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Sample records for self-assembled nano structured

  1. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Zhigang

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  2. Self-assembly of hybrid structures on nano templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruomiao

    This dissertation describes the investigation on the synthesis of hybrid structures on nano-templates. Fabrication of molecular nano-patterns of organic amphiphiles (e.g. fatty acids) by self-assembly has been discussed here, and their application as templates for two-dimensional in situ synthesis of metal soap molecular pattern has been demonstrated. The synthesis of nanoparticle---nanorod hybrid structure represents another effort to achieve hybrid materials. Therefore, methods to create complex inorganic---organic nano---hybrid are provided by this work. AFM disclosed the pattern structures of the self-assembled monolayers as designed nanoscaled patterns. It is observed two pattern periodicities reflecting the head-to-head and head-to-tail molecular assembly tendencies of the fatty acids and their dependence on the molecular structure and chain length, which exhibits a linear increase in the periodicity with an increasing molecular chain length. The investigation on molecular patterns of self-assembled monolayers of metal arachidates on graphite by AFM and FTIR is described. Metal arachidate self-assemblies show similar stripe pattern and periodicities as those of arachidic acid. The monolayer structure is mainly dictated by graphite, while the type of metal ions mainly affects the domain size, shape and regularity. The results of AFM and FTIR are correlated to the Irving-Williams Series, which predicts bond strength of the metal ions to ligands. The spin coated films from binary solutions of nanoparticles and fatty acids with different chain lengths (Even number of carbon, C18--C26), have been used to study the effect of nanoparticles on self-assemble pattern of fatty acids. C18--C22 acids formed uniform nanorods attached and induced by nanoparticles, while the self-assembled stripe patterns of C24 and C26 were unaffected by the presence of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were aligned on C26 monolayer. The seeded nucleation mechanism has been studied by AFM

  3. Liquid-bridging in particle self-assemblies toward constructing periodic nano-mesh structures and nano-dot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chul Park, Seung; Lee, In-Ho; Na, Jun-Hee; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate a simple generic principle of constructing periodic nano-mesh structures and nano-dot arrays by liquid-bridging in particle self-assemblies. A self-assembly of nano- to micro-sized spheres of polystyrene, produced in a close-packed monolayer on a substrate by a convective method, is used as a template for liquid-bridging of a functional fluid in the pores among the neighboring particles. After the solidification of the fluid, followed by the detachment of the particles from the substrate, a periodic mesh structure is directly obtained. Moreover, deposition of a desired substance onto such mesh structure made of a sacrificial material, which is subsequently removable through a lift-off process, enables to produce a periodic dot array of the substance. Depending on the size of the particle and the nature of liquid bridging in the particle assembly, a variety of nano-mesh structures of silver-ink and nano-dot arrays of gold are constructed. This simple liquid bridging-based methodology is easily applicable for different classes of functional fluids such as soluble organic semiconductors.

  4. Self-Assembled Wiggling Nano-Structures and the Principle of Maximum Entropy Production

    PubMed Central

    Belkin, A.; Hubler, A.; Bezryadin, A.

    2015-01-01

    While behavior of equilibrium systems is well understood, evolution of nonequilibrium ones is much less clear. Yet, many researches have suggested that the principle of the maximum entropy production is of key importance in complex systems away from equilibrium. Here, we present a quantitative study of large ensembles of carbon nanotubes suspended in a non-conducting non-polar fluid subject to a strong electric field. Being driven out of equilibrium, the suspension spontaneously organizes into an electrically conducting state under a wide range of parameters. Such self-assembly allows the Joule heating and, therefore, the entropy production in the fluid, to be maximized. Curiously, we find that emerging self-assembled structures can start to wiggle. The wiggling takes place only until the entropy production in the suspension reaches its maximum, at which time the wiggling stops and the structure becomes quasi-stable. Thus, we provide strong evidence that maximum entropy production principle plays an essential role in the evolution of self-organizing systems far from equilibrium. PMID:25662746

  5. Self-Assembled Wiggling Nano-Structures and the Principle of Maximum Entropy Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, A.; Hubler, A.; Bezryadin, A.

    2015-02-01

    While behavior of equilibrium systems is well understood, evolution of nonequilibrium ones is much less clear. Yet, many researches have suggested that the principle of the maximum entropy production is of key importance in complex systems away from equilibrium. Here, we present a quantitative study of large ensembles of carbon nanotubes suspended in a non-conducting non-polar fluid subject to a strong electric field. Being driven out of equilibrium, the suspension spontaneously organizes into an electrically conducting state under a wide range of parameters. Such self-assembly allows the Joule heating and, therefore, the entropy production in the fluid, to be maximized. Curiously, we find that emerging self-assembled structures can start to wiggle. The wiggling takes place only until the entropy production in the suspension reaches its maximum, at which time the wiggling stops and the structure becomes quasi-stable. Thus, we provide strong evidence that maximum entropy production principle plays an essential role in the evolution of self-organizing systems far from equilibrium.

  6. The structure of unsupported, self-assembled phospholipid bilayers on an artificially nano-patterned surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Jung, Seung-Yong; Browning, James; Keum, Jong; Lavrik, Nickolay; Collier, Pat

    2012-02-01

    We present neutron reflectivity measurements of the in-situ microscopic architecture of phospholipid molecules at the interface between a regularly nano-patterned surface and an aqueous sub-phase using neutron reflectometry. 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) single bilayers were deposited on a patterned silicon substrate. The substrate was patterned with a rectangular array of nano-scaled holes using e-beam nano-lithographic techniques. The goal of these experiments is to produce a set of small freely-suspended bilayers spanning the nanostructured surface. We compare results for films deposited by vesicle adsorption or by the Langmuir--Shafer (L-S) technique. Initial data analysis shows that there are well formed bilayers on the surface. Detailed analysis of the reflectivity curves will be presented to confirm details of the architecture of these bilayer films. Bilayers prepared in this way may serve as model single bilayer systems with freely suspended areas for the study of membrane functionality in biological and biomimetic materials and systems.

  7. Guided Self-Assembly of Nano-Precipitates into Mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, Z.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wang, Y.; Nie, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    We show by a combination of computer simulation and experimental characterization guided self-assembly of coherent nano-precipitates into a mesocrystal having a honeycomb structure in bulk materials. The structure consists of different orientation variants of a product phase precipitated out of the parent phase by heterogeneous nucleation on a hexagonal dislocation network. The predicted honeycomb mesocrystal has been confirmed by experimental observations in an Mg-Y-Nd alloy. The structure and lattice parameters of the mesocrystal and the size of the nano-precipitates are readily tuneable, offering ample opportunities to tailor its properties for a wide range of technological applications.

  8. Guided Self-Assembly of Nano-Precipitates into Mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, Z.; Zhu, Y.M.; Wang, Y.; Nie, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    We show by a combination of computer simulation and experimental characterization guided self-assembly of coherent nano-precipitates into a mesocrystal having a honeycomb structure in bulk materials. The structure consists of different orientation variants of a product phase precipitated out of the parent phase by heterogeneous nucleation on a hexagonal dislocation network. The predicted honeycomb mesocrystal has been confirmed by experimental observations in an Mg-Y-Nd alloy. The structure and lattice parameters of the mesocrystal and the size of the nano-precipitates are readily tuneable, offering ample opportunities to tailor its properties for a wide range of technological applications. PMID:26559002

  9. Novel nano-structured materials: Preparation by self- assembly techniques and study of physical properties by x-ray analysis and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiemann, Joan Ann K.

    2000-10-01

    most reliable data processing technique. In addition, the ordering of nano-scale materials have been studied. Two-dimensional arrays of nano-spheres were prepared by spin coating various substrates, and three- dimensional structures of nano-spheres were formed by self-assembly. Both two- and three-dimensional structures were examined for the extent of ordering using optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Nano-Structured Mesoporous Silica Wires with Intra-Wire Lamellae via Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly in Space-Confined Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.; Shi, Donglu; Blom, Douglas Allen

    2014-04-06

    Evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) of silica sol-gel ethanol-water solution mixtures with block-copolymer were studied inside uniform micro/nano channels. Nano-structured mesoporous silica wires, with various intra-wire self-assembly structures including lamellae, were prepared via EISA process but in space-confined channels with the diameter ranging from 50 nm to 200 nm. Membranes made of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) and track-etched polycarbonate (EPC) were utilized as the arrays of space-confined channels (i.e., 50, 100, and 200-nm EPC and 200-nm AAO) for infiltration and drying of mixture solutions; these substrate membranes were submerged in mixture solutions consisting of a silica precursor, a structure-directing agent, ethanol, and water. After the substrate channels were filled with the solution under vacuum impregnation, the membrane was removed from the solution and dried in air. The silica precursor used was tetra-ethyl othosilicate (TEOS), and the structure-directing agent employed was triblock copolymer Pluronic-123 (P123). It was found that the formation of the mesoporous nanostructures in silica wires within uniform channels were significantly affected by the synthesis conditions including (1) pre-assemble TEOS aging time, (2) the evaporation rate during the vacuum impregnation, and (3) the air-dry temperature. The obtained intra-wire structures, including 2D-hexagonal rods and lamellae, were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A steric hindrance effect seems to explain well the observed polymer-silica mesophase formation tailored by TEOS aging time. The evaporation effect, air-drying effect, and AAO-vs-EPC substrate effect on the mesoporous structure of the formed silica wires were also presented and discussed.

  11. Nano-imaging enabled via self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Imaging object details with length scales below approximately 200 nm has been historically difficult for conventional microscope objective lenses because of their inability to resolve features smaller than one-half the optical wavelength. Here we review some of the recent approaches to surpass this limit by harnessing self-assembly as a fabrication mechanism. Self-assembly can be used to form individual nano- and micro-lenses, as well as to form extended arrays of such lenses. These lenses have been shown to enable imaging with resolutions as small as 50 nm half-pitch using visible light, which is well below the Abbe diffraction limit. Furthermore, self-assembled nano-lenses can be used to boost contrast and signal levels from small nano-particles, enabling them to be detected relative to background noise. Finally, alternative nano-imaging applications of self-assembly are discussed, including three-dimensional imaging, enhanced coupling from light-emitting diodes, and the fabrication of contrast agents such as quantum dots and nanoparticles. PMID:25506387

  12. Observation of self-assembled periodic nano-structures induced by femtosecond laser in both ablation and deposition regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingzhen; Zhang, Haitao; Her, Tsing-Hua

    2008-02-01

    We observed the spontaneous formation of periodic nano-structures in both femtosecond laser ablation and deposition. The former involved 400-nm femtosecond pulses from a 250-KHz regenerated amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser and periodic nanocracks and the nano-structure are in the form of periodic nanocracks in the substrate, the latter applied an 80-MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator with pulse energy less than half nanojoule in a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition configuration and tungsten nanogratings grow heterogeneously on top of the substrates. These two observed periodic nanostructures have opposite orientations respecting to laser polarization: the periodic nanocracks are perpendicular to, whereas the deposited tungsten nanogratings are parallel to laser polarization direction. By translating the substrate respecting to the laser focus, both the periodic nanocrack and tungsten nanograting extend to the whole scanning range. The deposited tungsten nanogratings possess excellent uniformity on both the grating period and tooth length. Both the attributes can be tuned precisely by controlling the laser power and scanning speed. Furthermore, we discovered that the teeth of transverse tungsten nanogratings are self aligned along their axial direction during multiple scanning with appropriate offset between scans. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating large-area one-dimensional grating by exploiting such unique property. These distinct phenomena of nanocracks and tungsten nanogratings indicate different responsible mechanisms.

  13. A route to self-assemble suspended DNA nano-complexes.

    PubMed

    Lansac, Yves; Degrouard, Jeril; Renouard, Madalena; Toma, Adriana C; Livolant, Françoise; Raspaud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Highly charged polyelectrolytes can self-assemble in presence of condensing agents such as multivalent cations, amphiphilic molecules or proteins of opposite charge. Aside precipitation, the formation of soluble micro- and nano-particles has been reported in multiple systems. However a precise control of experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired structures has been so far hampered by the extreme sensitivity of the samples to formulation pathways. Herein we combine experiments and molecular modelling to investigate the detailed microscopic dynamics and the structure of self-assembled hexagonal bundles made of short dsDNA fragments complexed with small basic proteins. We suggest that inhomogeneous mixing conditions are required to form and stabilize charged self-assembled nano-aggregates in large excess of DNA. Our results should help re-interpreting puzzling behaviors reported for a large class of strongly charged polyelectrolyte systems. PMID:26912166

  14. A route to self-assemble suspended DNA nano-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansac, Yves; Degrouard, Jeril; Renouard, Madalena; Toma, Adriana C.; Livolant, Françoise; Raspaud, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Highly charged polyelectrolytes can self-assemble in presence of condensing agents such as multivalent cations, amphiphilic molecules or proteins of opposite charge. Aside precipitation, the formation of soluble micro- and nano-particles has been reported in multiple systems. However a precise control of experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired structures has been so far hampered by the extreme sensitivity of the samples to formulation pathways. Herein we combine experiments and molecular modelling to investigate the detailed microscopic dynamics and the structure of self-assembled hexagonal bundles made of short dsDNA fragments complexed with small basic proteins. We suggest that inhomogeneous mixing conditions are required to form and stabilize charged self-assembled nano-aggregates in large excess of DNA. Our results should help re-interpreting puzzling behaviors reported for a large class of strongly charged polyelectrolyte systems.

  15. A route to self-assemble suspended DNA nano-complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lansac, Yves; Degrouard, Jeril; Renouard, Madalena; Toma, Adriana C.; Livolant, Françoise; Raspaud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Highly charged polyelectrolytes can self-assemble in presence of condensing agents such as multivalent cations, amphiphilic molecules or proteins of opposite charge. Aside precipitation, the formation of soluble micro- and nano-particles has been reported in multiple systems. However a precise control of experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired structures has been so far hampered by the extreme sensitivity of the samples to formulation pathways. Herein we combine experiments and molecular modelling to investigate the detailed microscopic dynamics and the structure of self-assembled hexagonal bundles made of short dsDNA fragments complexed with small basic proteins. We suggest that inhomogeneous mixing conditions are required to form and stabilize charged self-assembled nano-aggregates in large excess of DNA. Our results should help re-interpreting puzzling behaviors reported for a large class of strongly charged polyelectrolyte systems. PMID:26912166

  16. Structure and Properties of Nano- and Meso-Scale Materials Prepared by Designed Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukach, Ariella

    The work presented in this thesis explores the homo- and co-assembly process, structural characteristics and properties of nano- and meso-scale, one- and three-dimensional structures composed of nanoscale building blocks. In chapter 3, we developed a method for terminating the colloidal polymerization process of gold nanorods by post-assembly photocrosslinking of polymer ligands. By functionalizing gold nanorods with a hydrophobic polymer containing pendant double bonds, we were able to compartmentalize a hydrophobic photoinitiator. We could then suppress the association ability of the polymer ligands by covalently crosslinking them using photoirradiation. The averaged aggregation number of the polymers could be predicted from the kinetics of molecular step-growth polymerization. Furthermore, we found that following crosslinking, the inert-rod distance reduced, and the nanorod co-linearity increased, both allowing for better electromagnetic coupling between the nanorods. In chapter 4, we further explored the resemblance between colloidal and molecular polymerization reactions by applying strategies from molecular copolymerization to the co-assembly of gold nanorods with different dimensions into random and block copolymer structures (plasmonic copolymers). The approach was extended to the co-assembly of random copolymers of gold and palladium nanorods. We showed that the formation of random copolymers is achieved regardless of the composition, size, or concentration if both co-monomers are present at the beginning of the copolymerization. Block copolymers were prepared by combining one pre-polymer with the second monomer, or two pre-polymers. A kinetic model validated and further expanded the kinetic theories developed for molecular copolymerization reactions. Chapters 5 and 6 explore a bottom-up method to produce composite materials from spherical nanoparticles with different core-composition, surface-characteristics, and concentrations and cellulose nanocrystals

  17. Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Furst, Eric; Dunn, Elissa; Park, Jin-Gyu; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil; Merrill, Jason; Dufresne, Eric; Reichert, Matthew D.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Molecke, Ryan A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Grillet, Anne Mary; Gorby, Allen D.; Singh, John; Lele, Pushkar; Mittal, Manish

    2009-09-01

    Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal structures or using aspherical building blocks.

  18. Self-Assembled DNA Templated Nano-wires and Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez

    2000-03-01

    The realization that conventional microelectronics is approaching its miniaturization limits has motivated the search for an alternative route based on self-assembled nanometer-scale electronics. We have recently proposed a new approach based on the hybridization of biological and electronic materials (Braun E., Eichen Y., Sivan U. and Ben-Yoseph G., Nature 391, 775 (1998)). The concept relies on a two-step self-assembly process. The inherent molecular recognition capabilities of DNA molecules are first utilized to construct a network that serves as a template for the subsequent assembly of electronic materials into a circuit. The utilization of DNA and its associated enzymatic machinery enables: (a) self-assembly of complex substrates, (b) specific molecular addresses for the localization of electronic materials (e.g., gold colloids) by standard molecular biology techniques, (c) interdevice wiring and (d) bridging the microscopic structures to the macroscopic world. The self-assembly of nanometer scale electronics relies on two complementary developments. First, the ability to convert DNA molecules into thin conductive wires and second, the self-assembly of complex extended DNA templates. Our progress in these two directions will be presented. Regarding the first issue, a physical process resulting in condensation of gold colloids onto DNA molecules enables the assembly of thin gold wires (around 100-200 A wide) having, in principle, unlimited extensions. The second issue is developed in the context of recombinant DNA which allows the self-assembly of precise molecular junctions and networks. Specifically, we use RecA protein, which is the main protein responsible for genetic recombination in E. Coli bacteria, to construct DNA junctions at pre-designed addresses (sequences) on the molecules. The integration of these processes allows advancing nanometer-scale electronics. A realistic fabrication scheme for a room-temperature single-electron transistor

  19. Controlling the nano-bio interface to build collagen-silica self-assembled networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimé, Carole; Mosser, Gervaise; Pembouong, Gaëlle; Bouteiller, Laurent; Coradin, Thibaud

    2012-10-01

    Bio-hybrid networks are designed based on the self-assembly of surface-engineered collagen-silica nanoparticles. Collagen triple helices can be confined on the surface of sulfonate-modified silica particles in a controlled manner. This gives rise to hybrid building blocks with well-defined diameters and surface potentials. Taking advantage of the self-assembling properties of collagen, collagen-silica networks are further built-up in solution. The structural and specific recognition properties of the collagen fibrils are well-preserved within the hybrid assembly. A combination of calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, zetametry and microscopy studies indicates that network formation occurs via a surface-mediated mechanism where pre-organization of the protein chains on the particle surface favors the fibrillogenesis process. These results enlighten the importance of the nano-bio interface on the formation and properties of self-assembled bionanocomposites.Bio-hybrid networks are designed based on the self-assembly of surface-engineered collagen-silica nanoparticles. Collagen triple helices can be confined on the surface of sulfonate-modified silica particles in a controlled manner. This gives rise to hybrid building blocks with well-defined diameters and surface potentials. Taking advantage of the self-assembling properties of collagen, collagen-silica networks are further built-up in solution. The structural and specific recognition properties of the collagen fibrils are well-preserved within the hybrid assembly. A combination of calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, zetametry and microscopy studies indicates that network formation occurs via a surface-mediated mechanism where pre-organization of the protein chains on the particle surface favors the fibrillogenesis process. These results enlighten the importance of the nano-bio interface on the formation and properties of self-assembled bionanocomposites. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XPS

  20. Nano-Self-Assemblies Based on Synthetic Analogues of Mycobacterial Monomycoloyl Glycerol and DDA: Supramolecular Structure and Adjuvant Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Korsholm, Karen S; Roces, Carla B; Nielsen, Maja H; Christensen, Dennis; Franzyk, Henrik; Yaghmur, Anan; Foged, Camilla

    2016-08-01

    The mycobacterial cell-wall lipid monomycoloyl glycerol (MMG) is a potent immunostimulator, and cationic liposomes composed of a shorter synthetic analogue (MMG-1) and dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide represent a promising adjuvant that induces strong antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 responses. In the present study, we investigated the supramolecular structure and in vivo adjuvant activity of dispersions based on binary mixtures of DDA and an array of synthetic MMG-1 analogues (MMG-2/3/5/6) displaying longer (MMG-2) or shorter (MMG-3) alkyl chain lengths, or variations in stereochemistry of the polar headgroup (MMG-5) or of the hydrophobic moiety (MMG-6). Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering experiments and cryo transmission electron microscopy revealed that DDA:MMG-1/2/5/6 dispersions consisted of unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles (ULVs/MLVs), whereas a coexistence of both ULVs and hexosomes was observed for DDA:MMG-3, depending on the DDA:MMG molar ratio. The studies also showed that ULVs were formed, regardless of the structural characteristics of the neat MMG analogues in excess buffer [lamellar (MMG-1/2/5) or inverse hexagonal (MMG-3/6) phases]. Immunization of mice with a chlamydia antigen surface-adsorbed to DDA:MMG-1/3/6 dispersions revealed that all tested adjuvants were immunoactive and induced strong Th1 and Th17 responses with a potential for a central effector memory profile. The MMG-1 and MMG-6 analogues were equally immunoactive in vivo upon incorporation into DDA liposomes, despite the reported highly different immunostimulatory properties of the neat analogues in vitro, which were attributed to the different nanostructural characteristics. This clearly demonstrates that optimal formulation and delivery of MMG analogues to the immune system is of major importance and challenges the use of in vitro screening assays with nondispersed compounds to identify potential new vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27377146

  1. Magnetic Response of Hydrothermally Prepared Self-Assembled Co3O4 Nano-platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, M. A.; Nam, S. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Ahmad, I.; Cho, B. K.; Kim, W. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present communication, we report a strong ferrimagnetic behavior of self-assembled Co3O4 nano-platelets, which most likely originates from the intrinsic spin structure of the unique Co3O4 structure. The microsphere-like structures are composed of nano-platelets that are entangled together to form the organized network. These anomalous ferrimagnetic properties can be rationalized by supposing that one of the Co3+ and one of the Co2+ ions are switched between the octahedral and tetrahedral sites. The powder sample was also characterized by x-ray diffraction and superconducting quantum interface device magnetometry.

  2. Unique nano-domain structures in self-assembled BiFeO₃ and Pb(Zr,Ti)O₃ ferroelectric nanocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengyuan; Miao, Qing; Tian, Guo; Lu, Zengxing; Zhao, Lina; Fan, Hua; Song, Xiao; Li, Zhongwen; Zeng, M; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Junming

    2016-01-01

    In this work, self-assembled ferroelectric BiFeO3 (BFO) and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) nanocapacitors were fabricated by a one-step pulsed-laser deposition process. Each individual nanocapacitor consists of a SrRuO3 or LaSrMnO3 bottom electrode layer, an epitaxial ferroelectric middle layer and a self-assembled nanoisland of conductive Bi2O3 or PbO2 as the top nanoelectrode. The nanoelectrodes have a lateral size of 10-100 nm depending on various deposition equivalent thickness. The as-fabricated nanocapacitors exhibit unique so-called anti-domain structures, with opposite polarization orientation to that of the naked ferroelectric films, which can be understood by the different interface built-in-voltages between their neighboring layers. They also show apparent reduced coercive fields and enhanced piezoelectricity compared to the naked films, as revealed by the switching spectroscopy piezoresponse force microscopy (SSPFM) and band-excitation mapping. Besides that, individual addressable polarization writing and erasing properties were also observed in these nanocapacitors and the written domain can maintain stability up to 12 h, which is promising for data storage devices. PMID:26594911

  3. Unique nano-domain structures in self-assembled BiFeO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ferroelectric nanocapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengyuan; Miao, Qing; Tian, Guo; Lu, Zengxing; Zhao, Lina; Fan, Hua; Song, Xiao; Li, zhongwen; Zeng, M.; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Junming

    2016-01-01

    In this work, self-assembled ferroelectric BiFeO3 (BFO) and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) nanocapacitors were fabricated by a one-step pulsed-laser deposition process. Each individual nanocapacitor consists of a SrRuO3 or LaSrMnO3 bottom electrode layer, an epitaxial ferroelectric middle layer and a self-assembled nanoisland of conductive Bi2O3 or PbO2 as the top nanoelectrode. The nanoelectrodes have a lateral size of 10-100 nm depending on various deposition equivalent thickness. The as-fabricated nanocapacitors exhibit unique so-called anti-domain structures, with opposite polarization orientation to that of the naked ferroelectric films, which can be understood by the different interface built-in-voltages between their neighboring layers. They also show apparent reduced coercive fields and enhanced piezoelectricity compared to the naked films, as revealed by the switching spectroscopy piezoresponse force microscopy (SSPFM) and band-excitation mapping. Besides that, individual addressable polarization writing and erasing properties were also observed in these nanocapacitors and the written domain can maintain stability up to 12 h, which is promising for data storage devices.

  4. Colloidosome like structures: self-assembly of silica microrods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Datskos, P.; Polizos, G.; Bhandari, M.; Cullen, D. A.; Sharma, J.

    2016-03-07

    Self-assembly of one-dimensional structures is attracting a great deal of interest because assembled structures can provide better properties compared to individual building blocks. We demonstrate silica microrod self-assembly by exploiting Pickering emulsion based strategy. Micron-sized silica rods were synthesized employing previously reported methods based on polyvinylpyrrolidone/ pentanol emulsion droplets. Moreover, rods self-assembled to make structures in the range of z10 40 mm. Smooth rods assembled better than segmented rods. Finally, the assembled structures were bonded by weak van der Waals forces.

  5. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    dry plasma etch. The wet chemical etches the silicon away, exposing the TiSi2 rods, whereas plasma etching preferentially etches the Si-TiSi2 interface to form a crater. The porous architectures are applicable to fabricating microdevices or creating templates for part fabrication. The porous rod structure can serve as a platform for fabricating microplasma devices for propulsion or microheat exchangers and for fabricating microfilters for miniatured chemical reactors. Although more work is required, self-assembly from DSE can have a role in microdevice fabrication.

  6. Strain mediated self-assembly of ceramic nano islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Michael

    This dissertation presents the first observations of self-assembled arrays of epitaxial nano islands in ceramic systems, based on RF sputtering and thermal processing of Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films on an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal substrate. In contrast to the conventional semiconductor nano island self-assembly systems, the island arrays in the GDC-YSZ system provide materials with categorically different physical properties and functionalities, and they exhibit a stronger ordering at a larger characteristic length scale. The initial focus of this study was on the processing and characterization of thin GDC layers on YSZ, which are used in SOFCs as barriers to prevent the reaction of some cathode materials with the YSZ electrolyte. Chapter 3 of this document describes studies on relatively thin (<200 nm) GDC deposits which remained adherent to their substrates during post-deposition processing. The GDC films were amorphous or ultra-fine grained as deposited, with a mixed GDC-YSZ layer at the interface. After annealing at 1150°C, the GDC films were epitaxially oriented on the YSZ substrates, with isolated porosity in their interior. Some of the thick RF-sputtered GDC layers (>300 nm) were found to fail by spalling from the YSZ substrate, leaving behind patches of unspalled film and exposing a sputter-mixed GDC-YSZ surface. Upon annealing, the modified surface spontaneously broke up into two-dimensional arrays of epitaxial islands with sub-micron dimensions, exhibiting order in spacing and alignment. In addition to the classical local effects that drive dewetting processes, the self-assembly of the epitaxial GDC-bearing islands is driven by elastic interactions between them, and these interactions are mediated by the elastically anisotropic underlying YSZ substrate. The stresses in the initial mixed surface layers are modified by two factors: The thermal-expansion mismatch leads to stresses, depending on temperature and heating rates

  7. Silicon based near infrared photodetector using self-assembled organic crystalline nano-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiki, Yoshiharu; Kan, Tetsuo; Yahiro, Masayuki; Hamada, Akiko; Adachi, Junji; Adachi, Chihaya; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-04-01

    We propose a silicon (Si) based near-infrared photodetector using self-assembled organic crystalline nano-pillars, which were formed on an n-type Si substrate and were covered with an Au thin-film. These structures act as antennas for near-infrared light, resulting in an enhancement of the light absorption on the Au film. Because the Schottky junction is formed between the Au/n-type Si, the electron excited by the absorbed light can be detected as photocurrent. The optical measurement revealed that the nano-pillar structures enhanced the responsivity for the near-infrared light by 89 (14.5 mA/W) and 16 (0.433 mA/W) times compared with those of the photodetector without nano-pillars at the wavelengths of 1.2 and 1.3 μm, respectively. Moreover, no polarization dependency of the responsivity was observed, and the acceptable incident angle ranged from 0° to 30°. These broad responses were likely to be due to the organic nano-pillar structures' having variation in their orientation, which is advantageous for near-infrared detector uses.

  8. Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Alexander A.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    Nano-science and nano-technology are rapidly developing scientific and technological areas that deal with physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on nano-meter scale -- one millionth of a millimeter. Self-organization and pattern formation play crucial role on nano-scales and promise new, effective routes to control various nano-scales processes. This book contains lecture notes written by the lecturers of the NATO Advanced Study Institute "Self-Assembly, Pattern Formation and Growth Phenomena in Nano-Systems" that took place in St Etienne de Tinee, France, in the fall 2004.

  9. Controlled self-assembly of biomolecular rods on structured substrates.

    PubMed

    Moghimian, Pouya; Harnau, Ludger; Srot, Vesna; de la Peña, Francisco; Farahmand Bafi, Nima; Facey, Sandra J; van Aken, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    We report on the evaporative self-assembly and orientational ordering of semi-flexible spherocylindrical M13 phages on asymmetric stranded webs of thin amorphous carbon films. Although the phages were dispersed with a low concentration in the isotropic phase, the substrate edges induced nematic ordering and bending of the phages. As revealed by transmission electron microscopy, phages were aligned parallel to the curved substrate edges. This two-dimensional self-assembly on structured substrates opens a new route to the design of structures of orientationally ordered semi-flexible biomacromolecules. PMID:26917247

  10. Tube-graft-Sheet Nano-Objects Created by A Stepwise Self-Assembly of Polymer-Polyoxometalate Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Li, Xue-Ying; Wu, Han; Ren, Li-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Yao, Hai-Xia; Hu, Min-Biao; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-19

    In this work, we report the preparation of complex nano-objects by means of a stepwise self-assembly of two polymer-polyoxometalate hybrids (PPHs) in solution. The PPHs are designed and synthesized by tethering two linear poly(ε-caprolactone)s (PCL) of different molecular weights (MW) on a complex of a Wells-Dawson-type polyoxometalate (POM) cluster and its countraions. The higher MW PCL-POM self-assembled into nanosheets, while the lower MW PCL-POM assembled into nanotubes just by altering the ratio of water in the DMF-water mixed solvent system. The two nano-objects have a similar membrane structure in which a PCL layer is sandwiched by the two POM-based complex layers. The PCL layer in the nanosheets is semicrystalline, while the PCL layer in the nanotubes is amorphous. We further exploited this MW-dependence to self-assemble the nanotubes on the nanosheet edges to create complex tube-graft-sheet nano-objects. We found that the nanotubes nucleate on the four {110} faces of the PCL crystal and then further grow along the crystallographic b-axis of the PCL crystal. Our findings offer hope for the further development of nano-objects with increasing complexity. PMID:26710830

  11. Self-assembled growth of multi-layer graphene on planar and nano-structured substrates and its field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Yu, Bin; Li, Guo-Zheng; Hou, Xing-Gang; Zhao, Meng-Li; Li, De-Jun; Zheng, Rui-Ting; Cheng, Guo-An

    2013-11-01

    Vertical multi-layer graphenes (MLGs) have been synthesized without a catalyst on planar and nano-structured substrates by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The growth of MLGs on non-carbon substrates is quite different from that on carbon-based substrates. It starts with a pre-deposition of a carbon buffer layer to achieve a homo-epitaxial growth. The nucleation and growth of MLGs was found to be strongly influenced by the surface geometry and topography of substrates. Planar substrates suitable for atom diffusion are favorable for growing large-scale MLGs, and defect-rich substrates are beneficial for quick MLG nucleation and thus the growth of densely distributed MLGs. The field emission properties of MLGs grown on planar and nano-structured substrates were studied and are found to be strongly dependent on the nature of substrates. Substrates having good conductivity and large aspect ratios such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have good field emission properties. The best field emission properties of MLG/CNT composites with optimal shapes were observed with a low turn-on electric field of 0.93 V μm-1, a threshold field of 1.56 V μm-1, a maximum emission current density of 60.72 mA cm-2, and excellent stability.Vertical multi-layer graphenes (MLGs) have been synthesized without a catalyst on planar and nano-structured substrates by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The growth of MLGs on non-carbon substrates is quite different from that on carbon-based substrates. It starts with a pre-deposition of a carbon buffer layer to achieve a homo-epitaxial growth. The nucleation and growth of MLGs was found to be strongly influenced by the surface geometry and topography of substrates. Planar substrates suitable for atom diffusion are favorable for growing large-scale MLGs, and defect-rich substrates are beneficial for quick MLG nucleation and thus the growth of densely distributed MLGs. The field emission properties of MLGs

  12. Hybrid subtractive micro-patterning of a self-assembled SiO2 nano/microsphere monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungyong; Hong, Sukjoon; Kang, Hyun Wook; Wanit, Manorokul; Kang, Bongchul; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-assembly and direct micro-patterning of functional materials have drawn intense interest as an alternative to the conventional photolithography based microelectronics fabrication process. In this paper, we introduce a facile subtractive micro contact printing method to create a patterned colloidal nano/micro sphere monolayer on a wafer scale by combining an additive ‘bottom-up’ self-assembly and subtractive ‘top-down’ printing process. A vacuum-assisted contact printing method enabled precise and uniform pressure control to directly fabricate a large-area micro-patterned hexagonally close packed structure of nano/micro spheres on the target substrate very fast, at low cost, under ambient conditions. In addition, analysis on the hybrid printing pressure and the patterning time has been conducted.

