations, selective metal ion recovery, and for separation or destruction of hazardous organics. They evaluated existing polymers and polymer formulations for recovery of toxic oxyanionic metals such as chromate and arsenate from selected waste streams and developed second-generation water-soluble polymeric systems for highly selective oxyanion removal and recovery. They optimized the simultaneous removal of radioactive strontium and cesium from aqueous solutions using the new nonhazardous separations agents, and developed recyclable, redox-active extractants that permitted recovery of the radioactive ions into a minimal waste volume. They produced hollow fibers and fabricated prototype hollow-fiber membrane modules for applications to gas separations and the liquid-liquid extraction and recovery of actinides and nuclear materials from process streams. They developed and fabricated cyclodextrin-based microporous materials that selectively absorb organic compounds in an aqueous environment; the resultant products gave pure water with organics at less than 0.05 parts per billion. They developed new, more efficient, membrane-based electrochemical reactors for use in organic destruction in process waste treatment. They addressed the need for advanced oxidation technologies based on molecular-level materials designs that selectively remove or destroy target species. They prepared and characterized surface-modified TiO{sub 2} thin films using different linking approaches to attach ruthenium photosensitizers, and they started the measurement of the photo-degradation products generated using surface modified TiO{sub 2} films in reaction with chlorophenol.

  14. Separation of p-Divinylbenzene by Selective Room-Temperature Adsorption Inside Mg-CUK-1 Prepared by Aqueous Microwave Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saccoccia, Beau; Bohnsack, Alisha M; Waggoner, Nolan W; Cho, Kyung Ho; Lee, Ji Sun; Hong, Do-Young; Lynch, Vincent M; Chang, Jong-San; Humphrey, Simon M

    2015-04-27

    A new Mg(II) -based version of the porous coordination polymer CUK-1 with one-dimensional pore structure was prepared by microwave synthesis in water. Mg-CUK-1 is moisture-stable, thermally stable up to 500?C, and shows unusual reversible soft-crystal behavior: dehydrated single crystals of the material selectively adsorb a range of organic molecules at ambient temperature and pressure. Both polar and apolar aromatic compounds, including pyridine, benzene, p-xylene, and p-divinylbenzene (p-DVB), are all readily adsorbed, while other isomers from complex mixtures of xylenes or DVBs are selectively excluded. The solvent-loaded structures have been studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Time-dependent liquid sorption experiments using commercially available DVB demonstrate a high and rapid selective adsorption of p-DVB and exclusion of m-DVB and ethylvinylbenzene isomers. PMID:25735765

  15. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section 540...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium...

  16. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section 540...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium...

  17. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section 540...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium...

  18. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section 540...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium...

  19. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section 540...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium...

  20. The Fisher-Markov selector: fast selecting maximally separable feature subset for multiclass classification with applications to high-dimensional data.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhou, Hongbo; Cheng, Jie

    2011-06-01

    Selecting features for multiclass classification is a critically important task for pattern recognition and machine learning applications. Especially challenging is selecting an optimal subset of features from high-dimensional data, which typically have many more variables than observations and contain significant noise, missing components, or outliers. Existing methods either cannot handle high-dimensional data efficiently or scalably, or can only obtain local optimum instead of global optimum. Toward the selection of the globally optimal subset of features efficiently, we introduce a new selector--which we call the Fisher-Markov selector--to identify those features that are the most useful in describing essential differences among the possible groups. In particular, in this paper we present a way to represent essential discriminating characteristics together with the sparsity as an optimization objective. With properly identified measures for the sparseness and discriminativeness in possibly high-dimensional settings, we take a systematic approach for optimizing the measures to choose the best feature subset. We use Markov random field optimization techniques to solve the formulated objective functions for simultaneous feature selection. Our results are noncombinatorial, and they can achieve the exact global optimum of the objective function for some special kernels. The method is fast; in particular, it can be linear in the number of features and quadratic in the number of observations. We apply our procedure to a variety of real-world data, including mid--dimensional optical handwritten digit data set and high-dimensional microarray gene expression data sets. The effectiveness of our method is confirmed by experimental results. In pattern recognition and from a model selection viewpoint, our procedure says that it is possible to select the most discriminating subset of variables by solving a very simple unconstrained objective function which in fact can be obtained with an explicit expression. PMID:21493968

  1. The effect of thickness, pore size and structure of a nanomembrane on the flux and selectivity in reverse osmosis separations: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail; Nitsche, Ludwig C.

