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Sample records for selectively oxidized coals

  1. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  2. Chemical coal cleaning using selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal of both mineral and organic sulfur from Illinois coals using low temperature selective oxidation. This overall objective is to develop new methods for either physical/chemical or physical/microbial cleaning of Illinois coal. Innovative approaches to achieve deep cleaned products, containing both ash and sulfur contents less than 0.5 percent, will be considered. Experiments focus on developing cost-effective methods for the removal of organic sulfur and finely disseminated mineral impurities, especially fine pyrite particles, from coal. Rates and mechanisms for organic sulfur removal will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes handling are included. Bench scale studies are performed.

  3. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-12-31

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate selective oxidation as a pretreatment for the enhanced desulfurization of Illinois Basin coals using a variety of mild thermal/chemical processes. Both an Illinois No.6 and an Indiana No.5 coal were selectively oxidized with peroxyacetic acid in the pretreatment step. The products were then treated with many hydroxide and carbonate bases using either water, methanol or ethanol as the solvent system. Other reaction variables investigated include reaction temperature, reaction time, pyrolysis pressure, particle size of the coal and the level of oxidation in the pretreatment step. Throughout the study the selectively oxidized coals were compared to unoxidized control coals. Model compounds were also studied. The results of these studies overwhelmingly show that selective oxidation with peroxyacetic acid significantly enhances the level of desulfurization obtained with subsequent chemical/thermal treatments. Indeed, every process investigated, including simple pyrolysis experiments, showed sulfur removal in the pretreatment step and the subsequent step to be substantially additive. In addition, considerable enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal was obtained by the selective oxidation pretreatment. Sulfur contents lower than 0.25% were obtained for selectively oxidized coals. This represents an overall sulfur reduction of around 95%. This is beyond the level required for compliance with Clean Air Act legislation. No unoxidized coal, regardless of the desulfurization treatment, approached this level of sulfur removal.

  4. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned the investigation of the desulfurization of the selectively oxidized coals using aqueous or alcoholic base mixtures. Model compound studies were initiated. Results were: Levels of desulfurization obtained in this study are at, or very close to, the 90% removal levels required for these coals to be in compliance with the Clean Air Act legislation; Up to 89.4% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal and 88.9% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and alcoholic/base reactions; Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product than the untreated sample; Substantial enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal has been achieved by the selective oxidation pretreatment; The highest levels of desulfurization obtained so far all involve bases as additives; The water/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} combination, was superior than any of the aqueous hydroxide bases. Possible synergistic interactions between the alcohol and the base are suspected. Over 70% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal can be removed by performing vacuum pyrolysis on the selectively oxidized coal. Lower sulfur contents are obtained by lowing the pyrolysis pressure.

  5. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter includes the investigation of the mild pyrolysis of unoxidized coals plus a selection of selectively oxidized coals. In addition the effect of particle size and extent of oxidation on pyrolysis was investigated. Some preliminary data concerning pyrolysis under vacuum and ambient pressure was also obtained. Work completed this quarter supports the following conclusions: (1) Desulfurization of unoxidized coals increases with increasing pyrolysis temperature and correlates with the loss of volatile matter. (2) Particle size did not influence the extent of desulfurization significantly. (3) Removing pyrite prior to pyrolysis helps to achieve a lower sulfur product beyond that expected from the removal of pyrite alone. (4) The extent of selective oxidation in teh pretreatment step did not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (5) Up to 84% of the sulfur has been removed from the IBC 101 coal by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (6) Evidence for regressive reactions between volatilized sulfur compounds and partially desulfurized products was obtained by studying how changes in pyrolysis pressure effected the product sulfur content.

  6. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned establishing the level of selective oxidation required for successful desulfurization in subsequent treatments. Many desulfurization reactions were performed on pretreated as well as unoxidized coal. The results obtained support the following new conclusions: (1) The extent of selective oxidation in the pretreatment step does not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (2) Up to 84% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal and 86% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (3) Most desulfurizations at 250{degree}C did not produce significant levels of desulfurization. However as the temperature was increased levels of desulfurization increased considerably. (4) Although aqueous base was successful in removing sulfur from both pretreated and untreated samples, the most pronounced desulfurizations were obtained for the untreated samples. This is explained primarily by the dissolution of pyrite in the untreated samples. (5) The best desulfurizations involved SCM and base. Possible synergistic interactions between the methanol and the base are suspected. (6) Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product. The severity of desulfurization is reduced by selective oxidation pretreatment.

  7. Oxidation of mercury across selective catalytic reduction catalysts in coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Senior, Constance L

    2006-01-01

    A kinetic model for predicting the amount of mercury (Hg) oxidation across selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems in coal-fired power plants was developed and tested. The model incorporated the effects of diffusion within the porous SCR catalyst and the competition between ammonia and Hg for active sites on the catalyst. Laboratory data on Hg oxidation in simulated flue gas and slipstream data on Hg oxidation in flue gas from power plants were modeled. The model provided good fits to the data for eight different catalysts, both plate and monolith, across a temperature range of 280-420 degrees C, with space velocities varying from 1900 to 5000 hr(-1). Space velocity, temperature, hydrochloric acid content of the flue gas, ratio of ammonia to nitric oxide, and catalyst design all affected Hg oxidation across the SCR catalyst. The model can be used to predict the impact of coal properties, catalyst design, and operating conditions on Hg oxidation across SCRs. PMID:16499143

  8. Chemical coal cleaning using selective oxidation. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal of both mineral and organic sulfur from Illinois coals using low temperature selective oxidation. This overall objective is to develop new methods for either physical/chemical or physical/microbial cleaning of Illinois coal. Innovative approaches to achieve deep cleaned products, containing both ash and sulfur contents less than 0.5 percent, will be considered. Experiments focus on developing cost-effective methods for the removal of organic sulfur and finely disseminated mineral impurities, especially fine pyrite particles, from coal. Rates and mechanisms for organic sulfur removal will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes will be studied. Chemical reagent recycling and/or reagent wastes handling are included. Bench scale studies are performed.

  9. MERCURY OXIDATION PROMOTED BY A SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED POWDER RIVER BASIN COAL COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Power River Basin (PRB) coal combustion ...

  10. Influence of selected coal contaminants on graphitic carbon electro-oxidation for application to the direct carbon fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, John; Allen, Jessica; Wibberley, Louis; Donne, Scott

    2014-08-01

    A novel method examining the fundamental electrochemical behaviour of carbon is outlined here involving the use of a half cell set-up and solid sacrificial anode. Using this method, electrochemical oxidation of graphite is assessed using selective contamination of a graphite electrode with major coal contaminants identified in selected Australian black coals using X-ray diffraction. Contaminants identified include anatase, alumina, pyrite, quartz, kaolin and montmorillonite. From the systematic introduction of these contaminants it is shown that clay materials, such as kaolin and montmorillonite, act catalytically to increase the rate of graphite oxidation. Metal oxides and sulfides such as anatase, alumina and pyrite give a limited increase in the normalised current, whereas quartz gives a significant decrease in performance. This demonstrates a clear effect of the solid phase interaction of these contaminants on the electrochemical oxidation of graphite since the same effect is not observed when the contaminants are added instead to the molten carbonate electrolyte.

  11. A predictive mechanism for mercury oxidation on selective catalytic reduction catalysts under coal-derived flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Niksa; Naoki Fujiwara

    2005-12-15

    This paper introduces a predictive mechanism for elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts in coal-fired utility gas cleaning systems, given the ammonia (NH{sub 3})/nitric oxide (NO) ratio and concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and HCl at the monolith inlet, the monolith pitch and channel shape, and the SCR temperature and space velocity. A simple premise connects the established mechanism for catalytic NO reduction to the Hg{sup 0} oxidation behavior on SCRs: that hydrochloric acid (HCl) competes for surface sites with NH{sub 3} and that Hg{sup 0} contacts these chlorinated sites either from the gas phase or as a weakly adsorbed species. This mechanism explicitly accounts for the inhibition of Hg{sup 0} oxidation by NH{sub 3}, so that the monolith sustains two chemically distinct regions. In the inlet region, strong NH{sub 3} adsorption minimizes the coverage of chlorinated surface sites, so NO reduction inhibits Hg{sup 0} oxidation. But once NH{sub 3} has been consumed, the Hg{sup 0} oxidation rate rapidly accelerates, even while the HCl concentration in the gas phase is uniform. Factors that shorten the length of the NO reduction region factors that enhance surface chlorination, promote Hg{sup 0} oxidation. This mechanism accurately interprets the reported tendencies for greater extents of Hg{sup 0} oxidation on honeycomb monoliths with smaller channel pitches and hotter temperatures and the tendency for lower extents of Hg{sup 0} oxidation for hotter temperatures on plate monoliths. The mechanism reproduces the reported extents of Hg{sup 0} oxidation on a single catalyst for four coals that generated HCl concentrations from 8 to 241 ppm, which covers the entire range encountered in the U.S. utility industry. Similar performance is also demonstrated for full-scale SCRs with diverse coal types and operating conditions. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun W; Serre, Shannon D; Zhao, Yongxin; Lee, Sung Jun; Hastings, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg(o)) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg(o). Concentrations of Hg(o) and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg(o) oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg(o) oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg(o) oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg2+) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH3) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg(o) oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH3 injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. PMID:18422035

  13. A predictive mechanism for mercury oxidation on selective catalytic reduction catalysts under coal-derived flue gas.

    PubMed

    Niksa, Stephen; Fujiwara, Naoki

    2005-12-01

    This paper introduces a predictive mechanism for elemental mercury (Hg(o)) oxidation on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts in coal-fired utility gas cleaning systems, given the ammonia (NH3)/nitric oxide (NO) ratio and concentrations of Hg(o) and HCl at the monolith inlet, the monolith pitch and channel shape, and the SCR temperature and space velocity. A simple premise connects the established mechanism for catalytic NO reduction to the Hg(o) oxidation behavior on SCRs: that hydrochloric acid (HCl) competes for surface sites with NH3 and that Hg(o) contacts these chlorinated sites either from the gas phase or as a weakly adsorbed species. This mechanism explicitly accounts for the inhibition of Hg(o) oxidation by NH3, so that the monolith sustains two chemically distinct regions. In the inlet region, strong NH3 adsorption minimizes the coverage of chlorinated surface sites, so NO reduction inhibits Hg(o) oxidation. But once NH3 has been consumed, the Hg(o) oxidation rate rapidly accelerates, even while the HCl concentration in the gas phase is uniform. Factors that shorten the length of the NO reduction region, such as smaller channel pitches and converting from square to circular channels, and factors that enhance surface chlorination, such as higher inlet HCl concentrations and lower NH3/NO ratios, promote Hg(o) oxidation. This mechanism accurately interprets the reported tendencies for greater extents of Hg(o) oxidation on honeycomb monoliths with smaller channel pitches and hotter temperatures and the tendency for lower extents of Hg(o) oxidation for hotter temperatures on plate monoliths. The mechanism also depicts the inhibition of Hg(o) oxidation by NH3 for NH3/NO ratios from zero to 0.9. Perhaps most important for practical applications, the mechanism reproduces the reported extents of Hg(o) oxidation on a single catalyst for four coals that generated HCl concentrations from 8 to 241 ppm, which covers the entire range encountered in the U

  14. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

    2001-11-06

    The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

  15. Photochemical oxidation of coals and some selected model compounds by using copper(II) chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, M.

    1999-12-01

    The H-donor ability of different rank coals was examined by using a copper(II)chloride-acetonitrile system as the dehydrogenator. A bituminous coal and two lignites were irradiated in the UV in the presence of copper(II)chloride in acetonitrile. The coal was dehydrogenated while the Cu(II) was reduced to CU(I). Considerable amounts of aliphatic or alicyclic hydrogen were removed from the coals. In the process, while the oxygen contents of coals do not increase, more condensed aromatic products occur. It was concluded that lignites are better reducing agents than bituminous coals. A photooxidation mechanism is proposed on the basis of the model compound reaction. Photooxidation of alcohols (ethanol, 2-propanol, benzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, and diphenyl carbinol), a hydroaromatic compound (tetrahydronaphthalene), and an aromatic ether (dibenzyl ether) was performed under similar reaction conditions.

  16. The cyclic oxidation resistance at 1200 C of beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl alloys with selected third element additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The intermetallic compounds Beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl were tested in cyclic oxidation with selected third element alloy additions. Tests in static air for 200 1-hr cycles at 1200 C indicated by specific weight change/time data and x-ray diffraction analysis that the 5 at percent alloy additions did not significantly improve the oxidation resistance over the alumina forming baseline alloys without the additions. Many of the alloy additions were actually deleterious. Ta and Nb were the only alloy additions that actually altered the nature of the oxide(s) formed and still maintained the oxidation resistance of the protective alumina scale.

  17. Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Gao, Zhengyang; Zhu, Jiashun; Wang, Quanhai; Huang, Yaji; Chiu, Chengchung; Parker, Bruce; Chu, Paul; Pant, Wei-Ping

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0)concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH3 addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH3 reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. PMID:18350905

  19. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Chin; George W. Roberts; James J. Spivey

    2003-12-31

    Uses for structured catalytic supports, such as ceramic straight-channel monoliths and ceramic foams, have been established for a long time. One of the most prominent examples is the washcoated ceramic monolith as a three-way catalytic converter for gasoline-powered automobiles. A distinct alternative to the ceramic monolith is the metal foam, with potential use in fuel cell-powered automobiles. The metal foams are characterized by their pores per inch (ppi) and density ({rho}). In previous research, using 5 wt% platinum (Pt) and 0.5 wt% iron (Fe) catalysts, washcoated metal foams, 5.08 cm in length and 2.54 cm in diameter, of both varying and similar ppi and {rho} were tested for their activity (X{sub CO}) and selectivity (S{sub CO}) on a CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reaction in the presence of a H{sub 2}-rich gas stream. The variances in these metal foams' activity and selectivity were much larger than expected. Other structured supports with 5 wt% Pt, 0-1 wt% Fe weight loading were also examined. A theory for this phenomenon states that even though these structured supports have a similar nominal catalyst weight loading, only a certain percentage of the Pt/Fe catalyst is exposed on the surface as an active site for CO adsorption. We will use two techniques, pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), to characterize our structured supports. Active metal count, metal dispersion, and other calculations will help clarify the causes for the activity and selectivity variations between the supports. Results on ceramic monoliths show that a higher Fe loading yields a lower dispersion, potentially because of Fe inhibition of the Pt surface for CO adsorption. This theory is used to explain the reason for activity and selectivity differences for varying ppi and {rho} metal foams; less active and selective metal foams have a lower Fe loading, which justifies their higher metal dispersion. Data on the CO desorption temperature and average metal

  20. Plasma gasification of coal in different oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, I.B.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B.

    2008-12-15

    Oxidant selection is the highest priority for advanced coal gasification-process development. This paper presents comparative analysis of the Powder River Basin bituminous-coal gasification processes for entrained-flow plasma gasifier. Several oxidants, which might be employed for perspective commercial applications, have been chosen, including air, steam/carbon-dioxide blend, carbon dioxide, steam, steam/air, steam/oxygen, and oxygen. Synthesis gas composition, carbon gasification degree, specific power consumptions, and power efficiency for these processes were determined. The influence of the selected oxidant composition on the gasification-process main characteristics have been investigated.

  1. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  2. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur in the Presence of Coal-Derived Fuel Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.W., Jr.; Gardner, T.H.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, D.A.; Freed, A.D.

    2005-09-01

    A rotatable central composite design approach was utilized to examine the activity and selectivity of an activated carbon-based catalyst during partial oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur. Tests were conducted at 400 psig with a 4000 ppmv H2S inlet concentration in the presence of coal-derived fuel gas (i.e., CO, CO2, H2, and H2O). Temperature, space velocity, and O2:H2S ratio were chosen as process variables for the study to generate response surface maps of elemental sulfur yield and longevity. Temperature was varied from 150-300°C; gas hourly space velocity varied from 1000 -15000 h-1 (STP); O2:H2S varied from 0.5-2.0. Evolution of SO2 and/or COS during some of the tests indicated the presence of side reactions. The relationship between the process variables and catalyst performance as well as the results of catalyst characterization is discussed.

  3. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

    2005-06-01

    Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

  4. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third and fourth quarters 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  5. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  6. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  7. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal.

  8. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. First and second quarterly technical progress reports, [January--June 1995]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor containing a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW nameplate capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing all aspects of this project.

  9. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO.) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO. to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal- fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: 1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels. 2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of- plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. 3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacturer under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties were explored by operating nine small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. In addition, the test facility operating experience provided a basis for an economic study investigating the implementation of SCR technology.

  10. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Federal Energy Technology Center

    1999-12-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round 2. The project is described in the report ''Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x}) Emissions from High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers'' (Southern Company Services 1990). In June 1990, Southern Company Services (Southern) entered into a cooperative agreement to conduct the study. Southern was a cofunder and served as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. Other participants and cofunders were EPRI (formerly the Electric Power Research Institute) and Ontario Hydro. DOE provided 40 percent of the total project cost of $23 million. The long-term operation phase of the demonstration was started in July 1993 and was completed in July 1995. This independent evaluation is based primarily on information from Southern's Final Report (Southern Company Services 1996). The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the 3 flue gas through a catalyst bed where the NO{sub x} and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The objectives of the demonstration project were to investigate: Performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and manufacturing methods at typical U.S. high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions; Catalyst resistance to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals but not present, or present at much lower concentrations, in fuels from other countries; and Effects on the balance-of-plant equipment

  11. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. [Quarterly] technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1993-06-30

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the eleventh quarter, dry thermal oxidation tests were done on coal samples from the Pennsylvania State Coal Bank. As-received and oxidized coal samples were studied by ion-exchange methods to determine the carboxylate and phenolic group concentrations. Film flotation tests were done to characterize the flotability of as-received and oxidized coals. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on different coals, to obtain information pertinent to the selection of flotation reagents. DRIFT analysis was done to characterize the structure of coals.

  12. Oxidative Denitrogenation of Coal Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshamsi, Sepideh

    The oxidative denitrogenation of quinoline (as a model compound representing the nitrogen containing structure of coal liquids) has been investigated in two steps: oxidation by perdecanoic acid at 50 °C to produce quinoline N-oxide in order to weaken the nitrogen-carbon bond; thermal decomposition of quinoline N-oxide to remove nitrogen as its respective oxides. Quinoline is successfully converted to quinoline N-oxide in the oxidation step. Thermal decomposition of quinoline N-oxide at 400 °C and 600 kPa of N2 produces 52-wt% quinoline, 22-wt% a condensed polymeric compound and 26-wt% gaseous mixture of CO2, CO and O2. Almost all the nitrogen content of quinoline N-oxide has remained in the residue of decomposition reaction. This confirms that thermal decomposition not only fails to remove nitrogen from structure of the oxidized molecule, but it also leads to production of a more complex aromatic structure with 10.4-wt% nitrogen content, compared to 10.6-wt% nitrogen content of quinoline.

  13. Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, David S.; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

  14. Oxidation of coal: a mechanistic puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabartty, S.K.

    1981-03-29

    The mechanism of coal oxidation was investigated by two-phase oxidation of hvb and lvb coals. The oxidants used were commercial bleach, tetrabutylammonium fluoroborate and tetrabutylammonium permanganate. After extraction, the compounds were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Coal-oxidation is much more complicated than would be expected from oxidations of standard organic compounds. It is reasonable to assume that aliphatic structures, particularly benzylic methyl, methylene or methine groups, or carbon adjacent to hetero-atoms are the most reactive, and are oxidized to ketones or carboxylic acids. In order to degrade coal to CO/sub 2/ and water-soluble low-molecular-weight compounds by mild oxidants, an abundance of these functional groups must be assumed. However, the stability of ethyl-polyvinylbenzene polymer towards hypochlorite oxidant indicates that activation of coal-carbon for oxidation results from features other than electronegativity of aromatic rings. The uniqueness of the coal-oxidation has to rest on a destabilizing factor which makes even aromatic sites vulnerable. One may speculate that mineral matter in coal is coordinated with aromatic structures, and that the resultant complexes are destabilized by electrophilic attack. If a coal is an entangled interpenetrating macromolecular mixture, the destabilizing effect would decrease with increasing compactness of the physical structure which accompanies increase in rank;higher rank coals would therefore be less reactive. However, if the oxidant can also, like mineral matter, intercalate, it would open the structure up, and produce destabilization. The success of wet oxidation would then depend less on the oxidation potential than on the ability of the oxidant to intercalate. The oxidation of lvb coal with assistance from phase-transfer catalysts in a two-phase system is consistent with this view.

  15. Selective flotation of inorganic sulfides from coal

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Kenneth J.; Wen, Wu-Wey

    1989-01-01

    Pyritic sulfur is removed from coal or other carbonaceous material through the use of humic acid as a coal flotation depressant. Following the removal of coarse pyrite, the carbonaceous material is blended with humic acid, a pyrite flotation collector and a frothing agent within a flotation cell to selectively float pyritic sulfur leaving clean coal as an underflow.

  16. Selective flotation of inorganic sulfides from coal

    DOEpatents

    Miller, K.J.; Wen, Wu-Wey

    1988-05-31

    Pyritic sulfur is removed from coal or other carbonaceous material through the use of humic acid as a coal flotation depressant. Following the removal of coarse pyrite, the carbonaceous material is blended with humic acid, a pyrite flotation collector and a frothing agent within a flotation cell to selectively float pyritic sulfur leaving clean coal as an underflow. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Flotation and flocculation chemistry of coal and oxidized coals

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to understand the fundamentals involved in the flotation and flocculation of coal and oxidized coals and elucidate mechanisms by which surface interactions between coal and various reagents enhance coal beneficiation. An understanding of the nature of the heterogeneity of coal surfaces arising from the intrinsic distribution of chemical moieties is fundamental to the elucidation of mechanism of coal surface modification and its role in interfacial processes such as flotation, flocculation and agglomeration. A new approach for determining the distribution in surface properties of coal particles was developed in this study and various techniques capable of providing such information were identified. Distributions in surface energy, contact angle and wettability were obtained using novel techniques such as centrifugal immersion and film flotation. Changes in these distributions upon oxidation and surface modifications were monitored and discussed. An approach to the modelling of coal surface site distributions based on thermodynamic information obtained from gas adsorption and immersion calorimetry is proposed. Polyacrylamide and dodecane was used to alter the coal surface. Methanol adsorption was also studied. 62 figs.