  13. Switchable self-assembly of Prussian blue analogs nano-tiles triggered by salt stimulus.

    PubMed

    Dedovets, D; Bauduin, P; Causse, J; Girard, L; Diat, O

    2016-01-28

    Prussian blue analogs (PBAs) are materials well known for their bulk physical and (electro)-chemical properties, with an outstanding selectivity for caesium in ion exchange processes. Crystalline nano-tiles, made of copper based PBA, are produced and dispersed in water by tuning their electrostatic interactions. The shape and size of the nano-crystals are determined by combining scattering, microscopic and spectral techniques. We show here that Cu-PBA nano-tiles form planar superstructures by an edge to edge self-assembly process controlled by specific cation effect and ionic strength. Sedimentation and (re-)dispersion of the nano-tiles are found to be fully reversible. This switchable anisotropic self-assembly triggered by salt stimulus makes PBA nanocrystals potentially interesting for applications. PMID:26743449

  14. Toughening of epoxies based on self-assembly of nano-sized amphiphilic block copolymer micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia

    As a part of a larger effort towards the fundamental understanding of mechanical behaviors of polymers toughened by nanoparticles, this dissertation focuses on the structure-property relationship of epoxies modified with nano-sized poly(ethylene-alt-propylene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEP-PEO) block copolymer (BCP) micelle particles. The amphiphilic BCP toughener was incorporated into a liquid epoxy resin and self-assembled into well-dispersed 15 nm spherical micelle particles. The nano-sized BCP, at 5 wt% loading, can significantly improve the fracture toughness of epoxy (ca. 180% improvement) without reducing modulus at room temperature and exhibits only a slight drop (ca. 5°C) in glass transition temperature (Tg). The toughening mechanisms were found to be BCP micelle nanoparticle cavitation, followed by matrix shear banding, which mainly accounted for the observed remarkable toughening effect. The unexpected "nano-cavitation" phenomenon cannot be predicted by existing physical models. The plausible causes for the observed nano-scale cavitation and other mechanical behaviors may include the unique structural characteristics of BCP micelles and the influence from the surrounding epoxy network, which is significantly modified by the epoxy-miscible PEO block. Other mechanisms, such as crack tip blunting, may also play a role in the toughening. Structure-property relationships of this nano-domain modified polymer are discussed. In addition, other important factors, such as strain rate dependence and matrix crosslink density effect on toughening, have been investigated. This BCP toughening approach and conventional rubber toughening techniques are compared. Insights on the decoupling of modulus, toughness, and Tg for designing high performance thermosetting materials with desirable physical and mechanical properties are discussed.

  15. Nano-droplet systems by surfactant self-assembly and applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Vila, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Liquid systems containing droplets with size in the nanoscale range are attractive from both scientific and technological points of view as they have many current and potential applications in several industries and products. The formation and stabilization of nano-droplet systems are mostly based on the self-assembly of surfactant (amphiphilic) molecules at interfaces, driven by the solvophobic effect. Surfactants are involved in both top-bottom (high energy) and bottom- up (low energy) methods. Several devices have also been developed to aid in liquid fragmentation down to the nanometer scale. Nano-droplet systems can be both thermodynamically stable (microemulsions) or metastable (nanoemulsions), and appropriate formulation is a key for optimum product design in terms of droplet size, maximum solubilization, colloidal stability, and optical and rheological properties, among others. Such characteristics are determined by molecular packing, interfacial curvature, droplet-droplet interactions, film elasticity and nature of the dispersed and continuous phase. These properties can be engineered by proper understanding of the molecular structure and phase behavior of the multicomponent systems involved and by a range of experimental characterization techniques. Nano-droplet systems can help to solve specific issues in pharmaceutical products such as processing, limitations in drug solubility or stability, control on drug release, drug targeting and absorption; there are many examples to prove that. However, several practical aspects should be considered for preclinical and clinical tests and product development. PMID:24444153

  16. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  17. GeSi strained nanostructure self-assembly for nano- and opto-electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Means, Joel L.; Floro, Jerrold Anthony

    2001-07-01

    Strain-induced self-assembly during semiconductor heteroepitaxy offers a promising approach to produce quantum nanostructures for nanologic and optoelectronics applications. Our current research direction aims to move beyond self-assembly of the basic quantum dot towards the fabrication of more complex, potentially functional structures such as quantum dot molecules and quantum wires. This report summarizes the steps taken to improve the growth quality of our GeSi molecular beam epitaxy process, and then highlights the outcomes of this effort.

  18. Solvent-induced structural transition of self-assembled dipeptide: from organogels to microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengli; Yan, Xuehai; Su, Ying; Yang, Yang; Li, Junbai

    2010-03-01

    Organogels that are self-assembled from simple peptide molecules are an interesting class of nano- and mesoscale soft matter with simplicity and functionality. Investigating the precise roles of the organic solvents and their effects on stabilization of the formed organogel is an important topic for the development of low-molecular-weight gelators. We report the structural transition of an organogel self-assembled from a single dipeptide building block, diphenylalanine (L-Phe-L-Phe, FF), in toluene into a flower-like microcrystal merely by introducing ethanol as a co-solvent; this provides deeper insights into the phase transition between mesostable gels and thermodynamically stable microcrystals. Multiple characterization techniques were used to reveal the transitions. The results indicate that there are different molecular-packing modes formed in the gels and in the microcrystals. Further studies show that the co-solvent, ethanol, which has a higher polarity than toluene, might be involved in the formation of hydrogen bonds during molecular self-assembly of the dipeptide in mixed solvents, thus leading to the transition of organogels into microcrystals. The structural transformation modulated by the co-solvent might have a potential implication in controllable molecular self-assembly. PMID:20119986

  19. Prospects for using self-assembled nucleic acid structures.

    PubMed

    Rudchenko, M N; Zamyatnin, A A

    2015-04-01

    According to the central dogma in molecular biology, nucleic acids are assigned with key functions on storing and executing genetic information in any living cell. However, features of nucleic acids are not limited only with properties providing template-dependent biosynthetic processes. Studies of DNA and RNA unveiled unique features of these polymers able to make various self-assembled three-dimensional structures that, among other things, use the complementarity principle. Here, we review various self-assembled nucleic acid structures as well as application of DNA and RNA to develop nanomaterials, molecular automata, and nanodevices. It can be expected that in the near future results of these developments will allow designing novel next-generation diagnostic systems and medicinal drugs. PMID:25869355

  20. Model for dynamic self-assembled magnetic surface structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, M.; Glatz, A.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-07

    We propose a first-principles model for the dynamic self-assembly of magnetic structures at a water-air interface reported in earlier experiments. The model is based on the Navier-Stokes equation for liquids in shallow water approximation coupled to Newton equations for interacting magnetic particles suspended at a water-air interface. The model reproduces most of the observed phenomenology, including spontaneous formation of magnetic snakelike structures, generation of large-scale vortex flows, complex ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic ordering of the snake, and self-propulsion of bead-snake hybrids.

  1. Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers in Thin Films on Polymer Nano-Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Eun; Kang, Ho-Jong; Lee, Dong Hyun; Nano Functional Materials Lab. Team

    In this study, we report directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers in thin films on nano-stripes of polymers. Unique nano-stripes of poly(tetrafluoro ethylene) (PTFE) having ~20 nm of amplitude and ~200 nm of pitch were simply generated by physically rubbing a PTFE bar on various substrates like Si wafers, glass, and polyimide due to its low friction coefficient and high wear rate. The resulting nano-stripes were extremely oriented along the rubbing direction. Then, various asymmetric polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) copolymers (PS- b-P2VP) were directly self-assembled on the nano-stripes of PTFE by solvent-annealing in vapor of tetrahydrofuran (THF). As a result, PS- b-P2VP exhibited extremely ordered P2VP cylinders oriented normal to the surface in large area on the underlying nano-stripes of PTFE. In addition, as utilizing the BCPs as templates, hexagonal arrays of metal nanoparticles were generated in large area for further application. BCP thin films and arrays of metal nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  2. Simultaneous nano- and micro-scale control of nanofibrous microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Marson, Ryan L.; Ge, Zhishen; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the multi-scale self-assembly of star-shaped polymers into non-hollow, hollow, and spongy nanofibrous microspheres is reported. Star-shaped poly(L-lactic acid) polymers with varying arm-numbers and arm-lengths are synthesized, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, emulsified in glycerol, and thermally-induced to phase separate, resulting in microspheres that are either smooth or fibrous on the nano-scale, and either non-hollow, hollow, or spongy on the micro-scale. Molecular architecture and the hydroxyl density are shown to control assembly and morphology at both nano- and micro-scales. Nanofibers form only when the arm length is sufficiently long, while an increase in hydroxyl density causes the microspheres to change from non-hollow to hollow to spongy. We demonstrate via both experiments of capping or doubling the hydroxyl end groups and dissipative particle dynamics simulations that the affinity of hydroxyl to glycerol is critical to stabilizing the micro-scale structure. A “phase diagram” was constructed for the six types of microspheres in relation to the molecular structures of the star-shaped polymers. The proposed mechanism explains how star-shaped polymers self-assemble into various microspheres, and guides us to simultaneously control both nano- and micro-features of the microspheres. PMID:26009995

  3. STEM characterization on silica nanowires with new mesopore structures by space-confined self-assembly within nano-scale channels

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Peng; Hu, Michael Z.; Shi, Donglu; Blom, Douglas Allen

    2008-01-01

    Critical channel diameters were found (below which space confinement takes effect, leading to more uniform and ordered mesopore structures) in the study of evaporation-induced coassembly of triblock-copolymer (P123) and silica molecular precursors (TEOS, tetraethyl orthosilicate) by employing channels in anodized aluminum oxide (AAO, 13 200 nm channel diameter) and in track-etched polycarbonate (EPC, 10 80 nm channel diameter) and for the first time we have observed a new mesopore structure (i.e., packed hollow spheres) in silica nanowires formed in AAO channels with diameters from 30 to 80 nm.

  4. Self-Assembled Nano-energetic Gas Generators based on Bi2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobosyan, Mkhitar; Trevino, Tyler; Martirosyan, Karen

    2012-10-01

    Nanoenergetic Gas-Generators are formulations that rapidly release a large amount of gaseous products and generate a fast moving thermal wave. They are mainly based on thermite systems, which are pyrotechnic mixtures of metal powders (fuel- Al, Mg, etc.) and metal oxides (oxidizer, Bi2O3, Fe2O3, WO3, MoO3 etc.) that can generate an exothermic oxidation-reduction reaction referred to as a thermite reaction. A thermite reaction releases a large amount of energy and can generate rapidly extremely high temperatures. The intimate contact between the fuel and oxidizer can be enhanced by use of nano instead of micro particles. The contact area between oxidizer and metal particles depends from method of mixture preparation. In this work we utilize the self-assembly processes, which use the electrostatic forces to produce ordered and self-organized binary systems. In this process the intimate contact significantly enhances and gives the ability to build an energetic material in molecular level, which is crucial for thepressure discharge efficiency of nano-thermites. The DTA-TGA, Zeta-size analysis and FTIR technique were performed to characterize the Bi2O3 particles. The self-assembly of Aluminum and Bi2O3 was conducted in sonic bath with appropriate solvents and linkers. The resultant thermite pressure discharge values were tested in modified Parr reactor. In general, the self-assembled thermites give much higher-pressure discharge values than the thermites prepared with conventional roll-mixing technique.

  5. Real-time monitoring of phosphorylation kinetics with self-assembled nano-oscillators.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yimin; Chen, Shan; Wang, Wei; Shan, Xiaonan; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-02-16

    Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that is involved in many basic cellular processes and diseases, but is difficult to detect in real time with existing technologies. A label-free detection of phosphorylation is reported in real time with self-assembled nano-oscillators. Each nano-oscillator consists of a gold nanoparticle tethered to a gold surface with a molecular linker. When the nanoparticle is charged, the nano-oscillator can be driven into oscillation with an electric field and detected with a plasmonic imaging approach. The nano-oscillators measure charge change associated with phosphorylation of peptides attached onto a single nanoparticle, allowing us to study the dynamic process of phosphorylation in real time without antibodies down to a few molecules, from which Michaelis and catalytic rate constants are determined. PMID:25583693

  6. Designing self-assembling 3D structures of microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Like; Shum, Henry; Shklyaev, Oleg; Yashin, Victor; Balazs, Anna

    Self-assembly of complex, three-dimensional structures is commonly achieved by biological cells but difficult to realize in synthetic systems with micron-scale or larger components. Some previous modeling studies have considered only the planar self-assembly of microcapsules on a substrate. In this work, nanoparticles released from the capsules bind to the substrate and to the shells of nearby capsules. The non-uniform nanoparticle deposition on a capsule's surface leads to adhesion gradients, which drive the capsules to effectively ``climb'' on top of one another and self-organize in the vertical direction. We determine conditions that favor this structural organization. In particular, we study how the vertical structuring depends on the background fluid flow, the topography of the microcapsules and the underlying surface, the capsule-capsule interaction and that between the capsules and the substrate. The findings can provide design rules for the autonomous creation of novel nanocomposites, where the layers are formed from nanoparticle-containing and nanoparticle-decorated microcapsules.

  7. Structure of self - assembled two-dimensional spherical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bausch, Andreas R.

    2004-03-01

    Dense spherical particles on a flat surface usually pack into a simple triangular lattice, similar to billiard balls at the start of a game. The minimum energy configuration for interacting particles on the curved surface of a sphere, however, presents special difficulties, as recognized already by J.J. Thomson. We describe experimental investigations of the structure of two-dimensional spherical crystals. The crystals, formed by beads self-assembled on water droplets in oil, serve as model systems for exploring very general theories about the minimum energy configurations of particles with arbitrary repulsive interactions on curved surfaces. Above a critical system size we find that crystals develop distinctive high-angle grain boundaries or "scars" not found in planar crystals. The number of excess defects in a scar is shown to grow linearly with the dimensionless system size. First experiments where the melting of the crystal structure was observable will be discussed. Dynamic triangulation methods allow the analysis of the dynamics of the defects. Possible modifications towards mechanically stabilized self assembly structures result in so called Colloidosomes, which are promising for many different encapsulation purposes.

  8. Self-Assembly of Soft Colloids with Multi-scale Phase-Separated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Chris; Prud'Homme, Robert K.; Priestley, Rodney D.

    The ability of polymers and block co-polymers to self-assemble into highly-ordered structures in bulk two-dimensional films under specific environmental conditions has allowed in recent years for the fabrication of nano-porous membranes, nano-structured surfaces, and sacrificial templates for the preparation of inorganic nanomaterials with well-defined geometries. Extending these fairly specific fabrication techniques to the creation of similar three-dimensional colloidal structures in bulk solutions, however, has proven quite challenging despite the significant need for heterogeneously-structured colloidal materials in medicine and industry. Here we present a strategy for controlling the structural heterogeneity of soft polymer particles along multiple length scales by inducing the rapid phase-separation of polymer mixtures through a continuous nanoprecipitation process. DOE SCGF Fellowship Program.

  9. Self-Assembly of Soft Colloids with Multi-scale Phase-Separated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Chris; Prud'Homme, Robert K.; Priestley, Rodney D.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of polymers and block co-polymers to self-assemble into highly-ordered structures in bulk two-dimensional films under specific environmental conditions has allowed in recent years for the fabrication of nano-porous membranes, nano-structured surfaces, and sacrificial templates for the preparation of inorganic nanomaterials with well-defined geometries. Extending these fairly specific fabrication techniques to the creation of similar three-dimensional colloidal structures in bulk solutions, however, has proven quite challenging despite the significant need for heterogeneously-structured colloidal materials in medicine and industry. Here we present a strategy for controlling the structural heterogeneity of soft polymer particles along multiple length scales by inducing the rapid phase-separation of polymer mixtures through a continuous nanoprecipitation process. Supported by the DOE SCGF Fellowship administered under ORAU.

  10. Structural Diversity of Self-Assembled Iridescent Arthropod Biophotonic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranathan, Vinod Kumar; Prum, Richard O.

    2015-03-01

    Many organisms, especially arthropods, produce vivid interference colors using diverse mesoscopic (100-350 nm) integumentary biophotonic nanostructures that are increasingly being investigated for technological applications. Despite a century of interest, we lack precise structural knowledge of many biophotonic nanostructures and mechanisms controlling their development, when such knowledge can open novel biomimetic routes to facilely self-assemble tunable, multi-functional materials. Here, we use synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to characterize the photonic nanostructure of 140 iridescent integumentary scales and setae from 127 species of terrestrial arthropods in 85 genera from 5 orders. We report a rich nanostructural diversity, including triply-periodic bicontinuous networks, close-packed spheres, inverse columnar, perforated lamellar, and disordered sponge-like morphologies, commonly observed as stable phases of amphiphilic surfactants, block copolymer, and lyotropic lipid-water systems. Diverse arthropod lineages appear to have independently evolved to utilize the self-assembly of infolding bilayer membranes to develop biophotonic nanostructures that span the phase-space of amphiphilic morphologies, but at optical length scales.

  11. Self-assembly protocol design for periodic multicomponent structures.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-12-14

    Assembling molecular superstructures with many distinct components will allow unprecedented control over morphology at the nanoscale. Recently, this approach has been used to assemble periodic structures with precisely defined features, such as repeating arrays of pores and channels, using a large number of building blocks. Here we propose a predictive tool that allows us to optimize the nucleation and growth of unbounded, ordered structures. In what follows, we call these structures 'crystals', even though they may only be periodic in one or two dimensions. We find that the nucleation barriers and growth pathways for crystals consisting of many components exhibit generic features that are very different from those of simple crystals. To illustrate the very non-classical nature of the nucleation and growth of such structures, we study the formation of one and two-dimensional crystals with multicomponent unit cells. We find that, whilst the boundaries in the non-periodic dimensions significantly affect the stabilities of these crystals, the nucleation barriers are largely determined by the local connectivity of the associated bulk crystal and are independent of the number of distinct components in the unit cell. We predict that the self-assembly of crystals with complex morphologies can be made to follow specific pathways toward the target structure that successively incorporate key features of the three-dimensional target structure. In contrast with simple crystals, it is possible to tune the kinetics of nucleation and growth separately, thus minimizing defect formation. We show how control over self-assembly pathways can be used to optimize the kinetics of formation of extended structures with arbitrary nanoscale patterns. PMID:26404794

  12. Three-dimensional structures self-assembled from DNA bricks.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yonggang; Ong, Luvena L; Shih, William M; Yin, Peng

    2012-11-30

    We describe a simple and robust method to construct complex three-dimensional (3D) structures by using short synthetic DNA strands that we call "DNA bricks." In one-step annealing reactions, bricks with hundreds of distinct sequences self-assemble into prescribed 3D shapes. Each 32-nucleotide brick is a modular component; it binds to four local neighbors and can be removed or added independently. Each 8-base pair interaction between bricks defines a voxel with dimensions of 2.5 by 2.5 by 2.7 nanometers, and a master brick collection defines a "molecular canvas" with dimensions of 10 by 10 by 10 voxels. By selecting subsets of bricks from this canvas, we constructed a panel of 102 distinct shapes exhibiting sophisticated surface features, as well as intricate interior cavities and tunnels. PMID:23197527

  13. Three-Dimensional Structures Self-Assembled from DNA Bricks

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yonggang; Ong, Luvena L.; Shih, William M.; Yin, Peng

    2013-01-01

    We describe a simple and robust method to construct complex three-dimensional (3D) structures using short synthetic DNA strands that we call “DNA bricks”. In one-step annealing reactions, bricks with hundreds of distinct sequences self-assemble into prescribed 3D shapes. Each 32-nucleotide brick is a modular component; it binds to four local neighbors and can be removed or added independently. Each 8-base-pair interaction between bricks defines a voxel with dimensions 2.5 nanometers by 2.5 nanometers by 2.7 nanometers, and a master brick collection defines a “molecular canvas” with dimensions of 10 by 10 by 10 voxels. By selecting subsets of bricks from this canvas, we constructed a panel of 102 distinct shapes exhibiting sophisticated surface features as well as intricate interior cavities and tunnels. PMID:23197527

  14. Ordered patterns and structures via interfacial self-assembly: superlattices, honeycomb structures and coffee rings.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongmin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2011-11-01

    Self-assembly is now being intensively studied in chemistry, physics, biology, and materials engineering and has become an important "bottom-up" approach to create intriguing structures for different applications. Self-assembly is not only a practical approach for creating a variety of nanostructures, but also shows great superiority in building hierarchical structures with orders on different length scales. The early work in self-assembly focused on molecular self-assembly in bulk solution, including the resultant dye aggregates, liposomes, vesicles, liquid crystals, gels and so on. Interfacial self-assembly has been a great concern over the last two decades, largely because of the unique and ingenious roles of this method for constructing materials at interfaces, such as self-assembled monolayers, Langmuir-Blodgett films, and capsules. Nanocrystal superlattices, honeycomb films and coffee rings are intriguing structural materials with more complex features and can be prepared by interfacial self-assembly on different length scales. In this critical review, we outline the recent development in the preparation and application of colloidal nanocrystal superlattices, honeycomb-patterned macroporous structures by the breath figure method, and coffee-ring-like patterns (247 references). PMID:21792458

  15. Sub-15nm patterning technology using directed self-assembly on nano-imprinting guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Seiji; Kanno, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Ryousuke; Sasao, Norikatsu; Sugimura, Shinobu

    2016-04-01

    In next generation lithography to make sub-15nm pattern, Directed self-assembly (DSA) and Nano-imprint lithography (NIL) are proposed. The current DSA process is complicated and it is difficult to decrease width and line edge roughness of a guide pattern for sub-15nm patterning. In the case of NIL, it is difficult to make the master template having sub- 15nm pattern. This paper describes cost-effective lithography process for making sub-15nm pattern using DSA on a guide pattern replicated by Nano-imprinting (NIL + DSA). Simple process for making sub-15nm pattern is proposed. The quartz templates are made and line/space patterns of half pitch (hp) 12nm and hp9.5nm are obtained by NIL + DSA.

  16. Self-assembly of PEGylated gold nanoparticles with satellite structures as seeds.

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Marie; Chen, Rongjun

    2016-07-21

    We report a very simple method for the self-assembly of spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), coated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), through a slow evaporation process at room temperature. Clusters of particles forming satellite structures may act as seeds for the self-assembly in a crystallization-like process. Based on the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images obtained a mechanism for the self-assembly was suggested. PMID:27384086

  17. Molecular self-assembly routes to optically functional thin films: Electroluminescent multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Malinsky, J.E.; Chou, H.

    1998-07-01

    This contribution describes the use of layer-by-layer self-limiting siloxane chemisorption processes to self-assemble structurally regular multilayer organic LED (OLED) devices. Topics discussed include: (1) the synthesis of silyl-functionalized precursor molecules for hole transport layer (HTL), emissive layer (EML), and electron transport layer (ETL) self-assembly, (2) the use of layer-by-layer self-assembly for ITO electrode modification/passivation/hole-electron balancing in a vapor-deposited device, (3) the microstructure/chemical characterization of HTL self-assembly using a prototype triarylamine precursor, (4) fabrication and properties of a hybrid self-assembled + vapor deposited two-layer LED, and (5) fabrication and properties of a fully self-assembled two-layer OLED.

  18. From Nano to Macro through Hierarchical Self-Assembly: The DNA Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Wolfgang; Saccà, Barbara

    2016-06-16

    From atoms to molecules and bio-macromolecules, from organelles to cells, tissues, to the whole living system, nature shows us that the formation of complex systems with emergent properties originates from the hierarchical self-assembly of single components in guided bottom-up processes. By using DNA as a fundamental building block with well-known self-recognition properties, scientists have developed design rules and physical-chemical approaches for the fully programmable construction of highly organized structures with nanosized features. This review highlights the basic principles of hierarchical self-assembly in terms of type and number of distinguishable components and their interaction energies. Such general concepts are then applied to DNA-based systems. After a brief overview of the strategies used until now for the construction of individual DNA units, such as DNA tile motifs and origami structures, their self-association into assemblies of higher order is discussed. Particular emphasis is given to the forces involved in the self-assembly process, understanding and rational combination of which might help to coordinate the single elements of hierarchical structures both in space and time, thus advancing our efforts towards the creation of devices that mimic the complexity and functionality of natural systems. PMID:27186937

  19. The investigation of selective pre-pattern free self-assembled Ge nano-dot formed by excimer laser annealing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Localized Ge nano-dot formation by laser treatment was investigated and discussed in terms of strain distribution. The advantage of this technique is patterning localization of nano-dots without selective epitaxial growth, reducing costs and improving throughput. Self-assembled Ge nano-dots produced by excimer laser annealing statistically distributed dot density and size dependent on laser energy. Improvement in the crystallization quality of the dots was also studied, and a strain analysis was undertaken. PMID:22709630

  20. Sequence, structure, and function of peptide self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Ann K; Sun, Fang; White, Andrew D; Keefe, Andrew J; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2012-04-01

    Cysteine is commonly used to attach peptides onto gold surfaces. Here we show that the inclusion of an additional linker with a length of four residues (-PPPPC) and a rigid, hydrophobic nature is a better choice for forming peptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with a well-ordered structure and high surface density. We compared the structure and function of the nonfouling peptide EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am with EKEKEKE-C-Am. Circular dichroism, attenuated total internal reflection Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics results showed that EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am forms a secondary structure while EKEKEKE-C-Am has a random structure. Surface plasmon resonance sensor results showed that protein adsorption on EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am/gold is very low with small variation while protein adsorption on EKEKEKE-C-Am/gold is high with large variation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results showed that both peptides have strong gold-thiol binding with the gold surface, indicating that their difference in protein adsorption is due to their assembled structures. Further experimental and simulation studies were performed to show that -PPPPC is a better linker than -PC, -PPC, and -PPPC. Finally, we extended EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am with the cell-binding sequence RGD and demonstrated control over specific versus nonspecific cell adhesion without using poly(ethylene glycol). Adding a functional peptide to the nonfouling EK sequence avoids complex chemistries that are used for its connection to synthetic materials. PMID:22401132

  1. Self-assembled hierarchically structured organic-inorganic composite systems.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Designing bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composite materials is one of the most popular current research objectives. Due to the high complexity of biocomposite structures found in nacre and bone, for example, a one-pot scalable and versatile synthesis approach addressing structural key features of biominerals and affording bio-inspired, multifunctional organic-inorganic composites with advanced physical properties is highly challenging. This article reviews recent progress in synthesizing organic-inorganic composite materials via various self-assembly techniques and in this context highlights a recently developed bio-inspired synthesis concept for the fabrication of hierarchically structured, organic-inorganic composite materials. This one-step self-organization concept based on simultaneous liquid crystal formation of anisotropic inorganic nanoparticles and a functional liquid crystalline polymer turned out to be simple, fast, scalable and versatile, leading to various (multi-)functional composite materials, which exhibit hierarchical structuring over several length scales. Consequently, this synthesis approach is relevant for further progress and scientific breakthrough in the research field of bio-inspired and biomimetic materials. PMID:27175790

  2. Self-assembly, redox activity, and charge transport of functional surface nano-architectures by molecular design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Daniel

    Surface-assisted molecular self-assembly is a promising strategy to program the structure and chemical state of atoms and molecules in nano-architectures to achieve a specific function. The experiments described in this thesis demonstrate that the design and programming of basic organic components leads to desired characteristics by self-assembly. The fabrication of uniform single-site metal centers at surfaces, important for high selectivity in next-generation catalysts, was accomplished by coordination to redox non-innocent phenanthroline and tetrazine-based ligands. These examples were the first demonstrating tuning of the metal oxidation state in surface coordination architectures through rational ligand design. The molecular-scale coordination architectures were the first formed from chromium and vanadium, and the first from platinum in a non-porphyrin system. The first mixed valence metal-ligand surface structure was fabricated that attained the same ligand coordination number for all metal sites. A new surface reaction method was demonstrated between an inexpensive sodium chloride reagent and carboxylate ligands. High-temperature, molecular-resolution microscopy and spectroscopy of the ordered metal-organic structures demonstrated thermal stability up to 300 °C, the highest molecular-level thermal stability in organic surface nanostructures yet achieved, making such systems potential candidates for moderate-temperature catalytic reactions. Molecular self-assembly was expanded into organic semiconductor thin films. In a two-component, bi-layered system, hydrogen bonding between carboxylates and carboxylic acid-substituted thiophenes was utilized, yielding the first real-space images of phenyl-thiophene stacking. In a one-component system, multiple donor-acceptor pi-pi contacts between phenyltriazole building blocks accomplished assembly of flat-lying molecules from a surface with molecular-scale precision through more than twenty molecular layers. Sufficient

  3. Lipid self-assembled structures for reactivity control in food.

    PubMed

    Sagalowicz, L; Moccand, C; Davidek, T; Ghanbari, R; Martiel, I; Negrini, R; Mezzenga, R; Leser, M E; Blank, I; Michel, M

    2016-07-28

    Lipid self-assembled structures (SASs) have recently gained considerable interest for their potential applications, especially for sustained nutrient release and protein crystallization. An additional property, which is underexploited, is their ability to control chemical reactions in food products. Here, we concentrate on SASs formed by phospholipids (PLs) and monoglycerides (MGs), those compounds being the most natural surfactants and therefore, the best compatible with food products, in view of providing new functionalities through the formation of SASs. In this work, the phase behaviour of these amphiphiles when mixed with oil and water is described and compared. Subsequently, we address the influence of these structures to the oxidation and Maillard-type reactions. Finally, we show that SASs formed by MGs can strongly increase the yield of key aroma impact compounds generated by Maillard-type reactions when compared with the reaction performed in aqueous precursor solutions. Various SASs are compared. In particular, addition of oil to a reversed bicontinuous structure formed by MG leads to a reversed microemulsion, which, considering its low viscosity, is particularly suitable for food products and act as a very efficient reactor system. The influence of oil and precursors on phase behaviour is discussed and related to the efficiency of the Maillard reactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298441

  4. Atomic Structure of Self-Assembled Monolayer of Thiolates on a Tetragonal Au92 Nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chenjie; Liu, Chong; Chen, Yuxiang; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-07-20

    Unveiling the ligand binding mode on the crystalline surfaces is important for deciphering the long-standing structural enigma in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Here, the binding and patterning structures of thiolates (SR) on the Au(100) crystalline facet are revealed on the basis of the atomic structure of a highly regular, single crystalline Au92(SR)44 nanocrystal. The six exposed facets of this tetragonal nanocrystal give rise to six pieces of "nanoSAMs". We found that thiolates bind to the planar (100) facets of the nanocrystal via a simple bridge-like mode and are assembled into an overlayer with c(2 × 2) symmetry. The Au-S binding mode and translational symmetry in the kernel and on the surface of the Au92 nanocrystal can be generalized infinitely to construct the bulk two-dimensional SAMs and various tetragonal nanocrystals. PMID:27355843

  5. Multi-component self-assembled anti-tumor nano-vaccines based on MUC1 glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Y; Chen, P G; Liu, Y F; Zhang, B D; Wu, J J; Chen, Y X; Zhao, Y F; Li, Y M

    2016-06-18

    Novel multi-component self-assembled nano-vaccines containing both Pam3CSK4 and CpG were developed for the first time. These multi-component vaccines could effectively activate the macrophages in vitro and elicit strong antibody immune responses and anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. PMID:27216415

  6. Effect of Structural Modifications on the Self-Assembly of Oligoprolines Conjugated with Sterically Demanding Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Urszula; Zajaczkowski, Wojciech; Pisula, Wojciech; Ma, Yingjie; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Wennemers, Helma

    2016-03-01

    Conjugates between oligoprolines and sterically demanding perylene monoimides (PMIs) form hierarchical supramolecular self-assemblies. The influence of the length and stereochemistry at the attachment site between the peptide backbone and the chromophore on the self-assembly properties of the conjugates was explored. Comparison between oligoprolines bearing 4R- or 4S-configured azidoprolines (Azp) for the conjugation with the PMIs revealed that diastereoisomers with 4R configuration guide the self-assembly consistently better than conjugates with 4S configuration. Elongating the peptide chain beyond nine proline residues or introducing structural "errors", by altering the absolute configuration of one stereogenic center at the outside of the functionalizable oligoproline helix, lowered the efficacy of self-assembly significantly, both in solution phase and in the solid state. The results showed how subtle structural modifications allow for tuning the self-assembly of chromophores and provided further design principles for the development of peptide-chromophore conjugates into nanostructured materials. PMID:26891419

  7. Molecular Structure of a Helical ribbon in a Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Marini, Davide; Kamm, Roger D.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the molecular structure of nanometer scale helical ribbons observed during self-assembly of the peptide KFE8 (amino acid sequence: FKFEFKFE) (NanoLetters (2002, in press)). By analyzing the hydrogen bonding patterns between neighboring peptide backbones, we constructed a number of possible β-sheets. Using all possible combinations of these, we built helical ribbons with dimensions close to those found experimentally and performed molecular dynamics simulations to identify the most stable structure. Solvation effects were implemented by the analytic continuum electrostatics (ACE) model developed by Schaefer and Karplus (J. Phys. Chem. 100, 1578 (1996)). By applying electrostatic double layer theory, we incorporated the effect of pH by scaling the amount of charge on the sidechains. Our results suggest that the helical ribbon is comprised of a double β-sheet where the inner and the outer helices have distinct hydrogen bonding patterns. Our approach has general applicability to the study of helices formed by the self-assembly of β-sheet forming peptides with various amino acid sequences.