    2004-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations examine the effect of pore size, structure and membrane thickness on flux and selectivity in reverse osmosis. Membranes are modeled using layers of barrier molecules tethered harmonically to periodic lattice sites. Permeation occurs within a Knudsen like regime where close confinement in nanopores precludes water-water interactions, leaving water-pore interactions to determine hydraulic resistance. Results show the solvent flux to be rather insensitive to an appropriately defined tortuosity. Ion selectivity seems to correlate primarily with overall hydraulic resistance, irrespective of the number of membrane layers.

  2. Selected measurement data for plutonium and uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M E; Lemming, J F

    1982-11-01

    This handbook is designed primarily for use by inspectors when verifying the nuclear material contents of samples by nondestructive means. It contains discussions of various properties and the applicability of the measurement of these properties toward verification of specific samples. Because the thrust of this handbook is with properties rather than techniques or instruments, portions of it may be useful to other analysts as a reference.

  3. Chest wall thickness measurements for enriched uranium: an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G H; Puscalau, M

    1994-05-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory has developed a technique to determine the chest wall thickness of an individual using information from the spectrum produced by internally deposited radionuclides. The technique has been investigated both theoretically and practically using phoswich detectors and the Lawrence Livermore Torso Phantom. The phantom was used with lung sets containing homogeneously distributed 93% enriched uranium, 20% enriched uranium, natural uranium, and 241Am. It was found that a 3-cm chest wall thickness can be estimated to within 9% when measuring 93% enriched uranium. The technique does not work for the latter two radionuclides because of an insufficient separation in the photon energies and poor resolution of the phoswich detectors. The technique is only of value for activity levels well above the detection limit. PMID:8175366

  4. ANTHEM BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD You may select from two separate dental care plans to meet your individual needs. Premium cost

    E-print Network

    PPO Plus This dental plan offers you flexibility by allowing you to select the dentist of your choice or a dentist within the extensive Anthem Dental PPO network of over 2,200 providers throughout Colorado. Dentists within the network have agreed to a Maximum Allowable Charge for reimbursement and will not bill

  5. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel based on reprocessed uranium and plutonium mixture in thermal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Y.S.; Bibichev, B.A.; Zilberman, B.Y. [RPA - V.G.Khlopin Radium Institute, St-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Baryshnikov, M.V.; Kryukov, O.V.; Khaperskaya, A.V. [State Corporation ROSATOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    REMIX fuel consumption in WWER-1000 is considered. REMIX fuel is fabricated from non-separated mixture of uranium and plutonium obtained during NPP spent fuel reprocessing with further makeup by enriched natural uranium. It makes possible to recycle several times the total amount of uranium and plutonium obtained from spent fuel with 100% loading of the WWER-1000 core. The stored SNF could be also involved in REMIX fuel cycle by enrichment of regenerated uranium. The same approach could be applied to closing the fuel cycle of CANDU reactors. (authors)

  6. Fine tuning of the PCDTBT-OR:PC71BM blend nanoscale phase separation via selective solvent annealing toward high-performance polymer photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Meng, Bin; Fang, Gang; Fu, Yingying; Xie, Zhiyuan; Wang, Lixiang

    2013-12-01

    Solution-processable polymer solar cells show great promise for providing a cost-effective route to create lightweight and flexible solar energy conversion devices. The photoactive layer comprising the conjugated polymer donor and fullerene derivative acceptor must be optimized to form bicontinuous nanoscale phase separation in order for efficient exciton dissociation and charge collection due to the short exciton diffusion length of organic semiconductors. The donor polymer poly[9-(heptadecan-9-yl)-9H-carbazole- 2,7-diyl-alt-(5,6-bis(hexyloxy)-4,7-di(thiophen-2- yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole)-5,5-diyl] (PCDTBT-OR) has a deeper highest occupied molecular orbital level compared to its counterpart PCDTBT, and shows promise in increasing the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of polymer solar cells. The phase separation evolution of the PCDTBT-OR:PC71BM blend with various weight ratios under tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapor annealing and its influence on the photovoltaic performance is investigated in detail. It is found that THF vapor annealing can promote the acceptor PC71BM aggregation from the donor PCDTBT-OR matrix to form nanoscale donor/acceptor phase separation for efficient exciton dissociation and charge collection depending on the donor/acceptor weight ratio and the annealing time. The THF vapor-annealed PCDTBT-OR:PC71BM solar cells exhibit remarkable enhancement, with a PCE of 7.01% compared to 3.25% of the as-cast solar cells with the same active layer thickness. This work provides a general methodology to construct nano-interpenetrating networks for homogeneous polymer/fullerene blends and is potentially applicable to the roll-to-roll manufacturing of polymer solar cells. PMID:24196394