  18. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This project's objective is to demonstrate the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process that removes nitrogen oxides (NOx) from the flue gas of boilers that burn US high-sulfur coal. The SCR technology involves the catalytic reduction of NH{sub 3} which is injected into the flue gas to react with NOx contained in the flue gas to produce molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and water vapor. This quarter, work was initiated on the pilot plant ductwork layout, flue gas distribution and flow control concepts and preliminary pilot plant reactor designs concepts. Conceptual designs were produced for flue gas flow distribution and control philosophy that includes a variable speed fan, dampers, full-flow venturi and reactor bypass ducting to ensure proper control and distribution among all the reactors. 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Electricity from Coal Combustion: Improving the hydrophobicity of oxidized coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehra, Mohindar; Singh, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    To reduce pollution and improve efficiency, undesirable mineral impurities in coals are usually removed in coal preparation plants prior to combustion first by crushing and grinding coals followed by gravity separation using surfactant aided water flotation. However certain coals in the US are not amendable to this process because of their poor flotation characteristics resulting in a major loss of an energy resource. This problem has been linked to surface oxidation of mined coals which make these coals hydrophilic. In this project, we are investigating the surface and water flotation properties of the eight Argonne Premium (AP) coals using x-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements. The role of the surface functional groups, (phenolic -OH and carboxylic -COOH), produced as a result of chemisorptions of O2 on coals in determining their flotation behavior is being explored. The isoelectric point (IEP) in zeta potential measurements of good vs. poor floaters is being examined in order to improved the hydrophobicity of poor floating coals (e.g. Illinois #6). Results from XRD and IR will be presented along with recent findings from zeta potential measurements, and use of additives to improve hydrophobicity. Supported by USDOE/CAST, Contract #DE-FC26-05NT42457.

  20. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 5, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  1. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. [Coal pyrite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the eighth quarter, wet chemical and dry oxidation tests were done on Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville [number sign]2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. In addition electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania.

  2. ENHANCED COAL REBURNING IN OXIDIZING ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric G. Eddings; Kerry Kelly; Dana W. Overacker; Christopher R. Thurston

    2004-11-01

    Conventional fuel rich coal reburning relies upon two primary mechanisms: (1) the reaction of coal volatiles with NO to form HCN, which can subsequently decay to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) given sufficient residence time at a suitable temperature; and (2), additional NO reduction by reaction of NO with carbon on the coal char surfaces. Recent research has indicated the possibility of HCN release as an additional product during char oxidation, and under appropriate conditions this HCN could provide a third mechanism for reducing NO to N{sub 2}. Lab-scale experiments and kinetic calculations were carried out to identify conditions that might lead to effective coal reburning under oxidizing conditions. The results of the kinetic calculations indicated that, depending on the temperature, oxygen concentrations in the range of 200 ppm to 1000 ppm (0.1%) would provide the greatest levels of gas phase reduction of NO using HCN, and that reductions between 60-80% are possible (in the absence of heterogeneous effects). Experiments using pulverized coal in a laminar flow drop tube furnace demonstrated NO reduction levels as high as 40-50%; however, these experiments were shown to have limited gas/coal contacting. The two different experimental configurations used demonstrated a clear dependence of observed NO reduction efficiency on gas/coal loading. The laboratory results were thus extrapolated to gas/solid loadings more typical of a utility boiler, and this extrapolation indicated that greater levels of NO reductions may well be achievable in a coal-fired boiler application. It was concluded that, given a knowledge of the location of high NO concentrations (obtained for example by CFD modeling), these regions could be targeted with coal injection under slightly oxidizing conditions to obtain NO reductions in excess of the 40-50% levels obtained in the lab-scale experiments. It is recommended that further testing under conventional pulverized coal combustion conditions be

  3. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-10-01

    Measurement and control of the surface properties of coal and pyrite are important in the application of selective oil agglomeration for coal beneficiation and both received further study and consideration. One method of surface characterization involves measuring the heat of immersion of coal in water or other liquids. To develop a useful and consistent measurement technique, numerous measurements were conducted with Illinois No. 6 coal to study the effects of coal particle size and moisture content on the heat of immersion in heptane, water, hexadecane and methanol. The effect of particle size was also studied. Also, ground mineral pyrite was pretreated with dilute solutions of sodium sulfide at various Ph and then agglomerated with heptane. To achieve better control over the oil agglomeration process, oil agglomeration experiments were conducted with aqueous suspensions of graphite which were first degassed with a vacuum pump. 7 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal

    DOEpatents

    Shang, J.Y.; Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.

    1992-12-15

    The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyses the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step. 9 figs.

  5. Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.; Cha, Chang Y.; Merriam, Norman W.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyzes the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step.

  6. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-06-30

    during the seventh quarter, electrokinetic, humic acid extraction and film flotation tests were done on oxidized samples of Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville {number sign} 2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis was done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal, oxidized coal after extraction of humic acids and humic acid extracted from oxidized coal. In addition, electrochemical studies were done on electrodes prepared from coal pyrite samples.

  7. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    Work continued on the basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for beneficiating aqueous suspensions of coal by selective agglomeration with oil. A new method was demonstrated for characterizing the agglomerability of coal suspensions. This method utilizes a photometric dispersion analyzer to monitor changes in the turbidity of a particle suspension as increasing amounts of oil are added to the suspension in a batch agglomeration test. Agglomeration of the particles leads to a marked decrease in the turbidity of the suspension. Another experimental technique was also demonstrated for characterizing oil agglomeration. This technique involves measuring the rate of growth of agglomerates in a continuous flow system operating under stead-state conditions. The data are analyzed by means of a population balance. The results of a preliminary set of experiments in which Indiana V seam coal was agglomerated with tetralin seemed to fit a particular growth model very well. Equipment was also constructed for studying the kinetics of agglomeration in a batch process. While earlier work showed that quebracho (a commercially available dispersant) is a strong agglomeration depressant for pyrite, recent experiments with mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and mineral pyrite showed that quebracho does not appear to be sufficiently selective. Further consideration was given to the separation of mixtures of coal and pyrite agglomeration with heptane. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  8. COST OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) APPLICATION FOR NOX CONTROL ON COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides a methodology for estimating budgetary costs associated with retrofit applications of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology on coal-fired boilers. SCR is a postcombustion nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technology capable of providing NOx reductions >90...

  9. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    During the ninth quarter, electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal and coal pyrite. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on Upper Freeport coal pyrite.

  10. Detection and modeling of subsurface coal oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonhart, Leo S.; Rasmussen, William O.

    1980-01-01

    The oxidation and sustained ignition of coal and coaly wastes within surface coal mine spoils in the southwestern U.S. have hampered the success of reclamation efforts at these locations. To assess better the magnitude, depth, geometry, and dynamics of the oxidation process thermal infrared remote sensing data have been used. Digital thermal imagery was found to be useful for this purpose and was integrated with finite different heat transfer models to yield predictions of several characteristics of the thermal source. In addition to thermal infrared imagery, aerial color and false color infrared imagery were found to provide useful information for the interpretation of oxidation phenomena by means of variations in surface vegetation, color of the surface material, subsidence, etc. The combined use of thermal infrared imagery and thermal modeling techniques are well suited for use in exploration and interpretation of other thermal targets.

  11. Bacterial Oxidation of Pyritic Materials in Coal

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Melvin P.; Rogoff, Martin H.; Wender, Irving

    1961-01-01

    Applicability of the manometric method for studying the oxidation of pyritic material in the presence of bacteria has been demonstrated. Resting cells of Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans accelerated the oxidation of coal pyrites and coarsely crystalline marcasite, but were inactive on coarsely crystalline pyrite. Resting cells of Thiobacillus thiooxidans were inactive on all pyrites tested. Oxidation rates in the presence of Ferrobacillus were increased by reducing the particle size of pyritic samples, and, in one case, by removing the CaCO3 from a calcite-containing sample. PMID:16349610

  12. Bacterial Oxidation of Pyritic Materials in Coal.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M P; Rogoff, M H; Wender, I

    1961-11-01

    Applicability of the manometric method for studying the oxidation of pyritic material in the presence of bacteria has been demonstrated. Resting cells of Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans accelerated the oxidation of coal pyrites and coarsely crystalline marcasite, but were inactive on coarsely crystalline pyrite. Resting cells of Thiobacillus thiooxidans were inactive on all pyrites tested. Oxidation rates in the presence of Ferrobacillus were increased by reducing the particle size of pyritic samples, and, in one case, by removing the CaCO(3) from a calcite-containing sample. PMID:16349610

  13. Catalytic performance and deactivation of precipitated iron catalyst for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in the waste gas streams from coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Mashapa, T.N.; Rademan, J.D.; van Vuuren, M.J.J.

    2007-09-15

    The selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, using a commercial, precipitated silica promoted ferric oxide based catalyst, was investigated in laboratory and pilot-plant reactors. Low levels of hydrogen sulfide (1-3 vol%) can be readily removed, but a continuous slow decrease in catalyst activity was apparent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the loss of activity was due to the formation of ferrous sulfate, which is known to be less active than the ferric oxide. In addition, studies using a model feed showed that the propene and HCN impurities in the plant feed stocks also act as potent catalyst poisons.

  14. Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

    2009-09-14

    Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot

  15. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1996-01-26

    Coal oxidation has been studies extensively in previous work. However, there is still no general agreement concerning the mechanisms of oxidation. Moreover, the oxidation behavior of coal and mineral matter have generally been regarded as separate processed. There is appreciable evidence that organic and inorganic oxidation process are actually coupled, consequently the changes in their surface properties induced by oxidation are difficult to predict. This makes the effectively of coal cleaning processes highly sensitive to the extent of weathering and oxidation that the coal has experienced. The objective of this research was to investigate the oxidation behavior of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with these surface properties that would influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes.

  16. Further studies of the effects of oxidation on the surface properties of coal and coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, M.N.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this research was to investigate the oxidation behavior of coal and coal pyrite and to correlate the changes in the surface properties induced by oxidation, along with the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these organic and inorganic materials, with the behavior in physical coal cleaning processes. This provide more fundamental knowledge for understanding the way in which different factors interact in a medium as heterogeneous as coal. Fourteen coal samples of different ranks ranging from high to medium sulfur content were studied by dry oxidation tests at different temperatures and humidities, and by wet oxidation tests using different oxidizing agents. The concentration of surface oxygen functional groups was determined by ion-exchange methods. The changes in the coal composition with oxidation were analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. The wettability of as-received and oxidized coal and coal pyrite samples was assessed by film flotation tests. The electrokinetic behavior of different coals and coal pyrite samples was studied by electrokinetic tests using electrophoresis. Possible oxidation mechanisms have been proposed to explain the changes on the coal surface induced by different oxidation treatments.

  17. Enhanced coal hydrogasification via oxidative pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1992-04-16

    The gasification of coal char by hydrogen is much slower than in steam or carbon dioxide; moreover, hydrogasification rate in pure hydrogen decreases sharply with conversion for most carbons. To overcome this kinetic behavior, the oxidation of the char prior to and during hydrogasification has been investigated as a means of enhancing hydro gasification rate. Kinetic rate studies under well-characterized conditions have been complemented by careful surface analyses to characterize oxygen on the char surface prior to and during hydrogasification.

  18. Microbial oxidation of pyrrhotites in coal chars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, K.W.; Risatti, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans to oxidize pyrrhotite minerals occurring in coal chars was investigated, to evaluate the feasibility of microbial char desulphurization. Bio-oxidation of pyrrhotites in chars produced by two different processes was demonstrated conclusively. Microbial removal of sulphur from a char and its parent coal proceeded at the rate of 3.5% and 12% day-1, respectively with a total of 48% and 81% removal after 27 days. The pH of shake flask cultures containing the coal dropped naturally to a final value of 2.2, while the pH of cultures containing the corresponding char rose and had to be lowered artificially with additional acid. Amending char cultures with elemental sulphur to increase acidity upon bio-oxidation and prevent precipitation of ferric iron was successful; however, the extent of pyrrhotite removal, as demonstated by X-ray diffraction analysis, was not improved. As yet, there is no explanation for the failure of microbial removal of pyrrhotitic sulphur to go to completion. ?? 1988.

  19. Fast and Selective Preconcentration of Europium from Wastewater and Coal Soil by Graphene Oxide/Silane@Fe3O4 Dendritic Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Patra, Santanu; Roy, Ekta; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2015-05-19

    In this study, nanocomposite of graphene oxide and silane modified magnetic nanoparticles (silane@Fe3O4) were synthesized in a form of dendritic structure. For this, silane@Fe3O4 nanoparticle gets sandwiched between two layers of graphene oxide by chemical synthesis route. The synthesized dendritic structure was used as a monomer for synthesis of europium ion imprinted polymer. The synthesis of imprinted polymer was contemplated onto the surface of the vinyl group modified silica fiber by activated generated free radical atom-transfer radical polymerization, that is, AGET-ATRP technique. The synthesized dendritic monomer was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, VSM, FE-SEM, and TEM analyses. The imprinted polymer modified silica fiber was first validated in the aqueous and blood samples for successful extraction and detection of europium ion with limit of detection = 0.050 pg mL(-1) (signal/noise = 3). The imprinted polymer modified silica fiber was also used for preconcentration and separation of europium metal ion from various soil samples of coal mine areas. However, the same silica fiber was also used for wastewater treatment and shows 100% performance for europium removal. The findings herein suggested that dendritic nanocomposite could be potentially used as a highly effective material for the enrichment and preconcentration of europium or other trivalent lanthanides/actinides in nuclear waste management. PMID:25895010

  20. Assessment of oxidative stress markers and concentrations of selected elements in the leaves of Cassia occidentalis growing wild on a coal fly ash basin.

    PubMed

    Love, Amit; Banerjee, B D; Babu, C R

    2013-08-01

    Assessment of oxidative stress levels and tissue concentrations of elements in plants growing wild on fly ash basins is critical for realistic hazard identification of fly ash disposal areas. Hitherto, levels of oxidative stress markers in plants growing wild on fly ash basins have not been adequately investigated. We report here concentrations of selected metal and metalloid elements and levels of oxidative stress markers in leaves of Cassia occidentalis growing wild on a fly ash basin (Badarpur Thermal Power Station site) and a reference site (Garhi Mandu Van site). Plants growing on the fly ash basin had significantly high foliar concentration of As, Ni, Pb and Se and low foliar concentration of Mn and Fe compared to the plants growing on the reference site. The plants inhabiting the fly ash basin showed signs of oxidative stress and had elevated levels of lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage from cells and low levels of chlorophyll a and total carotenoids compared to plants growing at the reference site. The levels of both protein thiols and nonprotein thiols were elevated in plants growing on the fly ash basin compared to plants growing on the reference site. However, no differences were observed in the levels of cysteine, reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione in plants growing at both the sites. Our study suggests that: (1) fly ash triggers oxidative stress responses in plants growing wild on fly ash basin, and (2) elevated levels of protein thiols and nonprotein thiols may have a role in protecting the plants from environmental stress. PMID:23307051

  1. Treatment of aqueous streams containing strong oxidants using bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.; Bodine, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Certain oxidizing contaminants, notably Cr(VI) and Mn(VII), are attenuated by reduction and sorption on organic matter in soils. Coals have some chemical similarity with this organic matter, and might be used on an industrial scale to treat effluents. We have studied the ability of acidic KMnO{sub 4} to oxidize Upper Freeport, bituminous coal with concurrent sorption of the resulting Mn(IV) and Mn(II). The oxidizing ability of Cr(VI) was briefly investigated. The ability of the oxidized coal to sorb Cu{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} was then studied, and compared with coal oxidized by hydrogen peroxide. The effect of oxidation treatment, metal ion concentration, and solution pH on metal uptake kinetics and coal loading was investigated. Potential applications for treating effluents containing oxidizing ions are discussed.

  2. Oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde catalyzed by a bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Haim Cohen; Uri Green

    2009-05-15

    It has been observed that molecular hydrogen is formed during long-term storage of bituminous coals via oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde by coal surface peroxides. This study has investigated the effects of coal quantity, temperature, and water content on the molecular hydrogen formation with a typical American coal (Pittsburgh No. 6). The results indicate that the coal's surface serves as a catalyst in the formation processes of molecular hydrogen. Furthermore, the results also indicate that low temperature emission of molecular hydrogen may possibly be the cause of unexplained explosions in confined spaces containing bituminous coals, for example, underground mines or ship holds. 20 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Desulfurization of coal: enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development in viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions that otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidation for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful, this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal.

  4. A new approach in ultrapurification of coal by selective flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgil, B.M.

    1992-04-01

    The specific objective of the present investigation is to develop a mathematical and computational model to elicit values of active sites ({phi}) and fractional surface coverage ({theta}) which would yield optimum separation of coal from coal pyrite and coal refuse. Attempts are to be made to select appropriate flocculants and experimental conditions to obtain {phi} and {theta} values as dictated by the theoretical model so as to achieve the desired separation in naturally occurring samples of fine coal. (VC)

  5. Desulfurization of coal: Enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development of viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigates the application of phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions than otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidations for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal. During this quarter aliquots of the IBC-101 coal have been ground to various particle sizes in an attempt to find the optimum physical pretreatment for mineral, especially pyrite, removal. Analysis of these various aliquots shows them to be representative of the original coal. In addition, preliminary desulfurization reactions using fly ash and scrubber sludges have been performed on an unoxidized IBC-101 sample. Results will be available next quarter. Also, SEM-EDAX analysis of the fly ash indicates that it contains oxides that have shown activity in base desulfurization reactions.

  6. Process for selective grinding of coal

    DOEpatents

    Venkatachari, Mukund K.; Benz, August D.; Huettenhain, Horst

    1991-01-01

    A process for preparing coal for use as a fuel. Forming a coal-water slurry having solid coal particles with a particle size not exceeding about 80 microns, transferring the coal-water slurry to a solid bowl centrifuge, and operating same to classify the ground coal-water slurry to provide a centrate containing solid particles with a particle size distribution of from about 5 microns to about 20 microns and a centrifuge cake of solids having a particle size distribution of from about 10 microns to about 80 microns. The classifer cake is reground and mixed with fresh feed to the solid bowl centrifuge for additional classification.

  7. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1995-05-31

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. Work during the nineteenth quarter has concluded studies of the surface functional groups produced on coal by severe thermal and chemical oxidation, and on investigating the partition of metal ions between such strongly oxidized coal samples and aqueous solutions. This partitioning behavior was being followed to obtain further information on the chemistry of the coal surfaces after different oxidation treatments. Adsorption isotherms for the uptake of Cd{sup 2+} on coal oxidized by different methods were obtained, and these and the Cu{sup 2+} adsorption isotherms reported in the last report have been scrutinized, and interpreted more exhaustively. The apparent discrepancies noted in the last report for the analysis of surface functional groups have been investigated further. The adsorption behavior has been related to the surface chemistry of Upper Freeport coal oxidized by different methods.

  8. Organic structures in coals: a new oxidative depolymerization technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hayatsu, R.; McBeth, R.L.; Scott, R.G.; Botto, R.E.; Winans, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    To better understand the chemical structures found in coal macromolecular material, as well as the origin and reactivity of these structures, a new mild, oxidative depolymerization procedure has been developed. This two step technique has been applied to eight coals of various rank ranging from lignite to anthracite. This study has provided quantitative information on reactive hydrogens and on the number of bonds cleaved to form a soluble material and has yielded a solubilized coal which appears to be mostly unaltered and which is being studied intensively. By refluxing coal and iodine in pyridine reactive hydrogens in methyl and methylene groups are replaced and pyridinium iodides are formed. The number of (Py/sup +/I/sup -/) units bonded to the coals decreased with increasing rank from 8.5/100 carbon atoms in a lignite to 1.5/100 carbons in an anthracite. These derivatized coals are much more susceptible to oxidative depolymerization than the raw coal. In the second step, the coal-Py/sup +/I/sup -/ samples were converted to soluble species by alkaline silver oxide oxidation (100/sup 0/ for 12 to 20 hrs). The yields, determined as a percentage of carbon recovered, of soluble materials are very good (60 to 100%) for coals in rank up to the MV bituminous and 26 to 42% for high rank coals. For comparison, the yields for the raw coals with the same oxidation ranged from 5 to 25%. The majority of the soluble material consisted of high molecular weight carboxylic acids. Smaller molecular weight organic acids were also present as minor depolymerization products and were analyzed as methyl esters by gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy.

  9. COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip E. Savage

    1999-10-18

    Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, we examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}. We used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which we can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that we could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, we performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2} , which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the rate of formation of

  10. Coal conversion wastewater treatment by catalytic oxidation in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip E. Savage

    1999-10-20

    Wastewaters from coal-conversion processes contain phenolic compounds in appreciable concentrations. These compounds need to be removed so that the water can be discharged or re-used. Catalytic oxidation in supercritical water is one potential means of treating coal-conversion wastewaters, and this project examined the reactions of phenol over different heterogeneous oxidation catalysts in supercritical water. More specifically, the authors examined the oxidation of phenol over a commercial catalyst and over bulk MnO{sub 2}, bulk TiO{sub 2}, and CuO supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They used phenol as the model pollutant because it is ubiquitous in coal-conversion wastewaters and there is a large database for non-catalytic supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with which they can contrast results from catalytic SCWO. The overall objective of this research project is to obtain the reaction engineering information required to evaluate the utility of catalytic supercritical water oxidation for treating wastes arising from coal conversion processes. All four materials were active for catalytic supercritical water oxidation. Indeed, all four materials produced phenol conversions and CO{sub 2} yields in excess of those obtained from purely homogeneous, uncatalyzed oxidation reactions. The commercial catalyst was so active that the authors could not reliably measure reaction rates that were not limited by pore diffusion. Therefore, they performed experiments with bulk transition metal oxides. The bulk MnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} catalysts enhance both the phenol disappearance and CO{sub 2} formation rates during SCWO. MnO{sub 2} does not affect the selectivity to CO{sub 2}, or to the phenol dimers at a given phenol conversion. However, the selectivities to CO{sub 2} are increased and the selectivities to phenol dimers are decreased in the presence of TiO{sub 2}, which are desirable trends for a catalytic SCWO process. The role of the catalyst appears to be accelerating the

  11. Oxidation properties of processed low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, K.T.; Fauth, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Thermally treated subbituminous coals tend to self-heat, leading to spontaneous ignition. Evidence is presented indicating that thermally treated Rosebud subbituminous coal may be oxidized at 80 C under moist conditions to provide sample stability as measured by oxygen adsorption tests.

  12. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, [March--May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-06-30

    during the seventh quarter, electrokinetic, humic acid extraction and film flotation tests were done on oxidized samples of Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville {number_sign} 2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis was done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal, oxidized coal after extraction of humic acids and humic acid extracted from oxidized coal. In addition, electrochemical studies were done on electrodes prepared from coal pyrite samples.

  13. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-12-31

    During the ninth quarter, electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal and coal pyrite. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on Upper Freeport coal pyrite.

  14. COST OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) APPLICATION FOR NOX CONTROL ON COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides a methodology for estimating budgetary costs associ-ated with retrofit applications of selec-tive catalytic reduction (SCR) technology on coal-fired boilers. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxides (NOX) con-trol technology capable of providing NOX reductions...