  8. Structural transformation of peptide amphiphile self-assembly induced by headgroup charge and size regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changrui; Bedzyk, Michael; Olvera, Monica; Kewalramani, Sumit; Palmer, Liam

    The ability to control the nano and the meso-scale architecture of molecular assemblies is one of the major challenges in nanoscience. Significantly, structural transformations of amphiphilic aggregates induced by variations in environmental conditions have attracted attention due to their biotechnological relevance. Here, we study the assembly in aqueous solution for a modular series of peptide amphiphiles with 3, 2 or 1 lysine groups conjugated to a C16 carbon tail (C16K3, C16K2 and C16K1) . This system design allow us to probe how the equilibrium structure of the self-assembly can be tuned by controlling the coupling between steric (via choice of headgroup: K3, K2, or K1) and electrostatic (via solution pH) interactions. Solution small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that depending on pH and number of lysines in the lipid headgroup, amphiphiles can assemble into a range of structures: spherical micelles, bilayer ribbons and vesicles. We also perform detailed phase space mapping of pH-and headgroup size dependency of the structures of assembly over 0.1-100 nm length scales via SAXS/WAXS. The experimental results in conjunction with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations deduce quantitative relations between pH-dependent molecular charges, steric constraints and self-assembly morphologies, which is significant for developing experimental routes to obtain assembly structures with specific nano- and meso-scale features through controlled external stimuli.

  9. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  10. Exploration of the directed self-assembly based nano-fabrication design space using computational simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, Azat; Preil, Moshe; Schmid, Gerard; Xu, Ji; Yi, He; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Zou, Yi

    2013-03-01

    Properly designed geometries of directing pre-patterns broaden the set of lattice symmetries and the local arrangements of patterns achievable by directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP), compared to the ones achievable in un-directed, bulk systems. We present the results of parametric computational simulation studies, concentrating on exploring the chemoepitaxy or graphoepitaxy directing geometries yielding the DSA structures needed for typical integrated circuits, but not achievable in bulk, undirected annealing of BCP. The examples include the parametric studies of chemoepitaxy and graphoepitaxy DSA patterns etch-transferrable, respectively, into isolated lines and contact hole arrays. The results of the DSA defect simulations are also presented and discussed.

  11. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram S.; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ~120 nm in a 60 μm length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates.Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The

  12. Electrophoretic dynamics of self-assembling branched DNA structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Daniel Milton

    This study advances our understanding of the electrophoretic dynamics of branched biopolymers and explores technologies designed to exploit their unique properties. New self-assembly techniques were developed to create branched DNA for visualization via fluorescence microscopy. Experiments in fixed gel networks reveal a distinct trapping behavior, in contrast with linear topologies. The finding that detection can be achieved by introducing a branch point contributes significantly to the field of separation science and can be exploited to develop new applications. Results obtained in polymer solutions point to identical mobilities for branched and linear topologies, despite large differences in their dynamics. This finding led to a new description of electrophoresis based on non-Newtonian viscoelastic effects in the electric double layer surrounding a charged object. This new theoretical framework presents a new outlook important not only to the electrophoretic physics of nucleic acids, but all charged objects including proteins, colloids, and nanoparticles. To study the behavior of smaller biopolymers, such as restriction fragments and recombination intermediates, a library of symmetrically branched DNA was synthesized followed by characterization in gels. The experimental results contribute a large body of information relating molecular architecture and the dynamics of rigid structures in an electric field. The findings allow us to create new separation technologies based on topology. These contributions can also be utilized in a number of different applications including the study of recombination intermediates and the separation of proteins according to structure. To demonstrate the importance of these findings, a sequence and mutation detection technique was envisioned and applied for genetic analysis. Restriction fragments from mutation "hotspots" in the p53 tumor suppressor gene, known to play a role in cancer development, were analyzed with this technique

  13. Investigating the Self-assembled Structure of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using Two Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyran, Jenee D.; Krummel, Amber T.

    Self-assembly mechanisms are required for many biological and material processes, such as chlorophyll in photosynthesis, the tobacco mosaic virus and in the formation of molecular crystals. The self-assembly process can be favorable in the case of formation of nanoparticles for electronic devices. However, self-assembly processes, such as asphaltene nanoaggregation, can be unwarranted. Studying the structure of self-assembled supramolecules is important to understand how to mimic or inhibit the formation of the nanoaggregates. In this research, we studied the monomer and self-assembled structure of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), lumogen orange and violanthrone-79, using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR). The carbonyl stretching and the ring breathing vibrational modes were used as vibrational probes. For violanthrone-79, a local mode basis and an electrostatic coupling model were applied to three nanoaggregate structures; parallel, antiparallel, and 28 degrees rotation. The experimental and simulated 2D IR spectra are best represented by majority of the antiparallel configuration with some angular distribution. For lumogen orange, vibrational cross peaks appear as the concentration is increased from a monomer to a nanoaggregate. The 2D IR cross peaks indicate vibrational coupling, which relates directly to the nanoaggregate structure. Comparison between the self-assembled structure of lumogen orange and violanthrone-79 can determine the role of side chains in the nanoaggregate structure.

  14. Aspen SP1, an exceptional thermal, protease and detergent-resistant self-assembled nano-particle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Dgany, Or; Wolf, Sharon Grayer; Levy, Ilan; Algom, Rachel; Pouny, Yehonathan; Wolf, Amnon; Marton, Ira; Altman, Arie; Shoseyov, Oded

    2006-09-01

    Stable protein 1 (SP1) is a homo-oligomeric protein isolated from aspen (Populus tremula aspen) plants which forms a ring-shape dodecameric particle with a central cavity. The oligomeric form of SP1 is an exceptionally stable structure that is resistant to proteases (e.g., trypsin, V8, and proteinase K), high temperatures, organic solvents, and high levels of ionic detergent. Analytical ultra-centrifugation, chemical cross-linking, matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and transmission electron microscopy were used to further characterize the SP1 dodecamer. Introduction of a single cysteine at the N-terminus of SP1 enabled the formation of disulfide bridges within the SP1 dodecamer, concurrent with increased melting point. A six-histidine tag was introduced at the N-terminus of SP1 to generate 6HSP1, and the DeltaNSP1 mutant was generated by a deletion of amino acids 2-6 at the N-terminus. Both 6HSP1 and DeltaNSP1 maintained their ability to assemble a stable dodecamer. Remarkably, these SP1 homo-dodecamers were able to re-assemble into stable hetero-dodecamers following co-electro-elution from SDS-PAGE. The exceptional stability of the SP1-nano ring and its ability to self-assemble hetero-complexes paves the way to further research in utilizing this unique protein in nano-biotechnology. PMID:16732592

  15. X-ray Analysis of Self-assembled Nano-Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li; Turrisi, Riccardo; Emery, Jonathan; Hersam, Mark; Marks, Tobin; Bedzyk, Michael

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) are viewed as the new generation thin-film transistors (TFT) for future low-cost, printable, flexible electronics. A class of materials called self-assembled nano-dielectrics (SAND) with phosphoric acid-based-electron (PAE) building blocks sandwiched between ultrathin layers of high- k inorganic oxide materials has been synthesized. These materials show exceptional large capacitance, insulating properties, and are also suitable for ambient atmosphere fabrication. The hybrid nature of these materials combines the distinct properties of both the organic and inorganic components and can be incorporated into the low-operating voltage semiconductor-based OTFT. Despite the great performance and flexibility of SANDs, fundamental aspects of dielectric behavior remain unexplored. Particularly, the behaviors of the Br counteranions that exist within PAE building blocks are poorly understood. Therefore, long-period X-ray Standing Wave (LP-XSW), which is a powerful technique sensitive to heavy atom distributions, was used to characterize SAND deposited on synthetic Si/Mo multilayer substrates. The elemental distributions of Br and reference elements were extracted from the analysis of XSW data. These accurate measurements are important for better understanding of counteranions distributions, charge transportation, dipole-semiconductors interactions, and future device modeling and engineering.

  16. Self-Assembling NanoLuc Luciferase Fragments as Probes for Protein Aggregation in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Nelson, Travis J; Vu, Quyen; Truong, Tiffany; Stains, Cliff I

    2016-01-15

    Given the clear role of protein aggregation in human disease, there is a critical need for assays capable of quantifying protein aggregation in living systems. We hypothesized that the inherently low background and biocompatibility of luminescence signal readouts could provide a potential solution to this problem. Herein, we describe a set of self-assembling NanoLuc luciferase (Nluc) fragments that produce a tunable luminescence readout that is dependent upon the solubility of a target protein fused to the N-terminal Nluc fragment. To demonstrate this approach, we employed this assay in bacteria to assess mutations known to disrupt amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregation as well as disease-relevant mutations associated with familial Alzheimer's diseases. The luminescence signal from these experiments correlates with the reported aggregation potential of these Aβ mutants and reinforces the increased aggregation potential of disease-relevant mutations in Aβ1-42. To further demonstrate the utility of this approach, we show that the effect of small molecule inhibitors on Aβ aggregation can be monitored using this system. In addition, we demonstrate that aggregation assays can be ported into mammalian cells. Taken together, these results indicate that this platform could be used to rapidly screen for mutations that influence protein aggregation as well as inhibitors of protein aggregation. This method offers a novel, genetically encodable luminescence readout of protein aggregation in living cells. PMID:26492083

  17. Synthesis of novel 3D SnO flower-like hierarchical architectures self-assembled by nano-leaves and its photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yongkui; Wang, Fengping Iqbal, M. Zubair; Wang, Ziya; Li, Yan; Tu, Jianhai

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Novel 3D SnO flowers self-assembled by 2D nano-leaves were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The SnO nano-leaf is of single crystalline nature. • The band gap of 2.59 eV of as-prepared products was obtained. • The as-synthesized material will be a promising photocatalytic material. - Abstract: In this report, the novel 3D SnO flower-like hierarchical architectures self-assembled by 2D SnO nano-leaves are successfully synthesized via template-free hydrothermal approach under facile conditions. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the 2D nano-leaves structure is of single crystalline nature. The band gap 2.59 eV for prepared product is obtained from UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrum. The photocatalysis of the as prepared SnO for degrading methyl orange (MO) has been studied. A good photocatalytic activity is obtained and the mechanism is discussed in detail. Results indicate that the SnO nanostructures are the potential candidates for photocatalyst applications.

  18. Biocompatible self-assembly of nano-materials for Bio-MEMS and insect reconnaissance.

    SciTech Connect

    Brozik, Susan Marie; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Sinclair, Michael B.; Manginell, Monica; Ashley, Carlee E.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Calvert, Paul Davidson; Hartenberger, Tamara N.; Flemming, Jeb Hunter; Baca, Helen Kennicott

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the development of new biocompatible self-assembly procedures enabling the immobilization of genetically engineered cells in a compact, self-sustaining, remotely addressable sensor platform. We used evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) to immobilize cells within periodic silica nanostructures, characterized by unimodal pore sizes and pore connectivity, that can be patterned using ink-jet printing or photo patterning. We constructed cell lines for the expression of fluorescent proteins and induced reporter protein expression in immobilized cells. We investigated the role of the abiotic/biotic interface during cell-mediated self-assembly of synthetic materials.

  19. Understanding self-assembled amphiphilic peptide supramolecular structures from primary structure helix propensity.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Martina K; Textor, Marcus; Reimhult, Erik

    2008-08-01

    Small amphiphilic peptides are attractive building blocks to design biocompatible supramolecular structures via self-assembly, with applications in, for example, drug delivery, tissue engineering, and nanotemplating. We address the influence of systematical changes in the amino acid sequence of such peptides on the self-assembled macromolecular structures. For cationic-head surfactant-like eight-residue peptides, the apolar tail amino acids were chosen to systematically vary the propensity to form an alpha-helical secondary structure while conserving the overall hydrophobicity of the sequence. Characterization of the supramolecular structures indicates that for short peptides a beta-sheet secondary structure correlates with ribbonlike assemblies while random-coil and alpha-helical secondary structures correlate with assembly of rods. PMID:18597507

  20. Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly of Nano-flaky Li3PS4 for Ultra thin Solid Electrolyte Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Hood, Zachary; Hood, Zachary D; Xia, Younan

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage system is a critical technology to achieve efficient delivery and a steady supply of energy from intermittent sustainable sources (e.g. solar, wind). Lithium (Li) solid-state batteries are attractive candidates for next-generation batteries that require high energy density and stringent safety. In solid-state batteries, sulfides solid electrolytes are very promising to construct a large scale energy storage system. However, sulfide solid electrolyte pallets usually have an average thickness of 500-2000 m, which is 50 times that of the separators in conventional Li-ion batteries pose a huge challenge for their practical applications. Furthermore, the preparation of ultra-thin sulfide solid electrolyte membranes is difficult mainly due to the lack of efficient, low-cost solid electrolyte processing methods. Herein, we propose to use an evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) technique to produce ultra-thin sulfide solid electrolyte membranes. We designed and synthesized nano-flaky structured -Li3PS4 with high ionic conductivity, employed EISA method to produce ultra-thin -Li3PS4 membranes as thin as 8 m plus controllable thickness. It was clearly demonstrated that EISA method could be an facile approach to prepare solid electrolyte membranes.

  1. Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly of Nano-flaky Li3PS4 for Ultra thin Solid Electrolyte Membrane

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Hood, Zachary; Hood, Zachary D; Xia, Younan

    2016-01-01

    Energy storage system is a critical technology to achieve efficient delivery and a steady supply of energy from intermittent sustainable sources (e.g. solar, wind). Lithium (Li) solid-state batteries are attractive candidates for next-generation batteries that require high energy density and stringent safety. In solid-state batteries, sulfides solid electrolytes are very promising to construct a large scale energy storage system. However, sulfide solid electrolyte pallets usually have an average thickness of 500-2000 m, which is 50 times that of the separators in conventional Li-ion batteries pose a huge challenge for their practical applications. Furthermore, the preparation of ultra-thin sulfide solid electrolytemore » membranes is difficult mainly due to the lack of efficient, low-cost solid electrolyte processing methods. Herein, we propose to use an evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) technique to produce ultra-thin sulfide solid electrolyte membranes. We designed and synthesized nano-flaky structured -Li3PS4 with high ionic conductivity, employed EISA method to produce ultra-thin -Li3PS4 membranes as thin as 8 m plus controllable thickness. It was clearly demonstrated that EISA method could be an facile approach to prepare solid electrolyte membranes.« less

  2. Self-assembly and structural relaxation in a model ionomer melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero, Jose M.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to understand the self-assembly and structural relaxation in ionomer melts containing less than 10% degree of ionization on the backbone. The self-assembly of charged sites and counterions shows structural ordering and agglomeration with a range of structures that can be achieved by changing the dielectric constant of the medium. The intermediate scattering function shows a decoupling of charge and counterion relaxation at longer length scales for only high dielectric constant and at shorter length scales for all dielectric constants. Overall, the slow structural decay of counterions in the strongly correlated ionomer system closely resembles transport properties of semi-flexible polymers.

  3. Mathematical Models, Analytical Solutions and Numerical Simulations of Self-Assembled Magnetic Colloidal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, David L.

    Ferromagnetic microparticles suspended at the interface between immiscible liquids and energized by an external alternating magnetic field show a rich variety of self-assembled structures, from linear snakes to radial asters, elongated wires to spinning chains to less dense clouds of particles called snails. In order to obtain insight into the fundamental physical mechanisms and the overall balance of forces governing self-assembly, we develop a modeling approach based on analytical solutions of the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. These analytical expressions for the self-consistent hydrodynamic flows are then employed to modify effective interactions between the particles, which in turn are formulated in terms of the time-averaged quantities. Our method allows effective computational verification of the mechanisms of self-assembly and leads to a testable predictions on the transitions between various self-assembled patterns. In one set of experiments, it was observed that viscosity is the primary driving force that determines whether asters or snakes appear at steady state. In the second set of experiments where hydrodynamics are less critical, the amplitude and frequency of the applied magnetic field determine whether wires, spinners or snails will appear. The ability to better understand what drives self-assembly and how to control which dynamic structures appear is necessary for further development of such structures and their applications.

  4. Polyaniline-nanodiamond fibers resulting from the self-assembly of nano-fibrils: a nanomechanical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, Daniele; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), torsional harmonics atomic force microscopy (TH-AFM, also referred to with the commercial name HarmoniX™) allows one to perform a quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of soft samples on the nanometer scale. In this work, such a technique has been employed to study the mechanical properties of self-assembled micrometric fibers of polyaniline (PANI) doped with nanodiamond (ND) particles and to investigate the role of ND in the assembly. In particular, besides PANI-ND fibers, other features, i.e., nano-fibrils and blobs, have also been observed on the sample, the mechanical properties of which have been determined and compared after correcting for the effect of the substrate and of the cylindrical geometry of nano-fibrils. Their similar mechanical properties suggest that PANI-ND micro-fibers are constituted by self-assembly of nano-fibrils. Finally, the combination of nanomechanical characterization with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Raman analyses allowed us to determine that softer blobs are residuals of amorphous PANI not polymerized in nano-fibrils.

  5. Systematic Study on the Self-Assembled Hexagonal Au Voids, Nano-Clusters and Nanoparticles on GaN (0001).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Puran; Sui, Mao; Li, Ming-Yu; Zhang, Quanzhen; Kim, Eun-Soo; Lee, Jihoon

    2015-01-01

    Au nano-clusters and nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely utilized in various electronic, optoelectronic, and bio-medical applications due to their great potentials. The size, density and configuration of Au NPs play a vital role in the performance of these devices. In this paper, we present a systematic study on the self-assembled hexagonal Au voids, nano-clusters and NPs fabricated on GaN (0001) by the variation of annealing temperature and deposition amount. At relatively low annealing temperatures between 400 and 600°C, the fabrication of hexagonal shaped Au voids and Au nano-clusters are observed and discussed based on the diffusion limited aggregation model. The size and density of voids and nano-clusters can systematically be controlled. The self-assembled Au NPs are fabricated at comparatively high temperatures from 650 to 800°C based on the Volmer-Weber growth model and also the size and density can be tuned accordingly. The results are symmetrically analyzed and discussed in conjunction with the diffusion theory and thermodynamics by utilizing AFM and SEM images, EDS maps and spectra, FFT power spectra, cross-sectional line-profiles and size and density plots. PMID:26285135

  6. Systematic Study on the Self-Assembled Hexagonal Au Voids, Nano-Clusters and Nanoparticles on GaN (0001)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Puran; Sui, Mao; Li, Ming-Yu; Zhang, Quanzhen; Kim, Eun-Soo; Lee, Jihoon

    2015-01-01

    Au nano-clusters and nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely utilized in various electronic, optoelectronic, and bio-medical applications due to their great potentials. The size, density and configuration of Au NPs play a vital role in the performance of these devices. In this paper, we present a systematic study on the self-assembled hexagonal Au voids, nano-clusters and NPs fabricated on GaN (0001) by the variation of annealing temperature and deposition amount. At relatively low annealing temperatures between 400 and 600°C, the fabrication of hexagonal shaped Au voids and Au nano-clusters are observed and discussed based on the diffusion limited aggregation model. The size and density of voids and nano-clusters can systematically be controlled. The self-assembled Au NPs are fabricated at comparatively high temperatures from 650 to 800°C based on the Volmer-Weber growth model and also the size and density can be tuned accordingly. The results are symmetrically analyzed and discussed in conjunction with the diffusion theory and thermodynamics by utilizing AFM and SEM images, EDS maps and spectra, FFT power spectra, cross-sectional line-profiles and size and density plots. PMID:26285135

  7. Hierarchical self-assembly of colloidal magnetic particles into reconfigurable spherical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morphew, Daniel; Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan

    2015-04-01

    Colloidal self-assembly has enormous potential as a bottom-up means of structure fabrication. Here we demonstrate hierarchical self-assembly of rationally designed charge-stabilised colloidal magnetic particles into ground state structures that are topologically equivalent to a snub cube and a snub dodecahedron, the only two chiral Archimedean solids, for size-selected clusters. These spherical structures open up in response to an external magnetic field and demonstrate controllable porosity. Such features are critical to their applications as functional materials.

  8. Enzyme-mediated self-assembly of highly ordered structures from disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athamneh, Ahmad I.; Barone, Justin R.

    2009-10-01

    Wheat gluten is an amorphous storage protein. Trypsin hydrolysis of wheat gluten produced glutamine-rich peptides. Some peptides were able to self-assemble into fibrous structures extrinsic to native wheat gluten. The final material was an in situ formed peptide composite of highly ordered nanometer-sized fibrils and micron-sized fibers embedded in an unassembled peptide matrix. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction data suggested that the new structures resembled that of cross- β fibrils found in some insect silk and implicated in prion diseases. The largest self-assembled fibers were about 10 µm in diameter with right-handed helicity and appeared to be bundles of smaller nanometer-sized fibrils. Results demonstrated the potential for utilizing natural mechanisms of protein self-assembly to design advanced materials that can provide a wide range of structural and chemical functionality.

  9. Computational de novo design of a self-assembling peptide with predefined structure.

    PubMed

    Kaltofen, Sabine; Li, Chenge; Huang, Po-Ssu; Serpell, Louise C; Barth, Andreas; André, Ingemar

    2015-01-30

    Protein and peptide self-assembly is a powerful design principle for engineering of new biomolecules. More sophisticated biomaterials could be built if both the structure of the overall assembly and that of the self-assembling building block could be controlled. To approach this problem, we developed a computational design protocol to enable de novo design of self-assembling peptides with predefined structure. The protocol was used to design a peptide building block with a βαβ fold that self-assembles into fibrillar structures. The peptide associates into a double β-sheet structure with tightly packed α-helices decorating the exterior of the fibrils. Using circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray fiber diffraction, we demonstrate that the peptide adopts the designed conformation. The results demonstrate that computational protein design can be used to engineer protein and peptide assemblies with predefined three-dimensional structures, which can serve as scaffolds for the development of functional biomaterials. Rationally designed proteins and peptides could also be used to investigate the subtle energetic and entropic tradeoffs in natural self-assembly processes and the relation between assembly structure and assembly mechanism. We demonstrate that the de novo designed peptide self-assembles with a mechanism that is more complicated than expected, in a process where small changes in solution conditions can lead to significant differences in assembly properties and conformation. These results highlight that formation of structured protein/peptide assemblies is often dependent on the formation of weak but highly precise intermolecular interactions. PMID:25498388

  10. Expanding the structural diversity of self-assembling dendrons and supramolecular dendrimers via complex building blocks.

    PubMed

    Percec, Virgil; Won, Betty C; Peterca, Mihai; Heiney, Paul A

    2007-09-12

    The design and synthesis of the first examples of AB4 and AB5 dendritic building blocks with complex architecture are reported. Structural and retrostructural analysis of supramolecular dendrimers self-assembled from hybrid dendrons based on different combinations of AB4 and AB5 building blocks with AB2 and AB3 benzyl ether dendrons demonstrated that none of these new hybrid dendrons exhibit the previously encountered conformations of libraries of benzyl ether dendrons. These hybrid dendrons enabled the discovery of some highly unusual tapered and conical dendrons generated by the intramolecular back-folding of their repeat units and of their apex. The new back-folded tapered dendrons have double thickness and self-assemble into pine-tree-like columns exhibiting a long-range 7/2 helical order. The back-folded conical dendrons self-assemble into spherical dendrimers. Non-back-folded truncated conical dendrons were also discovered. They self-assemble into spherical dendrimers with a less densely packed center. The discovery of dendrons displaying a novel crown-like conformation is also reported. Crown-like dendrons self-assemble into long-range 5/1 helical pyramidal columns. The long-range 7/2 and 5/1 helical structures were established by applying, for the first time, the helical diffraction theory to the analysis of X-ray patterns obtained from oriented fibers of supramolecular dendrimers. PMID:17705390

  11. Photo-induced reversible structural transition of cationic diphenylalanine peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongchao; Fei, Jinbo; Li, Qi; Li, Junbai

    2015-04-17

    The photo-induced self-assembly of a cationic diphenylalanine peptide (CDP) is investigated using a photoswitchable sulfonic azobenzene as the manipulating unit. A reversible structural transition between a branched structure and a vesicle-like structure is observed by alternating between UV and visible light irradiation. PMID:25405602

  12. Experimental and Computational Studies Reveal An Alternative Supramolecular Structure for Fmocdipeptide Self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaojia; Eckes, Kevin M.; Nguyen, Mary M.; Suggs, Laura J.; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the self-assembly of fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-conjugated dialanine (Fmoc-AA) molecules using combined computational and experimental approaches. Fmoc-AA gels were characterized using TEM, circular dichroism, FTIR, and WAXS. Computationally, we simulated the assembly of Fmoc-AA using molecular dynamics techniques. All simulations converged to a condensed fibril structure in which the Fmoc groups stack mostly within in the center of the fibril. However, the Fmoc groups are partially exposed to water, creating an amphiphilic surface, which may be responsible for aggregation of fibrils into nano-scale fibers observed in TEM. From the fibril models, radial distribution calculations agree with d-spacings observed in WAXS for the fibril diameter and π-stacking interactions. Our analyses show that dialanine, despite its short length, adopts a mainly extended polyproline II conformation. In contrast to previous hypotheses, these results indicate that β-sheet-like hydrogen bonding is not prevalent. Rather, stacking of Fmoc groups, inter-residue hydrogen bonding and hydrogen bonding with water play the important roles in stabilizing the fibril structure of supramolecular assemblies of short conjugated peptides. PMID:23020140

  13. Multiscale simulations of nanoribbon structures from chromophore amphiphile self-assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongxu; Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera, Monica; Stupp, Samuel

    Finite-width self-assembled one-dimensional nanostructures have many potential applications as electronically or biologically active materials. Understanding the driving forces for supramolecular self-assembly is essential for the molecular design of new highly functional structures. Here we use multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the self-assembly of chromophore amphiphiles into a nanoribbon previously shown to be useful in photocatalysis. We demonstrate that the nanoribbon structure is a result of the competition between electrostatics and the hydrophobic effect. We incorporate a scaling analysis that correlates the electrostatic strength with the finite width of the ribbon. These results with additional numerical calculations show that anisotropy of the short-range intermolecular interactions and long-range electrostatics can be used to control the dimensionality of these systems.

  14. Self-assembly of nanoparticles on the surface of ionic crystals: Structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, K.; Murugesan, M.; Forshaw, M.; Cunningham, D.; Martinez-Albertos, J.-L.; Moore, B. D.

    2007-07-01

    With a suitable combination of ligand-stabilised nanoparticle suspension and ionic salt solutions, it is possible to produce microcrystals that are coated with nanoparticles. The self-assembly process of coating microcrystals by gold nanoparticles (NP) is mediated by the crystal lattice. This is the so-called CLAMS process - a generic process for self-organisation of nanoparticles on the surface of crystals [M. Murugeshan, D. Cunningham, J.-L. Martnez-Albertos, R. Vrcelj, B.D. Moore, Chem. Commun. (2005) 2677]. We are exploring here the structural properties of these self-assembled structures by using different imaging techniques.

  15. Hierarchical aqueous self-assembly of C60 nano-whiskers and C60-silver nano-hybrids under continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Iyer, K Swaminathan; Raston, Colin L; Saunders, Martin

    2007-09-01

    The ubiquitous starch-iodine complex can be used to organize hydrophobic fullerene C(60) in water into nano-whiskers shrouded by the biopolymer, and are approximately 5-8 nm in cross section, and 250-350 nm in length, as a hierarchical self assembly process. The preformed starch-iodine complex reacts with solid pristine C(60) affording nano-whiskers with iodine surrounding the fullerene array, the iodine then being removed on treatment with ascorbic acid. The hydrophobic surface of the nano-whiskers of C(60) can be coated with silver metal in a controlled way using 'soft energy' spinning disc processing. PMID:17713609

  16. Modelling self-assembling of colloid particles in multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł; Barbasz, Jakub; Kolasińska, Marta

    2007-04-01

    Simulations of particle multilayer build-up in the layer by layer (LbL) self-assembling processes have been performed according to the generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) scheme. The first (precursor) layer having an arbitrary coverage of adsorption centers was generated using the standard RSA scheme pertinent to homogeneous surface. Formation of the consecutive layers (up to 20) was simulated by assuming short-range interaction potentials for two kinds of particles of equal size. Interaction of two particles of different kind resulted in irreversible and localized adsorption upon their contact, whereas particles of the same kind were assumed to interact via the hard potential (no adsorption possible). Using this algorithm theoretical simulations were performed aimed at determining the particle volume fraction as a function of the distance from the interface, as well as the multilayer film roughness and thickness as a function of the number of layers. The simulations revealed that particle concentration distribution in the film was more uniform for low precursor layer density than for higher density, where well-defined layers of closely packed particles appeared. On the other hand, the roughness of the film was the lowest at the highest precursor layer density. It was also predicted theoretically that for low precursor layer density the film thickness increased with the number of layers in a non-linear way. However, for high precursor layer density, the film thickness increased linearly with the number of layers and the average layer thickness was equal to 1.58 of the particle radius, which is close to the closely packed hexagonal layer thickness equal to 1.73. It was concluded by analysing the existing data for colloid particles and polyelectrolytes that the theoretical results can be effectively exploited for interpretation of the LbL processes involving colloid particles and molecular species like polymers or proteins.

  17. Directing Hybrid Structures by Combining Self-Assembly of Functional Block Copolymers and Atomic Layer Deposition: A Demonstration on Hybrid Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Moshonov, Moshe; Frey, Gitti L

    2015-11-24

    The simplicity and versatility of block copolymer self-assembly offers their use as templates for nano- and meso-structured materials. However, in most cases, the material processing requires multiple steps, and the block copolymer is a sacrificial building block. Here, we combine a self-assembled block copolymer template and atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a metal oxide to generate functional hybrid films in a simple process with no etching or burning steps. This approach is demonstrated by using the crystallization-induced self-assembly of a rod-coil block copolymer, P3HT-b-PEO, and the ALD of ZnO. The block copolymer self-assembles into fibrils, ∼ 20 nm in diameter and microns long, with crystalline P3HT cores and amorphous PEO corona. The affinity of the ALD precursors to the PEO corona directs the exclusive deposition of crystalline ZnO within the PEO domains. The obtained hybrid structure possesses the properties desired for photovoltaic films: donor-acceptor continuous nanoscale interpenetrated networks. Therefore, we integrated the films into single-layer hybrid photovoltaics devices, thus demonstrating that combining self-assembly of functional block copolymers and ALD is a simple approach to direct desired complex hybrid morphologies. PMID:26523422

  18. The structural parameters of self-assembled quantum dots determined from the optical spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Boon Hon; Beaumont, Matthew; Rybchenko, Sergey I.; Itskevich, Igor E.; Haywood, Stephanie K.; Tinkler, Lloyd; Hugues, Maxime

    2013-12-04

    Structural parameters of InGaAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs), which were grown using In-flush technique, were deduced using optical spectroscopy combined with computer modeling. The results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data obtained from transmission electron microscopy. The developed approach suggests a promising alternative to structural characterization methods for SAQDs.