  7. Fine tuning of the PCDTBT-OR:PC71BM blend nanoscale phase separation via selective solvent annealing toward high-performance polymer photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Bin; Fang, Gang; Fu, Yingying; Xie, Zhiyuan; Wang, Lixiang

    2013-12-01

    Solution-processable polymer solar cells show great promise for providing a cost-effective route to create lightweight and flexible solar energy conversion devices. The photoactive layer comprising the conjugated polymer donor and fullerene derivative acceptor must be optimized to form bicontinuous nanoscale phase separation in order for efficient exciton dissociation and charge collection due to the short exciton diffusion length of organic semiconductors. The donor polymer poly[9-(heptadecan-9-yl)-9H-carbazole- 2,7-diyl-alt-(5,6-bis(hexyloxy)-4,7-di(thiophen-2- yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole)-5,5-diyl] (PCDTBT-OR) has a deeper highest occupied molecular orbital level compared to its counterpart PCDTBT, and shows promise in increasing the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of polymer solar cells. The phase separation evolution of the PCDTBT-OR:PC71BM blend with various weight ratios under tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapor annealing and its influence on the photovoltaic performance is investigated in detail. It is found that THF vapor annealing can promote the acceptor PC71BM aggregation from the donor PCDTBT-OR matrix to form nanoscale donor/acceptor phase separation for efficient exciton dissociation and charge collection depending on the donor/acceptor weight ratio and the annealing time. The THF vapor-annealed PCDTBT-OR:PC71BM solar cells exhibit remarkable enhancement, with a PCE of 7.01% compared to 3.25% of the as-cast solar cells with the same active layer thickness. This work provides a general methodology to construct nano-interpenetrating networks for homogeneous polymer/fullerene blends and is potentially applicable to the roll-to-roll manufacturing of polymer solar cells.

  8. Selective extraction, separation and speciation of iron in different samples using 4-acetyl-5-methyl-1-phenyl-1 H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ?erife Samac?; ?enol Kartal

    2008-01-01

    A method for speciation, preconcentration and separation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in different matrices was developed using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry. 4-Acetyl-5-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid (AMPC) was used as a new complexing reagent for Fe(III). The Fe(III)AMPC complex was extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) phase in the pH range 1.02.5, and Fe(II) ion remained in aqueous phase at

  9. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mt. Sinai, NY); Milau, Julius S. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  10. Isotope separation using metallic vapor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, G. R.; Chen, C. J.; Harstad, K. G. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    The isotope U235 is separated from a gasified isotope mixture of U235 and U238 by selectively exciting the former from the ground state utilizing resonant absorption of radiation from precisely tuned lasers. The excited isotope is then selectively ionized by electron bombardment. It then is separated from the remaining isotope mixture by electromagnetic separation.