  15. 2000 resource assessment of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northern and Central Appalachian Basin Coal Regions Assessment Team

    2001-01-01

    This report includes results of a digital assessment of six coal beds or zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions that produce over 15 percent of the Nation's coal. Other chapters include an executive summary, a report on geology and mining, a report summarizing other selected coal zones that were not assessed, and a report on USGS coal availability and recoverablity studies in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions.

  16. Oxidative derivatization and solubilization of coal. Final report. Period: October 1, 1986 - April 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, J.G.; Porowski, E.N.; Straub, A.M.

    1988-05-01

    We investigated the solubilization of coal by oxidative means to produce motor fuels. Nitric acid was used in the first of two approaches taken to cleave aliphatic linkages in coal and reduce the size of its macrostructure. Mild conditions, with temperatures up to a maximum of 75 C, and nitric acid concentrations below 20% by weight, characterize this process. The solid product, obtained in high yields, is soluble in polar organic solvents. Lower alcohols, methanol in particular, are of interest as carrier solvents in diesel fuel applications. Coals investigated were New York State peat, Wyodak subbituminous coal, North Dakota lignite, and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The lower tank coals were easily converted and appear well suited to the process, while the bituminous Illinois No. 6 and Pitt Seam coals were unreactive. We concentrated our efforts on Wyodak coal and North Dakota lignite. Reaction conditions with regards to temperature, acid concentration, and time were optimized to obtain high product selectivity at maximum conversion. A continuous process scheme was developed for single pass coal conversions of about 50% to methanol-soluble product.

  17. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Amui, J.

    1992-06-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stages of direct coal liquefaction. Scope of work study the conversion of Argonne Premium coals in tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin and compare the following: conversion to soluble products and product composition. Hydrogen donated by both solvents will be measured by gas chromatography and the same technique will be used to establish the amount of dealkylation of 2-t-butyltetralin. Reactions will be performed at several different temperatures for varying amounts of time.

  18. Shield support selection based on geometric characteristics of coal seam

    SciTech Connect

    K. Goshtasbi; K. Oraee; F. Khakpour-yeganeh

    2006-01-15

    The most initial investment in longwall face equipping is the cost of powered support. Selection of proper shields for powered supports is based on load, geometric characterization of coal seams and economical considerations.

  19. NITRIC OXIDE FORMATION DURING PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data on the overall conversion of coal-nitrogen to NOx were obtained at 1250 K and 1750 K for a residence time of one second. The conversion of coal-nitrogen to NOx decreased monotonically with increasing fuel/oxygen equivalence ratio and decreased slightly with increasing temper...

  20. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-06-01

    During coal liquefaction, coal fragments forming a liquid product with reduced heteroatom content. Coal can be considered to be a large network of polynuclear aromatic species connected by heteroatoms and alkyl bridging structures. Predominant heteroatoms contained in coal are sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Predominant alkyl bridges are methylene and ethylene structures. The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge structures. The reactions studied include: hydrogenation (HYD), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrosulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum napththenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS/sub 2/). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  1. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Volume 2, Appendices A--N. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Volume 2 contains the following appendices: Appendix A, Example Material Safety Data Sheet; Appendix B, Initial Site Characterization Test Results; Appendix C, Testing Proposal, Southern Research Institute; Appendix D, Example Laboratory Catalyst Test Protocol; Appendix E, Detailed Coal Analysis Data; Appendix F, Standard Methods-QA/QC Document; Appendix G, Task No. 1 Commissioning Tests; Appendix H, Task No. 2 Commissioning Tests; Appendix I, First Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix J, Second Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix K, Third Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix L, Fourth Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; Appendix M, Fifth Parametric Sequence Spreadsheets; and Appendix N, First Series-Manual APH Tests.

  2. A new approach in ultrapurification of coal by selective flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgil, B.M.

    1990-06-01

    A relatively pure sample of coal and coal pyrite (free of clays) was provided from the Coal Research Resource Center at VPI, Blackburgh, VA. The samples have been prepared and single mineral flucculation tests are in progress to confirm the selectivity achieved with the previously evaluated flocculents. The mathematical/computational model was used to predict the effect of process parameters such as feed composition and polymer dosage on the yield and selectivity. It is determined that improvement is selectivity can be achieved by controlling the dosage of not so selective flocculents. Further screening of potential selective flocculents will continue. Also FT-IR and heat of adsorption measurements and planned to better understand the parameters which control the floc properties.

  3. Oxidation of pyrite in coal to magnetite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Alexander, C.C.; Dulong, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    When bituminous coal is heated in an inert atmosphere (He) containing small amounts of oxygen at 393-455 ??C, pyrite (FeS2) in coal is partially converted to magnetite (Fe304). The maximum amount of Fe304 formed during the time of heating corresponds to 5-20% of the total pyrite present, depending on the coal sample. The magnetite forms as an outer crust on the pyrite grains. The fact that the magnetic properties of the pyrite grains are substantially increased by the magnetite crust suggests that pyrite can be separated from coal by use of a low magnetic field. In a laboratory test, 75% removal is obtained by means of a 500 Oe magnet on three samples, and 60% on a fourth sample. ?? 1984.

  4. Biodegradation of air-oxidized Illinois No. 6 coal

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Wilson, B.W.; Bean, R.M.; Stewart, D.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Franz, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    We have found that Illinois No. 6 coal, after an air-oxidation pretreatment, can be substantially biodegraded by Penicillium sp. to a product largely soluble in dilute base. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the chemical nature of the biotreated Illinois No. 6 coal and to compare it with the corresponding material from leonardite biosolubilization. 12 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Desulphurization of coal via low temperature atmospheric alkaline oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaicheng; Yang, Ji; Jia, Jinping; Wang, Yaling

    2008-03-01

    Different from other options which usually required strict conditions, a method combining atmospheric oxidization and chemical cleaning with alkali solutions was employed to desulphur coals at temperature around 90 degrees C. The data show that 66% organic sulphur, 44% sulphide sulphur, and 15% pyrite sulphur were lost when the coal was treated in 0.25M NaOH at 90 degrees C, while the solution being aerated at the flow rate of 0.136m3h(-1). The rate increased to 73% for organic sulphur, 83% for sulphide sulphur and 84% for pyrite sulphur when the previous coal was further treated in acidic solution containing HCl at pH 1 for another hour. The mechanism of desulphurization was explored using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared. It was found out that the bond of -CS was broken by atmospheric oxygen in basic environment, leading to the lost of organic sulphur in coal. Scanning electron microscope data show that the physical structure of the coal was not adversely affected by the treatment and thermogravimetric analysis results prove that the pyrolysis behavior remained unchanged, indicating that the burning process of the coal would not be adversely affected. Unlike other oxidizing methods, this technique does not lower the heating value of the coal which was manifested by relevant data. PMID:18022211

  6. Quantifying the modes of occurrence of mercury in coal using a selective leaching procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Mroczkowski, S.J.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.; Bullock, J.H. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Using a selective solvent leaching procedure the modes of occurrence of mercury (Hg) have been quantitatively determined in eight as-mined coals and six commercially cleaned coals from major coal producing areas of the U.S. (Northern Appalachian, Eastern Interior, and Powder River Basin). Samples were sequentially leached with 1N ammonium acetate, 3N HCl, 48% HF, and 2N HNO{sub 3}. Residues from each step were analyzed by cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA). Most of the Hg in the Northern Appalachian and Eastern Interior samples was leached by HNO{sub 3} (50-75% and 60-65%, respectively), indicating an association with pyrite. Up to 25% of the Hg in the Northern Appalachian coals and up to 20% of the Hg in the Eastern Interior coals was leached by HCl. This HCl-soluble Hg may be associated with mono-sulfides or oxidized pyrite. Fifteen to 50% of the Hg in the Northern Appalachian coals and 15-25% of the Hg in the Eastern Interior coals was not removed by leaching. This residual Hg may be present as organically-bound Hg or, less likely, as organically-encapsulated Hg-bearing pyrite. Results from the Powder River Basin samples were variable. In one sample, 30% of the Hg was HCl-soluble, 25% was associated with pyrite, and 40% remained unleached. In the other sample, no Hg was leached, possibly indicating that all of the Hg in this sample is organically associated.

  7. Desulfurization of coal: Enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1997-05-01

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development of viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application of phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst was expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions than otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidations for selective sulfur oxidation were also studied. If successful this project would have lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would have significantly improved the marketability of Illinois coal. However, the phase transfer catalysts, the cerium and the scrubber sledge did not catalize the sulfur removal significantly.

  8. Colloidal stability of coal-simulated suspensions in selective agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Schurger, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A coal suspension was simulated by using graphite to simulate the carbonaceous fraction and kaolinite clay to simulate the ash fraction. Separate studies on each material established their response to additions of oxidized pyrite (ferrous sulfate) and a humic acid simulate (salicylic acid) in terms of zeta potentials profiles with pH and Ionic strength. Concentrations of iron and salicylic acid evaluated were 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M and 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M, respectively. The zeta potentials profiles of graphite, clay and hexadecane were negative throughout the pH ranges studied. The addition of iron lowered the zeta potentials all of the suspensions under all pH and ionic strength conditions. Salicylic acid decreased the graphite and hexadecane zeta potentials but had no effect on the clay zeta potential profiles. Agglomeration of graphite with bridging liquid shows distinct time dependent rate mechanisms, a initial growth of graphite agglomerates followed by consolidation phase. Graphite agglomeration was rapid with the maximum amount of agglomerate volume growth occurring in under 2-4 minutes. Agglomeration in the first two minutes was characterized by a 1st order rate mechanism. The presence of either Iron and salicylic acid generally improved the first order rates. The addition of clay also improved the first order rates except in the presence of salicylic acid. Heteroagglomeration of graphite with clay was found by hydrodynamic arguments to be unfavored. A multicomponent population balance model which had been developed for evaluating collision efficiencies of coal, ash and pyrite selective agglomeration was evaluated to explain these results. The growth and consolidation characteristics of graphite agglomeration for the experimental conditions examined herein revealed the limitations of such as model for this application.

  9. The oxidizing power of illinois coal. II. The effects of extended time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yohe, G.R.; Wilt, M.H.

    1942-01-01

    The oxidizing power exhibited by five Illinois coals has been shown to reach a maximum value and then decrease, suggesting that this "reactive oxygen" may play the role of an intermediate in the oxidative degradation of these coals.

  10. Nitrogen oxide emissions from coal fired MHD plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.N.

    1996-03-01

    In this topical report, the nitrogen oxide emission issues from a coal fired MHD steam combined cycle power plant are summarized, both from an experimental and theoretical/calculational viewpoint. The concept of staging the coal combustion to minimize NO{sub x} is described. The impact of NO{sub x} control design choices on electrical conductivity and overall plant efficiency are described. The results of the NO{sub x} measurements in over 3,000 hours of coal fired testing are summarized. A chemical kinetics model that was used to model the nooks decomposition is described. Finally, optimum design choices for a low nooks plant are discussed and it is shown that the MHD Steam Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant can be designed to operate with nooks emissions less than 0.05 lbm/MMBTU.

  11. Ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate oxidation of coal tar DNAPLs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Libin; Wang, Li; Hu, Xingting; Wu, Peihui; Wang, Xueqing; Huang, Chumei; Wang, Xiangyang; Deng, Dayi

    2016-11-15

    The feasibility of ultrasound assisted, thermally activated persulfate for effective oxidation of twenty 2-6 ringed coal tar PAHs in a biphasic tar/water system and a triphasic tar/soil/water system were investigated and established. The results indicate that ultrasonic assistance, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature are all required to achieve effective oxidation of coal tar PAHs, while the heating needed can be provided by ultrasonic induced heating as well. Further kinetic analysis reveals that the oxidation of individual PAH in the biphasic tar/water system follows the first-order kinetics, and individual PAH oxidation rate is primary determined by the mass transfer coefficients, tar/water interfacial areas, the aqueous solubility of individual PAH and its concentration in coal tar. Based on the kinetic analysis and experimental results, the contributions of ultrasound, persulfate and elevated reaction temperature to PAHs oxidation were characterized, and the effects of ultrasonic intensity and oxidant dosage on PAHs oxidation efficiency were investigated. In addition, the results indicate that individual PAH degradability is closely related to its reactivity as well, and the high reactivity of 4-6 ringed PAHs substantially improves their degradability. PMID:27450342

  12. Effects of coal oxidation on calorific value

    SciTech Connect

    Uenal, S.; Yalcin, Z.G.; Piskin, S.

    1999-04-01

    A brief investigation of the effects of oxidation on the calorific values of three Turkish lignite samples has been made. The lignite samples have been vacuum dried and oxidized in pure oxygen at 35, 45, and 55 C at 100 kPa for 10 days. The calorific values of the oxidized and unoxidized samples have been measured. A relation has been observed between the extent of oxidation and decrease in calorific value. Various possibilities of modeling the relation have been explored.

  13. The oxidizing power of illinois coal. I. The reaction with titanous chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoke, G.R.; Harman, C. Alex

    1941-01-01

    Illinois coals which have been exposed to air or oxygen show a small but definite ability to oxidize titanous chloride. This oxidizing power is gained very rapidly when freshly ground coal is exposed to air. Neither the magnitude nor the rapid increase of this oxidizing power can be accounted for entirely by the presence or the formation of soluble ferric compounds in the coal.

  14. Integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siefert, N.; Shamsi, A.; Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.

    2010-01-01

    A review was conducted for coal gasification technologies that integrate with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to achieve system efficiencies near 60% while capturing and sequestering >90% of the carbon dioxide [1-2]. The overall system efficiency can reach 60% when a) the coal gasifier produces a syngas with a methane composition of roughly 25% on a dry volume basis, b) the carbon dioxide is separated from the methane-rich synthesis gas, c) the methane-rich syngas is sent to a SOFC, and d) the off-gases from the SOFC are recycled back to coal gasifier. The thermodynamics of this process will be reviewed and compared to conventional processes in order to highlight where available work (i.e. exergy) is lost in entrained-flow, high-temperature gasification, and where exergy is lost in hydrogen oxidation within the SOFC. The main advantage of steam gasification of coal to methane and carbon dioxide is that the amount of exergy consumed in the gasifier is small compared to conventional, high temperature, oxygen-blown gasifiers. However, the goal of limiting the amount of exergy destruction in the gasifier has the effect of limiting the rates of chemical reactions. Thus, one of the main advantages of steam gasification leads to one of its main problems: slow reaction kinetics. While conventional entrained-flow, high-temperature gasifiers consume a sizable portion of the available work in the coal oxidation, the consumed exergy speeds up the rates of reactions. And while the rates of steam gasification reactions can be increased through the use of catalysts, only a few catalysts can meet cost requirements because there is often significant deactivation due to chemical reactions between the inorganic species in the coal and the catalyst. Previous research into increasing the kinetics of steam gasification will be reviewed. The goal of this paper is to highlight both the challenges and advantages of integrating catalytic coal gasifiers with SOFCs.

  15. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-02-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that employ coal and natural gas and produce electric power and clean transportation fuels. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. Specifically, we aim to: Measure the kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur over selective catalysts in the presence of major

  16. Oxidative DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of coal workers.

    PubMed

    Schins, R P; Schilderman, P A; Borm, P J

    1995-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are important mediators of both mineral dust-induced (malignant) lung disease and in vitro DNA damage. Therefore, we studied in vivo oxidative DNA damage in coal workers who had been chronically exposed to silica-containing dust. In peripheral blood lymphocytes of 38 retired coal miners (eight with coal workers pneumoconiosis, 30 references) and 24 age-matched, non-dust-exposed controls 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) was determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The ratio of 8-oxodG residues to deoxyguanosine (dG) was related to individual cumulative dust exposure estimates and pneumoconiotic stage as established by chest radiography. The ratio of 8-oxodG to dG(x 10(-5)) in lymphocytes did not differ between miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (2.61 +/- 0.44) and miners without coal workers' pneumoconiosis (2.96 +/- 1.86). However, oxidative DNA damage in all miners was higher than in the non-dust-exposed controls (1.67 +/- 1.31). 8-oxodG/dG ratio was not related to individual cumulative coal dust exposure, age or smoking (pack years) when evaluated by multiple linear regression. We suggest that oxidative damage to the DNA of peripheral blood lymphocytes may be introduced by increased oxidative stress responses in subjects chronically exposed to mineral dusts. Whether this is an important pathway in the suggested carcinogenicity of silica is still an open question. PMID:7591172

  17. OXIDATION AND DEVOLATILIZATION OF NITROGEN IN COAL CHAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reactions of organically-bound nitrogen in coal char during combustion have been studied in a laboratory furnace using size-graded char particles prepared by the pyrolysis of a Montana lignite. The time-resolved variations of nitrogen-to-carbon ratio during char oxidation hav...

  18. The effect of coal bed dewatering and partial oxidation on biogenic methane potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Harris, Steve H.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Orem, William H.; Clark, Arthur C.; Corum, Margo D.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Coal formation dewatering at a site in the Powder River Basin was associated with enhanced potential for secondary biogenic methane determined by using a bioassay. We hypothesized that dewatering can stimulate microbial activity and increase the bioavailability of coal. We analyzed one dewatered and two water-saturated coals to examine possible ways in which dewatering influences coal bed natural gas biogenesis by looking at differences with respect to the native coal microbial community, coal-methane organic intermediates, and residual coal oxidation potential. Microbial biomass did not increase in response to dewatering. Small Subunit rRNA sequences retrieved from all coals sampled represented members from genera known to be aerobic, anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic. A Bray Curtis similarity analysis indicated that the microbial communities in water-saturated coals were more similar to each other than to the dewatered coal, suggesting an effect of dewatering. There was a higher incidence of long chain and volatile fatty acid intermediates in incubations of the dewatered coal compared to the water-saturated coals, and this could either be due to differences in microbial enzymatic activities or to chemical oxidation of the coal associated with O2 exposure. Dilute H2O2 treatment of two fractions of structural coal (kerogen and bitumen + kerogen) was used as a proxy for chemical oxidation by O2. The dewatered coal had a low residual oxidation potential compared to the water-saturated coals. Oxidation with 5% H2O2 did increase the bioavailability of structural coal, and the increase in residual oxidation potential in the water saturated coals was approximately equivalent to the higher methanogenic potential measured in the dewatered coal. Evidence from this study supports the idea that coal bed dewatering could stimulate biogenic methanogenesis through partial oxidation of the structural organics in coal once anaerobic conditions are restored.

  19. Treatment and recovery of larger particles of fine oxidized coal

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, R.E.

    1980-09-16

    This invention relates to a method and treating agent for increasing the yield of larger particles of fine oxidized coal where the particle size is 28 X 100 mesh and preferably 28 X 70 mesh and where said coal particles are concentrated by froth flotation. The method consists of utilizing as a promoter an alkali metal or ammonium polyacrylate. A preferred promoter is about 0.05-1.5 lbs of sodium polyacrylate latex per ton of dry coal (0.017-0.5 lb of dry sodium polyacrylate per ton of dry coal), having an average molecular weight of about 100,000, to 1, 000,000 and more, with a preferred range of 1,000,000 or more. This preferred promoter or frothing aid for oxidized coal is a water-in-oil latex of sodium polyacrylate used with a water-inoil emulsifier and preferably used with an alcohol-type frother. The latex may be utilized neat and self inverts with the assistance of an oil-in-water surfactant and the water in the system upon application to form an oil-in-water emulsion, or it may be used as a two part system with an activator (Aqueous) to promote inversion. Additionally, the latex emulsion recovers larger particles in the size 100 mesh and greater and preferably in the range 28 X 70 mesh.

  20. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, June 1995--August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The action of coal and pyrite as reducing agents and as waste processing sorptive material for wastes outside the industry are also discussed.

  1. Surface Properties of Photo-Oxidized Bituminous Coals: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Natural weathering has a detrimental effect on the hydrophobic nature of coal, which in turn can influence clean-coal recovery during flotation. Few techniques are available that can establish the quality of coal surfaces and that have a short analysis time to provide input for process control. Luminescence emissions which can be quantified with an optical microscope and photometer system, are measurably influenced by degree of weathering as well as by mild storage deterioration. In addition, it has been shown that when vitrinite is irradiated with a relatively high intensity flux of violet- or ultraviolet- light in the presence of air, photo-oxidation of the surface occurs. The combination of measuring the change in luminescence emission intensity with degree of surface oxidation provided the impetus for the current investigation. The principal aim of this research was to determine whether clear correlations could be established among surface oxygen functionality, hydrophobicity induced by photo-oxidation, and measurements of luminescence intensity and alteration. If successful, the project would result in quantitative luminescence techniques based on optical microscopy that would provide a measure of the changes in surface properties as a function of oxidation and relate them to coal cleanability. Two analytical techniques were designed to achieve these goals. Polished surfaces of vitrain bands or a narrow size fraction of powdered vitrain concentrates were photo-oxidized using violet or ultraviolet light fluxes and then changes in surface properties and chemistry were measured using a variety of near-surface analytical techniques. Results from this investigation demonstrate that quantitative luminescence intensity measurements can be performed on fracture surfaces of bituminous rank coals (vitrains) and that the data obtained do reveal significant variations depending upon the level of surface oxidation. Photo-oxidation induced by violet or ultraviolet light

  2. Activity and selectivity of molybdenum catalysts in coal liquefaction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Pellegrino, J.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate how effectively three different molybdenum catalysts promote reactions involving heteroatom removal and cleavage of alkyl bridge hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrocracking (HYC). Both model and coal liquefaction reactions were performed to test the activity and selectivity of three different molybdenum catalysts. The three catalysts used were molybdenum naphthenate, molybdenum supported on gamma alumina (Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and precipitated, poorly crystalline molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). The model compounds, chosen to mimic coal structure, on which the effectiveness of the catalysts for the model reactions was tested were: 1-methylnaphthalene, representing aromatic hydrocarbons, for hydrogenation; 1-naphthol, representing oxygen containing compounds, for deoxygenation; benzothiophene, representing sulfur containing compounds, for desulfurization; indole, representing nitrogen containing compounds, for denitrogenation; and bibenzyl, representing alkyl bridging structures, for hydrocracking. Catalytic reactions of combinations of reactants were performed to simulate a complex coal matrix. Thermal and catalytic coal liquefaction reactions were performed using Illinois No. 6 coal with anthracene as a solvent. The efficacy of the catalysts was determined by comparing the product and compound class fractions obtained from the liquefaction reactions.