  19. Self-assembled coffee-ring colloidal crystals for structurally colored contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhuoying; Li, Linliang; Liu, Panmiao; Zheng, Fuyin; Guo, Liuyang; Zhao, Yuanjin; Jin, Lu; Li, Tingting; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-02-25

    A circlular structural-colored contact lens is reported, which is fabricated by replicating self-assembled colloidal photonic crystal templates. The structural-colored contact lenses not only display variable and brilliant color under light illumination, but also avoid the addition of any colorants to the hydrogel lenses and prevent the potential harm posed by traditional colored contact lenses. PMID:25331232

  20. Cooperative, reversible self-assembly of covalently pre-linked proteins into giant fibrous structures.

    PubMed

    Averick, Saadyah; Karácsony, Orsolya; Mohin, Jacob; Yong, Xin; Moellers, Nicholas M; Woodman, Bradley F; Zhu, Weipu; Mehl, Ryan A; Balazs, Anna C; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate a simple bioconjugate polymer system that undergoes reversible self-assembling into extended fibrous structures, reminiscent of those observed in living systems. It is comprised of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules linked into linear oligomeric strands through click step growth polymerization with dialkyne poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Confocal microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering revealed that such strands form high persistence length fibers, with lengths reaching tens of micrometers, and uniform, sub-100 nm widths. We ascribe this remarkable and robust form of self-assembly to the cooperativity arising from the known tendency of GFP molecules to dimerize through localized hydrophobic patches and from their covalent pre-linking with flexible PEO. Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the system revealed its tendency to form elongated fibrous aggregates, suggesting the general nature of this mode of self-assembly. PMID:25044628

  1. Template-induced structure transition in sub-10 nm self-assembling nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Asbahi, Mohamed; Mehraeen, Shafigh; Lim, Kevin T P; Wang, Fuke; Cao, Jianshu; Tan, Mei Chee; Yang, Joel K W

    2014-05-14

    We report on the directed self-assembly of sub-10 nm gold nanoparticles confined within a template comprising channels of gradually varying widths. When the colloidal lattice parameter is mismatched with the channel width, the nanoparticles rearrange and break their natural close-packed ordering, transiting through a range of structural configurations according to the constraints imposed by the channel. While much work has been done in assembling ordered configurations, studies of the transition regime between ordered states have been limited to microparticles under applied compression. Here, with coordinated experiments and Monte Carlo simulations we show that particles transit through a more diverse set of self-assembled configurations than observed for compressed systems. The new insight from this work could lead to the control and design of complex self-assembled patterns other than periodic arrays of ordered particles. PMID:24702584

  2. Polarization switching and patterning in self-assembled peptide tubular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bdikin, Igor; Bystrov, Vladimir; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Gracio, José; Kopyl, Svitlana; Wojtas, Maciej; Mishina, Elena; Sigov, Alexander; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembled peptide nanotubes are unique nanoscale objects that have great potential for a multitude of applications, including biosensors, nanotemplates, tissue engineering, biosurfactants, etc. The discovery of strong piezoactivity and polar properties in aromatic dipeptides [A. Kholkin, N. Amdursky, I. Bdikin, E. Gazit, and G. Rosenman, ACS Nano 4, 610 (2010)] opened up a new perspective for their use as biocompatible nanoactuators, nanomotors, and molecular machines. Another, as yet unexplored functional property is the ability to switch polarization and create artificial polarization patterns useful in various electronic and optical applications. In this work, we demonstrate that diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes are indeed electrically switchable if annealed at a temperature of about 150 °C. The new orthorhombic antipolar structure that appears after annealing allows for the existence of a radial polarization component, which is directly probed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements. Observation of the relatively stable polarization patterns and hysteresis loops via PFM testifies to the local reorientation of molecular dipoles in the radial direction. The experimental results are complemented with rigorous molecular calculations and create a solid background of electric-field induced deformation of aromatic rings and corresponding polarization switching in this emergent material.

  3. Effect of density and structure on dynamics within self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Derrick; Scott, Mary; Bochinski, Jason; Clarke, Laura

    2009-03-01

    Previously, we have observed interacting dynamics within self-assembled alkylsiloxane monolayers, and characterized this motion via sensitive dielectric spectroscopy (along with more traditional techniques such as ellipsometry, contact angle, and force microscopy). In these monolayers, molecules are covalently bound to the surface and thus cannot spontaneously change density, as in an adsorbate system. We identified this relaxation as akin to the polyethylene-like glass transition observed in polymers with phase-segregated alkyl side chains [1]. As a next step, we deliberately manipulated the physical structure of the monolayers (via different film growth procedures and/or post-deposition heat treating) and the monolayer density (from ˜10% to full coverage), and observed the resultant changes in dynamics. This experimental system may prove a useful model for more complex materials, such as glassy polymers or traditional molecular glasses, where density cannot be explicitly tuned. As density increases, the steepness index increases, indicating a more complex or fragile relaxation. At low densities, the motion has an almost-Arrhenius dependence on temperature. [1] M.C. Scott, D.R. Stevens, J.R. Bochinski, L.I. Clarke, ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/nn800543j.

  4. Polymerization-induced self-assembly of block copolymer nano-objects via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Warren, Nicholas J; Armes, Steven P

    2014-07-23

    In this Perspective, we discuss the recent development of polymerization-induced self-assembly mediated by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization. This approach has quickly become a powerful and versatile technique for the synthesis of a wide range of bespoke organic diblock copolymer nano-objects of controllable size, morphology, and surface functionality. Given its potential scalability, such environmentally-friendly formulations are expected to offer many potential applications, such as novel Pickering emulsifiers, efficient microencapsulation vehicles, and sterilizable thermo-responsive hydrogels for the cost-effective long-term storage of mammalian cells. PMID:24968281

  5. Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Nano-objects via RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this Perspective, we discuss the recent development of polymerization-induced self-assembly mediated by reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization. This approach has quickly become a powerful and versatile technique for the synthesis of a wide range of bespoke organic diblock copolymer nano-objects of controllable size, morphology, and surface functionality. Given its potential scalability, such environmentally-friendly formulations are expected to offer many potential applications, such as novel Pickering emulsifiers, efficient microencapsulation vehicles, and sterilizable thermo-responsive hydrogels for the cost-effective long-term storage of mammalian cells. PMID:24968281

  6. Self-assembly of nanocomponents into composite structures: Derivation and simulation of Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankavich, S.; Shreif, Z.; Miao, Y.; Ortoleva, P.

    2009-05-01

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods, which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on the atomistic fluctuations. We account for the effect of order parameters on the statistics of the atomistic fluctuations, which contribute to the entropic and average forces driving order parameter evolution. This approach enables an efficient algorithm for computer simulation of self-assembly, whereas other methods severely limit the timestep due to the separation of diffusional and complexing characteristic times. Given that our approach does not require recalibration with each new application, it provides a way to estimate assembly rates and thereby facilitate the discovery of self-assembly pathways and kinetic dead-end structures.

  7. Self-assembly of nanocomponents into composite structures: derivation and simulation of Langevin equations.

    PubMed

    Pankavich, S; Shreif, Z; Miao, Y; Ortoleva, P

    2009-05-21

    The kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocomponents into a virus, nanocapsule, or other composite structure is analyzed via a multiscale approach. The objective is to achieve predictability and to preserve key atomic-scale features that underlie the formation and stability of the composite structures. We start with an all-atom description, the Liouville equation, and the order parameters characterizing nanoscale features of the system. An equation of Smoluchowski type for the stochastic dynamics of the order parameters is derived from the Liouville equation via a multiscale perturbation technique. The self-assembly of composite structures from nanocomponents with internal atomic structure is analyzed and growth rates are derived. Applications include the assembly of a viral capsid from capsomers, a ribosome from its major subunits, and composite materials from fibers and nanoparticles. Our approach overcomes errors in other coarse-graining methods, which neglect the influence of the nanoscale configuration on the atomistic fluctuations. We account for the effect of order parameters on the statistics of the atomistic fluctuations, which contribute to the entropic and average forces driving order parameter evolution. This approach enables an efficient algorithm for computer simulation of self-assembly, whereas other methods severely limit the timestep due to the separation of diffusional and complexing characteristic times. Given that our approach does not require recalibration with each new application, it provides a way to estimate assembly rates and thereby facilitate the discovery of self-assembly pathways and kinetic dead-end structures. PMID:19466829

  8. Creating Prebiotic Sanctuary: Self-Assembling Supramolecular Peptide Structures Bind and Stabilize RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carny, Ohad; Gazit, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Any attempt to uncover the origins of life must tackle the known `blind watchmaker problem'. That is to demonstrate the likelihood of the emergence of a prebiotic system simple enough to be formed spontaneously and yet complex enough to allow natural selection that will lead to Darwinistic evolution. Studies of short aromatic peptides revealed their ability to self-assemble into ordered and stable structures. The unique physical and chemical characteristics of these peptide assemblies point out to their possible role in the origins of life. We have explored mechanisms by which self-assembling short peptides and RNA fragments could interact together and go through a molecular co-evolution, using diphenylalanine supramolecular assemblies as a model system. The spontaneous formation of these self-assembling peptides under prebiotic conditions, through the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) pathway was demonstrated. These peptide assemblies possess the ability to bind and stabilize ribonucleotides in a sequence-depended manner, thus increase their relative fitness. The formation of these peptide assemblies is dependent on the homochirality of the peptide monomers: while homochiral peptides (L-Phe-L-Phe and D-Phe-D-Phe) self-assemble rapidly in aqueous environment, heterochiral diastereoisomers (L-Phe-D-Phe and D-Phe-L-Phe) do not tend to self-assemble. This characteristic consists with the homochirality of all living matter. Finally, based on these findings, we propose a model for the role of short self-assembling peptides in the prebiotic molecular evolution and the origin of life.

  9. Self-assembly and dynamics of oxide nano-rods on NiAl(110).

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, John P.; McCarty, Kevin F.

    2004-10-01

    We observe the spontaneous formation of parallel oxide rods upon exposing a clean NiAl(110) surface to oxygen at elevated temperatures (850-1350 K). By following the self-assembly of individual nanorods in real time with low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM), we are able to investigate the processes by which the rods lengthen along their axes and thicken normal to the surface of the substrate. At a fixed temperature and O{sub 2} pressure, the rods lengthen along their axes at a constant rate. The exponential temperature dependence of this rate yields an activation energy for growth of 1.2 {+-} 0.1 eV. The rod growth rates do not change as their ends pass in close proximity (<40 nm) to each other, which suggests that they do not compete for diffusing flux in order to elongate. Both LEEM and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies show that the rods can grow vertically in layer-by-layer fashion. The heights of the rods are extremely bias dependent in STM images, but occur in integer multiples of approximately 2-{angstrom}-thick oxygen-cation layers. As the rods elongate from one substrate terrace to the next, we commonly see sharp changes in their rates of elongation that result from their tendency to gain (lose) atomic layers as they descend (climb) substrate steps. Diffraction analysis and dark-field imaging with LEEM indicate that the rods are crystalline, with a lattice constant that is well matched to that of the substrate along their length. We discuss the factors that lead to the formation of these highly anisotropic structures.

  10. Self-assembled nano- to micron-size fibers from molten R11Ni4In9 intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Provino, Alessia; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Gschneidner, Karl A; Dhar, Sudesh K; Schlagel, Deborah L; Lograsso, Thomas A; Miller, Gordon J; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; Wang, Hui; Russell, Alan M; Becker, Andrew; Mudryk, Yaroslav

    2014-07-01

    A study of the formation of Gd11M4In9 (M = Ni, Pd, Pt) and R11Ni4In9 (R = rare earth) compounds revealed a unique and peculiar property, which is to naturally crystallize in a bundle of self-assembled fibers when cooled from the melt. The fibers, which are nano- to millimeters in cross-section and approximate to 11-40 mm long, grow unidirectionally along a temperature gradient. These compounds adopt the orthorhombic Nd11Pd4In9 structure type (oC48-Cmmm). This structure is layered, with slabs of R atoms alternating with slabs of Ni/In atoms along a short c-axis (much shorter than either the a- or b-axis). The growth direction of the fibers is along the crystallographic c-axis, orthogonal to the a-b plane. Two strong and short In In bonds lie in the a-b plane, which are even shorter than in In metal. Integrated crystal orbital Hamilton population calculations show that the In In bonds create isolated "R8Ni4In9" rods growing along the c-axis, with the In In bonds being part of the rods. This appears to be an important factor explaining the microfibrous nature of these phases. Some physical properties have been measured on the Gd11Ni4In9 homolog. The compound orders ferrimagnetically at T-c approximate to 88 K, and at lower temperatures (46 and 10 K), two other magnetic anomalies were observed, probably due to spin reorientations. As expected from the bonding features, the mechanical, magnetic and electrical properties are strongly anisotropic. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-assembly of hierarchically ordered structures in DNA nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Martin; Schnauß, Jörg; Tschirner, Teresa; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Moebius-Winkler, Maximilian; Käs, Josef A.; Smith, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The self-assembly of molecular and macromolecular building blocks into organized patterns is a complex process found in diverse systems over a wide range of size and time scales. The formation of star- or aster-like configurations, for example, is a common characteristic in solutions of polymers or other molecules containing multi-scaled, hierarchical assembly processes. This is a recurring phenomenon in numerous pattern-forming systems ranging from cellular constructs to solutions of ferromagnetic colloids or synthetic plastics. To date, however, it has not been possible to systematically parameterize structural properties of the constituent components in order to study their influence on assembled states. Here, we circumvent this limitation by using DNA nanotubes with programmable mechanical properties as our basic building blocks. A small set of DNA oligonucleotides can be chosen to hybridize into micron-length DNA nanotubes with a well-defined circumference and stiffness. The self-assembly of these nanotubes to hierarchically ordered structures is driven by depletion forces caused by the presence of polyethylene glycol. This trait allowed us to investigate self-assembly effects while maintaining a complete decoupling of density, self-association or bundling strength, and stiffness of the nanotubes. Our findings show diverse ranges of emerging structures including heterogeneous networks, aster-like structures, and densely bundled needle-like structures, which compare to configurations found in many other systems. These show a strong dependence not only on concentration and bundling strength, but also on the underlying mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Similar network architectures to those caused by depletion forces in the low-density regime are obtained when an alternative hybridization-based bundling mechanism is employed to induce self-assembly in an isotropic network of pre-formed DNA nanotubes. This emphasizes the universal effect inevitable

  12. Formation of Ordered Biomolecular Structures by the Self-assembly of Short Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yuran, Sivan; Reches, Meital

    2013-01-01

    In nature, complex functional structures are formed by the self-assembly of biomolecules under mild conditions. Understanding the forces that control self-assembly and mimicking this process in vitro will bring about major advances in the areas of materials science and nanotechnology. Among the available biological building blocks, peptides have several advantages as they present substantial diversity, their synthesis in large scale is straightforward, and they can easily be modified with biological and chemical entities1,2. Several classes of designed peptides such as cyclic peptides, amphiphile peptides and peptide-conjugates self-assemble into ordered structures in solution. Homoaromatic dipeptides, are a class of short self-assembled peptides that contain all the molecular information needed to form ordered structures such as nanotubes, spheres and fibrils3-8. A large variety of these peptides is commercially available. This paper presents a procedure that leads to the formation of ordered structures by the self-assembly of homoaromatic peptides. The protocol requires only commercial reagents and basic laboratory equipment. In addition, the paper describes some of the methods available for the characterization of peptide-based assemblies. These methods include electron and atomic force microscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Moreover, the manuscript demonstrates the blending of peptides (coassembly) and the formation of a "beads on a string"-like structure by this process.9 The protocols presented here can be adapted to other classes of peptides or biological building blocks and can potentially lead to the discovery of new peptide-based structures and to better control of their assembly. PMID:24301009

  13. Formation of ordered biomolecular structures by the self-assembly of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Yuran, Sivan; Reches, Meital

    2013-01-01

    In nature, complex functional structures are formed by the self-assembly of biomolecules under mild conditions. Understanding the forces that control self-assembly and mimicking this process in vitro will bring about major advances in the areas of materials science and nanotechnology. Among the available biological building blocks, peptides have several advantages as they present substantial diversity, their synthesis in large scale is straightforward, and they can easily be modified with biological and chemical entities(1,2). Several classes of designed peptides such as cyclic peptides, amphiphile peptides and peptide-conjugates self-assemble into ordered structures in solution. Homoaromatic dipeptides, are a class of short self-assembled peptides that contain all the molecular information needed to form ordered structures such as nanotubes, spheres and fibrils(3-8). A large variety of these peptides is commercially available. This paper presents a procedure that leads to the formation of ordered structures by the self-assembly of homoaromatic peptides. The protocol requires only commercial reagents and basic laboratory equipment. In addition, the paper describes some of the methods available for the characterization of peptide-based assemblies. These methods include electron and atomic force microscopy and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Moreover, the manuscript demonstrates the blending of peptides (coassembly) and the formation of a "beads on a string"-like structure by this process.(9) The protocols presented here can be adapted to other classes of peptides or biological building blocks and can potentially lead to the discovery of new peptide-based structures and to better control of their assembly. PMID:24301009

  14. Naturally engineered glycolipid biosurfactants leading to distinctive self-assembled structures.

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomohiro; Ohta, Noboru; Inoue, Katsuaki; Yagi, Naoto; Negishi, Hideyuki; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai

    2006-03-01

    Self-assembling properties of "natural" glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosyl-erythritol lipids A and B (MEL-A, MEL-B), which are abundantly produced from yeast strains, were investigated by using the fluorescence-probe method, dynamic light-scattering (DLS) analysis, freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM), and synchrotron small/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) analysis, among other methods. Both MEL-A and MEL-B exhibit excellent self-assembly properties at extremely low concentrations; they self-assemble into large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) just above their critical-aggregation concentration (CAC). The CAC(I) value was found to be 4.0x10(-6) M for MEL-A and 6.0x10(-6) M for MEL-B. Moreover, the self-assembled structure of MEL-A above a CAC(II) value of 2.0x10(-5) M was found to drastically change into sponge structures (L3) composed of a network of randomly connected bilayers that are usually obtained from a complicated multicomponent "synthetic" surfactant system. Interestingly, the average water-channel diameter of the sponge structure was 100 nm. This is relatively large compared with those obtained from "synthetic" surfactant systems. In addition, MEL-B, which has a hydroxyl group at the C-4' position on mannose instead of an acetyl group, gives only one CAC; the self-assembled structure of MEL-B seems to gradually move from LUV to multilamellar vesicles (MLV) with lattice constants of 4.4 nm, depending on the concentration. Furthermore, the lyotropic-liquid-crystal-phase observation at high concentrations demonstrates the formation of an inverted hexagonal phase (H2) for MEL-A, together with a lamella phase (L(alpha)) for MEL-B, indicating a difference between MEL-A and MEL-B molecules in the spontaneous curvature of the assemblies. These results clearly show that the difference in spontaneous curvature caused by the single acetyl group on the head group probably decides the direction of self-assembly of glycolipid biosurfactants. The

  15. The Role of Secondary Structure in the Entropically Driven Amelogenin Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Fan, Daming; Du, Chang; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Amelogenin, the major extracellular enamel matrix protein, plays critical roles in controlling enamel mineralization. This generally hydrophobic protein self-assembles to form nanosphere structures under certain solution conditions. To gain clearer insight into the mechanisms of amelogenin self-assembly, we first investigated the occurrences of secondary structures within its sequence. By applying isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we determined the thermodynamic parameters associated with protein-protein interactions and with conformational changes during self-assembly. The recombinant porcine full length (rP172) and a truncated amelogenin lacking the hydrophilic C-terminal (rP148) were used. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements performed at low concentrations (<5 μM) revealed the presence of the polyproline-type II (PPII) conformation in both amelogenins in addition to α-helix and unordered conformations. Structural transition from PPII/unordered to β-sheet was observed for both proteins at higher concentrations (>62.5 μM) and upon self-assembly. ITC measurements indicated that the self-assembly of rP172 and rP148 is entropically driven (+ΔSA) and energetically favorable (−ΔGA). The magnitude of enthalpy (ΔHA) and entropy changes of assembly (ΔSA) were smaller for rP148 than rP172, whereas the Gibbs free energy change of assembly (ΔGA) was not significantly different. It was found that rP172 had higher PPII content than rP148, and the monomer-multimer equilibrium for rP172 was observed in a narrower protein concentration range when compared to rP148. The large positive enthalpy and entropy changes in both cases are attributed to the release of ordered water molecules and the associated entropy gain (due to the hydrophobic effect). These findings suggest that PPII conformation plays an important role in amelogenin self-assembly and that rP172 assembly is more favorable than rP148. The data are direct evidence for the notion that hydrophobic

  16. Molecular self-assembly: Design, synthesis, and characterization of peptidic materials for bio- and nano-technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamm, Matthew S.

    The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and characterization of amphiphilic peptides capable of self-assembling into beta-sheet fibrils under specific aqueous solution conditions. The peptide design consists of two beta-sheet forming strands of alternating valine and lysine residues, flanking a central tetrapeptide sequence that contains a diproline. Depending on the chirality of the prolines the peptide can assume either an intramolecularly folded or an extended conformation in the self-assembled state. For the peptide where intramolecular folding is designed against, the self-assembled nanostructure was found to exhibit a unique, nontwisted laminated morphology. Experimental techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the self-assembled structure and kinetics. With the understanding of the self-assembly process gained from these first peptides, other peptide sequences were rationally designed to assemble with a desired nanostructure. For example, the effect of peptide strand length in conserving the laminated morphology and controlling the fibril height was investigated. In addition, other peptides were designed so as to affect the self-assembled nanostructure by enforcing a parallel versus anti-parallel beta-sheet or by disrupting the registry of laminating beta-sheet filaments. In some cases, the peptides assembled into structures predicted by the initial design while other peptides assembled into unexpected fibril morphologies. The major conclusions from the research on these peptides is that the diproline sequence plays an important role in disrupting the beta-strand twist thereby resulting in a nontwisted laminated morphology. However, when the flanking beta-strands become long enough, the effect of the diproline sequence becomes diminished and the fibrils do

  17. Detection and analysis of SERS effect of nano gold by self-assembly chemical plating composite method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Huazhou; Gang, Chen; Lai, Chunhong; Liao, Xin; Wang, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a powerful analytical tool has gained extensive attention. Despite of many efforts have been devoted to design SERS substrates, it still remains a grand challenge for creating a general substrate with high SERS active by a simple, controllable and low-cost way. Herein, we attempt to address this issue by fabricating SERS-active nano gold film based on self-assembly chemical plating composite method. The influence of gold colloid particle size on gold seed distribution density and the influence of the particle size of nano gold films on the SERS activity were investigated in detail. 10-5 M Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was taken as Raman probe molecules and homemade Raman detection microsystem was used as detector. According to the results of SERS detection, the SERS substrate enhancement factors (SSEF) were calculated, and the nano gold film with average particle size of about 55 nm showed the maximum SSEF of 0.93 × 105, which indicated such nano gold films showed excellent SERS activity. Moreover, these nano gold films are all low-cost and easy to prepared. This study provided theoretical and experimental basis for the design and preparation of general SERS substrate.

  18. Formation of the self-assembled structures by the ultrasonic cavitation erosion-corrosion effect on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dayun; Wang, Jiadao; Liu, Fengbin; Rajjoub, Kenan

    2015-11-01

    The cavitation erosion-corrosion effect on the metal surface always forms irregular oxide structures. In this study, we reported the formation of regular self-assembled structures of amorphous nanoparticles around the cavitation erosion pits on carbon steel upon the ultrasonic cavitation in methylene blue solution. Each self-assembled structure was composed of linearly aligned nanoparticles of about 100 nm. The formation of self-assembled structures might be due to the combined effect of corrosion, specific sonochemical reaction in methylene blue solution, and the magnetic domain structures on the carbon steel.

  19. Solid-state NMR: An emerging technique in structural biology of self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Protein self-assemblies are ubiquitous biological systems involved in many cellular processes, ranging from bacterial and viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Studying the atomic three-dimensional structures of protein self-assemblies is a particularly demanding task, as these systems are usually insoluble, non-crystalline and of large size. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is an emerging method that can provide atomic-level structural data on intact macromolecular assemblies. We here present recent progress in magic-angle spinning ssNMR to study protein assemblies and give an overview on its combination with complementary techniques such as cryo-EM, mass-per-length measurements, SAXS and X-ray diffraction. Applications of ssNMR on its own and in hybrid approaches have revealed precious atomic details and first high-resolution structures of complex biological assemblies, including amyloid fibrils, bacterial filaments, phages or virus capsids. PMID:26234527

  20. M13 Bacteriophage-Based Self-Assembly Structures and Their Functional Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Chuntae; Park, Geun-Tae; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Y; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the assembly of basic structural building blocks in a systematic and orderly fashion is an emerging issue in various areas of science and engineering such as physics, chemistry, material science, biological engineering, and electrical engineering. The self-assembly technique, among many other kinds of ordering techniques, has several unique advantages and the M13 bacteriophage can be utilized as part of this technique. The M13 bacteriophage (Phage) can easily be modified genetically and chemically to demonstrate specific functions. This allows for its use as a template to determine the homogeneous distribution and percolated network structures of inorganic nanostructures under ambient conditions. Inexpensive and environmentally friendly synthesis can be achieved by using the M13 bacteriophage as a novel functional building block. Here, we discuss recent advances in the application of M13 bacteriophage self-assembly structures and the future of this technology. PMID:26146494

  1. Self-Assembled Structures of Tubulin and Microtubules Complexed with Oppositely Charged Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Ryan; Pfohl, Thomas; Kim, Joon Heon; Lin, Alison; Safinya, Cyrus R.; Miller, Herb P.; Wilson, Les

    2000-03-01

    Tubulin normally polymerizes into hollow cylindrical microtubules, with outer diameters of about 25 nm, in the presence of Mg^2+ ions and GTP at 37^o C. Microtubules can be stabilized with anticancer agents, such as Taxol. We report on synchotron x-ray studies and confocal imaging data that show that tubulin self-assembles in the presence of cationic lipids at room temperature. These complexes form novel structures with length scales up to three times the diameter of microtubules formed under normal conditions. To improve our understanding of these structures, we use x-ray scattering data of self-assembled structures of Taxol-stabilized microtubule - cationic lipid complexes as a comparison. Supported by NSF DMR-9972246, University of California Biotech Research, and Education Program Training Grant 99-14, DFG Pf 375/1-1.

  2. Complex self-assembly of pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine nucleoside supramolecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Guo, Xiurong; He, Shiliang; Zeng, Xin; Zhou, Xinglong; Zhang, Chaoliang; Hu, Jing; Wu, Xiaohua; Xing, Zhihua; Chu, Liangyin; He, Yang; Chen, Qianming

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly is not only one of the chemical roots of biological structure but is also drawing attention in different industrial fields. Here we study the mechanism of the formation of a complex flower-shaped supramolecular structure of pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine nucleosides by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray analysis. Upon removing the hydroxyl group of sugars, different flower-shaped superstructures can be produced. These works demonstrate that complex self-assembly can indeed be attained through hierarchical non-covalent interactions of single molecules. Furthermore, chimerical structures built from molecular recognition by these monomers indicate their potential in other fields if combined with other chemical entities.

  3. Rational design of self-assembly pathways for complex multicomponent structures

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William M.; Reinhardt, Aleks; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-01-01

    The field of complex self-assembly is moving toward the design of multiparticle structures consisting of thousands of distinct building blocks. To exploit the potential benefits of structures with such “addressable complexity,” we need to understand the factors that optimize the yield and the kinetics of self-assembly. Here we use a simple theoretical method to explain the key features responsible for the unexpected success of DNA-brick experiments, which are currently the only demonstration of reliable self-assembly with such a large number of components. Simulations confirm that our theory accurately predicts the narrow temperature window in which error-free assembly can occur. Even more strikingly, our theory predicts that correct assembly of the complete structure may require a time-dependent experimental protocol. Furthermore, we predict that low coordination numbers result in nonclassical nucleation behavior, which we find to be essential for achieving optimal nucleation kinetics under mild growth conditions. We also show that, rather surprisingly, the use of heterogeneous bond energies improves the nucleation kinetics and in fact appears to be necessary for assembling certain intricate 3D structures. This observation makes it possible to sculpt nucleation pathways by tuning the distribution of interaction strengths. These insights not only suggest how to improve the design of structures based on DNA bricks, but also point the way toward the creation of a much wider class of chemical or colloidal structures with addressable complexity. PMID:25941388

  4. Rational design of self-assembly pathways for complex multicomponent structures.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Reinhardt, Aleks; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-05-19

    The field of complex self-assembly is moving toward the design of multiparticle structures consisting of thousands of distinct building blocks. To exploit the potential benefits of structures with such "addressable complexity," we need to understand the factors that optimize the yield and the kinetics of self-assembly. Here we use a simple theoretical method to explain the key features responsible for the unexpected success of DNA-brick experiments, which are currently the only demonstration of reliable self-assembly with such a large number of components. Simulations confirm that our theory accurately predicts the narrow temperature window in which error-free assembly can occur. Even more strikingly, our theory predicts that correct assembly of the complete structure may require a time-dependent experimental protocol. Furthermore, we predict that low coordination numbers result in nonclassical nucleation behavior, which we find to be essential for achieving optimal nucleation kinetics under mild growth conditions. We also show that, rather surprisingly, the use of heterogeneous bond energies improves the nucleation kinetics and in fact appears to be necessary for assembling certain intricate 3D structures. This observation makes it possible to sculpt nucleation pathways by tuning the distribution of interaction strengths. These insights not only suggest how to improve the design of structures based on DNA bricks, but also point the way toward the creation of a much wider class of chemical or colloidal structures with addressable complexity. PMID:25941388

  5. Directed self-assembly, genomic assembly complexity and the formation of biological structure, or, what are the genes for nacre?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E

    2016-03-13

    Biology uses dynamical mechanisms of self-organization and self-assembly of materials, but it also choreographs and directs these processes. The difference between abiotic self-assembly and a biological process is rather like the difference between setting up and running an experiment to make a material remotely compared with doing it in one's own laboratory: with a remote experiment-say on the International Space Station-everything must be set up beforehand to let the experiment run 'hands off', but in the laboratory one can intervene at any point in a 'hands-on' approach. It is clear that the latter process, of directed self-assembly, can allow much more complicated experiments and produce far more complex structures than self-assembly alone. This control over self-assembly in biology is exercised at certain key waypoints along a trajectory and the process may be quantified in terms of the genomic assembly complexity of a biomaterial. PMID:26857670

  6. Engineering biological structures of prescribed shape using self-assembling multicellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Karoly; Neagu, Adrian; Mironov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R.; Forgacs, Gabor

    2004-01-01

    Self-assembly is a fundamental process that drives structural organization in both inanimate and living systems. It is in the course of self-assembly of cells and tissues in early development that the organism and its parts eventually acquire their final shape. Even though developmental patterning through self-assembly is under strict genetic control it is clear that ultimately it is physical mechanisms that bring about the complex structures. Here we show, both experimentally and by using computer simulations, how tissue liquidity can be used to build tissue constructs of prescribed geometry in vitro. Spherical aggregates containing many thousands of cells, which form because of tissue liquidity, were implanted contiguously into biocompatible hydrogels in circular geometry. Depending on the properties of the gel, upon incubation, the aggregates either fused into a toroidal 3D structure or their constituent cells dispersed into the surrounding matrix. The model simulations, which reproduced the experimentally observed shapes, indicate that the control parameter of structure evolution is the aggregate–gel interfacial tension. The model-based analysis also revealed that the observed toroidal structure represents a metastable state of the cellular system, whose lifetime depends on the magnitude of cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. Thus, these constructs can be made long-lived. We suggest that spherical aggregates composed of organ-specific cells may be used as “bio-ink” in the evolving technology of organ printing. PMID:14981244

  7. Engineering biological structures of prescribed shape using self-assembling multicellular systems.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Karoly; Neagu, Adrian; Mironov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R; Forgacs, Gabor

    2004-03-01

    Self-assembly is a fundamental process that drives structural organization in both inanimate and living systems. It is in the course of self-assembly of cells and tissues in early development that the organism and its parts eventually acquire their final shape. Even though developmental patterning through self-assembly is under strict genetic control it is clear that ultimately it is physical mechanisms that bring about the complex structures. Here we show, both experimentally and by using computer simulations, how tissue liquidity can be used to build tissue constructs of prescribed geometry in vitro. Spherical aggregates containing many thousands of cells, which form because of tissue liquidity, were implanted contiguously into biocompatible hydrogels in circular geometry. Depending on the properties of the gel, upon incubation, the aggregates either fused into a toroidal 3D structure or their constituent cells dispersed into the surrounding matrix. The model simulations, which reproduced the experimentally observed shapes, indicate that the control parameter of structure evolution is the aggregate-gel interfacial tension. The model-based analysis also revealed that the observed toroidal structure represents a metastable state of the cellular system, whose lifetime depends on the magnitude of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Thus, these constructs can be made long-lived. We suggest that spherical aggregates composed of organ-specific cells may be used as "bio-ink" in the evolving technology of organ printing. PMID:14981244

  8. Fabrication of cyclodextrins-procainamide supramolecular self-assembly: shape-shifting of nanosheet into microtubular structure.