  11. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  12. Chemical Equilibrium of the Dissolved Uranium in Groundwaters From a Spanish Uranium-Ore Deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Garralon, Antonio; Gomez, Paloma; Turrero, Maria Jesus; Buil, Belen; Sanchez, Lorenzo [Departamento de Medio Ambiente, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22. Edificio 19, Madrid, 28040 (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The main objectives of this work are to determine the hydrogeochemical evolution of an uranium ore and identify the main water/rock interaction processes that control the dissolved uranium content. The Mina Fe uranium-ore deposit is the most important and biggest mine worked in Spain. Sageras area is located at the north part of the Mina Fe, over the same ore deposit. The uranium deposit was not mined in Sageras and was only perturbed by the exploration activities performed 20 years ago. The studied area is located 10 Km northeast of Ciudad Rodrigo (Salamanca) at an altitude over 650 m.a.s.l. The uranium mineralization is related to faults affecting the metasediments of the Upper Proterozoic to Lower Cambrian schist-graywacke complex (CEG), located in the Centro-Iberian Zone of the Hesperian Massif . The primary uranium minerals are uraninite and coffinite but numerous secondary uranium minerals have been formed as a result of the weathering processes: yellow gummite, autunite, meta-autunite, torbernite, saleeite, uranotile, ianthinite and uranopilite. The water flow at regional scale is controlled by the topography. Recharge takes place mainly in the surrounding mountains (Sierra Pena de Francia) and discharge at fluvial courses, mainly Agueda and Yeltes rivers, boundaries S-NW and NE of the area, respectively. Deep flows (lower than 100 m depth) should be upwards due to the river vicinity, with flow directions towards the W, NW or N. In Sageras-Mina Fe there are more than 100 boreholes drilled to investigate the mineral resources of the deposit. 35 boreholes were selected in order to analyze the chemical composition of groundwaters based on their depth and situation around the uranium ore. Groundwater samples come from 50 to 150 m depth. The waters are classified as calcium-bicarbonate type waters, with a redox potential that indicates they are slightly reduced (values vary between 50 to -350 mV). The TOC varies between <0.1 and 4.0 mgC/L and the dissolved uranium has a maximum value of 7.7 mg/L. According the analytical data of dissolved uranium, the mineral closest to equilibrium seems to be UO{sub 2}(am). The tritium contents in the groundwaters vary between 1.5 and 7.3 T.U. Considering that the mean value of tritium in rainwater from the studied area has a value of 4 T.U., it can be concluded that the residence times of the groundwaters are relatively short, not longer than 50 years in the oldest case. (authors)

  13. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  14. Chemical Separations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site contains complete notes in a PowerPoint-like presentation for a chemical separations course. It covers a wide variety of topics, including distillation, extraction, gas chromatography, liquid chromatograpy, chromatography theory, instrumentation, electrophoresis, field flow fractionation, and affinity chromatography. It covers these topics thoroughly using a clear, consistent, and simple presentation style. Links to major topics like GC, LC, and electrophoresis provide specific information about the theory, instrumentation, and practice related to these techniques. The site also contains many annimations illustrating important separation processes.

  15. Selective and quantitative separation of zinc and lead from other elements by cation-exchange chromatography in hydrohalic acid-acetone solutions.

    PubMed

    Victor, A H; Strelow, F W

    1981-04-01

    Zinc and lead can be separated from Cd, Bi(III), In and V(V) by eluting these elements with 0.2M hydrochloric acid in 60% acetone from a column of AG50W-X8 cation-exchange resin, zinc and lead being retained. Mercury(II), Tl(III), As(III), Au(III), Sn(IV), Mo(VI), W(VI) and the platinum metals have not been investigated quantitatively, but from their distribution coefficients, should also be eluted. Vanadium(V), Mo(VI) and W(VI) require the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Zinc and lead can be eluted with 0.5M hydrochloric acid in 60% acetone or 0.5M hydrobromic acid in 65% acetone and determined by AAS; the alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions, Mn(II), Co, Ni, Cu(II), Fe(III), Al, Ga, Cr(III), Ti(IV), Zr, Hf, Th, Sc, Y, La and the lanthanides are retained on the column, except for a small fraction of copper eluted with zinc and lead. Separations are sharp and quantitative. The method has successfully been applied to determination of zinc and lead in three silicate rocks and a sediment. PMID:18962901

  16. Remedial action plan for the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, geology report; Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report; Attachment 4, supplemental information

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section} 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado.

  17. Chalcogels : porous metal-chalcogenide networks from main-group metal ions. Effect of surface polarizability on selectivity in gas separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, S.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-10-06

    We report the synthesis of metal-chalcogenide gels and aerogels from anionic chalcogenide clusters and linking metal ions. Metal ions such as Sb{sup 3+} and Sn{sup 2+}, respectively chelated with tartrate and acetate ligands, react in solution with the chalcogenide clusters to form extended polymeric networks that exhibit gelation phenomena. Chalcogenide cluster anions with different charge densities, such as [Sn{sub 2}S{sub 6}]{sup 4-} and [SnS{sub 4}]{sup 4-}, were employed. In situ rheological measurements during gelation showed that a higher charge density on the chalcogenide cluster favors formation of a rigid gel network. Aerogels obtained from the gels after supercritical drying have BET surface areas from 114 to 368 m{sup 2}/g. Electron microscopy images coupled with nitrogen adsorption measurements showed the pores are micro (below 2 nm), meso (2-50 nm), and macro (above 50 nm) regions. These chalcogels possess band gaps in the range of 1.00-2.00 eV and selectively adsorb polarizable gases. A 2-fold increase in selectivity toward CO{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 6} over H{sub 2} was observed for the Pt/Sb/Ge{sub 4}Se{sub 10}-containing aerogel compared to aerogel containing Pt{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}. The experimental results suggest that high selectivity in gas adsorption is achievable with high-surface-area chalcogenide materials containing heavy polarizable elements.