  3. [Comprehensive fuzzy evaluation of nitrogen oxide control technologies for coal-fired power plants].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Shu-xiao; Hao, Ji-ming

    2010-07-01

    A multi-level assessment index system was established to quantitatively and comprehensively evaluate the performance of typical nitrogen oxide control technologies for coal-fired power plants. Comprehensive fuzzy evaluation was conducted to assess six NO, control technologies, including low NO, burner (LNB), over the fire (OFA), flue gas reburning (Reburning), selective catalyst reduction (SCR), selective non-catalyst reduction (SNCR) and hybrid SCR/SNCR. Case studies indicated that combination of SCR and LNB are the optimal choice for wall-fired boilers combusting anthracite coal which requires NO, removal efficiency to be over 70%, however, for W-flame or tangential boilers combusting bituminous and sub-bituminous coal which requires 30% NO, removal, LNB and reburning are better choices. Therefore, we recommend that in the developed and ecological frangible regions, large units burning anthracite or meager coal should install LNB and SCR and other units should install LNB and SNCR. In the regions with environmental capacity, units burning anthracite or meager coal shall install LNB and SNCR, and other units shall apply LNB to reduce NO, emissions. PMID:20825011

  4. Selective Oxidizer For Removal Of Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trocciola, John C.; Schroll, Craig R.; Lesieur, Roger R.

    1996-01-01

    Catalytic apparatus selectively oxidizes most of carbon monoxide (without oxidizing hydrogen) in stream of reformed fuel gas fed to low-temperature fuel cell. Multiple catalytic stages at progressively lower temperatures operate without becoming poisoned. Catalysts used to oxidize CO selectively include platinum on alumina and commercial catalyst known as "Selectoxo."

  5. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the eighth quarter, wet chemical and dry oxidation tests were done on Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville {number_sign}2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. In addition electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania.

  6. Enhanced coal hydrogasification via oxidative pretreatment. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1992-04-16

    The gasification of coal char by hydrogen is much slower than in steam or carbon dioxide; moreover, hydrogasification rate in pure hydrogen decreases sharply with conversion for most carbons. To overcome this kinetic behavior, the oxidation of the char prior to and during hydrogasification has been investigated as a means of enhancing hydro gasification rate. Kinetic rate studies under well-characterized conditions have been complemented by careful surface analyses to characterize oxygen on the char surface prior to and during hydrogasification.

  7. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Technical progress report, May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. Work during the nineteenth quarter has concluded studies of the surface functional groups produced on coal by severe thermal and chemical oxidation, and on investigating the partition of metal ions between such strongly oxidized coal samples and aqueous solutions. This partitioning behavior was being followed to obtain further information on the chemistry of the coal surfaces after different oxidation treatments. Adsorption isotherms for the uptake of Cd{sup 2+} on coal oxidized by different methods were obtained, and these and the Cu{sup 2+} adsorption isotherms reported in the last report have been scrutinized, and interpreted more exhaustively. The apparent discrepancies noted in the last report for the analysis of surface functional groups have been investigated further. The adsorption behavior has been related to the surface chemistry of Upper Freeport coal oxidized by different methods.

  8. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, Michael S.; Murtha, Marlyn J.

    1983-05-31

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  9. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ADDITION ON MERCURY OXIDATION BY SCR CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED SUBBITUMINOUS COAL FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An entrained flow reactor is used to study the effect of addition of chlorine-containing species on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo)by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in simulated subbituminous coal combustion flue gas. The combustion flue gas was doped wit...

  10. Interactions of selected bacterial isolates with DBT and solubilized coal

    SciTech Connect

    Key, D.H.; Fox, R.V.; Kase, R.S.; Willey, M.S.; Stoner, D.L.; Ward, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    We are studying the interactions of isolated bacteria with dibenzothiophene (DBT), a sulfur-containing model compound, and with a solubilized coal product derived from a high-organic-sulfur lignite. The sensitivity of the tetrazolium assay used to identify and study these strains was improved by substituting tetrazolium violet for triphenyltetrazolium. DBT metabolism by thirteen strains was investigated using qualitative and quantitative GC and GC-MS analyses. Growth medium and incubation time affect the extent of DBT degradation and the production of DBT metabolites. Under specific conditions, seven of the strains produce metabolites which elute close to the position of one or another of the biphenyl standards. However, when these samples are spiked with the standard compounds, the bacterial metabolites do not co-elute with the standards. The modification of solubilized high-organic-sulfur coal by six of these strains was also studied. No selective removal of sulfur relative to carbon was observed. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Nitrogen oxides emission control options for coal-fired electric utility boilers.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ravi K; Hall, Robert E; Khan, Sikander; Culligan, Kevin; Lani, Bruce W

    2005-09-01

    Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increasingly important to implement state-of-the-art NOx control technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NOx control options for these boilers. It discusses the established commercial primary and secondary control technologies and examines what is being done to use them more effectively. Furthermore, the paper discusses recent developments in NOx controls. The popular primary control technologies in use in the United States are low-NOx burners and overfire air. Data reflect that average NOx reductions for specific primary controls have ranged from 35% to 63% from 1995 emissions levels. The secondary NOx control technologies applied on U.S. coal-fired utility boilers include reburning, selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Thirty-six U.S. coal-fired utility boilers have installed SNCR, and reported NOx reductions achieved at these applications ranged from 15% to 66%. Recently, SCR has been installed at >150 U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. Data on the performance of 20 SCR systems operating in the United States with low-NOx emissions reflect that in 2003, these units achieved NOx emission rates between 0.04 and 0.07 lb/10(6) Btu. PMID:16259432

  12. Oxidation of coal-water slurry feed to hydrogasifier

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Bernard S.

    1976-01-01

    An aqueous coal slurry is preheated, subjected to partial oxidation and vaporization by injection of high pressure oxygen and is introduced into a top section of a hydrogasifier in direct contact with hot methane-containing effluent gases where vaporization of the slurry is completed. The resulting solids are reacted in the hydrogasifier and the combined gases and vapors are withdrawn and subjected to purification and methanation to provide pipeline gas. The amount of oxygen injected into the slurry is controlled to provide the proper thermal balance whereby all of the water in the slurry can be evaporated in contact with the hot effluent gases from the hydrogasifier.

  13. Kinetics of Direct Oxidation of H2S in Coal Gas to Elemental Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-11-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct

  14. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Ruppert; Susan Tewalt; Linda Bragg

    2002-02-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides

    DOEpatents

    Rashid Khan, M.

    1988-05-05

    A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere is described. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Decaking of coal or oil shale during pyrolysis in the presence of iron oxides

    DOEpatents

    Khan, M. Rashid

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing a fuel from the pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of iron oxide in an inert gas atmosphere. The method includes the steps of pulverizing feed coal or oil shale, pulverizing iron oxide, mixing the pulverized feed and iron oxide, and heating the mixture in a gas atmosphere which is substantially inert to the mixture so as to form a product fuel, which may be gaseous, liquid and/or solid. The method of the invention reduces the swelling of coals, such as bituminous coal and the like, which are otherwise known to swell during pyrolysis.

  17. Studies on the Low-Temp Oxidation of Coal Containing Organic Sulfur and the Corresponding Model Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanjun; Li, Zenghua; Li, Jinhu; Zhou, Yinbo; Yang, Yongliang; Tang, Yibo

    2015-01-01

    This paper selects two typical compounds containing organic sulfur as model compounds. Then, by analyzing the chromatograms of gaseous low-temp oxidation products and GC/MS of the extractable matter of the oxidation residue, we summarizing the mechanism of low-temp sulfur model compound oxidation. The results show that between 30°C to 80°C, the interaction between diphenyl sulfide and oxygen is mainly one of physical adsorption. After 80°C, chemical adsorption and chemical reactions begin. The main reaction mechanism in the low-temp oxidation of the model compound diphenyl sulfide is diphenyl sulfide generates diphenyl sulfoxide, and then this sulfoxide is further oxidized to diphenyl sulphone. A small amount of free radicals is generated in the process. The model compound cysteine behaves differently from diphenyl sulfide. The main reaction low-temp oxidation mechanism involves the thiol being oxidized into a disulphide and finally evolving to sulfonic acid, along with SO₂ being released at 130°C and also a small amount of free radicals. We also conducted an experiment on coal from Xingcheng using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the major forms of organic sulfur in the original coal sample are thiophene and sulfone. Therefore, it can be inferred that there is none or little mercaptan and thiophenol in the original coal. After low-temp oxidation, the form of organic sulfur changes. The sulfide sulfur is oxidized to the sulfoxide, and then the sulfoxide is further oxidized to a sulfone, and these steps can be easily carried out under experimental conditions. What's more, the results illustrate that oxidation promotes sulfur element enrichment on the surface of coal. PMID:26690405

  18. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  19. A new approach in ultrapurification of coal by selective flocculation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgil, B.M.

    1992-04-01

    The specific objective of the present investigation is to develop a mathematical and computational model to elicit values of active sites ({phi}) and fractional surface coverage ({theta}) which would yield optimum separation of coal from coal pyrite and coal refuse. Attempts are to be made to select appropriate flocculants and experimental conditions to obtain {phi} and {theta} values as dictated by the theoretical model so as to achieve the desired separation in naturally occurring samples of fine coal. (VC)

  20. Selective glycerol oxidation by electrocatalytic dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ju; Lee, Jechan; Green, Sara K; Huber, George W; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an electrochemical dehydrogenation process can be used to oxidize glycerol to glyceraldehyde and glyceric acid even without using stoichiometric chemical oxidants. A glyceric acid selectivity of 87.0 % at 91.8 % glycerol conversion was obtained in an electrocatalytic batch reactor. A continuous-flow electrocatalytic reactor had over an 80 % high glyceric acid selectivity at 10 % glycerol conversion, as well as greater reaction rates than either an electrocatalytic or a conventional catalytic batch reactor. PMID:24664518

  1. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie; Tewalt, Susan; Bragg, Linda

    2002-01-01

    The Appalachian Basin is one of the most important coal-producing regions in the world. Bituminous coal has been mined in the basin for the last three centuries, and the cumulative production is estimated at 34.5 billion short tons. Annual production in 1998 was about 452 million short tons; the basin's production is mostly in the northern (32 percent) and central (63 percent) coal regions. The coal is used primarily within the Eastern United States for electric power generation, but some of it is suitable for metallurgical uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain.

  2. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  3. Oxidative desulfurization of Tufanbeyli coal by hydrogen peroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Guru, M.; Sarioz, B.V.; Cakanyildirim, C.

    2008-07-01

    It is becoming popular to use fossil fuels efficiently since the necessary energy is mostly supplied from fossil fuels. Altough there are high lignite reserves, high sulfur content limits the efficient use of them. In this article, we aimed to convert combustible sulfur in coal to non-combustible sulfate form in the ash by oxidizing it with a hydrogen peroxide solution. The parameters affecting the sulfur conversion were determined to be: hydrogen peroxide concentration, reaction time, mean particle size at constant room temperature and shaking rate. The maximum desulfurization efficiency reached was 74% of the original combustible sulfur with 15% (w/w) hydrogen peroxide solution, 12 hours of reaction time, and 0.25 mm mean particle size.

  4. Distribution of trace elements in selected pulverized coals as a function of particle size and density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, C.L.; Zeng, T.; Che, J.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Olmez, I.; Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Mroczkowski, S.; Palmer, C.; Finkelman, R.

    2000-01-01

    Trace elements in coal have diverse modes of occurrence that will greatly influence their behavior in many coal utilization processes. Mode of occurrence is important in determining the partitioning during coal cleaning by conventional processes, the susceptibility to oxidation upon exposure to air, as well as the changes in physical properties upon heating. In this study, three complementary methods were used to determine the concentrations and chemical states of trace elements in pulverized samples of four US coals: Pittsburgh, Illinois No. 6, Elkhorn and Hazard, and Wyodak coals. Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was used to measure the absolute concentration of elements in the parent coals and in the size- and density-fractionated samples. Chemical leaching and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to provide information on the form of occurrence of an element in the parent coals. The composition differences between size-segregated coal samples of different density mainly reflect the large density difference between minerals, especially pyrite, and the organic portion of the coal. The heavy density fractions are therefore enriched in pyrite and the elements associated with pyrite, as also shown by the leaching and XAFS methods. Nearly all the As is associated with pyrite in the three bituminous coals studied. The sub-bituminous coal has a very low content of pyrite and arsenic; in this coal arsenic appears to be primarily organically associated. Selenium is mainly associated with pyrite in the bituminous coal samples. In two bituminous coal samples, zinc is mostly in the form of ZnS or associated with pyrite, whereas it appears to be associated with other minerals in the other two coals. Zinc is also the only trace element studied that is significantly more concentrated in the smaller (45 to 63 ??m) coal particles.

  5. National coal resource assessment non-proprietary data: Location, stratigraphy, and coal quality for selected tertiary coal in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stricker, G.D.; Ellis, M.S.; Roberts, S.B.; Keighin, C.W.; Murphy, E.C.; Cavaroc, V.V., Jr.; Johnson, R.C.; Wilde, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the objectives of the National Coal Resource Assessment in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region was to compile stratigraphic and coal quality-trace-element data on selected and potentially minable coal beds and zones of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene) and equivalent formations. In order to implement this objective, drill-hole information was compiled from hard-copy and digital files of the: (1) U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) offices in Casper, Rawlins, and Rock Springs, Wyoming, and in Billings, Montana, (2) State geological surveys of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, (3) Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in Cheyenne, (4) U.S. Office of Surface Mining in Denver, Colorado, (5) U.S. Geological Survey, National Coal Resource Data System (NCRDS) in Reston, Virginia, (6) U.S. Geological Survey coal publications, (7) university theses, and (8) mining companies.

  6. Engineering and economical aspects of selection of coal conveying system in Czech underground mines

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.; Drozdek, K.

    1995-12-31

    Coal, rock and material conveying and men-riding presently represent the critical activities of the mining process. Coal when cut out in the face is continually transported towards the expedition from a mine. The selection of coal conveying system from face to the skip complex or directly to the surface depends mainly on the quantity of coal conveyed, the hauling distance, the local and time concentration of production and the lifetime of a system. Possibilities of belt conveying and combined belt conveying and locomotive haulage, used in Czech coal mines, are analyzed from the point of view of technological advantages and disadvantages and compared according to the economic parameters.

  7. Coal extraction - environmental prediction

    SciTech Connect

    C. Blaine Cecil; Susan J. Tewalt

    2002-08-01

    To predict and help minimize the impact of coal extraction in the Appalachian region, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is addressing selected mine-drainage issues through the following four interrelated studies: spatial variability of deleterious materials in coal and coal-bearing strata; kinetics of pyrite oxidation; improved spatial geologic models of the potential for drainage from abandoned coal mines; and methodologies for the remediation of waters discharged from coal mines. As these goals are achieved, the recovery of coal resources will be enhanced. 2 figs.

  8. Combined adsorption and oxidation mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide on granulated coal ash.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Satoshi; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Kim, Kyung-Hoi; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Katayama, Misaki; Yamamoto, Tamiji

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic to benthic organisms and may cause blue tide with depletion of dissolved oxygen in water column due to its oxidation. The purpose of this study is to reveal the combined adsorption and oxidation mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide on granulated coal ash that is a byproduct from coal electric power stations to apply the material as an adsorbent for hydrogen sulfide in natural fields. Sulfur species were identified in both liquid and solid phases to discuss removal mechanisms of the hydrogen sulfide with the granulated coal ash. Batch experiments revealed that hydrogen sulfide decreased significantly by addition of the granulated coal ash and simultaneously the sulfate ion concentration increased. X-ray absorption fine structure analyses showed hydrogen sulfide was adsorbed onto the granulated coal ash and successively oxidized by manganese oxide (III) contained in the material. The oxidation reaction of hydrogen sulfide was coupling with reduction of manganese oxide. On the other hand, iron containing in the granulated coal ash was not involved in hydrogen sulfide oxidation, because the major species of iron in the granulated coal ash was ferrous iron that is not easily reduced by hydrogen sulfide. PMID:22487226

  9. Sulfur oxides mapping and coal grade - Finding the right coal to meet applications and regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, K.C.; Hohn, M.E.; McColloch, G.H.; Smith, C.J. )

    1989-08-01

    West Virginia has a vast range of coal grades within its 62 mineable coal seams. Higher grades generally occur in the southern coalfields and have lower sulfur and higher Btu values. Although these coals may be compliance coals in term of SO{sub x} producing potential, many may not be best suited for pulverized coal combustion applications due primarily to the high ratio of fixed carbon to volatile matter. Coals with a high carbon/volatile matter ratio burn hotter. However, they also tend to be harder to ignite (coals with a high volatile content are easier to ignite), which may cause them to burn less efficiently in pulverized coal furnaces (like those used by many electric utilities) where residence time is short and ignition must occur quickly. However, blends using these higher ranked coals have worked effectively in some plants. Many coal-quality parameters affect the method in which a coal may be best used. At the West Virginia Geological Survey, the authors attempt to match the optimum grade of coal to any given application. This match is achieved by mapping quality parameters such as pounds of SO{sub x} per million Btu then combining several coal quality maps to determine probable locations of a specific grade. This procedure enables them to better categorize their coals for their optimum use potential.

  10. A selective nanosensing probe for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouma, P. I.; Kalyanasundaram, K.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of NO gas in exhaled human breath may be used to monitor oxidative stress and pulmonary diseases. Until now, only bulk, expensive, chemiluminescence-based NO monitors have been available to medicine. A nanosensing probe based on WO3 selectively detecting minute nitric oxide gas concentrations in the presence of interfering volatile compounds is presented. This is possible due to the chemical affinity of rhenium trioxide based phases to oxidizing gases. The NO nanoprobe is expected to lead to portable and affordable, noninvasive, single breath sampling, NO diagnostics.

  11. Preparation of oxygen-containing organic products from bed-oxidized brown coal by ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Semenova, S.A.; Patrakov, Y.F.; Batina, M.V.

    2009-01-15

    The possibility of modifying the functional composition of humic acids by gas-phase ozonation of bed-oxidized brown coal was examined. About 90% of the organic matter of brown coal was converted to low-molecular weight soluble oxygen-containing products by stepwise liquid-phase ozonation (in chloroform and acetic acid).

  12. Scope and limitation of ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation of coal as an analytical tool for an aliphatic portion of coal organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, S.; Nomura, M.; U-esaka, K. I.

    1994-12-31

    We have been investigating a chemical structure of Japanese bituminous Akabira coal by Curie-point pyrolysis GC/MS coupled with CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR and proposed a unit chemical structure of the coal on the basis of these results. In that paper, we had pointed out more precise and quantitative evaluation of chemical bonds connecting aromatic rings should be clarified in order to evaluate more precise chemical structures of coal organic materials (COM). As for this, Stock et al., investigated ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation (RICO) of coal. Ruthenium tetroxide is well known to have a property to attack selectively sp{sup 2} carbons of organic substrates: for example, in this oxidation arylalkanes and diarylalkanes could be converted to aliphatic monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, respectively. One of the most critical points of this reaction is believed to be the difficulty in attaining quantitative analyses of lower carboxylic acids because they are main products, showing high volatility. Stock et al. and Strausz et al. had applied the isotope dilution method{close_quote} and esterification with phenacyl bromide for the quantitative analysis, respectively. The former, however, needs preparation of deuterium-labeled carboxylic acids and the later has a slow rate of conversion of the carboxylic acids to their phenacyl esters. In this paper, we have examined quantitative determination of carboxylic acids resulted from RICO reaction and proposed the method to accomplish this, applying this for RICO reaction of Illinois No.6 (American subbituminous), Akabira (Japanese bituminous), and Zao Zhuang (Chinese bituminous) coals.

  13. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1993-12-31

    Results of research pertaining to chemical reactions that aim to selectively cleave C-S bonds in model compounds as well as Illinois coal are summarized. Chemical reactions that result in carbon-sulfur bond cleavage are an essential aspect of any protocol designed to remove organic sulfur from coal. In the second year of the project ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal`` investigations of reactions in which organic sulfur-containing coal model compounds are subjected to different conditions of temperature, solvent mixtures, reagents, and radiation have been completed. A series of reactions have been undertaken in which physically cleaned Illinois coal has been subjected to many of the same reaction conditions that were shown, via the use of model sulfides, to result in substantial C-S bond cleavage and or sulfur oxidation. Therefore, summarized in this final report are results of the investigations of the photooxidation reactions of coal model sulfones and sulfides; the photolytic desulfurization of coal; and various other topics, including a summary of endeavors aimed at initiating C-S bond cleavage reactions using oxidation/chlorination/desulfurization protocols, and various tellurium reagents.

  14. THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF SELECTED TRACE ELEMENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical investigation of the disposition of five volatile trace elements (arsenic, boron, lead, selenium, and mercury) in SNG-producing coal gasification plants. Three coal gasification processes (dry-bottom Lurgi, Koppers-Totzek, and HYGAS) were...

  15. Upgrading selected Czech coals for home and industrial heating

    SciTech Connect

    Musich, M.A.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Czech Republic has large coal reserves, particularly brown coal and lignite, and to a lesser extent, bituminous coal. Concurrent with the recent political changes, there has been a reassessment of the role of coal for electrical and heating energy in the future economy, owing to the large dependence on brown coal and lignite and the implementation of more stringent environmental regulations. These coals have a relatively high sulfur content, typically 1-3 wt%, and ash content, leading to significant SO{sub 2} and other gaseous and particulate emissions. Some of the bituminous coals also exhibit high ash content. Against this background, the Energy & Environmental Research Center, on behalf of the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, undertook a project on upgrading Czech coals to achieve desired fuel properties. The purpose of the project was to assist the city of Usti nad Labem in Northern Bohemia in developing cost-effective alternatives for reducing environmental emissions from district and home heating systems.

  16. Process and analytical studies of enhanced low severity co-processing using selective coal pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The findings in the first phase were as follows: 1. Both reductive (non-selective) alkylation and selective oxygen alkylation brought about an increase in liquefaction reactivity for both coals. 2. Selective oxygen alkylation is more effective in enhancing the reactivity of low rank coals. In the second phase of studies, the major findings were as follows: 1. Liquefaction reactivity increases with increasing level of alkylation for both hydroliquefaction and co-processing reaction conditions. 2. the increase in reactivity found for O-alkylated Wyodak subbituminous coal is caused by chemical changes at phenolic and carboxylic functional sites. 3. O-methylation of Wyodak subbituminous coal reduced the apparent activation energy for liquefaction of this coal.

  17. Sequential solvent extraction for forms of antimony in five selected coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, C.; Liu, Gaisheng; Kong, Y.; Chou, C.-L.; Wang, R.