    PubMed

    Siva, S; Kothai Nayaki, S; Rajendiran, N

    2015-05-20

    Encapsulation behavior of α- and β-cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD) with procainamide hydrochloride (PCA) has been investigated by absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. Spectral results revealed that PCA forms 1:2 drug-CD2 inclusion complexes with CDs. Novel supramolecular self-assemblies have been fabricated by inclusion complexation of PCA with α-CD/β-CD and characterized by transmission electron microscope and micro-Raman imaging. The obtained results from transmission electron microscope indicated that PCA/α-CD complex could form nano-sized particles. However, when the macrocyclic ring with six glucose units was switched into seven glucose units, the resultant PCA/β-CD complex could be self-assembled to micro-sized tubular structures. Shape-shifting of 2D nanosheet into 1D microtube by simple rolling mechanism was analyzed. Thermodynamic parameters of inclusion process were determined by Parameter Method 3 calculations. PMID:25817651

  9. Multi-stacks of epitaxial GeSn self-assembled dots in Si: Structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, F.; Fischer, I. A.; Schulze, J.; Benedetti, A.; Cerqueira, M. F.; Vasilevskiy, M. I.; Stefanov, S.; Chiussi, S.

    2015-03-28

    We report on the growth and structural and morphologic characterization of stacked layers of self-assembled GeSn dots grown on Si (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy at low substrate temperature T = 350 °C. Samples consist of layers (from 1 up to 10) of Ge{sub 0.96}Sn{sub 0.04} self-assembled dots separated by Si spacer layers, 10 nm thick. Their structural analysis was performed based on transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman scattering. We found that up to 4 stacks of dots could be grown with good dot layer homogeneity, making the GeSn dots interesting candidates for optoelectronic device applications.

  10. Multi-stacks of epitaxial GeSn self-assembled dots in Si: Structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F.; Fischer, I. A.; Benedetti, A.; Cerqueira, M. F.; Vasilevskiy, M. I.; Stefanov, S.; Chiussi, S.; Schulze, J.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the growth and structural and morphologic characterization of stacked layers of self-assembled GeSn dots grown on Si (100) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy at low substrate temperature T = 350 °C. Samples consist of layers (from 1 up to 10) of Ge0.96Sn0.04 self-assembled dots separated by Si spacer layers, 10 nm thick. Their structural analysis was performed based on transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman scattering. We found that up to 4 stacks of dots could be grown with good dot layer homogeneity, making the GeSn dots interesting candidates for optoelectronic device applications.

  11. Polymorphism in Self-Assembled Structures of 9-Anthracene Carboxylic Acid on Ag(111)

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chao; Wei, Yinying; Zhu, Erkuang; Reutt-Robey, Janice E.; Xu, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Surface self-assembly process of 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (AnCA) on Ag(111) was investigated using STM. Depending on the molecular surface density, four spontaneously formed and one annealed AnCA ordered phases were observed, namely a straight belt phase, a zigzag double-belt phase, two simpler dimer phases, and a kagome phase. The two high-density belt phases possess large unit cells on the scale length of 10 nm, which are seldom observed in molecular self-assembled structures. This structural diversity stems from a complicated competition of different interactions of AnCA molecules on metal surface, including intermolecular and molecular-substrate interactions, as well as the steric demand from high molecular surface density. PMID:22837666

  12. Self-assembled structures of Gaussian nematic particles.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Likos, Christos N

    2010-03-17

    We investigate the stable crystalline configurations of a nematic liquid crystal made of soft parallel ellipsoidal particles interacting via a repulsive, anisotropic Gaussian potential. For this purpose, we use genetic algorithms (GA) in order to predict all relevant and possible solid phase candidates into which this fluid can freeze. Subsequently we present and discuss the emerging novel structures and the resulting zero-temperature phase diagram of this system. The latter features a variety of crystalline arrangements, in which the elongated Gaussian particles in general do not align with any one of the high-symmetry crystallographic directions, a compromise arising from the interplay and competition between anisotropic repulsions and crystal ordering. Only at very strong degrees of elongation does a tendency of the Gaussian nematics to align with the longest axis of the elementary unit cell emerge. PMID:21389441

  13. Solvent Controlled Structural Transition of KI4K Self-Assemblies: from Nanotubes to Nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yurong; Deng, Li; Wang, Jiqian; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2015-12-01

    The structural modulation of peptide and protein assemblies under well-controlled conditions is of both fundamental and practical significance. In spite of extensive studies, it remains hugely challenging to tune the self-assembled nanostructures in a controllable manner because the self-assembly processes are dictated by various noncovalent interactions and their interplay. We report here how to manipulate the self-assembly of a designed, symmetric amphiphilic peptide (KI4K) via the solvent-controlled structural transition. Structural transition processes were carefully followed by the combination of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the introduction of acetonitrile into water significantly affected the hydrophobic interactions among hydrophobic side chains while imposing little impact on the β-sheet hydrogen bonding between peptide backbones. A structural transition occurred from nanotubes to helical/twisted ribbons and then to thin fibrils with the addition of acetonitrile due to the reduced hydrophobic interactions and the consequent weakening of the lateral stacking between KI4K β-sheets. The increased intermolecular electrostatic repulsions among lysine side chain amino groups had little effect on the lateral stacking of KI4K β-sheets due to the molecular symmetry. Complementary molecular dynamic (MD) simulations also indicated the solvation of acetonitrile molecules into the hydrophobic domains weakening the coherence between the neighboring sheets. PMID:26540520

  14. Two-Dimensional Layered Oxide Structures Tailored by Self-Assembled Layer Stacking via Interfacial Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Mingtao; Chen, Aiping; Li, Leigang; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Xia, Zhenhai; Lu, Ping; Boullay, Philippe; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Jia, Quanxi; Zhou, Honghui; Narayan, Jagdish; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Study of layered complex oxides emerge as one of leading topics in fundamental materials science because of the strong interplay among intrinsic charge, spin, orbital, and lattice. As a fundamental basis of heteroepitaxial thin film growth, interfacial strain can be used to design materials that exhibit new phenomena beyond their conventional forms. Here, we report a strain-driven self-assembly of bismuth-based supercell (SC) with a two-dimensional (2D) layered structure. With combined experimental analysis and first-principles calculations, we investigated the full SC structure and elucidated the fundamental growth mechanism achieved by the strain-enabled self-assembled atomic layer stacking. The unique SC structure exhibits room-temperature ferroelectricity, enhanced magnetic responses, and a distinct optical bandgap from the conventional double perovskite structure. This study reveals the important role of interfacial strain modulation and atomic rearrangement in self-assembling a layered singe-phase multiferroic thin film, which opens up a promising avenue in the search for and design of novel 2D layered complex oxides with enormous promise. PMID:27295399

  15. Aromatic Cross-Strand Ladders Control the Structure and Stability of [beta]-Rich Peptide Self-Assembly Mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Biancalana, Matthew; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei

    2009-09-02

    Though {beta}-rich self-assemblies comprise a major structural class of polypeptides, a detailed understanding of the determinants of their structure and stability is lacking. In particular, the roles of repetitive stretches of side chains running the long axis of these {beta}-sheets, termed 'cross-strand ladders,' remain poorly characterized due to the inherently insoluble and heterogeneous nature of self-assemblies. To overcome these experimental challenges, we have established a complementary experimental system termed 'peptide self-assembly mimics' (PSAMs). The PSAMs capture a defined number of self-assembly-like peptide repeats within a soluble {beta}-rich protein, making structural and energetic studies possible. In this work, we investigated the role of cross-strand ladders containing aromatic residues, which are prominent in self-assembling peptides. A combination of solution data and high-resolution crystal structures revealed that a single cross-strand ladder consisting solely of Tyr significantly stabilized, rigidified, and flattened the PSAM {beta}-sheet. These characteristics would stabilize each {beta}-sheet layer of a self-assembly and direct sheet conformations compatible with lamination. Our results therefore provide a rationale for the abundance of aromatic amino acids in fibril-forming peptides and establish important roles of cross-strand Tyr ladders in the structure and stability of {beta}-rich peptide self-assemblies.

  16. Self-assembled nucleolipids: from supramolecular structure to soft nucleic acid and drug delivery devices

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Vanessa; Bourgaux, Claudie; Couvreur, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This short review aims at presenting some recent illustrative examples of spontaneous nucleolipids self-assembly. High-resolution structural investigations reveal the diversity and complexity of assemblies formed by these bioinspired amphiphiles, resulting from the interplay between aggregation of the lipid chains and base–base interactions. Nucleolipids supramolecular assemblies are promising soft drug delivery systems, particularly for nucleic acids. Regarding prodrugs, squalenoylation is an innovative concept for improving efficacy and delivery of nucleosidic drugs. PMID:22075995

  17. Preparation of a multifunctional verapamil-loaded nano-carrier based on a self-assembling PEGylated prodrug.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongping; Liu, Na; Shi, Kemei; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wu, Guolin

    2015-11-01

    In an effort to prove the inherent side effects of doxorubicin (DOX) and potentially revoke the effects of drug resistance exhibited by cancer cells, we have designed a multifunctional DOX-delivery nano-carrier system able to encapsulate the drug resistance reversal agent Verapamil HCl (VRP·HCl). Hydrophilic short-chain polyethylene glycol (i.e., mPEG) was covalently linked to hydrophobic DOX and a benzoic imine linkage was used to form a linear amphiphilic PEGylated prodrug, namely mPEG-b-DOX. In aqueous solution, the amphiphilic PEG-b-DOX is able to self-assemble to form stable nanoparticles with a DOX loading content of approximately 40 wt% and a diameter of ∼ 143 nm. The resulting nanoparticles can simultaneously serve as an anticancer drug conjugate and as a drug carrier system. Here, the hydrophilic VRP could be encapsulated into the nano-carriers via a conventional dialysis method. The loading efficiency in mPEG-b-DOX nano-carrier was determined to be 53.97% and the loading content was found to be 7.71 wt%. The VRP-loaded nano-carriers grew slightly in size, to a diameter of ∼ 177 nm. We found that the release of DOX and VRP was much faster at a lower pH value. The biological activity of the nano-carriers were evaluated in vitro and compared with the DOX-loaded system. In doing so we found that the VRP-loaded nano-carrier features a much higher antitumor activity. Furthermore, the combined-system exhibits a significantly enhanced cytotoxicity with an elevated apoptosis rate observed for MCF-7/ADR used as a cell line in this in vitro study. This combinatory system and promising candidate for applications involving DOX chemotherapy proved to be easy to prepare and could be characterized in terms of biocompatibility, biodegradability, loading capacity, pH responsiveness and reversal of drug resistance. PMID:26340357

  18. Hematite Thin Films with Various Nanoscopic Morphologies Through Control of Self-Assembly Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingling; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2015-05-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) thin films with various nanostructures were synthesized through self-assembly between iron oxide hydroxide particles, generated by hydrolysis and condensation of Fe(NO3)3 · 6H2O, and a Pluronic triblock copolymer (F127, (EO)106(PO)70(EO)106, EO = ethylene oxide, PO = propylene oxide), followed by calcination. The self-assembly structure can be tuned by introducing water in a controlled manner through the control of the humidity level in the surrounding of the as-cast films during aging stage. For the given Fe(NO3)3 · 6H2O:F127 ratio, there appear to be three different thermodynamically stable self-assembly structures depending on the water content in the film material, which correspond to mesoporous, spherical micellar, and rod-like micellar structures after removal of F127. Coupled with the thermodynamic driving forces, the kinetics of the irreversible reactions of coalescence of iron oxide hydroxide particles into larger ones induce diverse nanostructures of the resultant films. The length scale of so-obtained nanostructures ranges from 6 nm to a few hundred nanometers. In addition to water content, the effects of other experimental parameters such as aging temperature, spin rate during spin coating, type of substrate, and type of iron reagent were investigated.

  19. The transcriptional regulator GalR self-assembles to form highly regular tubular structures

    PubMed Central

    Agerschou, Emil D.; Christiansen, Gunna; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Madsen, Daniel Jhaf; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Semsey, Szabolcs; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Gal repressor regulates transport and metabolism of D-galactose in Escherichia coli and can mediate DNA loop formation by forming a bridge between adjacent or distant sites. GalR forms insoluble aggregates at lower salt concentrations in vitro, which can be solubilized at higher salt concentrations. Here, we investigate the assembly and disassembly of GalR aggregates. We find that a sharp transition from aggregates to soluble species occurs between 200 and 400 mM NaCl, incompatible with a simple salting-in effect. The aggregates are highly ordered rod-like structures, highlighting a remarkable ability for organized self-assembly. Mutant studies reveal that aggregation is dependent on two separate interfaces of GalR. The highly ordered structures dissociate to smaller aggregates in the presence of D-galactose. We propose that these self-assembled structures may constitute galactose-tolerant polymers for chromosome compaction in stationary phase cells, in effect linking self-assembly with regulatory function. PMID:27279285

  20. The transcriptional regulator GalR self-assembles to form highly regular tubular structures.

    PubMed

    Agerschou, Emil D; Christiansen, Gunna; Schafer, Nicholas P; Madsen, Daniel Jhaf; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Semsey, Szabolcs; Otzen, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The Gal repressor regulates transport and metabolism of D-galactose in Escherichia coli and can mediate DNA loop formation by forming a bridge between adjacent or distant sites. GalR forms insoluble aggregates at lower salt concentrations in vitro, which can be solubilized at higher salt concentrations. Here, we investigate the assembly and disassembly of GalR aggregates. We find that a sharp transition from aggregates to soluble species occurs between 200 and 400 mM NaCl, incompatible with a simple salting-in effect. The aggregates are highly ordered rod-like structures, highlighting a remarkable ability for organized self-assembly. Mutant studies reveal that aggregation is dependent on two separate interfaces of GalR. The highly ordered structures dissociate to smaller aggregates in the presence of D-galactose. We propose that these self-assembled structures may constitute galactose-tolerant polymers for chromosome compaction in stationary phase cells, in effect linking self-assembly with regulatory function. PMID:27279285

  1. Phase behavior and complex crystal structures of self-assembled tethered nanoparticle telechelics.

    PubMed

    Marson, Ryan L; Phillips, Carolyn L; Anderson, Joshua A; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by growing interest in the self-assembly of nanoparticles for applications such as photonics, organic photovoltaics, and DNA-assisted designer crystals, we explore the phase behavior of tethered spherical nanoparticles. Here, a polymer tether is used to geometrically constrain a pair of nanoparticles creating a tethered nanoparticle "telechelic". Using simulation, we examine how varying architectural features, such as the size ratio of the two end-group nanospheres and the length of the flexible tether, affects the self-assembled morphologies. We demonstrate not only that this hybrid building block maintains the same phase diversity as linear triblock copolymers, allowing for a variety of nanoparticle materials to replace polymer blocks, but also that new structures not previously reported are accessible. Our findings imply a robust underlying ordering mechanism is common among these systems, thus allowing flexibility in synthesis approaches to achieve a target morphology. PMID:24641517

  2. Structure formation in binary mixtures of lipids and detergents: Self-assembly and vesicle division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly dynamics in binary surfactant mixtures and structure changes of lipid vesicles induced by detergent solution are studied using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Disk-shaped micelles, the bicelles, are stabilized by detergents surrounding the rim of a bilayer disk of lipids. The self-assembled bicelles are considerably smaller than bicelles formed from vesicle rupture, and their size is determined by the concentrations of lipids and detergents and the interactions between the two species. The detergent-adsorption induces spontaneous curvature of the vesicle bilayer and results in vesicle division into two vesicles or vesicle rupture into worm-like micelles. The division occurs mainly via the inverse pathway of the modified stalk model. For large spontaneous curvature of the monolayers of the detergents, a pore is often opened, thereby leading to vesicle division or worm-like micelle formation.

  3. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klinkova, Anna; Gang, Oleg; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; Ahmed, Aftab; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Gagnon, Brandon; Muntyanu, Anastasiya; Walker, Gilbert C.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-10-10

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, compositionmore » and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.« less

  4. Structural and optical properties of self-assembled chains of plasmonic nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkova, Anna; Gang, Oleg; Therien-Aubin, Heloise; Ahmed, Aftab; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Gagnon, Brandon; Muntyanu, Anastasiya; Walker, Gilbert C.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2014-10-10

    Solution-based linear self-assembly of metal nanoparticles offers a powerful strategy for creating plasmonic polymers, which, so far, have been formed from spherical nanoparticles and nanorods. Here, we report linear solution-based self-assembly of metal nanocubes (NCs), examine the structural characteristics of the NC chains and demonstrate their advanced optical characteristics. Predominant face-to-face assembly of large NCs coated with short polymer ligands led to a larger volume of hot spots in the chains, a nearly uniform E-field enhancement in the gaps between co-linear NCs and a new coupling mode for NC chains, in comparison with chains of nanospheres with similar dimensions, composition and surface chemistry. The NC chains exhibited a stronger surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal, in comparison with linear assemblies of nanospheres. The experimental results were in agreement with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations.

  5. Structure formation in binary mixtures of lipids and detergents: self-assembly and vesicle division.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-14

    Self-assembly dynamics in binary surfactant mixtures and structure changes of lipid vesicles induced by detergent solution are studied using coarse-grained molecular simulations. Disk-shaped micelles, the bicelles, are stabilized by detergents surrounding the rim of a bilayer disk of lipids. The self-assembled bicelles are considerably smaller than bicelles formed from vesicle rupture, and their size is determined by the concentrations of lipids and detergents and the interactions between the two species. The detergent-adsorption induces spontaneous curvature of the vesicle bilayer and results in vesicle division into two vesicles or vesicle rupture into worm-like micelles. The division occurs mainly via the inverse pathway of the modified stalk model. For large spontaneous curvature of the monolayers of the detergents, a pore is often opened, thereby leading to vesicle division or worm-like micelle formation. PMID:23320721

  6. Chemical nano-gardens: growth of salt nanowires from supramolecular self-assembly gels.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ronan; Kotova, Oxana; Boese, Markus; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Boland, John J

    2013-06-25

    In this article, we examine the phenomenon of single-crystal halide salt wire growth at the surface of porous materials. We report the use of a single-step casting technique with a supramolecular self-assembly gel matrix that upon drying leads to the growth of single-crystal halide (e.g., NaCl, KCl, and KI) nanowires with diameters ~130-200 nm. We demonstrate their formation using electron microscopy and electron-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, showing that the supramolecular gel stabilizes the growth of these wires by facilitating a diffusion-driven base growth mechanism. Critically, we show that standard non-supramolecular gels are unable to facilitate nanowire growth. We further show that these nanowires can be grown by seeding, forming nanocrystal gardens. This study helps understand the possible prefunctionalization of membranes to stimulate ion-specific filters or salt efflorescence suppressors, while also providing a novel route to nanomaterial growth. PMID:23663045

  7. Nanoscale self-assembly of starch: Phase relations, formation, and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creek, John A.

    This project has been undertaken to develop a fundamental understanding of the spherulitic self-assembly of starch polymers from aqueous solution, both as a model for starch granule initiation in vivo and as a biologically-inspired material with applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Botanical starches were observed to form semi-crystalline spherulites from aqueous solution when cooled after a high temperature treatment, and the processes resulting in spherulite formation were investigated. Based on the influence of cooling rate on spherulite formation from a botanical starch, liquid-liquid demixing in competition with crystallization was proposed as the mechanism leading to spherulite formation (summarized in a hypothetical phase diagram). Study of amylose and amylopectin self-assembly demonstrated that the linear polymer plays the primary role in forming spherulites. As a result, the roles of degree of polymerization, concentration, and thermal processing conditions on amylose self-assembly were explored. Thermal properties, final system morphology, and crystalline allomorph were characterized. In all cases the experimental findings supported the proposed phase diagram. Finally, the crystalline nanostructure of the spherulites was probed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing a seemingly universal level of structure in crystalline starch materials. This was compared to an existing model of crystallization for synthetic polymers involving a transitional liquid crystalline-like ordering---a comparison that makes sense in light of the known helical structure of starch.

  8. Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Studies on the Structural Evolution of Pyromellitamide Self-assembled Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jamieson; Tong, Katie; William, Hamilton; He, Lilin; James, Michael; Thordarson, Pall; Boukhalfa, Sofiane

    2014-10-31

    The kinetics of aggregation of two pyromellitamide gelators; tetrabutyl- (C4) and tetrahexylpyromellitamide (C6), in deuterated cyclohexane has been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) for up to six days. The purpose of this study was to improve our understanding of how self-assembled gels are formed. Short-term (< 3 hour) time scales revealed multiple phases with the data for the tetrabutylpyromellitamide C4 indicating one dimensional stacking and aggregation corresponding to a multi-fiber braided cluster arrangement that is about 35 Å in diameter. The corresponding tetrahexylpyromellitamide C6 data suggests that the C6 also forms one-dimensional stacks but that these aggregate to a thicker multi-fiber braided cluster that have a diameter of 61.8 Å. Over a longer period of time, the radius, persistence length and contour length all continue to increase in 6 days after cooling. This data suggests that structural changes in self-assembled gels occur over a period exceeding several days and that fairly subtle changes in the structure (e.g. tail-length) can influence the packing of molecules in self-assembled gels on the single-to-few fiber bundle stage.

  9. Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Studies on the Structural Evolution of Pyromellitamide Self-assembled Gels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scott, Jamieson; Tong, Katie; William, Hamilton; He, Lilin; James, Michael; Thordarson, Pall; Boukhalfa, Sofiane

    2014-10-31

    The kinetics of aggregation of two pyromellitamide gelators; tetrabutyl- (C4) and tetrahexylpyromellitamide (C6), in deuterated cyclohexane has been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) for up to six days. The purpose of this study was to improve our understanding of how self-assembled gels are formed. Short-term (< 3 hour) time scales revealed multiple phases with the data for the tetrabutylpyromellitamide C4 indicating one dimensional stacking and aggregation corresponding to a multi-fiber braided cluster arrangement that is about 35 Å in diameter. The corresponding tetrahexylpyromellitamide C6 data suggests that the C6 also forms one-dimensional stacks but that these aggregate tomore » a thicker multi-fiber braided cluster that have a diameter of 61.8 Å. Over a longer period of time, the radius, persistence length and contour length all continue to increase in 6 days after cooling. This data suggests that structural changes in self-assembled gels occur over a period exceeding several days and that fairly subtle changes in the structure (e.g. tail-length) can influence the packing of molecules in self-assembled gels on the single-to-few fiber bundle stage.« less

  10. Polymer Physics Prize Lecture: Self-assemblies of Giant Molecular Shape Amphiphiles as a New Platform for Engineering Structures with Sub-Nanometer Feature Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2013-03-01

    Utilizing nano-building blocks rather than atoms to construct and engineer new structures is a fresh approach to design and develop functional materials for the purpose of transferring and amplifying microscopic functionality to macroscopic materials' property. As one of the important elements of these nano-building blocks, giant molecular shape amphiphiles (GMSAs) provide a latest platform for generating self-assembled ordered structures at nanometer scale, which are stabilized by collective physical bonds (such as collective hydrogen bonding). In this talk, two topics will be focused on. First, composed of functionalized hydrophilic molecular nanoparticles as the heads with rigid shape and fixed volume, and tethered polymer chains as the tails (such as giant molecular surfactants and lipids and other topologies), these GMSAs of various architectures can self-assemble into highly diversified, thermodynamically stable microstructures at sub-10 nm length scale in the bulk, thin film and solution states. Second, GMSAs could also be constructed solely from nanoparticles interconnected via different numbers of the rigid linkages in specific symmetry, simulating the overall shapes of small molecules but with sizes that are one-order of magnitude larger in length and three-order of magnitude larger in volume. Giant crystal structures can then be obtained from this class of ``giant molecules'' via supramolecular crystallization. These findings are not only scientifically intriguing in understanding the physical principles underlying their self-assembly, but also technologically relevant in industrial applications.

  11. Structural and Chemical Control of Supramolecular Coordination Self-Assembly Confined on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ziliang

    This thesis is concerned with the structural and chemical control of two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular self-assemblies through judiciously manipulating bonding motifs at various intrinsic and external conditions. The self-selection and the self-recognition of the noncovalent interactions among organic and/or metallic building blocks govern the structural and chemical properties of the resultant self-assembled two-dimensional nanostructures, accompanying with the thermodynamic and kinetic process as well. In this thesis, we have investigated the supramolecular self-assembly achieved via coordination bonds assisted by transition metals and functional ligands on metal surfaces. The self-assembled nanostructures were studied by ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy working at room temperatures. The structural transition processes were also inspected via the low energy electron diffraction. Further, artificial "quantum dots" represented by the cavities of the self-assembled networks were investigated. The modulation of surface electrons by these "quantum dots" was characterized by the local density of states detected by low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The major contributions of this thesis are outlined as below: (1) Through modifying the chemical states of organic ligands, a unique coordination Kagome network structure was obtained for the first time by two distinct methods. TPyP (5, 10, 15, 20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin) species on Au(111) surfaces form the TPyP-Au coordination Kagome network achieved by a novel treatment that was suggested to modify the chemical state of the TPyP. In a condition that the TPyP coexists with Cu on a Au(111), Cu adatoms play two roles in the self-assembly---the coordination with pyridyl end-groups and the reaction with TPyP macrocycles, which control the chemical and structural phase of the self-assembly. Following a high temperature annealing, the same Kagome structure emerged from a precursor rhombus network

  12. Structure-property Relationships for Methyl-terminated Alkyl Self-assembled Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    F DelRio; D Rampulla; C Jaye; G Stan; R Gates; D Fischer; R Cook

    2011-12-31

    Structure-property relationships for methyl-terminated alkyl self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are developed using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). NEXAFS C K-edge spectra are used to compute the dichroic ratio, which provides a quantitative measure of the molecular structure. AFM data are analyzed with an elastic adhesive contact model, modified by a first-order elastic perturbation method to include substrate effects, to extract the monolayer mechanical properties. Using this approach, the measured mechanical properties are not influenced by the substrate, which allows universal structure-property relationships to be developed for methyl-terminated alkyl SAMs.

  13. Self-assembly of magnetic spheres in two dimensions: The relevance of onion-like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, René; Stanković, Igor

    2015-05-01

    The self-assembly in two dimensions of spherical magnets is addressed theoretically. Minimal energy structures are obtained by optimization procedures as well as Monte Carlo computer simulations. For a small number of constitutive magnets N ≤ 17 , ring-like structures are found to be stable. In the regime of larger N ≥ 18 , the magnets form touching concentric rings that are reminiscent of the onion-like structures. At sufficiently large N, the (edgy) shells are hexagonal where dipole moments tend to align to the edge direction. All these relevant predicted shapes are experimentally reproduced by manipulating millimetric magnets.

  14. Immobilization of self-assembled pre-dispersed nano-TiO2 onto montmorillonite and its photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Luo, Yuan; Jia, Bing; Li, Yan; Yuan, Lingling; Yu, Jiang

    2015-06-01

    The immobilization of pre-dispersed TiO2 colloids onto the external surface of the clay mineral montmorillonite (Mt) was accomplished and regulated via a self-assembly method employing the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The role of CTAB in the synthesis process was investigated by preparing a series of TiO2-CTAB-Mt composites (TCM) with various CTAB doses. The results indicated that a uniform and continuous TiO2 film was deposited on the external surface of montmorillonite in the composite synthesized with 0.1 wt.% of CTAB, and the TCM nano-composites showed much higher values for specific surface area, average pore size and pore volume than the raw montmorillonite clay. Then, the formed TCM materials were applied in photocatalytic degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in aqueous solution. The degradation efficiency reached as high as 94.7%. Based on the degradation intermediates benezoquinone, fumaric acid and oxalic acid identified by LC-MS analysis, a mechanism for the photocatalytic oxidation of 2,4-DCP on TiO2/Mt nano-composites is proposed. PMID:26040737

  15. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces.

  16. Carbon frameworks as scaffolding for self-assembly to bio-organic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Bettina

    1999-12-01

    Carbon spheres and tubes form readily under a variety of physical-chemical conditions. They can mimic elementary life forms as well as fossilized organisms. However, they may still be connected to living systems either as proto- structures for future life or as rudimentary forms of past life. This paper suggests that carbon frameworks allow by virtue of their scaffolding properties the self-assembly to expanded structures, eventually leading to biosystems such as simple viruses and other microorganisms. This development is not limited to terrestrial environments, although solvents molecules such as water and coordinating metal ions are essential vehicles for morphogenesis.

  17. Structure of Self-Assembled Mn Atom Chains on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Villarreal, R; Longobardi, M; Köster, S A; Kirkham, Ch J; Bowler, D; Renner, Ch

    2015-12-18

    Mn has been found to self-assemble into atomic chains running perpendicular to the surface dimer reconstruction on Si(001). They differ from other atomic chains by a striking asymmetric appearance in filled state scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. This has prompted complicated structural models involving up to three Mn atoms per chain unit. Combining STM, atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory we find that a simple necklacelike chain of single Mn atoms reproduces all their prominent features, including their asymmetry not captured by current models. The upshot is a remarkably simpler structure for modeling the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn atom chains on Si(001). PMID:26722930

  18. Self-assembled Ag nanoparticle network passivated by a nano-sized ZnO layer for transparent and flexible film heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Han-Ki; Kim, Min-Yi; Chang, Hyo-Sik

    2015-12-15

    We investigated a self-assembled Ag nanoparticle network electrode passivated by a nano-sized ZnO layer for use in high-performance transparent and flexible film heaters (TFFHs). The low temperature atomic layer deposition of a nano-sized ZnO layer effectively filled the uncovered area of Ag network and improved the current spreading in the self-assembled Ag network without a change in the sheet resistance and optical transmittance as well as mechanical flexibility. The time-temperature profiles and heat distribution analysis demonstrate that the performance of the TFTH with the ZnO/Ag network is superior to that of a TFFH with Ag nanowire electrodes. In addition, the TFTHs with ZnO/Ag network exhibited better stability than the TFFH with a bare Ag network due to the effective current spreading through the nano-sized ZnO layer.

  19. Preparation of self-assembled core-shell nano structure of conjugated generation 4.5 poly (amidoamine) dendrimer and monoclonal Anti-IL-6 antibody as bioimaging probe.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Shewaye Lakew; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2015-11-01

    In this article, interleukin-6 (IL-6)-conjugated anionic generation 4.5 (G4.5) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) was synthesized through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry and evaluated for its optical properties in vitro. Conjugation was confirmed using Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR). After IL-6 conjugation, nanoparticle size increased to approximately 70 nm and zeta potential increased from -56.5 ± 0.2 to -19.1 ± 2.4 mV due to neutralization of negatively charged G4.5. Wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) suggested that a layered nanoparticle structure was formed by the G4.5/IL-6 conjugate. Most interestingly, the intrinsic fluorescence of G4.5 significantly increased after IL-6 conjugation and underwent a blue shift as a result of H-aggregation. Furthermore, the cellular uptake of the conjugates by HeLa cells was significantly enhanced in comparison to free G4.5, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. These results indicated that the described system may be a potential bioimaging probe in vitro. PMID:26263213

  20. A reticulate superhydrophobic self-assembly structure prepared by ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Maogang; Xu, Xiaoliang; Yang, Zhou; Liu, Yuanyue; Lv, Haifei; Lv, Liu

    2009-04-01

    A simple hydrothermal self-assembly method was adopted to grow a newly reported superhydrophobic reticulate ZnO film with papillary nodes. The formation mechanism has also been explained by the tension junction model. This structure can extremely enhance the dewettability for the surface modification with low-surface-energy materials such as long chain fluorinated organic compounds. The surfaces of the ZnO thin film were superhydrophobic with a contact angle (CA) of 170° ± 1°, while the sliding angle (SA) is 2°. The samples were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM).