  18. Electrochromatographic separation of proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basak, S. K.; Velayudhan, A.; Kohlmann, K.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a modified electrochromatography system which minimizes Joule heating at electric field strengths up to 125 V/cm. A non-linear equilibrium model is described which incorporates electrophoretic mobility, hydrodynamic flow velocity, and an electrically induced concentration polarization at the surface of the stationary phase. This model is able to provide useful estimates of protein retention time and velocity in a column packed with Sephadex gel and subjected to an electric field. A correlation of electrophoretic mobility of peptide and proteins with respect to their charge, molecular mass, and asymmetry enables the selection of solute target molecules for electrochromatographic separations. Good separation of protein mixtures have been obtained.

  19. Chromatographic Separations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interactive applet provides a simulation of the separation of a mixture of 5 substances across a chromatographic column. The effect of changing various chromatographic factors can simultaneously be seen in the time-dependent dedistribution of analytes along the column along with the development of the chromatogram.

  20. Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing Technology. ISAM semiannual report, Volume 3, Number 1, October 1993March 1994

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Carpenter; T. Kan

    1994-01-01

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (I) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (II) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser

  1. Energy transfer and charge separation in photosystem I: P700 oxidation upon selective excitation of the long-wavelength antenna chlorophylls of Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed Central

    Plsson, L O; Flemming, C; Gobets, B; van Grondelle, R; Dekker, J P; Schlodder, E

    1998-01-01

    Photosystem I of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus contains two spectral pools of chlorophylls called C-708 and C-719 that absorb at longer wavelengths than the primary electron donor P700. We investigated the relative quantum yields of photochemical charge separation and fluorescence as a function of excitation wavelength and temperature in trimeric and monomeric photosystem I complexes of this cyanobacterium. The monomeric complexes are characterized by a reduced content of the C-719 spectral form. At room temperature, an analysis of the wavelength dependence of P700 oxidation indicated that all absorbed light, even of wavelengths of up to 750 nm, has the same probability of resulting in a stable P700 photooxidation. Upon cooling from 295 K to 5 K, the nonselectively excited steady-state emission increased by 11- and 16-fold in the trimeric and monomeric complexes, respectively, whereas the quantum yield of P700 oxidation decreased 2.2- and 1.7-fold. Fluorescence excitation spectra at 5 K indicate that the fluorescence quantum yield further increases upon scanning of the excitation wavelength from 690 nm to 710 nm, whereas the quantum yield of P700 oxidation decreases significantly upon excitation at wavelengths longer than 700 nm. Based on these findings, we conclude that at 5 K the excited state is not equilibrated over the antenna before charge separation occurs, and that approximately 50% of the excitations reach P700 before they become irreversibly trapped on one of the long-wavelength antenna pigments. Possible spatial organizations of the long-wavelength antenna pigments in the three-dimensional structure of photosystem I are discussed. PMID:9591685

  2. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  3. Investigation of Great Basin big sagebrush and black greasewood as biogeochemical indicators of uranium mineralization. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, F.E.; McGrath, S.

    1982-11-01

    The effects of varying phosphate concentrations in natural aqueous systems upon the uptake of uranium by big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata subsp. tridentata) and black greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus (Hook) Torr.) were investigated. Two separate growth experiments with five drip-flow hyroponic units were used and plant seedlings were grown for 60 days in solutions of varying phosphate and uranium concentrations. Successful growth experiments were obtained only for big sagebrush; black greasewood did not sustain sufficient growth. The phosphate concentration of the water did affect the uptake of uranium by the big sagebrush, and this effect is most pronounced in the region of higher concentrations of uranium in the water. The ratio of the concentration of uranium in the plant to that in the water was observed to decrease with increasing uranium concentration in solution. This is indicative of an absorption barrier in the plants. The field data shows that big sagebrush responds to uranium concentrations in the soil water and not the groundwater. The manifestation of these results is that the use of big sagebrush as a biogeochemical indicator of uranium is not recommended. Since the concentration of phosphate must also be knwon in the water supplying the uranium to the plant, one should analyze this natural aqueous phase as a hydrochemical indicator rather than the big sagebrush.