    2008-01-01

    Abundance of antimony in bulk samples has been determined in five selected coals, three coals from Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui, China, and two from the Illinois Basin in the United States. The Sb abundance in these samples is in the range of 0.11-0.43 ??g/g. The forms of Sb in coals were studied by sequential solvent extraction. The six forms of Sb are water soluble, ion changeable, organic matter bound, carbonate bound, silicate bound, and sulfide bound. Results of sequential extraction show that silicate-bound Sb is the most abundant form in these coals. Silicate- plus sulfide-bound Sb accounts for more than half of the total Sb in all coals. Bituminous coals are higher in organic matterbound Sb than anthracite and natural coke, indicating that the Sb in the organic matter may be incorporated into silicate and sulfide minerals during metamorphism. ?? 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  18. Sequential solvent extraction for forms of antimony in five selected coals

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, C.C.; Liu, G.J.; Kang, Y.; Chou, C.L.; Wang, R.W.

    2008-03-15

    Abundance of antimony in bulk samples has been determined in five selected coals, three coals from Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui, China, and two from the Illinois Basin in the United States. The Sb abundance in these samples is in the range of 0.11-0.43 {mu} g/g. The forms of Sb in coals were studied by sequential solvent extraction. The six forms of Sb are water soluble, ion changeable, organic matter bound, carbonate bound, silicate bound, and sulfide bound. Results of sequential extraction show that silicate-bound Sb is the most abundant form in these coals. Silicate-plus sulfide-bound Sb accounts for more than half of the total Sb in all coals. Bituminous coals are higher in organic matter bound Sb than anthracite and natural coke, indicating that the Sb in the organic matter may be incorporated into silicate and sulfide minerals during metamorphism.

  19. Cost comparison of selected US and Polish coal mines, August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report on the Polish coal industry is the fifth in a series of studies on coal exporting countries requested by the House Appropriations Committee. The committee requested that the basic differences in mining costs for U.S. and foreign mines be identified, especially those costs incurred in complying with health, safety, and environmental regulations. Basic costs in extracting raw coal are analyzed in this report for underground longwall mining operations, the only mining method employed in Poland for hard coal. In this report there is also a limited analysis of the relative market competitiveness of selected Polish and U.S. steam and metallurgical coal mines in the European electric utility and metallurgical coal markets.

  20. Selective flocculation of pyrite and/or silica in the presence of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatadri, R.; Markuszevski, R.; Wheelock, T.D. ); Walters, A.B. )

    1988-06-01

    Two cationic surfactants, Arquad T-50 and Duomac T, were investigated as possible selective flocculants or coagulants for iron pyrite or silica particles in the presence of particles of eastern bituminous coal. Although these surfactants were adsorbed by all three materials, they were found to promote the flocculation of pyrite and silica much more than the flocculation of coal when the solid materials were flocculated separately. In subsequent selective flocculation tests involving binary mixtures of the solid components, a good separation of coal and silica was achieved with Duomac T by agitating the flocculating suspension for a prolonged time. However, the separation of coal and pyrite proved more elusive. While some separation was achieved with Arquad T-50 because pyrite was flocculated more extensively than coal, the separation was marginal at best.

  1. Use of metal hydrous titanium oxide catalysts to enhance coal tar yield via hydropyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klavetter, E.A.; Stephens, H.P.; Dosch, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Catalytic hydropyrolysis experiments performed in this project on several US and UK coals have established that tar yields in excess of 70% (daf basis) and conversions (100%-char) in excess of 80% can be achieved from bituminous coals containing 80--84% dmmf carbon using hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) catalysts with low concentrations of active metals. Total conversion approaches the reactive maceral contents for these coals. Previously performed two-stage catalytic hydropyrolysis experiments have demonstrated that high yields of liquid products with high H/C ratios, low heteroatom contents, and a significant concentration of light naphtha can be achieved. The objectives of this research are to determine suitable methods for catalyzing the hydropyrolysis process and to investigate the reactions and mechanisms responsible for the high conversion of coal materials to distillable liquids via direct catalytic hydropyrolysis. Recently developed hydrous titanium oxide (HTO)-supported catalysts have received encouraging results in direct coal liquefaction applications. Results of hydropyrolysis experiment using Mo and Pd HTO catalysts coated directly onto the coal are presented here and compared with results from experiments using uncatalyzed coal samples and using a dispersed MoS{sub 2} catalyst. The effect of coal rank, active metals concentration, dispersion method, and metal type are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Flotation of oxidized coal with a latex emulsion of sodium polyacrylate used as a promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, R.E.

    1980-09-16

    A method and treating agent for increasing the yield of oxidized coal or coal from surface or strip mines where said coal particles are concentrated by froth flotation. The method consists of utilizing as a promoter or frothing aid about 05-1.5 lbs of sodium polyacrylate latex per ton of dry coal (0.017-0.5 lb of dry sodium polyacrylate per ton of dry coal), having an average molecular weight of about 100,000 to 1,000,000 and more, with a preferred range of 1,000,000 or more. The preferred promoter or frothing aid for oxidized coal is a water-in-oil latex of sodium polyacrylate and preferably used with an alcohol-type frother. The latex may be utilized neat and self inverts with the assistance of an oil-in-water surfactant hydrophilic (Or activator) and the water in the system upon application to form an oil-in-water emulsion, or it may be used as a two-part system with an activator (Aqueous) to promote inversion. The latex emulsion has demonstrated superiority as a flotation promoter for oxidized coal over the dry polymer and exhibits synergism over the dry polymer and over the components of the latex emulsion including a paraffin solvent, a hydrophobic emulsifier such as sorbitan monooleate, a solvent such as espersol 3-e (Charter; an aromatic blend) and stabilizers such as polyisobutylene and aluminum tristearate.

  3. Air/water oxidative desulfurization of coal and sulfur-containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warzinski, R. P.; Freidman, S.; LaCount, R. B.

    1981-02-01

    Air/water Oxydesulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major U. S. coal basins. The applicability at present of this treatment for producing an environmentally acceptable coal has been restricted by recently proposed SO2 emission standards for utility boilers. The product would, however, be attractive to the many smaller industrial coal users who cannot afford to operate and maintain flue gas desulfurization systems. It is also possible that the utility industry could realize a benefit by using chemically cleaned coal with partial flue gas scrubbing. The higher cost of the cleaned coal would be offset by the reduction in capital and operating costs resulting from decreased FGD requirements. The susceptibility of sulfur in coal to oxidative removal varies with the nature of the sulfur-containing species. The inorganic sulfur compounds, primarily pyrite, marcasite, and iron sulfate, are more amenable to treatment than the organically bound sulfur which exhibits varying degrees of resistance depending on its chemical environment. Air/water Oxydesulfurization consistently removes in excess of 90 percent of the pyritic sulfur; the extent and efficiency of organic sulfur removal however, depends on the type of coal and severity of treatment used. In general, the organic sulfur of the higher rank coals exhibits more resistance to treatment than that of the lower rank coals; however, the accompanying heating value is greater for the latter. Similar treatment of sulfur-containing model compounds further illustrates the relative susceptibilities of different chemical species to oxidation. Application of these data to the understanding of the complex chemistry involved in the treatment of coal is a preliminary step toward improving the efficiency of Oxydesulfurization.

  4. NOVEL MERCURY OXIDANT AND SORBENT FOR MERCURY EMISSIONS CONTROL FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have successfully developed novel efficient and cost-effective sorbent and oxidant for removing mercury from power plant flue gases. These sorbent and oxidant offer great promise for controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants burning a wide range of c...

  5. Experimental laboratory measurement of thermophysical properties of selected coal types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A number of bituminous coals of moderate to high plasticity were examined, along with portions of their extrudates from the JPL 1.5-inch 850 F screw extruder. Portions of the condensed pyrolysis liquids released during extrusion, and of the gaseous products formed during extrusion were also analyzed. In addition to the traditional determinations, the coals and extrudates were examined in terms of microstructure (especially extractable fractions), thermal analysis (especially that associated with the plastic state), and reactivity towards thermal and catalyzed hydroliquefaction. The process of extrusion increases the fixed carbon content of coals by about 5% and tends to increase the surface area. Coals contaning 25% or more DMF-extractable material show an increase in extractables as a result of extrusion; those initially containing less than 20% extractables show a decrease as a result of extrusion. Both the raw and extruded samples of Kentucky #9 coal are highly reactive towards hydroliquefaction, undergoing conversions of 75 to 80% in 15 min and 85-94% in 60 min in a stirred clave.

  6. Coal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brant, Russell A.; Glass, Gary B.

    1983-01-01

    Principle work of 23 state geological surveys is summarized. Work includes mapping/estimating coal resources, centralizing data in National Coal Resources Data System through cooperative programs, exploration drilling, and others. Comments on U.S. Geological Survey activities, coal-related conferences/meetings, and industry research activities are…

  7. Influence of Combined Water in Coal on Pre-reduction of Iron Oxide with Coal Carbonization Gas in Low, Middle and High Volatile Matter Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Noriyoshi; Usui, Tateo

    Volatile matter, which occupies more than 20 mass% in non-coking coal, is not utilized when the coal is fed directly into the smelting furnace. Its presence may even cause adverse effects in the operation. Therefore, the fundamental study on pre-reduction of iron oxide was carried out in order to investigate the conditions for efficient use of volatile matter in an iron bath smelting reduction total process. The final fractional reduction, F, was calculated from the loss in weight of pellets after reduction. Presence of combined water in coal affected F and caused a decrease in F at higher temperatures. However, when the combined water was removed from coal, F increased. In each coal, when the combined water was removed from volatile matter, F increased linearly from about 0.08 to 0.20 at the reduction temperatures from 773K up to 1073 K, beyond which F increased more than the linear relation, such as F about 0.30 at 1173 K and 0.40 at 1273 K. This may be due to caused by the contribution of hydrocarbons in the reduction reaction at high temperatures.

  8. Hypochlorite oxidation of select androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Mash, Heath; Schenck, Kathleen; Rosenblum, Laura

    2010-03-01

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their synthetic analogs released from agricultural activities and wastewater discharge may be introduced into drinking water sources. The fate of androgenic steroids during drinking water treatment, specifically the use of chlorine for biological control, has not been extensively studied. As such, this study focuses on the hypochlorite oxidation of a select number of androgenic compounds that vary in their structural composition. Where a favorable reaction is observed, we also attempt to describe the product distribution. The results show compounds that possess a ketonic functional group conjugated with a double bond inhibit oxidation by hypochlorite in the absence of biological or indirect oxidative pathways. Oxidative reactivity in the presence of hypochlorite was favorably correlated with the presence of isolated unsaturated carbon bonds and resulted in various transformation products. PMID:20031185

  9. An EPR spin probe method for characterizing changes in the accessible regions of coal upon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Sady, W.; Kispert, L.D.; Spears, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples (APCS) were weathered in air and the structural and chemical changes that upon swelling with toluene and pyridine were, examined by an EPR spin probe method developed in this laboratory. Under mild oxidation conditions and swelling with toluene large structural changes were observed for lignite (Beulah-Zap) which suggested the collapse of the coal structure. This did not occur for higher rank coal. Upon oxidation and swelling with toluene and pyridine an increase occurred in the amino substituted spin probe concentration for coals with the carbon percent above 80%. A maximum was found for the creation of 5 {Angstrom} diameter pores upon swelling with pyridine at 85% C.

  10. Oxidative Activity of Heated Coal Affected by Antypirogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Borovikov, I. F.; Yakutova, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of antypirogens on chemical activity of heated coal is studied. It is proved that ammonium sulfate, calcium phosphate, calcium chloride, calcium nitrate and acid fluoride are the most effective antypirogens.

  11. Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    2000-01-01

    A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

  12. A new approach in ultrapurification of coal by selective flocculation. Progress report, [July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Moudgil, B.M.

    1990-06-01

    A relatively pure sample of coal and coal pyrite (free of clays) was provided from the Coal Research Resource Center at VPI, Blackburgh, VA. The samples have been prepared and single mineral flucculation tests are in progress to confirm the selectivity achieved with the previously evaluated flocculents. The mathematical/computational model was used to predict the effect of process parameters such as feed composition and polymer dosage on the yield and selectivity. It is determined that improvement is selectivity can be achieved by controlling the dosage of not so selective flocculents. Further screening of potential selective flocculents will continue. Also FT-IR and heat of adsorption measurements and planned to better understand the parameters which control the floc properties.

  13. Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion - Phase I Coal Selection and Chaacterization

    SciTech Connect

    A. Kolker; A. Sarofim; C.A. Palmer; C.L. Senior; F.E. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; I. Olmez; N. Shah; R. Finkelman; S. Crowley; T. Zeng

    1998-07-16

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. Over the past decade, a large database identifying the partitioning and emitted concentrations of several toxic metals on the list of HAPs has been developed. Laboratory data have also been generated to help define the general behavior of several elements in combustion systems. These data have been used to develop empirical and probabalistic models to predict emissions of trace metals from coal-fired power plants. While useful for providing average emissions of toxic species, these empirically based models fail when extrapolated beyond their supporting database. This represents a critical gap; over the coming decades, new fuels and combustion systems will play an increasing role in our nation's power generation system. For example, new fuels, such as coal blends or beneficiated fuels, new operating conditions, such as low-NO burners or staged combustion, or new power x systems, for example, those being developed under the DoE sponsored Combustion 2000 programs and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, are all expected to play a role in power generation in the next century. The need for new predictive tools is not limited to new combustion systems, however. Existing combustion systems may have to employ controls for HAPs, should regulations be imposed. Testing of new control methods, at pilot and full scale, is expensive. A sound under-standing of the chemical transformations of both organic and inorganic HAPs will promote the development of new control methods in a cost-effective manner. To ensure that coal-fired power generation proceeds in an environmentally benign fashion, methods for the prediction and

  14. Genetic and oxidative damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes in workers with occupational exposure to coal.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Paula; Kvitko, Kátia; da Silva, Fernanda R; Menezes, Ana Paula Simões; Porto, Carem; Sarmento, Merielen; Decker, Natália; Reyes, Juliana M; Allgayer, Mariangela da C; Furtado, Tatiane Chao; Salvador, Mirian; Branco, Catia; da Silva, Juliana

    2013-12-12

    Coal is an important fossil fuel used to generate energy. Coal dust is constituted primarily of hydrocarbons and metals. During coal extraction, large quantities of coal dust particles are emitted, contributing to environmental pollution. Coal miners are constantly exposed to coal dust and its derivatives. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential genotoxic effects of coal and oxidative stress in individuals from Candiota who were exposed to coal as part of their occupation. The comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test were used to assess these effects. This study involved 128 male participants of whom 71 reported work that included exposure to coal (exposed group) and 57 reported working at different jobs (unexposed group). The exposed group had a significantly increased damage index and damage frequency, as assessed using the comet assay, and increased MN and nucleoplasmic bridge frequencies, as assessed using the MN assay, compared with unexposed individuals. Significant and positive correlations between MN frequencies in the lymphocytes and buccal cells of control and exposed individuals were observed. The exposed individuals presented lower average levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and catalase activity (CAT), while the mean superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) levels were higher in this group. The exposed group also had higher hematocrit levels. No correlation between DNA damage and inorganic elements, as identified using PIXE, was found; however, there was a correlation between the damage index and zinc. The evidence that exposure to coal and its derivatives presents a genetic hazard demonstrates the need for protective measures and educational programs for coal miners. PMID:24004879

  15. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  16. Coal Oxide as a Thermally Robust Carbon-Based Proton Conductor.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Kazuto; Ogata, Chikako; Koinuma, Michio; Taniguchi, Takaaki; Hayami, Shinya; Kuroiwa, Keita; Matsumoto, Yasumichi

    2015-10-21

    Inexpensive solid proton conducting materials with high proton conductivity and thermal stability are necessary for practical solid state electrochemical devices. Here we report that coal oxide (CO) is a promising carbon-based proton conductor with remarkable thermal robustness. The CO produced by simple liquid-phase oxidation of coal demonstrates excellent dispersibility in water owing to the surface carboxyl groups. The proton conductivity of CO, 3.9 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 90% relative humidity, is as high as that of graphene oxide (GO). Remarkably, CO exhibits much higher thermal stability than GO, with CO retaining the excellent proton conductivity as well as the capacitance performance even after thermal annealing at 200 °C. Our study demonstrates that the chemical modification of the abundant coal provides proton conductors that can be used in practical applications for a wide range of energy devices. PMID:26452091

  17. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report is a coordinated effort of the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science. The topics concerning coal liquefaction discussed are: sulfate promoted metal oxides as direct coal liquefaction catalysts; low temperature depolymerization and liquefaction of premium R.S. coal samples; construction of continuous flow-through gas reactor for liquefaction investigations; generic structural characterization and liquefaction research; macerals, model compounds and iron catalyst dispersion; coal structure/liquefaction yield correlation by means of advanced NMR techniques; GC/MS of model compound mixtures; catalytic cracking, hydrogenation and liquefaction of coals under milder conditions; ENDOR investigations of coal liquefaction under mild conditions; catalytic dehydrogenation of model compounds in relation to direct coal liquefaction; surface characterization of catalyst added coal samples; computational chemistry of model compounds and molecular fragments of relevance to coal liquefaction; chemical characterization and hydrogenation reactions of single coal particles; thermolytic cleavage of selected coal-related linkages at mild temperatures; solvent sorption and FTIR studies on the effect of catalytic depolymerization reactions in coal; bioprocessing of coal; chemical routes to breaking bonds; novel liquefaction concepts cyclic olefins: novel new donors for coal liquefaction; better hydrogen transfer in coal liquefaction; catalytic hydropyrolysis and energized extraction of coals; gallium catalyst in mild coal liquefaction; potential of temperature microscope in coal liquefaction; evaluation of nitride catalysts for hydrotreatment and coal liquefaction; coprocessing and coal liquefaction with novel catalysts.

  18. A Combined Raman Spectroscopic and Thermogravimetric Analysis Study on Oxidation of Coal with Different Ranks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqing; Jiang, Shuguang; Hardacre, Christopher; Goodrich, Peter; Wang, Kai; Shao, Hao; Wu, Zhengyan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy and nonisothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements have been reported for different rank coals (lignite, bituminous coal, and anthracite) and the relationship between the measurements was examined. It was found that the Raman spectra parameters can be used to characterize structure changes in the different rank coals, such as the band area ratios based on the curve-fitted results. Higher ranked coal was found to have higher values of I GR/I All and I (G + GR)/I All but lower values of I D/I (G+GR), I DL/I (G+GR), I (S + SL)/I (G+GR), and I (GL+GL')/I (G+GR). The oxidation properties of the coal samples were characterized by the reactivity indexes T ig, T 20%, and T max from TGA data which were found to correlate well with the band area ratios of I GR/I All, I (G + GR)/I All, and I (S + SL)/I (G+GR). Based on these correlations, the Raman band area ratios were found to correlate with the oxidation activity of coal providing additional structural information which can be used to understand the changes in the TGA measurements. PMID:26682084

  19. A Combined Raman Spectroscopic and Thermogravimetric Analysis Study on Oxidation of Coal with Different Ranks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiqing; Jiang, Shuguang; Hardacre, Christopher; Goodrich, Peter; Wang, Kai; Shao, Hao; Wu, Zhengyan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy and nonisothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements have been reported for different rank coals (lignite, bituminous coal, and anthracite) and the relationship between the measurements was examined. It was found that the Raman spectra parameters can be used to characterize structure changes in the different rank coals, such as the band area ratios based on the curve-fitted results. Higher ranked coal was found to have higher values of IGR/IAll and I(G + GR)/IAll but lower values of ID/I(G+GR), IDL/I(G+GR), I(S + SL)/I(G+GR), and I(GL+GL')/I(G+GR). The oxidation properties of the coal samples were characterized by the reactivity indexes Tig, T20%, and Tmax from TGA data which were found to correlate well with the band area ratios of IGR/IAll, I(G + GR)/IAll, and I(S + SL)/I(G+GR). Based on these correlations, the Raman band area ratios were found to correlate with the oxidation activity of coal providing additional structural information which can be used to understand the changes in the TGA measurements. PMID:26682084

  20. MECHANISMS OF NITROUS OXIDE FORMATION IN COAL FLAMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study, using both detailed kinetic modeling and plug-flow simulator experiments, to investigate an unknown mechanism by which N2O is formed in coal flames. This mechanism has considerable importance in determining the influence of common and advanced ...

  1. Chemical-looping combustion of coal with metal oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjani Siriwardane; Hanjing Tian; George Richards; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston

    2009-08-15

    The combustion and reoxidation properties of direct coal chemical-looping combustion (CLC) over CuO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CO{sub 3}O{sub 4}, NiO, and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor studies. When coal is heated in either nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), 50% of weight loss was observed because of partial pyrolysis, consistent with the proximate analysis. Among various metal oxides evaluated, CuO showed the best reaction properties: CuO can initiate the reduction reaction as low as 500{sup o}C and complete the full combustion at 700{sup o}C. In addition, the reduced copper can be fully reoxidized by air at 700{sup o}C. The combustion products formed during the CLC reaction of the coal/metal oxide mixture are CO{sub 2} and water, while no carbon monoxide was observed. Multicycle TGA tests and bench-scale fixed-bed flow reactor tests strongly supported the feasibility of CLC of coal by using CuO as an oxygen carrier. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of solid reaction products indicated some changes in the surface morphology of a CuO-coal sample after reduction/oxidation reactions at 800 {sup o}C. However, significant surface sintering was not observed. The interactions of fly ash with metal oxides were investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermodynamic analysis. Overall, the results indicated that it is feasible to develop CLC with coal by metal oxides as oxygen carriers. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1991-01-01

    Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost--effective of desulfurizing Illinois coal is non-existent at the present time. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds, relative to fragmentation of the coal macromolecule via C-C, C-O, and C-N bond cleavage. During this funding period, we plan to carry out examinations of: (a) the effects of various reaction conditions on radical-initiated and Lewis acid-catalyzed C-S bond cleavages; (b) the effects of caustic impregnation and subsequent alcoholic reflux on C-S bond cleavage strategies; (c) the reactions of coal model compounds with electron-deficient substrates; (d) examinations of photooxidative C-S bond cleavage reactions; (e) the effects of moderate (300--400{degrees}C) temperatures and pressures as well as ultrasonic radiation on (a) - (c). Also planned are differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) examinations of selected C-S bond cleavage protocols, including those on Illinois coals that possess varying amounts of organic and inorganic sulfur.

  3. The use of coal in a solid phase reduction of iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.; Hodosov, I. E.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands.