  1. Electronic structure of self-assembled Si nanowires on Ag(110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Rotenberg, Eli; Horn, Karsten

    2006-03-01

    Much attention has recently been paid to the physics of one- dimensional (1-D) systems, since exotic properties are predicted from basic theoretical consideration. However, it is not easy to realize such one-dimensional systems experimentally. Recently, Leandri et al.[1] have reported the growth of self-assembled 1D linear structures of silicon on Ag(110), perfectly aligned along [-110] direction and 16å wide. We have investigated the electronic structure of such self-assembled Si “nanowires” using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Si 2p core level line shows two narrow components in agreement with earlier work [1]. Silicon-induced features in the valence band region are observed, most clearly within the band gap of the Ag s-p states. The silicon-induced band exhibits a sizeable dispersion only in the direction along the linear structure, i.e. the [- 110] azimuth of the Ag(110) substrate. Details of the experimentally observed bands will be presented and related to the atomic structure within the 1D structure and its arrangement on the silver substrate. T.O. acknowledges financial support from Max Planck Society. Experiments were performed at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory operated by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. [1] C. Leandri et al., Self-aligned silicon quantum wires on Ag (110), Surface Science 574 (2005) L9 L15

  2. Structure and dynamics of optically directed self-assembly of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles leading to the formation of colloidal clusters often serves as the representative analogue for understanding molecular assembly. Unravelling the in situ structure and dynamics of such clusters in liquid suspensions is highly challenging. Presently colloidal clusters are first isolated from their generating environment and then their structures are probed by light scattering methods. In order to measure the in situ structure and dynamics of colloidal clusters, we have generated them using the high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulse optical tweezer. Since the constituent of our dimer, trimer or tetramer clusters are 250 nm radius two-photon resonant fluorophore coated nanospheres under the optical trap, they inherently produce Two-Photon Fluorescence, which undergo intra-nanosphere Fluorescence Energy Transfer. This unique energy transfer signature, in turn, enables us to visualize structures and orientations of these colloidal clusters during the process of their formation and subsequent dynamics in a liquid suspension. We also show that due to shape-birefringence, orientation and structural control of these colloidal clusters are possible as the polarization of the trapping laser is changed from linear to circular. We thus report important progress in sampling the smallest possible aggregates of nanoparticles, dimers, trimers or tetramers, formed early in the self-assembly process. PMID:27006305

  3. Structure and dynamics of optically directed self-assembly of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles leading to the formation of colloidal clusters often serves as the representative analogue for understanding molecular assembly. Unravelling the in situ structure and dynamics of such clusters in liquid suspensions is highly challenging. Presently colloidal clusters are first isolated from their generating environment and then their structures are probed by light scattering methods. In order to measure the in situ structure and dynamics of colloidal clusters, we have generated them using the high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulse optical tweezer. Since the constituent of our dimer, trimer or tetramer clusters are 250 nm radius two-photon resonant fluorophore coated nanospheres under the optical trap, they inherently produce Two-Photon Fluorescence, which undergo intra-nanosphere Fluorescence Energy Transfer. This unique energy transfer signature, in turn, enables us to visualize structures and orientations of these colloidal clusters during the process of their formation and subsequent dynamics in a liquid suspension. We also show that due to shape-birefringence, orientation and structural control of these colloidal clusters are possible as the polarization of the trapping laser is changed from linear to circular. We thus report important progress in sampling the smallest possible aggregates of nanoparticles, dimers, trimers or tetramers, formed early in the self-assembly process. PMID:27006305

  4. Structure and dynamics of optically directed self-assembly of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debjit; Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles leading to the formation of colloidal clusters often serves as the representative analogue for understanding molecular assembly. Unravelling the in situ structure and dynamics of such clusters in liquid suspensions is highly challenging. Presently colloidal clusters are first isolated from their generating environment and then their structures are probed by light scattering methods. In order to measure the in situ structure and dynamics of colloidal clusters, we have generated them using the high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulse optical tweezer. Since the constituent of our dimer, trimer or tetramer clusters are 250 nm radius two-photon resonant fluorophore coated nanospheres under the optical trap, they inherently produce Two-Photon Fluorescence, which undergo intra-nanosphere Fluorescence Energy Transfer. This unique energy transfer signature, in turn, enables us to visualize structures and orientations of these colloidal clusters during the process of their formation and subsequent dynamics in a liquid suspension. We also show that due to shape-birefringence, orientation and structural control of these colloidal clusters are possible as the polarization of the trapping laser is changed from linear to circular. We thus report important progress in sampling the smallest possible aggregates of nanoparticles, dimers, trimers or tetramers, formed early in the self-assembly process.

  5. Self-Assembled Silica Nano-Composite Polymer Electrolytes: Synthesis, Rheology & Electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Saad A.: Fedkiw Peter S.; Baker, Gregory L.

    2007-01-24

    The ultimate objectives of this research are to understand the principles underpinning nano-composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs) and facilitate development of novel CPEs that are low-cost, have high conductivities, large Li+ transference numbers, improved electrolyte-electrode interfacial stability, yield long cycle life, exhibit mechanical stability and are easily processable. Our approach is to use nanoparticulate silica fillers to formulate novel composite electrolytes consisting of surface-modified fumed silica nano-particles in polyethylene oxides (PEO) in the presence of lithium salts. We intend to design single-ion conducting silica nanoparticles which provide CPEs with high Li+ transference numbers. We also will develop low-Mw (molecular weight), high-Mw and crosslinked PEO electrolytes with tunable properties in terms of conductivity, transference number, interfacial stability, processability and mechanical strength

  6. Monte Carlo study on the self-assembly of nanoparticles into a nanorod structure.

    PubMed

    Matin, Mohammad A; Kim, Hyojeong; Saha, Joyanta K; Zhang, Zhengqing; Kim, Jinkwon; Jang, Joonkyung

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) can assemble into a range of low dimensional structures, such as nanowires, nanorods and nanosheets. In this study, we investigate the self-assembly of CdTe NPs by using Monte Carlo simulation. Using a simple model for the anisotropic interaction of NPs, the present Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that NPs with large dipole moments assemble spontaneously into a nanorod even if the short range interactions among NPs is isotropic. Interestingly, we found that the present nanorod grew by forming a transient structure which looks similar to a double ring. For NPs similar to CdTe, the dipole-dipole interaction had a dominant effect over van der Waals attractions and steric repulsion on the final structure of the NP aggregates. The simulated rods are similar to those observed in the experimental self-assembly of CdTe NPs. The NPs with relatively small electric dipole moments aggregated into more or less isotropic structures. PMID:24205640

  7. A tractable genotype–phenotype map modelling the self-assembly of protein quaternary structure

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Johnston, Iain G.; Louis, Ard A.; Ahnert, Sebastian E.

    2014-01-01

    The mapping between biological genotypes and phenotypes is central to the study of biological evolution. Here, we introduce a rich, intuitive and biologically realistic genotype–phenotype (GP) map that serves as a model of self-assembling biological structures, such as protein complexes, and remains computationally and analytically tractable. Our GP map arises naturally from the self-assembly of polyomino structures on a two-dimensional lattice and exhibits a number of properties: redundancy (genotypes vastly outnumber phenotypes), phenotype bias (genotypic redundancy varies greatly between phenotypes), genotype component disconnectivity (phenotypes consist of disconnected mutational networks) and shape space covering (most phenotypes can be reached in a small number of mutations). We also show that the mutational robustness of phenotypes scales very roughly logarithmically with phenotype redundancy and is positively correlated with phenotypic evolvability. Although our GP map describes the assembly of disconnected objects, it shares many properties with other popular GP maps for connected units, such as models for RNA secondary structure or the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model for protein tertiary structure. The remarkable fact that these important properties similarly emerge from such different models suggests the possibility that universal features underlie a much wider class of biologically realistic GP maps. PMID:24718456

  8. Bio-inspired Structural Colors from Deposition of Synthetic Melanin Nanoparticles by Evaporative Self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming; Li, Yiwen; Deheyn, Dimitri; Yue, Xiujun; Gianneschi, Nathan; Shawkey, Matthew; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Melanin, a ubiquitous black or brown pigment in the animal kingdom, is a unique but poorly understood biomaterial. Many bird feathers contain melanosomes (melanin-containing organelles), which pack into ordered nanostructures, like multilayer or two-dimensional photonic crystal structures, to produce structural colors. To understand the optical properties of melanin and how melanosomes assemble into certain structures to produce colors, we prepared synthetic melanin (polydopamine) particles with variable sizes and aspect ratios. We have characterized the absorption and refractive index of the synthetic melanin particles. We have also shown that we can use an evaporative process to self-assemble melanin films with a wide range of colors. The colors obtained using this technique is modeled using a thin-film interference model and the optical properties of the synthetic melanin nanoparticles. Our results on self-assembly of synthetic melanin nanoparticles provide an explanation as why the use of melanosomes to produce colors is prevalent in the animal kingdom. National science foundation, air force office of scientific research, human frontier science program.

  9. A Structural Model for a Self-Assembled Nanotube Provides Insight into Its Exciton Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The design and synthesis of functional self-assembled nanostructures is frequently an empirical process fraught with critical knowledge gaps about atomic-level structure in these noncovalent systems. Here, we report a structural model for a semiconductor nanotube formed via the self-assembly of naphthalenediimide-lysine (NDI-Lys) building blocks determined using experimental 13C–13C and 13C–15N distance restraints from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance supplemented by electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction data. The structural model reveals a two-dimensional-crystal-like architecture of stacked monolayer rings each containing ∼50 NDI-Lys molecules, with significant π-stacking interactions occurring both within the confines of the ring and along the long axis of the tube. Excited-state delocalization and energy transfer are simulated for the nanotube based on time-dependent density functional theory and an incoherent hopping model. Remarkably, these calculations reveal efficient energy migration from the excitonic bright state, which is in agreement with the rapid energy transfer within NDI-Lys nanotubes observed previously using fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:26120375

  10. Large-scale self-assembled epitaxial growth of highly-ordered three-dimensional micro/nano single-crystalline PbSe pyramid arrays by selective chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jijun; Weng, Binbin; Li, Lin; Li, Xiaomin; Shi, Zhisheng

    2015-05-01

    Highly ordered three-dimensional micro- and nano- PbSe pyramid arrays were synthesized by using selective epitaxial self-assembled chemical bath deposition method. Each pyramid consists of a very sharp (111) tip with six smooth equivalent {100} facets. Every (100) facet forms an angle of about 54.7° with respect to the (111) facet. The structural features including pyramidal size and period could be precisely tailored by pre-patterned Au mask and etching time. Pyramids are self-assembled on the confined positions by the dual functions of one-dimensional and two-dimensional oriented attachment mechanisms along [110] directions on the (111) surface, following the Gibbs-Curie-Wulff minimum energy principle. This method could effectively create large, bottom-up 3D pyramidal surface patterns in a cost-effective and time-saving manner, which has potential applications in infrared photoconductors, solar cells and light emitting enhancement for display, etc.

  11. Structure of a designed protein cage that self-assembles into a highly porous cube

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lai, Yen-Ting; Reading, Eamonn; Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Laganowsky, Arthur; Asturias, Francisco J.; Tainer, John A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-11-10

    Natural proteins can be versatile building blocks for multimeric, self-assembling structures. Yet, creating protein-based assemblies with specific geometries and chemical properties remains challenging. Highly porous materials represent particularly interesting targets for designed assembly. Here we utilize a strategy of fusing two natural protein oligomers using a continuous alpha-helical linker to design a novel protein that self assembles into a 750 kDa, 225 Å diameter, cube-shaped cage with large openings into a 130 Å diameter inner cavity. A crystal structure of the cage showed atomic level agreement with the designed model, while electron microscopy, native mass spectrometry, and small angle x-raymore » scattering revealed alternate assembly forms in solution. These studies show that accurate design of large porous assemblies with specific shapes is feasible, while further specificity improvements will likely require limiting flexibility to select against alternative forms. Finally, these results provide a foundation for the design of advanced materials with applications in bionanotechnology, nanomedicine and material sciences.« less

  12. Structure of a designed protein cage that self-assembles into a highly porous cube

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Yen-Ting; Reading, Eamonn; Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Laganowsky, Arthur; Asturias, Francisco J.; Tainer, John A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-11-10

    Natural proteins can be versatile building blocks for multimeric, self-assembling structures. Yet, creating protein-based assemblies with specific geometries and chemical properties remains challenging. Highly porous materials represent particularly interesting targets for designed assembly. Here we utilize a strategy of fusing two natural protein oligomers using a continuous alpha-helical linker to design a novel protein that self assembles into a 750 kDa, 225 Å diameter, cube-shaped cage with large openings into a 130 Å diameter inner cavity. A crystal structure of the cage showed atomic level agreement with the designed model, while electron microscopy, native mass spectrometry, and small angle x-ray scattering revealed alternate assembly forms in solution. These studies show that accurate design of large porous assemblies with specific shapes is feasible, while further specificity improvements will likely require limiting flexibility to select against alternative forms. Finally, these results provide a foundation for the design of advanced materials with applications in bionanotechnology, nanomedicine and material sciences.

  13. Bamboo leaf-like micro-nano sheets self-assembled by block copolymers as wafers for cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Peng, Bo; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Lixin; Chen, Yongming

    2014-12-01

    Bamboo leaf shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) sheets were prepared via crystallization-driven self-assembly. By selecting an appropriate mixed solvent, the polymer sheets, with a PCL single-crystal layer sandwiched by two PEO layers, were obtained efficiently. The morphology and structure of the sheets were characterized by microscopes and diffraction techniques. As a non-spherical model particle, endocytosis of the sheets was investigated on RAW 264.7, U937, HUVECs, HeLa, and 293 T cells. The polymer sheets, just like wafers for cells, displayed a selective internalization to different cells, which showed a potential application in accurate cell targeting drug delivery and imaging. PMID:25205068

  14. Controlled evaporative self-assembly of confined microfluids: A route to complex ordered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Myunghwan

    The evaporative self-assembly of nonvolatile solutes such as polymers, nanocrystals, and carbon nanotubes has been widely recognized as a non-lithographic means of producing a diverse range of intriguing complex structures. Due to the spatial variation of evaporative flux and possible convection, however, these non-equilibrium dissipative structures (e.g., fingering patterns and polygonal network structures) are often irregularly and stochastically organized. Yet for many applications in microelectronics, data storage devices, and biotechnology, it is highly desirable to achieve surface patterns having a well-controlled spatial arrangement. To date, only a few elegant studies have centered on precise control over the evaporation process to produce ordered structures. In a remarked comparison with conventional lithography techniques, surface patterning by controlled solvent evaporation is simple and cost-effective, offering a lithography- and external field-free means to organize nonvolatile materials into ordered microscopic structures over large surface areas. The ability to engineer an evaporative self-assembly process that yields a wide range of complex, self-organizing structures over large areas offers tremendous potential for applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and bio- or chemical sensors. We developed a facile, robust tool for evaporating polymer, nanoparticle, or DNA solutions in curve-on-flat geometries to create versatile, highly regular microstructures, including hierarchically structured polymer blend rings, conjugated polymer "snake-skins", block copolymer stripes, and punch-hole-like meshes, biomolecular microring arrays, etc. The mechanism of structure formation was elucidated both experimentally and theoretically. Our method further enhances current fabrication approaches to creating highly ordered structures in a simple and cost-effective manner, envisioning the potential to be tailored for use in photonics, optoelectronics, microfluidic

  15. Role of Surfactant Molecular Structure on Self Assembly: Aqueous SDBS on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttipong, Manaswee; Thompson, John R.; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    Stabilizing aqueous dispersions of carbon nanotubes mono-dispersed in diameter and chirality remains elusive. Surfactants have proven useful in deploying ultra-centrifugation techniques, but the molecular mechanism responsible for their effectiveness remains not fully understood. Based on a number of recent molecular simulation results, including those from our group, it appears that the morphology of the self-assembled surfactant aggregates on the carbon nanotubes strongly affects the effective potential of mean force between pairs of interacting carbon nanotubes. In this work we explore the effect of surfactant molecular structure on the properties of aqueous surfactant self-assembled aggregates. We employ equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We consider the surfactant SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) with benzene ring located on the fifth or on the twelfth carbon atom in the tail, and the surfactant AOT [sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate]. The simulations are conducted at room conditions for different surface coverages on (6,6), (12,12), and (20,20) single walled carbon nanotubes. These new results will help us identify the surfactant properties that allow us to manipulate nanotube-nanotube effective interactions. Research supported by the Department of Energy via CANTEC.

  16. Directed Self-Assembly of Large Scaffold-free Multicellular Honeycomb Structures

    PubMed Central

    Tejavibulya, Nalin; Youssef, Jacquelyn; Bao, Brian; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Morgan, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    A significant challenge to the field of biofabrication is the rapid construction of large three dimensional (3D) living tissues and organs. Multi-cellular spheroids have been used as building blocks. In this paper, we create large multi-cellular honeycomb building blocks using directed self-assembly, whereby cell-to-cell adhesion, in the context of the shape and obstacles of a micromold, drives the formation of a 3D structure. Computer aided design, rapid prototyping and replica molding were used to fabricate honeycomb-shaped micro-molds. Nonadhesive hydrogels cast from these micro-molds were equilibrated in cell culture medium and seeded with two types of mammalian cells. The cells settled into the honeycomb recess, were unable to attach to the nonadhesive hydrogel and so cell-to-cell adhesion drove the self-assembly of a large multicellular honeycomb within 24 hours. Distinct morphological changes occurred to the honeycomb and its cells indicating the presence of significant cell-mediated tension. Unlike the spheroid, whose size is constrained by a critical diffusion distance needed to maintain cell viability, the overall size of the honeycomb is not limited. The rapid production of the honeycomb building unit, with its multiple rings of high density cells and open lumen spaces, offers interesting new possibilities for biofabrication strategies. PMID:21828905

  17. Atomically precise self-assembly of one-dimensional structures on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barke, I.; Rügheimer, T. K.; Zheng, Fan; Himpsel, F. J.

    2007-10-01

    This work has three main themes: (1) fabricate atomically precise nanostructures at surfaces, particularly nanowires consisting of atom chains; (2) explore the behavior of one-dimensional electrons in atomic chains; (3) find the fundamental limits of data storage using an atomic scale memory. Semiconductor surfaces lend themselves towards self-assembly, because the broken covalent bonds create elaborate reconstruction patterns to minimize the surface energy. An example is the large 7 × 7 unit cell on Si(1 1 1), which can be used as building block. On semiconductors, the surface electrons completely de-couple from the substrate, as long as their energy lies in the band gap. Angle-resolved photoemission reveals surprising features, such as a fractional band filling and a spin-splitting at a non-magnetic surface. An interesting by-product is a memory structure with self-assembled tracks that are five atom rows wide and store a bit by the presence or absence of a single silicon atom. This toy memory is used to test the fundamental limits of data storage and to see how storage on silicon compares to storage in DNA.

  18. Structurally Flexible C₃-Symmetric Receptors for Molecular Recognition and Their Self-Assembly Properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashutosh S; Sun, Shih-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The bioinspired design and synthesis of building blocks and their assemblies by the supramolecular approach has ever fascinated scientists to utilize such artificial systems for numerous purposes. Flexibility is a basic feature of natural systems. However, in artificial systems this is difficult to control, especially if there is no preorganization of the component(s) of a system. We have designed and synthesized a series of C3 -symmetric N-bridged flexible receptors and successfully utilized them to selectively entrap the notorious and toxic nitrate anion in aqueous medium. This was the first report of highest binding affinity for the nitrate anion in aqueous medium. An impressive self-sorting phenomenon of reversibly formed hydrogen-bonded capsules, which self-assembled from flexible tripodal receptors having branches of similar size and bearing the same amide functionality, has been disclosed. Encapsulated nitrate anion has been further utilized for the photochemical [2+2] cycloaddition reaction for the synthesis of strained four-membered ring structures through dynamic self-assembly. In this Personal Account, we summarize these results showing the utility of naturally inspired flexibility in artificial systems. PMID:26202256

  19. Investigating the Structure-Property Relationships of Aqueous Self-Assembled Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, Daniel Vincent

    The components of all living organisms are formed through aqueous self-assembly of organic and inorganic materials through physical interactions including hydrophobic, electrostatic, and hydrogen bonding. In this dissertation, these physical interactions were exploited to develop nanostructured materials for a range of applications. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) self-assemble into varying structures depending on the physical interactions of the peptides and tails. PA aggregation was investigated by cryo-TEM to provide insight on the effects of varying parameters, including the number and length of the lipid tails as well as the number, length, charge, hydrophobicity, and the hydrogen bonding ability of the peptides. It was determined that cylindrical micelles are most commonly formed, and that specific criteria must be met in order to form spherical micelles, nanoribbons, vesicles or less ordered aggregates. Controlling the aggregated structure is necessary for many applications---particularly in therapeutics. Additionally, two-headed PAs were designed to act as a catalyst and template for biomimetic mineralization to control the formation of inorganic nanomaterials. Finally, injectable hydrogels made from ABA triblock copolymers were synthesized with the A blocks being functionalized with either guanidinium or sulfonate groups. These oppositely charged polyelectrolyte endblocks formed complex coacervate domains, which served as physical crosslinks in the hydrogel network. The mechanical properties, the network structure, the nature of the coacervate domain and the kinetics of hydrogel formation were investigated as a function of polymer concentration, salt concentration, pH and stoichiometry with rheometry, SAXS and SANS. It was shown that the mechanical properties of the hydrogels was highly dependent on the structural organization of the coacervate domains and that the properties could be tuned with polymer and salt concentration. Polymer and salt concentration were

  20. Self-Assembled, Iridescent, Crustacean-Mimetic Nanocomposites with Tailored Periodicity and Layered Cuticular Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baochun; Walther, Andreas

    2015-11-24

    Natural high-performance materials inspire the pursuit of ordered hard/soft nanocomposite structures at high fractions of reinforcements and with balanced molecular interactions. Herein, we develop a facile, waterborne self-assembly pathway to mimic the multiscale cuticle structure of the crustacean armor by combining hard reinforcing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with soft poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). We show iridescent CNC nanocomposites with cholesteric liquid-crystal structure, in which different helical pitches and photonic band gaps can be realized by varying the CNC/PVA ratio. We further show that multilayered crustacean-mimetic materials with tailored periodicity and layered cuticular structure can be obtained by sequential preparation pathways. The transition from a cholesteric to a disordered structure occurs for a critical polymer concentration. Correspondingly, we find a transition from stiff and strong mechanical behavior to materials with increasing ductility. Crack propagation studies using scanning electron microscopy visualize the different crack growth and toughening mechanisms inside cholesteric nanocomposites as a function of the interstitial polymer content for the first time. Different extents of crack deflection, layered delamination, ligament bridging, and constrained microcracking can be observed. Drawing of highly plasticized films sheds light on the mechanistic details of the transition from a cholesteric/chiral nematic to a nematic structure. The study demonstrates how self-assembly of biobased CNCs in combination with suitable polymers can be used to replicate a hierarchical biological structure and how future design of these ordered multifunctional nanocomposites can be optimized by understanding mechanistic details of deformation and fracture. PMID:26372330

  1. Bio-Inspired Structural Colors Produced via Self-Assembly of Synthetic Melanin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Li, Yiwen; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Yue, Xiujun; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Shawkey, Matthew D; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-05-26

    Structural colors arising from interactions of light with submicron scale periodic structures have been found in many species across all taxa, serving multiple biological functions including sexual signaling, camouflage, and aposematism. Directly inspired by the extensive use of self-assembled melanosomes to produce colors in avian feathers, we set out to synthesize and assemble polydopamine-based synthetic melanin nanoparticles in an effort to fabricate colored films. We have quantitatively demonstrated that synthetic melanin nanoparticles have a high refractive index and broad absorption spanning across the UV-visible range, similar to natural melanins. Utilizing a thin-film interference model, we demonstrated the coloration mechanism of deposited films and showed that the unique optical properties of synthetic melanin nanoparticles provide advantages for structural colors over other polymeric nanoparticles (i.e., polystyrene colloidal particles). PMID:25938924

  2. Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Studies: Structure and Formation of Self-assembled Nanostructures in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Seung

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) techniques are among the most powerful to characterize self-assembling soft materials (colloids, polymers, and microemulsions, etc.) at the nanometer scale, without any need for implicit models or assumptions about the structure. We can even visualize structure under dynamic conditions, capturing each stage of development. In this thesis, cryo-EM has been used to investigate the formation and structure of a variety of self-assembling soft materials. Visualization is complemented by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, and conductivity measurements. In each case, cryo-EM provides new insights, not otherwise available, into the nanostructure development. Self-assembly phenomena at the molecular level are critical to the performance of tremendous number of applied systems ranging from personal care products to industrial products. To evaluate these self-assembled materials, multiple characterization techniques are required. We investigated aggregation behavior of cesium dodecyl sulfate (CsDS) ionic surfactant in aqueous solution. Coupled with the real space data from cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and the inverse space data from SAXS, the experimental result of CsDS in aqueous solution gave a new insight in CsDS micellar structures and their development as a function of concentration. Cryo-TEM showed the presence of the liquid-like hydrocarbon core in the CsDS micelles and relatively thick shell structures at a low CsDS concentration. The core-shell sphere structure micelle shifted to core-shell cylindrical micelle structure at high concentration. The morphology and structure of paclitaxel silicate (PTX) prodrug, encapsulated with amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) diblock copolymers were studied. The six different silicate PTX prodrug candidates were characterized with cryo-TEM. Direct imaging with cryo-TEM illustrated structure of prodrug

  3. Interactions of main chain in folding and self assembly of unfolded protein structure: Enquiries with a serine solubilized nonapeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Kinshuk Raj; Durani, Susheel

    2014-06-01

    Interactions of the protein main chain are probed for their role in folding and self-assembly. The interactions are assessed with serine nonapeptide Ac-(Ser-Ala)4-Ser-NH2 in poly-L and alternating-L,D structure variations. Being a neutral molecule, Serine nonapeptide has been found to display not only folding-unfolding equilibrium, but also association-dissociation equilibrium as a function of solvent and concentration. Thus scrutiny of intra- and inter-molecular interactions have been undertaken in water, methanol, and DMSO solvents. In water, poly-L peptide displays a PPII-helix conformation which unfolds to extended β-conformation with increase of temperature, apparently in a two-state equilibrium. Poly-L peptide at high concentration and on transfer to the low polarity solvent, methanol, displays ordering as a β-hairpin. This implies folding of the peptide by self assembly. Self assembly and ordering possibly as double-stranded β-helix is also evidence for alternating-L,D peptide. Both isomers were observed to be unfolded in high polarity solvent DMSO. Dynamic light scattering suggests that assembly in both isomers may involve large size aggregates. The results have established that folding and self-assembly can be coupled equilibria dependent upon solute structure, concentration, and solvent. The interactions of the protein main chain involved in folding and self assembly of unfolded structure are illuminated and have been discussed.

  4. Self-assembly of DNA double-double crossover complexes into high-density, doubly connected, planar structures.

    PubMed

    Reishus, Dustin; Shaw, Bilal; Brun, Yuriy; Chelyapov, Nickolas; Adleman, Leonard

    2005-12-21

    We designed a molecular complex, the double-double crossover, consisting of four DNA double helices connected by six reciprocal exchanges. Atomic force micrographs suggest that double-double crossover complexes self-assemble into high-density, doubly connected, two-dimensional, planar structures. Such structures may be suitable as substrates for the deposition of nanomaterials in the creation of high-density electrical and quantum devices. We speculate about a modified double-double crossover complex that might self-assemble into high-density, doubly connected, three-dimensional structures. PMID:16351073

  5. An ultrasensitive and low-cost graphene sensor based on layer-by-layer nano self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-02-01

    The flexible cancer sensor based on layer-by-layer self-assembled graphene reported in this letter demonstrates features including ultrahigh sensitivity and low cost due to graphene material properties in nature, self-assembly technique, and polyethylene terephthalate substrate. According to the conductance change of self-assembled graphene, the label free and labeled graphene sensors are capable of detecting very low concentrations of prostate specific antigen down to 4 fg/ml (0.11 fM) and 0.4 pg/ml (11 fM), respectively, which are three orders of magnitude lower than carbon nanotube sensors under the same conditions of design, manufacture, and measurement.

  6. Self-assembly of coordination molecular baskets as inorganic analogues of cyclotriveratrylenes (CTV).

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Hui; Huang, Hai-Ping; Yu, Shu-Yan; Li, Yi-Zhi; Huang, Hui; Sei, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Kentaro

    2005-07-21

    A [3 + 3] modular self-assembly gives rise to the formation of basket-shaped, crown ether-functionalized, nano-sized trimetallo-macrocycles, which function as structural analogues of cyclotriveratrylenes (CTV). PMID:15995740

  7. Directed self-assembly of quantum structures by nanomechanical stamping using probe tips.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Curtis; Marega, Euclydes; Stach, Eric A; Salamo, Gregory; Hussey, Lindsay; Muñoz, Martin; Malshe, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that nanomechanically stamped substrates can be used as templates to pattern and direct the self-assembly of epitaxial quantum structures such as quantum dots. Diamond probe tips are used to indent or stamp the surface of GaAs(100) to create nanoscale volumes of dislocation-mediated deformation, which alter the growth surface strain. These strained sites act to bias nucleation, hence allowing for selective growth of InAs quantum dots. Patterns of quantum dots are observed to form above the underlying nanostamped template. The strain state of the patterned structures is characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The potential of using nanoprobe tips as a quantum dot nanofabrication technology are discussed. PMID:21730527

  8. Intermolecular hydrogen bonded and self-assembled β-pleated sheet structures of β-sulfidocarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Sahid; Das, Gopal; Chaudhuri, Mihir K.

    2007-06-01

    The three crystal structures of β-sulfidocarbonyls 1, 2 and 3 synthesized from the reaction of acryl amide with cystiene, 1,2-dithiol and 1,3-dithiols, respectively, in water catalyzed by borax, have been determined at 273 K. The characteristic features of the structures are self-assembly through intermolecular hydrogen bonding leading to infinite chains of molecules in one direction, in addition to the stacking of layers of such molecular chains in the perpendicular direction ultimately giving rise to β-pleated sheets of 3D molecular network involving N-H⋯O, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯S bonding in the crystal lattice.

  9. Structure and energetics of diphenylalanine self-assembling on Cu(110).

    PubMed

    Tomba, Giulia; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Costantini, Giovanni; Kern, Klaus; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi; De Vita, Alessandro

    2007-12-13

    We investigate the dynamical features of the adsorption of diphenylalanine molecules on the Cu(110) surface and of their assembling into supramolecular structures by a combination of quantum and classical atomistic modeling with dynamic scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopic experiments. Our results reveal a self-assembling mechanism in which isolated adsorbed molecules change their conformation and adsorption mode as a consequence of their mutual interactions. In particular, the formation of zwitterions after proton transfer between initially neutral molecules is found to be the key event of the assembling process, which stabilizes the supramolecular structures. Because of the constraints on the intermolecular bonds exerted by the surface-molecule interactions, the assembly process is strictly stereoselective, and may suggest a general model for patterning and functionalization of bare metal surfaces with short chiral peptides. PMID:17999478

  10. Structure-property relationships for self-assembled zinc chlorin light-harvesting dye aggregates.

    PubMed

    Huber, Valerie; Sengupta, Sanchita; Würthner, Frank

    2008-01-01

    A series of zinc 3(1)-hydroxymethyl chlorins 10 a-e and zinc 3(1)-hydroxyethyl chlorins 17 with varied structural features were synthesized by modifying naturally occurring chlorophyll a. Solvent-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent UV/Vis and CD spectroscopic methods as well as microscopic investigations were performed to explore the importance of particular functional groups and steric effects on the self-assembly behavior of these zinc chlorins. Semisynthetic zinc chlorins 10 a-e possess the three functional units relevant for self-assembly found in their natural bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) counterparts, namely, the 3(1)-OH group, a central metal ion, and the 13(1) C==O moiety along the Qy axis, and they contain various 17(2)-substituents. Depending on whether the zinc chlorins have 17(2)-hydrophobic or hydrophilic side chains, they self-assemble in nonpolar organic solvents or in aqueous media, respectively. Zinc chlorins possessing at least two long side chains provide soluble self-aggregates that are stable in solution for a prolonged time, thus facilitating elucidation of their properties by optical spectroscopy. The morphology of the zinc chlorin aggregates was elucidated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies, revealing well-defined nanoscale rod structures for zinc chlorin 10 b with a height of about 6 nm. It is worth noting that this size is in good accordance with a tubular arrangement of the dyes similar to that observed in their natural BChl counterparts in the light-harvesting chlorosomes of green bacteria. Furthermore, for the epimeric 3(1)-hydroxyethyl zinc chlorins 17 with hydrophobic side chains, the influence of the chirality center at the 3(1)-position on the aggregation behavior was studied in detail by UV/Vis and CD spectroscopy. Unlike zinc chlorins 10, the 3(1)-hydroxyethyl zinc chlorins 17 formed only small oligomers and not higher rod aggregate structures, which can be attributed to the steric effect imposed by the additional

  11. Self-Assembling Nano-Architectures Created from a Protein Nano-Building Block Using an Intermolecularly Folded Dimeric de Novo Protein.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Yanase, Keiichi; Sato, Takaaki; Unzai, Satoru; Hecht, Michael H; Arai, Ryoichi

    2015-09-01

    The design of novel proteins that self-assemble into supramolecular complexes is an important step in the development of synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Recently, we described the three-dimensional structure of WA20, a de novo protein that forms an intermolecularly folded dimeric 4-helix bundle (PDB code 3VJF ). To harness the unusual intertwined structure of WA20 for the self-assembly of supramolecular nanostructures, we created a protein nanobuilding block (PN-Block), called WA20-foldon, by fusing the dimeric structure of WA20 to the trimeric foldon domain of fibritin from bacteriophage T4. The WA20-foldon fusion protein was expressed in the soluble fraction in Escherichia coli, purified, and shown to form several homooligomeric forms. The stable oligomeric forms were further purified and characterized by a range of biophysical techniques. Size exclusion chromatography, multiangle light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses indicate that the small (S form), middle (M form), and large (L form) forms of the WA20-foldon oligomers exist as hexamer (6-mer), dodecamer (12-mer), and octadecamer (18-mer), respectively. These findings suggest that the oligomers in multiples of 6-mer are stably formed by fusing the interdigitated dimer of WA20 with the trimer of foldon domain. Pair-distance distribution functions obtained from the Fourier inversion of the SAXS data suggest that the S and M forms have barrel- and tetrahedron-like shapes, respectively. These results demonstrate that the de novo WA20-foldon is an effective building block for the creation of self-assembling artificial nanoarchitectures. PMID:26120734

  12. Structural investigations of self-assembled monolayers for organic electronics: results from X-ray reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Khassanov, Artoem; Steinrück, Hans-Georg; Schmaltz, Thomas; Magerl, Andreas; Halik, Marcus

    2015-07-21

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been established as crucial interlayers and electronically active layers in organic electronic devices, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), and nonvolatile memories (NVMs). The use of self-assembling functionalized organic molecules is beneficial due to mainly three advantages compared with common thin film deposition approaches. (1) Molecular self-assembly occurs with surface selectivity, determined by the interaction between the functional anchor group of the organic molecules and the target surface. (2) The film thickness of the resulting layers is perfectly controllable on the angstrom scale, due to the self-terminating film formation to only a single molecular layer. And finally, (3) the wide variability in the chemical structure of such molecules enables different SAM functionalities for devices, ranging from electrical insulation to charge storage to charge transport. The SAM approach can be further expanded by employing several functionalized molecules to create mixed SAMs with consequently mixed properties. The function of SAMs in devices depends not only on the chemical structure of the molecules but also on their final arrangement and orientation on the surface. A reliable and nondestructive in-depth characterization of SAMs on nonconductive oxide surfaces is still challenging because of the very small thickness and the impracticality of methods such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this Account, we illustrate how X-ray reflectivity (XRR) provides analytical access to major questions of SAM composition, morphology, and even formation by means of investigations of pure and mixed SAMs based on phosphonic acids (PAs) of various chain structures on flat alumina (AlOx) surfaces. XRR is an analytical method that provides access to spatially averaged structural depth profiles over a relatively

  13. Self assembling proteins

    DOEpatents

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  14. Sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of self-assembled structures of Guanosine 5‧-monophosphate on mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstelj, Klemen; Spindler, Lea; Federiconi, Francesco; Bonn, Mischa; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Čopič, Martin

    2008-12-01

    The structure and ordering of Guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) films self-assembled on mica from GMP salt solutions were studied by infrared-visible sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (IR-VIS SFG) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We find that the surface self-assembly of GMP can be tuned through the concentration of the GMP solution as well as the nature of the counter ion. At low concentrations of the ammonium and the sodium GMP salt solutions, the self-assembled films are very similar, while at higher concentrations the SFG signal of ammonium GMP samples is dominated by a contribution not originating from azimuthally symmetric layers, which signifies that a helical bulk structure might be present.