  4. Effect of polymer containing a naphthyl-alanine derivative on the separation selectivity for aromatic compounds in temperature-responsive chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Tadashi; Kanazashi, Ryosuke; Nojima, Akari; Kanazawa, Hideko; Okano, Teruo

    2012-03-01

    A novel polymer-grafted stationary phase of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed, utilizing a temperature-responsive polymer containing an aromatic moiety. Firstly, we synthesized novel functional polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloyl-3-(2-naphthyl)-L-alanine methyl ester) [poly(NIPAAm-co-Nap)], which has temperature-responsiveness and selective retention of aromatic compounds by an intermolecular ?-? interaction. The polymer exhibited a significant reversible phase transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic in the vicinity of its lower critical solution temperature. Employing the developed polymer-grafted silica column, temperature-responsive chromatography was conducted using water as a sole mobile phase. A comparison with a conventional ODS column or a homogeneous PNIPAAm-grafted silica column showed that the retention of aromatic compounds was dramatically increased on the poly(NIPAAm-co-Nap)-grafted stationary phase. Introducing the naphthyl-alanine derivative caused a significant effect on the retention selectivity for aromatic compounds. PMID:21831387

  5. Selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction in the presence on new hydrophilic chelating polymers functionalized with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. I. Development of new hydrophilic chelating polymers and their adsorption properties for rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Miyamoto, Yoshikazu; Teramoto, Masaaki [Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    New hydrophilic chelating polymers were synthesized by introducing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) onto water-soluble polyallylamine. The selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction including these chelating polymers in the aqueous phase is the goal of this work. The polymers were characterized by IR analysis, elemental analysis, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurement, and pH titration. Two kinds of polymers with different solubilities in water were produced using different solvents. Both polymers were naturally precipitated in the presence of rare earth metals. This suggests that in the solvent extraction system including these chelating polymers, the recovery of the polymers is easy. Adsorption properties of Y{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} on these polymers were also investigated. The separation properties by adsorption on the polymers were comparable to those by EDTA. The chelating polymers had the characteristics that their separation factors decreased by adsorption and the total amount adsorbed increased with increasing pH or initial metal concentrations, although in the presence of EDTA these properties were found to be almost constant.

  6. US developments in technology for uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, W.J. Jr.; McGill, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review recent progress and the status of the work in the United States on that part of the fuel cycle concerned with uranium enrichment. The United States has one enrichment process, gaseous diffusion, which has been continuously operated in large-scale production for the past 37 years; another process, gas centrifugation, which is now in the construction phase; and three new processes, molecular laser isotope separation, atomic vapor laser isotope separation, plasma separation process, in which the US has also invested sizable research and development efforts over the last few years. The emphasis in this paper is on the technical aspects of the various processes, but the important economic factors which will define the technological mix which may be applied in the next two decades are also discussed.

  7. Plasma core reactor simulations using RF uranium seeded argon discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater systems to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor (PCR). A nonfissioning, steady-state RF-heated argon plasma seeded with pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was used. An overall objective was to achieve maximum confinement of uranium vapor within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition. Exploratory tests were conducted using the 80 kW RF induction heater with the test chamber at approximately atmospheric pressure and discharge power levels on the order of 10 kW. Four different test chamber flow configurations were tested to permit selection of the configuration offering the best confinement characteristics for subsequent tests at higher pressure and power in the 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility.

  8. 6-(Tetrazol-5-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine: a highly selective ligand for the separation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III).