  4. Evaluation of BOC'S Lotox Process for the Oxidation of Elemental Mercury in Flue Gas from a Coal-Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid Omar

    2008-04-30

    Linde's Low Temperature Oxidation (LoTOx{trademark}) process has been demonstrated successfully to remove more than 90% of the NOx emitted from coal-fired boilers. Preliminary findings have shown that the LoTOx{trademark} process can be as effective for mercury emissions control as well. In the LoTOx{trademark} system, ozone is injected into a reaction duct, where NO and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas are selectively oxidized at relatively low temperatures and converted to higher nitrogen oxides, which are highly water soluble. Elemental mercury in the flue gas also reacts with ozone to form oxidized mercury, which unlike elemental mercury is water-soluble. Nitrogen oxides and oxidized mercury in the reaction duct and residual ozone, if any, are effectively removed in a wet scrubber. Thus, LoTOx{trademark} appears to be a viable technology for multi-pollutant emission control. To prove the feasibility of mercury oxidation with ozone in support of marketing LoTOx{trademark} for multi-pollutant emission control, Linde has performed a series of bench-scale tests with simulated flue gas streams. However, in order to enable Linde to evaluate the performance of the process with a flue gas stream that is more representative of a coal-fired boiler; one of Linde's bench-scale LoTOx{trademark} units was installed at WRI's combustion test facility (CTF), where a slipstream of flue gas from the CTF was treated. The degree of mercury and NOx oxidation taking place in the LoTOx{trademark} unit was quantified as a function of ozone injection rates, reactor temperatures, residence time, and ranks of coals. The overall conclusions from these tests are: (1) over 80% reduction in elemental mercury and over 90% reduction of NOx can be achieved with an O{sub 3}/NO{sub X} molar ratio of less than two, (2) in most of the cases, a lower reactor temperature is preferred over a higher temperature due to ozone dissociation, however, the combination of both low residence time and high temperature

  5. The effect of selective solvent absorption on coal conversion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    Using a pair of different recycle oils from Wilsonville and {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, gel permeation (GPC) chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and elemental analysis, no significant differences were observed between the composition of the recycle oil and that portion of the oil not absorbed by the coal. For these complex mixtures, coals are not selective absorbants. Since most of the heteroatoms responsible for most of the specific interactions have been removed by hydrogenolyses, this is perhaps not surprising. To address the issue of the role of hydrogen bond donors in the reused as hydrogen donor coal, tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin were used as hydrogen donor solvents. This work is reported in detail in Section 2. The basic idea is that the presence of the t-butyl group on the aromatic ring will hinder or block diffusion of the hydrogen donor into the coal resulting in lower conversions and less hydrogen transferred with 2-t-butyltetralin than with tetralin. Observed was identical amounts of hydrogen transfer and nearly identical conversions to pyridine solubles for both hydrogen donors. Diffusion of hydrogen donors into the coal does not seem to play a significant role in coal conversion. Finally, in Section 3 is discussed the unfavorable impact on conversion of the structural rearrangements which occur when Illinois No. 6 coal is swollen with a solvent. We believe this rearrangement results in a more strongly associated solid leading to the diminution of coal reactions. Hydrogen donor diffusion does not seem to be a major factor in coal conversion while the structural rearrangement does. Both areas warrant further exploration.

  6. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  7. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  8. NOVEL ECONOMICAL HG(0) OXIDATION REAGENT FOR MERCURY EMISSIONS CONTROL FROM COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have developed a novel economical additive for elemental mercury (Hg0) removal from coal-fired boilers. The oxidation reagent was rigorously tested in a lab-scale fixed-bed column with the Norit America's FGD activated carbon (DOE's benchmark sorbent) in a typical PRB...

  9. VAPOR-PHASE CRACKING AND WET OXIDATION AS POTENTIAL POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNIQUES FOR COAL GASIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of two techniques (hydrocracking of heavy organics in the raw gas prior to quency, and wet oxidation of the gasifier condensate) for pollutant control in coal gasification processes. Bench-scale experiments were used to determine rates...

  10. Effect of carbon entrapped in Co-Al double oxides on structural restacking and electrochemical performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ling-Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Gang

    Co-Al layered double hydroxides (LDH) were synthesized from nitrates and sodium benzoate by direct coprecipitation, and heated at 600 °C for 3 h in argon gas flow to obtain Co-Al double oxides. The effect of carbon, created during the pyrolysis of benzoate and inserted in resulting double oxides, on structural reconstruction was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy techniques. It is horizontal arrangement rather than vertical dilayer orientation in the interlayer spacing that was adopted by benzoate. An abnormal phenomenon was found that when immersed in aqueous 6 M KOH solution in air, the double oxides restacked to Co-Al layered double hydroxides with more regular crystal than before. The reason is believed that carbon was confined in the matrix of resulting double oxides, which prevented further collapse of the layered structure. Cyclic voltammetries (CV) and constant current charge/discharge measurements reveal that the restacked Co-Al layered double hydroxide has good long-life capacitive performance with a capacitance up to 145 F g -1 even at a large current of 2 A g -1. In addition, two clear slopes in chronoampermetric test demonstrated two different diffusion coefficients, explaining the slope of about 118.4 mV in the plot of formal potential E f versus pOH.

  11. Application of infiltrated LSCM-GDC oxide anode in direct carbon/coal fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiangling; Arenillas, Ana; Irvine, John T S

    2016-08-15

    Hybrid direct carbon/coal fuel cells (HDCFCs) utilise an anode based upon a molten carbonate salt with an oxide conducting solid electrolyte for direct carbon/coal conversion. They can be fuelled by a wide range of carbon sources, and offer higher potential chemical to electrical energy conversion efficiency and have the potential to decrease CO2 emissions compared to coal-fired power plants. In this study, the application of (La, Sr)(Cr, Mn)O3 (LSCM) and (Gd, Ce)O2 (GDC) oxide anodes was explored in a HDCFC system running with two different carbon fuels, an organic xerogel and a raw bituminous coal. The electrochemical performance of the HDCFC based on a 1-2 mm thick 8 mol% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and the GDC-LSCM anode fabricated by wet impregnation procedures was characterized and discussed. The infiltrated oxide anode showed a significantly higher performance than the conventional Ni-YSZ anode, without suffering from impurity formation under HDCFC operation conditions. Total polarisation resistance (Rp) reached 0.8-0.9 Ω cm(2) from DCFC with an oxide anode on xerogel and bituminous coal at 750 °C, with open circuit voltage (OCV) values in the range 1.1-1.2 V on both carbon forms. These indicated the potential application of LSCM-GDC oxide anode in HDCFCs. The chemical compatibility of LSCM/GDC with carbon/carbonate investigation revealed the emergence of an A2BO4 type oxide in place of an ABO3 perovskite structure in the LSCM in a reducing environment, due to Li attack as a result of intimate contact between the LSCM and Li2CO3, with GDC being stable under identical conditions. Such reaction between LSCM and Li2CO3 was not observed on a LSCM-YSZ pellet treated with Li-K carbonate in 5% H2/Ar at 700 °C, nor on a GDC-LSCM anode after HDCFC operation. The HDCFC durability tests of GDC-LSCM oxide on a xerogel and on raw bituminous coal were performed under potentiostatic operation at 0.7 V at 750 °C. The degradation mechanisms were

  12. Valorization of selected biomass and wastes by co-pyrolysis with coal

    SciTech Connect

    Moliner, R.; Lazaro, M.J.; Suelves, I.; Blesa, M.J.

    2004-07-01

    Implementation of a more sensible energy-environmental policy should include a 'green alliance of biomass and coal to pursue eco-friendly technologies for co-utilizing biomass and other opportunity fuels with coal or natural gas'. This article discusses two parallel cases of copyolysis of coal with biomass or wastes. In the first case, smokeless fuel briquettes are prepared with a low-rank coal and biomass byproducts such as olive stones and sawdust. Additives to improve the mechanical properties and the sulfur retention in ash are used. The briquettes showed good mechanical properties and slow, uniform, smokeless combustion. In the second case, petroleum residua and waste lubrication oils are used to produce chemicals and energy by co-pyrolysis with coal. It has been shown that co-pyrolysis in the presence of coal char selectively promotes transfer of hydrogen from the parent material to the gas and liquid products, concentrating carbon in the remaining char. Split-off hydrogen from carbon is enhanced when the primary co-pyrolysis products are submitted to thermocatalytic decomposition in a subsequent catalytic step. This process represents an attractive route for the production of carbon dioxide free hydrogen from hydrocarbons, whatever their origin. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1992-12-31

    Summarized in the final technical report for our project ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal`` are results of research pertaining to chemical reactions that aim to selectively cleave C-S bonds in model compounds as well as Illinois coal. Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost-effective means of desulfurizing Illinois coal is, at present, non-existent. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives and reaction conditions, including solvents, bases, added reagents, catalysts, oxidizing agents, electron acceptors, temperature, pressure, and light energy, can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds. These experiments have been at the focus of our research effort for the past twelve months. Previous quarterly reports described research results in which simple aromatic and aliphatic sulfides were allowed to react with (a) Lewis Acids such as zinc chloride and tin chloride; (b) electron accepting substrates such as 9-fluorenone and benzoquinone; (c) strong bases such as NaOH and KOH; (d) radical initiators such as AIBN; (e) neat solvents at reflux temperatures and higher temperatures; (f) molecular oxygen in the presence of dyes or sensitizers such as anthracene. In this final report, we report on additional experiments involving the photooxidation of organic sulfides, as well as some experiments aimed at evaluating and comparing the reactivities of simple organic sulfones with their sulfidyl analogues. Also contained in this final report is a brief summary of the research described in the previous three quarterly reports for ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal.``

  14. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1992-08-01

    Planned in this project ``Protocols for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Sulfur Bonds in Coal`` are reactions in which organic free radicals and/or organic anions are allowed to react with physically cleaned Illinois coal and sulfur-containing coal model compounds. This quarterly report contains the results of photooxidation of coal model compounds, namely, benzyl phenyl sulfide, phenylsulfide, dibenzothiophene, benzothiophene and thiophene, in the presence of 9,10-dicyanoanthracene or anthracene. Quantitative product analysis for the matrix of reactions whereby the coal model compounds are subjected to various solvents and temperature changes is presented in this quarterly report. Further quantitative analyses of the products are being undertaken.

  15. Studies of the effect of selected nondonor solvents on coal liquefaction yields

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R. L.; Rodgers, B. R.; Benjamin, B. M.; Poutsma, M. L.; Douglas, E. C.; McWhirter, D. A.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of this research program was to evaluate the effectiveness of selected nondonor solvents (i.e., solvents that are not generally considered to have hydrogen available for hydrogenolysis reactions) for the solubilization of coals. Principal criteria for selection of candidate solvents were that the compound should be representative of a major chemical class, should be present in reasonable concentration in coal liquid products, and should have the potential to participate in hydrogen redistribution reactions. Naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, carbazole, phenanthridine, quinoline, 1-naphthol, and diphenyl ether were evaluated to determine their effect on coal liquefaction yields and were compared with phenol and two high-quality process solvents, Wilsonville SRC-I recycle solvent and Lummus ITSL heavy oil solvent. The high conversion efficacy of 1-naphthol may be attributed to its condensation to binaphthol and the consequent availability of hydrogen. The effectiveness of both the nitrogen heterocycles and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds may be due to their polycyclic aromatic nature (i.e., possible hydrogen shuttling or transfer agents) and their physical solvent properties. The relative effectiveness for coal conversion of the Lummus ITSL heavy oil solvent as compared with the Wilsonville SRC-I process solvent may be attributed to the much higher concentration of 3-, 4-, and 5-ring PAH and hydroaromatic constituents in Lummus solvent. The chemistry of coal liquefaction and the development of recycle, hydrogen donor, and nondonor solvents are reviewed. The experimental methodology for tubing-bomb tests is outlined, and experimental problem areas are discussed.

  16. XFAS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF SELECTED HAP ELEMENTS IN FINE PM DERIVED FROM COAL COMBUSTION: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-RTP-P-646 Shoji, T., Huggins, F.E., Huffman, G.P., Linak*, W.P., and Miller*, C.A. XFAS Spectroscopy Analysis of Selected HAP Elements in Fine PM Derived from Coal Combustion. Energy and Fuels 16 (2): (2002). 11/30/2001 X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscop...

  17. SITE SELECTION AND DESIGN FOR MINIMIZING POLLUTION FROM UNDERGROUND COAL MINING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to determine how best to select a layout and mining system and also to develop and operate an underground coal mine while at the same time minimizing pollution of the environment. The pre-mining environment was assessed by sampling Cedar Creek 3 ...

  18. Characterization of oxidized coal surfaces: Quarterly report, February 1988-April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hercules, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Work has progressed in the area of applying derivatization and analytical procedures developed for model compounds to oxidized coal samples. Both SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) analysis have been pursued. Data obtained with TAB (4-triethylammonium-1-chloro-2-butene) derivatization is particularly encouraging. Coal samples have been oxidized in the reactor described in previous quarterly reports. The progress of the oxidation was monitored using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. DRIFT results confirmed that changes in oxygen functionality were occurring under the conditions and in the time frame of the reactor experiments. The potential of 2-fluoro-1-methyl pyridinium (FMP) as a derivatizing reagent for alcohols was also explored. Preliminary results show it to be useful. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Selective-oxidation catalyst improves Claus process

    SciTech Connect

    Lagas, J.A.; Borsboom, J. ); Berben, P.H. )

    1988-10-10

    Increased SO/sub 2/ emissions. On a worldwide scale, the exploitation and processing of crude oil and natural gas have increased significantly during the past 30 years. This expansion has caused severe pollution problems, especially from sulfur dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. A new development for the well-known Claus process improves production of elemental sulfur from H/sub 2/S. The ''SuperClaus'' process involves a modification of the process-control system and the use of a newly developed selective-oxidation catalyst in the third reactor with the objective of achieving a 99% or 99.5% overall sulfur recovery (two versions) without further tail-gas cleanup. The catalyst for the new process was developed and tested on laboratory bench scale for more than 3 years. Based on the results, it was decided to test the process directly in a commercial unit. A three-stage, 100-t/d Claus plant in a natural-gas plant in the Federal Republic of Germany has been retrofitted to SuperClause. Since Jan. 21, the process has been successfully operated.

  20. Geochemistry of Selected Coal Samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    and ash (generally <1 and < 10 wt.%, respectively). Coal mining for both local use and for export has a very strong future in Indonesia although, at present, there are concerns about the strong need for a major revision in mining laws and foreign investment policies (Wahju, 2004; United States Embassy Jakarta, 2004). The World Coal Quality Inventory (WoCQI) program of the U.S. Geological Survey (Tewalt and others, 2005) is a cooperative project with about 50 countries (out of 70 coal-producing countries world-wide). The WoCQI initiative has collected and published extensive coal quality data from the world's largest coal producers and consumers. The important aspects of the WoCQI program are; (1) samples from active mines are collected, (2) the data have a high degree of internal consistency with a broad array of coal quality parameters, and (3) the data are linked to GIS and available through the world-wide-web. The coal quality parameters include proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, major-, minor-, and trace-element concentrations and various technological tests. This report contains geochemical data from a selected group of Indonesian coal samples from a range of coal types, localities, and ages collected for the WoCQI program.

  1. Selective batch crushing in the coal-preparation shop at OAO NTMK

    SciTech Connect

    N.A. Berkutov; Yu.V. Stepanov; P.V. Shtark; L.A. Makhortova; N.K. Popova; D.A. Koshkarov; N.V. Tsarev

    2007-05-15

    In September 2004, after reconstruction at OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK), blast furnace 6 went into operation for the production of vanadium from hot metal. At the startup of furnace 6, besides optimising its composition; it was decided to restore selective crushing of the coal batch using pneumatic and mechanical separation in the third unit of the coal preparation shop. Additional increase in the mechanical strength of coke by 1.5-2.0% was predicted with a 0.5-1.0% decrease in wear.

  2. A Sensor System Based on Semi-Conductor Metal Oxide Technology for In Situ Detection of Coal Fired Combustion Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Marquis

    2007-05-31

    Sensor Research and Development Corporation (SRD) proposed a two-phase program to develop a robust, autonomous prototype analyzer for in situ, real-time detection, identification, and measurement of coal-fired combustion gases and perform field-testing at an approved power generation facility. SRD developed and selected sensor materials showing selective responses to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride. Sensor support electronics were also developed to enable prototype to function in elevated temperatures without any issues. Field-testing at DOE approved facility showed the ability of the prototype to detect and estimate the concentration of combustion by-products accurately with relatively low false-alarm rates at very fast sampling intervals.

  3. COAL CLEANING VIA LIQUID-FLUIDIZED CLASSIFICAITON (LFBC) WITH SELECTIVE SOLVENT SWELLING

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Calo

    2000-12-01

    The concept of coal beneficiation due to particle segregation in water-fluidized beds, and its improvement via selective solvent-swelling of organic material-rich coal particles, was investigated in this study. Particle size distributions and their behavior were determined using image analysis techniques, and beneficiation effects were explored via measurements of the ash content of segregated particle samples collected from different height locations in a 5 cm diameter liquid-fluidized bed column (LFBC). Both acetone and phenol were found to be effective swelling agents for both Kentucky No.9 and Illinois No.6 coals, considerably increasing mean particle diameters, and shifting particle size distributions to larger sizes. Acetone was a somewhat more effective swelling solvent than phenol. The use of phenol was investigated, however, to demonstrate that low cost, waste solvents can be effective as well. For unswollen coal particles, the trend of increasing particle size from top to bottom in the LFBC was observed in all cases. Since the organic matter in the coal tends to concentrate in the smaller particles, the larger particles are typically denser. Consequently, the LFBC naturally tends to separate coal particles according to mineral matter content, both due to density and size. The data for small (40-100 {micro}m), solvent-swollen particles clearly showed improved beneficiation with respect to segregation in the water-fluidized bed than was achieved with the corresponding unswollen particles. This size range is quite similar to that used in pulverized coal combustion. The original process concept was amply demonstrated in this project. Additional work remains to be done, however, in order to develop this concept into a full-scale process.

  4. Effect of Coal Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel System Performance and Service Life

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala Krishnan; P. Jayaweera; J. Bao; J. Perez; K. H. Lau; M. Hornbostel; A. Sanjurjo; J. R. Albritton; R. P. Gupta

    2008-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy's SECA program envisions the development of high-efficiency, low-emission, CO{sub 2} sequestration-ready, and fuel-flexible technology to produce electricity from fossil fuels. One such technology is the integrated gasification-solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) that produces electricity from the gas stream of a coal gasifier. SOFCs have high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency, environmental compatibility (low NO{sub x} production), and modularity. Naturally occurring coal has many impurities and some of these impurities end in the fuel gas stream either as a vapor or in the form of fine particulate matter. Establishing the tolerance limits of SOFCs for contaminants in the coal-derived gas will allow proper design of the fuel feed system that will not catastrophically damage the SOFC or allow long-term cumulative degradation. The anodes of Ni-cermet-based SOFCs are vulnerable to degradation in the presence of contaminants that are expected to be present in a coal-derived fuel gas stream. Whereas the effects of some contaminants such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3} and HCl have been studied, the effects of other contaminants such as As, P, and Hg have not been ascertained. The primary objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells to trace level contaminants present in a coal-derived gas stream in the temperature range 700 to 900 C. The results were used to assess catastrophic damage risk and long-term cumulative effects of the trace contaminants on the lifetime expectancy of SOFC systems fed with coal-derived gas streams.

  5. Submicrometer elemental carbon as a selective measure of diesel particulate matter in coal mines.

    PubMed

    Birch, M Eileen; Noll, James D

    2004-10-01

    A monitoring method for diesel particulate matter was published as Method 5040 by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Organic and elemental carbon are determined by the method, but elemental carbon (EC) is a better exposure measure. The US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) proposed use of NIOSH 5040 for compliance determinations in metal and nonmetal mines. MSHA also published a rulemaking for coal mines, but no exposure standard was provided. A standard based on particulate carbon is not considered practical because of coal dust interference. Interference may not be a problem if an appropriate size-selective sampler and EC exposure standard are employed. Submicrometer dust concentrations found in previous surveys of nondieselized, underground coal mines were relatively low. If a large fraction of the submicrometer dust is organic and mineral matter, submicrometer EC concentrations would be much lower than submicrometer mass concentrations. Laboratory and field results reported herein indicate the amount of EC contributed by submicrometer coal dust is minor. In a laboratory test, a submicrometer EC concentration of 31 microg m(-3) was found when sampling a respirable coal dust concentration over three times the US compliance limit (2 mg m(-3)). Laboratory results are consistent with surveys of nondieselized coal mines, where EC results ranged from below the method limit of detection to 18 microg m(-3) when size-selective samplers were used to collect dust fractions having particle diameters below 1.5 microm-submicrometer EC concentrations were approximate 7 microg m(-3). In dieselized mines, submicrometer EC concentrations are much higher. PMID:15480493

  6. Durable zinc oxide-containing sorbents for coal gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1996-01-01

    Durable zinc-oxide containing sorbent pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream at an elevated temperature are made up to contain titania as a diluent, high-surface-area silica gel, and a binder. These materials are mixed, moistened, and formed into pellets, which are then dried and calcined. The resulting pellets undergo repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration without loss of reactivity and without mechanical degradation. Regeneration of the pellets is carried out by contacting the bed with an oxidizing gas mixture.

  7. Conducting oxide formation and mechanical endurance of potential solid-oxide fuel cell interconnects in coal syngas environment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kejia; Luo, Junhang; Johnson, Christopher; Liu, Xingbo; Lang, J.; Mao, S.X.

    2008-08-15

    The oxidation properties of potential SOFCs materials Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230 exposed in coal syngas at 800 °C for 100 h were studied. The phases and surface morphology of the oxide scales were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The mechanical endurance and electrical resistance of the conducting oxides were characterized by indentation and electrical impedance, respectively. It was found that the syngas exposure caused the alloys to form porous oxide scales, which increased the electrical resistant and decreased the mechanical stability. As for short-term exposure in syngas, neither carbide nor metal dusting was found in the scales of all samples.

  8. Conducting oxide formation and mechanical endurance of potential solid-oxide fuel cell interconnects in coal syngas environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kejia; Luo, Junhang; Johnson, Chris; Liu, Xingbo; Yang, J.; Mao, Scott X.

    The oxidation properties of potential SOFCs materials Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230 exposed in coal syngas at 800 °C for 100 h were studied. The phases and surface morphology of the oxide scales were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The mechanical endurance and electrical resistance of the conducting oxides were characterized by indentation and electrical impedance, respectively. It was found that the syngas exposure caused the alloys to form porous oxide scales, which increased the electrical resistant and decreased the mechanical stability. As for short-term exposure in syngas, neither carbide nor metal dusting was found in the scales of all samples.