  15. Combinatorial and topological modeling of cluster self-assembly of the crystal structure of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, G. D.; Blatov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    Combinatorial and topological modeling of packings of symmetrically connected polyhedral T12 clusters (hexagonal prisms), which are most widespread in crystal structures of zeolites, has been performed. Packings of T12 clusters are periodic 1D chains (11 types) and 2D microlayers (15 types). 2D microlayers that can be involved in the self-assembly of 3D zeolite structures described by tetracoordinated T nets are selected. Computer methods (the ToposPro program package) have been used to establish a correspondence with zeolites CHA (Chabazite, Ca6(H2O)40Al12Si24O72), AEI (AlPO-18, Al24P24O96), SAV ((C18H42N6)2(H2O)7Mg5Al19P24O96), KFI (Na30(H2O)98Al30Si66O192), GME (Gmelinite, (Ca,Na)4(H2O)24Al8Si16O48), AFX (SAPO-56, H3Al23Si5P20O96), and AFT (AlPO-52, Al36P36O144) for 7 out of 11 obtained models of 3D frameworks. Modeling of 3D polytypes of the GME (1L type)- AFX (2L type)- AFT (3L type) family has resulted in a new 3L polytype with the following crystallographic parameters: a =13.75 Å, c = 30.00 Å, V = 4912.0 Å3, sp. gr. P m2 (no. 187). It is established that the 2D self-assembly of known zeolite structures is accompanied by pairwise binding of all (T12 + T12) clusters with the formation of 4C rings, and the number of bonds between complementary chains during the formation of microlayers is maximum. Three types of obtained frameworks, which have no analogs among zeolites, exhibit low chain connectivity during microlayer formation in all cases.

  16. Structural and electronic characterization of self-assembled molecular nanoarchitectures by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gulino, Antonino

    2013-02-01

    Molecular monolayers and similar nanoarchitectures are indicative of the promising future of nanotechnology. Therefore, many scientists recently devoted their efforts to the synthesis, characterization, and properties of mono- and multilayer-based systems. In this context, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an important technique for the in-depth chemical and structural characterization of nanoscopic systems. In fact, it is a surface technique suitable for probing thicknesses of the same order of the photoelectron inelastic mean free paths (a few tens of ångströms) and allows one to immediately obtain qualitative and quantitative data, film thickness, surface coverage, molecule footprint, oxidation states, and presence of functional groups. Nevertheless, other techniques are important in obtaining a complete spectroscopic characterization of the investigated systems. Therefore, in the present review we report on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of self-assembled molecular mono- and multilayer materials including some examples on which other characterization techniques produced important results. PMID:23014858

  17. Structural organization of DMPC lipid layers on chemically micropatterned self-assembled monolayers as biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Brechling, A; Pohl, M; Kleineberg, U; Heinzmann, U

    2004-08-26

    The growth structure of DMPC lipid layers on hydrophobic and hydrophilic alkylsilane-based self-assembled monolayers adsorbed on silicon has been investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry and atomic force microscopy. Hydrophilic modification of hydrophobically terminated ODS-SAMs has been achieved by dose-controlled irradiation with DUV light. While island formation of small DMPC bilayer islands is observed on hydrophobic SAM surfaces, closed layers of DMPC monolayers are formed on hydrophilic SAM surfaces. Furthermore, DMPC adsorption on chemically micropatterned substrates with alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface properties has been studied by imaging ellipsometry and photoemission microscopy. Indication for at least partial bridging of hydrophobic areas by an adsorbed DMPC monolayer has been found. PMID:15288947

  18. Light manipulation with Bacteriorhodopsin membrane self-assembled on high-Q photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2008-03-01

    Resonant photonic structures such as ring resonators and photonic crystal nanocavities interact evanescently with biological material assembled on a reflecting interface. Quality (Q-) factors ˜10^6 and sub-wavelength modal (V-) volumes significantly enhance the interaction so that tuning of microcavity resonances by only few molecules is feasible. Since only few constituents are required, the molecular-photonic interface can be fashioned from self-organizing principles that govern interaction of organic and biological polymers. We demonstrate this bottom-up approach with photochromic Bacteriorhodopsin membrane which we self-assemble on various microcavities. The hybrid molecular-photonic architectures exhibit high Q/V-values and are sensitive to photoinduced molecular transitions and other non-linearities which we utilize for demonstrations of all-optical switching, routing and molecular analysis.

  19. Template assisted self-assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles: An x-ray structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, D.; Zabel, H.; Ulyanov, S. V.; Romanov, V. P.; Uzdin, V. M.

    2014-02-07

    We have fabricated by e-beam lithography periodic arrays of rectangular shaped trenches of different widths into Si substrates. The trenches were filled with iron oxide nanoparticles, 20 nm in diameter, by spin-coating them onto the Si substrate. The trenches have the purpose to assist the self-assembly of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Using x-ray scattering techniques, we have analyzed the structure factor of the trenches before and after filling in order to determine the filling factor. We present a theoretical analysis of the x-ray scattering function within the distorted-wave Born approximation and we present a quantitative comparison between theory and experiment.

  20. Supramolecular self-assembly of amphiphilic hyperbranched polymers at all scales and dimensions: progress, characteristics and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2009-03-14

    This feature article describes the supramolecular self-assembly of hyperbranched polymers (HBPs), including the progress, unique characteristics and future perspectives. HBPs are irregular in molecular structure compared with that of linear block copolymers and dendrimers. However, similar to these well-defined polymer tectons, HBPs have displayed great potential to be excellent precursors in solution self-assembly, interfacial self-assembly and hybrid self-assembly. Many impressive supramolecular aggregates and hybrids at all scales and dimensions, such as macroscopic tubes, micro- or nano-vesicles, fibers, spherical micelles and honeycomb films, have been generated. In addition, HBPs also demonstrate unique characteristics or advantages in supramolecular self-assembly behaviours, including controllable morphologies and structures, special properties, characteristic self-assembly mechanism and facile functionalization process. Although still being at the early stage, self-assembly of HBPs has provided a new avenue for the development of supramolecular chemistry. PMID:19240868

  1. Transformation of self-assembly of a TTF derivative at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface studied by STM--from a nanoporous network to a linear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Xiao, Xunwen; Deng, Ke; Zeng, Qingdao

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative (EDTTF) and a 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy)-benzene (TCDB) heterobilayer nanostructure at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface under ambient conditions has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). EDTTF and TCDB could co-assemble into a brand new hexagonal network with one of the largest nano-cavities. Finally, the nanoporous network would transform into a more stable linear structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to reveal the formation mechanism.The self-assembly of a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative (EDTTF) and a 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy)-benzene (TCDB) heterobilayer nanostructure at the 1-phenyloctane/HOPG interface under ambient conditions has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). EDTTF and TCDB could co-assemble into a brand new hexagonal network with one of the largest nano-cavities. Finally, the nanoporous network would transform into a more stable linear structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to reveal the formation mechanism. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07345f

  2. Structure-property relationships in self-assembling peptide hydrogels, homopolypeptides and polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hule, Rohan A.

    The main objective of this dissertation is to investigate quantitative structure-property relationships in a variety of molecular systems including de novo designed peptides, peptide amphiphiles, polysaccharides and high molecular weight polypeptides. Peptide molecules consisting of 20 amino acids were designed to undergo thermally triggered intramolecular folding into asymmetric beta-hairpins and intermolecular self-assembly via a strand swapping mechanism into physically crosslinked fibrillar hydrogels. The self-assembly mechanism was confirmed by multiple characterization techniques such as circular dichroism and FITR spectroscopy, atomic force and transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. Three distinct fibrillar nanostructures, i.e. non-twisted, twisted and laminated were produced, depending on the degree of strand asymmetry and peptide registry. Differences in the fibrillar morphology have a direct consequence on the mechanical properties of the hydrogels, with the laminated hydrogels exhibiting a significantly higher elastic modulus as compared to the twisted or non-twisted fibrillar hydrogels. SANS and cryo-TEM data reveal that the self-assembled fibrils form networks that are fractal in nature. Models employed to elucidate the fractal behavior can relate changes in the correlation lengths, low q (network), and high q (fibrillar) fractal exponents to the distinct fibrillar nanomorphology. The fractal dimension of the networks varies significantly, from a mass to a surface fractal and can be directly related to the local fibrillar morphology and changes in the peptide concentration. Transitions in the fractal behavior seen in the high q regime can be attributed to self-assembly kinetics. An identical model can be used to establish a direct correlation between the bulk properties and changes in both, the network density and underlying morphology, of a modified peptide-based hydrogel. As in the case of asymmetric peptides, changes in

  3. Self-assembly of 3D prestressed tensegrity structures from DNA

    PubMed Central

    Liedl, Tim; Högberg, Björn; Tytell, Jessica; Ingber, Donald E.; Shih, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Tensegrity or tensional integrity is a property of a structure that relies on a balance between components that are either in pure compression or in pure tension for its stability [1,2]. Tensegrity structures exhibit extremely high strength-to-weight ratios and great resilience, and are therefore widely used in engineering, robotics and architecture [3,4]. Here we report nanoscale, prestressed, three-dimensional tensegrity structures in which rigid bundles of DNA double helices resist compressive forces exerted by segments of single-stranded DNA that act as tension-bearing cables. Our DNA tensegrity structures can self-assemble against forces up to 14 pN, which is twice the stall force of powerful molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin [5,6]. The forces generated by this molecular prestressing mechanism can be employed to bend the DNA bundles or to actuate the entire structure through enzymatic cleavage at specific sites. In addition to being building blocks for nanostructures, tensile structural elements made of single-stranded DNA could be used to study molecular forces, cellular mechanotransduction, and other fundamental biological processes. PMID:20562873

  4. Self-assembly of three-dimensional prestressed tensegrity structures from DNA.

    PubMed

    Liedl, Tim; Högberg, Björn; Tytell, Jessica; Ingber, Donald E; Shih, William M

    2010-07-01

    Tensegrity, or tensional integrity, is a property of a structure indicating a reliance on a balance between components that are either in pure compression or pure tension for stability. Tensegrity structures exhibit extremely high strength-to-weight ratios and great resilience, and are therefore widely used in engineering, robotics and architecture. Here, we report nanoscale, prestressed, three-dimensional tensegrity structures in which rigid bundles of DNA double helices resist compressive forces exerted by segments of single-stranded DNA that act as tension-bearing cables. Our DNA tensegrity structures can self-assemble against forces up to 14 pN, which is twice the stall force of powerful molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin. The forces generated by this molecular prestressing mechanism can be used to bend the DNA bundles or to actuate the entire structure through enzymatic cleavage at specific sites. In addition to being building blocks for nanostructures, tensile structural elements made of single-stranded DNA could be used to study molecular forces, cellular mechanotransduction and other fundamental biological processes. PMID:20562873

  5. Self-assembly of three-dimensional prestressed tensegrity structures from DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, Tim; Högberg, Björn; Tytell, Jessica; Ingber, Donald E.; Shih, William M.

    2010-07-01

    Tensegrity, or tensional integrity, is a property of a structure indicating a reliance on a balance between components that are either in pure compression or pure tension for stability. Tensegrity structures exhibit extremely high strength-to-weight ratios and great resilience, and are therefore widely used in engineering, robotics and architecture. Here, we report nanoscale, prestressed, three-dimensional tensegrity structures in which rigid bundles of DNA double helices resist compressive forces exerted by segments of single-stranded DNA that act as tension-bearing cables. Our DNA tensegrity structures can self-assemble against forces up to 14 pN, which is twice the stall force of powerful molecular motors such as kinesin or myosin. The forces generated by this molecular prestressing mechanism can be used to bend the DNA bundles or to actuate the entire structure through enzymatic cleavage at specific sites. In addition to being building blocks for nanostructures, tensile structural elements made of single-stranded DNA could be used to study molecular forces, cellular mechanotransduction and other fundamental biological processes.

  6. Molecular Structure of RADA16-I Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Ashley R.; Pang, Xiaodong; Zimmerman, Maxwell I.; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Paravastu, Anant K.

    2013-01-01

    The designer self-assembling peptide RADA16-I forms nanofiber matrices which have shown great promise for regenerative medicine and 3-dimensional cell culture. RADA16-I has a β-strand-promoting alternating hydrophobic/charged motif, but arrangement of β-strands into the nanofiber structure has not been previously determined. Here we present a structural model of RADA16-I nanofibers, based on solid-state NMR measurements on samples with different schemes for 13C isotopic labeling. NMR peak positions and line widths indicate an ordered structure composed of β-strands. The NMR data show that the nanofibers are composed of two stacked β-sheets stabilized by a hydrophobic core formed by alanine sidechains, consistent with previous proposals. However, the previously proposed antiparallel β-sheet structure is ruled out by 13C-13C dipolar couplings. Instead, neighboring β-strands within β-sheets are parallel, with a registry shift that allows for cross-strand staggering of oppositely charged arginine and aspartate sidechains. The resulting structural model is compared to nanofiber dimensions observed via images taken by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Multiple NMR peaks for each alanine sidechain were observed and could be attributed to multiple configurations of sidechain packing within a single scheme for intermolecular packing. PMID:23977885

  7. Self-assembly Columnar Structure in Active Layer of Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Cheng; Segui, Jennifer; Yu, Yingjie; Li, Hongfei; Akgun, Bulent; Satijia, Sushil. K.; Gersappe, Dilip; Nam, Chang-Yong; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2012-02-01

    Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells are an area of intense interest due to their flexibility and relatively low cost. However, due to the disordered inner structure in active layer, the power conversion efficiency of BHJ solar cell is relatively low. Our research provides the method to produce ordered self-assembly columnar structure within active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell by introducing polystyrene (PS) into the active layer. The blend thin film of polystyrene, poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) at different ratio are spin coated on substrate and annealed in vacuum oven for certain time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show uniform phase segregation on the surface of polymer blend thin film and highly ordered columnar structure is then proven by etching the film with ion sputtering. TEM cross-section technology is also used to investigate the column structure. Neutron reflectometry was taken to establish the confinement of PCBM at the interface of PS and P3HT. The different morphological structures formed via phase segregation will be correlated with the performance of the PEV cells to be fabricated at the BNL-CFN.

  8. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  9. Self-assembly and structure of directly imaged inorganic-anion monolayers on a gold nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Neyman, Alevtina; Arkhangelsky, Elizabeth; Gitis, Vitaly; Meshi, Louisa; Weinstock, Ira A

    2009-12-01

    Cryogenic "trapping" was used to obtain the first TEM images of self-assembled monolayers of inorganic anions on a gold nanoparticle. This unique structural information makes it possible to study the formation of a protecting-ligand shell at an unprecedented level of detail. The protecting ligands are polyoxometalates (POMs; alpha-X(n+)W(12)O(40)((8-n)-), X(n+) = Al(3+) and "2H(+)", and alpha-X(n+)W(11)O(39)((12-n)-), X(n+) = P(5+), Si(4+), and Al(3+)) with large negative charges for association with the gold surface and W atoms (Z = 74) for TEM imaging. The POM-anion shells were obtained by ligand exchange from citrate-protected 13.8 nm gold nanoparticles. Replacement of the organic (citrate) by inorganic (tungsten-oxide) ligand shells results in substantial changes in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). By correlating cryo-TEM images with changes in the SPR, degrees of surface coverage were reliably quantified by UV-visible spectroscopy. Then, the kinetics and thermodynamics of ligand-shell formation were investigated by systematically varying POM structure and charge. Rates of POM association with the gold surface ("nucleation") are inhibited by the electric-potential barrier of the citrate-stabilized particles, while binding affinities increase linearly with the charges (from 5- to 9-) of structurally different POM anions, suggesting that no single orientation ("lattice matching") is required for monolayer self-assembly. Time-dependent cryo-TEM images reveal that monolayer growth occurs via "islands", a mechanism that points to cation-mediated attraction between bound POMs. Complete ligand shells comprised of 330 molecules of alpha-AlW(11)O(39)(9-) (1) possess small net charges (29e from zeta-potential measurements) and short Debye lengths (kappa(-1) = 1.0 nm), which indicate that approximately 99% of the 2970 K(+) counter cations lie within ca. 1.5 nm (approximately 3 hydrated K(+) ion diameters) from the outer surface of the POM shell. Energetic analysis of

  10. The absence of tertiary interactions in a self-assembled DNA crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam; Birktoft, Jens J; Sha, Ruojie; Wang, Tong; Zheng, Jianping; Constantinou, Pamela E; Ginell, Stephan L; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2012-04-01

    DNA is a highly effective molecule for controlling nanometer-scale structure. The convenience of using DNA lies in the programmability of Watson-Crick base-paired secondary interactions, useful both to design branched molecular motifs and to connect them through sticky-ended cohesion. Recently, the tensegrity triangle motif has been used to self-assemble three-dimensional crystals whose structures have been determined; sticky ends were reported to be the only intermolecular cohesive elements in those crystals. A recent communication in this journal suggested that tertiary interactions between phosphates and cytosine N(4) groups are responsible for intermolecular cohesion in these crystals, in addition to the secondary and covalent interactions programmed into the motif. To resolve this issue, we report experiments challenging this contention. Gel electrophoresis demonstrates that the tensegrity triangle exists in conditions where cytosine-PO(4) tertiary interactions seem ineffective. Furthermore, we have crystallized a tensegrity triangle using a junction lacking the cytosine suggested for involvement in tertiary interactions. The unit cell is isomorphous with that of a tensegrity triangle crystal reported earlier. This structure has been solved by molecular replacement and refined. The data presented here leave no doubt that the tensegrity triangle crystal structures reported earlier depend only on base pairing and covalent interactions for their formation. PMID:22434713

  11. Nucleosomal arrays self-assemble into supramolecular globular structures lacking 30-nm fibers.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Rogge, Ryan; Tamura, Sachiko; Joti, Yasumasa; Hikima, Takaaki; Szerlong, Heather; Krause, Christine; Herman, Jake; Seidel, Erik; DeLuca, Jennifer; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-17

    The existence of a 30-nm fiber as a basic folding unit for DNA packaging has remained a topic of active discussion. Here, we characterize the supramolecular structures formed by reversible Mg(2+)-dependent self-association of linear 12-mer nucleosomal arrays using microscopy and physicochemical approaches. These reconstituted chromatin structures, which we call "oligomers", are globular throughout all stages of cooperative assembly and range in size from ~50 nm to a maximum diameter of ~1,000 nm. The nucleosomal arrays were packaged within the oligomers as interdigitated 10-nm fibers, rather than folded 30-nm structures. Linker DNA was freely accessible to micrococcal nuclease, although the oligomers remained partially intact after linker DNA digestion. The organization of chromosomal fibers in human nuclei in situ was stabilized by 1 mM MgCl2, but became disrupted in the absence of MgCl2, conditions that also dissociated the oligomers in vitro These results indicate that a 10-nm array of nucleosomes has the intrinsic ability to self-assemble into large chromatin globules stabilized by nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, and suggest that the oligomers are a good in vitro model for investigating the structure and organization of interphase chromosomes. PMID:27072995

  12. Temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide and the structural transition from organogel to crystalline nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Wang, Yuefei; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide (FF) into various nanoarchitectures has received great amounts of attention in recent years. Here, we report the temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide to microtubes, nanowires, or organogel in different solvents. We also find that the organogel in isopropanol transforms into crystalline flakes or nanowires when the temperature increases. The reversible self-assembly in polar solvents may be mainly controlled by electronic and aromatic interactions between the FF molecules themselves, which is associated with the dissociation equilibrium and significantly influenced by temperature. We found that the organogel in the isopropanol solvent made a unique transition to crystalline structures, a process that is driven by temperature and may be kinetically controlled. During the heating-cooling process, FF preferentially self-assembles to metastable nanofibers and organogel. They further transform to thermodynamically stable crystal structures via molecular rearrangement after introducing an external energy, such as the increasing temperature used in this study. The strategy demonstrated in this study provides an efficient way to controllably fabricate smart, temperature-responsive peptide nanomaterials and enriches the understanding of the growth mechanism of diphenylalanine peptide nanostructures. PMID:25520600

  13. Temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide and the structural transition from organogel to crystalline nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide (FF) into various nanoarchitectures has received great amounts of attention in recent years. Here, we report the temperature-induced reversible self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptide to microtubes, nanowires, or organogel in different solvents. We also find that the organogel in isopropanol transforms into crystalline flakes or nanowires when the temperature increases. The reversible self-assembly in polar solvents may be mainly controlled by electronic and aromatic interactions between the FF molecules themselves, which is associated with the dissociation equilibrium and significantly influenced by temperature. We found that the organogel in the isopropanol solvent made a unique transition to crystalline structures, a process that is driven by temperature and may be kinetically controlled. During the heating-cooling process, FF preferentially self-assembles to metastable nanofibers and organogel. They further transform to thermodynamically stable crystal structures via molecular rearrangement after introducing an external energy, such as the increasing temperature used in this study. The strategy demonstrated in this study provides an efficient way to controllably fabricate smart, temperature-responsive peptide nanomaterials and enriches the understanding of the growth mechanism of diphenylalanine peptide nanostructures. PMID:25520600

  14. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces. PMID:27418116

  15. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces. PMID:27418116

  16. Engineering novel mesoscopic structures using DNA-programmed colloidal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Anthony Ji

    Controlling interactions between colloidal suspensions has been a fascinating challenge both experimentally and theoretically. Three-dimensional colloidal crystals assembled from monodisperse colloidal particles have generated a significant interest because of their potential application as photonic band gap materials (PBG), chemical sensors, optical filters, and switches. DNA-mediated colloidal assembly offers a unique tool for controlling the range and magnitude of interparticle interaction to promote novel crystal formation. We try to delimit those conditions under which the DNA-mediated interaction gives rise to well-ordered 3-D colloidal crystals, as well as to discuss the applications, optimization, and ultimate limitations of such DNA-mediated particle self-assembly. There are many unknowns regarding the expected colloidal phase diagram and the strength and kinetics of the DNA-mediated interaction, as well as the nonspecific interactions between colloids with different surface chemistries. We start with the simplest case of one-component system, where every colloid has a DNA-mediated attraction to every other, since the phase behavior and kinetics of one-component dispersions is well understood from previous studies. We determine and model the temperature and DNA-density dependence of the self-assembly phase diagram and kinetics. We find that crystals only form with the sterically stabilized DNA-particles in a rather narrow range of temperatures and have acceptably fast nucleation and growth in a small range of grafted-DNA density. In addition, the phase behavior of binary alloy solid solutions is studied using the same sterically stabilized colloidal particles. A competition between DNA single-base mismatches is used to create energy penalties for the substitution of a few KBTs'. The minority species substitute into the crystal lattice when the pair interaction difference is a fraction of a K BT, however, they exclude from the growing crystal when the pair

  17. Lotus-like biomimetic hierarchical structures developed by the self-assembly of tubular plant waxes.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Jung, Yong Chae; Niemietz, Adrian; Koch, Kerstin

    2009-02-01

    Hierarchical roughness is beneficial for superhydrophobic and self-cleaning surfaces. Biomimetic hierarchical surfaces were fabricated by replication of a micropatterned master surface and self-assembly of two kinds of tubular wax crystals, which naturally occur on the superhydrophobic leaves of Tropaeolum majus (L.) and Leymus arenarius (L.). These tubule forming waxes are multicomponent waxes, composed of a mixture of long chain hydrocarbons. Thermal evaporation of wax was used to cover artificial surfaces with a homogeneous wax layer and tubule formation was initiated by temperature and a solvent vapor phase. Based on this technique, various nanostructures produced by three-dimensional tubular waxes have been fabricated by changing the wax mass. Fabricated structures and surface chemistry mimic the hierarchical surfaces of superhydrophobic and self-cleaning plant surfaces. The influence of structures on superhydrophobicity at different length scales is demonstrated by investigation of contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, droplet evaporation and propensity of air pocket formation as well as adhesive forces. The optimal structural parameters for superhydrophobicity and low static contact angle hysteresis, superior to natural plant leaves including Lotus, have been identified and provide a useful guide for development of biomimtetic superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:19132938

  18. Self-assembly of "Mickey Mouse" shaped colloids into tube-like structures: experiments and simulations.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Joost R; Avvisati, Guido; Hagemans, Fabian; Vissers, Teun; Kraft, Daniela J; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kegel, Willem K

    2015-02-14

    The self-assembly of anisotropic patchy particles with a triangular shape was studied by experiments and computer simulations. The colloidal particles were synthesized in a two-step seeded emulsion polymerization process, and consist of a central smooth lobe connected to two rough lobes at an angle of ∼90°, resembling the shape of a "Mickey Mouse" head. Due to the difference in overlap volume, adding an appropriate depletant induces an attractive interaction between the smooth lobes of the colloids only, while the two rough lobes act as steric constraints. The essentially planar geometry of the Mickey Mouse particles is a first geometric deviation of dumbbell shaped patchy particles. This new geometry enables the formation of one-dimensional tube-like structures rather than spherical, essentially zero-dimensional micelles. At sufficiently strong attractions, we indeed find tube-like structures with the sticky lobes at the core and the non-sticky lobes pointing out as steric constraints that limit the growth to one direction, providing the tubes with a well-defined diameter but variable length both in experiments and simulations. In the simulations, we found that the internal structure of the tubular fragments could either be straight or twisted into so-called Bernal spirals. PMID:25523360

  19. Correlating Electronic Transport to Atomic Structures in Self-Assembled Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Li, An-Ping; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Ouyang, Wenjie; Zhang, Yanning; Weitering, Harm H; Shih, Chih-Kang; Baddorf, Arthur P; Wu, Ruiqian

    2012-01-01

    Quantum wires, as a smallest electronic conductor, are expected to be a fundamental component in all quantum architectures. The electronic conductance in quantum wires, however, is often dictated by structural instabilities and electron localization at the atomic scale. Here we report on the evolutions of electronic transport as a function of temperature and interwire coupling as the quantum wires of GdSi{sub 2} are self-assembled on Si(100) wire-by-wire. The correlation between structure, electronic properties, and electronic transport are examined by combining nanotransport measurements, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. A metal-insulator transition is revealed in isolated nanowires, while a robust metallic state is obtained in wire bundles at low temperature. The atomic defects lead to electron localizations in isolated nanowire, and interwire coupling stabilizes the structure and promotes the metallic states in wire bundles. This illustrates how the conductance nature of a one-dimensional system can be dramatically modified by the environmental change on the atomic scale.

  20. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin. PMID:25716479

  1. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-02-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin.

  2. Structural basis for self-assembly of a cytolytic pore lined by protein and lipid

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M.M.; Morante, Koldo; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are water-soluble proteins that possess the remarkable ability to self-assemble on the membrane of target cells, where they form pores causing cell damage. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of the haemolytic protein fragaceatoxin C (FraC), a α-barrel PFT, by determining the crystal structures of FraC at four different stages of the lytic mechanism, namely the water-soluble state, the monomeric lipid-bound form, an assembly intermediate and the fully assembled transmembrane pore. The structure of the transmembrane pore exhibits a unique architecture composed of both protein and lipids, with some of the lipids lining the pore wall, acting as assembly cofactors. The pore also exhibits lateral fenestrations that expose the hydrophobic core of the membrane to the aqueous environment. The incorporation of lipids from the target membrane within the structure of the pore provides a membrane-specific trigger for the activation of a haemolytic toxin. PMID:25716479

  3. Structure and property relations of macromolecular self-assemblies at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihao

    Hydrophilic polymer chains, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), are attached to glass surfaces by silylation of the silanol groups on glass surfaces with the omega-(methoxyl terminated PEG) trimethoxysilanes. These tethered polymer chains resemble the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of PEG, which exhibit excellent biocompatibility and provide a model system for studying the interactions of proteins with polymer surfaces. The low molecular weight PEGs tend to extend, forming a brush-like monolayer, whereas the longer polymer chains tend to interpenetrate each other, forming a mushroom-like PEG monolayer at the interface. Interactions between a plasma protein, bovine serum albumin, and the PEG-SAMs are investigated in terms of protein adsorption and diffusion on the surfaces by the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The diffusion and aggregation behaviors of the protein on the two monolayers are found to be quite different despite the similarities in adsorption and desorption behaviors. The results are analyzed with a hypothesis of the hydrated surface dynamics. A method of covalently bonding phospholipid molecules to silica substrates followed by loading with free phospholipids is demonstrated to form well organized and stable phospholipid self-assembled monolayers. Surfaces of such SAMs structurally mimic the aqueous sides of phospholipid bilayer membranes. The dynamics of phospholipids and an adsorbed protein, lipase, in the SAMs are probed with FRAP, in terms of lateral diffusion of both phospholipids and protein molecules. The esterase activity of lipase on the SAM surfaces is confirmed by the hydrolysis reaction of a substrate, umbelliferone stearate, showing such lipid SAMs posess biomembrane functionality in terms of interfacial activation of the membranous enzymes. Dynamics of polyethylene oxide and polypropylene oxide tri-block copolymers, PEO-PPO-PEO and PPO-PEO-PPO, at the air/water interface upon thermal stimulation is studied by

  4. Nanopropulsion by biocatalytic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Leckie, Joy; Hope, Alexander; Hughes, Meghan; Debnath, Sisir; Fleming, Scott; Wark, Alastair W; Ulijn, Rein V; Haw, Mark D

    2014-09-23

    A number of organisms and organelles are capable of self-propulsion at the micro- and nanoscales. Production of simple man-made mimics of biological transportation systems may prove relevant to achieving movement in artificial cells and nano/micronscale robotics that may be of biological and nanotechnological importance. We demonstrate the propulsion of particles based on catalytically controlled molecular self-assembly and fiber formation at the particle surface. Specifically, phosphatase enzymes (acting as the engine) are conjugated to a quantum dot (the vehicle), and are subsequently exposed to micellar aggregates (fuel) that upon biocatalytic dephosphorylation undergo fibrillar self-assembly, which in turn causes propulsion. The motion of individual enzyme/quantum dot conjugates is followed directly using fluorescence microscopy. While overall movement remains random, the enzyme-conjugates exhibit significantly faster transport in the presence of the fiber forming system, compared to controls without fuel, a non-self-assembling substrate, or a substrate which assembles into spherical, rather than fibrous structures upon enzymatic dephosphorylation. When increasing the concentration of the fiber-forming fuel, the speed of the conjugates increases compared to non-self-assembling substrate, although directionality remains random. PMID:25162764

  5. Functional architectures based on self-assembly of bio-inspired dipeptides: Structure modulation and its photoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengjun; Liu, Kai; Li, Junbai; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-01

    Getting inspiration from nature and further developing functional architectures provides an effective way to design innovative materials and systems. Among bio-inspired materials, dipeptides and its self-assembled architectures with functionalities have recently been the subject of intensive studies. However, there is still a great challenge to explore its applications likely due to the lack of effective adaptation of their self-assembled structures as well as a lack of understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms. In this context, taking diphenylalanine (FF, a core recognition motif for molecular self-assembly of the Alzheimer's β-amyloid polypeptides) as a model of bio-inspired dipeptides, recent strategies on modulation of dipeptide-based architectures were introduced with regard to both covalent (architectures modulation by coupling functional groups) and non-covalent ways (controlled architectures by different assembly pathways). Then, applications are highlighted in some newly emerging fields of innovative photoelectronic devices and materials, such as artificial photosynthetic systems for renewable solar energy storage and renewable optical waveguiding materials for optoelectronic devices. At last, the challenges and future perspectives of these bio-inspired dipeptides are also addressed. PMID:26365127

  6. Self-assembly and structural-functional flexibility of oxygenic photosynthetic machineries: personal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Garab, Győző

    2016-01-01

    This short review, with a bit of historical aspect and a strong personal bias and emphases on open questions, is focusing on the (macro-)organization and structural-functional flexibilities of the photosynthetic apparatus of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms at different levels of the structural complexity-selected problems that have attracted most my attention in the past years and decades. These include (i) the anisotropic organization of the pigment-protein complexes and photosynthetic membranes-a basic organizing principle of living matter, which can, and probably should be adopted to intelligent materials; (ii) the organization of protein complexes into chiral macrodomains, large self-assembling highly organized but structurally flexible entities with unique spectroscopic fingerprints-structures, where, important, high-level regulatory functions appear to 'reside'; (iii) a novel, dissipation-assisted mechanism of structural changes, based on a thermo-optic effect: ultrafast thermal transients in the close vicinity of dissipation of unused excitation energy, which is capable of inducing elementary structural changes; it makes plants capable of responding to excess excitation with reaction rates proportional to the overexcitation above the light-saturation of photosynthesis; (iv) the 3D ultrastructure of the granum-stroma thylakoid membrane assembly and other multilamellar membrane systems, and their remodelings-associated with regulatory mechanisms; (v) the molecular organization and structural-functional plasticity of the main light-harvesting complex of plants, in relation to their crystal structure and different in vivo and in vitro states; and (vi) the enigmatic role of non-bilayer lipids and lipid phases in the bilayer thylakoid membrane-warranting its high protein content and contributing to its structural flexibility. PMID:26494196

  7. Direct observation of self-assembled chain-like water structures in a nanoscopic water meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung I.; Boehm, Ryan D.; Bonander, Jeremy R.