    PubMed

    Kratsch, Jochen; Beele, Bjrn B; Koke, Carsten; Denecke, Melissa A; Geist, Andreas; Panak, Petra J; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-09-01

    The coordination structure in the solid state and solution complexation behavior of 6-(tetrazol-5-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine (HN4bipy) with samarium(III) was investigated as a model system for actinide(III)/lanthanide(III) separations. Two different solid 1:2 complexes, [Sm(N4bipy)2(OH)(H2O)2] (1) and [Sm(N4bipy)2(HCOO)(H2O)2] (2), were obtained from the reaction of samarium(III) nitrate with HN4bipy in isopropyl alcohol, resuspension in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), and slow crystallization. The formate anion coordinated to samarium in 2 is formed by decomposition of DMF to formic acid and dimethylamine. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) studies were performed with curium(III) and europium(III) by using HN4bipy as the ligand. Curium(III) is observed to form 1:2 and 1:3 complexes with increasing HN4bipy concentration; for europium(III), formation of 1:1 and 1:3 complexes is observed. Although the solid-state samarium complexes were confirmed as 1:2 species the 1:2 europium(III) solution complex in ethanol was not identified with TRLFS. The determined conditional stability constant for the 1:3 fully coordinated curium(III) complex species is more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than that for europium(III) (log ?3[Cm(N4bipy)3] = 13.8 and log ?3[Eu(N4bipy)3] = 11.1). The presence of added 2-bromodecanoic acid as a lipophilic anion source reduces the stability constant for formation of the 1:2 and 1:3 curium(III) complexes, but no ternary complexes were observed. The stability constants for the 1:3 metal ion-N4bipy complexes equate to a theoretical separation factor, SF(Cm(III)/Eu(III)) ? 500. However, the low solubility of the HN4bipy ligand in nonpolar solvents typically used in actinide-lanthanide liquid-liquid extractions prevents its use as a partitioning extractant until a more lipophilic HN4bipy-type ligand is developed. PMID:24967733

  9. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye (Newton, MA)

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  10. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z. [Newton, MA

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  11. Separation system

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Leslie S. (Newton, MA)

    1986-01-01

    A separation system for dewatering radioactive waste materials includes a disposal container, drive structure for receiving the container, and means for releasably attaching the container to the drive structure. Separation structure disposed in the container adjacent the inner surface of the side wall structure retains solids while allowing passage of liquids. Inlet port structure in the container top wall is normally closed by first valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the inlet port and discharge port structure at the container periphery receives liquid that passes through the separation structure and is normally closed by second valve structure that is centrifugally actuated to open the discharge ports. The container also includes coupling structure for releasable engagement with the centrifugal drive structure. Centrifugal force produced when the container is driven in rotation by the drive structure opens the valve structures, and radioactive waste material introduced into the container through the open inlet port is dewatered, and the waste is compacted. The ports are automatically closed by the valves when the container drum is not subjected to centrifugal force such that containment effectiveness is enhanced and exposure of personnel to radioactive materials is minimized.

  12. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry R. (Palos Heights, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  13. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  14. Diffusion model of the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Emily, E-mail: emily.moore@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN-DPC-SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Guneau, Christine, E-mail: christine.gueneau@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN-DPC-SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Crocombette, Jean-Paul, E-mail: jean-paul.crocombette@cea.fr [CEA Saclay, DEN DEN, Service de Recherches de Mtallurgie Physique, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2013-07-15

    Uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), which is used in light water reactors, exhibits a large range of non-stoichiometry over a wide temperature scale up to 2000 K. Understanding diffusion behavior of uranium oxides under such conditions is essential to ensure safe reactor operation. The current understanding of diffusion properties is largely limited by the stoichiometric deviations inherent to the fuel. The present DICTRA-based model considers diffusion across non-stoichiometric ranges described by experimentally available data. A vacancy and interstitial model of diffusion is applied to the UO system as a function of its defect structure derived from CALPHAD-type thermodynamic descriptions. Oxygen and uranium self and tracer diffusion coefficients are assessed for the construction of a mobility database. Chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen are derived with respect to the Darken relation and migration energies of defects are evaluated as a function of stoichiometric deviation. - Graphical abstract: Complete description of OxygenUranium diffusion as a function of composition at various temperatures according to the developed Dictra model. - Highlights: Assessment of a uraniumoxygen diffusion model with Dictra. Complete description of UO diffusion over wide temperature and composition range. Oxygen model includes terms for interstitial and vacancy migration. Interaction terms between defects help describe non-stoichiometric domain of UO{sub 2x}. Uranium model is separated into mobility terms for the cationic species.

  15. Biosorption of uranium and lead by Streptomyces longwoodensis

    SciTech Connect

    Friis, N.; Myers-Keith, P.