  9. Investigation of coal char-slag transition during oxidation: effect of temperature and residual carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Suhui Li; Kevin J. Whitty

    2009-04-15

    The transition of coal char to molten slag at high conversion was studied for a bituminous coal using a laminar entrained-flow reactor under oxidizing conditions. Post-oxidized char particles were analyzed by various techniques including loss-on-ignition, gas adsorption analysis, and scanning electron microscopy to determine carbon content, internal surface area and pore size distribution, and char morphology, respectively. These analyses provide information concerning the effect of temperature and residual carbon on the transition from porous char to molten slag. Results showed that, at temperatures above the ash flow temperature, the transition from porous char to molten slag occurred at about 90% conversion for the coal used in this study. No transition occurred at temperatures below the ash flow temperature. This finding explains previous observations that there is a coal-dependent critical carbon conversion at which the ash stickiness increases dramatically. This result also indicates that surface area can be used as a criterion for determining the critical conversion of the transition. In addition, it was found that the randomly overlapping pore model cannot be directly applied to predict the surface area evolution of char particles during the transition without considering the reopening of closed micropores during the initial reaction and the ash fusion effect. 33 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Quartz in Coal Dust Deposited on Internal Surface of Respirable Size Selective Samplers

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Kashon, Michael; Kusti, Mohannad; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to quantify quartz mass in coal dust deposited on the internal cassette surface of respirable size-selective samplers. Coal dust was collected with four different respirable size-selective samplers (10 mm Dorr-Oliver nylon [Sensidyne, St. Petersburg, Fla.], SKC Aluminum [SKC Inc., Eighty Four, Pa.], BGI4L [BGI USA Inc., Waltham, Mass.], and GK2.69 cyclones [BGI USA Inc.]) with two different cassette types (polystyrene and static-dissipative polypropylene cassettes). The coal dust was aerosolized in a calm air chamber by using a fluidized bed aerosol generator without neutralization under the assumption that the procedure is similar to field sampling conditions. The mass of coal dust was measured gravimetrically and quartz mass was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Manual of Analytical Methods, Method 7603. The mass fractions of the total quartz sample on the internal cassette surface are significantly different between polystyrene and static-dissipative cassettes for all cyclones (p < 0.05). No consistent relationship between quartz mass on cassette internal surface and coal dust filter mass was observed. The BGI4L cyclone showed a higher (but not significantly) and the GK2.69 cyclone showed a significantly lower (p < 0.05) internal surface deposit quartz mass fraction for polystyrene cassettes compared to other cyclones. This study confirms previous observations that the interior surface deposits in polystyrene cassettes attached to cyclone pre-selectors can be a substantial part of the sample, and therefore need to be included in any analysis for accurate exposure assessment. On the other hand, the research presented here supports the position that the internal surface deposits in static-dissipative cassettes used with size-selective cyclones are negligible and that it is only necessary to analyze the filter catch. PMID:25204985

  11. Surface properties of photo-oxidized bituminous coals. Technical progress report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Polat, H.; Davis, A.; Chander, S.

    1996-02-01

    During this report period, polished blocks of coal containing 3--4 mm wide vitrain bands were prepared for contact angle measurements of fresh and photo-oxidized surfaces using the advancing-drop technique. Contact angles were measured on two of the coals collected for this study, (the Ohio No. 4a (DECS-33) and Lower Kittanning (PSOC-1562) seams) and the results added to those presented in the last quarterly report. Although the new data give additional variation to the sample set, they are consistent with the original observations, i.e., that contact angle is influenced by irradiation time and coal rank. Using the maximum change in contact angle measured between fresh and photo-oxidized surfaces, a linear decrease is observed with increasing rank resulting from 5 and 10 minutes of irradiation. The magnitude of the decrease in contact angle diminishes with increasing rank. Also during this period, an ultraviolet spotlight was evaluated as a means of irradiating powdered vitrain. This 100 watt, long wavelength (366 nm) ultraviolet lamp is to be used in place of the optical microscope system to establish the influence of surface photo-oxidation on the flotation characteristics of vitrain concentrates. A series of experiments was designed to determine the magnitude of change in the luminescence intensity (at 600 nm measured in the optical microscope) with exposure to the ultraviolet light with time for vitrinite from different rank coals. The authors have established that there is a significant decrease in luminescence intensity with time of exposure which diminishes slightly as rank increases. The ultraviolet light appears to provide a level of photo-oxidation that is a factor of 10 lower than that obtained with their optical microscope system.

  12. Process and analytical studies of enhanced low severity co-processing using selective coal pretreatment. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.M.; Miller, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The findings in the first phase were as follows: 1. Both reductive (non-selective) alkylation and selective oxygen alkylation brought about an increase in liquefaction reactivity for both coals. 2. Selective oxygen alkylation is more effective in enhancing the reactivity of low rank coals. In the second phase of studies, the major findings were as follows: 1. Liquefaction reactivity increases with increasing level of alkylation for both hydroliquefaction and co-processing reaction conditions. 2. the increase in reactivity found for O-alkylated Wyodak subbituminous coal is caused by chemical changes at phenolic and carboxylic functional sites. 3. O-methylation of Wyodak subbituminous coal reduced the apparent activation energy for liquefaction of this coal.

  13. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2004-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 1-6 milliseconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, moisture concentration, reaction pressure on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 70 v% hydrogen, 2,500-7,500-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,250-3,750 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 0-15 vol% moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 100 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The

  14. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.059-0.87 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, reaction pressure, and catalyst loading on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 62-78 v% hydrogen, 3,000-7,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,500-3,500 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 50 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an

  15. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Narayanan, K.S.; Urbina, R.H.; Diao, J.; Yin, Y.; Harris, G.; Hu, Weibei; Zou, Y.; Chen, W.; Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Xhong, K.; Xiao, L.; Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R.; Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT; Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA )

    1989-08-15

    The primary goal of this project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur removal at 90% Btu yield, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Investigation of mechanisms for the control of coal and pyrite surfaces prior to fine coal flotation is an important aspect of the project objectives. Large quantities of coal samples have been procured from six major seams. Samples of the same coals are also to be supplied to the University of Pittsburgh for selective agglomeration research. A second objective is to investigate factors involved in the progressive weathering and oxidation of coal stored in three storage modes, namely, open, covered and in an argon-inerted atmosphere, over a period of twelve months. After regular intervals of weathering, samples of the three base coals are to be collected and shipped to both the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California at Berkeley for characterization studies of the weathered coals. Work is divided into 8 tasks: (1) project work plan; (2) coal procurement and weathering; (3) coal characterization; (4) standard beneficiation test; (5) grinding studies; (6) surface modification studies; (7) exploratory R D and support; and (8) task integration and project management. 8 refs., 50 figs., 38 tabs.

  16. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  17. Modeling selective intergranular oxidation of binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K; Rosso, Kevin M; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 μm ahead of grain boundary crack tips was documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (∼100 s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner's model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al. PMID:25573575

  18. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

  19. Effect of coal ash on growth and metal uptake by some selected ectomycorrhizal fungi in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.; Reddy, U.G.; Lapeyrie, F.; Adholeya, A.

    2005-07-01

    Six isolates of ectomycorrhizal fungi namely, Laccaria fraterna (EM-1083), Pisolithus tinctorius (EM-1081), Pisolithus tinctorius (EM-1290), Pisolithus tinctorius (EM-1293), Scleroderma verucosurn (EM-1283), and Scleroderma cepa (EM-1233), were grown on three variants of coal ash, namely electrostatically precipitated (ESP) ash, pond ash, and bottom ash moistened with Modified Melin-Norkans (MMN) medium in vitro. The colony diameter reflected the growth of the isolates on the coal ash. Metal accumulation in the mycelia was assayed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Six metals, namely aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, and nickel were selected on the basis of their abundance in coal ash and toxicity potential for the present work. Growth of vegetative mycelium on fly ash variants and metal accumulation data indicated that Pisolithus tinctorius (EM-1290) was the most tolerant among the isolates tested for most of the metals. Since this isolate is known to be mycorrhizal with Eucalyptus, it could be used for the reclamation of coal ash over burdened sites.

  20. Fuel nitrogen conversion and release of nitrogen oxides during coal gangue calcination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingyi; Ge, Xinlei; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2015-05-01

    The pollution emission during the widespread utilization of coal gangue in construction industry has long been neglected. In present study, the NO x release behaviors in a simulation experiment of coal gangue calcination in construction industry were systematically investigated. The corresponding evolution of nitrogen functionalities in coal gangue was also discussed. Results showed that pyrrolic (N-5) and pyridine N-oxide (N-6-O) forms nitrogen were relatively abundant in the raw gangue. During calcination, the N-5 and N-6-O form nitrogen greatly decreased and converted to quaternary nitrogen (N-Q). It was found that NO2 was formed under slowly heating-up condition and at 600 °C under isothermal condition, while only NO was detected with further increase of temperature. From 600 to 1000 °C, the conversion ratio of fuel nitrogen to NO x increased from 8 to 12 %. The char nitrogen was found greatly contribute to NO formation, which may bring difficulty to the abatement of NO x emission during coal gangue calcination. PMID:25501860

  1. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Engelhard, Mark; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

    2012-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm-2 degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm-2 degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

  2. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operaated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, G.; Gerdes, K.; Song, X.; Chen, Y.; Shutthanandan, V.; Englehard, M.; Zhu, Z.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gemmen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

  3. Semiconducting Metal Oxide Based Sensors for Selective Gas Pollutant Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Sofian M.; El-Kadri, Oussama M.; Abu-Yousef, Imad A.; Kanan, Marsha C.

    2009-01-01

    A review of some papers published in the last fifty years that focus on the semiconducting metal oxide (SMO) based sensors for the selective and sensitive detection of various environmental pollutants is presented. PMID:22408500

  4. Selected oxidative stress markers in gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koźlik, Jacek; Przybyłowska, Joanna; Mikrut, Kinga; Zwoliński, Jacek; Piątek, Jacek; Sobczak, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The surgical stress response after laparoscopy is smaller when compared with open surgery, and it is expected that after minimally invasive surgery the possible development of oxidative stress will be less severe. Aim To evaluate markers of pro-oxidant activity – levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde – and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the perioperative period in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopy and to determine whether the duration of laparoscopy can affect these changes. Material and methods The study included 64 patients, divided into two groups: group 1 with duration of laparoscopy up to 20 min, and group 2 with duration of the operation over 40 min. Blood samples were collected before anesthesia, 5 min after release of pneumoperitoneum, and 10 h after surgery. Results A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde in samples collected after surgery was found in comparison with values obtained before surgery. Also statistically significant differences existed between groups of patients with different duration of surgery. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity values were significantly decreased. They were also significantly different between the two groups with different duration of surgery. Conclusions In our study, levels of the markers of pro-oxidant activity increased and levels of the markers of antioxidant enzymes decreased, suggesting development of oxidative stress. The duration of laparoscopic procedures affects the severity of the presented changes. PMID:25960799

  5. Oxidative Dehydrogenative Couplings of Pyrazol-5-amines Selectively Forming Azopyrroles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New oxidative dehydrogenative couplings of pyrazol-5-amines for the selective synthesis of azopyrrole derivatives have been described. The former reaction simultaneously installs C–I and N–N bonds through iodination and oxidation, whereas the latter involved a copper-catalyzed oxidative coupling process. The resulting iodo-substituted azopyrroles were employed by treatment with various terminal alkynes through Sonogashira cross-coupling leading to new azo compounds. PMID:24731223

  6. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of various alcohols is studied in liquid phase under nitrogen atmosphere over vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method are found to be suitable for the selective oxidation of a variet...

  7. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  8. The Nitric Acid Oxidation of Selected Alcohols and Ketones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kurt W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Shows that nitric acid can be used as a rapid, versatile, and economical oxidant for selected organic substances. The experiments (with background information, procedures, and results provided) require one three-hour laboratory period but could serve as open-ended projects since substrates not described could be oxidized. (JN)

  9. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  10. Selective enrichment of phenols from coal liquefaction oil by solid phase extraction method

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, M.; Feng, J.

    2009-07-01

    This study focuses on the solid phase extraction method for the enrichment and separation of phenol from coal liquefaction oil. The phenols' separation efficiency was compared on different solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges, and the effect of solvents with different polarity and solubility parameter on amino-bonded silica was compared for selection of optimal elution solution. The result showed that amino-bonded silica has the highest selectivity and best extraction capability due to two factors, weak anion exchange adsorption and polar attraction adsorption.

  11. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  12. Surface properties of photo-oxidized bituminous coals. Technical progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Davis, A.; Chander, S.

    1996-12-31

    During this report period, a vitrinite concentrate from the mvb Splash Dam seam (DECS-30) was prepared and analyzed. Results show that the concentrate was 91 vol % vitrinite and that the sample has been adequately protected from oxidation under refrigerated storage in argon. The 9% level of contamination within the vitrinite resulted from the extreme friability of the coal and to the dispersion of fine grains of semifusinite and micrinite. Polished blocks containing vitrain bands that were prepared, irradiated in blue-light and employed in contact angle measurements were evaluated using specular reflectance-mode FT-IR for changes in functional group chemistry. Infrared spectra from unexposed areas of vitrinite and those irradiated for 1, 5 and 10 min for six coals ranging in rank from hvCb to mvb were obtained using a FTS 175 spectrometer with a Bio-Rad UMA 500 microscope accessory. Preliminary results demonstrate that photo-oxidation occurred during irradiation, becoming progressively more intense with increasing irradiation time; however, the magnitude of this change diminished with increasing rank. A relatively steady increase in the carbonyl region (1,800--1,650 cm{sup {minus}1}) and a decrease in the aliphatic region (2,950--2,850 cm{sup {minus}1}) of the spectra supports this observation and is similar to observations made in the past for natural weathering and laboratory oxidation of coals. A series of tests was initiated to photo-oxidize powdered vitrains using the BLAK-RAY ultraviolet lamp evaluated last quarter. Samples of four vitrinite concentrates were exposed to UV light for 10 mins per side. These and the corresponding whole-seam channel samples and raw vitrinite concentrates were submitted for initial microflotation tests which have not been completed at this time.

  13. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Constance Senior; Temi Linjewile

    2003-07-25

    This is the first Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Ceramics GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, analysis of the coal, ash and mercury speciation data from the first test series was completed. Good agreement was shown between different methods of measuring mercury in the flue gas: Ontario Hydro, semi-continuous emission monitor (SCEM) and coal composition. There was a loss of total mercury across the commercial catalysts, but not across the blank monolith. The blank monolith showed no oxidation. The data from the first test series show the same trend in mercury oxidation as a function of space velocity that has been seen elsewhere. At space velocities in the range of 6,000-7,000 hr{sup -1} the blank monolith did not show any mercury oxidation, with or without ammonia present. Two of the commercial catalysts clearly showed an effect of ammonia. Two other commercial catalysts showed an effect of ammonia, although the error bars for the no-ammonia case are large. A test plan was written for the second test series and is being reviewed.

  14. Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes nanocomposite prepared via a precursor route and enhanced catalytic property

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Guoli; Wang Hui; Xiang Xu; Li Feng

    2013-01-15

    The present work reported the synthesis of Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes (CoAl-MMO/CNT) nanocomposite from Co-Al layered double hydroxide/CNTs composite precursor (CoAl-LDH/CNT). The materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), low temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiments, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA), Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results revealed that in CoAl-MMO/CNT nanocomposite, the nanoparticles of cobalt oxide (CoO) and Co-containing spinel-type complex metal oxides could be well-dispersed on the surface of CNTs, thus forming the heterostructure of CoAl-MMO and CNTs. Furthermore, as-synthesized CoAl-MMO/CNT nanocomposite was utilized as additives for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). Compared to those for pure AP and CoAl-MMO, the peak temperature of AP decomposition for CoAl-MMO/CNT was significantly decreased, which is attributed to the novel heterostructure and synergistic effect of multi-component metal oxides of nanocomposite. - Graphical abstract: Hybrid Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes nanocomposite showed the enhanced catalytic activity in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate, as compared to carbon nanotubes and pure Co-Al mixed metal oxides. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Al mixed metal oxides/carbon nanotubes nanocomposite was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Al mixed metal oxides consisted of cobalt oxide and Co-containing spinels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocomposite exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the decomposition of AP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The superior catalytic property is related to novel heterostructure and composition.

  15. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1991-05-16

    The overall objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of an enzymatic desulfurization process specifically intended for organic sulfur removal from coal. Toward that end, a series of specific objectives were defined: (1) establish the feasibility of (bio)oxidative pretreatment followed by biochemical sulfate cleavage for representative sulfur-containing model compounds and coals using commercially-available enzymes; (2) investigate the potential for the isolation and selective use of enzyme preparations from coal-utilizing microbial systems for desulfurization of sulfur-containing model compounds and coals; and (3) develop a conceptual design and economic analysis of a process for enzymatic removal of organic sulfur from coal. Within the scope of this program, it was proposed to carry out a portion of each of these efforts concurrently. (VC)

  16. The use of starch to enhance sulfur and ash removal from coal by selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.J.; Badgujar, M.N.

    1990-01-01

    We have found that the use of starch or gelatin, as an additive in the Otisca T-Process of selective oil agglomeration of coal, leads to a considerable improvement in the reduction of pyritic sulfur and of ash-forming minerals. A patent application has been filed; (Good Badgugar). Improvement in rejection of pyritic sulfur by up to 55% has been found, and improvement in ash rejection by up to 28%. Carbon recovery of 97.5 to 99.1% was obtained when the starch concentration was in the range, 30 to 200 ppM in the water. Three different bituminous coals were used: Upper Freeport, Kentucky No. 9, and Illinois No. 6.

  17. 20 °C, 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements of five selected Alberta coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudynska, J.; Buckmaster, H. A.; Duczmal, T.

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports the first determination of the spin-lattice (T_1) and spin-spin (T_2) relaxation times at 20 °C for two subbituminous and three hv bituminous selected Alberta coals using 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements. Argand diagrammatic techniques were used to verify that the lineshapes were Lorentzian since the deviation was less than 4%. Consequently, it was assumed that the CW-EPR spectral resonances could be approximated to homogeneously broadened lineshapes and saturation techniques could be used to determine these relaxation times. The T_1 and T_2 relaxation times are in good agreement with values reported in the literature using saturation measurements, but two orders of magnitude shorter than those obtained using ESE because coal EPR spectral resonances are the unresolved superposition of comparatively narrow homogeneous resonances.

  18. Charge transport-driven selective oxidation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Keun; Choi, Hongkyw; Lee, Changhwan; Lee, Hyunsoo; Goddeti, Kalyan C; Moon, Song Yi; Doh, Won Hui; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Due to the tunability of the physical, electrical, and optical characteristics of graphene, precisely controlling graphene oxidation is of great importance for potential applications of graphene-based electronics. Here, we demonstrate a facile and precise way for graphene oxidation controlled by photoexcited charge transfer depending on the substrate and bias voltage. It is observed that graphene on TiO2 is easily oxidized under UV-ozone treatment, while graphene on SiO2 remains unchanged. The mechanism for the selective oxidation of graphene on TiO2 is associated with charge transfer from the TiO2 to the graphene. Raman spectra were used to investigate the graphene following applied bias voltages on the graphene/TiO2 diode under UV-ozone exposure. We found that under a reverse bias of 0.6 V on the graphene/TiO2 diode, graphene oxidation was accelerated under UV-ozone exposure, thus confirming the role of charge transfer between the graphene and the TiO2 that results in the selective oxidation of the graphene. The selective oxidation of graphene can be utilized for the precise, nanoscale patterning of the graphene oxide and locally patterned chemical doping, finally leading to the feasibility and expansion of a variety of graphene-based applications. PMID:27199184

  19. Selective Electrochemical versus Chemical Oxidation of Bulky Phenol.

    PubMed

    Zabik, Nicole L; Virca, Carolyn N; McCormick, Theresa M; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2016-09-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of selected tert-butylated phenols 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (1), 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (2), 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol (3), 2-tert-butylphenol (4), and 4-tert-butylphenol (5) was studied in an aprotic environment using cyclic voltammetry, square-wave voltammetry, and UV-vis spectroscopy. All compounds exhibited irreversible oxidation of the corresponding phenol or phenolate ion. Compound 2 was selectively electrochemically oxidized, while other phenol analogues underwent mostly chemical oxidation. The electrochemical oxidation of 2 produced a highly absorbing product, 3,5,3',5'-tetra-tert-butyl-4,4'-diphenoquinone, which was characterized by X-ray crystal diffraction. The electrochemical oxidation was monitored as a function of electrochemical parameters and concentration. Experimental and theoretical data indicated that the steric hindrance, phenoxyl radical stability, and hydrogen bonding influenced the outcome of the electrochemical oxidation. The absence of the substituent at the para position and the presence of the bulky substituents at ortho positions were structural and electrostatic requirements for the selective electrochemical oxidation. PMID:27454828

  20. Cooperative Catalysis for Selective Alcohol Oxidation with Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Slot, Thierry K; Eisenberg, David; van Noordenne, Dylan; Jungbacker, Peter; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2016-08-22

    The activation of dioxygen for selective oxidation of organic molecules is a major catalytic challenge. Inspired by the activity of nitrogen-doped carbons in electrocatalytic oxygen reduction, we combined such a carbon with metal-oxide catalysts to yield cooperative catalysts. These simple materials boost the catalytic oxidation of several alcohols, using molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure and low temperature (80 °C). Cobalt and copper oxide demonstrate the highest activities. The high activity and selectivity of these catalysts arises from the cooperative action of their components, as proven by various control experiments and spectroscopic techniques. We propose that the reaction should not be viewed as occurring at an 'active site', but rather at an 'active doughnut'-the volume surrounding the base of a carbon-supported metal-oxide particle. PMID:27355443

  1. The oxidative potential of PM10 from coal, briquettes and wood charcoal burnt in an experimental domestic stove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Longyi; Hou, Cong; Geng, Chunmei; Liu, Junxia; Hu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Jones, Tim; Zhao, Chengmei; BéruBé, Kelly

    2016-02-01

    Coal contains many potentially harmful trace elements. Coal combustion in unvented stoves, which is common in most parts of rural China, can release harmful emissions into the air that when inhaled cause health issues. However, few studies have dealt specifically with the toxicological mechanisms of the particulate matter (PM) released by coal and other solid fuel combustion. In this paper, PM10 particles that were generated during laboratory stove combustion of raw powdered coal, clay-mixed honeycomb briquettes, and wood charcoal were analysed for morphology, trace element compositions, and toxicity as represented by oxidative DNA damage. The analyses included Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Plasmid Scission Assay (PSA). Gravimetric analysis indicated that the equivalent mass concentration of PM10 emitted by burning raw powdered coal was higher than that derived by burning honeycomb briquette. FESEM observation revealed that the coal burning-derived PM10 particles were mainly soot aggregates. The PSA results showed that the PM10 emitted by burning honeycomb briquettes had a higher oxidative capacity than that from burning raw powdered coal and wood charcoal. It is also demonstrated that the oxidative capacity of the whole particle suspensions were similar to those of the water soluble fractions; indicating that the DNA damage induced by coal burning-derived PM10 were mainly a result of the water-soluble fraction. An ICP-MS analysis revealed that the amount of total analysed water-soluble elements in the PM10 emitted by burning honeycomb briquettes was higher than that in PM produced by burning raw powdered coal, and both were higher than PM from burning wood charcoal. The total analysed water-soluble elements in these coal burning-derived PM10 samples had a significantly positive correlation with the level of DNA damage; indicating that the oxidative capacity of the coal burning