    2013-08-01

    Sawtooth-like oscillatory forces generated by water molecules confined between two oxidized silicon surfaces were observed using a cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope when the two surfaces approached each other in ambient environments. The humidity-dependent oscillatory amplitude and periodicity were 3-12 nN and 3-4 water diameters, respectively. Half of each period was matched with a freely jointed chain model, possibly suggesting that the confined water behaved like a bundle of water chains. The analysis also indicated that water molecules self-assembled to form chain-like structures in a nanoscopic meniscus between two hydrophilic surfaces in air. From the friction force data measured simultaneously, the viscosity of the chain-like water was estimated to be between 108 and 1010 times greater than that of bulk water. The suggested chain-like structure resolves many unexplained properties of confined water at the nanometer scale, thus dramatically improving the understanding of a variety of water systems in nature.

  8. Direct observation of self-assembled chain-like water structures in a nanoscopic water meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D; Bonander, Jeremy R

    2013-08-01

    Sawtooth-like oscillatory forces generated by water molecules confined between two oxidized silicon surfaces were observed using a cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscope when the two surfaces approached each other in ambient environments. The humidity-dependent oscillatory amplitude and periodicity were 3-12 nN and 3-4 water diameters, respectively. Half of each period was matched with a freely jointed chain model, possibly suggesting that the confined water behaved like a bundle of water chains. The analysis also indicated that water molecules self-assembled to form chain-like structures in a nanoscopic meniscus between two hydrophilic surfaces in air. From the friction force data measured simultaneously, the viscosity of the chain-like water was estimated to be between 10(8) and 10(10) times greater than that of bulk water. The suggested chain-like structure resolves many unexplained properties of confined water at the nanometer scale, thus dramatically improving the understanding of a variety of water systems in nature. PMID:23927275

  9. Laser printing hierarchical structures with the aid of controlled capillary-driven self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanlei; Lao, Zhaoxin; Cumming, Benjamin P.; Wu, Dong; Li, Jiawen; Liang, Haiyi; Chu, Jiaru; Huang, Wenhao; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Capillary force is often regarded as detrimental because it may cause undesired distortion or even destruction to micro/nanostructures during a fabrication process, and thus many efforts have been made to eliminate its negative effects. From a different perspective, capillary force can be artfully used to construct specific complex architectures. Here, we propose a laser printing capillary-assisted self-assembly strategy for fabricating regular periodic structures. Microscale pillars are first produced by localized femtosecond laser polymerization and are subsequently assembled into periodic hierarchical architectures with the assistance of controlled capillary forces in an evaporating liquid. Spatial arrangements, pillar heights, and evaporation processes are readily tuned to achieve designable ordered assemblies with various geometries. Reversibility of the assembly is also revealed by breaking the balance between the intermolecular force and the elastic standing force. We further demonstrate the functionality of the hierarchical structures as a nontrivial tool for the selective trapping and releasing of microparticles, opening up a potential for the development of in situ transportation systems for microobjects. PMID:26038541

  10. Pressure effects on structures formed by entropically driven self-assembly: Illustration for denaturation of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Harano, Yuichi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    We propose a general framework of pressure effects on the structures formed by the self-assembly of solute molecules immersed in solvent. The integral equation theory combined with the morphometric approach is employed for a hard-body model system. Our picture is that protein folding and ordered association of proteins are driven by the solvent entropy: At low pressures, the structures almost minimizing the excluded volume (EV) generated for solvent particles are stabilized. Such structures appear to be even more stabilized at high pressures. However, it is experimentally known that the native structure of a protein is unfolded, and ordered aggregates such as amyloid fibrils and actin filaments are dissociated by applying high pressures. This initially puzzling result can also be elucidated in terms of the solvent entropy. A clue to the basic mechanism is in the phenomenon that, when a large hard-sphere solute is immersed in small hard spheres forming the solvent, the small hard spheres are enriched near the solute and this enrichment becomes greater as the pressure increases. We argue that “attraction” is entropically provided between the solute surface and solvent particles, and the attraction becomes higher with rising pressure. Due to this effect, at high pressures, the structures possessing the largest possible solvent-accessible surface area together with sufficiently small EV become more stable in terms of the solvent entropy. To illustrate this concept, we perform an analysis of pressure denaturation of three different proteins. It is shown that only the structures that have the characteristics described above exhibit interesting behavior. They first become more destabilized relative to the native structure as the pressure increases, but beyond a threshold pressure the relative instability begins to decrease and they eventually become more stable than the native structure.

  11. [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to approach diazatwistpentacenes: synthesis, structures, physical properties, and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Junbo; Li, Peizhou; Wu, Jiansheng; Gao, Junkuo; Xiong, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Guodong; Zhao, Yanli; Zhang, Qichun

    2014-05-16

    Three novel diazatwistpentacenes (1,4,6,13-tetraphenyl-7:8,11:12-bisbenzo-2,3-diazatwistpentacene (1, IUPAC name: 9,11,14,16-tetraphenyl-1,6-dihydrobenzo[8,9]triphenyleno[2,3-g]phthalazine); 1,4-di(pyridin-2-yl)-6,13-diphenyl-7:8,11:12-bisbenzo-2,3-diazatwistpentacene (2, IUPAC name: 9,16-diphenyl-11,14-di(pyridin-2-yl)-1,6-dihydrobenzo[8,9]triphenyleno[2,3-g]phthalazine); and 1,4-di(thien-2-yl)-6,13-diphenyl-7:8,11:12-bisbenzo-2,3-diazatwistpentacene (3, IUPAC name: 9,16-diphenyl-11,14-di(thien-2-yl)-1,6-dihydrobenzo[8,9]triphenyleno[2,3-g]phthalazine)) have been successfully synthesized through [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction involving in situ arynes as dienophiles and substituted 1,2,4,5-tetrazines as dienes. Their structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, confirming that all compounds have twisted configurations with torsion angles between the pyrene unit and the 2,3-diazaanthrance part as high as 21.52° (for 1), 24.74° (for 2), and 21.14° (for 3). The optical bandgaps for all compounds corroborate the values derived from CV. The calculation done by DFT shows that the HOMO-LUMO bandgaps are in good agreement with experimental data. Interestingly, the substituted groups (phenyl, pyridyl, thienyl) in the 1,4-positions did affect their self-assembly and the optical properties of as-resulted nanostructures. Under the same conditions, compounds 1-3 could self-assemble into different morphologies such as microrods (for 1), nanoprisms (for 2), and nanobelts (for 3). Moreover, the UV-vis absorption and emission spectra of as-prepared nanostructures were largely red-shifted, indicating J-type aggregation for all materials. Surprisingly, both 1 and 2 showed aggregation-induced emission (AIE) effect, while compound 3 showed aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect. Our method to approach novel twisted azaacenes through [4 + 2] reaction could offer a new tool to develop unusual twisted conjugated materials for future optoelectronic

  12. Self-Assembled Multilayer Structure and Enhanced Thermochromic Performance of Spinodally Decomposed TiO2-VO2 Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangyao; Zhou, Huaijuan; Cao, Xun; Li, Rong; Tazawa, Masato; Okada, Masahisa; Jin, Ping

    2016-03-23

    Composite films of VO2-TiO2 were deposited on sapphire (11-20) substrate by cosputtering method. Self-assembled well-ordered multilayer structure with alternating Ti- and V-rich epitaxial thin layer was obtained by thermal annealing via a spinodal decomposition mechanism. The structured thermochromic films demonstrate superior optical modulation upon phase transition, with significantly reduced transition temperature. The results provide a facile and novel approach to fabricate smart structures with excellent performance. PMID:26937588

  13. BMHP1-derived self-assembling peptides: hierarchically assembled structures with self-healing propensity and potential for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gelain, Fabrizio; Silva, Diego; Caprini, Andrea; Taraballi, Francesca; Natalello, Antonino; Villa, Omar; Nam, Ki Tae; Zuckermann, Ronald N; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Vescovi, Angelo

    2011-03-22

    Self-assembling peptides (SAPs) are rapidly gaining interest as bioinspired scaffolds for cell culture and regenerative medicine applications. Bone Marrow Homing Peptide 1 (BMHP1) functional motif (PFSSTKT) was previously demonstrated to stimulate neural stem cell (NSC) viability and differentiation when linked to SAPs. We here describe a novel ensemble of SAPs, developed from the BMHP1 (BMHP1-SAPs), that spontaneously assemble into tabular fibers, twisted ribbons, tubes and hierarchical self-assembled sheets: organized structures in the nano- and microscale. Thirty-two sequences were designed and evaluated, including biotinylated and unbiotinylated sequences, as well as a hybrid peptide-peptoid sequence. Via X-ray diffraction (XRD), CD, and FTIR experiments we demonstrated that all of the BMHP1-SAPs share similarly organized secondary structures, that is, β-sheets and β-turns, despite their heterogeneous nanostructure morphology, scaffold stiffness, and effect over NSC differentiation and survival. Notably, we demonstrated the self-healing propensity of most of the tested BMHP1-SAPs, enlarging the set of potential applications of these novel SAPs. In in vitro cell culture experiments, we showed that some of these 10-mer peptides foster adhesion, differentiation, and proliferation of human NSCs. RGD-functionalized and hybrid peptide-peptoid self-assembling sequences also opened the door to BMHP1-SAP functionalization with further bioactive motifs, essential to tailor new scaffolds for specific applications. In in vivo experiments we verified a negligible reaction of the host nervous tissue to the injected and assembled BMHP1-SAP. This work will pave the way to the development of novel SAP sequences that may be useful for material science and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:21314189

  14. Self-assembled nano-architecture liquid crystalline particles as a promising carrier for progesterone transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Elgindy, Nazik A; Mehanna, Mohammed M; Mohyeldin, Salma M

    2016-03-30

    The study aims to elaborate novel self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) for management of hormonal disturbances following non-invasive progesterone transdermal delivery. Fabrication and optimization of progesteroneloaded LCNPs for transdermal delivery were assessed via a quality by design approach based on 2(3) full factorial design. The design includes the functional relationships between independent processing variables and dependent responses of particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, cumulative drug released after 24h and ex-vivo transdermal steady flux. The developed nanocarrier was subjected to TEM (transmission electron microscope) for morphological elucidation and stability study within a period of three months at different storage temperatures. The cubic phase of LCNPs was successfully prepared using glyceryl monooleate (GMO) via the emulsification technique. Based on the factorial design, the independent operating variables significantly affected the five dependent responses. The cubosomes hydrodynamic diameters were in the nanometric range (101-386 nm) with narrow particle size distribution, high negative zeta potential ≥-30 mV and entrapment efficiency ≥94%. The LCNPs succeeded in sustaining progesterone release for almost 24h, following a non-fickian transport of drug diffusion mechanism. Ex-vivo study revealed a significant enhancement up to 6 folds in the transdermal permeation of progesterone-loaded LCNPs compared to its aqueous suspension. The optimized LCNPs exhibited a high physical stability while retaining the cubic structure for at least three months. Quality by design approach successfully accomplished a predictable mathematical model permitting the development of novel LCNPs for transdermal delivery of progesterone with the benefit of reducing its oral route side effects. PMID:26828671

  15. High-Resolution Structure of a Self-Assembly-Competent Form of a Hydrophobic Peptide Captured in a Soluble [beta]-Sheet Scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Makabe, Koki; Biancalana, Matthew; Yan, Shude; Tereshko, Valentina; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Miller-Auer, Hélène; Meredith, Stephen C.; Koide, Shohei

    2010-02-08

    {beta}-Rich self-assembly is a major structural class of polypeptides, but still little is known about its atomic structures and biophysical properties. Major impediments for structural and biophysical studies of peptide self-assemblies include their insolubility and heterogeneous composition. We have developed a model system, termed peptide self-assembly mimic (PSAM), based on the single-layer {beta}-sheet of Borrelia outer surface protein A. PSAM allows for the capture of a defined number of self-assembly-like peptide repeats within a water-soluble protein, making structural and energetic studies possible. In this work, we extend our PSAM approach to a highly hydrophobic peptide sequence. We show that a penta-Ile peptide (Ile{sub 5}), which is insoluble and forms {beta}-rich self-assemblies in aqueous solution, can be captured within the PSAM scaffold in a form capable of self-assembly. The 1.1-{angstrom} crystal structure revealed that the Ile{sub 5} stretch forms a highly regular {beta}-strand within this flat {beta}-sheet. Self-assembly models built with multiple copies of the crystal structure of the Ile5 peptide segment showed no steric conflict, indicating that this conformation represents an assembly-competent form. The PSAM retained high conformational stability, suggesting that the flat {beta}-strand of the Ile{sub 5} stretch primed for self-assembly is a low-energy conformation of the Ile{sub 5} stretch and rationalizing its high propensity for self-assembly. The ability of the PSAM to 'solubilize' an otherwise insoluble peptide stretch suggests the potential of the PSAM approach to the characterization of self-assembling peptides.

  16. Self-Assembled 3D Ordered Macroporous Structures for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Wen-Tau; Chung, Kuo-Yuan; Mishra, Narayan; Lin, Keng-Hui

    2008-03-01

    A simple, inexpensive and fast microfluidic method to fabricate three-dimensional ordered macroporous gel is demonstrated using alginate as the scaffold material. The microfluidic device consists of two concentric micropipettes where one is nested inside the other. Nitrogen gas and aqueous alginate solution with Pluronic F127 are pumped through the inner and the outer channel respectively. Under appropriate conditions, bubbles of a uniform size are generated within the device at few thousand Hz. We show the control over bubble size by the gas pressure and quantitatively predict the size dependence from the geometry of fluidic device. Monodisperse bubbles are collected and self-assemble into crystal structures as wet foam. The alginate solution between bubbles is crosslinked by divalent calcium ions and turns into 3D ordered macroporous gel where the pores are highly interconnected. The pore size can be directly controlled by the bubble size which ranges from few tens microns to few millimeters. This technique promises a versatile and robust way to make 3D ordered tissue engineering scaffolds.

  17. Structure and Order of Phosphonic Acid-Based Self-Assembled Monolayers on Si(100)

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Manish; Weidner, Tobias; Gamble, Lara J.; Castner, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on oxide surfaces have recently seen increased use in electrical and biological sensor applications. The reliability and reproducibility of these sensors require good molecular organization in these SAMs. In this regard, packing, order and alignment in the SAMs is important, as it influences the electron transport measurements. In this study, we examine the order of hydroxyl- and methyl- terminated phosphonate films deposited onto silicon oxide surfaces by the tethering by aggregation and growth method using complementary, state-of-art surface characterization tools. Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy are used to study the order of the phosphonate SAMs in vacuum and under aqueous conditions, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry results show that these samples form chemically intact monolayer phosphonate films. NEXAFS and SFG spectroscopy showed that molecular order exists in the octadecylphosphonic acid and 11-hydroxyundecylphosphonic acid SAMs. The chain tilt angles in these SAMs were approximately 37° and 45°, respectively. PMID:20735054

  18. Self-assembly of silica colloidal crystal thin films with tuneable structural colours over a wide visible spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal crystal (CC) thin films that produce structural colours over a wide visible spectrum have been self-assembled from silica nanoparticles (SNPs) using a natural sedimentation method. A series of colloidal suspensions containing uniform SNPs (207-350 nm) were prepared using the Stöber method. The prepared silica suspensions were directly subjected to natural sedimentation at an elevated temperature. The SNPs were deposited under the force of gravity and self-assembled into an ordered array. The solid CC thin films produced structural colours over a wide visible spectrum from red to violet. Visual inspection and colorimetric measurements indicated that the structural colour of the CC thin film is tuneable by varying the SNPs diameters and the viewing angles. The closely packed face-centred cubic (fcc) structure of the CC thin film was confirmed using SEM imaging and was in agreement with the intense colour observed from the film surface.

  19. In Situ Electrochemical Synthesis and Deposition of Discotic Hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene Molecules on Electrodes: Self-Assembled Structure, Redox Properties, and Application for Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Leiqiang; Zhang, Yunan; Wu, Xiaoyan; Nian, Li; Xie, Zengqi; Liu, Linlin; Ma, Yuguang

    2015-07-01

    Discotic hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) molecules are synthesized by electrochemical cyclodehydrogenation reaction and in situ self-assembled to π-electronic, discrete nanofibular objects with an average diameter about 70 nm, which are deposited directly onto the electrode. The nanofibers consist of columnar arrays of the π-stacked HBC molecules and the intercolumnar distance is determined to be 1.19 nm by X-ray diffraction, which corresponds well to the distance of 1.1 nm observed by high-resolution transmitting electron microscopy. The diameter of the molecular columns matches the size of the discotic HBC molecule indicating face-to-face π-stacking of HBC units in the column. The HBC nanofibers on electrode are redox active, and the nanosized columnar structures provide a huge surface area, which is a great benefit for the charging/discharging process, delivering excellent capacitance of 155 F g(-1) . The described electrochemical deposition method shows great advantage for self-assembling the family of insoluble and structurally designable graphene-like nano materials, which constitutes an important step toward molecular electronics. PMID:25704093

  20. Simple fabrication of an antireflective hemispherical surface structure using a self-assembly method for the terahertz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Seon; Kim, Dong-Ju; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Hwang, Sehyun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2012-07-01

    A hemispherical surface structure was fabricated on a sapphire substrate by utilizing a self-assembly and spin-coating process for a terahertz (THz) antireflection coating. The self-assembled glass spheres and spin-coated material led to a gradual change in the effective refractive index. The aspect ratio of the hemispherical surface structure was controlled easily by adjusting the thickness of the B-staged bisbenzocyclobutene used as a coating. The reflectance of the fabricated hemispherical surface structure, having a period of 140 μm, exhibited low reflectance and low Fabry-Perot resonance in a THz spectral range from 0.1 to 1.9 THz. PMID:22743514

  1. Self-assembled porphyrin nanodiscs with structure-dependent activation for phototherapy and photodiagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Lovell, Jonathan F; Vedadi, Ali; Hajian, Taraneh; Zheng, Gang

    2013-04-23

    The abilities to deliver and subsequently activate a therapeutic at the intended site of action are two important challenges in the synthesis of novel nanoparticles. Poor tumor permeability as a result of a dense microenvironment can impede the delivery of nanoparticles to the site of action. The design of a sub-40 nm activatable porphyrin nanodisc, based on protein-induced lipid constriction, is described. The biophotonic nanoparticle, self-assembled from aggregated porphyrin-lipid, is stabilized by an amphipathic alpha helical protein and becomes photoactive when its structure is perturbed. Enzymatic cleavage of the constricting protein leads to conversion of the particle from a disc- to a vesicle-shaped structure and provides further evidence that the apolipoprotein serves a functional role on the nanodisc. Fluorescence measurements of these nanodiscs in a detergent show that fluorescence is over 99% quenched in the intact state with a 12-fold increase in singlet oxygen generation upon disruption. Cellular fluorescence unquenching and dose-dependent phototoxicity demonstrate that these nanodiscs can be internalized and unquenched intracellularly. Finally, nanodiscs were found to display a 5-fold increase in diffusion coefficient when compared with the protein-free control ((3.5±0.1)×10(-7) vs (0.7±0.03)×10(-7) cm2 s(-1)). The ability to incorporate large amounts of photosensitizer drugs into its compact structure allows for phototherapeutic action, fluorescence diagnostic applications, and the potential to effectively deliver photosensitizers deep into poorly permeable tumors. PMID:23464857

  2. Crystal structure of a self-assembling lipopeptide detergent at 1.20 Å

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Dona N.; Pomroy, Neil C.; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Prive, Gilbert G.

    2008-10-21

    Lipopeptide detergents (LPDs) are a new class of amphiphile designed specifically for the structural study of integral membrane proteins. The LPD monomer consists of a 25-residue peptide with fatty acyl chains linked to side chains located at positions 2 and 24 of the peptide. LPDs are designed to form {alpha}-helices that self-assemble into cylindrical micelles, providing a more natural interior acyl chain packing environment relative to traditional detergents. We have determined the crystal structure of LPD-12, an LPD coupled to two dodecanoic acids, to a resolution of 1.20 {angstrom}. The LPD-12 monomers adopt the target conformation and associate into cylindrical octamers as expected. Pairs of helices are strongly associated as Alacoil-type antiparallel dimers, and four of these dimers interact through much looser contacts into assemblies with approximate D{sub 2} symmetry. The aligned helices form a cylindrical shell with a hydrophilic exterior that protects an interior hydrophobic cavity containing the 16 LPD acyl chains. Over 90% of the methylene/methyl groups from the acylated side chains are visible in the micelle interiors, and {approx}90% of these adopt trans dihedral angle conformations. Dodecylmaltoside (DDM) was required for the crystallization of LPD-12, and we find 10-24 ordered DDM molecules associated with each LPD assembly, resulting in an overall micelle molecular weight of {approx}30 kDa. The structures confirm the major design objectives of the LPD framework, and reveal unexpected features that will be helpful in the engineering additional versions of lipopeptide amphiphiles.

  3. Thermodynamic-Driven Self-Assembly: Heterochiral Self-Sorting and Structural Reconfiguration in Gold(I)-Sulfido Cluster System.

    PubMed

    Yao, Liao-Yuan; Lee, Terence Kwok-Ming; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2016-06-15

    By employing chiral precursors, a new class of chiral gold(I)-sulfido clusters with unique structures has been constructed. Interestingly, pure enantiomers of the precursors are found to self-assemble into chiral hexa- and decanuclear clusters sequentially, while a racemic mixture of them has resulted in heterochiral self-sorting of an achiral meso decanuclear cluster. Chirality has determined not only the symmetry and structures but also the photophysical behaviors of these clusters. The racemic mixture of decanuclear clusters undergoes rearrangement and heterochiral self-sorting to give a meso decanuclear cluster. The thermodynamic-driven heterochiral self-sorting of gold(I) clusters provides a means to develop controlled self-assembly that may be of relevance to the understanding of chirality in nature. PMID:27248613

  4. Artificial leaf structures as a UV detector formed by the self-assembly of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Dongxu; Guo, Zhen; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Shen, Dezhen

    2013-04-01

    Artificial leaf structures have been fabricated by the self-assembly of ZnO nanoparticles. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize the nanoparticles. The self-assembly patterns showed asymmetric dendritic morphologies, larger surface-to-volume ratios, a broad absorption band and high resistance. A non-equilibrium two-stage-formation process included diffusion limited aggregation, and the phase-field model was introduced to explain the formation mechanism of the pattern. A high-performance ultraviolet detector was fabricated on the artificial leaf structures, which showed that the current under the irradiation of a UV lamp (1.21 mW cm(-2)) was about 10(4) times greater than in the dark. The various and functional properties of the pattern show us the vast prospects of potential applications for light harvesting systems and other optical-electric devices. PMID:23446434

  5. Structural Implications on the Properties of Self-Assembling Supramolecular Hosts for Fluorescent Guests.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sicheng; Donaphon, Bryan; Levitus, Marcia; Raymo, Françisco M

    2016-08-30

    systematic investigations provide invaluable structural guidelines to design self-assembling supramolecular hosts with optimal composition for the effective encapsulation of fluorescent guests and can lead to ideal delivery vehicles for the transport of imaging probes to target locations in biological samples. PMID:27490893

  6. Recent advances in self-assembled fluorescent DNA structures and probes.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, Anna I; Brylev, Vladimir A; Nozhevnikova, Elena V; Korshun, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    The combined efforts of chemistry, nanotechnology, and spectroscopy led to the development of self-assembled fluorescent DNA nanostructures, an inexhaustible source of refined and bizarre tools and powerful techniques for research and diagnostic applications. This multidisciplinary area has tremendous prospects for science and technology. PMID:25858134

  7. Artificial leaf structures as a UV detector formed by the self-assembly of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Dongxu; Guo, Zhen; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Shen, Dezhen

    2013-03-01

    Artificial leaf structures have been fabricated by the self-assembly of ZnO nanoparticles. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize the nanoparticles. The self-assembly patterns showed asymmetric dendritic morphologies, larger surface-to-volume ratios, a broad absorption band and high resistance. A non-equilibrium two-stage-formation process included diffusion limited aggregation, and the phase-field model was introduced to explain the formation mechanism of the pattern. A high-performance ultraviolet detector was fabricated on the artificial leaf structures, which showed that the current under the irradiation of a UV lamp (1.21 mW cm-2) was about 104 times greater than in the dark. The various and functional properties of the pattern show us the vast prospects of potential applications for light harvesting systems and other optical-electric devices.Artificial leaf structures have been fabricated by the self-assembly of ZnO nanoparticles. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize the nanoparticles. The self-assembly patterns showed asymmetric dendritic morphologies, larger surface-to-volume ratios, a broad absorption band and high resistance. A non-equilibrium two-stage-formation process included diffusion limited aggregation, and the phase-field model was introduced to explain the formation mechanism of the pattern. A high-performance ultraviolet detector was fabricated on the artificial leaf structures, which showed that the current under the irradiation of a UV lamp (1.21 mW cm-2) was about 104 times greater than in the dark. The various and functional properties of the pattern show us the vast prospects of potential applications for light harvesting systems and other optical-electric devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33748k

  8. Secondary Structures of Ubiquitin Ions Soft-Landed onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-01

    The secondary structures of multiply charged ubiquitin ions soft-landed onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces were studied using in situ infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Two charge states of ubiquitin, 5+ and 13+, were mass selected separately from a mixture of different charge states produced by electrospray ionization (ESI). The low 5+ charge state represents a nativelike folded state of ubiquitin, while the high 13+ charge state assumes an extended, almost linear conformation. Each of the two charge states was soft-landed onto a CH3- and COOH-terminated SAM of alkanethiols on gold (HSAM and COOH-SAM). HSAM is a hydrophobic surface known to stabilize helical conformations of soft-landed protonated peptides, whereas COOH-SAM is a hydrophilic surface that preferentially stabilizes β-sheet conformations. IRRAS spectra of the soft-landed ubiquitin ions were acquired as a function of time during and after ion soft-landing. Similar to smaller peptide ions, helical conformations of ubiquitin are found to be more abundant on HSAM, while the relative abundance of β-sheet conformations increases on COOH-SAM. The initial charge state of ubiquitin also has a pronounced effect on its conformation on the surface. Specifically, on both surfaces, a higher relative abundance of helical conformations and a lower relative abundance of β-sheet conformations are observed for the 13+ charge state compared to the 5+ charge state. Time-resolved experiments indicate that the α-helical band in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state slowly increases with time on the HSAM surface and decreases in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state on COOH-SAM. These results further support the preference of the hydrophobic HSAM surface toward helical conformations and demonstrate that soft-landed protein ions may undergo slow conformational changes during and after deposition. PMID:27192353

  9. Self-assembly and the Formation of Structure in Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Particle systems self-assemble in ways that are sensitive to their environments. Proteins fold, polymers crosslink, and molecular systems form crystals. Granular materials, unlike proteins, polymers or molecules, are not sensitive to temperature, and will only form new structures when they are driven. This raises the question of how a granular state depends on the preparation protocol, and an even more basic question of what is needed to specify a granular state. I will focus on granular systems near jamming, where key state variables include the density and stresses. Systems of frictionless grains follow the Liu-Nagel1 scenario of jamming, with a lowest packing fraction, ϕJ, such that any system with ϕ <ϕJ is unjammed, and all isotopic states (shear stress τ = 0) are jammed for ϕ >ϕJ . For frictional grains the picture changes. For a given ϕ in the range ϕS < ϕ <ϕJ , it is possible to have stress-free (unjammed) states, highly anisotropic fragile states, and robustly jammed states. The fragile and strongly jammed states form spontaneously in response to shear. By inference, ϕ is not a state variable, but recent experiments2 indicate that the non-rattler fraction, fNR is. In ϕS < ϕ <ϕJ , the system response is inherently non-linear; under cyclic shear, the system self-organizes to new steady states via a process that resembles thermal activation, with shear stress replacing energy3. The activation is provided by shear strain. We observe similar relaxation under cyclic compression. An important question is, what is (are) the organizing principle(s) which govern jamming by shear, and systematic reorganization under cyclic driving. NSF grants DMR1206351 and DMS1248071, NASA grant NNX10AU10G, and ARO grant W911NF-1-11-0110

  10. Hierarchical structures based on self-assembling beta-hairpin peptides and their application as biomaterials and hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul

    Self-assembly represents a robust and powerful paradigm for the bottom-up construction of nanostructures. Self-assembled peptide hydrogels are emerging as promising routes to novel multifunctional materials. The 20 amino acid MAX1and MAX8 peptides self-assemble into a three dimensional network of entangled, branched fibrils rich in beta-sheet secondary structure with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. These hydrogels form self-supporting structures that shear thin upon application of shear and then immediately recover to a solid hydrogel upon cessation of shear which facilitates the local delivery of the hydrogel into a site in vivo. Templated condensation of silica precursors on self-assembled nanoscale peptide fibrils with various surface functionalities can be used to mimic biosilicification. This template-defined approach towards biomineralization was utilized for the controlled fabrication of 3D hybrid nanostructures. We report a study on the structure-property relationship of self-assembled peptide hydrogels where mineralization of individual fibrils through sol-gel chemistry was achieved. The nanostructure and consequent mechanical characteristics of these hybrid networks can be modulated by changing the stoichiometric parameters of the sol-gel process. Construction of such organic-inorganic hybrid networks by sol-gel processing of self-assembled peptide hydrogels has improved mechanical properties and resulted in materials with ˜ 3 orders of magnitude higher stiffness. The physical characterization of the hybrid networks via electron microscopy and small angle scattering is detailed and correlated with changes in the network mechanical behavior. The resultant high fidelity templating process suggests that the peptide substrate can be used to template the coating of other functional inorganic materials. Self-assembling peptide hydrogels encapsulating an anti-tumorigenic drug, curcumin, have been prepared and demonstrated to be