    1986-01-01

    Biosorption of uranium and lead by lyophilized cells of Streptomyces longwoodensis was examined as a function of metal concentration, pH, cell concentration, and culture age. Cells harvested from the stationary growth phase exhibited an exceptionally high capacity for uranium (0.44 g U/g dry weight) at pH 5. Calculated values of the distribution coefficient and separation factor indicated a strong preference of the cell mass for uranyl ions over lead ions. The specific uranium uptake was similar for the cell wall and the cytoplasmic fraction. Uranium uptake was associated with an increase in hydrogen ion concentration, and phosphorus analysis of whole cells indicated a simple stoichiometric ratio between uranium uptake and phosphorus content. It is proposed that metal ions are bound to phosphodiester residues present both in the cell wall and cytoplasmic fractions. Based on this model, it was shown that uranium accumulation exhibits a maximum at pH 4.6 that is supported by experimental data from previous investigations.

  16. Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.

    2006-04-05

    The FRC groundwater and sediment contain significant concentrations of U and Tc and are dominated by low pH, and high nitrate and Al concentrations where dissimilatory metal reducing bacterial activity may be limited. The presence of Clostridia in Area 3 at the FRC site has been confirmed and their ability to reduce uranium under site conditions will be determined. Although the phenomenon of uranium reduction by Clostridia has been firmly established, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a reaction are not very clear. The authors are exploring the hypothesis that U(VI) reduction occurs through hydrogenases and other enzymes (Matin and Francis). Fundamental knowledge of metal reduction using Clostridia will allow us to exploit naturally occurring processes to attenuate radionuclide and metal contaminants in situ in the subsurface. The outline for this report are as follows: (1) Growth of Clostridium sp. under normal culture conditions; (2) Fate of metals and radionuclides in the presence of Clostridia; (3) Bioreduction of uranium associated with nitrate, citrate, and lepidocrocite; and (4) Utilization of Clostridium sp. for immobilization of uranium at the FRC Area 3 site.

  17. Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-07-01

    For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding the rate-limiting step of uranium uptake from seawater is also essential in designing an effective uranium recovery system. Finally, economic analyses have been used to guide these studies and highlight what parameters, such as capacity, recyclability, and stability, have the largest impact on the cost of extraction of uranium from seawater. Initially, the cost estimates by the JAEA for extraction of uranium from seawater with braided polymeric fibers functionalized with amidoxime ligands were evaluated and updated. The economic analyses were subsequently updated to reflect the results of this project while providing insight for cost reductions in the adsorbent development through cradle-to-grave case studies for the extraction process. This report highlights the progress made over the last three years on the design, synthesis, and testing of new materials to extract uranium for seawater. This report is organized into sections that highlight the major research activities in this project: (1) Chelate Design and Modeling, (2) Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure, (3) Advanced Polymeric Adsorbents by Radiation Induced Grafting, (4) Advanced Nanomaterial Adsorbents, (5) Adsorbent Screening and Modeling, (6) Marine Testing, and (7) Cost and Energy Assessment. At the end of each section, future research directions are briefly discussed to highlight the challenges that still remain to reduce the cost of extractions of uranium for seawater. Finally, contributions from the Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which complement this research program, are included at the end of this report.

  18. Isotope separation by laser means

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Paul Robinson; Reed J. Jensen; Theodore P. Cotter; Norman R. Greiner; Keith Boyer

    1982-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a

  19. Separation of sodium-22 from irradiated targets

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from an irradiated target including dissolving an irradiated target to form a first solution, contacting the first solution with hydrated antimony pentoxide to selectively separate sodium-22 from the first solution, separating the hydrated antimony pentoxide including the separated sodium-22 from the first solution, dissolving the hydrated antimony pentoxide including the separated sodium-22 in a mineral acid to form a second solution, and, separating the antimony from the sodium-22 in the second solution.

  20. Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from spent uranium alloy fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghusen, J. J.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gunderson, G. E.; Holmes, J. T.; Jonke, A. A.; Kincinas, J. E.; Levitz, N. M.; Potts, G. L.; Ramaswami, D.; Stethers, H.; Turner, K. S.

    1967-01-01

    Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from uranium fuels containing either zirconium or aluminum. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. The process requires few operations in simple, compact equipment, and eliminates aqueous radioactive wastes.