  2. Geochemical study of products associated with spontaneous oxidation of coal in the Cerro Pelado Formation, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Márquez, G.; Alejandre, F. J.; Del Río, J. J.; Hurtado, A.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this research work is a geochemical, mineralogical, and textural characterization of spontaneously smouldered coal-derived products in northwestern Venezuela (Cerro Pelado Formation, some 10 km from Pedregal city). Several solid samples were collected from this formation, six of unweathering coal, an other six of resulting unmelted rocks forming on a surface coal bed, and the last four of mineralizations found accumulating around gas vents. The fresh coal and the unmelted material were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and proximate techniques. Products such as magnetite and chabazite-K were identified in the alteration rocks. Likewise, both materials were also studied in order to determine the mobilization of 17 elements into the environment; such elements were analysed through inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy on extracts obtained by a sequential extraction method: each sample was firstly extracted with MilliQ water and then the resultant residue was washed. This and the subsequently resulting residues are extracted according to the mentioned procedure by using, respectively, ammonium acetate, chlorhydric acid, peroxide and chlorhydric acid, nitric acid and fluorhydric acid, and nitric acid. The studied elements are classified as highly mobile (Na, Ni, ...), nearly immobile (Ti, P) and partially mobile (Mg, Fe, K, ...). In regards to mineralizations around fumaroles associated with smoldering coal seams, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses have revealed the presence of salammoniac, mascagnite and other solid combustion compounds formed by reaction of gas emitted from coal oxidation, in addition to previously non-reported sulfur-rich by-products associated with gas fissures, particularly ammonium thiosulfate, a phase first obtained only synthetically in the laboratory. Another objective of the research was to collect and analyse gases escaping from surficial vents

  3. Two Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Contaminant Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Two catalysts for the selective oxidation of trace amounts of contaminant gases in air have been developed for use aboard the International Space Station. These catalysts might also be useful for reducing concentrations of fumes in terrestrial industrial facilities especially facilities that use halocarbons as solvents, refrigerant liquids, and foaming agents, as well as facilities that generate or utilize ammonia. The first catalyst is of the supported-precious-metal type. This catalyst is highly active for the oxidation of halocarbons, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates at low concentrations in air. This catalyst is more active for the oxidation of hydrocarbons and halocarbons than are competing catalysts developed in recent years. This catalyst completely converts these airborne contaminant gases to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral acids that can be easily removed from the air, and does not make any chlorine gas in the process. The catalyst is thermally stable and is not poisoned by chlorine or fluorine atoms produced on its surface during the destruction of a halocarbon. In addition, the catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to nitrogen at a temperature between 200 and 260 C, without making nitrogen oxides, which are toxic. The temperature of 260 C is higher than the operational temperature of any other precious-metal catalyst that can selectively oxidize ammonia. The purpose of the platinum in this catalyst is to oxidize hydrocarbons and to ensure that the oxidation of halocarbons goes to completion. However, the platinum exhibits little or no activity for initiating the destruction of halocarbons. Instead, the attack on the halocarbons is initiated by the support. The support also provides a high surface area for exposure of the platinum. Moreover, the support resists deactivation or destruction by halogens released during the destruction of halocarbons. The second catalyst is of the supported- metal-oxide type. This catalyst can selectively oxidize ammonia to

  4. New Approach to Study the Ignition Processes of Organic Coal-Water Fuels in an Oxidizer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Dmitrienko, M. A.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    To converge the conditions of organic water-coal fuel composition combustion in the typical power equipment we developed a new approach and installed an experimental setup, eliminating the traditional fixing the fuel droplets on the thermocouples or rods. Specialized cone-shaped chamber was used to implement the process of lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the lingering of organic water-coal fuel droplets were established. We determined the parameters of the system (droplet size of 0.4-0.6 mm, temperatures 823-903 K and the velocity of the oxidizer flow 1.5-6 m/s) at which the droplets were consistently ignited in the process of lingering. Minimum temperatures and ignition delay times of organic water-coal fuel droplets based on brown coal, used motor, turbine, transformer oils, kerosene, gasoline and water were defined.

  5. Method For Selective Catalytic Reduction Of Nitrogen Oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  6. Method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    DOEpatents

    Mowery-Evans, Deborah L.; Gardner, Timothy J.; McLaughlin, Linda I.

    2005-02-15

    A method for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxide compounds (NO.sub.x, defined as nitric oxide, NO, +nitrogen dioxide, NO.sub.2) in a gas by a material comprising a base metal consisting essentially of CuO and Mn, and oxides of Mn, on an activated metal hydrous metal oxide support, such as HMO:Si. A promoter, such as tungsten oxide or molybdenum oxide, can be added and has been shown to increase conversion efficiency. This method provides good conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2, good selectivity, good durability, resistance to SO.sub.2 aging and low toxicity compared with methods utilizing vanadia-based catalysts.

  7. N-Acetylcysteine and deferoxamine reduce pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation in rats after coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Pinho, R.A.; Silveira, P.C.L.; Silva, L.A.; Streck, E.L.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Moreira, J.C.F.

    2005-11-01

    Coal dust inhalation induces oxidative damage and inflammatory infiltration on lung parenchyma. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) administered alone or in combination with deferoxamine (DFX), significantly reduced the inflammatory infiltration and oxidative damage in the lungs of rats exposed to coal dust. Forty-two male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were exposed to the coal dust (3 mg/0.5 mL saline, 3 days/week, for 3 weeks) by intratracheal instillation. The animals were randomly divided into three groups: saline 0.9% (n = 8), supplemented with NAC (20 mg/kg of body weight/day, intraperitoneal injection (i.p.)) (n = 8), and supplemented with NAC (20 mg/kg of body weight/day, i.p.) plus DFX (20 mg/kg of body weight/week) (n = 8). Control animals received only saline solution (0.5 mL). Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total cell number were determined in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We determined lipid peroxidation and oxidative protein damage parameters and catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in the lungs of animals. Intratracheal instillation of coal dust in the lungs of rats led to an inflammatory response and induced significant oxidative damage. The administration of NAC alone or in association with DFX reduced the inflammatory response and the oxidative stress parameters in rats exposed to coal dust.

  8. Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases

    DOEpatents

    Ayala, Raul E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

  9. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation. Quarterly report, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  10. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  11. Selective edge modification in graphene and graphite by chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Moriyama, Satoshi; Higuchi, Masayoshi

    2014-04-01

    The effect of edge structures in graphene sheets has been well investigated theoretically but most experimental demonstrations of the functionalization have been for the bulk structures because of only a few reports on chemical methods to modify the edges selectively. We herein report a chemical method using the Lemieux-von Rudloff reagent that selectively oxidizes only the edges of graphene sheets. The selective oxidation at the edges of the graphene sheet was confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman mapping measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TGA result of the oxidized graphite with different particle sizes showed a slight weight loss at approximately 350 degrees C (2.29% for the middle particles (35 microm)), which indicates thermal decomposition of the oxidized edge part. The Raman mapping measurement in the inner part of graphene sheets didn't detect any defects or translational symmetry breaking after the oxidation. The XPS data clearly showed that the total carbon atom content present as C--O, C==O, and O--C==C increased from 4.65 to 6.18% by the oxidation. Using the obtained edge-oxidized graphene as a starting material, various functionalizations of the edge structure are expected in the future. PMID:24734719

  12. Method and reaction pathway for selectively oxidizing organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A method of selectively oxidizing an organic compound in a single vessel comprises: a) combining an organic compound, an acid solution in which the organic compound is soluble, a compound containing two oxygen atoms bonded to one another, and a metal ion reducing agent capable of reducing one of such oxygen atoms, and thereby forming a mixture; b) reducing the compound containing the two oxygen atoms by reducing one of such oxygen atoms with the metal ion reducing agent to, 1) oxidize the metal ion reducing agent to a higher valence state, and 2) produce an oxygen containing intermediate capable of oxidizing the organic compound; c) reacting the oxygen containing intermediate with the organic compound to oxidize the organic compound into an oxidized organic intermediate, the oxidized organic intermediate having an oxidized carbon atom; d) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the acid counter ion and higher valence state metal ion to bond the acid counter ion to the oxidized carbon atom and thereby produce a quantity of an ester incorporating the organic intermediate and acid counter ion; and e) reacting the oxidized organic intermediate with the higher valence state metal ion and water to produce a quantity of alcohol which is less than the quantity of ester, the acid counter ion incorporated in the ester rendering the carbon atom bonded to the counter ion less reactive with the oxygen containing intermediate in the mixture than is the alcohol with the oxygen containing intermediate.

  13. Evaluation of reaction mechanism of coal-metal oxide interactions in chemical-looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Richards, George; Poston, James; Tian, Hanjing; Miller, Duane; Simonyi, Thomas

    2010-11-15

    The knowledge of reaction mechanism is very important in designing reactors for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of coal. Recent CLC studies have considered the more technically difficult problem of reactions between abundant solid fuels (i.e. coal and waste streams) and solid metal oxides. A definitive reaction mechanism has not been reported for CLC reaction of solid fuels. It has often been assumed that the solid/solid reaction is slow and therefore requires that reactions be conducted at temperatures high enough to gasify the solid fuel, or decompose the metal oxide. In contrast, data presented in this paper demonstrates that solid/solid reactions can be completed at much lower temperatures, with rates that are technically useful as long as adequate fuel/metal oxide contact is achieved. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations as well as experimental techniques such as thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), flow reactor studies, in situ X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to evaluate how the proximal interaction between solid phases proceeds. The data indicate that carbon induces the Cu-O bond breaking process to initiate the combustion of carbon at temperatures significantly lower than the spontaneous decomposition temperature of CuO, and the type of reducing medium in the vicinity of the metal oxide influences the temperature at which the oxygen release from the metal oxide takes place. Surface melting of Cu and wetting of carbon may contribute to the solid-solid contacts necessary for the reaction. (author)

  14. Evolution of dissolved organic matter during abiotic oxidation of coal tar--comparison with contaminated soils under natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Ogier; Biache, Coralie; Boulangé, Marine; Parant, Stéphane; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Billet, David; Michels, Raymond; Faure, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In former coal transformation plants (coking and gas ones), the major organic contamination of soils is coal tar, mainly composed of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Air oxidation of a fresh coal tar was chosen to simulate the abiotic natural attenuation impact on PAC-contaminated soils. Water-leaching experiments were subsequently performed on fresh and oxidized coal tars to study the influence of oxidation on dissolved organic matter (DOM) quality and quantity. The characterization of the DOM was performed using a combination of molecular and spectroscopic techniques (high-performance liquid chromatography-size-exclusion chromatography (HPLC-SEC), 3D fluorescence, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS)) and compared with the DOM from contaminated soils sampled on the field exposed to natural attenuation for several decades. An increase in the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic compound concentrations was observed with abiotic oxidation both in the coal tar and the associated DOM. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the leachates exceeded pure water solubility limits, suggesting that co-solvation with other soluble organic compounds occurred. Furthermore, emission excitation matrix analysis combined with synchronous fluorescence spectra interpretation and size-exclusion chromatography suggests that oxidation induced condensation reactions which were responsible for the formation of higher-molecular weight compounds and potentially mobilized by water. Thus, the current composition of the DOM in aged soils may at least partly result from (1) a depletion in lower-molecular weight compounds of the initial contamination stock and (2) an oxidative condensation leading to the formation of a higher-molecular weight fraction. Abiotic oxidation and water leaching may therefore be a significant combination contributing to the evolution of coal tar-contaminated soils under natural attenuation. PMID:25146121

  15. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Sunder, Swaminathan

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  16. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  17. Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. ); Jacobsen, P.S. )

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes the washability and comprehensive characterization of 975 raw coal channel samples collected from the Eastern, Central, and Western Regions (including Alaska) of the United States. All of this information is sorted in the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Coal Technology Data Base. Individual reports for each region were completed previously as Volumes 1, 2, and 3 and included the detailed data for each of the 975 samples. This report is a summation of the results of those three reports on a state- and region-wide basis only, and does not include the data for individual samples, but only includes the composite data for each state and region. Graphical summations are presented by state, section or rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions and showing the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. The statistical evaluations in the Appendices present the composited washability data of 1.30, 1.40, and 1.60 specific gravities of separation, the selected chemical and physical properties, and the composited washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. 13 refs., 93 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on fine particle emission from two coal-fired power plants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Ma, Zizhen; Wang, Shuxiao; Duan, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission abatement of coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) requires large-scaled installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which would reduce secondary fine particulate matter (PM2.5) (by reducing nitrate aerosol) in the atmosphere. However, our field measurement of two CFPPs equipped with SCR indicates a significant increase of SO42- and NH4+ emission in primary PM2.5, due to catalytic enhancement of SO2 oxidation to SO3 and introducing of NH3 as reducing agent. The subsequent formation of (NH4)2SO4 or NH4HSO4 aerosol is commonly concentrated in sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) with a bimodal pattern. The measurement at the inlet of stack also showed doubled primary PM2.5 emission by SCR operation. This effect should therefore be considered when updating emission inventory of CFPPs. By rough estimation, the enhanced primary PM2.5 emission from CFPPs by SCR operation would offset 12% of the ambient PM2.5 concentration reduction in cities as the benefit of national NOx emission abatement, which should draw attention of policy-makers for air pollution control.

  19. Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium. Annual report and selected publications, 1 July 1992--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Dockter, B.A.; Eylands, K.E.; Hassett, D.J.; O`Leary, E.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced cars), formerly the Western Fly Ash Research, Development, and Data Center (WFARDDC), has continued fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research focused on promoting environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion fly ash. The research tasks selected for the year included: (1) Coal Ash Properties Database Maintenance and Expansion, (2) Investigation of the High-Volume Use of Fly Ash for Flowable Backfill Applications, (3) Investigation of Hydrated Mineralogical Phases in Coal Combustion By-Products, (4) Comparison of Department of Transportation Specifications for Coal Ash Utilization, (5) Comparative Leaching Study of Coal Combustion By-Products and Competing Construction Materials, (6) Application of CCSEM for Coal Ash Characterization, (7) Determination of Types and Causes of Efflorescence in Regional Concrete Products, and (8) Sulfate Resistance of Fly Ash Concrete: A Literature Review and Evaluation of Research Priorities. The assembly of a database of information on coal fly ash has been a focus area for CARRC since its beginning in 1985. This year, CARRC members received an updated run time version of the Coal Ash Properties Database (CAPD) on computer disk for their use. The new, user-friendly database management format was developed over the year to facilitate the use of CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members will be beneficial to each company`s utilization efforts, to CARRC, and to the coal ash industry in general. Many additions and improvements were made to CAPD during the year, and a three-year plan for computer database and modeling related to coal ash utilization was developed to guide both the database effort and the research effort.

  20. Oxidation resistance of selected mechanical carbons at 650 deg C in dry flowing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted with several experimental mechanical carbons at 650 C in air flowing at 28 cu cm/sec (STP). Experiments indicate that boron carbide addition and zinc phosphate treatment definitely improved oxidation resistance. Impregnation with coal tar pitch before final graphitization had some beneficial effect on oxidation resistance and it markedly improved flexure strength and hardness. Graphitization temperature alone did not affect oxidation resistance, but with enough added boron carbide the oxidation resistance was increased although the hardness greatly decreased.

  1. A novel three phase fluidized bed process for simultaneous selective flocculation and microbial desulfurization of high sulfur coal

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Bavarian, F.; Attia, Y.A.; Elzeky, M. )

    1990-10-16

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the feasibility of recovery and reclamation of ultrafine coal particles generated during the processing of coal. 10--35% of the total annual tonnage of coal in atypical coal preparation plant is estimated to be lost in forms of ultrafine particles during the mining, shipping, handling, and preparation of the coal. The technical feasibility of the proposed system which consisted of an integrated circuit of selective flocculation followed by microbial desulfurization, has been tested. The results indicate that using selective flocculation/froth flotation circuit, coal recoveryis 85% with 75% pyritic sulfur and 60% ash rejections. The remaining pyritic sulfur in the coal slurry was treated using microbial desulfurization in a draft-tube fluidized bed bioreactor. Using this reactor scheme considerable enhancement of the bioleaching rate was obtained. The results indicate that 90% rejection of pyritic sulfur can be achieved in less than 24 hrs. Note that the previously reported data for the bioleaching rate are from 4 to 12 days for the same amount of pyritic rejection. The results obtained in this work closely reflects the anticipated outcomes which were projected in the original proposal. Consequently, the results of this work implies a significant improvement in bioleaching process and the possibility for the commercialization of the microbial desulfurization process. Our results also indicate further improvement of this process by optimization of reactor sequence and operating conditions.

  2. A novel three phase fluidized bed process for simultaneous selective flocculation and microbial desulfurization of high sulfur coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Bavarian, F.; Attia, Y.A.; Elzeky, M.

    1990-10-16

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the feasibility of recovery and reclamation of ultrafine coal particles generated during the processing of coal. 10--35% of the total annual tonnage of coal in atypical coal preparation plant is estimated to be lost in forms of ultrafine particles during the mining, shipping, handling, and preparation of the coal. The technical feasibility of the proposed system which consisted of an integrated circuit of selective flocculation followed by microbial desulfurization, has been tested. The results indicate that using selective flocculation/froth flotation circuit, coal recoveryis 85% with 75% pyritic sulfur and 60% ash rejections. The remaining pyritic sulfur in the coal slurry was treated using microbial desulfurization in a draft-tube fluidized bed bioreactor. Using this reactor scheme considerable enhancement of the bioleaching rate was obtained. The results indicate that 90% rejection of pyritic sulfur can be achieved in less than 24 hrs. Note that the previously reported data for the bioleaching rate are from 4 to 12 days for the same amount of pyritic rejection. The results obtained in this work closely reflects the anticipated outcomes which were projected in the original proposal. Consequently, the results of this work implies a significant improvement in bioleaching process and the possibility for the commercialization of the microbial desulfurization process. Our results also indicate further improvement of this process by optimization of reactor sequence and operating conditions.

  3. Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

    2012-09-15

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300°C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm² degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm² degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

  4. Boiler materials for ultra-supercritical coal power plants - steamside oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, R.; Sarver, J.; Tanzosh, J.M.

    2006-06-15

    The corrosion behavior of tubing materials carrying steam at high temperature is of great concern to fossil power plant operators. This is due to the fact that the oxide films formed on the steam side can lead to major failures and consequently to reduced plant availability. The wall loss of the pressure boundary caused by oxidation can increase the hoop stresses and cause premature creep failures; second, the increased insulation of the tubes due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide film can lead to increased metal temperature, thereby exacerbating the fireside corrosion as well as creep problems. The third concern is that thicker oxides may spall more easily when the plant is cooled down. On restart, the spalled material may lodge somewhere in the system with the potential for causing tube blockages, or it may be swept out with the working fluid and enter the steam turbine causing erosion damage to the turbine nozzles and blades. Failures of tubing and turbine components by these mechanisms have been widely reported in the United States. In view of the importance of the steamside oxidation, a major study of the phenomenon is being carried out as part of a major national program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office. As a prelude to the experimental work, a literature survey was performed to document the state of the art. Results of the review are reported here.

  5. Microbial Oxidation of Ethane within Seep Sediment at Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, S. D.; Duncombe, R.; Scarlett, R. D.; Shaffer, J.; Lensch, S.; Valentine, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrocarbon seep field at Coal Oil Point (COP), off the coast of Santa Barbara, California, releases more than 10^10 g of thermogenic natural gas each year. Only a fraction of this methane, ethane, propane, and butane reaches the atmosphere, and is instead consumed by marine microbes in both the sediment and water column. Bacterial respiration of these gases has been observed in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with the exception of ethane (aerobic only) (Kniemeyer et. al 2007). This work seeks to quantify the rate of ethane oxidation (both aerobic and anaerobic) in marine sediment. A series of experiments, to be conducted using COP seep sediment aboard the R/V Atlantis in October 2013, will test how varying oxygen conditions impact ethane oxidation rate. Oxidation rates will be quantified using sensitive 3H-ethane tracers. Preliminary data from Shane's Seep, located within the COP seep field, indicates that ethane oxidation is restricted to the top 6 cm of sediment. This suggests that oxygen is a limiting factor, but further work is needed to establish if ethane oxidation is restricted to exclusively aerobic environments.

  6. Structural features of a bituminous coal and their changes during low-temperature oxidation and loss of volatiles investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mao, J.-D.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hatcher, P.G.; Li, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative and advanced 13C solid-state NMR techniques were employed to investigate (i) the chemical structure of a high volatile bituminous coal, as well as (ii) chemical structural changes of this coal after evacuation of adsorbed gases, (iii) during oxidative air exposure at room temperature, and (iv) after oxidative heating in air at 75 ??C. The solid-state NMR techniques employed in this study included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at a high spinning speed of 14 kHz, cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CH, CH2, and CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filtering, two-dimensional (2D) 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation NMR (HETCOR), and 2D HETCOR with 1H spin diffusion. With spectral editing techniques, we identified methyl CCH 3, rigid and mobile methylene CCH2C, methine CCH, quaternary Cq, aromatic CH, aromatic carbons bonded to alkyls, small-sized condensed aromatic moieties, and aromatic C-O groups. With direct polarization combined with spectral-editing techniques, we quantified 11 different types of functional groups. 1H-13C 2D HETCOR NMR experiments indicated spatial proximity of aromatic and alkyl moieties in cross-linked structures. The proton spin diffusion experiments indicated that the magnetization was not equilibrated at a 1H spin diffusion time of 5 ms. Therefore, the heterogeneity in spatial distribution of different functional groups should be above 2 nm. Recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing showed that the fraction of large charcoal-like clusters of polycondensed aromatic rings was relatively small. The exposure of this coal to atmospheric oxygen at room temperature for 6 months did not result in obvious chemical structural changes of the coal, whereas heating at 75 ??C in air for 10 days led to oxidation of coal and generated some COO groups. Evacuation removed most volatiles and caused a significant reduction in aliphatic signals in its DP

  7. Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion

    DOEpatents

    Mollot, Darren J.; Bonk, Donald L.; Dowdy, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Polluting NO.sub.x gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO.sub.x gases are removed is directed to introducing NO.sub.x -free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor.

  8. Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion

    DOEpatents

    Mollot, D.J.; Bonk, D.L.; Dowdy, T.E.

    1998-01-13

    Polluting NO{sub x} gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO{sub x} gases are removed is directed to introducing NO{sub x}-free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor. 2 figs.

  9. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Constance Senior

    2004-10-29

    This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

  10. OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Constance Senior

    2004-04-30

    This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.